Eden Local June 2021

Page 1

ISSN 2516-1431

Your Independent Community Magazine Penrith and areas of the Eden Valley

Eden 107

Solar is here to Stay New Menu at The Fairway Roped in for life The Afternoon Sessions On the River with the Kingfisher SINCE

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Cumbrian Local Publications • Issue No.1 171 • Distribution Over 15,000 Doors


A S E A V S I S E V S I A S M S MA

Explore our beautiful, Made In England collection of sofas. Cosy corner sofas, chairs, 2 and 3 seaters and much more arriving now.

Upholstered in the best quality fabrics, all offer exceptional comfort and great style. All delivered Free of charge by our 2 man delivery Team.

www.cumbriaoak.co.uk www.cumbriaoak.co.uk www.cumbriaoak.co.uk CUMBRIA OAK CUMBRIA OAK STATION YARD, PLUMPTON, NR PENRITH CA11 9PA CUMBRIA OAK THE POT PLACE, 01768 894 528 STATION THEPOT POT PLACE, STATIONYARD, YARD,PLUMPTON, PLUMPTON,NR NRPENRITH PENRITHCA11 CA119PA 9PA THE PLACE, 01768 894 528 01768 894 528 OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK MON - SAT 9-5 SUN 10-4 OPEN77DAYS DAYSAAWEEK WEEK MON MON- -SAT SAT 10-5 10-5 SUN SUN10-4 10-4 OPEN 2


O W O N E L N

O W N O O N W E O L N ALE

• Locally owned company with 25 yea selling quality furniture

• Locally ownedcompany company with 25 in in • Locally owned 25years yearsexpertise expertise selling furniture ranges of oak furniture selling quality furniture • quality 15 exclusive

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• One of selections the largest selections in Cum • One of the largest in Cumbria • One of the largest selections in Cumbria

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Contents

Cumbria Oak Made in England Range

Pages 2 - 3

Coming Up at North Lakes Hotel and Spa

Page

Introduction by Lee Quinn

Pages 6 - 7

Eden Local Update

Page

8

We’re looking for people just like you to join us!

Page

9

Bee Friendly by Karen Roberts

Page

10

Get Ready for Summer with Lloyd Lawn Care

Page

11

New Town Councillor for Penrith & other news

Page

12

Equity Release with Butterworths

Page

13

Solar is here to Stay by Ewen Estill

Page

14

Housing 21 Newton House show home open!

Page

15

Long Covid and Employment by Quinn HR

Pages 16 - 17

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June Word search Page 17 Fairways Bar & Catering everybody welcome

Pages 18 - 19

Roped in for Life by Lee Quinn

Pages 20 - 21

Pam’s Flower Power June – Larkspur

Pages 22 - 23

Bargains Galore, Best Before by Lee Quinn

Page

24

ConservClean Page 25 Introdcing the Afternoon Sessions & the Interview

Pages

26

Swifts, Swallows or House Martin? By Richard Dixon

Page

27

Eden FM June and July Interviews

Page

27

The Romans at Penrith and Eden Museum

Pages

28 - 29

The Kingfisher By Richard Dixon

Pages 32

The Hiking Household by the River

Page

Keeping Calm and Carrying On the Sequel

Pages 33 - 35

Marshalls Conservatory Conversions

Back Page

32

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Eden FM Notice: Eden Local prints various articles, features, and advertisements. Although these appear in Eden FM, any opinions expressed are the opinion of the author, these are not necessarily the opinion of the publisher. ©Copyright Eden Local 2020. The contents of this publication are written specifically for our readers, no part may be reproduced elsewhere without express and prior permission.

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updates 4


COMING UP AT NORTH LAKES HOTEL & SPA Celebrate Dad (and Mum!) at North Lakes Hotel and Spa this summer

Father’s Day is just around the corner, but this year, North Lakes Hotel is doing things a little differently. On 20th June, we’re not just honouring dads, we’re celebrating mums too with an unforgettable dining experience for all the family. Reunite with loved ones and join us for a sumptuous three-course Sunday lunch curated by the hotel’s expert chefs. Complete the occasion with a glass of fizz and a gift for every mum and dad. Book now by calling one of our team on 01768 868111.

National Picnic Week at North Lakes Hotel and Spa

Join us as we recreate a classic British tradition on the lawns of our hotel for National Picnic Week, 19th to 27th June. We’ll be laying out the check blankets and filling picnic baskets with delicious treats prepared by our chefs for the perfect summer’s day. Want to explore the local area? We’ll happily pack up your picnic so you can take it with you on the go. To book your spot, speak to one of our team by calling 01768 868111.

northlakeshotel.co.uk houseofdaniel thwaites.co.uk

Join us for an exclusive tour of North Lakes’ award-winning Spa

On Saturday 26th and Sunday 27th June, North Lakes will open the doors to its luxury Spa and wellness areas for both new and existing members. Enjoy a guided tour with our talented team of therapists and experience the hotel’s excellent facilities. Those thinking of becoming a Spa member will receive a complimentary day pass to experience the Spa on a day of their choice, and existing members can enjoy activities, treats and offers whilst having the chance to make suggestions on how we could further enhance the Spa membership. Everyone who attends the Spa open weekend will be entered into a prize draw with a chance to win an overnight stay at North Lakes Hotel, complete with dinner at FYR, Cumbria’s only open fire grill restaurant. Your visit must be pre-booked, to arrange a tour please call 01768 867141 or email spa@northlakeshotel.co.uk

For more details please visit northlakeshotel.co.uk or call us on 01768 868111 or email events@northlakeshotel.co.uk

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It’s that time once more

In-between showers, sunset from Penrith Golf Club, looking towards Skelton - © Lee Quinn I always thank a lot people at this stage in the month, and based on May’s weather, the delivery teams did their best to keep dry along with the magazines! Due to our further expansion out from Penrith in all directions, I have listed areas we need to recruit more teams for on Page 8. The more people we have, the quicker we can deliver, which this month will be all accessible doors that are safe and economically viable to deliver to. Welcome to your Eden Local - the first summer edition, out from June 3rd and published online from Thursday 27th May. It’s that time when I take a short breather before I print, just before the second May bank holiday. Apparently, we had the driest but coldest April on record since 1922, but will May be the wettest? Our Front Cover this month is the King of the River, the King Fisher. I would like to thank Richard Dixon for his contribution and some fantastic photos by Colin Barrett - both from the Local Group of the North Cumbria RSPB.

Dropping into an area we hadn’t covered for a while, lead to a return of Love Solar and catching up with Ewen Estill. I had a call from one customer when the deliveries hadn’t long started, who pretty much read out 10 of the new areas we were delivering to, as they had 10 new enquiries from areas we covered in May! I am pleased to welcome Lloyds of Penrith (Page 11) and it’s great to be working with Ricki Lamb again, as he and his team move forward with Fairways Bar and Catering at Penrith Golf Club. You can have a look at the menu and their plans on the centre page. We also welcome the Pop 6

up and Bargain shop, which I describe as ‘Best Before’ right on your door (Page 24). Relating back to the deliveries, I knew when we had covered Kings Meaburn for the first time in a while, as I took a call from Ian Outram the owner of Ropework UK - this was before we had even started the month of May. As you’ll see on pages 20 – 21, I learnt a lot about Ian and how he got ‘roped in’ to his profession. Customers returning and new customers arriving in support of your free community magazine; then we have those customers, who without continuity and loyalty you wouldn’t be reading this now. Thinking back to May 2020 there were no VE Day street parties as we entered the second month of Lockdown, or processions. In June 2020 we were waiting for that announcement which meant some businesses would be opening early July. We stopped print in March, with the exception of our ‘Hope’ magazine, which was funded by donations, but not enough were available to cover all areas.


We like many of you were waiting for information and direction. We finally got in to print at the end of July with a mid-summer edition. Quite a few magazines regionally across England and the odd few locally in Cumbria still haven’t come back. I still remain apprehensive on leaving magazines for collection, so for now, you could say will carry on delivering straight to you.

electrical services

A summer with a difference it will be, as businesses and the areas where we live continue to re-adapt. All being well, many of you will have had your second COVID vaccination, like me and as presented by Vee (Pages 33 – 35). If it all goes to plan, you should have your Eden Local by Sunday 20th June ‘Fathers Day’, ready for the final unlocking of Step Four on Monday 21st June. At Eden FM Community Radio, we have a number of ways of celebrating that day. One is launching our new show for local and regionally based bands in the Borders, and coast to coast in the North, and we set out with the first live session shows from 8pm to 10pm on Monday 21st June with local band ‘The Afternoon Sessions’ (Pages 26-27).

jonathan evans

07970 976318 01768 840404 imesystems.co.uk

I might see you out and about on deliveries. I might even see you at Mike Craven’s Book launch and book signing of his latest Crime novel ‘Dead Ground’ at the Hedgehog bookshop in Little Dockray Penrith from 10.30 – 12.30pm Saturday insert date. So, with 15 key features brought to you through the commitment of around 30 organisations, I’ll already be starting the July Eden Local before this one starts posting through over 15,000 doors from 3rd June. Let’s have a great June, and don’t forget from June 21st on Wednesdays and Fridays from 4pm to 6pm, I’ll be on Eden FM interviewing many of the people 107 you’re reading about this month.

Eden

We will beat any genuine like for like quote

Take care out there Lee

Eden107.5 01768 862394

Phone: Email: lee@cumbrianlocal.co.uk www.cumbrianlocal.co.uk Cumbrian Local Publications Ltd, Suite 6, Cumbria House, Gilwilly Road, Penrith CA11 9FF

Multi-award winning family run business with over 20 years roofing experience Re-roofing • Roof Repairs • Dry Verge Systems Dry Ridge Systems • Lead work • Chimney repairs Upvc facias, soffits & guttering • Gutter cleaning

01768 865416 info@onecallpenrith.co.uk

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Update - Can we increase deliver coverage to more than 16-18,000 doors? Yes, we can, but only with your help.

get teams delivering in the areas they live.

We have promoted a lot of people and businesses over these last 10 years, so maybe we should have a crack at promoting ourselves?

Delivery personnel, per route, range from one to four people; teams of two work very well. All teams do get paid. Some deliver for extra income, some deliver to raise money for charities, local groups and community organisations, or fundraise for another purpose.

Working from the centre of Penrith, we are looking to increase our magazine deliveries in some directions up to 10, 15 or 20 miles. A 10-mile radius around Penrith is roughly 300 square miles.

Below are the areas, that due to the planned expansions we have and a review of the logistic distribution, we require additional support for posting our Eden Local:

We have individuals and teams that do regular delivery routes from 31 magazines/doors up to 1,560 magazines/doors. From our Hub, we try to Aiketgate CA4 9 Ainstable CA4 9 Alston CA9 3 Appleby CA16 Armathwaite CA4 9 Barton CA10 2 Bowscar CA11 8 Brackenburgh CA11 9 Busk CA10 1 Carleton - Penrith CA11 8 Cocklakes CA4 0 Cotehill CA4 0 Croglin CA4 9 Crosby Ravensworth CA10 3 Cumwhinton CA4 8 Dacre CA11 0 Dale CA4 9 Dalemain CA11 0

Flusco CA11 0 Fort Putnam CA11 0 Great Asby CA16 6 Great Corby CA4 8LT Great Salkeld CA10 1 Greystoke CA11 0 Greystoke Gill CA11 0 High Bankhill CA10 1

Johnby CA11 0

Redhills CA11 0

Inglewood Bank CA11 8

Renwick CA10 1

Lamonby CA11 9

Row CA10 1

Lockhills CA4 9

Ruckcroft CA4 9

Longdales CA4 9

Salkeld Dykes CA11 9

High Hesket CA4 0

Low Cotehill CA4 0

Long Marton CA16 Low Braithwaite CA4 0

High Knipe CA10 2 Hazelrigg/Beck CA10 1 Haresceugh CA10 1 Holmwrangle CA4 9 Hornsby CA8 9 Hornsby Gate CA8 9 Hutton CA11 0 Hutton End CA11 Hutton John CA11 0

Low Hesket CA4 0 Motherby CA11 0

Moorthwaite CA8 9

Scarrowhill CA8 9 Scotby CA4 8 Stainton CA11 0EP Staffield CA10 1 South Dykes CA11 9 Soulby CA11 0

Newbiggin CA8 9

Southwaite CA4 0

Ousby CA10 1

Thiefside CA11 9

Pallet Hill CA11 0

Thomas Close CA11 0

Penruddock CA11 0

Wetheral CA4 8

Pettril Green CA11 9

Yanwath CA10 2

pricing structure affordable to all which helps generate the funding required to design, print and post currently up to 15,000 magazines (as of 1st June 2021).

Eden Local is your community magazine and the largest print media publication in the Eden Valley. It relies on doors and not sales to develop and increase its readership every month and it can only achieve this through the support of the community it serves, its people and its businesses.

Thank you to everyone who has helped and supported your community magazine. Coordinated here in the community, with volunteers and delivered by people in the community where they live.

A local media platform created in 2010, with the Eden FM Community Radio project to enable local people and local organisations to be seen and heard in the community they serve.

For all enquires calls or emails there is just one person to contact lee@cumbrianlocal.co.uk

Advertising placements are from £35 and a 8


We’re looking for people just like you to join us! Are you looking to be part of something that will benefit the lives of others? Find out more about our current vacancies at Newton House, our brand Extra Care Living development in Penrith. If you are interested in becoming part of a thriving Extra Care Living community, we would love to hear from you! Care roles We are hiring for a number of Care roles to join our experienced team at Newton House with full-time and part-time hours available. Catering provider Our restaurants are open to both residents and the local community and are always the heart of our developments. We are currently looking for a Catering provider for the restaurant at Newton House. IfToyou areout interested in becoming of a thriving Extra Care Living find more about our job part vacancies and running your community, would love tospace hear from you! business atwe a commercial at Newton House, please call us

on 07712 318420 or email Karen.Woolton@housing21.org.uk, Monday - Friday, 9am -5pm. Newton House | Newton Road | Penrith CA11 9FY housing21.org.uk

9


Bee Friendly

It’s not the most popular gardening decision to leave dandelions in the garden but what a bumper crop there was this year on the roadside verges. Whatever their popularity they do provide early nectar and pollen for the bees, but there are lots of ways to get on the right side of bees and other critters with minimal intervention. Thinking about your planting a bit can really help and by

adding a few extras you can get flowers in the garden all year round. Bulbs are quite cheap and easy; most of us know the lovely spring flowering bulbs but there are autumn and winter flowering ones too. Choose autumn and winter flowering crocus and of course, snowdrops (Galanthus nivalis) come up in winter, popping up as soon as January. An early splash of purple comes from the diminutive Iris reticulata and bright yellow winter aconites (Eranthis hyemalis) can’t fail to bring a smile. Wild bees need nest sites and it is straightforward to make one from small pieces of wood and cane. Solitary bees need tiny holes to nest (2 – 10mm) and so bamboo canes are ideal. For anyone who has seen my column before you know that I am a fan of bug hotels, which can be as simple as a pile of logs. It’s

also important to give a water source, just a shallow bowl will do. Why not try and get the kids involved, they might love messing around with sticks, leaves and other left overs to help with the hotels. On the reduce, reuse, recycle theme I’ve had some fun making newspaper pots. I want to try and get sweetcorn going (subject to the weather…) and as they don’t like being transplanted I put the seeds into the newspaper pots and will plant these straight into the ground. They have germinated, which is a good start. You could use these pots for other things too, so growing really doesn’t have to cost the earth… © Karen Roberts Garden Design

07856 528893 • karenrobertsgardendesign@gmail.com 07856 528893 karenrobertsgardendesign@gmail.com

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29/10/20


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New Councillor for Penrith Town Council Following the by-election held in the parish ward of Pategill on 6th May, Penrith Town Council welcomes Val Bowen as the newly elected Councillor. Val was born and bred in Derbyshire and has lived in Penrith for 18 years. She and her husband have two grown up children and four grandchildren. Before moving to Cumbria, she worked for Hertfordshire County Council, developing library services for children and young people, and their parents and carers. Her interests include current affairs, circle dancing, gardening, reading, family history and walking. She usually has a knitting project in progress, but admits to varying degrees of success. Since moving to Penrith, she and her husband have completed several long distance walks and have climbed all the Wainwrights. CV19 restrictions and advice have confined their recent walking to local lanes, but they look forward to getting out on the fells again before too long.

© Lee Quinn

Councillor Charlie Shepherd was elected Chair and Mayor of Penrith whilst Councillor Hilary Snell was appointed Vice Chair and Deputy Mayor. More details will appear in the next edition.

Val lives close to the Pategill estate and wants to work with residents to improve the local environment. Conversations during her election campaign have shown local concerns to include parking problems, the local playground, dog poo and litter.

office@penrithtowncouncil.co.uk Telephone:

Until we have contact details set up, residents can contact Cllr Bowen via email at office@ penrithtowncouncil.co.uk or phone us on 01768 899773 so that we can pass the message on.

01768 899 773 Write: Penrith Town Council, Unit 1, Church House, 19-24 Friargate, Penrith, Cumbria, CA11 7XR

Other News Penrith Town Council met physically for the first time in over a year on Monday 24th May to hold their Annual Town Council meeting at Penrith Leisure Centre.

Please get involved in helping to make Penrith a Carbon Neutral Town. It’s crucially important for all of us!! 12


Why Do You Need Butterworths? We are hearing and seeing a lot about road maps at the moment. Are we taking and making the right step at the right time? Are you thinking of some road maps towards better things for yourself, your family and those close to you?

 Planning Your Retirement  Equity Release  Re-Mortgaging  Preparing Your Will  Taking Control of Your Life

Butterworths Solicitors are members of the Equity Release Council.

To help you set off in the right direction with your plans, you will need a Solicitor. It starts with a simple call or email to ask what you need, why you need it and what you need to do next So why not contact Butterworths today and ask the question?

01768 868989 • 01228 593939 For Free No Obligation Advice info@butterworths-solicitors.co.uk

www.butterworths-solicitors.co.uk 13


Love Solar Ltd is in its 12th year of trading and has proudly claimed the crown of Cumbria’s longest established solar PV installation company with over 800 working solar PV installations under our belt.

there that were fitted over 12 years ago that we have never been back to. How many appliances do we have in our houses that work every day light hour for over a decade with no maintenance? Panel output has almost doubled in the last 10 years with panels now touching 400W. Inverters have evolved to maximise production of East / West and shady roofs and the visual aesthetics of Solar has improved massively, with sleek all black in-roof panels replacing the often less than attractive blue and silver roof mounted variety and where planners stipulate natural local slate in-roof solar panels are the cheaper roof covering option. www.solfit.co.uk

Solar PV (Solar electric) industry has evolved a lot since the boom days of the Feed In Tariff gold rush when solar PV installation companies were appearing overnight like mushrooms only to disappear as fast when subsidies were cut. Solar PV has matured over the last 12 years into a standard building technology capable of generating green sustainable energy for domestic and commercial properties without the need for governmental subsidies or grants. Solar can deliver a healthy return on investment, better than any bank by reducing the properties energy bills and equally importantly reducing the properties carbon footprint.

With so many positive things in favour of solar why do the big multiple house builders in the Eden Valley actively avoid fitting solar panels? The answer is simply that planning regulations and building standards are not stipulating it and the bigger house builders can tweak the figures get around it. There however is increasing number of quality house builders in the Eden Valley who are choosing to install well sized solar systems in their properties much to the delight of us their new owners.

Technological advances have and continue to be been made for example the issue of how to utilise the excess solar power generated through the day has been solved by domestic household batteries; designed to save the excess solar electricity generated through the day and using it at night or during periods of high demand.

I’m delighted to that Solar PV technology and Love Solar Ltd are both here to stay. Love Solar Ltd, www.love-solar.co.uk m; 07775897980 e; info@love-solar.co.uk

Electric cars are becoming ever more standard with national targets for the manufacturing and sale of conventional combustion engines due to be banned by 2030, electric cars are the perfect mobile battery for any surplus solar power and it won’t be long electric car plugged in on the drive will be running the house. The electric landscape and how we use and generate power is changing with eye watering speed. There are still a lot of big changes required to be made in the countries electric and charging infrastructure, but we are certainly moving in the right direction. Solar is an appealing technology for many reasons but none more than it is almost a maintenance free technology. We have hundreds of systems out 14


Sh no ow w H op om en e !

Newton House show home open! A stylish Extra Care Living development for people over the age of 55*, Newton House provides one and two bedroom apartments for rent, and two bedroom apartments for shared ownership**. Pets are more than welcome too! A dedicated Housing and Care Manager is available during the week and there is a care team on-site 24/7. Optional, tailored care and support packages are also available for residents that need it. There is an impressive range of fully accessible communal facilities, including a restaurant, for residents and their visitors to enjoy. To learn more, book your viewing today or visit bit.ly/h21-newton-house. Guide price: 25% ownership from £43,250** for a two bedroom or Rent from £108.29 a week** for a one bedroom apartment *The age for Newton House is 65 plus, however residents can qualify between the ages of 55 and 64 if they have a care and support need. **Eligibility criteria, core charges, support charges and service charges apply. Monthly rent also applies on shared ownership purchases up to 75%.

To book your viewing, please contact us Monday - Friday, 9am - 5pm. Sales enquiries Sean McDougall 07764 917300

Rental enquiries Karen Woolton 07712 318420

Newton House | Newton Road | Penrith CA11 9FY

housing21.org.uk

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Q

HR

Long Covid & employment WHAT IS LONG COVID? Long Covid is also known as postCovid-19 syndrome and long-tail Covid, and it refers to the symptoms some people suffer for weeks or perhaps even for several months after contracting coronavirus. It is still a relatively new illness and so it is likely it will take some time before we understand it more fully and how it really affects people. In the meantime, employers are advised to consider how best they can support any employees who have had coronavirus and are now suffering from the effects of Long Covid. WHAT DO EMPLOYERS NEED TO THINK ABOUT? Be aware that the symptoms of Long Covid could significantly affect an employee’s ability to carry out their role and it could cause them to have periods of short and long-term sickness absence. Employers also need to be aware that the effects can come and go quite quickly, and can change from one day to the next, making the situation challenging for the employee to deal with and for the employer to manage. Any periods of sickness absence due to Long Covid should be managed in the normal way in line with the organisation’s sickness absence policy and procedure. Employers need to think about how they can support their employees while they are off work, and on their return to work, and this may include considering:

• Discussing any concerns employees might have about being off work and how they will be supported when they return to work • Arrangements for maintaining contact with employees while they are off work and providing them with relevant work information to keep them up to date • Making arrangements to cover an employee’s work while they are off • Making adjustments to their role if necessary – the workplace or how they work – this could include reduced or different working hours • A phased return to work – particularly if an employee has been off work for a number of weeks or months • Getting advice from an occupational health provider following an assessment Employers are advised to make reasonable adjustments where they possibly can, for example, by sharing out workload or perhaps reducing working hours for a defined period of time. If the situation becomes problematic, however, and an employer believes the employee is not able to fulfil their role longer term, or they are having many or long periods of sickness absence, employers are advised to seek further advice from an occupational health provider. An employer may ultimately consider whether the employee is capable of fulfilling their role, however, the employer must first ensure they have done everything they can before taking any decisions about the viability of future employment. Employers should also be aware that Long Covid is more likely to affect women, older people and ethnic minorities more severely. DO YOU NEED ANY OTHER EMPLOYMENT-RELATED INFORMATION OR ASSISTANCE? If you would like any further guidance or assistance in relation to this topic or any other employment-related topic, I am here to help – able to offer advice and provide 16


information as needed. The following are typically some of the areas I support businesses with:

Advice and support can be provided on an ad hoc basis or through a retainer service, where for a small fixed, monthly fee, you can access support as and when you need it.

• Employee relations – disciplinaries, grievances, whistleblowing, bullying and harassment • Attendance issues – sickness related and other

I’d be delighted to hear from you, whether you need some immediate advice or whether you would like to discuss ongoing support.

• Performance issues – appraisals, managing poor performance and capability • Staff Handbooks – policies, procedures and standards • Employment contracts – terms and conditions of employment

Please either contact me by email charlotte@quinnhr.co.uk or by phone 01768 862394.

• Changes to Employment Law • Recruitment and selection – recruitment exercises and job descriptions • Pay and benefits – pay structures and job evaluation

Stay Safe and Well Charlotte

• Reorganisation and redundancy

Summer Flowers Wordsearch COMPILED AND SPONSORED BY QUINN HR

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Friday 30th July

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Penrith Golf Club: To book call 07969523148

catering@penrithgolfclub.co.uk • Salkeld Rd, Penrith CA11 8SG 18


For a light snack, Breakfast, Brunch, Lunch, Afternoon Tea or Dinner Breakfast Menu served from 7.30am - from butties to full breakfast, with vegetarian options and light breakfast ideas We have a Light Bites Menu from 11 – 5pm and Afternoon Tea from 2pm Lunch orders from 11.30am and serving dinner until 8.30pm

OFF THE TEE MENU Soup of the Day - Fresh in house served with a crusty roll £4.50 Garlic Mushrooms £4.50 Roasted field mushrooms with a creamy garlic sauce served on a crusty wedge Fish Goujons £4.95 Crisp battered strips of fish with homemade tartar sauce and salad garnish Caramelised Goats Cheese £4.95 Served on a crispy bruschetta with red onion marmalade and a salad garnish Prawn Cocktail £4.95 - The classic, in a Marie rose sauce with strips of bread Pan fried King Prawns £5.95 Cooked in a garlic butter on a crispy bruschetta, dressed with a lemon wedge Grilled Vegetable Anti Pasti £5.95 Slices of Charred Pepper, Courgette, Aubergine marinated with Balsamic Vinegar and Crispy Breads Brie Wedge £4.95 - Crispy and molten, served with red onion marmalade and a salad garnish

OUT OF THE ROUGH MENU 8oz Rump Steak £11.95 - 6oz Fillet Steak £14.95 - 8oz Horse-shoe Gammon £9.95 Cumberland Ring £9.95 - Chargrilled Chicken £9.95 Sauces £1.95 Blue Cheese, Pepper, Diane sauce or Tomato and Chilli Salsa Choose your sides (2 items) - grilled tomato, roast mushroom, onion rings, fried egg, pineapple Choose your spuds - chips, wedges or mash and your garnish - crisp salad or seasonal vegetables House Burger £7.95 - Beef, Chicken or Spicy Bean served with chips and salad garnish Add any topping for £1.00 each - Cheese, Bacon, Mushroom, Pineapple, Fried onions

THROUGH THE FRONT 9 MENU ALL AT £9.95 Beef Lasagne/Veg Lasagne, Served with chips, salad and garlic slice Tex-mex chilli beef or Vegetable, Chefs own recipe, served with rice or chips and garnished with salad and sour cream Steak and Ale Pie, Cumbrian beef and ale in a rich gravy served with chips and seasonal vegetables Beer-Battered Crisp fillet of fish served with mushy peas, chips and tartar sauce Grilled Chicken Carbonara The Italian classic with tagliatelle, chargrilled chicken breast and garlic slice Hunters Chicken Roasted Chicken fillet topped with a rich Smokey sauce, cheese and bacon, served with chips and salad garnish Chefs Chicken/ Vegetable Curry A taste of Asia, served with rice or chips, a Naan bread and mint raita 19


ROPED IN FOR LIFE by Lee Quinn

Can you get excited about it? I’ve met a man who can, and I’m hoping that on sharing my experience you might get roped in too! I was at the Smithy House in Kings Meaburn, formerly a Blacksmith’s. Before I tell you about Ian, the owner of Ropework UK and how the rope industry has evolved and innovated in many new areas, let’s talk about Rope! Rope dates back to prehistoric times. They were probably made from plant fibre, such as vines. Then there would have been the first attempts at twisting and braiding these strands together to form the first proper ropes in the modern sense of the word. Who hasn’t seen Tom Hanks make Rope to make a raft to get off that island?

his life. Born in Fleetwood, his father ran a company on the docks, so Ian used to get the orders together for the trawlers and ships. Back then it was a very busy fishing port, as Ian quoted - for every one fisherman at sea, this meant 10 jobs on land in and around the docks. Trawlers and Rope were a good match, but the store carried everything a trawler would need. By the early eighties, the fishing fleet had almost disappeared. For Ian it was a move to Bedford. His father had moved to head up an Irish company specialising in rope twine and farm supplies, but also made carpet.

From small fragments of three-ply cord from a Neanderthal site dated 50,000 years ago, to evidence of String, and in Europe as far back as 28,000 years, to fragments of rope found in one of the caves at Lascaux, near Montignac in the Dordogne, South Western France, dating back to approximately 15,000 BC, a place I have actually visited.

With a decline in Rope sales and with carpet being more profitable, the warehouse became purely a stockist of carpet, at which point Ian decided he’d address the needs of those customers they had who required rope and rope products until 1999. From 2000-2010, Ian took over the carpet business when his father retired, running the Carpet business until it finally came to an end. After taking a break, he decided that when you’re good at something and you enjoy what you know, it doesn’t have to be a dream. In 2012, Ian started again and set up in two sheds and a marquee in the woods at his property in Pavenham, North

It was probably those clever Egyptians who developed special tools to make rope, that was generally made of water reed fibres. These evidence through history that Rope was made from the fibres of date palms, flax, grass, papyrus, leather, or animal hair. As we know, these ropes were used in pulling, lifting and moving the heavy stones by the workers to build the ancient monuments we see today. Talking to Ian, rope has been and still is a big part of

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Bedfordshire. That decision and determination has put Ian where he is today making ropes and supplying ropes locally and around the world from his workshop, having moved back North to Kings Meaburn 3 years ago. He is using that knowledge and experience to continually discover new applications and uses for rope, whilst also keeping the tradition alive. From Cargo nets on ships, to assault courses, to playgrounds, indoor soft play areas and gardens; but also on film sets, especially the ones with Pirates. Rope can now be a fashion accessory; a tie back for the curtains and a lead for your dog in your team’s favourite colours. Today Ian makes rope from materials that date way back, but depending on its purpose, it could be common natural fibres, Manila hemp, hemp, linen, cotton, coir, jute, straw, and sisal. Today synthetic fibres are also used for rope-making that include polypropylene, nylon, polyesters and polyethylene, based on the purpose they are needed for. On the Ropeworks UK website, you’ll see plenty of ideas, but importantly, just because you can’t see what you’re looking for, doesn’t mean Ian can’t make it. “Manufactures Rope Products, Scramble nets, Rope Bridges, Swings, Rope Ladders, Fitness Ropes, Barrier ropes, Door stops, Cat scratchers, dog leads etc”

Ian Outram - Ropework-UK Smithy House,Kings Meaburn, Cumbria, CA10 3BU 01931 714482 • 07826 849647 www.ropework-uk.com • ian@ropework-uk.com FACEBOOK Ropework-UK

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© All photos Lee Quinn


PAM’S FLOWER POWER

June – The Honeysuckle

The heady scent of Lonicera periclymenum is a sure sign that summer is here! The common or English honeysuckle is found growing rampantly in hedgerows, gardens and woodlands. There are many different species that have, over the years, been introduced into Britain these have then naturalised while some escape from gardens and can be invasive! There are of course many other varieties to be found in garden centres and nurseries which can bring colour and scent to the garden.

The common honeysuckle is also known as Woodbine which refers to the winding vines or stems of the plant while the sweet scented flowers give the honeysuckle its more common name. A fast growing shrub native to the British Isles, it has dark green oval shaped leaves which grow on very short stems opposite each other in pairs. The cream trumpet shaped flowers turn a yellow-orange shade often with a red or pink flush; they bloom profusely from June until September. The plant is a valuable part of the ecosystem as it supports a wide variety of species of animals and insects. Butterflies, such as the increasingly rare White Admiral, rely on honeysuckle to provide nectar. At night a combination of the pale colour of the honeysuckle flowers and the strong heady scent attracts pollinating moths; they then use their long tongue (proboscis) to reach deep into the flower to reach the nectar. In the process they pick up pollen onto their bodies and transport it between plants. Bumble bees are also frequent daytime visitors to the flowers collecting the sweet nectar.

little mice are protected and increasingly rare, indeed they are found only in southern counties of the British Isles and are vulnerable to complete extinction. However the honeysuckle not only provides shelter but also food. The bark of the shrub is used to build nests for their young born during the summer and they also eat the sweet flowers to provide energy.

It is not only insects which find the honeysuckle a source of food; birds including thrushes, warblers and bullfinches eat the red berries which appear in the late summer and into the autumn. The seeds in the berries are then passed in the birds droppings resulting in the plant ‘escaping’ from its original site. The berries are also dropped by birds into new locations again spreading these easily grown shrubs.

It is possible to taste the sweetness of the honeysuckle yourself by sucking the nectar from the base of the flower! The honeysuckle, along with the rose, is the birth flower of June and is the symbol of love in the language of flowers due to how quickly it grows and how it entwines itself around any tree or plant near it. William Shakespeare used it as a metaphor for embracing arms.

One of the other surprising beneficiaries of the honeysuckle is the dormouse! These nocturnal 22


‘Sleep thou, and I will wind thee in my arms… So doth the woodbine the sweet honeysuckle Gently entwist; the female ivy so Enrings the barky fingers of the elm. O, how I love thee! How I dote on thee!’ ~ A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Act IV, Scene 1 ~ It is thought that in Greek Mythology Daphnis and Chloe were lovers but they live many miles apart and could only see each other when honeysuckle bloomed. Daphnis pleaded with Eros the god of love to make the honeysuckle bloom longer than a season so he and Chloe could be together for days on end, hence the plant blooms continuously throughout the summer and into the autumn. It was believed that if honeysuckle was grown around the entrance to a house it would bring good luck and prevent evil spirits from entering. The vines were also hung on barns and byres to protect the cattle from being bewitched. However it is often considered unlucky to bring honeysuckle flowers into the house – conversely in some countries bringing the flowers into the house meant there would be a wedding within the

year! Perhaps the connection between these two opposite meanings is down to the strong fragrance which is supposed to bring dreams of passion. In Victorian times young girls were forbidden to bring honeysuckle into the house in case they had suggestive dreams! Join me next month for a look at another favourite flower and the stories that lie behind it. By Pam Waggott

References. www.woodlandtrust.org.uk www.bardgarden.blogspot.com www.plant-lore.com, www.gardenguides.com www.eflorist.co.uk, www.flowerfairies.com

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BARGAINS GALORE, BEST BEFORE By Lee Quinn

Emily, Charlotte, Jobie-cash and Kieran

Neighbours to the Eden FM studios, I met Kieran and Charlotte Parker just down the Gilwilly Road a couple of weeks ago at Penrith Pop and Bargains. As Kieran explained to me, it’s about two years ago they had concerns about the amount of food that is wasted and the volume that is perfectly good to eat, which contributes to millions of tonnes that get thrown away. Importantly they decided to do something about. Introducing Emily Richardson - our first member of staff to join the team. Kieran added, “as a relatively new and small business, it’s great to be in a position to put back something into the community we serve by employing our first member of staff”. Kieran now sources a regular supply of ‘Best before dated’ grocery products across a vast range, which changes every week. He can also strike some good deals on seasonal and non-food products too. It’s one

the only places town you’ll see a sign that says ‘We stack em high, we sell em Cheap’. As a source of information in my research, I checked a lot of things out at: www.lovefoodhatewaste.com website, and by definition here is what I found out for those not online. BEST BEFORE ‘Best before’ refers to quality - your food will be at its best before the date given. After this date, it might not be at its best, but it will still be safe to eat. Use your senses to make a judgement. Depending on how your food is stored, it has the potential to be good enough to eat for a long time after this date. USE BY ‘Use by’ refers to safety - you must not eat food past the ‘use by’ date. You cannot always smell the bacteria that causes food to spoil, so after the ‘use

by’ date, the food may appear perfectly fine to eat, but could still lead to food poisoning. Let’s be absolutely clear, you should NOT eat food after the ‘use by’ date - even if it looks and smells OK. Top tip - you can freeze food right up to and including the ‘use by’ date. If you’re not sure you will eat it in time, freeze it for another day! DISPLAY UNTIL / SELL BY These dates are for the retailers – not us at home. You don’t need to worry about these. Some products, such as uncut fruit and vegetables and wine, for example, aren’t required to have a date label, and there are specific regulations referring to hen’s eggs, which require the use of a Best Before date. The brands you know but not at the prices you are probably paying and Kieran like’s his little quotes so we’ll leave you with this “If you’re not first your last!”

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Introducing the Afternoon Sessions

“They thrive in their undeniable individuality but are linked by their compelling dynamic on and off stage, taking eclectic influences from fashion, music, and attitudes, which all reflect through their unique sound.” Against the historic backdrop of Carlisle with its Castle, Cathedral and bustling sense of community, the Indie-Rock band ‘The Afternoon Sessions’ were born. Meeting at Carlisle College, this group of lads with strikingly loud and contrasting personalities yet un-ignorable chemistry, came together to create energetic indie-rock anthems, and the rest is history. The four piece is made up of Haz King, Evan Morgan, James Henderson and Christian Morley and since 2020 their love of music, albeit varied, can’t beat the collective buzz when the group lose themselves playing fast. Therefore, their sound has been compared to the likes of Arctic Monkeys, Fontaines D.C., Sports Team, Led Zeppelin, and Mac DeMarco. The group recently carted their equipment, and a camera crew into the centre of town to perform a live busking set, breaking

from the mundane stresses of everyday life, and falling in love under the sun, it’ll surely have you mistaking the concrete under your feet for sand.

down the stereotypical sound and setup, for their Youtube channel, as well as taking part in a live-streamed show debuting their original material to over 100 people. The band have recently released their extremely well received debut single ‘Fun In The Sun’, released on 23rd of April - putting a fresh spin on the age old subject matter... Love. Shouting out messages of getting away

The Afternoon Sessions are now working on their highly anticipated upcoming EP, alongside eagerly rehearsing to get match-fit for when they can sink their teeth into the post Covid world, including their set on the bill at Solfest 2021. Before that, you can listen to the band live on Eden FM from 8pm – 10pm on Monday 21st June for a live feast before the fest session on 107.5 FM and online via www. edenfm.co.uk The band takes influence from the likes of Arctic Monkeys, Fontaines D.C., The Kooks, Led Zeppelin, Sports Team, The Red Hot Chilli Peppers, Tame Impala, Alice In Chains and more.

Contact: Email: theafternoonsessions@gmail.com Tel: 07717 948375 / 07539 977113 Instagram: instagram.com/ theafternoonsessions_?igshid=5pztlvblyarp Facebook: m.facebook.com/theafternoonsessions/ TikTok: vm.tiktok.com/ZMePCveVq/ Twitter: mobile.twitter.com/afternoonsess YouTube: youtube.com/channel/UCfbluwC0PFiejjrx2JfbRZQ 26


Swifts, Swallows or House Martin? Which one is it ? By Richard Dixon

These summer visitors are associated with human habitation but their identification can sometimes be confusing. Swallow - rather late arriving this year due to adverse weather conditions.The most obvious thing that distinguishes swallows is their deeply forked tails with pale whitish undersides and uniformly dark blue back above with a reddish chin and throat. House martin - smaller than a swallow with a shallow forked tail.Their body is all white underneath with a white chin and throat but the main distinguishing feature is the white patch on their rump contrasting with their blue black back. Whereas the swallow looks like an arrow in flight they are more of a ‘torpedo’ shape with short, pointed wider wings and a fuller body.

Eden 107

Swift - the largest and rarest of the three. The last to arrive and the first to leave. They are a uniform sooty brown colour which often looks black on

Eden107.5

the wing. They have long narrow wings which give them a scythe like appearance leading to their colloquial name of ‘devil bird’. They form breeding parties chasing through the skies ‘screaming’ as they go. Unfortunately some people dislike having house martins nesting on their houses as they do make a bit of a mess below the nest but this inconvenience is more than compensated by the fact that they consume an enormous amount of flying insects and the sheer delight you will get when the young first take to the wing and are flying around the nest with what appears to be such carefree joy . Swifts are reducing in numbers and one of the main reasons is the shortage of nest sites as buildings are renovated - however they will take to suitable nest boxes so if you are having building work done please think of putting some up. Advice can be found on swift-conservation.org

Eden FM June – July interviews Do you have an interest in the Eden Local articles and topics?

In the month that follows the release and delivery of the Eden Local, we will now be working towards producing the stories for live and recorded interviews, from the content of the Eden Local. These interviews will feature in our programme schedule Mondays to Fridays across the week between 4pm & 6pm.

that have taken place, that may affect local residents and businesses. We hope to have interviews with local members of Penrith Town Council, and we will be talking to the Housing 21 team about the new Newton House development.

Whether it’s a new business or a topic of interest, it could be local news. Maybe a campaign that needs a voice or a debate to be shared?

We’ll be talking about walking with Laura Earl, gardening with Karen Roberts, Solar power with Ewen Estill of LovesSolar, Ropes with Ian Outram of Ropeworks UK, and Kieran Parker on Best Before dates, just to name a few!

From 21st June, we will be featuring interviews on Going Green, local wildlife, and the most recent consultations

The Eden FM interviews start Monday 21st June with the Eden FM Team 27


The Romans

at Penrith and Eden Museum Article by Sydney Chapman

Roman bronze oil lamp with phoenix bird roundel

Two part terracotta oil lamp in the form of a fish from Plumpton

Roman coin hoard from Newby

Bronze Etruscan figurines from Tuscany

Roman and Romano-Alexandrian coins found near Low Borrowbridge Roman Fort

The Museum has a wide range of Roman artefacts, most of them on display. Some of them were donated to the museum in its earlier days including small bronze figurines and brooches though these are more strictly speaking Etruscan, products of a neighbouring people eventually conquered by Rome but to whom the city owed much in respect of culture and religion. The Roman army probably arrived in the Eden valley from Yorkshire by way of the Stainmore Pass in about AD.76 and occupied it for almost four centuries. The neighbourhood of Penrith was at a crossroads of Roman communications and most of the material was found at or near the local forts at Brougham (Brocavum), Plumpton (Voreda), or those at Low Borrowbridge and Kirkby Thore (Brovoniacum); like the terracotta oil lamp from Plumpton, moulded to form a fish with separate upper and lower parts. More up-market is the bronze oil lamp featuring, appropriately, the legendary phoenix bird on a bed of burning sticks. There are Roman coin hoards from Ninekirks, (Brougham), Newby near Shap - still in the aggregated lump formed by the original container and comprising about 600 28

pieces - nummi of AD 32140. There is also a group of coins found in the 19th century close by the fort at Low Borrowbridge during construction of the Lancaster to Carlisle Railway. They include coins, many from the mints at Rome and Alexandria, of Claudius, Delmatius, Maximian, Diocletian, Alexander Severus and Marcus Aurelius. These were donated to the Museum by the great granddaughter of James Day, the railway engineer who oversaw the work. A note tells us that he would pay the men working for him for every coin they found. Awaiting delivery (delayed through Covid) is a purse hoard of 56 Roman copper-alloy coins dating from AD 313-335 found at Tebay; remarkably it includes a portion of the textile purse in which it had been carried.

Roman gold jewellery piece from Brougham


Roman silver ring from Crosby Ravensworth

Roman gold strips from Mallerstang

There are items of Roman gold and silver jewellery including the piece from Brougham in the form of two stylised opposed birds. A very similar gold piece Bronze skillet handle from Plumpton was found in Lancaster. From Mallerstang are two decorative a fragmented state including gold mount strips, each buff-ware storage vessels and considered part of same object other coarse and burnished and featuring clusters of pellets wares and the red moulded representing grapes, possibly ‘terra sigillata’ − Samian ware. part of a bracelet. Unusual items include a portion From Crosby Ravensworth are of that type made rounda Roman silver ring (lacking shaped for use in some sort intaglio), and the upper part of pitch-and-toss game; and of another silver ring. As being a nose shaped fragment of a also of silver, I also mention pottery vessel from Plumpton. here a coin − a denarius of Trajan (AD 103=111) found near the Roman fort at Kirkby Thore (Bravoniacum). The collection includes the handle of a skillet, on stylistic grounds probably the work of Cipius Polibius of Campania, a pottery spindle whorl and twelve sections of pottery drainage pipework from Voreda.

Finally, keeping largest to last, we have a good example of a Roman millstone; the grooved pattern is typical and finessed for function – to spread grain evenly between the stone surfaces.

There is a wide range of Roman domestic ceramics mostly in

Roman millstone

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The Kingfisher By Richard Dixon

A flash of azure blue as a small bird arrows its way upstream low over the water like a miniature Exocet missile - you have caught sight albeit briefly of one of our most iconic and easily recognisable birds if only it would stay still, the kingfisher. However if you are patient and can remain hidden there is every chance the bird will return. The reason is that kingfishers have favoured bankside perches, sometimes hidden but at other times very obvious where they fish from. Kingfishers are found on many rivers though they prefer still or gently flowing waterways and smaller bodies of water over larger open expanses such as lakes. Their prime concern is the availability of their aquatic food principally small fish and insects. Apart from using a favourite perch for fishing they can actually hover kestrel like over the water before making a forceful plunge into the water. They are able to compensate for reflection and refraction from the water and their eyes are protected at the point of impact by transparent nictitating membranes going across them.

© Colin Barrett

identical though the all black bill of the male is replaced by a red base in the female.They are difficult to accurately survey but it is thought there are between 5and 9 thousand pairs in the U.K. An average territory is some 1.5km which is aggressively guarded. By and large they are sedentary with a post breeding dispersal of up to 50km only. However in the winter there is often a movement to more open water including estuaries and harbours. Hard winters can have a severe effect on the population- the winter of 62/63 nearly wiped out the kingfisher in the south of England. This is offset by their reproductive potential as they can have two or even three broods a year with an average of 7 chicks in each

Kingfishers are solitary apart from during the breeding season and both sexes are virtually 30


so recolonisation can potentially occur quickly. Kingfishers nest in holes on the river bank which are excavated with their dagger like bill while their feet are used to propel the waste out of the tunnel. There is an enlarged chamber at the end of the tunnel which takes 5-7 days to construct. Fish are fed head first to the young which are then programmed to defecate towards the light. Needless to say much of this remains in the tunnel making it extremely messy. The adults are meticulous bathers especially after visiting the nest and they can be seen plunging into the water before returning to their perch to preen often repeating this exercise a few times.

Lancashire or from the hides at Caelaverock WWT reserve in Dumfriesshire . However they are present on many of our rivers including the Eden, the Irthing, the Kent, the Lune, the Esk and its associated ponds in Longtown and the Caldew between Dalston and Cummersdale - in fact the only places you will not find them

is on fast flowing or heavily polluted watercourses. Do remember if you happen to come across a kingfisher near its nest tunnel that it is a Schedule 1 protected species under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 and therefore it is illegal to disturb it or to photograph it without a license.

Where can you see kingfishers in Cumbria? First of all you need a bit of luck as for such a colourful bird they are remarkably unobtrusive so sightings cannot be guaranteed! My first one of the year was on New Years Day on the River Petteril in Wreay Woods but I have not seen one since! Perhaps your best chance of spotting one in this area is from Allen hide at Leighton Moss RSPB reserve in North Richard Dixon, Secretary RSPB North Cumbria Local Group There are two local groups for members of the RSPB in the area - one in West Cumbria and the other based in Carlisle. Both run indoor meetings during the winter and organise outdoor bird watching trips throughout the year. More details can be found on their websites (see below) along with joining information. There is also the opportunity to join work parties at the RSPB reserves in the area, Haweswater, Geltsdale and Campfield and occasionally to help with survey work or fund raising. The Royal Society of Protection of Birds (RSPB) is a registered charity: England and Wales no. 207076, Scotland no. SCO37654. For more information and contact details RSPB West Cumbria Local Group. ww2.rspb.org.uk/groups/westcumbria RSPB North Cumbria Local Group. ww2rspb.org.uk/groups/carlisle 31


River Safety with kids by The Hiking Household

Kids and water – we all know they go hand in hand! There is not a puddle, river, pond or lake that we can pass without my children having the overwhelming urge to jump right in. However, with water there is naturally an added risk. While we are often on the lookout for ‘walks with water’, as my children call them, I do have to be extra careful on these walks. Walking with four young children always keeps me on my toes but when we have river banks on our side there are certain rules I have to highlight to my little ones. • SAFE: Stay Away From the Edge. Simple yet effective. I often remind my children “I see water, let’s keep SAFE” to which my eldest responds STAY AWAY FROM THE EDGE!! It may seem obvious but please do keep reminding your little ones the importance of keeping on any paths, and avoiding the edge. • Hidden Dangers: pollution is something my eldest and I talk a lot about recently and we have had some really great conversations about the hidden dangers that could be found in the water, particularly from pollution. He recently found broken glass close to the shoreline and told his siblings “there could be glass in that water”. Reminding your children of these dangers is so important, as well as always reiterating that you are never to jump into water without an adult being aware and present. • Current: not only does a conversation around current and unexpected cold water prove to be a great little science lesson but it also teaches your children that currents can be strong, even when the water looks extremely calm, and the water can drag you under.

While walking alongside water can provide a few more challenges, it also does add great excitement and some of our favourite walks are those that include water! Below are a few of our favourite water walks:

• Do NOT jump in after anyone: with having four young children this is always my fear, that one of them will jump in and they all follow. I often explain to my children the importance of never jumping in after anyone, particularly to help someone. While this is a hard concept for them to understand (they feel they should jump in to help) I always highlight how important it is for them to stay dry, stay still and yell for help.

1. Aira Force: a fabulous waterfall in Matterdale. 2. Brougham Castle: found in a beautiful setting beside the crossing of the River Eamont in Cumbria. 3. Lake Ullswater, Pooley Bridge: a lovely little walk with stunning views. 4. Lacy’s Caves: a brilliant little explore with lots to see close to Little Salkeld, Penrith. 5. Coombs Wood, Armathwaite: a fabulous walk nestled adjacent to the River Eden between Carlisle and Penrith. For further information on any of these walks please do see my website www.thehikinghousehold.com. Here’s to a wonderful summer of safely exploring our wetlands and rivers 32


2020 – 2021

Keeping Calm & Carrying On The Sequel By Vee Today is a red-letter day - Saturday the 17 of April 2021. Who remembers red letter days on calendars? I used to flick through my Dad’s calendar each month to see how many there were going to be, but I digress! We are off to Penrith to receive our second Pfizer jab! a week earlier than we expected, it can’t be eleven weeks since our first jab, surely! It’s a truly lovely Spring day. Blue sky and sunshine and the natural world starting to green up all around us. Lambs in the fields on the left and the right. Hawthorn hedges turning green. Much more traffic on the road and many more people out and about as we pass through Carlton. We knew what to expect, we’d done it before so no feelings of trepidation like last time, no wondering how it was all going to work; we even know all about the digital egg timers. However, when we th

pulled into the car park, ten minutes before our scheduled time of 12 Noon, we were truly surprised to see a long queue snaking along the path next to the Medical Centre, this was not at all what we expected, and, of course, we were early again! The car park appeared to be full, but luckily a Penrith Lions volunteer was directing traffic, masked up and waving his arms about he indicated a parking space for us, and we did as we were told and parked where he indicated. We pulled into the space to wait until our appointment time. Oh! Dear, bit of a dilemma! Should we join the queue straight away or should we wait in the car until our appointed time. As we were debating this, cars were arriving and leaving thick and fast. Our peers were jumping out of their cars, slipping their face masks on and joining the queue! Did I just see someone skip? Surely not! at their age! The queue was swiftly disappearing

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The men sporting grey and white mullet hairdos, even the odd ponytail. Everyone looked brighter and most dressed in summery clothes; the chap in front of us wearing shorts and T shirt but the socks with sandals was a dead giveaway! He turned to us and asked what time our appointment was. We told him 12 noon! ‘Oh’ he said, ‘mines ten passed 12.’ I think he was grinning behind his mask. I chuckled; no offer made to change places. Another chair was carried past heading for the end of the queue. I hope to goodness I won’t need one. I’ll keep leaning on the fence and hanging on to John. The queue was slowly moving, and more and more folks were joining. Summer dresses were very evident and, fascinatingly, lots of ladies were wearing colour co-ordinated face masks. One lady in particular, wearing a floral suit trimmed with shocking pink, and a matching shocking pink mask. I couldn’t be too sure, but I think she was sporting a do-it-yourself haircut. Still, who cares in these strange times. The Shocking Pink, trim took my thoughts ‘back along’ once again. I must have been about 14 and the latest fashion colours, particularly for socks, were Shocking Pink, Lime Green and Electric Blue. All of them sort of dayglo, illuminous in the dark. It was the Easter Holidays and I had been to town shopping with my Mother and had noticed a pair of shocking pink jeans in what was then C&A Modes. I fell in love with them, Oh! How I wanted them. Mother’s reaction ‘They are a totally unserviceable colour’ end of conversation. All the way home on the United Bus I tried to work out how I could get the 14/11 (Fourteen Shillings and Eleven pence). I decided I would go to our nearest farm and see if they still needed tattie pickers. I had heard my elder brother talking about earning some extra money. Sure, enough the Farmer still needed pickers. He wasn’t very keen, me being a girl, but I said I could bring my little brother to help me. I was hired; I would get 10/- ten shillings – (about £20 in today’s money) for working for 5 days, 5 hours a day. How I would raise the rest of the money, I had no idea. It was probably one of the worst weeks in my life. The field was enormous, the rows of tatties went on forever. The weather on the first day was fine, the rest of the week drizzly rain. The mud flying off the back of the tractor thing spattered us if we got too near. It was back breaking, bending over to pick up the tatties. In the end I crawled along on my hands and knees, it was easier. My little brother helped till lunch time on the first day. Thereafter, he discovered the feral cats in the barn where we ate out ‘bait’ (lunch) and spent the rest of the week making dens in the hay and chasing the cats. I was never to repeat the experience, but I did get the shocking Pink jeans, making up

around a corner. Gosh, no more tottering and taking things slowly, it was beginning to look as though the Medical Centre was holding a Rummage Sale and folk were happily queuing to pick up a bargain. Directly opposite us was a Landrover type vehicle. It looked as though it had just returned from Safari or had last been seen chasing Rommel in 1944. The couple inside were sitting quite calmly, rather poker faced, and looking around at all the activity of the car park, no sign of them getting out of the mudspattered vehicle so we couldn’t work out whether they were arriving or leaving. They certainly looked as though they wanted to be somewhere else. Checking the queue again I could see it was mostly couples with the odd singly, mainly men. We decided we should join the queue; so on with our face masks and off we headed to the end of the considerable queue of what looked like a jolly crowd and as we got nearer; sounded like a happy crowd, socially distanced, of course. I must admit I was a little concerned about the queue and how fast it might move along because I don’t do standing still for very long these days – think its an age thing! But I would soon find out I wasn’t the only one with dodgy old legs. The chatter was really quite loud and surprisingly happy with the odd burst of laughter ringing out. The voices were muffled by the masks, and my hearing is not as good as it was; but it became apparent that two different jabs were being administered today. I heard ‘Are you having the Asda Vinegar or the Tizer?’ ‘Oh, I’m having the Tizer, my friend had the Asda Vinegar one and she was very poorly for a week.’ ‘Oh! Do we get a choice then? ‘Oh! Now I’m not sure.’ Just then a volunteer appeared, she was working her way along from the front of the queue which by now had move forward a bit and I could lean against the fence. The volunteer was offering dollops of hand sanitiser to each person she passed and handing them a few sheets of paper. containing a list of medical questions. Oh flip! I didn’t think I would need a pen. I managed to stuff the papers under my arm while I rubbed in my hand sanitiser. Then I heard the volunteer tell the chap in front of us that he didn’t need to fill anything in, just hand the papers to the nurse. Thank goodness! I saw a volunteer pass us carrying a chair and then another volunteer plus chair went by. I thought, yes! Some of these rock and rollers are just like me – legs not too good these days, must have been all that rocking and rolling we did, back along! (A lovely Cornish term of referring to any time in the past). I stood listening to the chatter and banter and thought how different the atmosphere was compared with last time in the cold and dull of January. Not so much Keeping Calm but a quite a lot of Carrying on. 34


the shortage in money by collecting lost golf balls and selling them back to the Golfers, strawberry picking and returning empty Lemonade bottles. In case your wondering if I paid my little brother for his contribution, the answer is no; he made more money than me selling golf balls so two Bubble gum Gob Stoppers was all he got, he seemed quite happy with that. It was almost 12 noon and quite suddenly we were at the finish line table! ‘Mr and Mrs Reed? You are sharing a bubble of course? Excuse me Sir, to the chap in front, could you just let this pair through, we are trying to keep bubbles together, thank you’. To us ‘Off you go, right to the end of the corridor.’ We found ourselves in a large airy room, a Nurse standing by with needle and a Volunteer who quickly ran through the multiple health questions. We sat down, exposed our arms ‘Jab’ and it was done! I didn’t feel a thing this time round. What a smooth and efficient production line it was. They say practice makes perfect and by golly they have certainly had plenty of practice over the last three or four months. We were shown into the same Egg Timer room, the chairs were being sanitised by a volunteer who cheerfully told us she started at nine and would finish at six, a long day but she didn’t mind. Like last time we sat quietly watching our egg timers and I couldn’t help chuckling when I thought back to the

last time when I thought the man across the room was having a heart attack when he was only trying to see his egg timer. I didn’t spot him in the queue today, but I hope he’s ok. Out in the corridor there were hoots of laughter and light-hearted chatter. After ten minutes we were told that, as it was our second Jab, we could go. We couldn’t resist pinging the egg timers before we left. The folk sitting in the hallway, waiting to be released, were chatting, and laughing, it was lovely to hear. I suppose you could say we had all been given the ‘Hope Jab’ and we’re all feeling a little more optimistic about the future. Now back to our car and home for a cup of tea. No sign of Rommel’s Landrover, must have headed for the hills. By the time you are reading these ramblings, the 17th of May will be ‘back along’, and we will have been allowed to meet our children and grandchildren indoors; not over the garden wall or standing 2m apart outside in the rain; but what I’m wondering is; when will we be allowed to give our family a hug? I don’t recall Boris setting a ‘You’re allowed to hug your family’ date. Between you me and the gatepost we will be giving them all a big hug on the 17th of May. Us oldies have never been risk averse and we just can’t wait. Good luck everyone!

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