Eden Local Issue 166

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ISSN 2516-1431

Your Independent Community Magazine Penrith and areas of the Eden Valley

Eden 107

The Christmas Robin Christmas Food Hygiene Two Christmas Crackers Select & Collect Online Where has all the buzz gone?

Eden107.5

Merry Christmas & a Happy New Year to all our readers S TAY SAF E - H AN D S • FA C E • S PAC E 1 Cumbrian Local Publications • Issue No. 166


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Contents

The Christmas Robin Page 7 Christmas Food Hygiene Pages 8 & 11 Two Christmas Crackers Page 10 Charity Christmas Tree Collections Page 12 Bring in the Wildlife Nature by design Page 13 Feeding the birds in your garden Pages 16 - 17 Christmas Past, Present and Yet to Come Page 18 ‘The Druids Cutting Mistletoe’ Page 20 Penrith Town Council 2020-21 Pages 21 - 22 Five Minutes Spare Select & Collect online shopping Page 23 Quinn HR Looking Back at 2020 Pages 24 - 25 Seasonal Wordsearch and Quiz Page 25 Pamela’s Scramble Page 26 Where has all the buzz gone? Pages 27 & 28 Will the ‘Pong’ ever stop? Page 29 Goodbye to 2020 & 2019 Pages 30 – 31 Follow us on Facebook for additional stories and

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Welcome to our 166th Issue Welcome to the last Eden Local of 2020. I woke early on this morning and I started to write this opening with the first heavy frost outside. With so many people already in ‘Christmas mode’, with all their decorations up and Christmas trees for a lot of families, or people on their own through

isolation or otherwise, it would seem that Christmas has come early. That early in the morning on this day and it wasn’t going to be light for at least another two hours, I had to put the central heating on. Fifty years ago, on a frosty morning like this one with minus temperatures, I would have seen the mist of my own breath in my bedroom as we didn’t have central heating. With steel frame single pane glass, there would have been ice on the inside of the windows in my bedroom! My second thought of the day, in my mind when I looked out of the window, was that I just couldn’t stop thinking about the

Eden FM Notice: Eden Local prints various articles, features, and advertisements. Although these appear in Eden FM, any opinions expressed are the opinion of the author, these are not necessarily the opinion of the publisher. ©Copyright Eden Local 2020. The contents of this publication are written

specifically for our readers, no part may be reproduced elsewhere without express and prior permission.

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Christmas carols I loved to sing in the school and the church choir. Christmas Carol Past three o’clock, an English Christmas carol loosely based on the call of the traditional town crier. The words were written by George Ratcliffe Woodward (1848–1934) to the traditional tune “London Waits”. The chorus I could never forget:

Spare, which is also featured in this publication, we’ve been offering local businesses the opportunity to be online with a ‘Select and Collect’ shop. We’ve been busy training and educating local businesses in doing things, but building a business is not an overnight process, just like education. (p23)

“Past three o’clock, on a cold frosty morning, past three o’clock, good morrow masters all.”

Welcome back to Cumbrian John Crouch! I first met John when I was working with Penrith Co-op Society in 2013. I was sourcing local products back then and John was in the demo kitchen. Well, we have some great projects planned for 2021, which cover many aspects of local produce, foraging and recipes. John’s made a start with two Christmas Crackers (p10) and some tips on Christmas Turkey (p8 & p11).

Eight short verses and I always remember the first three. It does take me back to my school assemblies when we had a hymn at the beginning and a hymn at the end. More than on a few occasions we had some verses taken out. It was the same at the Church, with the statement after or sometimes before, “we are now going to sing, but not verse or verses ‘X’” - this continues (p18).

John and I have also worked on the ‘Talking Turkey’ campaign that we did via Eden Local and Eden FM in 2013 for Eden District Council. It’s unfortunate that in 2020 we haven’t heard much from EDC this year, despite our posting through the doors of Penrith and 60 villages in the District. Perhaps it’s all online, or maybe not? With no information coming forward, I reach some important Turkey guidelines from the Food Standards Agency, which although is a 2019 guideline, we have decided to use this rather than have nothing at all. Believe it or not, some people will be cooking a turkey or poultry for the first time.

There is a lot to talk about in this issue of Eden Local. It’s been an extremely busy month of November, getting three publications together and getting them delivered through up to 25,100 doors, strangely this was just a small part of the month. Apart from covering my normal delivery routes in Penrith, I’ve had a trip to Armathwaite and Ainstable. For the first time in a long time, I took some Eden Locals back into Shap. Emily Q took care of Greystoke, which was our first time back there since pre lockdown in March. We also launched into areas of Carlisle for the first time since 2012 with the Border City Times equivalent to the Eden Local.

My thanks to Dave Smith from the RSPB West Cumbria this month with the origins of the Robin (p7), and how we can help birds is also covered in Karen’s Garden article (p14), as well as in John’s (p16 & 17). We also have a tip about preparing our Garden for Bees (p27 – 28). On another note, I was informed that my name is in the debate on the Fresh Air for Penrith Facebook page, referred to as Lee Quinn of Eden FM Radio! Obviously not a friend! Just someone like many, who likes to post comments and walk away.

As already explained, regarding deliveries we no longer leave magazines for collection by the public, especially in the current climate and we will continue to issue disposable gloves to all our delivery teams. Congratulations to Karen Morley-Chesworth of Chesworth Communications, who with the Appleby Town Council members and the Cumbrian Local Publication team, in a very small window of time produced the Appleby in Westmorland Christmas 2020 Shop Early, Shop Local, Shop Safely magazine. It’s another sign of not just putting all your eggs in one basket by selling on line.

I was called by Leo Group on 7th October 2020 as the Editor of Eden Local, which was also confirmed in an email. I shared with them my thoughts as a resident having to wear a mask, whilst going about my work outside my house loading up the Eden Local magazines for delivery. The stench in the air was bad, as one resident to another, and has been

Via Cumbrian Local Publications and 5 Minutes 4


endured for many years, which on that day was so bad I eventually had to go back into the house. Once again, I offered Leo Group, as the editor of Eden Local the opportunity to respond to the articles and releases from local groups (p29). To close and my final thought really before Christmas, is along the lines of thinking back and comparing to where we were last Christmas and then March 2020. I have looked back and reflected on memories of Christmas Past, Present and yet to come (p18). As a local community magazine, we’ve had to adapt. My family and the world around us, has not been much further than our front door most days in 2020, and that is how this year will end. This might not be our ideal, but before Big Ben chimes and takes us into 2021, there will be time to reflect on how well we have all done, how much we have achieved, in new found strengths from within we did not know we had, and how the kindness in human nature has come forward in the community.

As individuals we can’t do everything, but together we have, as a community achieved so much. This final Eden Local of 2020 is dedicated to those we lost in 2020 and those we have saved. At the time of receiving your Eden Local this month, it should be before Christmas Eve. From the Eden Local team, we would like to wish you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Our message is a clear one - stay safe everyone and we’ll be back in 2021! Lee

Phone: 01768 862394 Email: lee@cumbrianlocal.co.uk www.cumbrianlocal.co.uk Cumbrian Local Publications Ltd, 4 Market Square, Penrith Cumbria CA11 9AX

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The Christmas Robin Of all Britain’s birds, none is more closely associated with winter and Christmas, than the robin. But how did this come about?

In the 1900s, Victorian postmen wore red uniforms, as a proud link to the British flag, earning them the nickname ‘robin redbreast’. As Christmas drew near people eagerly awaited cards from loved ones, delivered by their local ‘robin’. The small bird’s fate was sealed, as artists began illustrating Christmas cards with the birds delivering festive letters and cards, and they quickly became a Christmas icon. It may be suspected that these reasons, alongside the festive red colouration, have led to the robin being featured on Christmas cards and decorations across the land. But the real reason goes back much further. Legend has it that the robin’s redbreast gives it a direct link to Christianity. One fable suggests that when the baby Jesus was in his manger in the stable by the fire; a small brown bird fanned the flames to help keep the baby Jesus warm. Embers

from the fire scorched its tiny chest, leaving it red-breasted forevermore. There is also a legend of when a robin rested upon Jesus’ shoulder when he was on the cross and sang to relieve his suffering. Blood from Jesus’ crown of thorns stained the little bird’s chest, since then, all robins were red breasted.

Have you noticed a robin’s red-breast is actually orange? The bird was named before the English language had a word for the colour ‘orange’. Many things that were really orange were called red instead even though we did have the word for ‘orange’ as in the fruit. The colour orange was not named as a colour in English until the 16th century. The name for the colour comes from the fruit. Robins are not the only bird visible at Christmas time and can be spotted all year round. Perhaps we hold a special feeling for them, as other species abandon us for warmer climates in the cold winter months. Their cheerful song is the soundtrack to many a wintery morning – although this cheerful piping tune is actually a male robin’s aggressive claim to territory. Robins evolved as woodland birds, and in mainland Europe this is still their main home. In Britain they prefer gardens, which provide the ideal habitat where they can feed, breed and roost. They also take advantage of the UK’s passion for 6

gardening, following residents closely as they dig up hard winter soil to reveal juicy worms. This has made them very tame – even more so when snow covers their food supplies. Cold weather also means robins have to plump up their feathers to trap a layer of warm air beneath, which makes them look portly and even more endearing than normal. Recent mild winters, especially in November and December, mean there is still plenty of natural food available elsewhere, so your garden robin may go missing for a while. But if there is early snowfall, you can be sure a robin will appear at your door in search of much-needed sustenance. See inside this edition for advice on feeding birds in your garden. Why not look out for them in January, and take part in the RSPB Big Garden Birdwatch. Full details on how to take part in the 2021 survey in next month’s edition. Dave Smith, Group Leader, RSPB West Cumbria Local Group


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Christmas food hygiene tips and how to cook your turkey safely (advisory foodstandardagency.gov.uk). There are an estimated 2.4 million cases of food poisoning in the UK each year. Whether cooking at home, or reusing leftovers, it’s important to maintain good food hygiene at Christmas by following the ‘4Cs’ of cleaning, chilling, cooking and avoiding cross-contamination. Christmas is a significant period of food waste. Love Food Hate Waste estimate over 100,000 tonnes of edible poultry, 96,000 tonnes of carrots and 710,000 tonnes of potatoes are thrown away each year in the UK. Thinking hygienically when storing, cooking, reusing and freezing food will help keep your Christmas safe and minimise food waste over the festive period.

Christmas food shopping Take enough bags for your Christmas food shop so that you can keep raw and ready-to-eat

food apart. To prevent crosscontamination, store raw meat, fish and shellfish separately from ready-to-eat food and vegetables. Keep these covered on the bottom shelf of your fridge. When food shopping over the Christmas period, it is important to understand the difference between best before and use-by dates to effectively plan your meals, get food to

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Two Christmas Crackers from Chef John Crouch festive but also taste great. Made from simple ingredients they really have that wow factor. We all like tucking into popcorn while watching a good film. So why not treat the family to this homemade snack.

Christmas is a time of treats and decorations, so why not combine the two? These Holly Wreath Biscuits not only look

Fill decorated cellophane food bags (Lakeland Ltd) with Christmas Popcorn and give as presents this holiday.

Check the government website for guidance on how to safely freeze your food. Don't waste the turkey carcass. Boiled up with some vegetables and seasoning it will make a tasty broth.

You've enjoyed your Christmas dinner and now ready to relax. But before you put your feet up make room in your fridge and

Look out for the next issue of Eden local where I'll give you some ideas to use up your leftover turkey.

Christmas Popcorn For the popcorn

• 2 tablespoons vegetable oil • 2 tablespoons popping corn You will need a fairly large saucepan that has a lid. Have a heatproof basin ready to hold the cooked popcorn. Pour the oil into the saucepan and put it on the hob. Heat the oil over medium heat for about 2 minutes. Add all the corn to the pan and put the lid on. Turn the heat to high until the corn begins to pop. When the corn is popping turn the heat to the lowest setting. Shake the pan occasionally and cook the corn until the popping has stopped. • • • • • • • •

chill any leftover cooked turkey. Once chilled this meat can be frozen in portions to be used at a later date to make quick easy meals.

100g (4oz) popped corn 50g (2oz) red glacé cherries 50g (2oz) green glacé cherries 50g (2oz) raisins 50g (2oz) chopped almonds 50g (2oz) chopped mixed peel 2 teaspoons ground mixed spice silver sugar balls

Mix all the ingredients together and serve.

Holly Wreath Biscuits Ingredient • • • • • • • •

85g (3oz) butter 170g (6oz) marshmallows 4 drops vanilla essence 1 teaspoon green food colouring 115g (4oz) cornflakes red glacé cherries silver and gold sugar balls edible glitter

Method Melt the butter in a heavy saucepan over a low heat. Add the marshmallows and stir until melted. Stir in the vanilla essence and food colouring, then mix in the cornflakes. Drop tablespoonfuls of the mixture on to greaseproof paper and press a hole in the middle of each. Decorate with half red glacé cherries, sugar balls and edible glitter while soft. 10


How to defrost your turkey If your turkey is frozen, check the guidance on the packaging in advance. Some turkeys can be cooked from frozen if the manufacturer’s instructions say so. Do not defrost your turkey at room temperature. Always defrost your turkey in a container large enough to catch any juices to avoid crosscontamination. A typical large turkey weighing 6-7kg could take as much as 4 days to fully defrost in the fridge. If there are no instructions for defrosting your turkey, you can work out yourself how long it will take to thaw completely. In a fridge, allow around 10-12 hours per kg. If your turkey is not fully defrosted before cooking, it may cook unevenly. This means harmful bacteria can survive the cooking process and you will be at risk of food poisoning.

How to cook your turkey Do not wash raw turkey before cooking. Washing raw meat spreads germs onto your hands, clothes, utensils and worktops. Thorough cooking will kill any bacteria present. When cooking your turkey, always check the advice on the packaging and follow the instructions provided. The cooking guidelines will be based on a bird that is not stuffed. Cook your stuffing in a separate roasting tin, not inside the turkey. A stuffed turkey will take longer to cook and may not cook thoroughly if it has not reached the correct temperature throughout. To work out the cooking time for your turkey, check the retailer’s instructions on the packaging. If there are no cooking instructions, in an oven preheated to 180ºC (350ºF or Gas Mark 4): Allow 45 minutes per kg plus 20 minutes for a turkey that weighs under 4.5kg Allow 40 minutes per kg for a turkey that weighs between 4.5kg and 6.5kg Allow 35 minutes per kg for a turkey weighs over 6.5kg Check the temperature of the thickest part of the bird, between the breast and the thigh, using a temperature probe.

The temperature needs to reach one of the following combinations to make sure it has been cooked properly: 60°C for 45 minutes 65°C for 10 minutes 70°C for 2 minutes 75°C for 30 seconds, 80°C for 6 seconds Remember to fully clean the temperature probe or cooking thermometer after each use to avoid cross-contamination.

Reusing your leftovers Reuse and reinvent your leftovers in different ways. Cool and cover your leftovers, and put them in a fridge or freezer within one to two hours. Splitting leftovers into smaller portions will cool food quicker and help portion control. You can freeze cooked turkey, other cooked meat and meals made from cooked and frozen meat. Once defrosted, you should eat the food within 24 hours. You can also use previously cooked and frozen turkey to make a new meal, such as a turkey curry. Love Food Hate Waste (Opens in a new window) have various creative recipes and ideas for how to make your Christmas leftovers go further. Freezing your leftovers Freeze and defrost any leftovers for future dishes. Freezing acts as a pause button. It is safe to freeze food right up until the use-by date. You can freeze most food. This includes raw and cooked meats, fruit, potatoes (after boiling for five minutes), grated cheese, and eggs. When food defrosts, its core temperature rises. This provides the ideal conditions for bacteria to grow if left at room temperature. It is best to defrost food slowly and safely in the fridge. You can also defrost your leftovers thoroughly in a microwave. Make sure you re-heat until steaming hot. Once the food is defrosted eat within 24 hours. The above information was researched and obtained from https://www.food.gov.uk/safety-hygiene/ christmas-food-hygiene#how-to-defrost-your-turkey Last updated 12 December 2019 11


Recycle your Christmas Tree with Hospice at Home Are you having a real Christmas Tree this year within your home or business? Do you live or work within the CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4 8, CA5 6, CA5 7, CA6 4, CA6 5, CA7 9, CA8 1, CA8 9, CA10 2, CA11 7, CA11 8, CA11 9, or CA11 0 postcode areas? Hospice at Home is once again organising this festive fundraising initiative that not only helpfully recycles trees after the festive season but also raises vital funds to provide local hospice care in the community. Last year, the Charity collected over 1,100 trees, raising almost £12,000. The areas in which the Charity is collecting trees covers Penrith, Carlisle, Wigton, Longtown, Brampton and Dalston – a significant proportion of the area in which Hospice at Home Carlisle and North Lakeland’s clinical services operate. Supporters can book their

tree for collection at www. charityxmastreecollection.com from Sunday 15th November and make a donation of their choice to Hospice at Home. On Friday 8th January 2021 volunteers and local businesses, who have pledged vans and staff teams to help, will collect the trees and take them to be recycled locally. No trips to the tip or needles in your car – just leave the trees in your front garden or outside your property and Hospice at Home will do the rest! Cath Coates, Fundraiser, said “We are delighted to be offering the Christmas Tree Collection again this year, particularly with many events cancelled during 2020 due to the Coronavirus pandemic. We were keen to continue organising this collection, and we will be following strict guidance to ensure our collectors stay safe. Year on year this event has

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increased in popularity and in turn, so has the fundraising total, which ultimately means we can provide more care for more people. We would like to thank all of the supporters of this event, from our leaflet distribution volunteers, to our van drivers and tree collectors, as well as our lead sponsor this year, Lloyd Motor Group”. For more information about the Charity or the Christmas Tree Collection please visit www.hospiceathome.co.uk. To help deliver leaflets in your local area to spread awareness of this appeal please email fundraising@hospiceathome. co.uk. To help with the collection on 8th January by donating your time and a van/ large vehicle, please email comms@hospiceathome.co.uk. Alternatively, please call 01768 210719.


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Bring in the wildlife autumn. It can grow quite large but I have mine in a big pot because it copes with restricted soil space; it’s pollution tolerant too, making it great for towns. So much to love about it!

It’s heading into winter and so you might think there is nothing left to do.. but think again; 28th November – 6th December is National Tree Week and it is the perfect time to plant bare-rooted trees. You’ll need to do it while the ground is still workable so get cracking.

A well-known Cumbrian sight on the hills… The rowan tree – Sorbus aucuparia – has a mythical history and is another native which the birds adore and I do too. It reminds me of being out on the majestic Lake District fells and has lovely feathery, dark green leaves which are blue-green underneath, also bright red berries which will amaze you and the birds. Plus it flowers in late spring and there’s the bonus of autumn colour. Historically the wood was used to stir milk to prevent it curdling and for divining rods… and the berries make fantastic jam. Leave some for the birds though.

As a garden designer, my starting point with any garden planting is to think of trees. They can provide structure and all year round interest, and importantly, bring in wildlife – if you read my last article you know I aim to get the wildlife into every garden!

These are all deciduous but next time I’ll talk about evergreen plants.

I’m a firm believer there’s a tree for any space. Do bear in mind the ultimate size of the tree and the distance from your house, but there are some wonderful small trees for small gardens and you can find trees to plant in pots.

Contact me to discuss bringing out the beauty in every season, from revitalising gardens to complete garden designs. © Karen Roberts Garden Design

Striking colours and bird friendly… There are so many trees to choose from but it is hard to beat Euonymus europaeus – the spindle tree. It has so many positives: a shrub or small tree native to hedgerows, with scarlet red fruits and orange seeds – spectacular to see and tasty for the birds, plus brilliant red autumn colour and attractive corky bark.

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A tolerant tree… Ginkgo biloba is an amazing deciduous conifer, sometimes called a living fossil with almost identical leaf fossils dating back more than 200 million years, which blows my mind a bit. The national tree of China, one of the first examples in the UK is in Kew dating back to 1759. It has beautiful bright green often bi-lobed leaves (hence “biloba”) which turn a magnificent yellow in 14

• karenrobertsgardendesign@gmail.com 29/10/2020 15:41


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Feeding the birds in your garden

Feeding garden birds is one of the easiest ways you can give your feathered friends a boost to help them survive natural food shortages and harsh winter weather, ensuring that they are in tip top condition to breed in spring. In the UK, birds need a fairly constant amount of energy throughout the year. In winter they will need this energy to keep warm, while in the spring and summer they have to deal with the rigours of raising young and then moulting and regrowing their feathers. In autumn, many migrant birds arrive at our bird tables hungry after their long journey. Although food shortages can occur at any time of the year, the natural supply is usually lowest in winter and spring, so this is when garden birds will reap the most benefit from the food you put out.

mostly house sparrows, dunnocks, finches, reed buntings and collared doves, while flaked maize is taken readily by blackbirds. Tits and greenfinches favour peanuts and sunflower seeds. Mixes that contain chunks or whole nuts are suitable for winter feeding only. Pinhead oatmeal is excellent for many birds.

There are different mixes for feeders, for bird tables and for ground feeding. The better mixtures contain plenty of flaked maize, sunflower seeds and peanut granules. Small seeds, such as millet, attract

Nyjer seeds are small and black, rich in fat and with high oil content. They do need a special type of seed feeder however. They're a favourite with goldfinches and siskins and are popular with tits, greenfinches, house sparrows, nuthatches and great spotted woodpeckers too.

Warning: Avoid seed mixtures that have split peas, beans, dried rice or lentils as again only the large species can eat them dry. These are added to some cheaper seed mixes to bulk them up. Also avoid any mixture containing green or pink lumps as these are dog biscuit, which can only be eaten when soaked. Black sunflower seeds are an excellent year-round food, and in many areas are even more popular than peanuts. The oil content is higher in black than striped ones.

birds, so always buy from a reputable dealer. Never put out loose peanuts, during spring or summer, as these pose a choking hazard if they are fed to chicks, place whole peanuts in a suitable mesh feeder. Fat balls and other fat-based food bars are excellent winter food. If they are sold in nylon mesh bags, always remove the bag before putting the fat ball out – the soft mesh can trap and injure birds. Mealworms are relished by robins and blue tits, and may attract other insect-eating birds such as pied wagtails. Mealworms are a natural food and you can feed them to birds throughout the year. Warning: as with most foods, there can be a risk of salmonella poisoning. If you're using dried mealworms reduce any risk by only providing small amounts that get eaten quickly. You can also store dried mealworms in the fridge. Soak dried mealworms in warm water for 20-60 minutes before putting out to provide valuable moisture content and make it easier for younger birds to digest.

Peanuts, crushed or grated, attract robins, dunnocks and even wrens. Nuthatches and coal tits may hoard peanuts.

Any dry breakfast cereal makes useful bird food, although you need to be careful only to put out small amounts at a time. Uncooked porridge oats are also fine for a number of birds.

Warning: Don't use salted or dry roasted peanuts. Remember, peanuts can be high in a natural toxin, which can kill

Warning: never cook porridge oats, this makes them glutinous and could harden around a bird's beak.

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ŠRSPBC


to digest milk and it can give them serious stomach upsets or kill them and never use desiccated coconut as it may swell once inside a bird. All types of bread can be digested by birds, but ideally it should only be just one component in a varied diet. Bread does not contain the necessary protein, vitamins and fat birds need from their diet. Although bread isn't harmful to birds, try not to offer it in large quantities, since its nutritional value is low. During the breeding season, make sure bread is crumbled into tiny pieces and dry chunks of bread will choke baby birds.

Lard and beef suet on their own are fine as they re-solidify after warming. Warning: fat from cooking is bad for birds as they will have meat juices blended in and when set, this consistency makes it prone to smearing, not good for birds' feathers destroying the waterproofing and insulating qualities. Polyunsaturated margarines or vegetable oils are also unsuitable for birds. Birds can digest fermented dairy products, such as cheese. Mild grated cheese can be a good way of attracting robins, wrens and dunnocks. Give fresh coconut only, in the shell. Warning: never give milk to any bird. A bird's gut is not designed

Dried fruits, such as raisins, sultanas and currants are particularly enjoyed by blackbirds, song thrushes and robins. Soak them during spring and summer. Some dogs and cats react badly to these fruits please do not put them out in areas where these animals might get to them. Apples, pears and other fruit, including bruised and part rotten ones, cut up, are very popular with all thrushes, tits and starlings. Garden birds are practically unable to metabolise salt. It is toxic to them in high quantities and affects their nervous system. Never put out salted food onto the bird table, and never add salt to bird baths to keep water ice-free in the winter. Birds need a supply of water for drinking, to help digest food and for bathing. If there is no local source of water; bird baths are a good substitute but position them where the birds 17

will feel safe from predators. Keep all bird tables, feeders and baths clean to avoid transmission of disease. Whatever food you use, always make sure it's fresh. Why not add your bird feeding equipment requirements to your list for Santa! As lockdown and various tiers make it hard to get out to the shops, the RSPB online shop has all sorts of goodies, from bird food to chocolates and books to binoculars. Have a browse at https://shopping.rspb.org.uk Dave Smith, Group Leader, RSPB West Cumbria Local Group The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) is a registered charity: England and Wales no. 207076, Scotland no. SC037654 For more information and contact details: RSPB West Cumbria Local Group https://ww2.rspb.org.uk/ groups/westcumbria/ RSPB North Cumbria Local Group https://ww2.rspb.org.uk/ groups/carlisle


Christmas Past, Present and Yet to Come Christmas has never not happened! Bank holidays move, Easter could be in March or April but 25th December is always Christmas for those celebrating it. As a child from the mid 60’s to the early 70’s, I remember a series of Christmas’s being a set routine for quite a period of my life. Nan cooked the turkey the night before, and after lunch, which was 12.30, we went to my great grandmother’s or we brought her back to ours. Then in the evening we went to my cousins.

from the earlier film. Another couple of classic black and white movies were ‘It's a Wonderful Life’ released in 1946, an American Christmas fantasy drama film with James Stewart, and then a 1947 film, Miracle on 34th Street that was the first full-length black and white film to be colourised. Above all of these in my childhood memories was the film Scrooge, also known as A Christmas Carol created from the Charles Dickens book of the same name, first published in London by Chapman & Hall in 1843, the Christmas Ghost story featuring Ebenezer Scrooge, an elderly miser who is visited by the ghost of his former business partner Jacob Marley and the spirits of Christmas Past, Present and Yet to Come.

This meant four lads all within 4 years age of each other, aged 3 to 6 till we got to the aged range 7 – 10 we would be playing the games that we had as presents for Christmas until I went home. Yes, Christmas Day evenings as I remember included Mouse Trap, Battling Tops, Buckaroo, Fastest Gun in the West, Haunted House, Subbuteo, Battleships, Striker and Kerplunk to name a few.

A British release in 1901 on the silver screen as a silent movie called Scrooge, it was then produced again as a silent movie in 1910 at the Edison Studios in the Bronx in New York City. The film was then called A Christmas Carol. It was finally released in 1935 with sound and of the seven since then! I think because of the age I was the 1970 version remains my favourite

Christmas in the late 60’s - we had three TV channels, all black and white. There weren’t that many Christmas films in the 1960’s that were like what we have now. There certainly wasn’t a Christmas channel. In raising this as part of memories of Christmas, I know it will jog memories for a lot of readers we have who will be reminded of more than just a white Christmas.

Christmas 2020 might just be a bit different. You might look back at Last Christmas and let’s hope you won’t be lonely this Christmas and a good friend or family are with you. I don’t miss walking across the road to the red telephone box to call friends and family but I’d do it again if I had to. And if you haven’t already, you will hear the sound of some of the best ever 50’s, 60’s, 70’s and 80’s Christmas music, again, which will last forever. This Christmas will be a Winters Tale next year, even if you’re not driving home for Christmas. Staying in with the Mistletoe and Wine, with some chestnuts roasting on an open fire, Let It Snow, Let It Snow, Let It Snow.

My memories of these films included three American movies and songs that originated from a film called ‘Holiday Inn’, an American musical from 1942, with Bing Crosby and Fred Astaire, with Marjorie Reynolds and Virginia Dale. The film featured the song White Christmas, and it also featured the song Easter Parade, so technically it wasn’t a Christmas movie, however in 1954, based on the success of the song ‘White Christmas’, this led to another film based on the song, called White Christmas (1954), which starred Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye, Rosemary Clooney, and Vera-Ellen. It is a plot involving an inn, but otherwise different

Merry Christmas Everybody! 18


Hearth & Home (Cumbria) Ltd

10 Years @ Hearth & Home ( C u m b r i a ) Lt d We are celebrating our 10th Year Anniversary on 2nd December 2020. Fraser took over Hearth & Home (Cumbria) Ltd on 2nd December 2010. Every year we are seeing an increase in enquiries for all types of installations, from Electric & Gas Stoves & Fires to Woodburning & Multifuel Stoves and Fireplaces. We also have a fantastic range of Accessories & Spares and specialise in listening to our Customers’ requirements, ensuring that everyone gets great service and can make their dreams become reality with spectacular installations which can totally transform their home or business. 2020 has been such a difficult year for so many people, with more people than ever spending the majority of their time at home, choosing a Stove or Fireplace is as important as choosing a Bathroom or Kitchen as they are usually the main focus within your living area so, call in and discuss your ideas with our experienced Staff or find inspiration for a special gift for your loved ones, there really is nothing better than a warm cosy home, especially at Christmas. Here’s to the next decade! These are just some of the photos from installations in 2020

Wishing you all a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year with a special thank you to all of our Customers, Suppliers and Installers for your support throughout 2020 and over the last 10 years. Opening Hours : Tuesday – Friday 9am – 5pm & Saturday 9am – 2.30pm Christmas Opening Hours : Closed 4pm Thursday 24th December. Re-Open : Tuesday 5th January

01768 867200 www.hearth-home.co.uk

6 Brunswick Road, Penrith, Cumbria. CA11 7LU Design • Supply Only • Supply & Install • Woodburning • Multi Fuel HomeGas (Cumbria) Ltd • Stoves • Fires • Fireplaces • Flues • Spares • Accessories & Electric 19 htly different for everyone. stovespenrith


‘The(oilDruids Cutting Mistletoe’ on canvas) By Jacob Thompson of Penrith (1806-1879) Article by Sydney Chapman

his painting was first exhibited in 1832 at the Royal Academy. The scene is close by one of Eden’s iconic ancient monuments and major tourist destinations, Long Meg stone circle, which appears on the right towards the horizon. The Druids are performing their ritual; the mistletoe has been cut with a sickle and caught in a great sheet of cloth. One of them explains the proceedings to two young onlookers. According to Llewellyn Jewitt, Thompson’s friend and biographer, it was commissioned by Colonel Lacy of Eden Lacy, creator of ‘Lacy’s Caves’, who owned the monument and surrounding land. Jacob’s early enthusiasm for drawing had met with no encouragement from his traditional Quaker parents for whom ‘Art’ was a vanity. After leaving school he worked for a local grocer, Joseph Drewery. He disliked that employment and his parents then apprenticed him to a ‘coach, house, sign and ornamental painter and gilder’. Two years later, however, he was self-employed and painting signboards and furniture. He soon became known as an artist receiving commissions for portraits of horses, dogs and cattle, and exhibited at the Carlisle Academy of Art. He preferred, nevertheless, painting landscapes, finding inspiration on fishing trips along the banks of the Rivers Lowther and Eamont. On an evening ramble along the Eamont in those earlier days he had met Thomas Wilkinson of

‘The Grotto’, Yanwath, the writer and anti-slavery campaigner. It was Wilkinson who had given him his first job - painting name boards for a couple of carts - and had helped spread the word of Jacob’s skill. On another occasion, as he was painting by the River Lowther, he met the man who would determine much of the rest of his career - William, Earl of Lonsdale, of nearby Lowther Castle. The Earl became Jacob’s patron and used his influence to secure him a place at the Royal Academy Schools in London. The young Thompson formed part of the literary and artistic circle which met at Lowther Castle which included the poet William Wordsworth. Interestingly, Wordsworth’s verses on Long Meg appeared the year after the first showing of Thompson’s painting. They reflect the Romantic enthusiasm for the druids of antiquity which for Wilkinson of Yanwath, as Jacob recalled, had become almost an obsession. Ancient druidic practices, real or 20

imagined, gave rise to a number of initiatory orders, including the Ancient Order of Druids (1781). Some of these emulated the philosophy and rituals of the Freemasons, founded in 1716, and shared with them fraternal , charitable and moral aims. In Penrith, following their example, and only four years after the appearance of Thompsons’ painting, the Northern Light Lodge of Druids No.118, was established on July 9th 1836 at the Red Lion Inn in Burrowgate, Penrith. Its seal has survived and is also one of the Museum’s treasures.

Seal of the Northern Light Lodge of Druids No.118, Penrith


Looking back over 2020 and forward with fresh hope to 2021 devised a strategy for addressing Climate Change and making Penrith a Carbon Neutral Town by 2030. Community engagement using our ‘Dialogue’ Platform is being used to encourage ideas through conversations online. Work has progressed on developing an Arts and Cultural Strategy over the next 5 years. In addition, we assisted the ‘Fairhill’ Community Group to raise funds for a new playpark with inclusive play equipment. The Town Council managed the tender and installation. We were reviewed by the Local Council Award Scheme and received a ‘Quality Award,’ demonstrating that we have all the documentation and information in place for good governance, effective community engagement and council improvement.

At this point in time, while many of us are looking forward to Christmas, there is a collective wish to end the year 2020. We have suffered emotionally as a result of the loss of loved ones and people we have known. Our mental and physical resilience has been sorely tested, and Penrith, similar to other towns, has suffered the impact of COVID culturally, socially and economically. However, there have been achievements and moments of light. Throughout the pandemic, the Town Council has worked with others involved in the Eden Resilience Group to help alleviate problems in Penrith. We have worked in close partnership to keep vital services running, to co-ordinate local volunteers and provide support to vulnerable people, such as shopping and prescription collections. Our website and social media have continuously informed the community to help address concerns. Encouragement was given through local networks to seek much needed personal support and friendship, especially for those living in isolation. Craft bags were distributed to primary school children who did not have access to such things at home while home schooling.

Pride in the Penrith community has helped to build community spirit during this massively worrying time in our lives. A film commissioned by the Town Council and shared widely tracked

We will beat any genuine like for like quote

Information was provided weekly about local businesses that stayed open, some operating online to deliver food and drink. The key focus has been on ‘think, shop and buy local.’ To encourage shopping locally, we have worked with others to lobby successfully to retain free car parking in Penrith.

Family run business with over 20 years roofing experience Re-roofing • Roof Repairs • Chimney Work Dry Verge Systems • Storm Damage Insurance Work • Fascias, Soffits & Guttering Gutter Cleaning from £20

Sadly, our weekend of VE celebrations had to be cancelled. However, we were able to set up a WW2 Community Memories section on our website, complete with recorded interviews, photos and booklets. Importantly, we have

01768 865416 info@onecallpenrith.co.uk 21


the work of the Community Gardeners and other volunteers in town. Their achievements gained several ‘Certificates of Recognition’ from RHS Britain in Bloom. The Town Council also received a recognition certificate for the support work carried out. In addition, the Community Gardeners received the overall ‘Outstanding’ Award from Cumbria in Bloom ‘For an Exceptional Effort in 2020, Keeping our Environment in Good Heart and an Inspiration to Others.’ Without a doubt, the town has looked beautiful as a result of the efforts of good-hearted people in Penrith.

work to address Climate Change and expand on Arts and Culture. We also look forward to developing our Community Resource Kit and working as before with volunteer gardeners. And we will continue to use our Dialogue platform and other engagement methods to gather views, listen and act on what you say. Members of the public are able to visit the Town Council offices by appointment and staff are available on email and via the telephone. Finally, we are looking forward to a safe Christmas and a New Year of hope and promise in anticipation that 2021 will be kinder to all of us. And we look forward to working with partners and people in the local community to make a difference to our town in the year ahead.

Throughout the pandemic, we have worked together with others in the community to support new ways of working, socialising, shopping, trading, and living. With renewed vigour, we will continue our efforts to open and support Penrith in a COVID safe way. In 2021, our Neighbourhood Plan will help our town go from strength to strength, focussing on sustainable design, our conservation areas, housing, local green spaces, sport, leisure and recreation facilities, traffic management and town centre improvements amongst other developments. We have applied to nominate Coronation Gardens as an Asset of Community Value. Working with local residents, we will be installing a new bus shelter on a site in Brentfield Way. In addition, responding to members of the public, we will place new benches in Norfolk Road and Lowther Street.

office@penrithtowncouncil.co.uk Telephone:

01768 899 773 Write: Penrith Town Council, Unit 1, Church House, 19-24 Friargate, Penrith, Cumbria, CA11 7XR Please get involved in helping to make Penrith a Carbon Neutral Town.

Our grants scheme remains open to help groups in the community plan, finance and deliver projects. And we will continue the important

It’s crucially important for all of us!!

BOOKING NOW FOR 2021 R & S REMOVALS • House Clearances, • Domestic Removals, • Large Tip Runs (with Permit) Mondays to Fridays, Weekends by appointment. 07969 455436 or 07828 632038 Email johnlee63@talktalk.net 22


SELECT AND COLLECT WITH FIVE MINUTES SPARE It was a few months back that I wrote the first introduction to a new idea for a local Business Directory. It was and is of course an online directory, but is also very different from many that are out there on the Internet.

Just because you see it doesn’t mean anyone else has. You can be a small fish or a big one in the ocean, but what about being a shoal of fish all swimming in the same direction. The Internet has certainly caught a lot of you out!

The Internet can be a wonderful thing, especially with up to date information, but it is an infinitive ocean polluted with out of date details of businesses with the wrong details, and some don’t even exist. A lot of businesses have taken a free listings offer which they have no access to. Left floating around with out of date information, their business is online sending potential customers and businesses to the wrong address, giving them the wrong contact details or phone number.

Five Minutes Spare, working with Cumbrian Local Publications, has helped and continues to help and support local businesses to rise above the waves with simple solutions in getting local businesses online. Imagine all the businesses in a town or area all heading in one direction. Imagine the impact it would have, when, for example, someone wanted to discover Penrith and through one portal they could discover it all.

As a test for current businesses who have moved, search for yourself. You know of a business that sadly has closed in the last 6 months - it will probably still be there. How many times as a new business do you get calls for the previous business that had that number? Shop Local is the way forward for any town, village or area where we live, but as a community together it requires linked thinking, not just opinions but a structure, a plan and not another point scoring exercise for business groups and unqualified keyboard marketeers. In the current situation, COVID 19 came like a tidal wave, not once and it took some businesses out and for those not online, if left them high and dry. Online shopping shouldn’t be unknown, unaffordable and a complicated thing for local independent businesses, whether they are retailers, restaurants, pubs, hair or beauty salons, garages or garden centres; yes there are a lot more trades that need to be seen selling products and services online. Firstly, I’m not taking about social media, post today gone tomorrow when the money is spent.

How high would this rank in a search online? Reserving products online, ordering a take away for delivery, booking an appointment, making a reservation, choosing a time for collecting your Christmas tree - as a business you don’t need to wait for a pandemic to be open 24 hours a day, to sell more products, to deliver a better customer service and saving your time and theirs, so you and the customer are not waiting around. Congratulations and thanks to Arnison & Son, Adlib, The Fish Cellar, Hi Pennine Outdoor, Harpers Toys, Just Greek, Styleline, The Arches Carpet Centre, Body Shop at Home, and as it’s almost the big day, Inglewood Christmas trees, reserving slots online for collect and select just for Christmas. If you have Five Minutes Spare, let us help you release the full potential of your business online in 2021. Call Lewis on 07587 774689 or Lee on 01768 862394. www.fiveminutesspare.com/businessdirectory/ select-collect-shop-local-penrith/cumbria/ www.fiveminutesspare.com/businessdirectory/ select-and-collect-eat-local-penrith/cumbria/ penrith/ 23


Q

HR Looking Back at 2020

Well, what a year it has been! This time last year, Brexit was probably still uppermost in many peoples’ minds. Little did we know what was coming after Christmas…

In July, when we came out of the first Lockdown, we talked about how we were adapting to a changed world, and covered some of the things employers and employees might want to think about, particularly with many employees returning to work.

Whilst the Pandemic has presented enormous challenges, caused heartache for many and generally turned our lives and the world upside down, perhaps it has also reminded us of what is truly important. Whilst we lead our lives differently and value different things, for most, family, friends and good health are probably at the top of the list.

In August, we confirmed that most of the Employment Law changes planned to take effect in April had, in fact been implemented, however, IR35 and Off-Payroll rules being extended to the Private Sector was delayed. In September, I talked about Quinn HR and reminded readers of how we are able to support businesses with employment matters, through ad hoc support or on a retained basis.

Reflecting on my year – my work and the articles I have written for the Eden Local, this has also been very different, and like many, we’ve had to adapt to changes and restrictions.

October was about working remotely (mainly from home) and the importance of continuing to record working hours. In November, we carried on the theme of working remotely, however, we tried to provide some useful advice on supporting employees working remotely – being aware that they may be feeling isolated and struggling with their mental health. As the Pandemic continues, and with some employers already deciding that remote working may be a permanent change for their business, this appears to be an increasing challenge for many organisations and should not be underestimated.

We began the year in February’s Eden Local talking about the Employment Law changes that were due to come into effect in April, including the entitlement to receive a written statement of key terms and conditions from day 1 of employment, and the reference period for the purposes of calculating holiday pay changing from 12 to 52 weeks. In March, we confirmed the new, increased National Minimum Wage and National Living Wage rates that would take effect from April 2020, as well as the other statutory rates of pay that would increase.

And so, here we are in December, approaching Christmas, reflecting on what has been an extraordinary year, that has presented and continues to present so many challenges to us all! Let’s hope that as we head into 2021, we are able to experience a less challenging year (for the right reasons), we are able to see more of the people we care about, and we can look forward with greater positivity.

April, May and June were unprecedented as the whole country was in Lockdown, and the Eden Local was not produced during this time. Employers and employees were having to adapt to the Pandemic, and whilst furlough was gratefully received, it certainly wasn’t easy to understand initially! 24


HOW CAN I HELP? If you need support or advice with any employment related issues relating to Covid-19 or anything else, please just drop me a line – I’d be delighted to hear from you.

Whether you need some immediate, ad hoc advice or whether you would like to discuss ongoing support, please contact me by email charlotte@quinnhr.co.uk or by telephone 01768 862394

Whilst my workload is always varied, typically I offer advice and support with: • Employee relations – disciplinaries, grievances, bullying and harassment • Attendance issues – sickness related and other • Performance issues – appraisals, managing poor performance and capability • Staff Handbooks – policies, procedures and standards • Employment contracts – terms and conditions of employment • Recruitment and selection – recruitment exercises and job descriptions • Pay and benefits – pay structures and job evaluation • Reorganisation and redundancy

You can also read more about me and the support I am able to provide on my website www.quinnhr.co.uk My very best wishes to you all Stay safe and well over the Christmas period

December 2020 Wordsearch COMPILED AND SPONSORED BY QUINN HR

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Christmas Festivities Carols Santa Claus Reindeer Holly Christingle Snow Frost Ice Cold Crisp Ivy Tree Tinsel Baubles Fairy Lights Stockings Robin

WIN A WINTER PRIZE How many times can you count the word Winter in your Eden local? Email the correct answers to info@cumbrianlocal.co.uk Entries close 12pm Sunday 3rd January. From all the correct answers one will be drawn live in the breakfast show on Eden FM 107.5 FM Tuesday 12th January straight after the 9am news and weather. The winner will be confirmed in your first Eden Local of 2021. 25


SCRAMBLE QUIZ Answer the questions and unscramble the initial letters of the answers to find something you might do on the Big Day! To help you here’s the number of words and letters in each word. (4),(9),(8) mimes the tile of a book, film, theatre, T.V. or similar for the rest of the group to guess.

1. He’s the one with the big red nose! 2. It can be thrown on the fire or it’s a chocolate covered yule cake.

12. A dried grape found in Christmas cake, Christmas pudding and mince pies.

3. They look after sheep. 4. A sweet dish you have after your main meal. At Christmas it’s full of fruit & nuts and is often set on fire with brandy.

13. The highest ranking Angel – Gabriel was one.

5. Often shown on Christmas cards as a chubby, healthy looking child or baby with wings; it is the second highest order of the 9 levels of angels.

15. The UK’s favourite bird. They traditionally appear on Christmas cards.

6. It’s where Santa might put your presents; ……… the Christmas tree!

17. An evergreen parasitic plant with white berries, it is traditional to kiss under it at Christmas time.

14. Traditionally the white outer layer and decoration on the Christmas cake.

16. A desert animal with one or two humps.

7. Caspar, Melchior and Balthazar are better known as the three what?

18. The four Sundays (and weeks) before Christmas. This year it will start on 29th November.

8. A portable light source. They traditionally used a wick or a candle and could be carried or hung up.

19. A decorative material that mimics the effect of ice. It is often used to decorate the tree or the house at Christmas time.

9. The name given to January 6th. It celebrates the arrival of (Q.7) to visit the baby Jesus.

20. Found wrapped in bacon with the turkey or in pastry on the buffet!

10. The Jewish festival which this year will be celebrated 10th -18th December. It is also known as The Feast of Dedication, Festival of Lights or Feast of the Maccabees.

21. A herb usually mixed with onions, breadcrumbs, butter and egg to make a traditional stuffing to go with turkey or chicken.

11. A traditional parlour or party game that is played at Christmas where one person

Here are the answers for last month 1. Open 2. Banana 3. Florence 4. Nettle 5. Equator

6. Icicle 7. Rhubarb 8. Ulaanbaatar /Ulan Bator 9. Geordie

10. Yesterday 11. Prune 12. Anteater 13. Eggplant 14. Scissors

15. Ragtime 16. Ruler 17. Skittles 18. Knitting 19. Lilo

What you might see on the 5th November - Bonfire, Guy, Sparklers 26


Where has all the buzz gone? At this time of year, bees have largely disappeared from our gardens as they prepare to shelter in their nests or hives through the winter months. There are 220 different bee species living in the UK. These consist of three main types: solitary bees, bumblebees and honey bees. While solitary bees live alone, bumblebees and honey bees live in social groups known as colonies. Bumble bees tend to nest under the ground, often using abandoned mouse holes. In the summer, there may be around 400 bees in the nest, but as autumn approaches the female worker bees and the male drones die off. The only bee to remain in the bumble bees’ nest over the winter will be the queen bee. She will have successfully mated during the summer months, and her worker bees will have helped her build up enough stores to feed on over the winter. She will leave the nest again in the early spring to find a new home in which to lay her eggs and rear the first brood of the season. During the summer, a successful colony of honey

bees may reach 60,000 in number. The queen bee lays 2,000 eggs a day to provide a constant supply of young bees. The worker bees spend the first three weeks inside the hive looking after the brood, building the wax comb and storing the nectar and pollen brought in by the foraging bees. The next three weeks is spent as ‘foragers’. During this time they will probably fly several hundred miles to and from the flowers from which they gather nectar, their ‘energy food’ and pollen, which provides them with protein. Eventually their wings wear out and when they can no longer fly, they die without returning to the hive. The males, known as drones, exist to mate with any queen bees that they can find. If they are successful, they die 27

immediately after mating. To ensure that there is sufficient food available for the worker bees and the queen bee to consume over the winter, any drones that are still in the hive by the autumn are ‘escorted ‘outside by the worker bees and not allowed to return to the colony. Over the summer months, the bees have stored the thin sweet nectar in their hexagonal wax cells and fanned it with their wings to reduce the water content. This turns the nectar into the thick syrupy substance we know as honey. As each cell is filled, the bees seal it off with a layer of wax. The surplus that is not required during the summer,( and not ‘stolen’ by beekeepers!) becomes their source of food for the winter. By the time the first frosts


can sometimes still be seen visiting ivy. These flowers provide one of the last opportunities for the bees to ‘top up’ their stores before the severe winter weather arrives. When the bees emerge in the spring they urgently need sources of nectar and pollen to replace their stores. You can help now by planting spring bulbs such as crocuses (mauve is the bees favourite colour) and snowdrops. To find out more visit: www.penrithbeekeepers.org or Tel 01768 894404 E mail: mr4cnr@gmail.com

arrive, the worker bees which hatched later in the summer (around 10,000 of them) will have formed a cluster around the queen bee deep inside the brood chamber close to where most of the honey is stored. The bees take it in turns to move to the edge of the tightly packed cluster and access the stores of honey. Honey gives them the energy they need to continually move their wings to maintain a the temperature within the hive of around 30 degrees centigrade. On brighter, milder, early winter days honey bees

Available from Booths Supermarket; The Chopping Block, Butchers North Lakes Hotel; Richardsons Timber & Home Improvements; Rooting 4 U Greengrocers 28


WILL THE ‘PONG’ EVER STOP? Year-end review and a look forward to 2021

This Eden Local magazine will always continue to bring you, our readers, fair balanced coverage of local issues and any situation arising that affects Penrith and the areas around in. In the last ten years, we have helped circulate important information related to several localised campaigns. One topic which has been at the forefront of discussions for many years is the Penrith ‘pong’. In 2020 there was no let-up. Indeed, for a couple of weekends in the summer, it was the ‘hot’ topic. For some it meant closing windows on hot days. The debate continues, with the recently formed ‘Fresh AIR for Penrith’ resident-led campaign group bringing the ‘pong’ back onto the mainstream agenda. As a community magazine as already mentioned, we can put to you the information we have available. There is an online petition; there has been media coverage including this magazine; there have been Freedom of Information Requests - questions (and answers); there has been political lobbying and there has been (sometimes heated) online debate. The issue remains highly controversial and we have tried to present both sides. However, our efforts to secure information from Omega Proteins, the animal renderer at Wildriggs, blamed by most for the odour nuisance, has failed to get any response. We have asked for comment, editorial contribution and response to the allegations, but to no avail. So, for our final 2020 edition, we look to the future to 2021 and what it might mean for the issue, and controversy, of the Penrith ‘pong’. Will it ever stop? 2021 may see the Environment Agency holding a public consultation. As reported, Eden District Council gave delegated full approval to Omega to build a new multi fuel thermal oxidiser, they claim as part of their investment in the future of the plant. To the best of our knowledge, the Environment Agency has, so far, not allowed Omega a permit to operate the oxidiser. The Agency is to take the permit application to public consultation and will be seeking the views of local people, residents,

businesses and others, before making its decision. A spokesperson from the ‘Fresh AIR for Penrith group’ confirmed that Eden District Council could also now be under pressure with questions being asked about the oxidiser planning application process. Why did it not ask ‘what fuel would be used to run the oxidiser?’ and did the Council not carry out an environmental assessment before approving the build application? We can report that the ‘Fresh AIR for Penrith group’ continues to make formal objections to Omega’s planning applications before EDC. We understand there are five or six in the pipeline and the campaign organiser Jeff Thomson will be making objection presentations at the next two or three virtual EDC planning committee meetings. So, let’s hope 2021 will be the year when the ‘pong situation’ is again not just discussed, debated and argued about, but opened up and it’s a year towards resolving this problem which has been present as one reader in an email said “It’s been going on for as long as I can remember.” There are two sides to every story. Is the end in sight? Fresh AIR for Penrith has a website with links to its Facebook page and the online petition calling on Eden District Council to stop approving further planning applications for Omega at Wildriggs. Omega Proteins, under the banner of its parent company Leo Group Ltd, issued this statement on social media on 7th November: “Omega Proteins Limited in Penrith has launched a designated odour complaint number. This will assist the company in responding to complaints regarding odour believed to originate from the Omega Proteins Penrith site more quickly, therefore allowing a more thorough investigation into the cause and ensuring the source can be properly tracked.” The dedicated number is – 07976 857 435. Another number you need to call relating to unpleasant odours, is the Environment Agency number which is 0800 80 70 60 for the 24 hour nuisance hotline. 29


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Goodbye to 2020 and the memory of 2019 by Lee Quinn

Eden107.5

After moving into Suite 6 in March 2019 at Cumbria House on Gilwilly Industrial Estate, things have generally moved in the right direction. In February 2019 we did have a person who came in as a guest, who then was going to become a volunteer, but who tried to take over the station. So many things felt right for the Eden FM team when we found the premises. With a new lease and its renewed full time community station licence taking it up to 2024, it had overcome the hardest part of any community radio station’s life in getting through the five years. So here we are, battling through 2020. Like any business, as a station for the first time since losing our transmission in May 2015, we have finally got our transmission site above our studios, and for the first time since 2015, Eden FM’s transmission on 107.5 FM in December will be running on its full transmission output. The last weekend was a busy one. The transmission was at my house temporarily until a site was found, at the right height. Our thanks to Darren at Lakeland Aerials for his time in making this happen without a single hiccup.

Sadly quite a few do not. Some stations on getting through the process of being awarded a licence, find the demand financially too much to take on as a voluntary group, because ultimately a small part of that group have to make decisions. In short, you’re running a business, you have to cover costs whilst being a not for profit organisation, which has to rely on people that are volunteers. We’ve only had two volunteers attempting to take over the radio station to date in ten years. In the two stations I have set up, this has only happened three times. Security costs, equipment costs but when this happens, the damage to a team which is built on trust is a devastating blow, which can destroy a station almost overnight.

For me seeing the mast come down and the equipment installed was a major achievement. Two weekends previously the transmission unit failed, so we had to order a new one which will be ready in January 2020, so we have one on loan.

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Eden107.5

LIVE

GAMBLESBY INNOVATE AND ADAPT The annual Community Carol Service at Gamblesby Methodist Church is always appreciated and well attended and for many, marks the start of Christmas. So, with capacity of the church severely restricted through social distancing rules what can be done this year? Not to be deterred, the church held a successful ‘Drive-In’ Harvest in September and now plan an outdoor ‘Drive-In’ Nativity and Carols at 2pm on Sunday 20 December. This will be held on the village green outside the church. The story of Christmas will be told and acted out by Little Acorns, a group of twenty children who meet regularly at the church. Those sitting in their cars will be able to tune into Edenfm 107.5 who have kindly agreed to broadcast the service live. This will also allow the event to be shared across the wider community. Church Treasurer John Slee said ‘We were desperate to try and hold our Carol Service and are very grateful to Edenfm for their enthusiastic support. Whilst we hope many people will attend in person, it is great to be able to share the story of Christmas with a wider audience.’ Hot takeaway drinks will be available after the service and a collection will be taken for Little Acorns and Action for Children.

A great Saturday, but on Sunday we had to say farewell to the outside broadcasting vehicle. It has served us well, and attended over 150 outside broadcasts across the county and as far as the East Coast to cover live commentary for Penrith AFC away! A casualty of not having enough exercise, with no outside broadcasts in 2020 due to COVID, we took the vehicle off the road to save costs, with no idea when it would be needed. It was sitting around for 8 months, but it didn’t sit well for its MOT, and the cost to get it back on the road with tax and insurance along with annual maintenance, would have been three times what we actually paid for it!

Eden 107

As a radio that has achieved so much, there is a word I’ve used in the Eden Local just once and that was a long time ago - that word is bounceback-ability.

Contact lee@edenfm.co.uk 01768 862394 • www.edenfm.co.uk Eden FM Radio Ltd Suite 6 Cumbria House, Gilwilly Road, Gilwilly Ind Est, Penrith Cumbria, CA11 9FF

From the Eden FM Team, I would like to wish you and your families, our supporters and sponsors a very Happy Christmas, and we’ll be back with you to celebrate in the New Year. 31

Eden107.5


TIER 2

HIGH ALERT

FROM 2 DEC

MEETING FRIENDS AND FAMILY

BARS, PUBS AND RESTAURANTS

RETAIL

WORK AND BUSINESS

No mixing of households indoors, apart from support bubbles. Maximum of six outdoors.

Pubs and bars must close, unless operating as restaurants. Hospitality venues can only serve alcohol with substantial meals. Venues must stop taking orders at 10pm and must close by 11pm.

Open.

Everyone who can work from home should do so.

EDUCATION

INDOOR LEISURE

ACCOMMODATION

PERSONAL CARE

Early years settings, schools, colleges and universities open. Childcare, other supervised activities for children, and childcare bubbles permitted.

Open.

Open.

Open.

OVERNIGHT STAYS

WEDDINGS AND FUNERALS

ENTERTAINMENT

PLACES OF WORSHIP

Permitted with household or support bubble.

15 guests for weddings, civil partnerships, wedding receptions and wakes; 30 for funerals.

Open.

Open, but cannot interact with anyone outside household or support bubble.

TRAVELLING

EXERCISE

RESIDENTIAL CARE

LARGE EVENTS

Reduce the number of journeys you make and walk or cycle if possible. Avoid busy times and routes on public transport. Avoid car sharing with those outside of your household or support bubble. Avoid entering a Tier 3 area, other than where necessary such as for work or education. Further exemptions apply.

Classes and organised adult sport can take place outdoors, but cannot take place indoors if there is any interaction between people from different households. Organised activities for elite athletes, under18s and disabled people can continue.

COVID-secure arrangements such as substantial screens, visiting pods, and window visits. Outdoor/airtight visits only (rollout of rapid testing will enable indoor visits including contact).

Sport, live performances and business meetings limited to 50% capacity or 2000 people outdoors (whichever is lower) and 50% capacity or 1000 people indoors (whichever is lower)

Find out what support you can get

If you have any coronavirus symptoms:

For example, if you’re out of work, need to get food, or want to take care of your mental health.

A high temperature • A new, continuous cough A loss of, or change to, your sense of smell or taste.

gov.uk/coronavirus

Get a test and stay at home

For more information and detailed guidance visit: gov.uk/coronavirus 32