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Edward Barwell Landscape Architecture Portfolio 2011-2016


I currently undertaking my Masters in Landscape Architecture at the University of Sheffield and looking for a job for when I graduate in June 2016. My interests lie primarily in the design of the urban environment, particularly ways in which urban landscapes can help to tackle climate change through the use of green infrastructure. This portfolio displays a selection of work from my undergraduate and postgraduate degrees at The University of Sheffield as well as my year in practice placement with NVB Architects. It aims to show the breadth and variety of projects I have worked on and the skills I have developed.

Telephone 07712607538 Email edbarwell@live.co.uk Website www.issuu.com/edbarwell

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Assistant Landscape Architect

Construction Work

Intern

August 2014 - August 2015 NVB Architects, Somerset

Summer 2014 Independent Housing Developer

Summer 2013 Natural England

Year in Practice with an architecture and landscape practice in Frome. Responsible conceptual and detailed design, construction details, planting plans. Trained in the use of Autodesk Revit BIM software.

Paid work for a housing developer and builder refurbishing properties. Experience and understanding gained of the construction industry.

Work experience with a senior landscape architect working for Natural England. Designed a car park for a Natural England SSSI, helped undertake Environmental Impact Assessments.

Landscaping Work

Volunteering

Landscape Architecture Work Experience

September - November 2013 University of Sheffield Landscape Society

Summer 2012-2013 The Conservation Volunteers - Bristol and Trowbridge branches

October 2011 Grant Associates

Volunteer work constructing an outdoor learning space and edible garden for a Sheffield school.

Landscaping and Construction work in a park in Bathampton. Conservation work on estate at Ammerdown House, Somerset.

A weeks work experience gaining experience of design work, Photoshop and AutoCAD

Masters in Landscape Architecture (ongoing)

BA (Hons) in Landscape Architecture with Planning

A-Levels

September 2015 to present The University of Sheffield

2011 - 2014 The University of Sheffield

2009 - 2011 Art (A), Geography (A), English (B) Prior Park College, Bath

AutoCAD Photoshop InDesign Illustrator Sketchup InDesign Revit

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Parkwood Springs, Sheffield

Granary Wharf, Leeds

Mayfield Park


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Castlegate, Sheffield

Dauntsey’s Quad, West Lavington

Ritchie House Gardens, Wells


Mayfield Park The site is divided into four areas; The Station, The Wetland, The Esplanade and The Woodland. These areas have their own distinct character, ranging from urban areas with primarily hard landscape, to more natural, ecologically focused spaces. Each area has a different programme of uses and a unique green infrastructure role.

Project Description and Vision Mayfield is an abandoned station and area of land located on the Eastern edge of Manchester City Centre. The site is located within the ‘Eastern Gateway’ district. This puts it at an interesting point between the cities main economic and tourism area, the City Centre, and Manchester’s deprived Eastern inner-city districts. Mayfield Park will become a landscape with dual roles, as a citywide destination and a local amenity. As a citywide destination the site will become a new feature in Manchester’s cultural regeneration. Since the recession Manchester has invested in remodelling itself as a cultural destination but has so far neglected landscape as a cultural feature. The park will provide spaces for a programme of cultural events and uses. The site will also be a focus around which a new community can develop, one which connects the City Centre and Eastern Manchester and brings jobs, education and training to some of the cities most deprived residents. This will all be underpinned by an emphasis on the creation of a green infrastructure landscape; shifting the landscape’s role from a primarily recreational one to one where it becomes a fundamental part of the future functioning of Manchester City Centre.

Area The Station

Programme of Uses

Green Infrastructure Role

Mayfield College Workshops and Studios

Green Roof

Exhibition Spaces Food Market

Existing Site Conditions The Wetland

Flood Zones

Kayaking

Water Filtration

Swimming

Functional Flood Plain Flood Zone 3a Flood Zone 2

Building Footprints

The Esplanade Outdoor Performance Space

Existing Vegetation

Recreational Lawn

Land Use

SUDS

Skate Park

Industrial Land Brownfield Amenity Greenspace

The Woodland BMX Park Woodland Trails

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Tree Barrier


Mayfield Park 1. Riverside plaza with stepped access to the wetland landscape

5. Woodland BMX Park 6. Wetland and reed bed landscape

2. Riverside grass performance space and seating area

7. Workshop and studio forecourt allows the buildings functions to spill out into the landscape

3. Recreational lawn

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4. Skate park

8. Rooftop landscape trees and other planting in the tracks and on the platforms

9. Food market - regular customer base from college students, commuters and local residents 10. Riverside trail 11. Woodland trail 12. Level crossing across ring road to Ardwick and Eastern Manchester

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2 3 4

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Mayfield Park Landscape Urbanism: The Continuous Surface

The four proposed entrances connect the site to the City Centre in the North West, Bradford to the North East, Ardwick to the South and The University District and Southern Manchester to the South West.

A series of spaces on which the parks programme of uses will take place are aligned with the shape of the River Medlock. They run diagonally across the park, slipping out from the horizontal focus of the Mayfield building, creating a new axis.

The parks main circulation route connects all four entrance points and the programme spaces in a circular route around the new wetland landscape, eliminating the need for expensive bridges.

Secondary routes allow greater connection across the site as well as around the key spaces. External elevators provide access to the station rooftop and down the ramp on the other side.

The landscape continues over Mayfield Station, seamlessly integrating landscape and architecture to create a continuous surface.

Tree barrier between road and landscape

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Rooftop food market under existing section of station roof

Rooftop food market under existing section of station roof

Shallow rill intended to mimic the railway tracks on the building, referencing the sites industrial history

Shade garden next to the riverside plaza


Mayfield Park a The Espl nade

The Station

The Wetland

Connection

Community

Culture

Connect the City to Landscape Connect the City Centre to Eastern Manchester Connect the Park to the River Medlock

The park will act as a catalyst for social change in Eastern Manchester, allowing a community to develop around the site and its new uses.

Manchester has been remodelling itself as a cultural destination, but has largely ignored landscape as a cultural feature. The park will remedy this, turning this neglected industrial site into a city park and cultural destination.

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Mayfield Park

The Esplanade

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Mayfield Park

The Skate Park

The Station Forecourt

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Parkwood Springs, Sheffield Enhance - The Hub Concept ‘A landscape experienced through movement’ Parkwood Ecological Park: Using Natural Processes to Guide Design and Supply the City Parkwood Springs is an urban wilderness just North of Sheffield City Centre. Residential areas to the North and East of the site have numerous social problems, making them some of the most derived in the city. Flooding is also an issue in the Southern part of the site where the River Don flows through the area.

Connection

Outdoor Activities

Ecological Enhancement

Change - Riverside Ecological Park

This proposal is for a strategic regeneration of this forgotten space, providing new uses while maintaining Parkwood’s unique character. Based on the theories of Michael Hough the park will be developed through the natural processes that sustain it, guided by human intervention but always subservient to these processes. In the face of growing environmental threat and resource depletion urban landscapes must be developed with sustainability and green infrastructure at their centre. Parkwood Springs will be developed as an ecological park while also providing for the needs of the city and the sites users through resources and recreation.

New Habitat

Improved Water Quality

Sustainable Flood Management

Food Production

Eco-Business

Sustain - The City as Supplier

Recycle

Theory: Michael Hough - Cities and Natural Process Process

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Economy of Means

Diversity

Connectedness

Environmental Education

Human Development and Environmental Enhancement

Making Visible the Processes that Sustain Life


Parkwood Springs Key N Reduced from1:10,000 @A3

Edward Barwell

Main Paths

New Heathland

Secondary Paths

Reed-beds and Wetlands

Hubs

Existing Woodlands

Visitors Centre

Natural Drainage Channels

Green Network

Mixed Use Developments

New Woodland

Eco-Business

New Grassland

Productive Woodland

Riparian Woodland

Controlled Floodplain Extent

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Parkwood Springs Water Strategy

Spatial Ecological Strategy

Green Network Strategy

Water Strategy showing Parkwood as part of the wider hydrological network. Sustainable drainage filters water and transports it into the wetland landscape, making the process visible to visitors. The park collects water from surrounding urban areas.

Change

Enhance

New species to increase biodiversity and variety for users. Planting through community involvement programmes.

Improve the health and resilience of existing ecological communities, implementation of regular maintenance regime.

Sustain Using vegetation communities as part of the city as supplier idea. Areas will have a distinct role in providing for Parkwood and the wider community.

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Parkwood Springs does not exist in isolation and must be viewed as part of Sheffield’s wider green network. Part of the parks strategy will be to connect it with key neighbouring green-spaces through increasing vegetation along roads linking the spaces. This will take the form of street trees, the benefits of which range from reducing the urban heat island effect to making people drive slower. Where possible, such as on roundabouts or wider stretches of roadside grass more extensive planting will take place using shrubs.


Parkwood Springs Project Phasing

0-1 Years

1-5 Years

5-10 Years

10-15 Years

15+ Years

In the short term the aim will be to improve the perception of the park through small scale maintenance measures to the existing landscape. The priority will be to clear the abandoned ski slope, a visible blight on the landscape.

The now cleared ski-slope site will be developed into the eco-business and retail centre to help fund the later stages.

The landfill site will be planted and the new connection route through the site will be put in.

The park will continue to develop with the natural processes that sustain it.

Further small scale maintenance of existing landscape will occur.

Further landscaping of the river park will take place to finalize the Southern half.

The final stage of the river park will be developed, completing the link of the riverside and Parkwood main circulation routes.

Small parcels of land will be sold for mixed use developments to help begin financing the project.

Land adjacent to the river will be landscaped to begin creating the new river park.

The mixed use development in the Southern corner of the site will be sold off to help finance the work.

By this point the mixture of income generators on site should make the park self-sustaining.

Some work will begin on the relandscaping of the riverside.

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Granary Wharf, Leeds

Project Description

Strategic Masterplan

Using the concept of Socially Restorative Urbanism, developed by Kevin Thwaites, Ian Simkins and Alice Mathers we developed a proposal for Granary Wharf in central Leeds, an area dominated by tall buildings and lacking in usable spaces. Using the process of experiential landscape mapping we were able to develop a proposal which addressed the dominance of tall buildings, creating human scale spaces where social interactions could occur. The design focuses on the ‘transitional edges’ between buildings and landscape, aiming to bring the functions of the buildings out while also bringing the functions of the canal in to the landscape.

Main Routes Secondary Routes Human Scale Spaces Buildings Out Water In Semi-public to public Transitional Edges

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N Reduced from1:200 @A1


Granary Wharf Group Model

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Granary Wharf

The Wharf Transitional Edge

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The Hotel Transitional Edge


Granary Wharf

River Taxi and Island Bar

The Apartments Transitional Edge

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Ritchie House Gardens, Wells Project Description Ritchie House is a Georgian house which serves as one of the boarding houses for Wells Cathedral School. NVB Architects were asked to design a new building to serve as additional boarding and staff accommodation and to redesign the garden/social space adjacent to it. The brief required that the new garden provide social space for the students living in the adjacent building while also being designed to allow for outdoor events and teaching.

Edward Barwell

I was asked to come up with designs which looked at different circulation routes and potential spaces which could be created, offering varying levels of enclosure. Two of these options are shown on the next page.


Ritchie House Gardens Design Option 1 The first design option was based on the idea of an outdoor theatre which would provide space for outdoor activities and classes. The school was keen for the new garden to be in keeping with the traditional private school appearance of the rest of the site so materials were proposed to fit in with this, using stone and wood similar to that of adjacent buildings. A set of 15th Century stone steps leading up to one of the demolished buildings was proposed to be moved and rebuilt within the new site, in this design it was to be placed at the back of the mound formed behind the theatre seating. Opposite this seating wooden poles reminiscent of stone pillars backed by dense planting formed the backdrop of the performance area. Other spaces were created around this central area. A new feature tree was proposed with seating around its base and a circular paving pattern to contrast with the straight paths which cut through it. At the North end of the site seating emerge from new planting, creating smaller, more intimate gathering spaces.

Design Option 2 The purpose of this design was to create a more open and connected space with less separation between areas. Paths curve around the edges creating a central grass area. Soil excavated for the footings of the new building would be moved into this central space to create mounds on which people could lie. The existing stone steps were moved to the bottom end of a new space opposite the new building. This area was intended to be provide a more secluded and private setting compared to the open nature of the rest of the site. It was to be planted with tall shrubs and small trees to provide a sheltered character. A long curved South-facing bench at the top of the site provides more formal seating and gives views over the rest of the site. In both schemes a large existing Yew tree in the East corner of the site was to be retained.

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Ritchie House Gardens, Wells Construction details for bespoke bench. This site plan shows the revised final layout for the landscape scheme. Site levels had to be majorly changed after the building had to be lowered over concerns from neighbours. Some of the paved paths have been replaced with rubber bound Tigermulch surface to minimize digging in the root protection area of the existing Yew tree. The Northern part of the site has been redesigned to create a larger hard surface social space with extra seating and a ramp to accommodate new level change.

Section showing build-up of path and ramp.

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Ritchie House Gardens Final Design Renders These images show the final design layout. They are all rendered in Autodesk Revit and come from a full 3D model of the site and building, created as part of the design process.

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Dauntsey’s Quad, West Lavington Design Option 2 This option took the raised form of the first design and inverted it. A ‘sunken garden’ was created which could be used as a games court or for outdoor teaching and other activities. Four ramps lead down into the central space, the edges of which provide seating.

Design Option 1 This scheme used excavated material from the adjacent new maths and science block to create a raised space in the centre of the quad. This would remove the need to take this material off site at an extra cost. The central space would contain seating as well as open space which could be accessed via two ramps and two sets of stairs. The sloped banks would be covered with planting and trees on 3 sides to provide a sense of enclosure and shelter. The layout was developed by looking at the main desire-lines across the space which ran in diagonals from the four corners of the site. Around the base of the mound the ground was left paved and open to allow movement around the space, including vehicular access.

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3 large trees hide the ugly fascade of the adjacent sports hall while on two of the other sides 6 planting areas collect surface water runoff and filter it down into the ground, some of which would then go into an attenuation tank to be reused. Seating is also placed around 3 of the edges of the planting areas. A different paving pattern is placed in areas around the edges of the site to contrast with the main pattern and to continue the rectilinear design language of the scheme.


Dauntsey’s Quad, West Lavington Final Design Due to a continually changing brief the scheme went through many different design options. This plan shows the final design which features a games court and a mixture of planted and lawn areas. Trimmed hedges run along the edges of many of these spaces with multiple paths provide routes through. Avenues of trees provide shelter and help to frame views and routes of movement.

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Dauntsey’s Quad, West Lavington

These two sections show build-ups and surface changes across the proposed site. Different paving types can be seen as well as planted areas and proposed trees. An attenuation tank can be seen underneath the games court. This location was chosen after coordination with engineers with regards to new surfaces and level changes.

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Dauntsey’s Quad, West Lavington These renders show the final scheme for the Quad along with the new Maths and Science building and Sports Hall extension being built alongside the scheme.Iwasresponsibleforcreatingthelandscape schemeinfull3DRevitalongwithplantingplansand construction details.

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Castlegate, Sheffield Project Description Castlegate is located on the confluence of the River Don and the River Sheaf. It is a historically important site located near the city centre which has become neglected over time. The plan is to develop a riverside park in which the constantly changing flow of the rivers become a design feature. Rising and falling water levels hide and reveal the areas around the river, creating a dynamic landscape which offers different experiences throughout the year. The scheme also involves developing the park as part of a wider ecological network and incorporates SUDS to ensure water is at the centre of the site’s design.

‘A recurrent pattern of coming and going or decline and regrowth’ This design takes this definition of ebb and flow and applies it to the four main aspects of the design: Water

Vegetation

Landform

People

The new design allows the landscape to be hidden or revealed depending on the water level. The high-sided retaining walls have been replaced with sloping riparian woodland edges, increasing the river’s potential carrying capacity.

Areas of deciduous woodland provide seasonal change as well as forming part of a wider proposed green network. Ornamental grasses and perennial planting provide another layer of flowing vegetation with changing heights as well as movement adding to the users sensory journey.

The ebb and flow design language has strongly dictated the form of the new park, with smooth flowing lines evident throughout the design, linking the designed landscape to the flow of the river.

The proposal aims to use design to control the ebb and flow of users and dictate gathering space. Winding paths across the site will change width as well as the amount of surrounding vegetation enclosure to suggest stopping areas and areas of movement.

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Integrated Design Project

1 2 3 4

1

Ecological Corridor

2

Central Park Area

3

Terraced Garden

4

Riparian Woodland

N

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Integrated Design Project

Riparian woodland/Floodplain

a

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Central Ur


rban Park Area

Visualisation showing the central park area.

Terraced Garden

Pedestrian Street

b a

b


Castlegate, Sheffield PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT 54.5 54.75 Wall Height

a1

These details show the construction of the retaining walls, seating and paths within this area.

A. Corten steel lights B. Concrete retaining walls with white concrete and exposed aggregate finish C. Black flamed granite cobbles D. Steam bent oak bench E. Grey fine picked granite setts

A

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

This construction project was part of the Castlegate integrated design project and dealt with part of the terraced garden area.

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54.25

54.25 Wall Height

54.25 Wall Height 51.75

51.5

51.75 Wall Height

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51.25

51 51.75

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51.25

a2

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B

C D

E

a1

a2

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Castlegate, Sheffield PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

LED light fittings are set into the concrete wall in galvanized steel boxes with a frosted glass cover held into place with slotted countersunk stainless-steel screws. The exploded sketchup model below shows the construction of this element.

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

The curved walls of this area are cast in situ with areas of the black granite cobble found on the path set into the wall, creating visual interest.

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Light Fitting Construction Detail PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Retaining Wall Construction Detail

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1:10 reinforced concrete wall section model showing how the paving pattern is set into cracks in the wall.

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Castlegate, Sheffield Bench Construction Detail A curved bench made from steam-bent wood creates an attractive feature within the terraced landscape. Oak - The timbers are made of steam bent oak, pressure treated with preservative and finished with an oil-based transparent stain. Corten Steel - The pre-cast steel frame is made of corten steel to match lamp fittings elsewhere in the area. The wooden planks are attached to the steel frame with 65mm carriage bolts.

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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SketchUp model of the detailed design area showing the bench detail located within the landscape.


16. Achillea filipendulina 'Terrecotta'

3. Calamagrostis brachytricha

100. Thymus 'Coccenius group'

Castlegate, Sheffield

100. Thymus 'Coccenius group' 16. Achillea filipendulina 'Terrecotta'

8. Matteucia struthiopteris

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

16. Achillea filipendulina 'Terrecotta'

8. Matteucia struthiopteris

Planting Scheme

2. Deschampsia cespitosa

The planting within the scheme plays a key role in the ‘Ebb and Flow’ Geranium macrorrhizum 'White-Ness' concept of the design. The vegetation aims to create interest330. and 40. Allium spehaerocephalon a sense of movement through a selection of grasses and perennials planted in drifts, which line curving terraces. As these curving2.paths Acer griseum 6. Veronica longifolia 'Charlotte' are not the direct route through the space the planting must be 5. Panicum virgatum 'Rehbaun' interesting enough to make people want to take this longer route. 10. Luzula nivea

14. Verbena bonariensis

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

330. Geranium macrorrhizum 'White-Ness'

13. Achillea filipendulina 'Terrecotta'

8. Stipa tenuissima 16. Verbena bonariensis

330. Geranium macrorrhizum 2. Acer griseum'White-Ness'

3. Calamagrostis brachytricha

100. Thymus 'Coccenius group'

2. Acer griseum

10. Luzula nivea

16. Achillea filipendulina 'Terrecotta'

10. Luzula nivea

8. Matteucia struthiopteris

330. Geranium macrorrhizum 'White-Ness' 2. Acer griseum

1. Astelia 'Silver Shadow'

1. Astelia 'Silver Shadow'

10. Luzula nivea

2. Deschampsia cespitosa

1. Astelia 'Silver Shadow'

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13. Achillea filipendulina 'Terrecotta'

40. Allium spehaerocephalon

6. Veronica longifolia 'Charlotte'

5. Panicum virgatum 'Rehbaun'

14. Verbena bonariensis

23. Allium spehaerocephalon

Key

4. Molinia caerulea 6. Panicum virgatum 'Rehbaun' 10. Stipa tenuissima

8. Stipa tenuissima

16. Verbena bonariensis

100. Thymus 'Coccenius group'

13. Achillea filipendulina 'Terrecotta'

3Panicum virgatum 'Rehbaun' 4. Knautia macedonica 4. Stipa tenuissima 4.Veronica longifolia 'Charlotte'

2. Calamagrostis brachytricha

330. Geranium macrorrhizum 'White-Ness' 2. Acer griseum

1. Astelia 'Silver Shadow'

4. Veronica longiflora 'Charlotte'

3. Matteucia struthiopteris3. Panicum virgatum 'Rehbaun'

12. Luzula nivea

50 Allium spehaerocephalon

1. Leucothoe scarletta 'Zeblid'

2. Knautia macedonica

330. Thymus 'Coccenius Group'

Bulbs

Trees

Paths

50 Allium spehaerocephalon

16 Veronica longifolia 'Charlotte'

16 Veronica longifolia 'Charlotte'

5. Verbena bonariensis

8. Knautia macedonica

2. Betula utilis var. jacquemontii 'Grayswood Ghost'

8. Knautia macedonica

35. Allium spehaerocephalon 2. Molinia caerulea

50. Stachys byzantina 'Silver Carpet'

8. Molinia caerulea

2. Knautia macedonica

7. Panicum virgatum 'Rehbaun'

3. Achillea filipendulina 'Terrecotta'

14. Veronica longifolia 'Charlotte'

12. 1. Acer davidii

1. Acer davidii

Luzula nivea

11. Tellima grandiflora

1. Leucothoe scarletta 'Zeblid'

11. Tellima grandiflora

330. Thymus 'Coccenius Group' 3. Matteucia struthiopteris

1. Leucothoe scarletta 'Zeblid'

50 Allium spehaerocephalon

1. Acer davidii

16 Veronica longifolia 'Charlotte'

330. Thymus 'Coccenius Group'

8. Knautia macedonica

11.struthiopteris Tellima grandiflora 3. Matteucia

8. Molinia caerulea

7. Panicum virgatum 'Rehbaun'

3. Achillea filipendulina 'Terrecotta'

3. Matteucia struthiopteris

11. Stipa tenuissima

Ground-cover

2. Molinia caerulea

11. Tellima grandiflora

2. Calamagrostis brachytricha

3. Panicum virgatum 'Rehbaun'

330. Thymus 'Coccenius Group'

35. Allium spehaerocephalon

1. Acer davidii

12. Luzula nivea

11. Stipa tenuissima

10. Luzula nivea

8. Achillea filipendulina 'Terrecotta'

4. Veronica longiflora 'Charlotte'

1. Leucothoe scarletta 'Zeblid'

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4. Calamagrostis brachytricha

4. Stipa tenuissima 4.Veronica longifolia 'Charlotte' 8. Achillea filipendulina 'Terrecotta'

N

11. Achillea filipendulina 'Terrecotta'

11. Tellima grandiflora

16. Achillea filipendulina 'Terrecotta'

8. Matteucia struthiopteris

12. Luzula nivea

4. Knautia macedonica

3. Calamagrostis brachytricha

8. Molinia caerulea

4. Stipa tenuissima

5. Verbena bonariensis

14. Veronica longifolia 'Charlotte'

50 Allium spehaerocephalon

1. Leucothoe scarletta 'Zeblid'

8. Knautia 330. macedonica Thymus

15. Knautia macedonica

0. Stachys byzantina 'Silver Carpet'

7. Panicum virgatum 'Rehbaun' 2. Stipa tenuissima

4. Stipa tenuissima

7. Achillea filipendula 'Terrecotta'

3. Panicum virgatum 'Rehbaun'

3. Panicum virgatum 'Rehbaun' 7. Panicum virgatum 'Rehbaun' 35. Allium spehaerocephalon

14. Veronica longifolia 'Charlotte' 2. Calamagrostis brachytricha

5. Verbena bonariensis

35. Allium spehaerocephalon

4. Knautia macedonica

2. Calamagrostis brachytricha 2. Calamagrostis brachytricha

2. Deschampsia cespitosa

4. Knautia macedonica

8. Verbena bonariensis 3. Stipa tenuissima

7. Achillea filipendulina 'Terrecotta'

7. Achillea filipendulina 'Terrecotta'

45. Allium spehaerocephalon

45. Allium spehaerocephalon 15. Knautia macedonica

16 Veronica longifolia 'Charlotte'

7. Panicum virgatum 'Rehbaun'

'Coccenius Group'

2. Stipa tenuissima

7. Achillea filipendula 'Terrecotta'

45. Allium spehaerocephalon

. jacquemontii 'Grayswood Ghost'

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Grasses and other species with long stems have been chosen for the visual quality they provide, specifically the movement of grasses, 23. Allium spehaerocephalon flower and seed-heads in the wind. The grass planting consists of two 4. Molinia caerulea Astelia 'Silver Shadow' ‘mixes’ which weave in and out of each other, mimicking the1.shape 6. Panicum virgatum 'Rehbaun' of the paths. The selected species flower later in the year, providing 10. Stipa tenuissima late summer and autumn interest. This flowering will coincide with 11. Achillea filipendulina 'Terrecotta' the changing colour of the leaves on the sites deciduous woodland Luzula nivea 13. Achillea filipendulina 'Terrecotta' species, resulting in a blanket of colour flowing across the site12. after summer. The mix of grasses, evergreen and perennial planting allows 4. Calamagrostis brachytricha for greater biodiversity, with many of the species being particularly 3Panicum virgatum 'Rehbaun' attractive to butterflies. 1. Acer davidii

8. Matteucia struthiopteris

8. Molinia3. caerulea Matteucia

struthiopteris

5. Verbena bonariensis 2. Calamagrostis brachytricha 2. Deschampsia cespitosa

7. Panicum virgatum 'Rehbaun'

50 longifolia Allium 'Charlotte' spehaerocephalon 14. Veronica

8. Verbena bonariensis 3. Stipa tenuissima 3. Deschampsia cespitosa

3. Deschampsia cespitosa

15. Knautia macedonica 7. Panicum virgatum 'Rehbaun' 2. Stipa tenuissima

Veronica longifolia 45. Allium16 spehaerocephalon 15. Knautia macedonica

'Charlotte'

8. Knautia macedonica

7. Panicum virgatum 'Rehbaun'

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Documents and Reports

Landscape Planting Journal Landscape Planting Journal Ed Barwell 110175658

This document contains information on three designed planted landscapes. The document aims to analyse and provide information on different plant species, their use within each design as well as maintenance issues. This document helped to greatly improve my plant knowledge as well as my understanding of the importance of plants within a design.

Land Contamination Report Former Croda Site, Kilnhurst, Rotherham

Landscape Contamination Report This report deals with a former tar and bitumen works on a site outside of Sheffield, working through various steps to identify contamination on the site and suggest remediation measures for dealing with its clean-up. A potential regeneration scheme for the site was then proposed. A pictoral and tabulated conceptual model of the site and its contamination were created to provide this information.

http://s0.geograph.org.uk/photos/19/63/196335_3ee17592.jpg

Student Number: 110175658

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Documents and Reports LSC 301 Environmental Impact Assessment Student No: 110175658

Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment This report was produced to form part of an environmental statement for a proposed open cast coal mine next to the village of Howbrook in South Yorkshire. The report looks at the existing planning policy context of the site as well as baseline conditions of the land. It discusses the potential landscape and visual impacts of the proposed scheme and provides visuals to show the visual effects from key viewpoints. Finally a regeneration proposal is presented for when the site is no longer in use.

Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment

Commissioned by Cobex Ltd.

barwell associates

Fee Proposal This document was a contract agreement drawn up for my final masters year project. It details the requirements of a client and landscape contractor needed to enter into a formal contract. It contains information on the proposed design team, a programme of proposed services, a table of works and a fee proposal for the works.

Mayfield Park Fee Proposal

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Documents and Reports Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment Extract

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Documents and Reports Landscape Planting Journal Extract

Hill Barn Farm Gardens

Dahlia ‘Karma Chocolate’

Designer: Derry Watkins Creation: 1999 Description: Hill Barn Farm is the home of Derry Watkins who runs Special Plants Nursery. The garden at Hill Barn Farm is a collaboration between Derry, who designed the planting, and her husband, architect Peter Clegg, who designed the structure of the garden with its series of curving lines and circles. Derry used to compete at flower shows such as Chelsea, which was where her inspiration for my selected area, the Black and White Bed, came from. In 1999 Derry entered Chelsea for the last time with a garden entitled ‘What Black and White and Red Only Occasionally?’ This garden was so popular that she decided to recreate it in her own garden.

Botanical Name

Common Name

Current Size

Ultimate Size

Habit

Plant Type

Dahlia ‘Karma Chocolate’

Dahlia ‘Karma Chocolate’

Height: 1.5m Spread: 0.5m

Height: 1.5m Spread: 0.5m Time to ultimate height: 1-2 years

Upright

Tuber

Health/Vigour

This Dahlia is generally in very good condition. Its large round flowers were in bloom however a few of its leaves were turning brown and dead around the edges.

Aesthetic/Functional Contribution

This plants main contribution is clearly its flowers. Around 5 inches wide and perfectly formed, they have a very attractice dark purple colour which means they stand out even against all the other attractive perennials used in this site. This Dahlia works as a focal point when viewed from the lawn it faces onto. It is taller than all the plants around it, drawing attention towards it.

Centred around a winding path with two large beds either side the Black and White garden, as the name suggests, uses a very restricted colour palette. It features a variety of plants with striking dark purple foliage as well as white,pink and purple perennials. The effect is very striking as we see a very unusual bed full of uncommon plants, something of a trademark for Derry.

Maintenance

This plant is well maintained and works well where it has been planted around smaller perennials and other plants.

Is it successful?

Dahlia ‘Twyning’s After Eight’

The restricted colour palette creates a unique visual style which makes it stand out. The use of many uncommon types of plant give the borders a real wow factor. Some plants do not have a very long flowering period, meaning the bed can look uninteresting out of season, particularly in winter. The bed is very much a plantsmans design which can result in it looking slightly overcrowded.

Location of the Black and White beds within the garden. The Designer Derry Watkins comes from Connecticut, USA but became obsessed with growing plants after travelling to Ireland as a photographer. She moved to England some time after this and settled near Bath, Somerset with her husband. Derry now runs Special Plants Nursery which, true to its name specialises in unique and uncommon plants, as Watkins has a particular interest in new species.

Botanical Name

Common Name

Dahlia ‘Twyning’s After Eight’

Dahlia ‘Twyning’s After Height: 1m Eight’ Spread: 1m

Current Size

Ultimate Size

Habit

Plant Type

Height: 0.5-1m Spread: 0.5-1m Time to ultimate height: 1-2 years

Bushy

Bedding

Health/Vigour

Like most of the other plants within this garden these Dahlias are very well maintained and appear healthy. They have grown large and are flowering well.

Aesthetic/Functional Contribution

She favours perennials and other flowering plants to more hardy selections and as a result her garden is packed full of flowering species which gives it its vivid colours. Within her garden each area is unified by a colour scheme to give it a sense of order, but the the variety of plants within each area is huge.

Unlike the Karma Chocolate which works on the basis of its attractive flowers this Dahlia has a much more structural role. Several of these are planted together in a large swathe, making up a significant portion of the south side of the path. Together their dark foliage combines to look like a large bush while its white flowers on top of thin dark stalks contrasts and stands out clearly against the dark foliage.

Watkins is passionate about growing plants and even took A level Biology and first-year Botany at the age of 40 to help her better understand her craft.

This plant will require deadheading to prolong flowering. It should also be cut back to ground level in Autumn.

Maintenance

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Thank you for taking the time to look through my portfolio. Please contact me for a copy of my CV or any further information on my work.

Telephone 07712607538 Email edbarwell@live.co.uk Website www.issuu.com/edbarwell

Landscape Architecture Portfolio  

A selection of work from my Masters and Undergraduate degrees at the University of Sheffield and from my Year in Practice.

Landscape Architecture Portfolio  

A selection of work from my Masters and Undergraduate degrees at the University of Sheffield and from my Year in Practice.

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