Page 1


'f k. l o/d

II

it

lmdt0111

I 路e ttnol /''' b us 11 i rhl li


UNIVERSITY OF DAYTON • VOLUME THIRTY-SEVEN

2


3


u. 0 : COLLECTTON

QUARTO


6


71 0 488 3

CONTENTS ADMINISTRATION SENIORS DEPARTMENTS ORGANIZATIONS ACTIVITIES SPORTS

Robert Antonick

Editor Ronald Danna

ASJociate Editor Susan Reiter

Se11ior Editor Joan Hollencomp

Social Editor Carolyn Duell Admi11i.rh 路t~t io11

Marty Payne

Mol'tl!e Le,7der

J. Herbert

Fox

Terhnirimz Jim Haines

Sports Bear Peterson

Business

7


I

I

-

---

-

-

-

Take a walk with us through a school year. It will be a long walk, for it is a big year. You may have to run in parts. Occasionally, though, you will be able to stroll, or even relax. So take life easy for awhile. Lean back, enjoy yourself. Renew some old friend ships and strike up a few fresh ones. You may even meet yourself.

8

-


9


Long one spots, the tion with degrees in

10

of Dayton's more elegant culture Dayton Art Institute, in conjuncthe UniYersity of Dayton, offers Fine Arts to its sh1dents.


II


What is it about a campus? . .. about a city? They e:>.:ude a personality of their own . Sometimes running frenzied, at other times speaking subtleties. But however they are, an undercurrent of thought and life spreads everywhere, everywhen.


.My dear Graduates of l960, Today you join the ranks of those who proudly call themselves college graduates. It is an honor, one for which you have sweated and toiled intellectually , and perhaps even physically, to make a reality. You richly deserve the distinction. But with every honor goes a corresponding responsibility -

one of which you may not be

thinking during the round of graduation activities. But your success in the academic field is tangible evidence that it has pleased Almighty God to bestow more than average talent upon you. Naturally these gifts are not solely for your personal aggrandizement, rather they are an important contribution to the world's solidarity . You do have a special role to fulfill, there is something you can offer better than anyone else. The University of Dayton has tried to help you appreciate and understand your obligation to the world's welfare, and solicitously lent its guiding hand to bring to full fruition those assets with which you shall enrich the common good of mankind. The final goal of all men is the Will of God. To you that must ever remain important. As each of you enters your unique role in life, may you always discharge your duty with honor and true charity. Your alma mater is proud of you and may you always be proud of her. Together, may you live and strive mutually "for God and Country.'' May the blessing of Jesus and Mary ever inspire your efforts and enthusiasm in the many happy years ahead . Sincerely,

14


16


ADMINI,STRATION

17


Very Reverend

RAYMOND A. ROESCH Prc:.rident

Reverend GEORGE BARRETT )Iire President

18

Brother

JOSEPH ]. PANZER Dean of the Uni11ersity


ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL

Standi11g: Rev. Charles L. Collins, Bro. Elmer Lackner, Bro. Louis J. Faerber, Bro. Austin J. Holian. Silting: Bro. Joseph J. Panzer, Bro. Joseph J. Mervar, Rev. Raymond A. Roesch, Chairman; Rev. George Barrett.

Reverend Joseph Lekan

Reverend George J . Rennekcr

BOARD OF

The Very Reverend James M . Darby Chaimum

Very Reverenc.l Raymond A . Ro h

Brother John T. Darby

TRUSTEE

19


ACADEMIC COUNCIL

Bro. leonard A. Mann, Mr. Donald C. Metz, Dr. Maurice R. Graney, Bro. l ouis H . Roes, Bro. Joseph J . Panzer, Chairman; Rev. George B. Barrett, Bro. louis ]. Faerber, Dr. Hilary R. Beth.

STU DENT WELFARE COUNCIL Reverend George B. Banett Chairma11

Reverend Paul ]. ',Xf agner

Reverend Charles l. Collins

20

Reverend John G . Dickson


PUBLIC RELATIONS COUNCIL

Mr. Mason Benner, Mr. John B. Steinbruegge, Bro . Elmer Lackner, Chaimwn: Bro. Joseph ] . Mervar, Mr. James E. Gallico, Dr. Maurice R. Graney.

Brother John J. Jansen

Brother Steve Sheehy

Professor Charles H . Scheidler

Professor Kathleen Whetro

21


~ Ut

, •RI ( P tUWl

ft , lr

-

uti

·, nl

Dr 'Y: AI

( ITH )

F'

All)n r A.

R I1IJ

• fr H.any t:. Fu;

~h.

UJ

lV

tllr.un

• fr

~lr

H m n

~rr

1m ,f

Mr G r,_

l~hr

F \X1:a lt

n

r r

fl\

Mr

\'\<'ou r

r

· IJnt

J:lr\lb-


ASSOCIATE BOARD OF LAY TRUSTEES

Mr. Edward \V. Gillaugh .Mr. Kenneth C. Long Mr. D wight E. Young

Mr. James J\.f. Cox Mr. David L. Rike Mr. Clarence H . Gosiger

Mr. Mason M. Roberts Dr. Carroll A. Hochwalt

Bro. Francis J. Perko Fr. James M. Darby Fr. Raymond A. Roesch

23


DEANS

Reverend CHARLES L. COLLINS

D erm of Studm!s

.1\HSS R. KATHLEEN WHETRO Dc,m of JP omefl

MRS. MARY ANN HUSSONG Assistant Deem of If/omen

24


iY!R. WILLIAM BEAUMONT Ant. to the Dean of M en for Off-Campus Housing

Brother STEVE SHEEHY D ean of Men

Reverend JOHN G. DICKSON ch,tplain

MR . JOSEPH LOOMIS AssistaNt Dea11 of Men Gibbons Hotel

25


Brother JAMES H . KLINE Purchasing A gent

Brother WILLIAM D . BUSCH Tt路eas!lrer

MR. WILLIAM SLONAKER Comptroller MR. PAUL C. MICHEL Assislaul Jo B11siness Manager

26


Brother JOSEPH ]. l\â&#x20AC;˘!ERVAR Registrar

MISS MARY SHAY Alumni Secretary

Brother FRANCIS ]. PERKO B11siness Manager

Brother AUSTIN ]. HOLIAN Superz,isor of Construction MRS. 0 . L. KRAPF Secretary lo t he President

27


Brother THOMAS POWERS D irector of Etâ&#x20AC;˘ming Classes

MR. ROBERT E. DO NOV AN Assistant to Director of Ew nin,g ClaSJes Erening Cltuses Rep resentative at l/YPAFB

Reverend PAUL}. WAGNER Director of Admissions

MISS MARY TU ITE Assistant to Direcror of Admis.rions

28


PUBLICITY

Brother ELMER LACKNER

MR. JOSEPH McLAUGHLIN Director of SporiJ Publicity

Director of Public Relations

"All those cigarettes and you can't find a match!"

MR. RICHARD BEACH Director of General Publici/)

29


MR. 1\IASON BENNER

DR. EDWARD fREEH

Direclor of Du,e/opmenl

Associe~re

Direclor of Reset~rch ln.rti1u/e

Jbt

MR. CYRIL G. PECKHAl\I DircclrJJ' of Dr1la Processing Di11ision

MR. JOHN R. WESTERHEIDE

MR. ROBERT R. LUTHMAN

Director. Research Center

Direclor of S jJecial Proiects Dir路i.rion

These are the men of the gomens, whose life bloods flow through circuits and solenoids and mini-transistors and back again through their own veins. A group of men who form the nucleus of the nerve center of the University; not guiding or ruling, but collecting and holding for the University's memory, calculating for the University's future.

30


l\lR. EDWARD DAILY Direr/or o f VetrraiJ A ffa irs

l\.:!R. JAMES E. GALLICO Director of Stud~nl Placement

MR. LLOYD A. RENSEL DirectOJ". Guiddltce Ceuter

MR. JOHN B. STEINBRUEGGE Director of th e Diz;isio!l of Specialized EducatiOIJ<tl Sc-n路ices

MR . LE\XIIS A. JONES Director of Studc111 Pl,,cement

A student steps on the campus, filled with expectations and conflicting desires, his future an abstract mosaic. These are the men who take him in hand, mould him, and find a niche for him at the University.

31


Brother PAUL OMLOR llic~~wgu路, Arcade Lunch

Brothet ARNOLD KLUG Postmaster

MRS. JOSEPH UNGER

Brother GEORGE N. l\fUKITS llianager, Book Store

Student Union Counselor

Brother EDWARD SCHMID llianager, Cafete1路ic1

Hurrying to class, the student stops at "Brother Paul's" for a cup of coffee, replaces that shabby notebook with a new one, and mails his dirty laundry home. Afterwards, he collapses in the Student Union, building up enough strength to buck the dinner line.

32


HEALTH CENTER

DR. SCHNEBLE

In medieval times, the cure-all for common illnesses was good luck charms and hex signs. The U.S. Navy also has a panacea for all ailments; they dispense aspirins. At the UD Health Center the procedure is to plunk a thermometer in one's mouth, check his pulse, give him a shot, hustle him off to bed, and quarantine him. Moral: stay healthy.

Left to Right: Miss Janet Rose, RN; Miss Maureen 11-fcNamara, Secretary; Miss Mary Angela Mulligan, RN; Mrs. Catherine Kirk, RN; Miss Patricia Lane, RN; Miss Nancy Dichito, SK

33


MRS . PATRICIA CRAMER

Secretary to Dean of Students

Brother EDWARD PROCHASKA

1'-HSS SARAH KEYES DireciOI' of Clericdl Peuonnel

Director of Buildingr tlluf G"1"D11nd.r

MISS KATHERINE ANGST

Secreta.·y to De,m of St11denu

Brother Wehrle and Friend

1'--IRS . ROBERT A HUXTABLE

Secrelal')' 10 Dean of Unit•ersity

34


SENIORS

Let thy eye.r look straight on, and let thy eyelids go before thy steps.

35


36


Arts

37


ADAMS, JEROME BERNARDCharleston, \X'. Va. Art Club, Bluegrass Club

BACHNER, VIRGINIA M. -Rivcr Forest, Illinois Illini Club Historian and Publicity Officer I , 2, 3, 4, UD Bowling, Players 1. 2, 3, 4, i\Iarching Coeds 1, 2, Psy ch ology Club 3, 4

BERGDAHL, HAROLD EUGENECharleston, W. Va. Bluegrass Club, Art Cl,;b

BORCHELT, JEAN LOUISE-Dayton, Ohio BRINGMAN, SALLY M.-Dayton, Ohio Psych ology Club, Psi Chi, Phi Alpha Theta, Intramurals

BROCK, ROBERT \X'ILLIAM-Dayton , Ohio

CARPENTER, CLARADELL MARYDayton, Ohio Sociology Club, Psychology Club

CONNOR, DONALD ALBERT- Colwnbus, Ohio President of International Club, Current Affairs Club, Vets Club, Columbus Club

COONEY, JAMES ROBERT-Rocky River, Ohio Clen·lanJ Club

DE HAVEN, JOANNE HELEN-Kettering, Ohio Psychology Club, Psi Chi,

Fl}'~r

DE PASQUALE, EDWARD S.New York, New York DUNSON, DAVID A.-Sidney, Ohio President of International Club, Treasurer of Columbus Club, Vice President of Sociology Club, Glee Club, Mixed Chorus, Varsity Show

GATTES, RUTH ANN-Dayton, Ohio Psychology Club, Psi Chi

GRAF, ANDREW GEORGECamp Hill, Pennsylvania Keystone Club, Pershing Rifles, Intramural Football

FULLERTON, JAMES D.-Tiffin, Ohio . Cleveland Club

HANRAHAN, THOMAS JAMESWhite Plains, New York Daytonian, Freshman Football, Knickerbocker Club HARVEY, EDWARD JAMESNiagara Falls, New York Homecoming Premier Chairman, Student Council, Student Activities, Knickerbocker Club

HAUER, DONALD RICHARD-Dayton, Ohio Intramural Basketball


HEALY, \'<IILLIAM H. Long Island , N ew York Offi cer of Kn ickerbocker Club, Genera l Chairman Student Activi ti es, Scabbard & Blade, Pershi ng Rifl es, Spo rts Pub licit}', Di rector of Flyerettes

HOLLENCAMP, JOAN- Dayton, Ohio Student Council ccretary, Psi Chi , Dayto nian Staff. D ay ton Club, Juni or Prom Co urt

JAMES, SH EIL A COLLETTE- Cincinnati, Ohio Cincinnati Club Secre tary, Dayto n Cl ub, Junio r Prom Decorations, Turnabo ut Tag Commi ttee, D ayton ian Social Editor, H omecom ing. Players

JOAQUIM, MANUEL JR .- Dayton, Oh io JOHNSON, WILLIAM PRESTON- Dayton, Oh io Pol iti ca l Science Speaker Bureau

JUDD, DONNA PAT-Dayton , Ohio Sodality, Legion of

~ofary,

Psycho logy Club

KAPUSCINSKI, LOUIS CHESTERCleveland, Ohio Art Club, CJ e,·da nd Club

LA PERA, RICHARD ANTHONYPort Washington , N ew York Mariology Club, Accounting Club, Varsity Track and Tennis, Kn ic kerbo cker Club

LAYMAN, CONSTANCE i.- Dayton, Ohio Marchi ng Coeds, Choir, Concert Band , Accompanist fo r M en's Glee Club

LEFF, BARBARA SOMERS-Dayton, Oh io D ayton Club, Psychology Club, Orientation Committee, D ay toni an Senior Editor, CWO, Flyers Hanger

LLOYD, MARY ELIZABETHCleveland Heights, Ohio Cl eve lan d Club, Daytonia o Staff, Flyers H anger

MacBETH, WILLIAM- Dayton, Ohio

MacPHERSON, WALTER JOSEPHDayton, Ohio MARi"l'ANE, JOSEPH PETERKings Park, New York Knickerbocker Club, Rifl e Club, Flyt·rs Hanger

MARR , JOHN

MARTING, ANITA GAlL- Kettering, Ohio Editor-in -Chief oJ Flyer, Sodality, Writers' Club, Coed Editor 59, FlyerC':Ites 56, Orientatio n Comm ittee 59

McGINTY, JOHN F. -Indianapolis, Indiana Legio n of Mary Presiden t, International Club, Hoos ier Club Treasurer, Men's Choir

McKECHNIE, DON FARRAR-Carrollton, Ohio Psychol ogy Club, Psi Ch i


MELVIN, GISELA MARTHA-Dayton, Ohio MERGLER, MARK ORMSBEE-Dayton, Ohio International Club

MICHELSEN, LUIS CHRISTIANJackson Heights, New York Knickerbocker Club, Flyers Hanger, Homecoming Committee, Society for the Advancement of Management, Intramural Sports

MOLITORISS, JOHN A.-Dayton, Ohio Football, Monogram, Knickerbocker Club, Fl yers Hanger

MULLINS, WILLIAM RONALD-Dayton, Ohio Pershing Rifles, Scabbard & Blade, DMS

NEV ARES-ZAVALA, JOSE RAFAELRio Piedras, Puerto Rico !>·! arching Band, Concert Band, Choir, Glee Club, Players, Variety Show, Latin-American Club, Sociology Club

O'DONNELL PAUL VINCENTElmhurst, Illinois Golf T eam , Intramural Football and Basketball , Illini Club, Pep Committee

PALUMBO, JR. ANTHONY JOSEPHAshtabula, Ohio Mariology Club, Psychology Club, Psi Chi, Religious Activities Council

PAYNE, MARY BRENNAN-Dayton, Ohio Flyerette Co-Captain 58-59, Ca ptain 59-60, Junior Prom Queen, Junior Class Secretary, Daytonian

PETERSON, BURDETTE NORMAN, JR.Indianapolis, Indiana ChaiFman of Pep Committee, Players, Flyers Hanger, DayIonian, Intramu rals

RUESTOW, GEORGE FREDERICKMiddletown, Pennsylvania UD Players, Ice Hockey, Flyers Hanger, BP Social

SCHERER, MARY ELIZABETH-Dayton, Ohio Psychology Club, Psi Chi, Dayton Club, Orientation Committee, Turnabo-ut Committee

SCHRAMM, JOHN THOMAS-Minena, New York Knickerbocker Club, Intramurals, Baseball

SCH\Xf ARTZ, MARY LOUISE-Dayton, Ohio Choir, Marching Coeds, CD Bowling League, Psychology Club

SEIVER, ANDREA JOSEPHINE-Dayton, Ohio Psi Chi, Psychology Club, Woman 's Choir, Mixed Chorus, Phi Alpha Theta

SMITH, JAMES STANLEY-Dayton, Ohio Junior Class Vice President, Junior Prom Chairman, Treasurer, Flyers Hanger, Chapel Choir, Dayton Club,. Pep Committee, Intramurals

STANG, LYNN RUTH-Dayton, Ohio CSMC

STOLTZ, VIRGINIA A.-Dayton, Ohio Flyers Hanger, D ayton Club, Psychology Club


â&#x20AC;˘

STUEVE, CAROLYN L.-Dayton, Ohio Dayton Club, Psychology Club, Flyerettes, Senior Class Secretary

VANWAGENEN, JOHN ALANPoughkeepsie, New York Knickerbocker Club, Intramural Basketball

ZILBA, GEORGE CHARLES-Toledo, Ohio Flyers Hanger, Intramural , Football and Basketball

FRITZ, DENNIS-Cherokee, Iowa Art Club, Nogoodnik Athletic Club, wood Liquidation Society

Wedge -

CALIBOSO, ROBERT-Honolulu, Hawaii Busin ess, Varsity Football, President Hui 0 ' Hawaii Club, Alpha Kappa Psi, .Monogram Club

41


42


Business

43


ALONZO, ANTHONY LUCIUSChicago, Ulinois ALSOP, JACK R. -Jenkins, Kentucky Society for Advancement of i\[aoagement, Pershing Rifles , Philosophy Club, Bluegrass Club

APPLE, RALPH GLENN-Fairborn, Ohio

ARKENBERG, DONALD LOUISCasstown, Ohio 1830 Club

BALSOM, MICHAEL JOSEPHDayton, Ohio Band

BARNES, DONALD EARLPhillipsburg, Ohio Retai ling Club

BECKER, HUGH ED\'V' ARD-Hamilton, Ohio Society for Advancement of Management, Butler County Club, Intramural Basketball

BEGLEY, JAMES A.-Dayton, Ohio Alpha Kappa Psi

BENTZ, WILLIAM

BEHM, HAROLD NORMAN-Dayton, Ohio All-Dayton Committee

BERGER, ROBERT NEIL-Dayton, Ohio BERTRAND, JOHN A.-Te:tneck, New Jersey SAM Vice President, Flyers Hanger, Pep Committee, Knickerbocker Club

BOLEK, JOHN-Dayton, Ohio BOMAR, CHESTER ALANDayton, Ohio BOURDET, ANDRE JULES, JR. St. Louis, Missouri Rifle Club, Illini Club, l D Choir, SAM

BO\'<'LIN, EARL-Dayton, Ohio BRAUN, PAUL JOHN-Buffalo, New York Knickerbocker Club, Flyer Hanger, Players, Daytonian Staff, Pep Committee, Treasurer of Junior Class, Vice President of Senior Class, General Chairman of Senior Farewell

BROOMALL, JOHN RICHARD-Dayton, Ohio Brother AI Rose's Assistant


CAHILL, RODNEY THOMAS-Chillicothe, Ohio Fl)•ers Hanger

CLARK, JOHN WIGET- Ciayton, Ohio Accounting Club, Sigma Epsi lo n Xi

CLODFELTER, BRUCE WILLIAMDayton, Ohio Accounting Club, Dayton Club, Intramural s

COOPER, GEORGE HENRYCleveland, Ohio Secretary SAM, Cleveland Club, Flyers Hanger, Bowling

CRISLER, WELLINGTON G.Dayton, Ohio Treasurer Vets Club, Accounting Club

DANIELCWICZ, RICHARDDayton, Ohio

DEEGAN, FRANCIS WILLIAMSeacliff, New York Accounting Club, Flyers Hanger, Alpha Kappa Psi, Knickerbocker Club

DICKERSON, E. JAMES-Dayton, Ohio Alpha Kappa Psi ), 4, Accounting Club 3, 4, Dayton Club I, 2, 3, Treasurer 4

DIVILBISS, THOMAS LOUIS-Dayton, Ohio

DODSON, LLOYD DALE-Dayton, Ohio 1830 Club Treasurer

DONNELLY, JOHN LEOConnellsville; Pennsylvania Vice President Keys tone Club, SAM

ENGLERT, LAWRENCE-Dayton, Ohio

FARKAS, GEORGE RAYMONDLorain, Ohio Cleveland Club, Flyers Hanger, lntramurals

FENLON, JAMES A. -Springfield , Ohio SAM, Intramural Football , Basketball

FINORID, PAUL NICHOLA Jersey City, New Jersey SAM, Knickerbocker Club, Flyers Hanger, Players , Pep Committee, lntramu rals

FrSK, DON- Brooklyn, New York Al pha Ka ppa Psi, Knickerbocker Club, SAl\.£, Flyers Hange r, Intr~nlllrals

FLEISCHMANN, BETTY-Dayton, Ohio Secretarial Studies Flyer, Da)•ton Club, Secretarial Club

GALEN, GEORGE THOMASRochester, New York

45


GATES, JAMES DAVID-Louisville, Kentucky Accounting Club, Bluegrass Manager, SAM Vice President

Club,

Daytonian

Business

GOLDEY, ROBERT CARROLL-Dayton, Ohio Accounting Club Secretary

GOVERNOR, PAUL .R.----,Rochester, New York Alpha Kappa Psi, Vets Club, SAM

GRILLIOT, HAROLD JOHNDayton, Ohio Accounting Club Vice President, Alpha Kappa Psi , Dayton Club

HARESTAD, CLIFFORD EUGENEToledo, Ohio Alpha Kappa Psi, Football, :1\·fonogram Club, Intramurals

HARPER, CHARLOTTE SCYTHADayton, Ohio Secretarial Studies Secretarial Club

.HARRELL, WILLIAM ARTHUR-Dayton, Ohio HARROD, ROBERT L - Miamisburg, Ohio Accounting Club

HART, PETER JOSEPH-Valley Stream, New York Knickerbocker Club, Rifle Club, SAM

HARTMANN, KARL

LOUI~ Pennsauken, New Jersey

Band and Orchestra, Intramural Softball and Basketball

HAUSFELD, GREGOR ARNOLD-Dayton , Ohio HA WLIK, HERSCHEL ROSSWELLDayton, Ohio

HORSTMAN, SUSAN ANNDayton, Ohio Secretarial Studies Dayton Club, Secretarial Club, Sophomore Pep Committee

IMBER, JOHl'{ FREDERICKDelphos, Ohio ROTC Rifle Team , Flyers Hanger

JENKINS, WILLIAM D.-Dayton, Ohio

JONES, ROBERT HARRY- Dayton, Ohio Alpha Kappa Psi, Vets Club

JOSEPH, CHARLOTTE MARLENEZanesville, Ohio Secretarial Studin Secretarial Club

JOSEPH, MONA LEE-Zanesville, Ohio Secretarial Studies Secretarial Club


KEDZIE, LAURENCE F. -South Bend, Indiana Vets Club, Hoosier Club. SAM, Flyers Hanger, Tntramural Basketbal l, H omecom ing Activities

KENNEY, JOHN ANDREWFair Haven, New Jersey Daytonian. Tntramural Softball and Basketball

KERN, ROBERT DOUGLAS-Dayton, Ohio Alpha Kappa Psi

KERNAN, JOHN-Dayton, Ohio KIMMELL, THOMAS HOWARDPittsburgh, Pennsylvania Keystone Club, Al pha Kappa Psi

KING, RICHARD JEROMEDayton, Ohio Flyers Hanger, President of Dayton Club, Chair· man Student Activities Committee, General Chair. man Freshr'llan Orientation

KLEIN, JAMES EDWARD-Toledo, Ohio Officer of Al pha Kappa Psi, Fl)•ers Hanger, Glee Club, Choir, Varsity Show

KOELLER, JOYCE ANN-Dayton, Ohio Secretarictl Studies Flyerettes, Dayton Club, Secretarial Club

KOLODZIEJSKI, ANTHONY JAMESBoonton, New Jersey Tntramural Football and Basketball

KUNTZ, GERARD BEA TIY- Dayton, Ohio Tntramural Volleyball, Charter Member Alpha Kappa Psi, SAM, Dixie Dynamoes

LAT AS, MICHAEL-Dayton, Ohio LEE, MELVIN T. C.-Honolulu, Hawaii Hui 0 Hawaii Club, Accounting Club, Vets Club

LIADIS, GEORGE L.Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania LIENESCH, JOSEPH A. JR.Dayton, Ohio Dayton Club Treasurer, Orientati on Committee, Flyers Hanger, Student Activities Committee, Vice President, Programming Chairman

MacLARDIE, JOHN A.-Kettering, Ohio

.McCABE, VINCENT EDWARD-Medway, Ohio Scabbard & SAM

Blade, UD Marching Band, Concert Band,

McEWEN, RUTH JOANNE- Dayton, Ohio Secretarial St11dies Dayton Club, Secretarial Club

McGOWAN, ALEXANDER RAYMONDWhippany, New Jersey Accounting Club, Glee Club


MELOY, WILLIAM NORMANSan Antonio, Texas Intramural Football, Basketball, Softball

MIDDLETON, CLEDIETH DALE- Dayton, Ohio Accounting Club

MILLER, JUDITH ELAINE-Dayton, Ohio Secretarial Studie.r Treasurer Secretarial Club, Secretary Freshman and Sophomore Class

MULLEN, WILLIAM JOSEPHPaterson, New Jersey Knickerbocker Club, SAM, Pershing Rifles, Distinguished Military Student, Freshman Orientation Committee, Homecoming Committee, Intramural Basketball and Football

MUNDHENK, DENNIS EDGARPitsburg, Ohio Rifle Club, Alpha Kappa Psi, Professional Business Fraternity

MURPHY, MAUREEN ANNCleveland, Ohio Secretarial Studies President Secretarial Club, Cleveland Club, Players

Flyerettes,

NFCCS.

MURPHY, PATRICK JOHN- Lima, Ohio President Vets Club, Alpha Kappa Psi, Intramurals, Vice President Sophomore Class

MUTH, THOMAS A.-Dayton, Ohio Alpha Kappa Psi, SAM, Dayton Club, Blast

NAUGHTON, FRANCIS MICHAELTarrytown, New York Alpha Kappa Psi, Professional Business Fraternity, SAM, Secretary of Vets Club 59-60

NEAL, MARTIN EDWARD-Dayton, Ohio Football, Latin-American Club, Illini Club

NELSON, CYNTHIA STANLEY-Dayton, Ohio Secretarial Studies Players, Marching Coeds, Secretarial Club

O'CONNOR, DAVID ALAN-Grafton, Ohio Cleveland Club, Flyers Hanger, Student Council Intercollegiate Committee, Premiere Chairman 59

PALAZZOLO, ANTHONY JOSEPHDayton, Ohio Cincinnati C lub, Cheerleader, Acholite, Sodality

P ALCIC, PHILIP THOMASGowanda, New York Student Chapter ASCE

PETERSON, WILLIAM JOSEPH JR.Kettering, Ohio

PLAGE, MARTIN EDWARDBrentwood, Long Island, New York Alpha Kappa Psi, SAM, Vets Club President, Knickerbocker Club, Flyers Hanger, Intramural Sports

PLATZER, RUDOLPH- Dayton, Ohio Society for the Advancement of Management

POWERS, DARREL L.- Dayton, Ohio Accounting Club


POWERS, REX KENNETH- Dayton, Ohio PUMPHREY, JUDITH ANN-Dayton, Ohio Secretari(Jl Stud ieJ Dayton Club, Secretarial Club

PUTERBAUGH, RAYMOND GERALDBrookville, Ohio

REMLEY, JOHN A. JR.Memphis, Tennessee Band, Intramurals, Monetary Adjustment Society

RENNER, ROBERT GEORGEDayton, Ohio Alpha Kappa Psi, 840 Club, Vice President Dayton Club, Flyers Hanger, Accounting Club, Rifle Club, Director of Flyerettes

REYNOLDS, ALrRED R.- Dayton, Ohio Cheerleader, Dayton Club

RICCIO, VINCENT FRANKGarden City, New York Knickerbocker Club, Intramurals

ROBINSON, PAUL LEWIS-Hampton, Virginia Society for the Adv:lflcement of Management

ROMIE, DONALD JOHN-Dayton, Ohio Intramurals

ROSHKOWSKI, DONALD GEORGEPort Washington, New York Retailing Club, Knickerbocker Club, Intr,tmurals

RYAN, WILLIAM CHARLES-Dayton, Ohio SAAL, WILLIAM JOSEPH-Cleveland, Ohio Cleveland Club, Woomar Club, SAM

SANDER III, EDWARD GEORGEDayton, Ohio Alpha Kappa Psi, President Accounting Club

SARMIR, ROBERT MICHAELDayton, Ohio SAYOUR, PAUL THEODOREBrooklyn, New York Knickerbocker Club, Intramural Football

SCHIERLOH, DON-Dayton, Ohio SCHNEIDER, SUE-Dayton, Ohio Treasurer Dayton Club, Flyers Hanger, Junior Prom Court

SCHOLES, JAMES EVANS-Dayton, Ohio Accounting Club


SCHOMER, PETER AL YINPoughkeepsie, New York Knickerbocker Club, Flyers Hanger, Football

SCHROERLUKE, EUGENE JOHN-Dayton, Ohio SEXTON, DANIEL STANLEYLambertville, Michigan Intramural Basketball, Football, Softball, Society for the Advancement of Management

SHERRY, ROBERT EMMETTDayton, Ohio Dayton Club, Retai ling Club, lntramurals

SIMON, WILLIAM RICHARDLancaster, Pennsylvania 1830 Club, Vets Club

STAUBACK, SISTER M. AUGUSTINE, S.F.P.-Dayton, Ohio

STRITTMATTER , DONALD ARTHURStewart Manor, New York Knickerbocker Club, Intramural Basketball, Football, Soft· ball

SULLIVAN, JOSEPH FRANCIS JR.Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Keystone Club, Alpha Kappa Psi

SWEENEY, JEROME MICHAELSpringfield, Ohio SAM

TROY, RUSSELL F.-Dayton, Ohio Vets Club, Accounting Club

UMBENHAUER, WILLIAM CLAYTONDayton, Ohio Alpha Kappa Psi, Para·psychology Club, Philosophy Club, Dayton Club

VON ALT, ROBERT EDGAR- Cleveland, Ohio SAM Treasurer 4, Cleveland Club, Flyers Hanger, Pep Club

VONDEREMBSE, THOMAS ]. Kalida, Ohio President and Treasurer Alpha Kappa Psi, Vets Club, Glee Club, Variety Show Cast

VONDERHEIDE, RONALD G.Dayton, Ohio Treasurer Retailing Club

WARD, WILLIAM F.Bayonne, New Jersey Knickerbocker Club, Monogram Club, Intramurals, Varsity Football Manager

WEBSTER, RICHARD W.- Bellevue, Kentucky Alpha Kappa Psi, SAM, Bluegrass Club

W ESTBROCK, W. JOSEPH-Dayton, Ohio Tennis Team 2, 3, 4, Dayton Club 1, 2, Monogram Club 4

WHITE, WILLIAM KEITH- Dayton, Ohio Alpha Kappa Psi

50


â&#x20AC;˘

ZI.i\HviERLE, THOMAS A.-Dayton, Ohio ZUMELLO, JOSEPH B.- Greensburg, Pennsylvania Alpha Kappa Psi, Society for the Ad\'ancem ent of i\.fanagement , Keystone Club


52


8dueation

53


ACKERMAN, MARY KRONAUGE-Dayton, Ohio Dayton Club, Flyers Hanger

BARHORST, SISTER MARY HILARY, C.P.P.S.Dayton, Ohio BO\XIMAN, LOVETT A E.-Honolulu, Hawaii

BUEKER, SHEILA JANE- Dayton, Ohio Flyerettes, Players, Flyers Hanger, SEA

BUELL, JOAN ELAINE- Dayton, Ohio BURKE, JOAN ROZANNAHSpring Lake, New Jersey AFCCS , SEA , Knickerbocker league, Exponent

Club,

Bowling

BYRD, ROSE M.-Dayton, Ohio Phi Alpha Theta

CALLAHAN, CLAIRE MAUREENDayton, Ohio NFCCS, Speech Club, Secretary Choir 59, Players, Variety Show, Turnabout, SEA, Upperclassmen Quartet, Ec.lucation Honor Society

CARi\UCHAEL, DOLORES M.-Fairborn, Ohio Playe rs, SEA, Education Honor Societ)•

CASE, FRANK ARTHURFlushing, New York Captain Basketball. Monogram Club, K.nicker· bocker Club. Softball and Volleyball Intramural Champs

CLARK, CLARA A.- Dayton, Ohio SEA

COLES, SHIRLEY- Dayton, Ohio

CROW, SYLVIA-Dayton, Ohio DEARTH, PEGGY Ji\NE- Dayton, Ohio DE WINE, DA V1D EUGENE- Dayton, Ohio Seconc.l lieutenant Pershing Rifles . Adjutant 57, 58, Circulation Manager Flyer 57, 58, Business i\fanager Flyer 58, 59, 60

DIETZ, JOAN EILEEN-Dayton, Ohio Legion o f Mary , Choir

DIORO, JOSEPH- Dayton, Ohio DIXON, RICHARD L.- Dayton, Ohio SEA. Ed ucation , Th eta

54

Student

Council,

Phi

Alpha


DIRCKSEN, KATHLEEN LOUISESpring Valley, Ohio Epsilon D elta Chi

DORIA, ANTHONY N . -Valley Stream, Ne\v York Knickerbockel' Club, Phys ical Education Club, Intramural Softball , Rifl e T eam , Soccer, SEA

EVANS, ANN VIRGINJA- Dayton, Ohio Education Student Council, SEA, Seasca pe Editor 57-58, Vice President Legion of Mary 59, Fly er

FELLA, SONDRA ANN- Dayton, Ohio Dayton Club, WRA , Girls' T ennis Team Man 1 ager

FISCHER, JACQUETTA ANNDayton, Ohio SEA, Phi Alpha Theta

FISCHER, JO ANN CECILIABellefontaine, Ohio Mar io logy Club, ACEI, Religious Acti vity Council Representative

GAGEL, CATHERINE JANE- Maria Stein, Ohio Home Ec Club, Concert Band, Student Education Council , l\•farching Coeds

GERLACH, PATRICIA ANN-Huntington, W.Va. SEA, SEC, Captain of Marching Coeds, Choir, WRA

GEV AT, GERALDINE ANN-Dayton, Ohio flyerettes, SEA, WRA, Education Student Council

GEYER, SUZANNE JANE-Dayton, Ohio Dayton Club, SEA

GETTER, JANET LEE-Dayton, Ohio Student Education Association

GOODMAN, MARJORIE W.Dayton, Ohio

GRILLOT, ANNETTE MARIE-Russia, Ohio SEA, ESC Secretat1'

GUESS, SUSAN M.-Dayton, Ohio SEA

HAGER, SUE A.-Germantown, Ohio WRA President, SEA, Secretarial Club, Physica l Education Majors Club

HAINES, JAMES CASE- Dayton, Ohio Sports Editor Daytonian 60, Intramural Football and Basketball

HALEY, BETTY ANN-Dayton, Ohio HAMANT, BARBARA JEANDayton, Ohio SEA, Flyerettes, Dayton Club

55


HATMAKER, ANN A MAE-Dayton, Ohio HEIDENREICH, SISTER MARY CHARLES, C.P.P.S. -Dayton, Ohio HORRIGAN, JANE KENNEDYShaker Heights, Ohio Cleveland Club, Flyers Hanger, NEA, BP's Social

HO\X! ARD, EVELYN LUCILLETipp City, Ohio HUNT, PATRICIA ANNE\X! est Milton , Ohio SEA, Defiance College 1, 2

ISHMAEL, MARGARET P.- Dayton, Ohio

JANES, ROBERT DUANE-Dayton, Ohio SEA

JOYCE, JANE- fairview Park, Ohio Rifle Club, Sccr€tary CleYe land Club, SEA

KAISER , MICHAEL HERBERT- Dayton, Ohio SEA Chairman Committee

KELLY, SHARON MARIE- Dayton, Ohio SEA, Central \'V'omen·s Organi zation , Sodality, Orientation Committee, OEA, 1\EA, Christmas Choir

KING, ROBERT LEE- Dayton, Ohio j\{arching and Concert BanJs, Choir. Glee Club, Brass Ensemble, Jntrammals

KLEMAN, SISTER MARY BONAVENTURE, C.P.P.S.-Dayton, Ohio

KOERNER, LOIS CATHERINE- Cincinnati, Ohio CSi\[C, Variety Sho w, Student Booster Committee

KRAMER, IRENE FRANCES-Dayton, Ohio Flyerettes, Dayton Club, StuJ ent Activities Committee Day· tonian , Players

KUHN, SISTER MARY JOSINA-Dayton, Ohio

LANGDON, SISTER MARY CYRIL, C.P.P.S.-Dayton, Ohio LATELL, TONY-Gerard, Ohio LEESE, BARBARA L.-Dayton, Ohio


LEIGH, JOSEPH 1\HCHAEL-Dayton, Ohio Glee Club, Marching and Concert Bands, Choir

LONGO, FRANCES M. -Dayton, Ohio flyers Hanger Secretary 3 )'ears, Central \Xfomen·s Organization (Senior Rep.), Junior Prom Court, Dayton Club, Intramural Vollerball , Orientation Entertainment Chairman, SEA

LONSWAY, GERARD ERNEST- Fostoria, Ohio Marching and . Concert Glee Club

Uands,

Dixie D)'namoes,

Choir,

LUKAS, TILL BARBARA-Dayton, Ohio Secretarial Club

MacGREGOR, NICOLINE M.Dayton, Ohio Association for Childhood Education. SEA

MAJERCIK, EILEEN PHYLISSStrongsville, Ohio Secretary Sodality, SEA, Cleveland Club, Education Honor Society

MEYER, RONALD E.-Dayton, Ohio MEYER, FRANCES MARIE- Dayton, Ohio Flyer, SEA, Publicity Chairman 2, Treasurer 3, Sodality 3, 4, Seascope 2, 3

MILLER, JUNE ANNE-Dayton, Ohio .Marching Coeds, Concert Band, Home Ec Club, SEA

MILLER, MARY SUE-Dayton, Ohio Players, SEA, Flyers Hanger, Dayton Club

MITCHELL, JOYCE ANN-Dayton, Ohio Concert Band I, 2, 3, 1 , Choir I, 2, 3, 4

NAGY, ANDREA LEE-Dayton, Ohio i\.farching Coeds, SEA, Legion of Mary , Education Honor Society

NE\'<'COME, ELEANOR PAUL-Dayton, Ohio NIESE, SISTER MARY ELAINE, C.P.P.S.Dayton, Ohio NOMINA, CAROL ELIZABETH-Delphos, Ohio Home Ec Club

OMIETANSKE, JOSEPH PETERDayton, Ohio Vets Club, Chess Club

O'NEILL, KEVIN-Cleveland, Ohio P ALENCHAR, STEVE JOHNMantua, Ohio Monogram Club, Cleveland Club, Football

57


PAUL, FRAN-Massillon, Ohio Cheerleader, Council

Homecoming

Queen

60,

Sodality,

Student

RAWERS, ANN MARGARET-Dayton, Ohio Education Student Counci l, Dayton Club, SEA

REED, DONALD PATRICK-Dayton, Ohio Education Club, Knickerbocker Club 51 , 52

REITER, SUSAN ANNE-Dayton, Ohio Daytonian Senior Editor, Dayton Club, Junior Prom Court, Publicity Chairman of Senior Week, Honorary Colonel, SEA , Education Honor Society

REYNOLDS, ETHEL L.- Dayton, Ohio REYNOLDS, RONALD LEEKettering, Ohio 1\•farching Band, SEA, Concert Band , Glee Club, Choir, Variety Shows, Mark V

RILEY, PAULA ANN-Franklin, Ohio SEA

RODERER, ROSALIE MARIE-Dayton, Ohio Choir, SEA, Dayton Club, Epsilon Delta Chi

ROGERSON, EDWARD A., JR.-Dayton, Ohio SEA !, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2; Committee Chairman 4; CSMC I, 2

ROGUS, JOSEPHLocust Valley, New York ROZZO, FELIX JAMES-Ashtabula, Ohio Physical Education Club, SEA, Freshman (Education) Orientation Chairman

RUETH, RUTH ANN-Dayton, Ohio Marching Coeds, SEA, Choir

SANDLIN, TERRI A.-Dayton, Ohio SCHNEIDER, SISTER M. LEOLA, C.P.P.S.Dayton, Ohio SCHREIN, JUDITH THERESA-Dayton, Ohio SEA, Legion of Mary

SMITH, PHYLLIS S.-Dayton, Ohio SPERANDEO, Al"JTHONY FRANCISPittsburgh, Pennsylvania Football, Monogram Club

SPITLER, NELLIE ALICE-Laura, Ohio 58


SPRINGER, MARGARET ALMYRADayton, Ohio ST. JACQUES, MARY- Dayton, Ohio STOGDILL, VIRGIE M.-Trotwood, Ohio

STRANGE, SHARON-Dayton, Ohio WRA, Cheerleader, Student Ed ucatio n Co uncil, Physical Education i\'faj ors Club

THIRIFAY, NANCY- Springfield, Ohio WI ALL, WILLIAM TYREE- Dayton, Ohio

\XfENING, GENEVIEVE MARIE-Dayton, Ohio WETHERILL, PAMELA ANN- Dayton, Ohio Flyerettcs 1, 2, 3, \XfRA , SEA, Physical Education Majors Club

\XfiLDENHAUS, SUSAN ANN-Dayton, Ohio SEA, Da}•ton Club

WILLIS, GERALD LESLIE- Dayton, Ohio SEA

WRAY, BERTRAND PATRICKMt. Kisco, New York Varsity Baseball, Monogram Club, Physical ·Education Club, Knickerbocker Club, lntramurals

WRIGHT, JANET-Dayton, Ohio


60


&ngineering

61


RAUER, JEROME LEO, JR. \Xlexford, Pennsylvania BOOS, DONALD JAMES- Effingham, Illinois A.I.Ch .E., Vets Club

CURK, LAWRENCE L.-Cleveland, Ohio Chairman A.I.Ch .E.

FLEMING, PAUL BYRON-Chicago, Illinois Illini Club Treasurer, A.l.Ch .E. Assistant Treasurer, ACS, OSPE, Homecoming Halftime, Homecoming Elections Committee, Orientation Committee

KURZ, PAUL- Dayton, Ohio LANDER, HERBERT R., JR.Lucinda, Pennsylvania A.l.Ch.E., ACS, Keystone Club, Intrarnurals

LEINGANG, JOHN LEONARD-Dayton, Ohio ACS, A.l.Ch .E.

LIMBERT, FRANK JOSEPH-Botkins, Ohio ACS, A.I.Ch.E.

MILLET, CARLOS RENAN-Dayton, Ohio International Club, ASC, Engineering Honor Society

MITRO, FRED T.- Oberlin, Ohio ACS, A .I.Ch .E. , Intr:unurals

POWERS, MICHAEL EDWARD- Dayton, Ohio ACS, A .l.Ch.E., l\•fath Club, American Society for Testing Materials, Pep Rally, lntramurals

REED, THOMAS OWEN-Columbus, Ohio ACS, A.I.Ch.E., Pershing Rifles, Intramural s

WINEGAR, D 0 NALD LEEDayton, Ohio ACS, A .I.Ch.E ., murals

~ 'llltclll b2

qin

Intra-


BITTNER, CHARLES JOSEPHGlenshaw, Pennsylvania Secretary ASCE, Keystone Club, Engineering H onor Society

FERNANDEZ-MALDONADO, HERNANLima, Peru ASCE, ASTM, OSPE, International Club, Latin-American Club

HEGEMANN, KENNETH LOUIS- Dayton, Ohio ASCE, OSPE

RICHTER, ED\Xf ARD CHARLES-Cincinnati, Ohio Cincinnati Club, OSPE, ASCE

SCHURER, JOHN THOMASPittsburgh, Pennsylvania Keystone Club, OSPE, ASCE

SOLLER, DAVID URBAN-Shelbyville, Indiana ASCE, H oosier Club, Pershing Rifles

YOSICK, DENNIS ANTHONY-Shelby, Ohio Vets Club, ASCE, American Society for Testing Materials

Z\XfiESLER, ED\Xf ARD G.-Dayton, Ohio

ivil m 1111 ri


BORNHORST, MELVIN VERNON-Minster, Ohio BURNS, RONALD RAYMOND- Hamilton , Ohio IRE, SAM, Intramural Volleyball and Basketball

BUSDON, VICTOR PHILIP-Youngstown, Ohio AlEE

COTRONA, VINCENT GEORGEN ew Rochelle, New York IRE , AlEE, OSPE, Knickerbocker Club

COTTER, JOHN JAMESPittsburgh, Pennsylvania Chairman AlEE-IRE J oint Student Branch, Engineering Honor Society

CROUSE, RICHARD JOSEPHCleveland, Ohio OSPE, IRE , AlEE, Cleveland Club, Engineering Honor Society

DIETRICH, HERBERT JOHNPittsburgh, Pennsylvania Engineering Honor Society, Keystone Club, AlEE , Intramural s

DOWNEY, FENTON THOMASCold Spring, New York AlE E, NSPE, OSPE

FELDMANN, RICHARD JOSEPHHollis, New York Engineering Hono r Society, Club

IRE, Players, Knickerbocker

FERREE, JOHN ROBERT, JR.Dayton, Ohio IRE , OSPE

FIRST, ROBERT JOSEPHLakewood, Ohio Cl eYeland Club. Intramura l Basketball

FONTANELLA, JOSEPH R. White Plains, New York IRE, AlEE, H ockey

OSPE,

Knickerbocker

Club.

Icc


.•

GARRETI, ARTHUR FRANKLIN-Dayton, Ohio HENNEBERGER, CAROL BEVERLYSpringfield, Massachusetts IRE, SWE

HERBERT, THOMAS PAUL-North Canton, Ohio AlEE

HOFFMAN, RICHARD F.Columbus Grove, Ohio Math Club, IRE, Vets Club, AlEE

JANNING, EUGENE A., JR.Kettering, Ohio JOSEFCZYK, HENRY MATTHEWYorkville, Ohio Basketball, IRE, Monogram Club, Student Coun· cil, V.C. IRE-AlEE Seminar

KERNAN, JOSEPH EDWARDPittsburgh, Pennsylvania OSPE, IRE, Keystone Club, NSPE

KRUETZKAMP, JOHN WILLIAMSouth Fort Mitchell, Kentucky OSPE, NSPE, Bluegrass Club, IRE, AlEE, Intramural Basketball

LIEBLER, LEE-Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

LIOTINO, PETER }.-Elmira, New York Student Council Parliamentarian, SAC General Chairman, IRE Secretary, Math Club Treasurer, Vets Club, OSPE

McCRATE, ROBERT EDWARDPortageville, Missouri IRE, AlEE

McDONALD, PAUL}.Niagara Falls, New York IREE

McGARY, JOHN SARGENTHardinsburg, Kentucky IRI-., AlEE

METCALF, WILLIAM W . -Springfield, Ohio IRE MIDDENDORF, GERALD PAULFort Mitchell, Kentucky IREE, OSPE, AlEE, Bluegrass Club, Intramural Basketball , NSPE

MINNELLI, MARION ANTHONYHamilton, Ohio Vets Club, IRE, AlEE, 1830 Club, Bowling League, 'Intramurals

O'HERRON, ROBERT JOHNCincinnati, Ohio PASSANITI, MICHAEL GREGORYLancaster, Pennsylvania


POST, JOHN LEO-Cincinnati, Ohio IRE

RALL, PAUL M. -Dayton, Ohio Vets Club

REHARGE, TED A.-Dayton, Ohio NSPE, OSPE, IRE, AlEE

SCHUETZ, JOSEPH ROBERTEaton, Ohio AlEE, IR30 Club

SCHULZE, CYRIL HERMANColdwater, Ohio TRAGESER, JAMES HENRYBalta, Missouri IRE, Legion of Mary, Director Flyerettes

ULLRICH, JOHN KARL- Trenton, New Jersey Knickerbocker Club, Intramural Basketball and Football, IRE

VERCHOT, ALBERT IRVINPittsfield, Massachusetts AlEE , IRE

WHITE, DOROTHY ANN-Dayton, Ohio IRE, AlEE, SWE


!HdJ rstrtal tngiHeetiHg

BECERRA, DANIEL-Lima, Peru IE Club, Intramural Vollqball, Varsity Soccer, International Club, latin-American Club

COLON, ABILIO-Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico International Club

DALEY, WILLIAM EDWARD-Dayton, Ohio Vets Club

EDMONDSON, LAWRENCE H.-Dayton, Ohio Intramurals, IE Club

TEACH, ELLIS ARTHUR-North Hampton, Ohio

URTEAGA, ANIBAL-Lima, Peru Varsity Soccer, IE Club, International Club, latin-American Club, Intramural Basketball, Volleyball, Softball

WALSH, G. PATRICK-Youngstown, Ohio IE Club, OSPE, Flyers Hanger, l\fost Proficient MSI

67


ANDERSON, JAMES W.-Massillon, Ohio ASME, OSPE, Flyer

BELL, THOMAS ANTHONYMaple Heights, Ohio ASME, OSPE, Glee Club, Cleveland Club, Cincinnati Club

BENNETT, JAMES ALBERT-Somerset, Ohio ASME, OSPE

BIER, THOMAS EDWARDDayton, Ohio Homecoming, F I y e r s Hanger, ASME, OSPE, WONG, Cleveland Club, l\·fember (Emeritus) 840 Club

BOEHMAN, LOUIS IRASt. Meinrad, Indiana President Engineering Honor Society, Math Club, ASME, Hoosier Club

BOERGER, JOHN JOSEPHMinster, Ohio ASME, OSPE, Intramural Football, Flyers Hanger, Sigma Mu Lambda

BROERING, ROGER FRANCISFort Thomas, Kentucky ASME 3, 4

CASTONGUAY, JOHN RAOULPiqua, Ohio ASME, OSPE, NSPE, Intramural Basketball

CORDOVA, ARTURO JESIUSSan Luis, Mexico International Club, Soccer Team

GEISSLER, GEORGE OSCARPittsburgh, Pennsylvania Keystone Club, Intramural Football, Softball, Basketball, ASME, OSPE

HARRIS, ROBERT EUGENE- Dayton, Ohio HART, -DAVID G.-Wellsville, New York Vice Chairman ASME, OSPE, Keystone Club, Knickerbocker Club, Intramural Basketball, f.ootball , Softball

68


.IIF.N 'E .

CY. Tl:-.K>TH Y \VAR R Sprin fidel, O hro

Fr bm.1n PO<ltl:u I, AS!IH! H EI RM;\f\, P I IP 1. - cw.uk, 0 io ub, II rs H nger

Tr~surer 0 · ·, A.;::.~E. 'col . bu .

LALTC..I:-1, RIC:H.I\RD P.- D:ty{

Oh1l,

11,

R

MA I ILI!, 13rRKARD VI

D.1 · on, Ohio

Muh Cluh, ,'\ M • MAY R. PAL;L 111!.\ /RY Cirll inn ti, O lu W nrer'

lu

urer I A

Pl"e'i.!mt f

1 ' '

n.oti llu l>. Tr ,,, .

~IE

NCr, T.A \ H •N 'E SO PI J lw 0 I h~ '.llf

KRY5L>\K,

In b. A ,\I r

J

Honoluln H.lw.lii

Ch.:vd nd, Ol io

A'>M , OSJ r Hwd,

rTcam

Kcnnu.ky

S< HI.!HZI

·c.

MARK NOHI3J:RT-

cndnn.tti, Ohio A:-\I F., 0 .' -Pii, Ci nc1nn ri

Sl L 0, Rl HAlUJ

Eas Mcadow,

~ew

York

A Ml!

V ·. {<,AMINI, GEORGE Pen in

L-D.t~1

. Ohi

Rifl · , 0'PE, A'ME Pre<uknt. lm r.amural Soft.

1· ·11 \Xi A LT.ACF.. WILLI:\ M CT. .i\R K.E-1\f~;dwa}. Ohio A, ~!F.

WELAGE. j nnM li

ART. H . RY-Cincinn.:u.i, Qhjo ub, A 'ME, 0 P ·

\XlOODRUFF, WILLIAM LEA- D ayt n. Ohio A 'ME

ub


Science

71


ADOLF, JOHN E.-Lancaster, New York Pick & Hammer Club

BISHOP, DAVID CLARENCE-Aurora, Illinois Sigma Delta Pi, Illini Club

BENASUTTI, ROGER-Fairborn, Ohio TI Club

BOSCH, CHARLES WILLIAM-Xenia, Ohio Dayton Club, Intramural Basketball

BRADY, AL-Dayton, Ohio Physics Club

BURKHARDT, RICHARD P.-Dayton, Ohio Sigma Delta Pi

CARLEO, JAMES ONOFRIONew York, New York Knickerbocker Club

CHALK, SISTER M. VINCENT DE PAUL, SFP-Dayton, Ohio CLUNE, JULIANNA B.-Chickasaw, Ohio ACS, International Club, Choir, Philosophy Club

DAVIS, JOSEPH EDWARD-Brooklyn, New York AlEE. IRE, Knickerbocker Club

DICKSON, GERALDINE "GERRY" FRANCESDayton, Ohio Flyer, ACS, Choir, Players

DIERKER, PAUL F.-Cheyenne, Wyoming Senior Class President, Student Council, l'v[ath Club, Physics Club

DOEBLER, CHARLES EDWARD-Dayton, Ohio Pick & Hammer Club

DUCHAK, JOHN MICHAEL-Dayton, Ohio Sigma Delta Pi President

DURSO, SISTER MARY DAMIAN, SFPDayton, Ohio

ECKSTEIN, SISTER M. ETHEL-Dayton, Ohio EDMISTON, WILLIAM L.-Fairborn, Ohio Nu Epsilon Delta

EDWARDS, ELAINE RUTH- Dayton, Ohio

72


ELLIS, SUEANNE-Dayron, Ohio Home Ec Club President, Program Chairman, Dayton Club

EMMERT, HELEN INGRID-Kettering, Ohio Home Ec Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Choir 2

FARRIS, CHARLES-Dayton, Ohio

F ASS, WILLIAM-Kettering, Ohio Debate Team, Physics Club

FECKE, MARY LOUISE-Dayton, Ohio Sigma Delta Pi, Freshman Orientation Committee 2.. 4, Chemistry Club 3, 4, Choir 3, 4, Flyer 4, Intemallonal Club 4

FISCHER, DAVID W.-Centerville, Ohio

FISHER, JEROME C.-Dayton, Ohio FLACH, THEODORE G.-Dayton, Ohio :M ath Club, Physics Club, Bluegrass Club

FRANKOWITZ, STANLEY HERBERTDayton, Ohio Intramural Baseball

GROGEAN, THOMAS NORBERT-Minster, Ohio ASME, OSPE, Engineering Honor Society

HIBBELN, FREDERIC PHILIPConnersville, Indiana Sigma Delta Pi

HUNT, JOHN SPENCER-Aurora, Illinois Illini Club, Sigma Delta Pi

KALINOWSKI, DONALD DAVIDCleveland, Ohio Scabbard & Blade, Pershing Rifles, Geology Club President, Choir, Rifle Club

KILCOYNE, RAPHAEL FRANCIS-Dayton, Ohio Sigma Delta Pi

LANE, PATRICIA LUISE-Miamisburg, Ohio Nu Epsilon Delta

lYONS, LINDA LEA-Dayton, Ohio Dayton Club, Flyers Hanger, Daytonian 3, Turnabout Decoration Chairman 2, 3, UD Representative for Elder's College Board 2, 3

KENNARD, MARY SANDRA-Augusta, Kentucky Bluegrass Club 1, 2, 4, Home Ec Club 1, 2, 3, Vice President 4

MANNING, JOHN-Dayton, Ohio 73


MARTINEZ, VIERA, HECTOR G.Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico International Club, Latin-American Club, Sigma Delta Pi, ACS, Hon. Premed. Soc.

McBARRON II, JAMES WILLIAM-Lima, Ohio Pick & Hammer Club, Flyers Hanger, Illini

l'vfcCLOSKEY, JOHN WILLIAM-Dayton, Ohio Math Club, Project Globe

MINAVEH, SISTER M. PAUL. JOANNE, SFPDayton, Ohio MOHLMAN, HENRY THEODORESt. Henry, Ohio l\L!th Club, Physics Club, ACS

NONELLE, RICHARDMineola, Long Island, New York Varsity Baseball , Freshman Football , Intrarnurals, Monogram Club, Knickerbocker Club President, Junior Prom Committee. Orientation Committee

O'MARA, HELEN W.-Fairborn, Ohio Writers Club

OMLOR, RALPH-Dayton, Ohio OTERO, RAYMOND B.-Dayton, Ohio Sigma Delta Pi, Intramurals, ACS, Knickerbocker Club

PAX, RALPH A.-Dayton, Ohio Vets Club

PETROKAS, ROBERT FELIX-Dayton, Ohio Dayton Club Vice President

ROHR , WILLIAM GEORGE-Kettering, Ohio Physi cs Club

PRINCEHOUSE, JOSEPH B.-Sidney, Ohio Student Council President 59, 60, OSPE, IE Club, Flyers Hanger, Intramurals

ROMER, JAMES FLORENZ-Dayton, Ohio Class Treasurer 60, Sigma Delta Pi Vice President, Chemistry Club, Flyers Hanger, Intramurals

SABOL, EDWARD DAVID, JR.Yonkers, New York Sigma Delta Pi, ACS, Knickerbocker Club, Dean's List

SCHNEBLE, WILLIAM J.-Dayton, Ohio Ice Hockey Captain . Sigma Delta Pi, Dayton Club. Flyers Hanger, Intramurals

SCHNEIDER, SISTER M. ALEXIS, SFPDayton, Ohio SHIVELY, BEVERLY JOYCE-Dayton, Ohio

74


SMITH, JEROME ALLEN-Dayton, Ohio .Math Club President 59, 60

SMITH, LAWRENCE HERBERT-Cincinnati, Ohio Physics Club

STEFANKO, JEROME STEPHENPittsburgh, Pennsylvania Physics Club, Keystone Club, Variety Shows

SWARTZBAUGH, JOSEPH T-Dayton, Ohio Physics Club, i\Jath Club

WALSH, JAMES JOSEPH-Portsmouth, Ohio Geology Club

WEAVER, LENORA JEAN-Dayton, Ohio

YOUNG, NORBERT ANTHONYKenmore, New York Freshman Welcome Dance General Chairman, Flyer, SAC, Pep Committee, Student Council Vice President, Homecoming 58 General Chairman, Spring Week, Field Day 59 Chairman, General Co-Chairman 59, Junior Class Party Chairman, Flyers Hanger President, Knickerbocker Club, Senior Farewell Committee, Intramurals, Wedgewood Liquidation Society


AN UNHURRIED VIEW OF EROTIC BEHAVIOR ... FRESHMEN-SOPHOMORES

"If they don 't stop ha"ing drill on these rainy days . . .".

"For the first time in your life, fed really clean!"

"Off we go to Grandmother's house."

76


"Hold everything! I left my meal ticket at home!"

~ "And because of this visit, we can expect an improvement 1 n international affairs."

"That's the last time I go to an Omega party."

77


FRESHMAN ROTC

"With LIVE ammunition ?"

"Why can't I have a rifle, too?"

"And one for you and one for rne and two for you and ... "

Every so often, if they have been mannerly and orderly at drill, the ROTC Freshmen are allowed to release their hostilities.

"Stand still, target!"

78


MOSTLY SENIORS

Remember to buy Christmas seal s. guys.

But it's only a poo r, defenseless, unhearing machine, Fran.

" \Xfhat Jo you mean . does it ti ckle ?"

" Sure, I have change for a ten."

"Good 1!-rief. \\'ho mixed that last bo\\' l of pund1 , ..

79


DEPARTMENTS

80


DEPARTMENTS

All men are gods: all gods are folly

81


ASSOCIATE GRADUATES

ALECKNA, ROBERT GEORGEEuclid, Ohio Cleveland, Ohio, TI Club, Pep Committee, Homecoming Float Committee, Intramurals, Band

AMEND, HOWARD M. -

Dayton, Ohio

ANDERSON, JAROLD G.Miamisburg,

ARNOLD, RUDOLPH JOSEPHDayton, Ohio Knickerbocker Club, Intramurals

BARNETT, JAMES ROGERBrookville, Ohio BARRY, CHARLES THEODOREPortsmouth, Ohio TI Club, CSMC

BARTUS, JOHN- Dayton, Ohio BAUER, ROBERT JOSEPH-Belleville, Illinois Varsity Tennis, TI Club President, Illini Club

BEERY, JACK-Dayton, Ohio

BLAND, RAYMOND- Clayton, Ohio BOSTICK, WAYNE A.- St. Henry, Ohio BROWN,

J. MICHAEL- Niagara Falls, New York

Rifle Club, TI Club


BROWN, ROBERT-Trotwood, Ohio BUKOWSKI, WILLIAM JAMESPittsburgh, Pennsylvania CALLAHAN, DONALD T.-Richmond, Indiana

CARPENTER, ROBERT MORRELL-Dayton, Ohio GIBSON, GERALD LEE- Kettering, Ohio CIANI, SAMUEL N.- Dayton, Ohio

CINDRIC, WILLIAM L.-Dayton, Ohio Vets Club

COLEMAN, RODNEY EUGENE- D:tyton, Ohio CLEARY, JAMES LOUIS-Dayton, Ohio

DANIEL, CHARLES JAMESTiffin, Ohio TI Club

DE SERRE, CHARLESXenia, Ohio DAVIS, JOBN B.-Elida, Ohio TI Club, Vets Club

DOTTO, JAMES D.New Kensington, Pennsylvania Kerstone Club, Debate Team, TI Club

DWYER, ROBERT FRANK, LARRY E.-Xenia, Ohio

FRITZ, DAVID W.-Xenia, Ohio GELS, KENNETH EDWARD-St. Henry, Ohio GIBBONEY, JAMES A.- Piqua, Ohio


GONZALEZ, CESAR \1V'. - New York, New York Knickerbocker Club, Rifle Club, ACS, Pep Committee, Intramural Softball, TI Club

HENRY, LA \1V'RENCE JOSEPH-Steubenville, Ohio Keystone Club, TI Club

HENSLEY, PAUL HENRY, JR.-Dayton, Ohio

HOFF, LEROY EDWARD-Hamilton, Ohio HOFSTETTER, CHARLES JOSEPH-Palh1a, Ohio Cleveland Club, TI Club, Players, Homecoming Campaign Chairman

HOOVER, WILLIAM-Dayton, Ohio

JACKSON, DEAN BAKERDayton, Ohio JARED, CHARLES A.Dayton, Ohio JONSKE, LOUIS JOSEPHBaltimore, Maryland Counselor Gibbons, TI Club, Intramurals, Float Committee and Publicity

KIEFFER, PAUL JAMES-Floral Park, New York Knickerbocker Club, ACS

KINSEL, EDMUND FRANCISNew Lexington, Ohio TI Club

KONCZAL, MICHAEL-Toledo, Ohio Cl~veland,

Ohio

KUKLA, TIMOTHY C.- Parma, Ohio Cleveland Club, Pep Club, ACS, Intramurals, Rifle Club, TI Club

LACY, THOMAS A.-Waynesville, Ohio LA SUSA, JOSEPH IGNATIUSPoughkeepsie, New York Math Club, Knickerbocker Club, TI Club

LEFLAR, RICHARD EUGENE-Dayton, Ohio MAUK, JAMES THOMAS-Dayton, Ohio McAULIFFE, EDWARD DANIELBrooklyn, New York Knickerbocker Club, TI Club


McCALLY, PAUL LEONARD-Dayton, Ohio MITRO, FRANCIS H.- Oberlin, Ohio TI Club Vice President. Intramurals

NOVAK, EDWARD JOSEPHPittsburgh, Pennsylvania Keystone Club, Tech·Ni Club

PAONE, ROBERT PAULPittsburgh, Pennsylvania Keystone Club

PINO, JAMES JOSEPB-Niagara Falls, New York Knickerbocker Club, Rifle Club, TI Club, Intramurals, Pep Committee

PSENICKA, CLIFFORD JOHN- Cleveland, Ohio Cleveland Club

RABY, COURTLAND WILLIAM, JUNIOR-Dayton, Ohio REBOULET, WILLIAM CHARLES - Dayton, Ohio ROCCHIO, FRANK HENRYLinden, New Jersey Knickerbocker Club, Rifle Club, TI Club, ACS, AICE

ROMIE, RICHARD JOSEPH-Fort Laramie, Ohio ROTH, ROBERT LOUIS-Portsmouth, Ohio RATTERMAN, JOSEPH HENRYMiddletown, Kentucky

SEAVEY, DENNIS WILLIAM-Springfield, Ohio SIDERS, NELSON EUGENE-Trotwood, Ohio SILCOTT, THOMAS M.-Xenia, Ohio

SILER, DALE CORWIN-Dayton, Ohio Intramural Bowling and Skating

SMITH, DAVID D.-Lima, Ohio TI Club, Rifle Club, Cleveland Club, CYO

SMITH, ELMER D.-Daytori, Ohio


STRASSELL, JAMES G.-Cincinnati, Ohio TI Club Secretary

TEMPEL, JAMES LEROY-Paulding, Ohio TJ Club, President, Cleveland Club

TULLY, THOMAS MATTHEWBrooklyn, New York TJ Club, Knickerbocker Club

VAN LEEUWEN, ROBERT H.-Dayton, Ohio VICK, BURL H.-Dayton, Ohio WUEBBEN, THOMAS PAUL-Dayton, Ohio

ZEQUEIRA TORAL, FRANCISCO XAVIERHate Rey, Puerto Rico TI Club, International Club

SHEFFIELD, LESLIE HUNCincinnati, Ohio Educt~! ion

WRA , SEA, Co-Ree, P.E., Majors Club

SUTTON, MARY MARGARETDayton, Ohio AriJ


ONWARDS, STOUT HEARTS ...

87


ARTS EDWARD A. HUTH Sociology

REV . ADRIAN J . McCARTHY

BRO. JOHN R. PERZ

English

MAURICE R. REICHARD

REV. EDMUND L. RHODES

Music

PhiloSOphy

BRO. ALBERT H . ROSE

WILFRED J. STEINER

Political Science

History

ROBERT L. NOLAND Psychology

REVEREND GEORGE B. BARRETT, S.M.

88

Dean of the Coiiege of Arts and Sciences


JUNIORS

EVERYONE PICKS ON ME: in there somewhere are George Bates, Hal Nielson, Sam Havadrink, Charlie Connolly, Ann Stark, John Stroh, Andre Bourdet Jr., Anudder Shot, Forda Rhode, Jackie Kuhn, Carters Bile, and the Bobbsey twins

THE MORALIST: Brian Hood, Pat Stippich, Dick Flanagan, Lynn Deters, ], Bruce Alessie, Myrna Gretsinger, Jacquie Hopkins, Dave Kiger, Marty Payne, Bob Frost. . Gordie Lah

89


ARTS

GOOD OLD SCHOOL SPIR IT: Joe Conwell, Jerry Wesibrock. Dick Lienesch. Jim O' Hara. Charlie Gradel. Georgt Henkle

SOPHOMORES 90


QUIET, PLEASE . PEOPLE ARE STUDYING: silliuz- Julie O "Meara , Nancy Clarke, .rltwdillg- Dee le,vi s, Bob Hogan , Alfred Cl o user, Susa n Faulkner

ARTS

SOPHOMORES

YE , W · RE ALL HAP PY: frontelson J. M artin Jr. . .Michel Kuwaha ra, Janet Leff, Karen Fleming, Sue Ann M ill r, Anne Reil ing, u·rtmd- Don Quig lee, D on La vant)•, Bdl Toll, Ben J akubowski , Jtrr )' Callahan, J im Kronenberg. Bli I D ar. Steve King, Rich Thomas

ARTS

FRESHMEN 91


ARTS

FRESHMEN OBVIOUSLY POSED: Linda Benjamin, Anita Amato , Ron Polidora, Gayle Schwain, Brenda Johnson

92

WAKE ME WHEN WE'RE LEAVING: fronl:- Joyce FloyJ . Pat Aufderheide, Liz Castellin i, Barbara Conner, Cathey Kramer . .recond- Frank Grabsk i. Eddie, Frank Carbone. John J'v[eagher. George Ringo . lhird- Greg 'J<fagner, Jim Po r路ovic


THE BEAUTIFICATION OF A CAMPUS

For months prior to the September opening of the University, workmen labored feverishly, striving to turn a once drab campus into a landscaped artist's palette.

Exotic metal lacework soon decorated the facades of the buildings. Strangely contrived pendulums dangled enticingly in the air.

路~ '.' :-

Remodeling a doorway on the second floor of St. Mary's, workmen Aichen and Zymurgy became carried away in their zeal, waJied in the door, opened their own illicit pre-registration bureau.

By the time the novice student stepped on campus, work, though not completed, had resulted in a majestic expanse of inspiring grounds, stretching to the setting sun, resplendent in the glory of the fair young growing things .. . not necessarily vegeta tive.

'

.,

_-!...,.


FACULTY

94

RICHARD R. BAKER Associate Professor of Philosophy

CLARENCE H. BAXTER, JR. Instructor in Speech

BRO. LAWRENCE L. BOLL Professor of English

EDWARD R. BURROUGHS Instructor in Fine Arts

ERVING E. BEAL'REGARD Associate Professor of History

REV. CHARLES C. BLOEMER Assistant Prof. of Philosophy

BUD T. COCHRAN Instructor in English

REV. WILLIAM J. COLE Assistant Prof. of Religion

REV. RICHARD ]. DOJ\-!BRO Assistant Prof. of Philosophy

ROCCO M. DONATELLI Assistant Prof. of History

REV. JAMES E. DONNELLY Assistant Prof. of English

REV. JOHN A. ELBERT Professor of Philosophy

SARAH A. ZIMMERMAN Instructor in English


JAMES B. FISHER Assistant Prof. of English

REV. EDWIN M. LEIMKUHLER Professor of Religion

HELEN S. PETERSON Assistant Prof. of English

LAWRENCE E. TAGG Associa te Prof. of Music

PATRICK S. GIL VARY Instructor in Speech

BRO. RICHARD A. LIEBLER Associate Prof. of History and Political Science

ANTOS C. RANCURELLO Assistant Prof. of Psychology

JAMES A. SUMMERS Assistant Prof . of Philosophy

REV . PHILIP C. HOELLE Assistant Prof. of Philosophy

REV. LAWRENCE W. MONHEIM Associate Prof. of Religion

KLARA REYST Associate Prof. of Languages

BRO. LOUIS WEBER Instructor in Art

EDWIN R. KING Assistant Prof. of History

LORRAINE M. MURPHY Instructor in English

BRO. GEORGE J. RUPPEL Assistant Prof. of History

NOREAN F. WRIGHT Instructor in English

BRO. GEORGE F. KOHLES Associate Prof. of Religion

PHILIP A. LAKE Instructor in English and Speech

REV . BERNARD A. NEUBAUER Assistant Prof. pf Religion

CHARLES H. SCHEIDLER Associate Prof. of Psychology

WALTER SORY Assistant Prof. of Languages

VERYL L. ZECH Associate Prof. of Music

95


BUSINESS MARY C. CIVILLE Secretarial Studies

ORVILLE COMER Business Organization

CHARLES W . WHALEN , JR. Associate Prof. Chairman of the D ep t. of Retailing

9b

DR. HILARY BETH ASJociate Dean of B11siness Admini.rlfation

CON ]. FECHER Economics

BARTH}. SNYDER Professor Chairman of the Dept. of Business Organization


EDMUND tl. O ' LEARY Professor Chairman of the Dept. of Economics

GERTRUDE D. SHAY Business

JANET H. WILSON Accounting

JOSEPH F. UPDYKE Accounting

THE GRANDSTAND: fro111-Hardly Wurthit, Chuck Sweeney, Eddie Paulus, •·ear- Don Stuart, Ronald Danna, Tony Mazza, Corp. Finance, Math Accounting

BUSINESS

JUNIORS 97


BUSINESS

SOPHOMORES 98

STRANGE HOW A BENCH CAN ATTRACT: ft路oni-Cynthia Nelson. Mona Lee Joseph, Charlotte Harper, secondThomas A. Micholak, Bill Lawrence, Bonnie Rose, Carl C. Dirksen , Susan Horstman. Carol Feggeler, Richard Reis, l'enr-Hank Staniszewski, Tom Spellman


BUSINESS

FRESHMEN NO. NO, GANG ... OVER HERE' Fumt rou Ron Yoakum , Joan Carsan, Marilyn McKinny, Louise Sawaya, Gabby Hayes, secoud-Victor Torbeck, Ernest Kieman, Hugh Murphy, G . Richard Dacey, third- Joh R. Martin, Tom Roderer, James Messer, Robert Callister, fou·rth- Hernan Guajardo, Allan Heller, John Turkaly, George J. Schrimpf, fifth- Joe Trovato, Charles Ludol!'Jh, David F. Murphy, Don Hamberg, Don Haemmerle, sixth--Gale Grismer, Robert Jones , James Hausfled, Johnny Fox, John Schoemy

AN ADMIRING GLANCE: left fro/It-Kathy Dunham, Gloria Keuritt, Rosemarie Hudak, left re<~r-Mary Lou Rosenberger, Mara \Xfa hl, Bonnie Huelsman, 1·ight fwut-Adele Little, Nanq• J\-!akley, Jane Kroger, right rear-Barb Conley, Judy Clark, Jane Kleckner, idol-Phillip Di Ruocco

BUSINESS

FRESHMEN 99


THE FINANCIERS: front-Carol Rizzo, Judy Baudendistel. .rewnd-Juan Ernesto Del Rosario, Chuck Campolo, Robert John Henigan, third-James Mooney, Sanford C. Douglas, Chesley Wheeler, Jerry Petermugh, Modesto Quilves, Robert Fosnaught, re(/1~John Hirt, John Dignam, John ]. Kerby, Charles E. Sempsey, Skip Viragh, Howard Hessinger, Dennis l. Sunderhaus

BUSINESS

FRESHMEN

THE MANIPULATORS: silting-Michael Nagle, Bob Gothie, Roy Kraebel, fii'Jt wu路- Dick Rohan , Carol Gold路 schmidt, Barbara Curtner, Sandy Karn , Kim Corpstein, second-Bill Bauer, Herbie Fox, Joe Gallina, John Boccuzza. tbird-Lou Hettinger, Alberto Martinez. James Deime, Frank Langman, fourthFrank ]. Ingalla, Romano, B. Castelli, Joe Coneglio, fifth-}.-fichael Colgan. Joseph Gallucci. Paul Lamment

100


BUSINESS

FRESHMEN

THE MAGNATES: t路ear-Jim Setford, William Routzonz, Paul, John A. Peters, Raymond Pastor, Michael Case, Ben Cestone, Pat Wall, Dan Estler, secondGary Priddy, Jerry Stoll, Bill Schenkel, Dave Boland, Chuck D. Polito, louis Dinicola, Jerry Boeckerman, Dan Kaczorowski, Mike Durkin, front-Russel Borelle, Nicholas Wong, Jim Sieffert, Martha Stauber, Carol Frazier, Barbara Conn, Joseph Ricciardi, Ben Jakubowski

BUSINESS

FRESHMEN

THE INDUSTRIALISTS: rem路-Helen Fiessinger, Mike Brown, loretta Yaoo, Paul l. Melloty, front-Dolores Thurn, Thomas A. Gagel, Rosalie Glaser, Phyllis Schneider

101


EDUCATION

SIM01 J. CHAVEZ Education

DORIS A. DREES Health and Physical Education

SISTER M. FELICITAS C.P.P.S . Elementary Education

HENRY L. FERRAZZO Chairman of the Dept. Physical Education

ROBERT C. FORT Health and Physical Education

BROTHER LOUIS 102

J.

FAERBER, S.M.

Associate Dean of Edflcation

BRO. JOHN F . Elv1LING Education


\Xf!T H LEFTIST TENDENCIES: ce11ter- Ray Thomes, first rou·-Colleen Weir, Layne Lahrman, Elaine Fosnot, Janice Wojtena, Ruthie Rueth , Sandi Sutton, Barb Feltner, Rita Fasolino, SanJy Carlile, second-Charleen Sullivan, Wilma Huelskamp, Charlotte Green, Ruth King, Deane Amann, Martha Fread, Mary Jo \X'ithrow, Judy Mayer, Irmhilp Buller, !bird-Rollin Furnas, W. L. Society, Ed Szeman, Bob McCoy, Joe McSteen , Earl Klosterman , Flint Loise

WITH RIGHTIST TENDENCIES: ctnter- AnJrc J. Baundit, firs! row-Barb Baison, Joan Murphy, Pat BucharJ. Judy Hoely , Regina freoh, Y\'onne Monnin , Frances Morris, .rerond--Kathleen Harris, Charlene Herz, Judy l\•lancer, Margie Moritz, Cacloe Lyl e, Harriet Ammann , Nancy Jo Caito, Sandy Wolf, Judy Pohl, lhird --John Nagle, Tom Cobey, J . Huntsberger, Bill Voge l. Vince Lombardo, Mike Sobota, C. Craycraft, fuurlb- Ernie Monnin, Ray Thomes, Jerome Steigerwald, Frank Kosco

jQ3


WITH RADICAL TENDENCIES: front- Dave Pfeifer, Congo Bill, firrt raw-Dotty DeVoe, Jill Edelman, Jane Van Thiel, Dorothy Napora, Pat Riley, Sharon Hollis, Joe Pizza, second-Judy Heiser, Theresa Curtner, Sharre Lawson, Vicky Miller, Joanne Rufe, Ann Stark, Janet Albright, Carmen Bauer, third- Louise Hand, Barb Kuntz, Pinky Henry, Bobbie Koenig, Marian Reasor, Pat Loges, Rose Garrity, Carol Burkhardt, Martha Watchler. Mary Geswein. fa!lrth-~ Christine Vogt, Joan Heenan, Sally Kuntz, Julie Gilmore, Kathy Liddy, Pat Gifford, Rozann, Connie, Liz, 1\<farilyn, way b,1ckTed Jones

WITH ALL KINDS OF TENDENCIES: first rou 路- Betti Grable, Pat McMillan, Joan Reichart, Madeline Albers, second-Carol Hoying, Gladys Huber. Carolyn Johnson, Kim Cokie, Jeanne Kipp, Judy Schoenberger, Joyce Aychler, on rock-Ramona Munsey, Mike White, thir路d-M. Hubbard, Ludwig Dietl. I 04 Marge Walsh, Shelly Lamonica, Mary Joyce, Sandra Monnin, Lou Rifeman Jr.


SOPHOMORES

EDUCATION

GRAB YOUR PARTNER : fr ont--Tom Lamendola, Mary Seeger, Ginny Valley, Betsy Weiler, Roberta Staup, Joan Allen, Joyce Floyd, b,1ck- Richard J. Kindle, Bernard Whalen, Jerry Hardt, Vincent Hogan, Al Roemer, Bill Stout, Jack Stein

FRESHMEN

FIVE PENNIES: :Martha Elliot, Linda Blake, Carol Allodi, Susan Hussong, Virginia Carter

105


THE PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION: frollt-]im Bender, fir.rt row-Daryle Ballweg, Richard Diamond, seco11d row -Pat DeBrosse, Cynthia Fortune, Barbara Harmeling, Shirley Watson, Kay Lyle, Patricia, Ferrie, Sheila Kerr, Carol Mahan, third row-Pat Kessler, Kathy Creager, Peggy \X'ard , Betsy Weiler, Joyce Niekamp, Margie Hoying, Lois Winklejohn, Rita Stockert

106

CAPT. KANGAROO AND CREW: first row-Thomas Klump , Jo Ann Mra~. Judy Van Kirk, Donna Somers, seco11d ro w-Cappy, Ben Goodman, A. E. Neumann, Charles Brown, Norman Rich, !bird row- Skinny Frank, Harry C. James, James P. Steinman, Bab Mayberry, four!b row-Raphael Mendez: !v{ary Ackerman, Irving Wong, Andrew Courter


PERCENTAGES: frollt-Jane Taylor, fir.rt 1'0U' Marla Mink, Marti Schmid , Iona Siegel, Margaret Siegel , Ellen Bromley, Frances Accrocco, Linda Otto, sewnd I'Ow-Carol Eilerman, Sharon Downey, Doroth)' Glendening, Phyllis Romie, Bridget Nardini, Barbam George, tbir.d row-Marcia Buchard, Laurie Dolph, Barbara Flamm , Dorothy Ungruhn, fourth row-M . Judith Nosil. Yvonne Didier, Georgia Bucharc.l. fifth rou路-Connie Lawson, Katherine SanJor. b,,ck-J. Scanlon

BACK TO NATURE: froTlt-Gerald W. Webber, fim rou 路-Barbara A. Conner, Sherry Hables, Kathy Gottshall, Sue Anne Michael, Sandra Smith, Pat Wildes, secoTld t路ow-Linda Sobieski, Catherine Dunn , Karen Brademeyer, Myrna Welter, Joan Chudd, Gretchen Sadlier, Karen Roycraft, third row-Mike Hackett, Lea J. Reuss, Charles Cozad

107


WELL, OFFER THE LADIES Barbara A SEAT: front Beach, Helen Eisenhauer, Bernadette Simcn Dinger, Edwina Cibulb, sec011d-Ann Palmer, Cathy Seipel, Cathy Rigolo, third-Linda Arvin , Liz Castellini, Janice Tekamp, Joan Ryan, fourth - Janet Kuntz, Mary Altick, Georgia Moyers, fifth-Joseph Polgar, Colleen Harrigan, Patricia Beumer, sixth-Jerry Partyka, Karl E. Hild, silling-William G. Atberth, Mike Bender, Stephen Schumm

108

TOP MAN: fr ol!t-Dora Baker, Sharon Guenther, Rose Ann Knoebel , Patti Jackson, Sue Folker, Sharon Kay Gar\'er, Judy Dapore, seco11d-Joan Cunningham, Margaret Back, Jane \Xfilkins, Judy Shoup, Janet Baker, Marjorie Allen, third-Rita Wirth. Doris Kay Wagoner, Marily Romie, fourth-Elizabeth Fox, Gloria Mejak, top manMaynard Fergeson


FACULTY

DANIELL. LEARY Education Director of Student Teaching

CADET STUDENT TEACHERS

MARY T. LEONARD Health and Physical Education

LEONARD T. BLACKBURN Health and Physical Education

JAMES B. LA VANCE Health and Physical Education

SISTER MARY PELAGIA, M .S.C. Education

ALMA E. RUHMSCHUSSEL Coordinator of Student Field Experiences

THE CADETS: back-Gail Busch, Rita Dorsten, Sandra Hunt, front-Carolyn Brown, Karen Koehler, Janet Moore, Dotty DeVoe

109


ENGINEERING

H . LAMAR ALDRICH Engineering Drawing

JOSEPH J. CHAMBERLAIN Civil Engineering

THADDEUS CZAKI Mechanical Engineering

JUNIORS

TAKING ADVANTAGE OF NEW BEER LAW: Charles K . Sweeney, Ned Becker, Tony Campanelli, George Inouye, Norman G . Horn, James Quinn, Timothy C. Murphy

DR. MAURICE R. GRANEY 110

Dean of the College of Engineering


GEORGE F. DRISCOLL Civil Engineering

WALTER A. SPURGEON Drawing Engineering

OSKAR HAUENSTEIN Engineering Drawing

JAi\!ES P. HSU Chemical Engineering

ADRIA.t"' J. MORGAN Electrical Engineering

BERNHARD ~f. SCHMIDT Electrical Engineering

STRIVING FOR HIGHER EDUCATION: top to hoi/om-Roger Toth, Ray Trevelline, George F. Halforan

Ill


ENGINEERING

SOPHOMORES

INTO EACH MAN'S LIFE A LITTLE RAIN .. . Ho Rhee

112

WHAT DO YOU MEAN WE'RE LATE FOR SIGN-IN? Top to bottom le ft James Schrader, Louis Lunne, Clement Etreck, top to bottom middle- George K mmer, Lou Dr6esch, Gerald Prinzing, near right-G'"eorgc Kunkel


ENGINEERING

SOPHOMORES

YOU GIRL, ME ENGINEER: left limb-Marvin Missig, Steve Schrand, John Kutter, D . Tarscn, middh~Richard Dailey. B ~ rnie _). Rezv, ri,ght lim b- Bob Balcert'k. Larry Patterson, 011 gro11nd- Peter V . Ct'rar, ThonHts Smith, Tom Bartz

A PRACTICAL SORT OF fRIENDSHIP : Rob D oe rr. Tom Druffel. Andrew Pickutowski.

113


ENGINEERING

YES. WE BUlL T IT: front 1路ow-Law rence Raiff , William Snitler, Leon Vorst, john Jauch, Bob Kohls, jerome Wysong, Joseph Lehmann, Dennis J. Seit:<, han gin~- John A. Allison , with umbrella-Emil Ferge

SOPHOMORES

ENGINEERING 114

FRESHMEN

GOOD UTILE SOLDIERS ARE WE: fro/It ww-Dave Ittenbach, Pete Connelie, joe Napoli, James Bohn, Tom Dooley, Bob Diller, second-David Gehle, Walter Gussman, Art Keffler, Net! Kennessey, AI Gaffney, third- John Feldman, William Mayer, Bob Retzer, Dick Rappel, fourtb - R. Decker, L. Houttuin. Frank Halpin, fiftb-Ken Kinderman , P. Frank, top-K. Kruper


YES, WE ARE COLLEGIATE: firsl row-Conrad Kopec, Ike Ittenbach, T. Cannon, J. Hazel, second-P. Frank, F. W. Einig, Ron Beckmon, John Bodner, Cappy Clardy, Jhird-G. Pershing, Dave Gehle, L. Horvath, R. J. Decker, D . Ditmer, fourlh- G. Beutet, S. Piscitelli, Vince Doyle, ]. Kennedy, fi/th-R . Boeke, D. McGuire, J. Broncel, sixlh- K. DeVilbris, R. Keller, Ray Hutter, Frank Halpin, William Brunner, 1Iein Kampf

MORE GOOD SOLDIERS: fiw row-Gray, Durkin, Charbonnean, Krick, Delciotto, Mayer, Crawford, secondSebenik, Francis, Perro, Amador, Pernusch, Mott, thit路d-Aufmuth, Meyer, Coyne, Wagner, Benko, forlflh-Nieters, DiHamo, Snyder, Bell, fi/lh-Wharton, Jokuoowski, Koike, Spolski, to[> row-Ricky Pereira, Martin Pain

ENGINEERING

FRESHMEN

ENGINEERING

FRESHMEN

115


ENGINEERING 11 6

FRESHMEN

OH, HEAVENS TO BETSY: first row-Abe Shyortz, C. G erot, Bill Brunner, secoud-Ira B. Fiscus, Bill Fabritius, Tobias, Dick Mahlmeister, tbi,路d-David Ditmer, John Hobbes, Robert .1\L Smith, fourtb- G. Washington, Frank Peter, Jack Cain, John Feldman, Robert Decker, Muggsy Hutter, Ken Kryson, Donald Kilgallon. AI Eyensti ne


HAROLD NIELSEN Associate Professo r of Mechanical Engineering Chairman of the Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

BRO. ROBERT A . THOMSON Engineering Mechanics

JESSE H . WILDER Mechanical Engineering

BRO. LOUIS Professor of Engineering Chairman of of Electrical ing

H. ROSE Electrical the Dept. Engineer-

RAYMOND ]. STITH Assistant Prof. of Civil Engineering Acting Chairman of the Dept. of Civil Engineering

ROBERT E. WILSON Associate Prof. of Chemical Engineering Chairman of the Dept. of Chemical Engineering

HAROLD E. WRIGHT Mechanical Engineering

JAMES N. Y AKURA Electrical Engineering

Unquestionably, a course in Engineering is a valuable asset to life. For instance, in this photo, student on left is seeing if glass A will hold volume of glass B. Student on right is seeing if coat pocket will hold volume of glass C Students in center are seeing how much they can hold.

117


SCIENCE

PETER]. FASO Biology

ANTHONY R. FRAGALA Chemistry BRO. MICHAEL B. GRANDY Physics

KATHRYN H . GRAY Geology RAYMOND G. HIEBER Physics

MARY E. HORRIGAN Nursing DOROTHY A. HASKIN Chemistry

LAWRENCE A. JEHN Mathematics

BROTHER LEONARD A. MANN, S.M. , Ph. D. Associate Dean of Science


BRO. WILLIAM BELMER Mathematics JOSEPH E. 130SSHART Mathematics SYLVESTER EVESIAGE Chemistry

PRINCE CHARMING AND HIS COURT: fir.rt row-Nancy Dichito, Wi lliam A. Fronek, Clara Trottman, seco11d-Judy 路weaver, Mary Probst, Kathy Koverman, Doris Gitzinger, Janet Woods, Eloise Weddle, third- Joe Brzozowski , Arthur Brunswick, Fred Faust, James A. Schwab, Joe Capella , Bill Brockman, Thorn Berger, Ronald Beisel , George Koehl FOOD, DRINK, AND SHELTER: setrted- Mary Patricia Eck, Gail Stube l, Mary Lou Westbrock. center- Sue Flanagan, Patty Smith, J/(1/lding-Joe Liszeski, Bill Gates, Ed Luce, Lew Diehl, Bill Weller, John Herrmann, Tony Magnant, Jim Smith, George ]. Skuns, Walter Reiling, Richard Gross, Jon Hogenkamp, Grant E. Deyer

SCIENCE

JUNIORS


SCIENCE

S0 PH0 M 0 RES

SCIENCE

S0 PH 0 M 0 RES 120

THE LINE -U P: front- Margaret Fi tzgera ld. Joe Fiore, Judy n{un che l, second rou路-Cha rles Ranere, Daniel Fiehrer, ':'_inn: Bubolo. Jalm Lam berjack, Edward Chamocik, John Meyer, Ct~rl R. Larsen, Gerald F. Nieters, Chow Tsung S1n~ . Jatk Amastas1a, Bernard F. Knmm

AND A GOOD TIME WAS HAD BY ALL: firs! roU"-Carol Echmann, Sandra Sherman, Judy McCu llorn, Donna B~nder. Ma r)~ Ann Montgom ery, Peggy Bruggiman, second-Mary E. Holt, Pat Miller, Joyce Mooney, 1hird-Joh n ~ao~~man , Josep h Kolesar, Da" e Kelly. Tom Korn_ John F. Owens, Tom Hibbeln, Arthur J . Leibold, Jefferey J.


SCIENCE

FRESHMEN

SCIENCE

FRESHMEN

LIKE A THREE DOLLAR BILL: Je(l/ed- Christine Hochendoner, 11-lary Claire Brinker, H . Joyce Howard, rmterWalter J . Majusick, st;mdillg- Dennis Rapesh, Joe Becker, Chas . Glomski , Harold McFarland, Ron Massey, John William Potye, R. Marshall, Ronald Glavan , Rick Pagliari, Paul Buni , James ]. Laco, Joe McPhilliamy, John J. Brady Jr.. Thomas J. Grilliot, Edward Humpert, George Smith

SO WE' RE TOO TIRED TO STAND: /rout-William D avis , Tom Reuth, Jim Rice, George Schumacher, Donald Brescia, Frank Blackstom, Edward C. Evans, Jon J . Carpenter, be1ck-Roger M. Romito, Robert W . Lipp Jr., Jerome E. Schmitz, Richard Reiling, Goebel Perkins. Jim Boos, Lawrence T . Riesser, John M . McKay

121


A PICNIC PERHAPS? fro ui-Theresa Faeta, Jud}' Kiebel , Carol Helbig, Julie Orf, umnd-Marcia Maughe, Patri ci.t Reese , Kathr}'n Brant, Gene Malone)', Clifton EnAlish, Marcia Hasenour, Barbara Breault, 1hird-Alan Stevens. Ja mes A. Mathews, Ken Maragni. Robert Willis. Gera ld Jira. Dave \\ ' elk<:r, Dick West meyer, Louis Unverferth, Rob路 t路rt O 'Connell

122

SCIENCE

FRESHMEN


BRO. RUSSEL A . JOLY, Biology CHARLES L. KELLER, Mathematics MORRIS ). KREIDER, Mathematics BRO. JOSEPH LUCIER, Chemistry

CARL I. i\HCHAELIS, Chemistry RICHARD E. PETERSON, Mathematics JOSEPH A. PAPPALARDO, Chemistry ELIZABETH PAYNE, Home Economics

ALBERTA G . PRATHER, Mathematics WERNER R. E. RAMBAUSKE, Physics BRO. ROBERT ). SCHUELLEIN, Biology ELIZABETH SMALL WOOD, Biology

JAMES G . STEED, Chemistry THOMAS G. KNORR, Physics MARGUERITE F. VANCE, Chemistry ROBERT CHARLES WIECHM.A.t"\l', Biology Assistant to the Associate Dean

CHAIRMEN

BRO. CLETUS C. CHUDD Chemistry

ANN FRANKLIN Nursing

BRO. THOMAS P. SCHICK Physics

KENNETH C. SCHRAUT Mathematics

GEORGE H . SPRINGER Geology

123


TECHNICAL INSTITUTE

J( • ('11 E. AVl· I.)J(.K

II ' T

7

124

D "A LD . cf ETZ D1rtr or of tht T ulmir, I l mlill It

$W\t Prof. rm~l Jm titutc-

YO r llr

T

Kc:n rt


DOUGLAS A. HANNEMAN Instructor in Technical Institute

/

AND THESE ARE A FEW OF .tvfY BUDDIES: front-.J ohn Dagian , Paul J. Rods, Jr .. Philip Jacques, Dave Thomas, Joseph Delvecchio , Jerry Gavett, Clyde C. Lockwood, second lfJu•- Lawrence Trick, Fuzzy Opa.lek, Matthew Hen· nessy, Dick Tusai. Dick Lt•ncioni, Patrick J. Treon. Mike Pay, Jim Collins, Roger \X-'interbotham, 011 I0/7-Miss Stake

INTO THE WOODS \XIE GO, RAH: /irrt rou·- J. Michael Muq,hey, Jim Gorman, Albert B. Teramana, Joseph G. Kromer, Jim Solomon, second rou·- Greg Studat. James Missig, Bruce Barker, Tony Caseate, Joe Stetzel, Dan Steinke, Edward Barkocy, Richard Hellyer

125


RICHARD R. HAZEN Chairman of Dept. of Electrical Engineering

A. WARD KNISLEY Instructor in Technical Institute

ROBERT F. MAUGER Instructor in Electrical Technology

]AJ\-IES l. McGRAW Chairman of Dept. of Industrial Technology

BRO. EMIL MORGANA Assistant Prof. in Technical Institute

Normally lasting only two years, Technical Institute affords the student with an abundance of technical knowledge. The purpose of the course is to prepare its students for various positions or activities

within the field of engineering. In the photograph at the left, Technical Institute graduate Milton, with cohorts Sue and Bill, uses his vastly superior technical knowledge to beat Bill to the punch, comprehends how to put phonograph needle on record before Bill has even finished reading the instructions. Male student in photograph on right is also involved in various technicalities.

126

RAYMOND B. PUCKETT Instructor in Technical Institute


Slowly, at first, they arrive,

walking to their classes,

filling the classrooms,

pouring into the assemblies,

joining the many activities,

then regrouping, planning an evening away from studies.


128


THE SPIRIT

THE SCHOOL

AND THE STUDENTS

GRASPING LEARNING BUILDING MOVING

129


ORGANIZATIONS NEW ENGLAND CLUB

Against wall, lop 10 hoi/om-William Sullivan, Bruce Alessie, againsl !he ,.t ,iling-Frank Halpin, Ignas Hammer路 shlab, Hank Staniszaewski, Mike Palmerie

KEYSTONE CLUB

Fi,-st row-Arthur Torelli, Daniel Shamenek, Pete Frank, Chuck Sweeney, Treasurer, John Schurer, President, Pinky Henry, Jim Riesmeyer, John L. Donnelly, Vice President, George F. Halloran, C. J . Bittner, second row-Ronald Bishop, Ira Fiscus, Paul Ley, Barie Ricketts, 011 floorDavid A. Miller, Secretary

NEW ENGLAND CLUB

130

KEYSTONE CLUB


WOLVERINE CLUB FirJI row-Mike Carroll, James Mabarak , Ted Barthel , Chuck Keais, Pres ident, Robert V . Karsick, Jecoud ro w-Russ Thompson, Walter DeAnna, Martin Kraimer, Charles McCarron, Treasurer, Edgar Rinke

HOOSIER CLUB Jack McGinty, Rose Ann Knoebel, Bob De Marco, Ru\h Fessler, Karen Brademeyer, Maril yn .McKenny, Fred .Mayhew, Dave Vog lewed e, Steve Soller, Hel en Fiessinger, Loretta Yano , Tony Becker, Gretchen Sadlier, Larry Ehinger, Tom Gantner, Jo hn Schneider, Mike Brogan, Andy Manning, Jim Barr. l\Iike Case, Ned Bec ker

131


OHIO SOCIETY OF Top- Thomas Rathke, Ri(hard Prosser, John Snider, Art K effler, John Hobbes, Stephen M. Sobota, Jr., middle- john Sornsel , John Hawn, John Kutter, Lawrence T. \X'ilkes, Jirn Snyder, John O'Donnell, Jackie Wilson, Richard Chastonay, Hector Dittamo, Edward Schultz, Jr., Vin cent Doyle, Robert V. Karsick, Francis Einig, Jim Jacobs, Jack Scurlock, /r(!/1/-Eugene M. Spolski. James \X'. Wolff

SOCIOLOGY CLUB Fiw row - Mike Renner, President, -Nancy Dichito, Treasurer, Betty :McGruder, Walt MacPherson, Vice Presi dent, second 1路ow-Mr. W eir, Dr. Huth, Mr. Doran, tibsent-Dan Nugent

132


PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS Tup-Joseph Kernan, George F. Halloran, Pete Cerar, D avid Hart, Joe Fontanella , Thomas R. Rolfes, Jerry Midden路 dorf. Vincent Cotrona, Ted Rehage, Jack Kruetzkamp, Fenton T. Downey, Louis Boehman, Jim Riesmeyer, Charles K. Sweeney, front-'\Xfilliam Sn ider, Ed Ferris, Thomas Corne, Roger Toth, John Schurer, Joseph Napoli, John J. Boerger, A. E. Newman, John Jauch, G. Patrick Walsh, Lwn Vorst, John Allison

NU EPSILON DELTA Fron/-Mary Frances Druffel, Thelma Kurz, Mary Horrigan, Advisor, Mary Patricia Ech, Marjorie M. Fawcett, br~ck-Juani ta Marrinan, Secretary, He I路 en W. O'Mara, T reasurer, Patricia Lane, President, Helen Kurz, Vice Preside nt

133


PSYCHOLOGY CLUB Front-Donna Pat Sudd, Claradell Carpenter, Jo Anne De Haven, Jinny Bachner, Mary Lee Schwartz, Ginger Stoltz, Don McKechnie, leftDick Hickenbotham, Mary Scherer, right-Jim Cleary, Tony Palumbo, bttck row- Bill Wake, Vice President, Andrea Seiver, President, Ruth Galtes, Secretary, Dick Lienesch, Treasurer

ILLINI CLUB

Fwnt- James Bollensen, Vice President, Richard Mocny, President, Judi Goelz, Secretary, Greg Wagner, Treasurer, 1he girls-Barbara Larkin, Chris Hipstind, Sandy Carlile, Jinny Bachner, Historian, Carol Rizzo, Judy Kiebel, the gU)'J -Patrick O'Hagan, Denny La Gordy, Jim McBarron, Fred Wenthe, John W. Maloney, P.eon, Mike Marri, Anthony Surusis, Tom Michalak, Tom Bartz

134


PICK AND HAMMER CLUB MODERATORS : Professor Kathryn Gray, Professor George Springer. MEMBERS : John Adolf, Jim Bollensen, B. Brady, Dave Coleman, Charles E. Doebler, Vice President, Doris Gitzinger, Joseph V . Goccetta, Don Kalinowski , President, Kathy Koverman, Secretary, Harry A. Lotus, Jack Phillips, Henry Sommer, Jam es Spieles, John Wheeler, Edward Williams, Treasurer

Relaxing in our second story penthouse, we received an urgent call. Hustle quickly, said call said, for there are grand happenings at the Geology Department. Indeed, we hustled, arriving in time to hear the last words of Professor Springer's explanation of the strange formation on the table. " . . . As soon as the eruption had ceased, I dashed out on the lava flow. Imagine my surprise to learn that the lava had not yet cooled." Prof. Springer gestured at the rock. "This specimen is where I calmly sank into the molten lava." Professor Gray smiled blandly as a hardy member crawled under the table to better inspect the lava specimen. "By George, there is a footprint m this lava!" the member explained . "Ruined a good pair of shoes, too," Prof. Springer mused.

Geology student inspecting remarkable sedimentary rocks on campus .

" Deuced shame." 135


HUI-0-HAWAII Front-Dam Bello, Melvin lee, Albert Pang, Bill lee, back-Joe Ah Sau, Nick Wong, Raudsom Piltz, larry Ng, Tom Gray, Manny Cadiz

MEN'S CHOIR Front-David A. Miller, J. McCaffery, Lawrence Ehinger, Robert J. Decker, Joe Brzozowski, Art Keffler, second row-Joseph E. Noar, Jerry Wiggins, Dave Volgewede, Tony Becker, Joseph D . Kolesar, third rouâ&#x20AC;˘-W. Maegley, G. Mike Browne, George Henrel, Louise lunne, Gary Scarlon. Johnny Feldmann, Joseph Davis

136


Front - Gayle Schwain, Mary Schweitzer, Ann Stark, Carol Ehemann, Helen Giessinger, Barbara Conn, standing left-Tom Scheidler, Vic Torbeck, Tom James Crowley, Schoeny, standing rightJeanie Heenan, Secretary, P a u I Mayer, President, Norman G. Horn, Treasurer, Robert Corpstein, Vice President

CINCY CLUB STUDENT EDUCATIONAL ASSOCIATION

Sitting - Julie Gilmore, President, Richard Dietl, Vice President, Kathleen Harris, Secretary, first row -Roseann Hickey, Bernadette Simendinger, Cynthia Fortune, Jane Van Thiel, Agnes Reitz, second mu~ Rita Stockert, Mary Margaret Malowney, Barbara Kuntz, Ann Stark, Pat Riley, Rose Garrity, third 1路ow -Pat Gifford, Felix J. Rozzo, Gerald Grilliot, Larry Hacevar, Edward A. Rogerson, Jr., Chairman, Secondary Schools Department

137


MISSION CLUB Moderator, Rev. Lawrence W . .Manheim, S.M., MEMBERSTed Barr}', Marcheta Cramer, William Fronek, Roseann Hickey, Rosemarie Hudak, Cathey Kramer, Bob LaMendol a, Gloria Mejak, Jo Anna Mraz, Bernadette Simendinger, Clara Trottman

C.S.M.C. RIFLE CLUB Left to right-Trigger Guard Diehl, Follower Lee, Firing Pin Clapp, Bolt McAllister, Sergeant Fuzzy Richards, Sling Maher, Loaded Clip Domanski, Muzzle Glawe, Misfire Trzos

138


FLYERS HANGAR Left to right-Julie O'Meara, Janet Woods, Hope Busse, Pete Salzarulo, Dave Lauxterman, Tom Cobey, Mary Lynn Goecke, Jerry Miller, John Bertrand, John Butler, Jill Edelna, Frank Reda, Mick Colgan, Norb Young, President, Paul Braun, Vice President, Twinkle Longo, Secretary, on table-Dave Murphy, Paul Finorio, Fire Extinguisher, under the table-Dick "Lose the game" LaPera

Mike "Pick 'em off" Romer

139


THE CULTURE COMMITTEE

• • •

IN ACTION

The University of Dayton prides itself on the maturity, adult tastes and behavior of its students. Thus, when the bete noire of the music world, rock and roll, reared its twitching head on campus, the Culture Committee was called upon to investigate.

Left: Chairman Tommy Swift and henchmen Mussel· mann and Brakem proceed to subversive dance, taking tape recorder disguised as overcoat.

Right: Swift asks to be admitted to dance, is cordially received.

Top: Disc jockey is warned not to play rock and roll at University function . Teenager at left shows jubilant smile, thinks Swift is president of Ricky fan club.

Right: Unscrup ulous vendor bribes disc jockey.

Left: Swift hears first melodious strains of " Hole in My Bucket but I Gotta Get Married Yeah Yeah Blues Rock."

Top: Acting in the best interests of the school , Swift and Mussel mann criticize disc jockey, make sure he won"t be back.


LEGION OF MARY LADY OF THE PILLAR Joan E. Dietz, Sharon Freeman, Jim Hartlage, President, Father Philip C. Hoelle. S.J\I. , Bill Groce, Vice President, Henry Mohlm an, Treasurer, Aspasia Phillips, Secretary

MATH CLUB Front-John E. Kauflin, Treasur路 er, Charles Mott, Vice President, Jerome Smith, President, Lawrence C. Raiff, Pub I icily Secretary . Jacqueline Kuhn, Secretary, sec路 ond-Art Brunswick, Paul Dierk路 er, Samuel Thompso,n, John W . Franklin Demana, McCloskey, Thomas ]. Grilliot, tbird-Russ Auebner, Walter Fuchs, D arrel Horvath, Philip Vukovie, Allan J . Sieradski, Robert Marshall, fourtb-Joseph Brzozowski, Ronald Beisel, Ron Thomas, John T akacs, Pete Frank, Fred C. Lane, fifth-Leon A . Vorst, John Eck路 man, Martin Cunniffe, John F. Owens, Kenneth L. Walter, Doris Gitzinger

141


ALPHA KAPPA PSI

FRATERNITY

Front-Stan Greenberg-Master of Rituals, Bill Jenkins-Vice President, Professor Will-Faculty Advisor, James M . Stuart-Honorary Member, Dr. Glen Yankee-District Advisor, Tom Yonder Embse-President, D~ck Mocny-Treasurer, .recond ,路ow-Pete Umbenhauer, Dean Willy, John Payne, Ross DiBacco, Norm Mitchell , Bob Jones, Sal Pantezzi , Richard Roesch, Jack Kernan, Frank Naughton, third row-Mike Long, John Lynott, Bill Hewitt, Ed McGinnis, Bob Herlih)', John Butler, Richard Niebryzdowski, Bob Kern, Don Fisk, Tom Krumm, John Marr, fourth row-Ed Landu, Don Webb, Ron Klaus, Jim Byrnes, Mike Brown, Herb Keil , Dennis O'Neal , Gene Salerno, Bill Brennan

NFCCS

NATIONAL FEDERATION OF CATHOLIC COLLEGE STUDENTS Ron Larcinese, John J . Takacs, Carolyn Duell, Patrick O'Hagan, Eileen A. Crowley, Jerome Hardt, Jean Kipp, Thomas L. Holtz, Fr. John Kelley, S.i\L-Moderator, Mark Sammon

142


TECHN-1-CLUB

Frmti-Vincent Canino, Ted Barry, Bennett Carroll, Leonard Raab, Louis Jonske, Brian Coughlin, Tim Coghill , Tony Pascale, second row-Edward J. Barkocy, John Vascsinec, \Xfilliam Hofrichter, K. Puckett, Bruce Barker, James Tempel, Joe Slitzel, third •·ow- Micheal O'Kelley, Dick Dennie, J a mes Missig, ]. Solomon, Marvin ~Iissig, Bill Berner, Mark Beggs,, Kenneth Piatak, Don Callahan, Jim Strassell, Dan Trauthwein, Richard Strahle

ACCOUNTING CLUB

Fmnt-Edward Sander, President, Mary Lou Rosenberger, Harold Grilliot, Vice President, James E. Scholes, Robert Goldey, Secretary, Professor Janet \X1ilson, Moderator, Barbara Couch, second row-Mariellice Trepeta, Jane Kleckner, Edward McCinnis, Robert Stack, A. Raymond McGowan, Dale Middleton, Russell Troy

143


COLUMBUS CLUB

COLUMBUS CLUB

Left to right-Ed Ferris. Nancy Nerny, Ron Beckman, John Freehill, Shirley Fey, Jim Jacobs


ENGINEERING HONOR SOCIETY

ENGINEERING HONOR SOCIET Y

Seaied-William L. Nighan-Treasurer, Lawrence Raiff-Secretary, Louis I. Boehman- President, Doctor R. WilsonAdvisor, sta!lding-Carlos R. Millet, Richard J . Crouse, Richard Kleiner, Tom Grogian, Harold Hahn, Richard Feldmann, Theodore W. Robbins, John L. Jauch, George Inouye, Timothy Trich, D avid A. Miller, r1bsent-Lawrence Gut路 man. Clarence Bittner, John. Cotter, Jerome Kindell , Herbert Dcrtrich-Vi ce President

ACS

AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY

Front-R. E. D orsett, Karl C. Kauffman , Elah Wilson, Mary Claire Brinker, Carole Balash, Gerry D ickson, Julianna Clune, Edward Steinmetz, George Halloran, second rotv-Robert S. Yolles, Leonard Smith, Arlo Harris, Charles Farris, l\-like Powers, J ohn Leingang, Tom Reed, D on Winegar, Thomas Austin, 'V<'' illiam J. Beer, Joseph Smith, James King, Richard Varga, Edward Zuscik. third roU'- Ji m Moloney, Jerome Baker, Frank Limbert, John Fortman, H arold Hohn, President Dick Rathsack

145


THE GIRLS ...

UD'S TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY


OF COEDUCATION "The turn-of-the-century conviction that woman needs no education beyond the a-b-c's of cooking, cleaning, and cradlerocking has disint~grated and vanished for good. Dissolving with equal certainty- a development to be greeted with devout thankfulness-is the idea that a college education is wasted on the woman who plans to enter marriage. The University itself is to be congratulated as well on the achievement of a milestone in its long-time recognition of the value, even necessity, of higher education in the preparatory of modern woman for her role in life. So- go collegiate, young women!" - Exponmt January, 1960

147


COEDS

are well appreciated on campus; they add a fresh note, ratse the general morale, and help tone down the language. Moreover, paying for a pregnant book bill is bad enough, but why pay it to some sulking beasto, when it can be paid to some sultry lovely?

'"Yes, men, it is a girl!"'

The wallet isn't the on ly thing that is stunned at the Bookstore

1-48


THE SPIRIT

So~ial functions are an Important . p art of any education , for as the . . UnJvetSity has stated "P · · . ' . ' artlCJpatwn m the t " . . md h · · · ac IVJtleS uces t e student to exercise all of soul and body." · · · powers

If · · · . exercising itself reseso, blUD's ~arhCJfahon m m es cal•sthemcs on a mil•"ta ry b ase.


lresltma11 Welcome ZJa11ee

ISO


151


â&#x20AC;˘

But things went on

"Yes, of co urse, you may leave the room."

Speak, boy 1

Glad to see you studying your lines , Dave.

. So the farmer said to the salesman . . "

"Bu t the alarm clock ¡is lUll ringing, Johnny."

152

If you' re .qoing to be that

CO)' ,

forget it .' '


• • •

and on

• • •

"I did not borrow your crib sheet!"

Ah ha, caught you, didn't we?

"And a four point would be dandy.'·

"But I don't want it mixed."

"Easy, doll. That's the third time on the toesies ." Oh my, another coy one.

153


• • •

and on

• •

"Okay, get ready . . . here comes that prof who dropped me."

''I was wondering when the snack bar would get around to this."

"But why aren't you contemplating your navel?"

The joys of apartment dwell· in g.

"Just say 'please,' and I'll hand it to you, Sue."

"Look, I hate to be a grouch, but if we don ' t get a better classroom, I'm leaving."

154

On the order of cha-cha.


... and on and on and on ...

. . . until finally ...

155


HOMECOMING 1960

156


It begins quietly, unnoticed . A plan, an idea hiding, begins to make itself known. Months ot plannmg begin to coagulate. Weeks of back room arranging, publicity, preparing, begin to formulate. Then, at three o'clock in the morning, the campus is tense. Campaign managers bundle together, joking, waiting, trying to stay awake until H Hour . . . the moment when all the planning erupts forth.


r\round and around, past the boiler room and the laundry, alongside Saint lvL!ry's Hall and back around ag,tin tu Saint Joe's, the parading r.unblcd. A collection of C\'crything from. gas nusks to crash helmets, finesse to frenzy, hollered, "Sec me. r\nd the students gathered on the walks and they saw.

"Wanna drag, ..

No, Greg. You can't start even a small fire!

Tell that guy to mind his driving, Linda.

Fran and ... Willie?

"Just let 'em try to give me a ticket!"


But this is

1101

the Grand Prix. Kathy!

Regular Army 5946210.

Riding high- Lynn '

Above: "Let's go . . I'm late for chapel."

Securing the ROTC YOtes.

Left: Yessir, a good clean election.

159


Control yourselves, men . . . here's the new queen! Oh, quit hamming in up, Pete, and escort the ladies.

Lo,路e those coeds!

Flowers and other sweet things.

" 'S okay," said Father Roesch.

160


The lon,t.: ni,t.:ht : ,,路hen you ".liked {rom one end of the '" rr idor to the other .md it t<H'k y<>u

.1 11

h<>ur tn dn it. Ynu stol'f'Cd. in-

' f'L't ted .1 ri' .II duh's flo .It ctnd c1dmittcd I hat

it l<>oked . ".

it:-路

And thL路 night

N<>t h.1cl. hut wktt i-; \\Tilt

on.

"Well, now that we've got it-what'll we do with it?"

The runway at Gentile.

To compete with the Nautilus.

LOAFER!!

"But if it reacts, we can always sell the isotopes."

161


ft

t.lllll' twnhl111,~

dm, 11 ~he strcl'h like .111 c(fcrH:sccnt titbl

w;wc. sending off s1).1rks and Ltu.~ htcr , origin;ttin.~ from rw

l'路lft ind.tr lot.tlc .tnd u1ding ohscurch路. .1 ilUSsl\c pcrcnni ;t l, hlt><>ming \lt>lcntly.

Top: first Hui-o-Hawaii Club

Right: second Bluegrass Club


Q11ccn IM

1rau Paul . . .


earole ÂŁule

.C!fHIIc Bracken )Unrty

Paune

attendant

Vcrru Jeuan .CiJtda!Jenjamin

KatIt }{offman

. . . a11d Iter co11rt


"Quit reciting and start stoking those engines

we're gonna be late!"

Enjoying one of Brother Paul's fabulous banquets.

166

Sounds of Glen Miller, uproarity, and glass, in various degrees.

"Aw, c'mon, fellows. It's the girls we want to see."


The queen and her attendants arrive at the stadium .

"Anyone got a spare ice cube?"

Not greedy-just popular.

\\'1th

.t

loud sound .

pcntlt: s1.~h. thc d.t)' ended

â&#x20AC;˘t

An analytic mincl in action.

167


IN MEMORIAM

The children loved him. They would come to him and tell him of their wants and they would trust in him, for here was a man as jolly as the Klaus he portrayed, and as gentle as the Holy Woman he adored. Like that jolly man each Christmastime, the warmth of Brother Wehrle's personality continues to whisper throughout the campus.

Brother William Otto Wehrle

168


The Marianist Award

The ninth annual Marianist Award was awarded to the late Archbishop Francis Noll, December 11, at a convocation on the UD campus. This highest religious honor of the Uni路 versity of Dayton was accepted by Archbishop Noll's successor, Bishop Leo A. Pursley.

The Marianist Award was initiated in 1950 and has been given every year since this time for "distinguished achievement in America for the Mother of God. " It commemorates the arrival of the Marianists in America from France, the death of Father William Joseph Chaminade, their founder, and the founding of the University of Dayton in 1850. - Flyer News

169


THE STUDENTS ...

Off to watch De Paul fall.

The hidden persuader.

It must have been a fine party. We went to it, but we're not sure.

170

"Ho, ho .. . it, it .. . tickles!"

Why trade an upset stomach ... ?

"Are you sure this is a home game?"


THE

PLAYERS

U.D. PLAYERS OFFICERS Julie Cline, Secretary Bear Peterson, Social Director Mary Sue Miller, President Dave F. Donahue, Vice President Sheila Bueker. Treasure?'

REHEARSING Ruth Snelling, Michel Kuwahara, Barbara Larkin, Les Cole, Louise Hand, Chris Hipskind, Greg Wagner, Sheila James, Jill Edelman

Watching over the flock in one of his more meditative moods-Director Pat Gilvary

171


Production One

*

Bette Lou Kilpatrick-Cotm/es.r Robert Bonny-Baron Ron Kuzak-P1路e.ridmt Mary Altick-Irma Jim Lauricella-Ragpicker Greg Wagner-Deaf Mute Kathy Gottschaii-Fiowergirl Dave Donahue-Doctor Jadin Janet Leff-Constance Dolores Carmichael-Gabrielle Irene Kramer-! osephi11e Michel Kuwahara-Sewennan Pat O'Hagan-Pierre Liz Fleming-Pageant sce11e Ken Krupa-W ailer Mike Sabota-Policeman Les Cole-Broker

172

With a flourish, the U D Players opened their season with a masterful performance of Jean Giraudox's sarcastic, "The Madwoman of Chaillot." Debuting were a number of actors and actresses new to the Players and the campus. Under Pat Gilvary's gesticulating guidance, the group again proved its merit. Perhaps prophesying the year, the play balanced sanity against madness, with the conclusion that life, regardless how bizarre it may appear, is indeed wonderful.


THE MADWOMAN OF CHAILLOT

Having discovered an oil deposit in mid-town Paris, the businessmen decide to dynamite the City Commissioner who refuses to give pennission to sink a well. Unfortunately, their dynamiter runs off to drown himself, manages to become water-logged , thwarts the plan and promptly falls in love with the barmaid .

The Countess arrives on the scene, takes the would-be dynamiter under wing, reprimands the scheming businessmen. Shocked by her sudden exposure to a materialistic world, she concocts a plan to save the land with the aid of three other flighty matrons , one with an imaginary dog.

A hidden doorway, conveniently located in the Countess' cellar. leads to a dungeon of nothingness which is to be the resting place of the materialists. Her friends consulti ng her. the Countess condemns the money-makers, lures them to the cellar under the pretense that oil is there. With the wurld saved, humanity and the audience sigh thank路 fully.

173


Production Two

* Jim Lauricella-Canan Daniel i\1cCooey Dave Donahue-Bishop Mary Lou Szuter-Miss Killicat Mary Lou Ruschau-Maura Michael Pugh-Peadar William Geier-Baron de Balbus Julie Cline-Sabena Layne Lahrman-Serena Mal Lorimer-S,t!ambo Charlie Connolly- Martyn McDara Michel Kuwahara-Joe the Lio11

174

Still toying with satire, the Players' second production was the merry little comedy, "The Wayward Saint," written by Paul Vincent Carroll, and dealing with a kindly canon who was too good to be true. Gently ridiculing everything it came in contact with, the play afforded a warm, mirthful evening in an otherwise bleak month.


THE WAYWARD SAINT

Once upon a time, there lived a little old priest in Ireland who was so kind and gentle that even the Bishop accused him of being a saint_

Such a precious thing was this kindly priest's soul, that he was soon visited by a worldly-wise nobleman who turned out to be, logically enough, a devil in disguise. With two satanically lovely nymphs and a recurrent messenger from Hades, the nobleman set about the task of damning the priest. No slouch, the Baron-Devil went to business, corrupt-

Even though he was good to vagabond gardeners, the kindly priest began to fall under the power of the devil and things began to look bad . Then, a lion escaped from a passing circus which turned out to be Saint Michael, also ia disguise.

The devil is finally exposed when he tries to line up a date for the village belle with a certain corpse. Determined to have his booty, the devil casts a spelt on the priest. In the nick of time, the blessed lion returns, scatters the band of demons, and gobbles up the Baron. Things end happily, but the lion suffers an acute case of indigestion.

175


BACKSTAGE with the Players

"Next line, please."

"Why don't we just put a match to it?"

176

"Okay, where'd you hide it ?"

C.B. and apprentice.

Going up!


Three old pros and two newcomers pose with their new trophies; Sheila Bueker, Bill Geier, Sheila James, Mary Sue l\路liller, and Mike Pugh. The trophies : Top Campus Club, and Outstanding Extracurricular Award. Offering no open parties or picnics, but only hard work and three chances a year to show its worth, the Players ran riot over all other organizations, swept the field as it gained a bright reputation as a moving group.

Maureen Murphy turns out some last minute publicity as the last big rehearsal draws near.


PRODUCTION THREE

*

Charlie ComTOl)'-Benny Southstreet Nicely-Nice!;路 Johmon-Tom Muth Rusty Charlie-George Ruestow Sarah Brown-Kathy Gottschall Harry the Hone- Vince Palyan Lt. Brmmigan-Joe Dressel Nathan Detroit-Pat O'Hagan Miss Adelaide-Julie Cline Sky iHasterson- Jerry Callahan Aruide Abernathy-Ralph Dennler Joey Biltmore-Joe Tache General Cartwright- Bette Lou Kilpatrick Big Jule-Don Edick Angie the Ox-Mike Palmerie Waiter- Jim Lang Drunk-James Lauricella Orchestra under the direction of Lawrence E. Tagg

178

Without a doubt, "Guys and Dolls" proved to be the season's most extravagant and enjoyable presentation. Concerned with the trials and tribulations of a number of Broadway bad guys (played to perfection by UD's football team) the play began with gusto and maintained a feverish pitch of hilarity throughout its two hours plus. Running four days, two nights of which were sellouts, the play wound up the Player's year in the grand tradition.


GUYS AND DOLLS

Besieged by a crowd of gamblers, tinhorn Nathan Detroit neeJs one thousand dollars to rent a joint ior his floating crap game. He bets Sky Masterson, underground l0ne wolf, that Sky cannot take Sarah the SaYe-a-Soul !\路fission doll to Havana, then settles back to patch up his fourteen year engagement with Adelaide.

AJelaide is a dancer at the provocative Hot Box club, and Joes not entirdy approve of Nathan 's gambling nor their prolonged engagement. Meanwhile, Sky manages to take Sarah to Havana b)' promising he will help the Mission . which thrt'atens to go out of business. Sky falls in love with her and reveals his black heart.

But Nathan is already holding his game in a sewer, hoping Chicago with unmarked dice, wins all the cash, plus a shot help his old buddy, Sky tells Nathan that Sarah wouiJ not as Sky fills the tottering l\路(ission with "one Jozen assorted a similar fate and Broadway rejoices.

to make enough money to elope. Big Jule, a hood from in the head by Sk)'. To save Sarah from shame and to go to Havana and forfeits the bet. Things end happily sinners" and wins back Sarah. i\'.1than anJ AdelaiJe meet

179


HOME EC

Front- Carolyn Brown, Marcella Revnolds , Joyce i\â&#x20AC;˘lcCelland, Dorothy Wozar, Ginny Beatty, Judy McCullam, 1\[argaret Weber, Back-Sue Ellis, Ruth Stabler, Carol Eheman, Colleen Weir, Louise Gilbert, Beverley Shively, Susana Donicke

BLUEGRASS CLUB

Front- Jean Kipp, Kathy Hoffman, Kathy Musterman , Betty Brady, Carole Wagner, Set011d-Ruth Ann Qgles, Jim Eaton, John Iv[edley. Bill Whelan, Jim Hazel , Back-Herb Fox, Tom Holtz, Joe Hagan, Ed Clark, Bert Higdon

ISO


CIVIL ENGINEERS

Kneeling-Norman Horn. Tony Campanelli, Donald Romes, St<mding Left-Prof. Raymond ]. Stith, Faculty Advisor, Hernan Fernandez Maldonaldo, Richard Meyer, On Stair.r-Charles L. Mey· ers, James Lockhart, Frank R. Papscun, Ronald Antes, David U. Soller, Wilbur ]. Houk, John Wirebaugh, Ned Becker, George H. Kreutzjans, Ken Hegemann, Philip T. Palcic, Dennis Yosick, Clarence Bittner, Henry Pope, Ed Ferris, Jim Brugge· man , Juan Vicente Arevalo, Gene G . Gross, Ed Richter

BIOLOGY CLUB

Front row - Ralph A. Pax, Chuck Cambria, Bernadette Simendinger, Mary Lou Fecke, Mike Pugh, Daniel ]. Higgnis, Ba(k •·ow - Ted Rogers, Aldo Rossini, John M. McKay, Eugene Keferl, Ed Humpert, Phil Morey, Tom Naugle

181


DEBATE TEAM

T t> p: Ed Kratt . Fred McKool , Ray Guzman, Bob McQuire, Clarence H. Baxter, Jr., Director of Debate, Bollom: Kathleen D<'ger, N o rm Mitchell, Jim Thesing, Jim Porky Herbert, ,1JJJ~JI/ : Carolyn Duell, Eddie Trapp, Jim Dotts, Chuck Kell)', arle Murphy, Roy \'Veiland

Guided by Assistant Professor of Speech Clarence Baxter, UD's Pi Kappa Delta team overcame its previous fledgling start and became known as an integral part of the ampus cultural program. With pride, we watched our Ohio Lambda Chapter 263, National Honorary Forensic Society, bore its way into intercollegiate recognition.


UD'S WINNING QUARTET

Jim Thesing Porky Herbert Ed Kraus Fred McKool

Inviting some thirteen colleges, the intercollegiate debating teams met for the finals at UD . With four renowned opponents, Dayton faced stiff competition, the final debate lasting from nine in the morning until late in the afternoon. With forced casualness, the teams awaited the results . Dayton succe.:ded in capturing the second place trophy, while the University of Kentucky swept first place, nabbing two of the individual speaker"s awards . Duquesne placed third, with Findlay and Wittenberg following up. Left: Kentucky's Miss Cannon accepts her speaker路s award .

Appearing somewhat reluctant, UD"s Debate D irector Clarence Baxter presents the first place trophy to Kentucky.

183


Back row- Mike Brogan, Jack Unverferth, Pete Liotino, Joe Asbury, Jim McCarthy, Dave Kelly , Paul Dierker, Chuck Sweeney, Rev. George B. Barrett, S. M ., Front 1路ow- Carolyn Duell, Sandy Carlile, Linda Benjamin, Fran Paul, Cenlel路-Joseph Princehouse

STUDENT COUNCIL Joe Princehouse, President Jim McCarthy, Treasurer

The 1959-60 Student Council , guided by Engineer Joe Princehouse and his everpresent secretary Fran Paul, began its year by wading through the waist-high debris resulting from several years of less than precise organization of the many campus clubs and activities. Once the task of clarifying the organizational constitutions wa.s firmly begun, Council turned its interests toward elections, publicity, and a number of

184

Sal Pantezzi, Vice President Fran Paul, Seaetary

proposals in the betterment of the studentbody. Examples of the wide range.of proposals given in Council meetings were the rebudgeting of Student-University activities, the building of a picnic pavilion, and the return of the voting machines. Probably most outstanding of Council's endeavors was the highly successful presentation of the spring Bob Hope Show (Page 216) .


SAC STUDENT ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE Ross Dibacco, J im Jiavana zzo, Sandy Carlile, Jinny Bachner, Gary Green, Pete Liotino, A bsent-Pat O ' Hagan, Jim Riesmeyer

Close on the heels of the Hope show came Spring Week with its third annual jazz festival, anothet: tremendous success. Although the Council suffered more than its share of ups and downs, nobody, at year's end, could say that it had lacked initiative, resourcefulness, a n d sheer drive. It fought, and fought hard for the things it wanted. It

-

got most of them. At times, it blanketed the student opinion. At other times, it stood clear and watched. It was a good Council.

185


Paul D ierker, Jim Romer, Sue Reiter, and Paul Braun

SENIOR Officers

Paul Dierker, President Paul Braun, Vice President James Romer, Treamrer Sue Reiter, Secretar)'

186


JUNIOR Officers

William Cramsey, Pat Buchard, Gene Schill, Charles Sweeney

Charles Sweeney, President Eugene Schill, Vice President William Cramsey, Treasurer Patricia Buchard, Secretary

187


Carl Cron, D ave Kelly, Judy Miller, John Lavelle

SOPHOMORE Officers

David Kelly, President Carl Cron, Vice President John Lavelle, Treasure1路 Judith Miller, Secretary

188


FRESHMAN Officers

Chris, Linda, :Mike. and Bob

Mike Brogan, President Chris Hickey, Vice President Bob Gothie, Treasurer Linda Arvin, Secretary

189


SENIOR

PEP COMMITTEE

Bear Peterson shows off his campus spirit, cleans up the place

Pushing the reorganized class pep committees onward to their new heights, Pete Peterson and undergraduate Marty Held set things rolling, whipped together a few minor riots, began the first really coordinated pep activities in years. Eyes to the future, Peterson and Held put the committees on a club basis.

190

Mart)' Held strikes noble pose. representative of position .

Bear Peterson also strikes pose, also representa . tive of position.


JUNIOR

PEP COMMITTEE

Chuck Sweeney, Hank Sommer, John Maloney, Ned Becker

Last year, a group of enterprising young men sat wondering what to do with themselves. Being loyal students, they were appalled by the seeming lack of spirit at games, activities, etc., and thereby decided to do something about it. The idea caught fire and the Pep Commission spread to other classes. The school's thanks go to each of these founding fathers, instigators and rioters all.

191


SOPHOMORE

PEP COMMITTEE

GO Carolyn Duell, Jim O'Hara, the notorious Beulah, Vince Hvizda, Judy McCullom, Diane Riesing

A cantankerous mule made its debut on campus. In the icy November weather, a clown walked down Main Street in the Homecoming Parade in his bare feet. A hearse carried an effigy of an opponent football team off the field. All these antics were only part of the spirited gayeties staged by a rambunctious group known as the Sophomore Pep Committee.

Off on an errand of mercy the time the photo was taken, leader Marty Held and

Charlie Gradel deserve special mention. Held holds the group together and Gradel owns the fool mule.

192


FRESHMAN

PEP COMMITTEE

Jeannine Brothers, Smiling Jack Neumann, Ka}' Lyle, Mike Pugh, Kosher Rittberg, Bill Geier, Cathy Rigolo, Kathy Creager, Muff Fox

Dropped into the hustle and hurry of campus line, the Frosh slowly grouped together to combat the dragons on Brown Street, painfully made their marks on campus with typical Frosh wonders as: unintelligible Chinese posters at NIT, strange scrawlings on the walls. Having only a small chance to exhibit their talents, they didn't. But they tried, and from the ranks of these weary youngsters may come the mob leaders of the future.

193


THE

F-LYER NEWS

Clustered around Dayton's Patterson Monument. the 1960 Flyer staff shows off its multi-faceted personality.

Traditionally the most vociferous publication on campus, the Flyer News, early in the first semester, suffered an acute case of laryngitis. Although hurrying to find a replacement staff for the previous cantankerous one, the school shuffled through a month void of its journalistic tabloid . Picking up the pieces, the Flyer regrouped, altered the format of the paper, dropped a few articles and ideas, originated a few new columns. Under fire from both sides, the new staff tripped through its first months in the vain attempt to please everyone, finally became angry and, towards the end of the year, constructively presented an unbiased reporting of the campus and community happenings.

Left: What to do before -the plumber arrives Right: Rev. Richard ] . Dombro, Mode,路at or


FYL VACCHIANO, Girl , GERRY DICKSON, Coed Editor

ANITA GAIL l\.fARTING, Editor-in-chief HAL NIELSEN, News Editor JIM BOHMAN, Associate Editor

DAVE HOPKINS and BILL LANGLEY, Co-Sports Editors

HECTOR DITT AMO , Chief Photographer

195


Riding the crest of UD's small wave of publications, Exponent presented a completely revamped magazine for the year. Under the reign of Therese Geis, the literary periodical enlarged both in size and in content, accomplished the near-impossible, and succeeded in pulling quality work from all divisions. Deciding that only a better magazine could induce more writing, the quarterly tore itself apart after its rather staid first issue, put itself back together again, won the approval of campus and administration.

Editor Therese Geis also boasted the acquisition of oln office for the previously homeless Exponent.

EXPONENT ..

F.-~ ~··~ <: :', ~~. .! .. :

.\

.;.....-"

-

,.

.

,

• II

~

.

l1XIF<ID~llmr ~ ... 4 .....r; 'f.~

Moderated by Rev. James Donnelly, Exponent was guided by two people well versed in their backgrounds. Therese Geis, long a member of UD's free-wheeling Writers' Club, had the penetrating ability to spot a shining manuscript among the many. On a long shot, Associate Editor Bob Antonick introduced the "new look," along with a regular fine arts feature, sat back contentedly to see both ac-

cepted. For the first time, facu1ty members were observed picking up copies to read.

Antonick even cleaned his car for the last issue.

196


ALBERT EMANUEL LIBRARY There comes a time, usually after a day of classes, that the library hums " quietly please" with the rain of inquiring students. Perhaps man, as a whole, is too reliant on his society. At any rate, quiet, like nothing else, induces a feeling of solitude. Surrounded by books and classmates, pending book reports and homework, thoughts still find time to roam, to wish, to grow lingering and alone. This is the time that a written word becomes an emotion, and a sentence a passion.


R.O.T.C. MILITARY

SCABBARD AND BLADE


DEPARTMENT

James L. Weaver

MSG

PERSHING RIFLES


GRADUATION

JANUARY 1960

We stood in the lobby and watched the people, parents and relatives and friends, arrive and move expectantly to their seats in the auditorium. We felt the happiness in the air and the pride and sensed the tears that unexplainedly come at moments of intense joy. ~re listened to the speeches, but our thoughts kept going

to the graduates and if they were listening, or dreaming or planning or hoping A joyous thing, graduation. Like birth, a personality is given vent. Like birth, a personality is thrust out and severed from its period of gestation . A somber thing, too, this graduation.

Dayton publisher George A. Pflaum receives an honorary degree for his work in religious periodicals.

200


SECOND SEMESTER

REGISTRATION

~~!I!!

Having had just barely enough time to recuperate from the first semester's studies and activities, students came back for more, perhaps not quite as many, but with the same rambunctuous vigor that left the campus quivering from September. After standing in lines that sometimes numbered nearly a hundred, paying their tuitions, and then herding to the Book Store, most agreed that, even with the improved IBM card system, registration time is the most harrowing of all experiences.

"But I can't find mr nu mber two card ."

The line began in the Fieldhouse, circled up to the Treasurer's office, then over to the Women's Gym. After a minimum of eight stops, the final resting place was either the gathering places off campus or, if truly fatigued, a quiet corner.

201


Militaru /!aU


.inall ldiers

holler the adct many ' iliAn patn the) ld m~ • .!~end on ~ b4Uraom ra_plmdent in therr sh1ny br: ltld !mid, prucieded t Wll8C ~ agamst the Budd M rrow •weitb a whoop and

'th

~

HONORARY COLONEL HONORARY CAPTAIN -

!faHicc WojtcHa l!arbara JlarmcliHg


flunior Prom


QUE EN

Sandy earlilc


206

Co-eds, like most American women, generally complain about suffrage and equal rights and things like that On one specific night, UD's males generously give the girls their full rig hts . They give them the right to open doors, arrange transportati on, buy corsages. pay the admission and the refreshments, and, presumably, the right to make the first pass.


?:urnab(JIIf ?:ap

f(oss :Dil!acco

joe J!oyersmitlt

:Dave O'Connor

KING Stan fjreenberg

Obviously. the girls appreciate this. They keep coming back for more. and this year was no exception. It was a history 路 making affair. Good old Lap was the first man to ever wreck a car into one of \X! ambler's tables . Quo Vadis?

207


DAI

Sooner or later, the average student becomes aware that there is an alien group circulating through his everyday campus affairs. This mysterious group is composed of people named Fine Artists, Art Educationalists, and "those bohemians." These are the ones who habitate the School of the Dayton Art Institute, which operates in conjunction with the University. Their function, at times, seems vague, but it slowly becomes apparent as the year progresses. Their posters plaster the halls, their illustrations dress up the publications frequently, and their attitude is rather easy-going.

LeRoy White ponders his massive free-form ment as it doubles as a lunch table.

Left: Bob Brock, an adherent of the 路路make it big"" philosophy, whips up a bit of plaster

In a Graphics class, Mike Turgon and DAI Council president Jim Wil路 liamson toy with a dainty press.

Jerry Adams preparing a mold for a bronze casting.

At first glance, the curriculum of a Fine Artist appears extremely troublefree, there being little of the normal homework assignments. But appearances can be slightly deceiving. For every three hours of credit, a Fine Arts student spends six in class, stretching the course to five years. Even so, when he graduates, a profitable job is usually only a hopeful thing in his mind. But he persists.

208


SPRING DANCE

~

It ~tl thtn · WI h wudenng ace rdl n pJ yers a.nd t (oun 10), Qell'l b«lame thing 0 tbe ~It Must •e pll nbn&t ~ bcins hAnged in the coun lltld without place for the tth u pro ptrts seemed dark. But I ng eli tan e Olll otk and Ouector -Colt smoothed the angles- r - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ,

Institute'

b~ rrom he

Qlle&H GAIL HAGEMAN KiHIJ NEIL BAILEY Invited to a twenty-five million dollar exhibit, Daytonian was impressed by the nonchalance of its viewers. Photographing through potted palms, around corners, and by available light without flash, the camera recorded a study in personalities ; some students, some socialites , some absorbed by the paintings, some obvoiusly disinterested and valuing only the social prestige to be gained .


In UD 's beloved Student Union, Mrs . Unger charges nominal prices for such essentials as cokes, cheese crackers, cigarettes, matches.

Lone Wolf catches up on reading, keeps abreast of the times with month-old periodicaL

Left: More compatible to coeds, Brother Paul's pizzaria does a landslide business.


LOOKING AROUND CAMPUS There are many little joys on our campus. For instance, there is sometimes a sale at the Bookstore. Students never fail to be amazed by the bargains available.

"So all right, we're looki ng. Now what?"

Jubilant Sheila James receives her cap and gown, rushes to share her joy with loveable Dick Beach who keeps tab on such things.

This is a happy camp us . . .

. an understanding campus ..

. . . usually .

211


SHERMAN HAll and the Pendulum


Chaplain Dickson, President Roesch , and Science Dean Mann bless the new building.

With the color guard behind, Math Chairman Kenneth Schraut leads the way.

Dedicatory services were held at the campus chapel, formally opening Sherman Hall.

Early on the morning of May 5, the north-east corner of the campus grew silent as the newest addition to UD was formally dedicated . Housing the Science departments, John Q. Sherman Hall is a crisp, clean structure of aluminum and glazed tile. Behind its construction were years of planning, minor setbacks, exasperating delays. But the most striking feature is the Foucault Pendulum, finished late in the year.

Devoid of lights and name in July, the new building awaits completion.

THE PENDULUM: 200 pounds of polished bronze suspended in the air.

The brain-child of Science Dean Leonard Mann and Physics Chairman Bro. Thomas Schick, the pendulum swings majestically in Sherman Hall's main lobby, indicating the rotation of the earth under it. Requiring about thirty-seven hours to complete its rotation, the pendulum is th irty-one feet in length . To keep it moving, a small magnet is attached to the bottom of the sphere. Current from a circular coil hidden in the ceiling runs to an iron bob on the cable, providing just enough pull to keep it oscillating. After a week of threatening to break through the windows, the correct amount of current was found and the pendulum became the campus conversation piece. Constructed jointly in California and in Cincinnati, the pendulum cost approximately $4,500, was generously donated by Mr. and Mrs. Freeman A. Pretzinger.

213


vÂŤau :Dau

Queen :Donna !Judd

atteHdaHfs: Sue (juess A11drea Seiver Molly Pay11e . . . and She wi ll crush the serpent's head . . .


Shortly after the lenten season, in the middle of April, the University suddenly began to hum with the sounds of five thousand-odd students emerging from their cocoons. Every nook and cubby soon whispered and conspired , plotting things to come. A record number of posters proclaiming a vast assortment of shows, picnics, and festivities gave a carnival-like appearance to the Arcade. Two jumps ahead of Spring Week, Student Council presented the show of the season : veteran comedy man Bob Hope came bouncing on campus, suavely bringing with him the ax to decapitate any apathy that might have been stubbornly remaining from winter.

THE

BOB HOPE

SHOW

On the round stage, Hope listens to applause, frowns, grins, releases a barrage of caustic humor.

路w A VI's ''B.W." started the show with a cup of "honest, it's orange juice," followed by our own Dixie Dynamoes, much to the dismay of Beethoven-lovers in the audience. The Upperclassmen quintet cooled the pace with their progressive tune styling, leaving the Hawaii(//JJ to warm the setting with a collection of Pacific pacifiers.

216


Then, a slim young lady named Pat Clark stepped on stage and belted out a lush ballad that reverberated all the way to the penthouse, dedicated to the "Dirt)' Double,'' an apartment dwelling on Alberta Street richly deserving of its title. To a standing ovation, the master appeared, gearing an hour of wisecracks, subtle chuckles, and bellybusters to the predominately collegiate audience. Typical of his barbs: "Why are you holding your stomach ? .. . been eating at Brother Paul's)" Learning that Miss Clark's perfume was "Evening in Paris," Hope answered that the aroma emanating from him was " Afternoon in Miamisburg.''

Hope seemed to enjoy the style show put on by the Home Ec department. At the show's end, amidst tumultous applause, Hope murmured, "I can't leave this," returned for another quarter hour's worth. At far fight, Hope heads for his dressing room , tired, but well pleased, leaving a highly appreciative UD.

217


VARIETY SHOW Hard on the heels of the Bob Hope show, with just explosion of Spring Week, came UD's annua l variety had consistently given pleasure and entertainment to tivities: our pride and joy, the Dixie Dynamoes, made make way for graduation.

The i\[ark V Quintet

enough time to sandwich itself in before the gentle show, composed of the people and groups which the campus. But there was a sad note to the festheir last stand before disbanding the group to

Good-bye to the Dynamoes . It was great whi le it lasted.


Mayhem breaks loose as tht band nearly gives up in desperation , infiltrated by a more progressive group.

Jack goes back for that high one, or that loud one. At any rate, the last one.

The cheering crowd should have something to cheer about next year.

U D 's version of Ella makes with a sultry .


BEAUTY

is where you find it. The University of Dayton found it in the person of Mary Roeckner, mentionable winner in Vogue magazine's yearly contest.

MARY ROECKNER 221


Intrepid adventurers Patty Ann , Jack Phillips, Wes Scoates, and John Houk pose before noble flight.

FLIGHT PROGRAM

"What do you mean, we're out of gas?"

222

Deciding to do the new ROTC Flight Program requirements one step better, cadets Phillips, Houk, Scoates and wife, churned off for the quaint island of Cuba, piloting a spanking new Comanche. Things were just dandy until slightly off the coast of Havana, where eYents took a turn for the worse. The voyageurs chugged painfully back into the Vandalia Port, bringing no rum, and just barely more airplane.

"Land ahead' Just a little bit more, Jack, ..


FLYERETTES

Clocku•ise: Sue Ann Miller, Sandy Horn, Lynn Deeters, Maureen Murphy, Lynn Hamant, Fran Straukamp, Nancy Clarke, Judy Baudendistal, Layne Lahrman, Irene Kramer, Loretto Yano, C1thy Liddy, Carol Mahan. Cathy Musterman, J oyce Koehler, Sheila Bueker, Ginny Beatty, Dottie DeVoe, Pat Aufderheide. Cflller: Molly Payne

THE SENIORS-Top: Sheila Bueker, Barbara Ha mant, Cathy Lidd)', Irene Kra mer, fro/It: Joyce Koehler, D ottie DeVoe, Jan Wojtena , Molly Payne

Bracken, Jan Wojtena, Barbara Deanne Lewis, Marcia Buchard, Joan 1-.•[ urphy, Kathy Hoffman, Brenda Kolentus . Bobbie Koenig,

Right: Mrs. Sonja Marsh . Chortographer

223


.YES, IT'S

ST. JOE'S On the south-west corner of the campus, there is a towering building which, on first glance, appears old and used. On second inspection, it appears demolished. In this venerable building live a rascally crew known as the "animals" (because they like pets, naturally).


Ernie !\路fannin, Gerry Hardt, Artie Dunlap, Goose Heller, Bill Cramser, Garry Roggenburk and l\1ark Sammon make a friendlr call to Founders. "But you GOTTA take a bath!"

A different breed, Founders' occupants take study serious!)' .

Proof that Founders is still on speaking terms with St. Joe's.

Founders' Hall is a bright, shiny, spit-and-polish dorm where bright, shiny men study and build up fine point averages. The occupants are extremely well-mannered and rarely indulge in serious horse-play due to the proximity of Founders' Hall to Alumni Hall.

-

FOUNDERS 225


OFF CAMPUS

THE RANCH: floor--Phil r.Iagnotti, Ann Lingo, Ed Palisin, coucb: Chris Michelson, John Bertrand, Paul Finorio. Jerry Kadela , top: Clark Barnrick

539 FORRER: Roger Bartsche, Jim Pistano, Bob Begley, Eddie Evans.

THE CELLAR : Clark Bamrick, Paul O'Donnell, Jerry Kadela , Ed Palisin, Bob Van Alt, John Cramblit, bollom: Phil Magnotti, John Bertrand

113.8 DEMPHLE ST.: dockwise-Gary Green, Terry Swarzc, Lou Taormina, Dick Lewicki, Bob Dietsche, John "Fritz" Ullrich, Fifi

226

UD has a bit of a problem. What with hundreds of new students pouring in each year, sleeping space on campus tends to become something of a problem. Then, too, there are those who simply prefer apartments to dorms. Some, of course, are content anywhere. At any rate, most students manage to find a home (or reasonable facsimile thereof) by the time second semester rolls around.


THE

GOVERNOR'S COMMITTEE Left to right: Garry Roggenburk, the "Governor," Bill

Brennan

Little known and even less recognized, the minute "Governor's Committee" made considerable headway this year. Directed by an old UD alumnus (affectionately known as the "Gm路ernor") the committee operates primarily among the sporting crowd . Showing a substantial profit for the academic year of '59-'60, the organization indicates a strong bid for supremacy in the coming year.

Sal Pantezzi Genet路al Chait路mt~n

Ross DiBacco Parade

May we offer a belated, but enthusiastic, cheer for this year's Homecoming Committee. It was a tremendous affair, requiring an equal amount of talent and initiative. Besides Sal, Ross, Joe, and Dave, Fred Reiff handled the dance, Gene Schill construed the publicity, and Terry Swartz put together the half-time ceremonies. Many thanks, men .

HOMECOMING

COMMITTEE

Joe Davis Campaigning cmd Electiom

Dave O'Connor Premiet路

227


. SPORTS

228


Top : Joe Grieco--h, Gerry Hardt-c, Ralph O'Donnell- g, AI PaJmerie-g-t, Nate Bruno--h, Bob Cyphers-h, Jack Parnell- h. second roU': Jack Uriah-g, Jim Theis- t, Ransom Piltz-t, Frank Kosco--c, AI Adkins-e, Mike Monaghan-e, Bill Sullivan-e, AI Watzek-t, Joe Belanich- c, Jordan-g, third row: Vince Palyan-f, Tony Latell -e, Bob Demarco-!, Cliff Harestad-g, Tim Ansbcrry- c, Pat Connor-q, Steve Palenchar- g, Joe Tache-t, George Marklay-e, froll/ •·ow: Brenden O'Leary-h, Earl Spivey- h, Schmidt-h, Tony Sperandeo- g, Earl McFeaters-g, Dan Laughlin-g. Frank Gniazdowski-f, Bob White-h, 11ot piom·ed: Ralph Harper, Frank Bongivengo, John Molitorris

FOOTBALL

SEASON RECORD

Opp. UD

0 pponent Richmond Cincinnati Bowling Green Holy Cross Louisville Xavier Villanova Detroit Miami Wichita WON 3

3 21 14 8 32 3 22 33 0

13 LOST 7

6 7 0 0

Hitting hard, Dayton smacks into Detroit's solid wall.

6 0

13 14 13 18

THE SEASON The University of Dayton football season was a campaign best represented by the alphabetical letter "V", not as the "V" for victory, but as a graphic symbol for the pattern which the Flyers won and lost games. The team started hot and hard, trouncing over Richmond in the first game of the season. But the second

game, against Cincinnati, broke the Flyers' wings and started a disastrous run of bad luck, as the gridders rang up seven straight losses. At the very bottom of the "V", the Flyers warmed the hearts of their stubborn rooters by smashing Miami, then Wichita, and regaining a foothold on the upswing.

229


And that's all she wrote! Joe Belanich puts the stopper on. Ralph Harper nails down a couple feet , and Steve and Bob come in for the fini shing touches .

Vince Palyan skirts wide as Jack Parnell watches approvingly .

He probably did not realize it at the time, but quarterback Danny Laughlin's thirty yard touchdown pass to end Bob Cyphers late in the first half was the game-saver as Dayton eked out a 6-3 win over Richmond on their home field. The Spiders grabbed an early 3-0 lead, but the Laughlin to Cyphers aerial was the clincher. The fans cheered, and sat back to watch the possibility of a winning season. Happily, most Dayton followers witnessed only two of the seven defeats on UD territory. After the Richmond victory, the Flyers

230

hit the road, running afoul as they butted up against their next four contests. At Cincinnati, the Flyers were scored upon in every quarter ex-

cept the second as Cincy's Bearcats let out a roar good to the tune of 21-7 . Late in the game, in the third quarter, Vince Palyan plunged, broke through for three yards and scored Dayton's single touchdown.


Earl McFeaters was happy .

George Marklay demonstrates one of UD"s secret plays .

A trip to Bowling Green proved just as fatal. BG hit paydirt in the first and fourth quarters for a 14-0 shutout over UD . Dayton's defense in this one was strong, but its offense lacked the needed punch. Holy Cross inflicted the Flyers' third straight loss in the young season with an 8-0 win at Wooster, Mass. Good defense intermingled with a shoddy offense told the story again in this battle. With only fourteen seconds remaining in the first half, the Cru-

. but the fans were throwing very little confetti later.

Tony Latell chops a big hole as Pat Connor goes for a valiant try.

saders romped merrily across the field, chalking up the winning score. Louisville, Kentucky, was Dayton's next stop on its month-long itinerary of woe. The bottom of the Flyers' defense fell out as the Cardinals ran roughshod over the locals, 32-6. Only halfback Jack Parnell's twenty yard run averted a shutout for Dayton. With a sigh of thanks, the Flyers returned home.

231


Playing at home was a welcome relief for the Flyers when the whistle sounded at the start of their game with Xavier. But when the smoke cleared, the team was wondering what it had to do to win, for they had done everything but win. The Flyers outgained Xavier in total offense, but the Musketeers scored when the chips were down. Dayton muffed at ]east six scoring opportunities and, although they did not threaten as often, Xavier made their only field goal attempt a good one for a 3-0 victory. Villanova had not won a game all season, so UD generously gave the Wildcats their first taste of victory in a 22-13 win. Dayton 's fortunes hit rock-bottom on Homecoming Day against Detroit in their own stadium. Although Detroit scored five times for a 33-14 decision, the day was not a total loss for Dayton grads. A seventy-seven yard pass by Quarterback Ralph Harper to end Mike Monaghan, and a two yard scoring run by Frank Gniazdowski provided agreeable entertainment for Flyer fans among the 7,500 in attendance. Tony watches over the flock as Pat Connor and Frank Gniazdowski come around to meet him.

Even though Dayton did lose seven of its ten games, it cannot be said that the '59 season was totally unsuccessful, because they did beat their bitterest rival, Miami . UD scored twice in the

The long campaign ended for UD on a winning note with an 18-13 tromping over the Wichita Wheatshockers on the home field. The game marked the end of the road for ten seniors in the

second quarter on a thirty-three yard pass play and a nine yard

Flyer uniform, and although the record seemed mediocre, these

run to put away a 13-0 mud-splattered victory over the Redskins. More than any other game this one helped bolster the fans' spirits and the Flyers found themseh路es with the strongest rooting section of all season.

ten seniors and their teammates could say they had played to the best of their ability and had upheld the traditions of the University, winniq.g or losing.

232


FROSH FOOTBALL The Frosh gridders did well for the season, winning three of their four games. Miami barely beat UD in the first game 22-18, but the Flyers came back under new Head Coach .Stan Zajdel . Xavier was shut out 6-0 on Bab Michigan's score. They routed Cincinnati 38-6 in a great offensive attack. The finis her was an 8-0 score over Ohio U. on Bill Spetrino's last quarter TD . The team played good hustling football and should help the varsity next year. Coming up will be such players as Jack Unverferth, Bab Michigan, Andy Tim ura, Don Delamar, Bob Heckman, and Gene McClellan .

SEASON RECORD

Opppneut

UD

Opp .

Miami Xavier Cincinnati Ohio U .

18

22

6 38

0 6

8

0

WON3

LOST 1

233


Coach Tom Blackburn, Don Heller, Hank Josefczyk, Pat Allen, Joe Kennelly, Garry Roggenbuck, Norm Schmotzer, i\.fanager Bill Brennan , Mr. Harry Baujan, fr ont row: Stan Greenberg .. Tomm)• Heller, ·Ken Barnett, Terry Bockhorn, Frank Case, Bill Cramsey, Phil Dubensky, Ray Zawadzki.

BASKETBALL SEASON RECORD Opponenl

Central State Arizona State Miami (0) Toledo Drake Citadel St. Mary's

UD

Opp .

80 89 61 71 71 60 79

51 50 45 81 54 48 53

36 50 71 63 54 73 75 58 62 77 62 72 66 66 55 91 64 75 67

32 61 63 70 ·51 63 60 52 53 59 45 60 79 70 60 82 51 69 66

72 64

51 78

DIXIE CL. N . C. State Wake Forest Duke Cincinnati Xavier Canisius -Duquesne Memphis State Louisville Virgin ia Tech Wake Forest Miami (0) Duquesne DePaul Louisville Xavier Eastern Kentucky Detroit DePaul

N.I.T. Temple Bradley WON 21

234

LOST 7

Frank Case with six legs


The 19 -60 s~JSO r• ' J V ·, ..rcdrnt t: 11 ) l r 111 ha,k :\ftc p ting . mediocre 14· 12 r .r,.l .l yc-.u be It:, Tom HIJ<- burn·. Fi re~ r g.tin I thear n.latm. I prcsti 'C by w'nn i n~ 21 ,2. m~ . 'The audition ol G.ur I Ru , nbutk ;..nd T mrny I iltt n

g

\'C

D ayton me scnring punch It so sorely h cked

c • had mudo tn du wi

Fr<:

Garry

~<j ll.ld '

1

fe\'iuusly. T ht:ar the rt·:tm·s n st im rovemenl.

cuding p int·maker Jn

rebounJcr, 1 Cl ;iliility. T omm. held dov. n t.a in1:; lx·rth nd hi~ ste.tdi nEs~ ::tl ,1 pl.lye,l ·' vit3l wk- in Da)ton's h£".1Jstr n • w }' th rnughout the caso . .l\lthou,1~h R g .~nbud.: ::tn.l H. t n w re JDSll nt.d in • Flyer :at ·, t cy w r · br o mc<~ m the whC'Ile ~~~ w. Etch player ll.ld · h::mJ m ;.:ivinf( th~: Fly r 1 p an l:.X tl'.l spin onto the height of •act 1 •• t

io . in a pi y!u.l mood th onnin bo m5~·li.

w a,;

the

tent •on his , aJu11bh: Jcf~:nsi\

235


Joe Kennelly's 21 points helped the Daytonians to an 80-51 margin over Central State in their initial test of the season. His 14 rebounds gave UD a commandipg lead of 62-33 in that department. Roggenburk and Hatton made their varsity debuts with 14 and 13 markers respectively. The team's next two contests were virtual " romps ." Arizona State came, saw, but did not conquer as the Dayton offense exploc\cd . for fifty points in the second half for a 89-50 humbling. The Miami Redskins were next to be set back by the Flyers in a 61-45 uprising at Oxford. Roggenburk and Frank Case led Dayton 's attack in these two victories with 40 and 35 points respectively. The Rockets of Toledo vaulted the Flyers' hopes for a fourth straight win when they defeated the locals 81-71 at Toledo. UD's

Seconds to go, Fcank fices fcom 路war out.

236

Central breaks loose. Pat Allen, Roggenbuck, and Hatton on the gmund. Garry hits hard against DePaul, (right) but we lost this one.


defense sagged in the second half after holding the upstaters to a 39-39 deadlock at halftime. Hatton pushed 21 points through the hoop for his season's high . While UD students were going to Cincinnati, New York, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, and various other spots on the map for Christmas vacation, the Flyers were giving themselves gifts in the UD Fieldhouse with relatively easy wins over their visiting adversaries. Drake was the first victim, followed by The Citadel and Saint Mary's of Texas. Dayton had a rough go of it in the first half against The Citadel Cadets, escaping with a narrow two point margin at that time. But UD fans were set at ease in the second half as the Flyers' offense began to click in full force. Fans witnessing the post-Christmas holiday Dixie Classic Tournament at Raleigh, N. C., saw the Flyers' toughest task of the season to that point and UD did not give their supporters a letdown. The pesky North Carolina State Wolfpack attempted to stop Dayton with slow-down basketball, but the visitors held their poise for a low-scoring 36-32 win. Roggenbuck accounted for 16 of our total points.

DePaul again, this time moving fast.

Pat Allen and Roggenbuck grapple. This didn't help, but Norm Schmotzer came through in

237


Wake Forest, the eventual tournament winner, put on a full court press with the score 50-47 against them to upend Dayton by eleven points in the second contest. UD had held the Deacons to a 25-21 score at halftime. Probably Dayton's most exciting game in their Farewell-to-Dixie came against Duke, 7163. The game was not decided until the Flyers won out in the last of three overtime periods. The two teams fought to ties of 54, 60, and 62 before the Flyers cut loose for nine points in the showdown. The first game of the 196o portion almost produced the upset of the year. Although Oscar Robertson got 32 points to lead the Bearcats to a 70-63 victory, U.C. had to fight all the way to do it. The nation's No. 1 team had no relaxation as Dayton, spearheaded by Roggenburk's lfl points, took advantage of the Bearcat mistakes and kept the score nip-and-tuck all evening . Playing on their own court in the next tile, the Flyers were scared by the Xavier Musketeers before they eventually copped a 14-51 decision. Garry Roggenburk and Frank Case led the way as the Flyers rolled 73-63 over Canisius at Buffalo. UD piled up a 40-24 in the first half.

238

Tommy Hatton climbing.

Joe Kennelly looks things over, then goes into action.


In their next six at home, the Flyers ran riot over Duquesne, Memphis, Louisville, Virginia Tech, Wake Forest, and Miami, with Stan Greenberg and Pat AJlen supplying the punch in the Duke game. Memphis saw Dayton win in an overtime. Soon after the Miami game, Dayton was selected to play National Invitational Tournament.

111

their 8th

By this time, the Flyers had an eight game winning streak working for them. But the Iron Dukes put an end to that at Pittsburgh with a 79-66 thrashing.. The irony of the game was that Duke had won only one of their 12 previous games. Dayton's only home court loss came at the hands of Howie Carl as his 25 points for DePaul put the chill on. A trip to Louisville proved just as fatal, but change of scenery at Cincinnati gave the Flyers their highest scoring game of the year as they snapped Xavier's six game winning skein . Benched because of a groin injury, Garry Roggenbuck provided the lift the Flyers needed to turn a close game into a 64-51 defeat of Eastern Kentucky. Case gunned down 19 points. Seniors Case and Kennelly made their final appearances in Dayton's thriller over Detroit. The Titan's Dave DeBusschere almost spoiled the fareweJI for Dayton as he finished with 34 points. The teams matched basket for basket in the second half after the Flyers had come from behind in the first 20 minutes to tie. They trailed by as many as 16 points in the first half, but made up for it in the second. In their final NIT tuneup, Dayton squeeked by DePaul at Chicago, 67-66. It was Dayton's 20th win of the year, giving Tom Blackburn his eighth 20victory season. Dayton drew Temple in the first NIT encounter and found the range for a 7251 runaway. And we just about made it, but Bradley pressed too hard and pulled the trophy away. Two words only are needed to describe the campaign: HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL!

239


N.I.T. A hard season tucked under their belts, NIT chances seemed good for the Flyers. Moreover, a victorious tournament meant free days for the student body. Understandably, UD entered a week-long spree as it prepared to take New York by storm. Reverberating over the campus, the torchlight rally trundled up to St. Joe's Hall, there to serenade the soon-to-be departing Flyer team .

Pas t the drill field with some suffering of cadence.

Smudge pots in winter?

The Flyers departed and, logically enough, it was decided that they would return some day. With an eye

to the future, banners and posters urged everyone to back the team, to get out there and holler, to greet 'em when they came back. Working late into the nights, publicity and committee members put the finishing touches on the banners, retained the school spirit, managed to raise a general hubbub.


GOING AN.D COMING

Every hovel with a handy television became a meeting grounds as the Flyers went into the elimination. Restaurants openly proclaimed, "Watch the N.I.T. here-Bring your Buddies!" (and presumably your billfold) Tension mounted after the half-time as the Flyers, running high and handsome, began hitting a solid streak of dark luck, gradually succumbed as Bradley caught its second breath . Hope for the conditional vacation looked dim.

The Flyers went down, but they went down with their teeth bared. With nothing lost, plus the satisfaction that the alma mater had again landed the big-time, the campus moved its location from College Park A venue to the Airport, there to await the arrival of the team.

Willie makes another joyous appearance.

Down the gangplank they come, a bouquet and an appreciative hand on the back waiting at the bottom.

241


FROSH BASKETBALL

Opponent

UD

Opp.

Bill's Drive-In Philips Oilers W-P Welfare Miami W-P Kittyhawks NCR Inland Bliss College W-P Welfare Tate's Sport G. Cincinnati Little Mickey's Xavier Inland Armco Tate's Sport G . Bill's Drive-In NCR W-P Welfare W-P Welfare Aeronca Deko Little Mickey's

80 59 69 87 107 91 87 79 93 74 70 79 78 68 101 87 65 75 81 76 94 82

73 88 44 58 54 80 80 64 67 76 83 77 52 93 60 53 64 86 64

105 77

33 82

55

60 50 76 77 (OT) 46 72 64 71 72 78 80 70 67 73 86 90 88 70 66 75

Miami Tate's Sport G. Bliss College Inland Inland Xavier Double Play Little Mickey's AAU TOURNEY Greenville Pyrex Grater Allen WON 24

LOST9


GOLF SEASON RECORD

UD Opp .

Opponent Louisville Cincinnati Miami Earlham Wittenberg Akron Xavier Ohio U.

13y2 13 11f2 14V2 1y2 12V2 16V2 11

4V2 14 2SV2 6V2 16V2 uv2 loV2 16

State Tourney at Columbus (15th out of 21) Hanover Louisville WON7

7

5

6V2

5V2

The UD Golfers, coached by Hank Ferazza, posted a winning season for 1960, taking seven against six setbacks. Ferazza will lose two consistent golfers through graduation when his charges begin the 1961 season. One is Bill Macbeth who maintained a scoring average of 74. Bill received the Illini Club Athletic trophy which is annually awarded to the top UD scholar-athlete. The other graduating senior is Paul O'Donnel who had a scoring average of 80 for the 1960 team . Don Leedom and Dick Kleiner gave the '60 Flyer linksmen strong support. Leedom shared the limelight with Macbeth, also ending the season with a scoring average of 74. Kleiner, the number three man on the team, placed fifth in the State competition held on the OSU Scarlet course. He carried an average of 76. Ed Alexander, with an average of 80 strokes per round, is expected to help fill the . gap of the graduated seniors on the 1961 team.

LOST 6 The linksmen's 7-6 mark was a large improvement over their 2-5 mark of 1959.

243


Back t路ou 路- Tom Tumbusch, Ed Wisnewski, Sam Edson, Charlie McCarron, Marty Kraimer, Bob Karsick, Joe Fontonelle, Charlie Gradel, Captain Bill Scheble, Walt DeAnna, Coach Nate Hawkes, Front row- Jerry Callahan, George Ruestor, John Rowles. Mike Case, Mike Freemon, ]. Smith, Mi.rsin g- Jim Smith, Marty Cunniffe

HOCKEY SEASON RECORD

0 ppo11mt

UD Opp.

Ohio U Ohio N

2

14

10

0

osu

14

1 3 2 12 5

Case Dennis Fenn Dayton Icelanders WON4

7

2 6 14 LOST 2

TIE 1

Sam Edson slashes for the goal

244

No sport is quite as fast moving, hard hitting, or hot headed as hockey, especially when the team members are dyed-in-the-wool skaters from way back. Placing fourth in the Ohio Intercollegiate Hockey Association, UD's stick-splinterers missed first place by only three points. Its third try, the team had its first winning season with four wins, two losses, and breaking even on one. Coached by Nate Hawkes and captained by Bill Scheb!e, the team is composed largely of Freshmen and Sophomores, with only three Seniors on the squad. It's a going group, quickly becoming known and respected in the state and becoming recognized as a group on its way up by hockey experts in Canada.


McCarron drives in

Hustling in a hurry , Walt DeAnna chops across Troy Arena

Just how high they will go is doubtful , however, for the team is forced to support itself without backing from the University. They drive their own cars around the state, finance their expeditions, and yet wear the UD label out of sheer loyalty. With complete uniforms costing several hundred dollars apiece, the team has made arrangements to wear outfits furnished by the Troy Arena. But they are stubborn and are rapidly gamtng many enthusiastic student fans who have gone to one game and then went back for more.

Captain Bill Scheble in action

Recipe for a cool drink: drop a puck and collect the ice slivers

Jim Smith dives, with no thanks for the stick across his ankles

245


SEASON RECORD

UD opp.

Opponent

2 0 0 4 0 0 0 4 4 6 6 0 3

Central State Louisville Bellarmine Xavier Bowling Green Cincinnati Toledo Louisville Earlham Earlham Xavier Miami Central State WON2

LOST 11

TENNIS The 1960 tennis team will not be remembered for its great victories this year. The team did not fare too well, considering eleven losses out of thirteen matches and six shut-outs. But they tried. Lacking, however, was an abundance of talent. Not that there is no tennis talent on campus, but there simply seemed to be a lack of it on the team. Perhaps some of the greatest of this talent tan be found among the coeds. Unfortunately, the coeds are not to be found on the team. We have yet to understand the reason for this, but there must be a valid one somewhere. Probably the greatest thing to happen to tennis on campus was the appearance of Louisville and its coeds, bringing a large crowd to the courts. From the looks of the record, the coeds on the Cardinal team did not seem to be a bad luck omen.

246

Nice return, but . . . look close and you will find two tennis balls. Things like this helped our record along.

5 9 9 5 9 9 9 5 5 3 3 9 6


~co.qw

Kdl.)·. inn0rrnt by tn.ndCJ", show,

nw

D1.,-crsion

Lies

trc

~uccc::ssfnl

UiO:!h

1rour o;eniM; ~ C ol u:.1tcJ 1 rom Lh~: t Jm ilft::r rhree ye~ c~ our! ac!i,)n. Tht:y wcr~: ?obrr r.mey, E,l T r.:t p. Joe W tstbrock and Jttk Dymond . Myron DJm f f . Uob U.1 er. Jtck Lallruy r . Fre Ccrv r.. , :.n Fred P nee rounJt:d out the tc;1m. ~ho · a murk<.-d imf \' ment un <:r iL llt·w "· h Shaw F.m . m ;1· it F•sLed 1ts Wt1 'ictorit:s und r him. The Flyc~~ d ( t d E. r he~m .;nd X "ier. bod by 6- 3. and h(lth ~'lmco; were aw.ty .u t on rniny Jays-.

The t ·un did ~p.uk!i ng

The 1 r sp ts look good for t.he futur n the new We~te dorl

hoi rship come. · intu dftcr. :\ d 1o thi ncxr yc.1r.

Sh1w ·mmoos· . Jr <ly 1 W\'Cn .1bil ily, ,;nd th::: tennis tc.1m may be moving m bctr~r rirclc llu' . ill, no cotd~ nn the te-am.

247


SEASON RECORD

Opponent

UD

opp.

1

5 6

Marshall Marshall Miami (0) Cincinnati Wright-Patterson Miami (0) Cincinnati Xavier Xavier Central State Ball State Earlham WON5

BASEBAll W eak hitting and ineffective pitching spelled the Flyers' downfall as they dropped their first six out of seven games. But from games nine through twelve, Herb Dintaman's athletes won four of the last five to finish the season with an impressive 5-7 record . . . not bad considering their agonizing start. The campaign got underway with a double-header loss at Marshall. UD could muster only six hits in three games and the pitchers were far from their best. Dintaman used nine hurlers, but their wildness and their teammates ' weak hitting were unable to cope with the home team. The plot was the same in the Flyers' next game as twelve Dayton batters were retired via strike-outs as UD lost to Miami, 8-1.

248

3 1 0

5 0

4 3 6 6 1 8

LOST 7

8 11

3 5 6 1

5 5 13 4


Things got even worse for the Flyers at Cincinnati in an 11-0 drubbing. It was a relatively quiet day on the field for Cincinnati as Bearcat pitcher Bill Faul registered 19 strike-outs. The Flyers put on their hitting shoes in their next engagement, bashing out eb路en hits for a 5-3 win over Wright-Patterson. A single in the seventh inning by third baseman Greg Finnin to drive in shortstop Tommy Hatton broke a 3-3 tie and put the game on ice for Dayton. The Miami Redskins made it two in a row over the Flyers with a 5-0 four-hit shutout. Garry Roggenburk made his baseball debut for Dayton against Cincinnati. Garry pitched creditably for the first six innings, striking out thirteen Bearcats. Although all of the Cincinnati runs were scored on him, most of them were unearned , due to a weak Flyer defense. The season started to look worthwhile as Dayton won its next three games m succession, beating Xavier twice and Central State. John Smykowski permitted only five hits as UD won over Xavier at Cincinnati, 3-1. The Musketeers followed the Flyers to Dayton a few days later, but went down to defeat once again, this time 6-5'. Another 6-5 victory over Central, a 13-1 trouncing at the hands of Ball State, and a 8-4 victory over Earlham gave the Flyers third place in the Richmond, Indiana, Tournament. The season ended far better than most fans hoped , especially after the foreboding start.

If Roggenburk can return to his 1958 form, when he posted a 4-1 record, and if the team is able to hold the consistency they displayed in the last half of their '60 campaign, UD's swatters will be on the move for '61.

249


\X/ ham

1

and the Flyers swre a twenty-five goal

SOCCER SEASON RECORD

Oppo11e111 St. Louis Denison Ohio Wesleyan Indiana Ohio State Ohio U . Earlham Ohio U . Antioch

UD

Opp.

0 0

10 4

6 1 0

7 4

2

6 13 6

2

1 5 WON 1

LOST 8

Outclassed and without a coach, the UD soccer team had little to cheer about in losing its first eight fall games. Not until the last match of the 1959 season did the Flyers register a victory . Antioch College was Darton's only autumn Yictim, absorbing a 5-1 defeat. Playing such strong teams as St. Louis, Indiana, Ohio University, and Ohio State, the UD kickers were able to score only twelve times while their opponents were crashing through the Flyer defense with a total of 57 goals the nine autumn matches . Besides the problem of trying to play without the benefit of a coach, the Flyers' biggest weakness in the 1959 season was their lack of conditioning. The team was able to keep the opponent's score down in game after game during the first

SPRING SEASON

UD

0 ppo11en1

4

Antioch Wilberforce

2

WON 2

LOST 0

OVERALL RECORD WON 3

250

Opp.

LOST 8

0 THE TEAM : Cliff Audretch, Charles Beck, August Buchhalter, Arturo Cordova, William o路Agostino, James D o ugherty, Horacio Fernandez. Fred Hirtreiter, Karam Emmanuel , AI Leiser, Bob Little, Tom Mattingly, James McCarthy, Jorge Mendizabel , John Nagle. Sal Pantezzi . Charles Raymond. Mark Sammon. Toni Scalia, Rafael Umana, Anibal U rteaga, \Xfeiss Ditmar


half, but most of the losses came in the second half when the Flyers tired and let their defense sag. The Flyers of the 1960 season found themselves with a new coach, John Wiesler, and two victories to add to their overall record of 3-8. UD registered a 4-1 victory over Antioch and a 2-0 shutout over Wilberforce to post a 2-0 Spring record. The team has potential and if things start out as they ended in the spring of 196o, the Flyers could return to the status that was theirs in 1958 when they were rated among the best in the state of Ohio.

This, then, was the year in sports, a year with magnificent heights. A year with mortifying lows; but still, a year long to be remembered.

251


SPRING WEEK This 1~ it : tht· b~t hig rc.1thcr befor tht ' in ~ l exarru. Tht I l ch.1:1,c I .~ w ·k , f free J )' r H: lr~ b rc the CJD pu fi chreu~ .Hid gir.ls it in . Thi~ i~

Sprin.-! "\ c k, sev n d.lp

nitcd for rd

SPRING WEEK COMMITTEE: ~ r. DlR D n~huc. u. Bear Pc l ct-<OD. t :cnc

J•m B

\\

;~ I

an azi. .. n l Jr

nil I

D'

tion.


SUNDAY Sophomore Class Picnic

The poster read " Food , Music, and Beer." All three were present and the week began hesitantly, then building up momentum, mshing toward the end of the year in a burst of frenzied activity.

SENIOR FAREWELL COMMITTEE: Jim Romer, Finances, Molly Payne, Dick LaPera , Co-Chain 11e11 of Elec路 lions, Norbie Young, Dance, Paul Braun, Geneml Cbdirman, Sue Reiter. Puhlhit y, Bill Bentz, Auw ds, Twinkle Longo. F({/ '0/'J. Bear Peterson. Clas.r Part y, Sheila James. Publicity


MONDAY: Music on the Lawn It rained. With the band assembled by the plaze, it rained . The concertors scurried off to the Fieldhouse, and someone re路 marked about the "smooth, liquid sounds" played that night. ..,-;;;;~~~7, We didn't say anything.

TUESDAY: Moment of Rest We ourselves scurried off this day, looking for a moment of quiet whence we could relax and brood. By chance, we found a small combo. Others found parts and small dances. Some met, some talked , some only thought.

WEDNESDAY: Track Meet Once again, the cinder track circumventing the UD gridiron had its annual work-out. The Knickerbocker Club provided the most talent as the Empire State boys amassed a total of 45 points, far outdistancing their nearest competitors, the Keystone Club which ended with 20 points. Ray Bartholmew set a new record in the high jump, springing 5 ft. sy2 inches. Dave Kelley did all right in the sack race, too.

254


AWARDS:

THE

With cooperation from the faculty and administration, Student Council chose the campus Top Twenty. The roster this year: Hank Josefczyk, Mary Sue Miller, Stan Greenberg, Andrea Siever, William Mullins, Sharon Strange, Joe Asbury, Joan Hollencamp, Carolyn Duell, Therese Geis, Donna Judd, Marion Reasor, Anita Gail Marting, Dave Kelly, T om Von derEmbse, Bob Antonick, Fred McKool, Paul Dierker, Jim McCarthy, and louis Boehman.

JAZZ

CONCERT

The Hi-lo's have a singularly individual manner of singing. They begin soft and mellow and suddenly the roof is torn off a few octaves and it's open house from therein. Dave Brubeck and his men came drivirig in with a hard streak of progressive. And UD furnished the sweet music of applause.


F IDAY:

256

Senior 1arcwcl/. . .

Joan Hollencamp

Twinkle Longo

Sue Reiter

Sheila Bueker


1111 ~fair to

Kemembcr

Dick Nonelle

Pete Peterson

Paul Braun

Norbie Young

Killg 'lJtcfl __ _

257


THE DANCE:

Through the center aisle .

Merry supporters of 7路up

. Linda

An American Legion poppy ?

Just congratulate her, Paul.


SATURDAY

SENIOR PARTY

The Avondale Club opened its arms and received the crowd .

n路

ui ox rn battle

linr, much I Some m.:LD&ged ~h ttam t

JDA&nhlin

rnakc at to the n:aJd t banquets 11nda morning orresr nd 'Emt1 Espy, our ( re5taunnteurs, wtup 6 e ith bam d for one such pener.

scattetea

A terror on any floor.

The bar, thankfully, opened at half hour intervals.

And thltt it. Th fin I b.rcatb of the fm I .,-et~c of allout life the hili. ith it the

fCJI' coded.

Thtrt- remamcd bur ne step to

There was food, too, providing you could get close to it .

Some old friends . . . the dragons .

uken.


COMMENCEMENT


TO THE GRADUATES:

By the time you page through this book, it will have been several months since you sat in the auditorium and took your turns standing and facing the watchers. In the time that has since ensued, you have taken the major step of your lives, perhaps into marriage, or into commerce or industry, or perhaps into meditative seclusion. Just one parting thought . . . a very heroic classmate of yours was to have graduated with you. After years of determination in his wheel chair, Keith Boyer wore his tassel in all of our minds as much as you wore yours in actuality. However the reward comes, success is always attainable. Take time out, now and then, to glance back and pause to reflect. But never lose perspecitve. The past is unalterable, but the future is yours to do with as you will. Step boldly, then . . . the world 1s yours.

261


HERBIE FOX Associate Technician

SUE REITER Senior Editor

REV. BERNARD A. NEUBAUER Moderator

262

JOAN HOLLENCAMP Social Editor


CAROLYN DUELL

KATHY DEGER

Administration

Assignor

MARTY PAYNE Morale Leader

DAYTONIAN '60

The blank space on the opposite page is our way of thanking Father Neubauer, our moderator, who was more instrumental than any other person on campus in making this yearbook a reality. His enthusiastic help, his optimism, and his encouragement were the combined single factor in keeping our merry little staff functioning. Toward the end of the year, his indomitable spirit gave way to physical stress and we were shocked to learn that he was conducting his affairs on his back from a bed. Naturally, we had kept putting things off until then, and we found ourselves without a photo of Father Neubauer. Rather than use one taken last vear, we thought we would do it this way. Our sincerest thanks and appreciation for all the aid he has given us. Special thanks also go to James Israel of the studios of the same name up in Mt. Vernon for getting us under way last June, to Dick Beach and Gail Wonka in the Publicity office, and to Dave Hopkins and Bill Langley of the Flyer staff for pinch-hitting on the sports section. Many people helped make the long nights in the penthouse more enjoyable, so lots of thanks to them. too. Personal thanks to Marty Payne and Herb Fox who never knew when to stop. Matter of fact, thanks to just about everybody. Bob Antonick

263


..

Compliments

~

·

- .\;~~

__

MIKE LONGO'S lta.licm-Americ.:an Cuisine Nou: at our neu· location • 26

HURRY DOWN TO

F.a.~f

First Street

~~

4.

RESTAURANTS

CONGRADULATIONS Yes, we know it's spelled wrong! But YOU won't go wrong if you visit any of Vic and Mom's 19 Pizza Kings. Don't forget the one nearest UD at:

2210 S. Patterson Blvd. AX-8-148 I

Vic Cassano and Mom Donisi PIZZA KINGS

2b4

JUST A JUMP AWAY FROM UD

ANGELINA'S PIZZA HOUSE 1127 Brown St. 205 Salem Avenue

4028 South Dixie Drive

TASTE DOESN'T LIE: The Best Is in Angelina•s Pizza Pie. Tried One Yet?


make no small plans

for your future Today's exciting era of rapi~ discovery and almost unbelievable technological progress opens up scores of richly rewarding opportunities for the youth of America. Thousands upon thousands of well-educated young people are needed to fill the exacting demands of engineering, the arts, social sciences, medicine, finance, aviation, electronics, and business. Your diploma signifies you have successfully completed that first long step toward greater responsibilities as you enter the career of your choice. This is an ideal moment for you to chart your future. Hake your plans BIG ONES! Think highly of your abilities and possibilities. Whatever degree of success you may achieve, let it be your personal goal at all times to add new honor to University of Dayton.

The National Cash Register Com~pany

2b5


COMPLIMENTS OF

ROMA INN I00 I South Brown Street

NATIONAL BARNATIONAL LANES

Dayton 9, Ohio

I 155 South Brown Street, Dayton, Ohio BA 2 8323

SOUTH PARK BARBER SHOP 930 Brown Street

CARL F. BRANDING BA 8-2832

First and Jefferson BA 2 2883 2bb


0

0

0

... was founded in Dayton by Col. Daniel E. Mead in 1846.

. . . has its principal executive offices in Dayton and has six manufacturing operations in Ohio .

. . . is one of the ten largest and one of the most diversified in the industry .

. . . today has 38 operations in 1 S states where paper, paperboard, wood pulp, corrugated containers, folding boxes, packaging cartons and technical papers are manufactured.

THE MEAD CORPORATION DAYTON, OHIO

267


TO THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1960 ...

Our Compliments and Congratulations

STANDARD REGISTER ... one of Dayton's prominent industries, an outstanding leader in the U.S. business forms industry. Founded in 1912 by John Q. Sherman and William C. Sherman. Through our products and the services of our sales representatives in applying them, we provide "Paperwork Simplification" to the business world.

THE STANDARD REGISTER COMPANY, DAYTON 1, OHIO

Sales and Service offices in principal cities. Plants at Dayton (Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 8); Oakland 16) and Glendale 17) Calif.; York, Pa. 15) and Fayetteville, Ark. (9).

Next Door to U D

YOUNG'S

CLEANERS

1227 Brown St. We have been serving UD's students with quality cleaning for 35 years.

SAN RAE MOTEL IN DAYTON, OHIO Six Miles South on U.S. 25 Phone UL 9-360 I 5600 South Dixie Highway

Completely Air Conditioned Member-AAA

Best Wishes

Fourth at Ludlow EAST OWN 3940 Linden Ave. 2b8

WEST OWN 4291 West Third St.


918 NITE CLUB Specialists in Home-Fried Chicken Liquid Refreshments 918 BROWN STREET BA 4-9194

Merrymakers

Compliments of

REEVES BROS. BARBERS I047 Brown Street DAYTON, OHIO

DAYTON MONUMENT CO. Designers and Manufacturers of

MONUMENTS, MAUSOLEUMS, MEMORIALS GRANITE, MARBLE AND BRONZE 1424 Alberta Street BA 8-1362 South of UD Stadium

MARTINA'S ITALIAN RESTAURANT UD'S HOME AWAY FROM HOME

Congratulates the Class of '60 I 126 Brown Street

COCKTAIL LOUNGE FINE FOOD AIR CONDITIONED ROOM SERVICE TELEPHONE IN EVERY ROOM

KEY MOTEL 222 East First Street BAldwin 6-271 I DAYTON 2, OHIO

Free Parking and Television DOWNTO WN DAYTON W ith Back

269


Patronize Your Nearest Drug Store

MILLER'S SOUTH END PHARMACY

THIE MllAMK ST A TllONIEJRS . Complete Line of Office Equipment and Supplies

Brown Street at Fairground Ave.

Greeting Cards Gift Items and Party Favors

BAldwin 2-51 0 I

TWO STORES

NED B. MILLER

27 E. SECOND ST. AND ARCADE MARKET

Pharmacist

~~路4 SERVICE STATION 1161 BROWN

BA 3-4502

Featuring Sinclair Products

Postoffice

SOUTH PARK WESTINGHOUSE LAUNDROMAT Complete Laundry and Dry Cleaning Shirts Finished - I Day Service BA 8-7821 852 Brown St. Dayton 9, Ohio Open 7 a.m. - 6 p.m. Daily CAROL LINDERMAN GLORIA TIPTON Trees

"Beef at Its Best"

1064 BROWN ST. 270

Wash Line

BAldwin 2-2151


"Best in Accommodations" Dayton's Most Beautiful

MOTEL CAPRI -76 UnitsComplete Motel Facilities Dining Room Cocktail Lounge Heated Swimming Pool Free TV and Telephones

Congratulations to the CLASS OF 1960

MIAMI CIGAR AND TOIBACCO co. 401-1 I East Fifth St.

BA 8-8195

"Closest to Campus" Ax 8-141 I

2700 S. DIXIE

Rent a New Car, Truck or Station Wagon

HERTZ Drive • It • Yourself, Inc.

117 W. SECOND ST. BA 26301 DAYTON 2, OHIO

Everything Photographic A COMPLETE LINE OF

Signwriters• Supplies

MALONE CAMERA STORE, INC.

Raw Wood Frames

4 Stores

Artist's Material

BERT L. DAILY, INC. 126 East Third St.

BA 3-4121

DAYTON, OHIO

DOWNTOWN 2 I E. Second St.

EASTOWN 3896 Linden Ave.

TOWN AND COUNTRY 62 E. Stroop Rd.

WEST OWN 4309 W. Third St.

Since 1916 271


Daytonian 1960  

University of Dayton student yearbook. Early yearbooks cover St. Mary's Institute. Annual publication of the Daytonian began in 1923; it was...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you