Issuu on Google+

is p

rt s

.

Th

roj e

ct is

supp orted in

or nt f e m ow al End part by an a n o i t a N e h t ward from

A th e


Turn your donation into something lasting.

If you want to make parks greener, improve neighborhoods, even support the arts, the Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan can help. And keep your donation giving for generations to come.

Visit CFSEM.org or call 1-888-WE-ENDOW for more information on how we can help. Scan the QR Code to find out more.


contents Beethoven Festival Commemorative Program February 2013 2012–13 Season

Departments Editor Gabrielle Poshadlo gposhadlo@dso.org 313.576.5194

DSO Administrative Offices Max M. Fisher Music Center 3711 Woodward Ave. Detroit, MI 48201 Phone: 313.576.5100 Fax: 313.576.5101 DSO Box Office: 313.576.5111 Box Office Fax: 313.576.5101 DSO Group Sales: 313.576.5130 Rental Info: 313.576.5050 Email: info@dso.org Web site: dso.org Subscribe to our e-newsletter via our website to receive updates and special offers. Performance is published by the DSO and Echo Publications, Inc. u Echo Publications, Inc. 248.582.9690 echopublications.com Tom Putters, president tom@echopublications.com Toby Faber, advertising director To advertise in Performance, call 248.582.9690 or email info@echopublications.com Performance magazine online: dsoperformance.com u To report an emergency during a concert, call 313.576.5111. To make special arrangements to receive emergency phone calls during a concert, ask for the house manager. It is the policy of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra that concerts, activities and services are offered without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, handicap, age or gender. The DSO is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Activities of the DSO are made possible in part with the support of the National Endowment for the Arts and the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs. Non-flash photography and video recording by silenced hand-held devices are allowed during DSO performances. The DSO can be heard on the Chandos, Columbia, DSO, Koch, London, Naxos, Mercury Records and RCA labels.

dso.org

4 Board of Directors 6 Orchestra Roster 7 Welcome Letter 8 News & Notes 13 Music Director 34 Education

Features

8 Orchestra History 10 The Titan’s “Ode to Joy”

35 General Information/Staff 36 Donor Roster

Festival Concerts 14 The Beethoven Symphonies: 3 & 8

Leonard Slatkin, conductor Fri., Feb. 8 at 10:45 a.m. & 8 p.m. 

Beethoven Leonore Overture No. 3 Symphony No. 8 Symphony No.3, “Eroica”

  16 The Beethoven Symphonies: 4 & 5

Leonard Slatkin, conductor Sat., Feb. 9 at 8 p.m. and Sun., Feb. 10 at 3 p.m.

Beethoven Fidelio Overture Symphony No. 4 Symphony No. 5

19 The Beethoven Symphonies: 1 & 6

Leonard Slatkin, conductor Thu., Feb. 14 at 10:45 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.

Beethoven Egmont Overture Symphony No. 1 Symphony No. 6, “Pastoral”

  22 The Beethoven Symphonies: 2 & 7 Leonard Slatkin, conductor Fri., Feb. 15 at 8 p.m. and Sat., Feb. 16 at 8 p.m. Beethoven Coriolan Overture Symphony No. 2 Symphony No. 7 25 Beethoven’s Ninth

Leonard Slatkin, conductor Thu. Feb. 21 at 7:30 p.m., Fri. Feb 22 at 8 p.m. Sat. Feb. 23 at 8 p.m., Sun. Feb. 24 at 3 p.m.

Beethoven Selections from The Creatures of Prometheus Symphony No. 9

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / february 201 3

3


Detroit Symphony Orchestra Board of Directors officers

Phillip Wm. Fisher Chairman

Mark A. Davidoff Vice Chair

Chacona W. Johnson

Bruce D. Peterson Vice Chair

Vice Chair

Glenda D. Price, Ph. D Secretary

Arthur Weiss Treasurer

David N. McCammon

Lois L. Shaevsky

Anne Parsons President & CEO

Directors

Linda Dresner

Marianne Endicott

Shelley Heron,‡ Orchestra Representative

Daniel Angelucci

Samuel Fogleman

Ronald M. Horwitz ‡

Floy Barthel

Mrs. Harold Frank

Robert H. Bluestein

Herman Frankel‡

Ismael Ahmed Rosette Ajluni

Mrs. Mandell L. Berman Penny B. Blumenstein

Stanley Frankel, Chairman Emeritus

Gary L. Cowger

Ralph J. Gerson

Richard A. Brodie Peter D. Cummings, Chairman Emeritus Stephen R. D’Arcy

Paul Ganson

Hon. Damon J. Keith Joel D. Kellman

David Robert Nelson

Alfred R. Glancy, III,‡ Chairman Emeritus Herman Gray, M.D.

Richard L. DeVore

Gloria Heppner, Ph. D.

James B. Nicholson, Chairman Emeritus Arthur T. O’Reilly‡

Robert E.L. Perkins, D.D.S.

Bonnie Larson ‡

William F. Pickard

Laurence M. Liberson,‡ Orchestra Representative

Brigitte Harris

Michael R. Tyson Ann Marie Uetz

Janice Uhlig

David Usher

Harold Kulish

Allan D. Gilmour

Jane F. Sherman

Stephen Strome ‡

Faye Alexander Nelson

Richard P. Kughn ‡

Maureen T. D’Avanzo Karen Davidson

Sean M. Neall

William P. Kingsley

Wei Shen

Joe Mullany

Renee Janovsky

Mrs. Ray A. Shapero

James C. Mitchell, Jr.

Michael J. Keegan

Barbara Frankel

Elizabeth Boone

Lois A. Miller

Sharad P. Jain

Sidney Forbes

Janet Ankers ‡

Edward Miller

Nicholas Hood, III

Jennifer Fischer

Robert Allesee

Barbara Van Dusen‡ Ted Wagner

Hon. Kurtis T. Wilder R. Jamison Williams Clyde Wu, M.D.‡

Stephen Polk

Arthur C. Liebler‡

Bernard I. Robertson‡

Florine Mark

Alan E. Schwartz‡

Ralph J. Mandarino

Marjorie S. Saulson

Executive Committee

Lifetime Members

Samuel Frankel†

David Handleman, Sr.†

Dr. Arthur L. Johnson†

Governing Members

Governing Members is a philanthropic leadership group designed to provide unique, substantive, hands-on opportunities for leadership and access to a diverse group of valued stakeholders. Governing Members are ambassadors for the DSO and advocates for arts and culture in Detroit and throughout Southeast Michigan. This list reflects gifts received from December 1, 2011 through January 1, 2013. For more information about the Governing Members program, please call Cassie Brenske, Governing Members Gift Officer at 313.576.5460. Jan Bernick Vice Chair, Philanthropy

Maureen T. D’Avanzo Vice Chair, Membership

James C. Farber Vice Chair, Outreach

Bonnie Larson Vice Chair, Engagement

Frederick J. Morsches Vice Chair, Communications

Randall Hawes Musician Liaison

Victoria J. King Musician Liaison

Mrs. Denise Abrash Mr. & Mrs. Richard L. Alonzo Richard & Jiehan Alonzo Dr. Lourdes V. Andaya Mr. & Mrs. Eugene Applebaum Dr. & Mrs. Ali-Reza R. Armin Mr. & Mrs. Robert Armstrong Mr. David Assemany & Mr. Jeffery Zook Mr. & Mrs. John Axe

4

officers

Arthur T. O’Reilly Chairperson

Jeanne Bakale & Roger Dye Mr. J. Addison Bartush Mr. & Mrs. Martin S. Baum Mary Beattie Mr. Chuck Becker Cecilia Benner Mr. & Mrs. Irving Berg Mrs. John G. Bielawski Barbra & Joe Bloch Dr. & Mrs. Duane Block

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / February 201 3

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Boll, Sr. Mr. & Mrs. Jim Bonahoom Dr. & Mrs. Rudrick E. Boucher Mr. & Mrs. S. Elie Boudt Gwen & Richard Bowlby Mr. Anthony F. Brinkman Mr. Scott Brooks Robert N. & Claire P. Brown Michael & Geraldine Buckles Mr. H. William Burdett, Jr.

Mr. H. Taylor Burleson & Dr. Carol S. Chadwick Philip & Carol Campbell Mr. William N. Campbell Dr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Carson Mr. & Mrs. Francois Castaing Dan Clancy & Jack Perlmutter Gloria & Fred Clark Dr. Thomas Clark Lois & Avern Cohn †Deceased

Jack, Evelyn & Richard Cole Family Foundation Dr. & Mrs. Charles G. Colombo Mrs. RoseAnn Comstock Dr. & Mrs. Ivan Louis Cotman Mr. & Mrs. Raymond M. Cracchiolo Mr. & Mrs. Thomas A. Cracchiolo Thomas & Melissa Cragg Ms. Mary Rita K. Cuddohy dso.org


Marvin & Betty Danto Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Colin Darke Ms. Barbara L. Davidson Lillian & Walter Dean Mrs. Beck Demery Ms. Leslie Devereaux Ms. Barbara Diles Adel & Walter Dissett David Elgin Dodge Mr. & Mrs. Mark Domin Mr. & Mrs. Walter E. Douglas Ms. Judith Doyle Eugene & Elaine Driker Paul & Peggy Dufault Mr. Robert Dunn Dr. and Mrs. Leopold Eisenbreg Dr. & Mrs. A. Bradley Eisenbrey Ms. Jennifer Engle Mr. & Mrs. John M. Erb Mary Sue & Paul E. Ewing Stephen Ewing Mr. David Faulkner Mr. & Mrs. Oscar Feldman Mrs. Kathryn L. Fife Ron Fischer & Kyoko Kashiwagi Mr. & Mrs. Alfred J. Fisher, III Mrs. Marjorie S. Fisher Mr. Steven J. Fishman Mr. David Fleitz Mrs. Anne Ford Dr. Saul & Mrs. Helen Forman Dale & Bruce Frankel Rema Frankel† Maxine & Stuart Frankel Ms. Carol A. Friend & Mr. Mark T. Kilbourn Mr. & Mrs. Daniel E. Frohardt-Lane Lynn & Bharat Gandhi Mr. William Y. Gard Dorothy & Byron Gerson Gale Girolami Dr. & Mrs. Kenneth W. Gitlin Dr. & Mrs. Theodore A. Golden Dr. Robert T. & Elaine Goldman Mr. Nathaniel Good Dr. Allen Goodman & Dr. Janet Hankin Mr. & Mrs. Mark Goodman Robert & Mary Ann Gorlin Mr. & Mrs. James A. Green Dr. & Mrs. Steven Grekin Mr. Jeffrey Groehn Mr. & Mrs. James Grosfeld

Sylvia & Ed Hagenlocker Alice Berberian Haidostian Dr. Algea O. Hale Mr. Kenneth R. Hale Mr. Tim & Mrs. Rebecca Haller Robert & Elizabeth Hamel Mr. & Mrs. Preston Happel Randall L. & Nancy Caine Harbour Mr. Scott I. Harrison and Ms. Angela M. Detlor Ms. Cheryl A. Harvey Dr. and Mrs. Gerhardt Hein Ms. Nancy Henk Mr. & Mrs. Demar W. Helzer Ms. Doreen Hermelin Mr. Eric J. Hespenheide & Ms. Judith V. Hicks Mr. & Mrs. Norman H. Hofley Dr. Jean Holland Dr. Deanna & Mr. David B. Holtzman Jack & Anne Hommes Mr. Matthew Howell and Mrs. Julie Wagner Mr. F. Robert Hozian Jean Wright & Joseph L. Hudson, Jr. Julius & Cynthia Huebner Richard H. & Carola Huttenlocher Mr. & Mrs. A. E. Igleheart Mr. & Mrs. Richard J. Jessup Mr. John S. Johns Mr. George Johnson Lenard & Connie Johnston Marjorie & Maxwell Jospey† Mrs. Ellen D. Kahn Faye & Austin Kanter Mr. & Mrs. Norman D. Katz Martin & Cis Maisel Kellman Rachel & Jacob Kellman† Mr. & Mrs. Bernard & Nina Kent Michael E. Smerza & Nancy Keppelman Mr. Patrick J. Kerzic & Stephanie Germack Kerzic Dr. David & Elizabeth Kessel Stephanie & Frederic Keywell Mrs. Frances King Mr. & Mrs. Ludvik F. Koci Ms. Rozanne Kokko Mr. & Mrs. Donald Kosch Dr. Harry & Katherine Kotsis Robert C. & Margaret A. Kotz Mr. & Mrs. James A. Kurz Mr. Myron & Joyce Joyce LaBan

Officers

Dr. Raymond Landes & Dr. Melissa McBrien-Landes Ms. Anne T. Larin Dolores & Paul Lavins Dr. Klaudia Plawny- Lebenbom & Mr. Michael Lebenbom Mr. David Lebenbom Marguerite & David Lentz Allan S. Leonard Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Lewis Mr. & Mrs. Robert Liggett Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Lile The Locniskar Group Mr. & Mrs. Harry A. Lomason Dr. & Mrs. Charles Lucas Mrs. Sandra MacLeod Mr. & Mrs. Charles W. Manke, Jr. Elaine & Mervyn Manning Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Mansfield Dr. Peter McCann & Kathleen L. McKee Mr. & Mrs. Alonzo L. McDonald Alexander & Evelyn McKeen Patricia A. & Patrick G. McKeever Mrs. Susanne O. McMillan Dr. & Mrs. Donald A. Meier Dr. David & Mrs. Lauren Mendelson Mr. Roland Meulebrouck Mrs. Thomas Meyer Thomas & Judith Mich Bruce & Mary Miller Mr. & Mrs. Leonard G. Miller Dr. Robert & Dr. Mary Mobley Mr. Stephen & Dr. Susan Molina Eugene & Sheila Mondry Mr. Lane J. Moore Mr. & Mrs. Craig R. Morgan Florence Morris Mr. Frederick J. Morsches Cyril Moscow Drs. Stephen & Barbara Munk Mr. Bruce Murphy Joy & Allan Nachman Edward & Judith Narens Geoffrey S. Nathan & Margaret E. Winters Denise & Mark Neville Mr. Geoffrey W. Newcomb Jim & Mary Beth Nicholson Patricia & Henry Nickol Mr. & Mrs. David E. Nims Joanna P. Moris & Arthur A. Nitzsche Mariam C. Noland & James

Board of Directors

Virginia Lundquist Vice President for Outreach

Deborah Savoie President Elect

Marvin D. Crawford Vice President for Administration & Finance

Dr. Nora Sugintas Vice President for Membership

Esther Lyons Recording Secretary Mary Beattie Corresponding Secretary

Katana Abbott

Charlotte Worthen

Marlene Bihlmeyer

Julie Zussman

Gwen Bowlby

Kelly Hayes Ex-Officio (Immediate Past President)

Gloria Clark Jill Jordan Sandie Knollenberg Deborah Meade Eva Meharry Lynn Miller Gloria Nycek Todd Peplinski

dso.org

William H. & Patricia M. Smith John J. Solecki Mr. Richard Sonenklar & Mr. Gregory Haynes Renate & Richard Soulen Ms. Wanda & Ms. Eugenia Staszewski Dr. Gregory E. Stephens Professor Calvin L. Stevens Mr. Clinton F. Stimpson, Jr. Dr. & Mrs. Charles D. Stocking Dr. & Mrs. Gerald H. Stollman Vivian Day & John Stroh III Mr. & Mrs. Ray Stone David Szymborski & Marilyn Sicklesteel D. I. Tarpinian Shelley & Joel Tauber Alice & Paul Tomboulian Mr. & Mrs. L. W. Tucker Amanda Van Dusen & Curtis Blessing Mr. & Mrs. Charles B. Van Dusen Mr. Robert VanWalleghem Mr. & Mrs. George C. Vincent Mr. & Mrs. William Waak Dr. & Mrs. Ronald W. Wadle Mr. & Mrs. Jonathan T. Walton Ann Kirk Warren Gary L. Wasserman & Charles A. Kashner Mr. Patrick A. Webster Mr. Herman W. Weinreich Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Weisberg Mr. Donald Wells Janis & William M. Wetsman Mr. & Mrs. John Whitecar Mr. & Mrs. Barry Williams Dr. Amy M. Horton & Dr. Kim Allan Williams Mrs. Beryl Winkelman Rissa & Sheldon Winkelman Dr. & Mrs. Max V. Wisgerhof II Mr. & Mrs. Jonathan Wolman David & Bernadine Wu Ms. June Wu Dr. & Mrs. Robert E. Wurtz Mrs. Judith G. Yaker Dr. Alit Yousif & Mr. Kirk Yousif Mrs. Rita J. Zahler Mr. & Mrs. Alan Zekelman Mr. Paul M. Zlotoff & Mrs. Terese Sante Mrs. Paul Zuckerman† Milton & Lois Zussman

VOLUNTEER COUNCIL 2010-13

Janet M. Ankers President

Ellie Tholen Vice President for Public Relations

A. Kelly Mr. & Mrs. Stanley Nycek Mrs. Jo Elyn Nyman David & Andrea Page Mr. & Mrs. Richard G. Partrich Mrs. Sophie Pearlstein Dr. & Mrs. Claus Petermann Mr. Charles L. Peters Donald & Jo Anne Petersen Mrs. Bernard E. Pincus Mrs. Helen F. Pippin Mr. & Mrs. Jack Pokrzywa Ms. Judith Polk Mrs. Anna Mary Postma Mr. & Mrs. William Powers Priester Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Nicolas I. Quintana Michele Rambour Mr. & Mrs. Gary & Rhonda Ran Mr. & Mrs. Richard Rappleye Drs. Stuart & Hilary Ratner Ms. Ruth Rattner Drs. Yaddanapudi Ravindranath & Kanta Bhambhani Carol & Foster Redding Mr. David & Mrs. Jean Redfield Ms. Emily J. Reid Hugh T. Reid Dr. Claude & Mrs. Sandra Reitelman Ms. Denise Reske Jack & Aviva Robinson Norman & Dulcie Rosenfeld Mr. & Mrs. Robert B. Rosowski Mr. & Mrs. Hugh C. Ross Mrs. Lois V. Ryan Martie & Bob Sachs Dr. Mark Saffer Dr. Hershel Sandberg Ruth & Carl Schalm Ms. Martha A. Scharchburg & Mr. Bruce Beyer Mr. & Mrs. Alan S. Schwartz Mr. & Mrs. Fred Secrest Mr. Merton J. & Beverly Segal Elaine & Michael Serling Mr. & Mrs. Herbert Shanbaum Mr. Stephan Sharf The Honorable Walter Shapero and Mrs. Kathleen Straus Dr. Les & Mrs. Ellen Siegel Robert & Coco Siewert Mr. & Mrs. Donald R. Simon Mr. & Mrs. William Sirois Drs. Daniel J. & Sophie Skoney Mr. & Mrs. Leonard W. Smith Mr. & Mrs. S. Kinnie Smith, Jr.

†Deceased

Eleanor Siewert Ex-Officio (Parliamentarian) Mark Abbott Musician Liaison Marcus Schoon Musician Liaison Chelsea Kotula Staff Liaison Perform ance / Vol . X XI / february 2013

5


Leonard Slatkin, Music Director Music Directorship endowed by the Kresge Foundation Jeff Tyzik, Principal Pops Conductor

Terence Blanchard, Fred A. and Barbara M. Erb Jazz Creative Director Chair Neeme Järvi, Music Director Emeritus

First Violins

Yoonshin Song Concertmaster Katherine Tuck Chair

Kimberly A. Kaloyanides Kennedy Associate Concertmaster Alan and Marianne Schwartz and Jean Shapero (Shapero Foundation) Chair Hai-Xin Wu Assistant Concertmaster Walker L. Cisler/Detroit Edison Foundation Chair Beatriz Budinszky*

Marguerite Deslippe* Elias Friedenzohn*

Laurie Landers Goldman* Eun Park*

Adrienne Rönmark* Laura Soto*

Greg Staples* Second Violins

Adam Stepniewski Acting Principal The Devereaux Family Chair Ron Fischer*

Sheryl Hwangbo*

Rachel Harding Klaus* Hong-Yi Mo*

Robert Murphy* Bruce Smith*

Joseph Striplin* Marian Tanau* Jing Zhang* Alvin Score Violas

Alexander Mishnaevski+ Julie and Ed Levy, Jr. Chair James VanValkenburg++ Caroline Coade Hang Su

Glenn Mellow~

Shanda Lowery-Sachs Hart Hollman Han Zheng

Catherine Compton Violoncellos

Robert deMaine+ James C. Gordon Chair Dorothy and Herbert Graebner Chair

Robert Bergman* Victor and Gale Girolami Cello Chair David LeDoux*

Peter McCaffrey* Haden McKay*

Oboes

Trumpets

Personnel Manager

Shelley Heron Maggie Miller Chair

Kevin Good

William Lucas

Heather Hart Rochon Assistant Orchestra Personnel Manager

Trombones

Assistant Conductor

Donald Baker+ Jack A. and Aviva Robinson Chair

Brian Ventura++

Monica Fosnaugh English Horn

Monica Fosnaugh Clarinets

Theodore Oien+ Robert B. Semple Chair PVS Chemicals, Inc./ Jim and Ann Nicholson Chair

Úna O’Riordan*

Laurence Liberson++

Paul Wingert*

Shannon Orme

Basses

E-Flat Clarinet

Stephen Molina Acting Principal Van Dusen Family Chair Linton Bodwin

Laurence Liberson Bass Clarinet

Larry Hutchinson

Shannon Orme Barbara Frankel and Ronald Michalak Chair

Maxim Janowsky ^

Bassoons

Stephen Edwards Craig Rifel

Alexander Hanna+^ Harp

Patricia Masri-Fletcher+ Winifred E. Polk Chair Flutes

David Buck+ Women’s Association for the DSO Chair

Sharon Sparrow Acting Assistant Principal Jeffery Zook Piccolo

Jeffery Zook

Robert Williams+ John and Marlene Boll Chair Victoria King

Stephen Anderson Acting Principal Lee and Floy Barthel Chair

Stephen Molina Orchestra Personnel Manager

Kenneth Thompkins+

Teddy Abrams

Randall Hawes

Stage Personnel

Nathaniel Gurin++

Bass Trombone Randall Hawes Tuba

Dennis Nulty+ Timpani

Frank Bonucci Stage Manager

Steven Kemp Department Head Matthew Pons Department Head

Michael Sarkissian Department Head

Brian Flescher ``#

Legend

Percussion

++ Assistant Principal

Joseph Becker+ Ruth Roby and Alfred R. Glancy III Chair William Cody Knicely Chair Librarians

Robert Stiles+ Ethan Allen

+ Principal

``# Substitute musician, Acting Principal ^ Extended Leave

* These members may voluntarily revolve seating within the section on a regular basis. ~ On Sabbatical

§ African-American Orchestra Fellow

Michael Ke Ma++ Marcus Schoon

Garrett McQueen§ Contrabassoon Marcus Schoon French Horns Karl Pituch+

Bryan Kennedy

Corbin Wagner

Johanna Yarbrough David Everson++ Mark Abbott

Musician bios, photos, fun facts and more can be found at dso.org/orchestra 6

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / February 201 3

dso.org


notes from t h e m u sic director

Dear Friends, Welcome to the 2013 Beethoven Festival! Presenting these nine symphonies, as well as Beethoven’s 32 Piano Sonatas, is a massive undertaking and I am very pleased that you have chosen to be a part of this celebration of one of classical music’s most significant (and most well-known) composers. It is my hope that many of you will take in as many events as your schedules permit, as this presentation will not take place again in the near future, if at all. So, why Beethoven? For every orchestra, the nine symphonies by the German master represent a summit of the musical experience. Each is a mountain that musicians must climb several times in their careers. The journey never gets easy. Each time we embark, we are filled with trepidation as to what new perils will confront us. Actually, there are few trips more worth taking than this one. It is not about the dangers but more about the adventure. For me, this will be my third time performing the cycle over a relatively short period of time. Immersing oneself in these masterpieces, without the intervention of other composers, is exhilarating. Each discovery brings one closer to the musical truth, although that truth is always elusive. So what did Beethoven mean when he wrote these symphonies? Recent scholarship has unearthed many discrepancies in previously published editions. Most of them are minor and not audible even to the seasoned professional, but there are others that are worth consideration. Sometimes we must fault the composer for misleading us, unintentionally. Other times those pesky publishers were lax, and egocentric editors put their own thinking into play. For these performances, we will attempt to be both historically authentic and do what makes logical sense. Certain passages will sound a bit different, simply because the notes, dynamics, orchestration and articulation have been altered from the old editions. Another factor will be the seating plan we will utilize for these festival concerts. Instead of the violins massed on my left, they will be divided with the first violins to the left and the second violins to the right, as was the practice during Beethoven’s lifetime. In addition, the cellos and basses will also be positioned on the left side with the violas moving to the middle. Some of the symphonies will be performed with smaller than usual forces. This has nothing to do with historical accuracy, rather it is just that symphonies 1, 2 and 4 seem better suited to Mozart or Haydn sized orchestras. The instruments we use will be the usual for the 21st century ensemble, but we will apply a few older playing techniques in selected passages. Tempos will be on the brisk side but not necessarily due to the metronome marks. Repeats will be observed with one big shock coming in the Scherzo of the Ninth. Is there really any other composer who can undergo a reevaluation of his or her symphonic output in this way? I don’t believe so. This is a testament to the staying power of these masterworks. They still resonate with all of us and speak with directness like no other cycle. Beethoven’s spirit, his struggles, his revolutionary vision remain the height of creative genius. Listening to him grow from classical simplicity into a romantic giant is a journey worth taking in our time. I sincerely hope you enjoy getting to know Beethoven a little better. Please join me in thanking the National Endowment for the Arts, whose gift helped make this project possible.

Previous Signature:

New Signature:

Sincerely,

Leonard Slatkin

dso.org

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / february 2013

7


N ews & notes

Join us for free Pre-Concert Presentations

Pre-Order Today!

Purchase the complete Beethoven 9 Symphonies This spring the DSO will release a complete set of Beethoven’s nine Symphonies, recorded “Live from Orchestra Hall” during the February 2013 Beethoven Festival — the first direct-to-digital live Beethoven cycle released by one of the world’s major orchestras. Grammy Award-winning producer Blanton Alspaugh, producer of the DSO’s latest releases on the Naxos label, will work closely with Leonard Slatkin and the DSO’s artistic and digital media team to record, produce, and release the entire box set in a matter of months. Special features will include liner notes, interviews, and video features. As soon as the box set is ready it will be delivered to email inboxes to be downloaded and enjoyed on your computer, iPod, or other personal music devices. Pre-order today for only $19.99 at dso.org/Beethoven. The digital box set was sponsored in part by MGM Grand Detroit.

8

Perform ance / Vol . X X I / february 201 3

Get the most out of your concert experience by attending our pre-concert presentations designed to enhance your knowledge of the evening’s repertoire and provide historical context for featured compositions’ origin. We’re proud to present a unique mix of presentations in honor of the 2013 DSO Beethoven Festival, which will include chamber music performances by DSO musicians, performances by select Civic Youth Chamber Ensembles, side-by-side chamber Greenwell performances with students and DSO musicians, and lectures given by Assistant Conductor Teddy Abrams, Charles Greenwell and Beethoven scholars from the community. See below for a full schedule of Beethoven pre-concert presentations. Date February 8 February 9 February 10 February 14 February 15 February 16 February 21 February 22 February 23 February 24

Time Location 7 p.m. Orchestra Hall 7 p.m. Orchestra Hall 2 p.m. Orchestra Hall 6:30 p.m. Orchestra Hall 7 p.m. Orchestra Hall 7 p.m. Orchestra Hall 6:30 p.m. Orchestra Hall 7 p.m. Orchestra Hall 7 p.m. Orchestra Hall 2 p.m. Orchestra Hall

Subject Beethoven Symphonies 3 & 8 Beethoven Symphonies 4 & 5 Beethoven Symphonies 4 & 5 Beethoven Symphonies 1 & 6 Beethoven Symphonies 2 & 7 Beethoven Symphonies 2 & 7 Beethoven Symphony No. 9 Beethoven Symphony No. 9 Beethoven Symphony No. 9 Beethoven Symphony No. 9

Stream the Symphony! Can’t make it downtown for the next classical concert? No worries! “Live From Orchestra Hall” returns this February to bring the DSO to a live global audience via HD webcast. Log on at dso.org/live or tap your DSO to Go mobile app to view the performance. “Live from Orchestra Hall” is presented by the Ford Motor Company and made possible by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Upcoming webcasts The Beethoven Symphonies: 3 & 8............... Fri., February 8, 2013 at 10:45 a.m. The Beethoven Symphonies: 4 & 5.............. Sun., February 10, 2013 at 3 p.m. The Beethoven Symphonies: 1 & 6............... Thu., February 14, 2013 at 10:45 a.m. The Beethoven Symphonies: 2 & 7............... Sat., February 16, 2013 at 8 p.m. Beethoven’s Ninth........................................... Sun., February 24, 2013 at 3 p.m. Classical Roots.................................................. Fri., March 8, 2013 at 10:45 a.m. Rite of Spring Centennial!............................. Sat., March 16, 2013 at 8p.m. Lynn Harrell plays Dvořák............................. Sun., April 28, 2013 at 3 p.m. dso.org


profile

DSO TIMELINE

detroit symphony OrchEstra

W

hen a group of local musicians and prominent citizens joined forces in 1887 to create the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, America’s fourth-oldest orchestra, they did more than plan a season of symphonic music. They planted the seeds for one of our nation’s longest-lasting — and forwardlooking — orchestras.

Preludes

Twenty-three years after its first concert at the Detroit Opera House, the DSO ceased operations for the first time. Four years later, the DSO resumed concerts in 1914 after 10 young society women each contributed $100 and pledged to find 100 additional subscribers to donate $10 to the DSO. The DSO began a quick ascent to the top ranks of American orchestras when it hired Ossip Gabrilowitsch as conductor, who insisted the orchestra needed a home of its own. The board agreed and Orchestra Hall was completed in just four months on Woodward Avenue. The DSO made world history in 1922 with the world’s first radio broadcast of a symphonic concert on WWJ, and later become the country’s most listened-to orchestra courtesy of the Ford Symphony Hour. As the Great Depression took its toll on Detroit, the DSO moved out of Orchestra Hall in 1939 and disbanded twice in the subsequent 12 years. In 1951, the DSO resumed operations in celebration of the city’s 250th anniversary.

Going Home

After a successful campaign by DSO bassoonist Paul Ganson and a group of community members to save Orchestra Hall from the wrecking ball, the DSO returned home in 1989, joined by new music director, Neeme Järvi. Maestro Järvi and the DSO made more than 40 recordings, embarked on multiple tours to Europe and Asia, and garnered acclaim from audiences and critics worldwide. In 2003, the DSO opened the Max M. Fisher Music Center, which features a second performance hall, the Pincus Music Education Center, and expanded lobby, rehearsal, and administrative facilities. dso.org

Setting the Stage

In 2007 the DSO announced Leonard Slatkin as its next Music Director. The orchestra began a relationship with the Naxos label, making it one of the only American orchestras signed to a major label. A commitment to AfricanAmerican music and musicians started 34 years ago continues through the annual Classical Roots Concert and Celebration and the African-American fellowship program. The Civic Youth Ensembles, which began as a single ensemble of less than 100 students, has grown to include over 1,000 students. In the wake of the 2008 economic collapse, the DSO suffered along with the rest of Detroit. The endowment plummeted, budgets were frozen, long-time staff members were laid off, and six months of DSO concerts were cancelled while management and musicians struggled over a new contract that would address new economic realities while preserving the institution’s commitment to excellence.

New Worlds

On April 9, 2011, a standing-room only crowd at Orchestra Hall leapt to their feet to greet the DSO with a thunderous ovation. The DSO can now be heard not only at Orchestra Hall, but throughout the metro area in six newly-established neighborhood residencies. Recalling its pioneering role as the first orchestra to broadcast live on the radio, the DSO launched Live from Orchestra Hall, making it the only orchestra in the world to webcast its concerts to a global audience for free at dso.org/live and on mobile devices through the DSO to Go mobile app. At home and abroad, the DSO is fast becoming the most accessible orchestra on the planet. Whether it’s a DSO trio performing in a coffee shop in Southfield or a couple watching the DSO on their iPad from a coffee shop in South Korea, a packed house for Beethoven at Orchestra Hall or a capacity turnout for Kid Rock at the Fox, a classroom full of budding young musicians Downriver or a free community concert Downtown, there is no venue too small or too large for the DSO.

1887 The DSO performs its first concert at the Detroit Opera House conducted by Rudolph Speil. 1917 Renowned Russian pianist Ossip Gabrilowitsch is appointed Music Director. Two years later Orchestra Hall opens. 1922 Gabrilowitsch leads the DSO in the world’s first radio broadcast of a symphonic concert. 1934 The DSO becomes the nation’s first official radio broadcast orchestra with the premiere of the Ford Symphony Hour. 1939 The DSO departs Orchestra Hall for the Masonic Temple. Orchestra Hall is transformed into the Paradise Theatre, where it plays host to the nation’s top jazz stars. 1956 After two decades of changing venues, during which the orchestra closed up shop twice, the DSO moves into Ford Auditorium and enters a golden age of recording, releasing 70 records in the next three decades. 1970 Concerned citizens save Orchestra Hall from the wrecking ball. The DSO starts the Civic Orchestra, an ensemble of the metro area’s most talented students. 1979 The DSO makes it first European tour, visiting 23 cities in 8 countries.

1989 The DSO returns to a restored Orchestra Hall, where it performs today. 1990 Neeme Järvi is appointed music director while Erich Kunzel begins his tenure as Pops Music Advisor. 1998 Järvi leads the orchestra on its first tour of Japan. 2000 The DSO begins a new holiday tradition with Home for the Holidays. 2003 The Max M. Fisher Music Center opens, adding performance, educational and public space to Orchestra Hall. 2008 Leonard Slatkin becomes Music Director and begins releasing new albums, including the orchestral works of Rachmaninoff and concertos by legendary film composer John Williams. 2011 The DSO launches “Live from Orchestra Hall,” making it the only orchestra in the world to offer concerts free to a global audience online and via its mobile app. 2012 In its inaugural season, the Neighborhood Series attracts thousands of new subscribers to the DSO in venues throughout metro Detroit. 2013 DSO makes its triumphant return to Carnegie Hall as part of the prestigious Spring for Music Festival

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / february 2013

9


The Titan’s ‘Ode to Joy’ Gustav Mahler’s revision of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony has a

Written by Jennifer Barlament Edited by Gabrielle Poshadlo

detroit connection

B Gustav Mahler

The cover of Beethoven’s Ninth score edited by Mahler resides in the DSO’s music library.

10

Perform ance / Vol . X X I / february 201 3

Gabrilowitsch, the Orchestra’s music director eethoven’s Ninth Symphony, from 1918-36. lovingly known by the world over as “Ode to Joy,” has been inspiring Gabrilowitsch Meets Mahler hearts and minds for Gabrilowitsch’s relationship with Mahler generations, including spanned remarkable depths—from fervid those of fellow composer Gustav Mahler, admiration for the composer as both a who revised the piece to reflect more musician and a man, to his special affection modern instrumentation, as for Mahler’s wife, Alma, an he believed that “the orchestra intelligent woman who had once of Beethoven’s day was totally belonged to a talented artistic insufficient for [the Ninth.]” circle and studied composition But what is far less widely with Alexander von Zemlinsky. known, is that Mahler’s original The two men met in Essen, copy of the score lives just feet Germany, in 1906, when from where you are sitting Gabrilowitsch heard Mahler now in the Detroit Symphony present his Sixth Symphony. The Orchestra library. Tucked away composer’s music, performance safely in its archival box, one and personality overwhelmed Ossip Gabrilowitsch, may see markings made by Gabrilowitsch, who found in DSO Music Director Mahler himself. Mahler, “the very incarnation of 1918-1936. As this is a Beethoven the highest ideals, artistic and Festival and not a Mahler one, the version human.” Gabrilowitsch soon joined the of Beethoven’s Ninth you will hear the growing circle of young conductors and DSO perform on Feb. 21-24 is Ludwig’s musicians that followed Mahler everywhere. own, orchestrated for only the modern Jeremy Nichols points out in The Classical incarnations of the instruments he wrote FM Guide to Classical Music, while Mahler for. However, Mahler’s version maintains a was revered as a musician, he was often personal connection to the DSO and Ossip reviled as a man. Stories about him reveal a

dso.org


The 2013 Beethoven Festival includes the DSO’s performance of the original version of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony.

man so inclined to perfection, he “criticized his musicians until they were reduced to tears, disciplined the audience and even prohibited latecomers from entering the auditorium during an opera’s first act—an unheard of demand in those days.” Still, he and Gabrilowitsch shared a unique friendship. In her later years, Alma Mahler wrote that Gabrilowitsch “worshipped [her husband] blindly,” and that Mahler, in return, valued Gabrilowitsch’s “unbelievable tenderness and loving consideration.” Music historians have described Alma as a woman of mesmerizing charm and beauty. Upon her marriange to Mahler in 1901, she was required to give up “composing and be entirely subservient to her husband’s whims.” Many men reportedly fell for her, including painter Oskar Kokoschka, architect Walter Gropius and writer Franz Werfel. So too did Gabrilowitsch. After making Alma’s acquaintance, the young conductor declared, “I have a dreadful confession to make. I’m on the verge of falling madly in love with you. Help me to get over it. I love Mahler. I could not bear to hurt him.” Years later, Alma wrote that, “It was natural for us to fall in love, but we refused to admit the fact to ourselves and struggled valiantly.”

dso.org

In 1909, Gabrilowitsch married Clara Clemens, daughter of famed American writer Samuel Clemens (a.k.a. Mark Twain). He and his wife remained friends with Alma, paying each other occasional visits and keeping up a genial correspondence.

The Score After Mahler’s death at age 50 in 1911, Alma and Gabrilowitsch continued to exchange letters. In one dated December 1923, Gabrilowitsch asked Alma if he could borrow several of Mahler’s retouched scores to the symphonies of “Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, etc.” Though no specific pieces are mentioned, it is possible that Mahler’s

Mahler’s alterations are indicated in red on Beethoven’s Ninth score.

score to Beethoven’s Ninth was one of the scores for which Gabrilowitsch asked. Arthur Luck, Gabrilowitsch’s part-time copyist and the DSO’s librarian from 191965, transferred Mahler’s changes to the Ninth to the music director’s own scores. The copy of Mahler’s Beethoven score was kept in Gabrilowitsch’s personal library, most of which was donated to the DSO in 1940. Mahler’s changes extend to omitting a portion of the Scherzo, which he considered to be an error made in the original copying of the score. He expanded the orchestra significantly, adding a duplicate set of woodwinds for doubling and reinforcing other instrumental lines, one tuba, and an extra pair of timpani for doubling particular passages. In certain places, he continued the melody in the brass section where it had been left fragmentary by the composer, presumably because of the instruments’ imperfect construction at that time. Mahler’s edition of Beethoven’s Ninth was not intended to hide the inadequacy of the work’s original scoring. Instead, it was an effort to restore the work to the grandeur of its conception. Visit the score in person in the Max M. Fisher Music Center Atrium.

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / february 201 3

11


Diamonds.

The Gift that Guarantees A Symphony of Happiness.

TCTL_DSO_AD Horiz_FINAL_PDFx1a.pdf

1

1/15/13

6:52 PM

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

12

Perform ance / Vol . X X I / february 201 3

dso.org


m u sic director

profile

LEONARD slatkin

I Maestro Slatkin’s more than 100 recordings have been recognized with seven Grammy awards and 64 nominations.

dso.org

nternationally acclaimed American conductor Leonard Slatkin began his tenure as Music Director of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra in September of 2008. In addition to his role at the DSO, he serves as Music Director of the Orchestre National de Lyon in France, an appointment which began in August of 2011. He has also served as Principal Guest Conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony since 2008. Slatkin’s first book, Conducting Business, was released this past summer. Following a 17-year tenure as Music Director of the Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra, Slatkin became Music Director of the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington, D.C. in 1996. Other positions in the United States have included Principal Guest Conductor of the Minnesota Orchestra, first Music Director of the Cleveland Orchestra’s summer series at the Blossom Music Festival; Principal Guest Conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra at the Hollywood Bowl; and additional positions with

the New Orleans Philharmonic and the Nashville Symphony Orchestra. Maestro Slatkin’s more than 100 recordings have been recognized with seven Grammy awards and 64 nominations. He has recorded with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, National Symphony Orchestra, Saint Louis Symphony, Minnesota Orchestra, Nashville Symphony Orchestra, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the New York Philharmonic, and numerous European ensembles. Throughout his career, Slatkin has demonstrated a continuing commitment to arts education and to reaching diverse audiences. He is the founder and director of the National Conducting Institute, and founded the Saint Louis Symphony Youth Orchestra while working with student orchestras across the United States. His engagements for the 2012-2013 season include the NHK Symphony, the Rotterdam Philharmonic, the Czech Philharmonic, the St. Louis Symphony, the Nashville Symphony and the State Symphony Orchestra of Russia. Perform ance / Vol . X XI / february 2013

13


program notes Leonore Overture No. 3

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN

B. Dec. 16, 1770 (baptized) in Bonn, Germany D. Mar. 26, 1827 in Vienna, Austria

Composed in 1805-6, Beethoven’s Leonore Overture No. 3 was premiered with the opera on March 29, 1806. It is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two trumpets (plus one off-stage trumpet), three trombones, timpani and strings (approx. 13 minutes).

B

Classical Series The Beethoven Symphonies: 3 & 8 Friday, February 8, 2013 at 10:45 a.m.* Friday, February 8, 2013 at 8:00 p.m. in Orchestra Hall Leonard Slatkin, conductor

Ludwig van Beethoven Leonore Overture No. 3, Op. 72a (1770-1827)

Symphony No. 8 in F major, Op. 93

Allegro vivace con brio Allegretto scherzando Tempo di menuetto Allegro vivace

I n ter mission Symphony No. 3 in E-Flat major, Op. 55, “Eroica”

Allegro con brio Marcia funebre: Adagio assai Scherzo: Allegro vivace Finale: Allegro molto

This Classical Series concert is generously sponsored by

PVS Chemicals, Inc.

These performances are being recorded for a direct-to-digital Beethoven “box set” to be released later this year. To pre-order your copy for just $19.99, visit dso.org/beethoven. *Denotes a webcast performance

ppa elibom oG ot OSD eht no ro evil/gro.osd ta enilno hctaW

ynohpmyS ”nagrO“ ’snëaS-tniaS .m.a 54:01 ,11 yaM ,yadirF

snruteR ivräJ .m.p 3 ,1 lirpA ,yadnuS

Get the most out of each classical concert by attending pre-concert presentations, one hour prior to performances (excluding Coffee Concerts). The presentations are informal and may include special guests, lectures and music that reveal interesting facts about the program and provide a behind-the-scenes look at the art of making music. emoR fo seniP ehT ynohpmyS ”dlroW weN“ s’kářovD .m.a 54:01 ,81 yaM ,yadirF .m.p 8 ,12 lirpA ,yadrutaS noitibihxE na ta serutciP .m.p 3 ,6 yaM ,yadnuS

The DSO can be heard on the DSO, Chandos, London, Naxos, RCA and Mercury Record labels.

14

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / February 201 3

eethoven began his only opera, a setting of a true story from J.N. Bouilly’s Mémoires, in 1803. He chose “Fidelio” as his title over “Leonore,” as he was well aware of the two previous settings of this same story (as Leonore) by other composers. Fidelio deals with the triumph of love and faithfulness over tyranny and oppression—favorite themes of Beethoven’s. Like many other works in Beethoven’s career, Fidelio went through several revisions before achieving its full success. The composer also wrote no fewer than four overtures for this work. The Leonore Overture No. 3 was written for an 1806 revival of the work. It is one of the longest overtures out of the four he composed for the work, and far exceeds the length and scope of the traditional curtainraiser. DSO Shop @ The Ma x recommends:

Beethoven – Leonore Overture No. 3: Kurt Masur conducting the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, Philips 438706.

Symphony No. 8 in F major, Op. 93

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN

B. Dec. 16, 1770 (baptized) in Bonn, Germany D. Mar. 26, 1827 in Vienna, Austria

Premiered on Feb. 27, 1814 in the Large Redoutensaale at the Hofburg Palace in Vienna with the composer conducting. Scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings (approx. 27 minutes).

B

eethoven typically composed symphonies in pairs: a larger one paired with a smaller, lighter one. In 1812, he completed both his Seventh and Eighth symphonies. The premiere of the Seventh, in December 1813, was a great success. Not so with the Eighth, which was premiered two months later. It was performed between two larger works; one was the Seventh. Because of its dso.org


lighter content, the Eighth symphony was overshadowed. Beethoven referred to the Eighth as “my little one,” written in an “unbuttoned mood.” Apparently the mood was one of ease as he composed this humorous lighthearted work. Throughout, it is celebratory, despite the circumstances of his increasing deafness, the estrangement of his brother and the departure of his “immortal beloved,” all occurring this same year. The Eighth was the only one of his symphonies composed without a movement in the minor mode, and it follows neither 18th nor 19th century forms. The first movement, Allegro vivace con brio, begins strong and continues robust throughout. Beethoven replaced the usual slow second movement with a brisk Allegretto scherzando, normally used as a third movement. This movement is a parody on the newly invented metronome built by his good friend Johann Nepomuk Mälzel. The even staccato 16th notes continue steadily throughout this movement – until shaken by the 64th note motif – sounding like a metronome malfunction. Though the third movement would normally be a Scherzo, Beethoven used a minuet, Tempo di menuetto, reminiscent of 18th century minuet movements. The finale, Allegro vivace, continues a fast-paced light-heartedness. The coda in this movement is one of the most elaborate codas in all of Beethoven’s works; in fact it is longer than the rest of the movement.

On the Kahlenberg September 1812

Almighty One In the woods I am blessed. Happy every one In the woods. Every tree speaks Through Thee. O God! What glory in the Woodland. On the Heights Is Peace, Peace to serve Him—

—Ludwig van Beethoven

(This poetic exclamation, accompanied by a few notes, is on a page of music paper owned by Hungarian violinist Joseph Joachim.)

dso.org

DSO Shop @ The Ma x recommends:

Beethoven – Symphony No. 8: George Szell conducting the Cleveland Orchestra, Sony 89832.

Symphony No. 3 in E-Flat Major, Op. 55, “Eroica” Ludwig van Beethoven

B. Dec. 16, 1770 (baptized) in Bonn, Germany D. March 26, 1827 in Vienna, Austria

The first public performance of Beethoven’s Symphony No. 3 “Eroica” was on April 7, 1805 at the Theater-an-der-Wien in Vienna, Austria, conducted by the composer. Scored for woodwinds in pairs, three horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings (approx. 47 minutes).

L

udwig van Beethoven’s Eroica Symphony stems very strongly from eighteenth-century practices of symphonic composition but, like a great earthquake, it created a huge fissure between everything that came before and the orchestral style that developed in the following decades. The sharp “hammerstroke” chords that open the symphony are a heroic imitation of the three loud chords heard in countless tiny, frivolous little Italian sinfonias composed in Naples and Milan in the 1730s. They had merely been used to silence a noisy audience, but Beethoven made them into huge structural pillars that recur at crucial junctures throughout the first movement of the Eroica Symphony. And as in thousands of its predecessors, Beethoven’s Third Symphony opens with a simple theme that rocks gently up and down the notes of the E-flat major triad. Size, dramatic emphasis and a sense of self-importance were the new elements in Beethoven’s Eroica. It was the longest symphony written up to that time. Along with its expanded dimensions, the Eroica also shifted the emphasis in a symphony from the first movement to the last, creating what became known as a “finale symphony” with the highly dramatic set of variations that conclude the work. Though the first-movement exposition is set forth as a typical set of short, pithy themes, the energy gathered in them foretells the scope of the symphony’s musical structure. He avoids the main thematic materials during the first half of the development section, concentrating on materials previously heard in relatively less important transitional episodes between the exposition’s main themes. But

developmental proceedings are suddenly interrupted by a brand new theme, in the quite foreign key of E-minor. Beethoven gradually introduces the opening triadic theme in a variety of tonalities that eventually lead back to the main key of E-flat major and a recapitulation of all the thematic material. He appends a long coda to the movement, reintroducing the new theme as one of its dramatic events. The grand and solemn funeral march that comprises the slow movement features contrasts of somber, heroic and elegiac sentiments. It is cast in a very large threepart form with a fughetta dramatically delaying the return of the main C minor theme. The Scherzo, with its pizzicato string effects, its contrasting horn colors in the trio section, its stubborn syncopations and changes of meter, is a virtuoso symphonic movement and a prime example of Beethoven’s Jovian laughter. Its exuberant high spirits are capped only by the Olympian set of variations that conclude the symphony. Where Mozart or Haydn would normally have placed such variations in a slow movement, Beethoven dared to make them a symphonic climax. Not only are the nine variations based upon two distinct themes, they include two complicated fugal sections, a stormy “Turkish” march in the sixth variation, and two seraphic variations that lead to a magnificent five-section coda. Beethoven ends the movement with another set of fierce “hammerstroke” chords.  SO Shop @ The Ma x D recommends:

Beethoven – Symphony No. 3: George Szell conducting the Cleveland Orchestra, Sony 89832.

The “Eroica” Symphony was originally to be titled the “Bonaparte Symphony” in honor of Napoleon Bonaparte’s radical European reforms. But when Napoleon crowned himself emperor, Beethoven changed the title out of anger. Beethoven on Bonaparte: “He, too, then, is nothing better than an ordinary man! Now he will trample on all human rights only to humor his ambition; he will place himself above all others, become a tyrant!”

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / february 201 3

15


program notes Overture to Fidelio, Op. 72b Ludwig Van Beethoven

B. Dec. 16, 1770 (baptized) in Bonn, Germany D. March 26, 1827 in Vienna, Austria

Premiered at the Theater an der Wien, Vienna, Nov. 20, 1805. Scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, two trombones, timpani and strings (approx. 6 minutes).

B

Classical Series The Beethoven Symphonies: 4 & 5 Saturday, February 9, 2013 at 8 p.m. Sunday, February 10, 2013 at 3 p.m.* in Orchestra Hall Leonard Slatkin, conductor

Ludwig van Beethoven Overture to Fidelio, Op. 72b (1770-1827)

Symphony No. 4 in B-flat major, Op. 60 Adagio - Allegro vivace Adagio Allegro vivace Allegro ma non troppo

I n ter mission Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67 Allegro con Brio Andante con moto Allegro Allegro

This Classical Series concert is generously sponsored by

PVS Chemicals, Inc.

These performances are being recorded for a direct-to-digital Beethoven “box set” to be released later this year. To pre-order your copy for just $19.99, visit dso.org/beethoven. *Denotes a webcast performance

ppa elibom oG ot OSD eht no ro evil/gro.osd ta enilno hctaW

ynohpmyS ”nagrO“ ’snëaS-tniaS .m.a 54:01 ,11 yaM ,yadirF

snruteR ivräJ .m.p 3 ,1 lirpA ,yadnuS

Get the most out of each classical concert by attending pre-concert presentations, one hour prior to performances (excluding Coffee Concerts). The presentations are informal and may include special guests, lectures and music that reveal interesting facts about the program and provide a behind-the-scenes look at the art of making music.

eethoven composed only one opera, and it was perhaps the work that caused him more agony than any other. Over the course of a decade, he wrote and rewrote Fidelio at least three times, including one aria which was revised 18 times. It was this struggle, however, which led the work to be the most valued to Beethoven. It is reported that he said of Fidelio, “Of all my children, this is the one that cost me the worst birth pangs, the one that brought me the most sorrow; and for that reason it is most dear to me.” Beethoven’s numerous rewritings of the opera resulted in four overtures. The first three are known as the “Leonore” overtures, the name of the main female protagonist and the title by which the opera was originally known. The final overture, as heard tonight, has become the most widely accepted to begin the opera. Contrary to the general trend of operatic overtures at the time, and to the other three written by Beethoven for this opera, the Fidelio overture contains no thematic material from the opera itself. Rather, it is a powerful symphonic work which conveys several of the opera’s overarching themes: majesty, heroism and hope. While the original three Leonore overtures were written in the key of C, the same key as the opera’s final liberation scene, the final Fidelio overture is in the key of E, the same key used to represent hope and heroism in the main aria from the character of Leonore. It is often thought that Beethoven chose this change to highlight the struggle of the aria; the “test of the virtuous wife and married love,” rather than foreshadowing the final victory of the opera.  SO Shop @ The Ma x D recommends:

Beethoven – Fidelio Overture: Kurt Masur conducting the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, Philips 438706.

emoR fo seniP ehT ynohpmyS ”dlroW weN“ s’kářovD .m.a 54:01 ,81 yaM ,yadirF .m.p 8 ,12 lirpA ,yadrutaS noitibihxE na ta serutciP .m.p 3 ,6 yaM ,yadnuS

The DSO can be heard on the DSO, Chandos, London, Naxos, RCA and Mercury Record labels.

16

Perform ance / Vol . X X I / february 201 3

dso.org


Symphony No. 4 in B-flat Major, Op. 60

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN

Beethoven wrote most of the Fourth Symphony during a summer residency in 1806 at the estate of a patron, Prince Karl Lichnowsky. In mid-March 1807, it was first performed during a private subscription concert at the palace of another patron, Prince Josef Lobkowitz, and was dedicated to a third, Count Franz Oppersdorff. Scored for flute, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings (approx. 32 minutes).

I

f Beethoven’s Fourth Symphony were the work of any other composer active during the first decade of the 19th century, it would establish its author as one of the major musical figures of his day. As it is, this work stands between two of its creator’s most dramatic and popular compositions, his Third and Fifth Symphonies, and rather in their shadow. Robert Schumann’s metaphoric description of this work as a “slender

Greek maiden between two Norse giants” leaves something to be desired as a characterization, but it does suggest the enduring perception of this piece as a less weighty and important achievement among Beethoven’s middle-period symphonies. The Fourth Symphony is a finely crafted and beautiful work that follows the formal outline of the Classical period symphony but fills that outline with music that often sounds quite Romantic in character. Nowhere is this Romantic element more evident than in the opening Adagio, a somber fantasy that ventures to say more than we would expect from an introduction to a symphonic first movement. Through 40 spellbinding measures, it explores dark and mysterious tonal regions, then suddenly breaks forth with two loud chords and a motif of insistently rising lines into the brilliant light of the Allegro, the main body of the first movement. The ensuing Adagio ranks among the loveliest movements Beethoven ever wrote. Typically, it juxtaposes two principal melodies. The first appears in the violins

Beethoven’s Nine Symphonies Digital Box Set The first direct-to-digital live Beethoven cycle released by one of the world’s major orchestras.

Preorder now at dso.org/beethoven *

* Download instructions will be delivered right to your email inbox this Spring!

dso.org

over a gently rocking accompaniment in the strings; the second is introduced by the clarinet. Beethoven weaves the extensions, variation and recollections of these ideas into an exquisite dream-like fantasy. The third movement is a Scherzo in all but name, a rollicking piece marked by a lively play of rhythms and accents. The concluding measure offers a surprise from the horns. The finale gives us many of Beethoven’s most characteristic gestures: sudden contrasts, abrupt offbeat accents and contrapuntal echoes of thematic fragments. The movement races along toward its conclusion, pausing only to allow the composer, in high humor, to draw the principal theme out in slow motion before dashing through its final measures.  SO Shop @ The Ma x D recommends:

Beethoven – Symphony No. 4: Herbert von Karajan conducting the Berlin Philharmonic, Deutsche Grammophon B0010508.

The DSO is pleased to recognize the generous support of the MGM Grand Detroit and their commitment to the Arts in our community. As a sponsor of the DSO’s Paradise Jazz Series, MGM has demonstrated enduring generosity to ensure the great tradition of jazz at Orchestra Hall continues and thrives. Additionally, MGM Grand Detroit has agreed to sponsor the Digital Box Set recordings of the DSO’s Beethoven Cycle. This generous and critical support makes it possible for the DSO to explore yet another avenue towards reaching its goal of being the most accessible orchestra on the planet and to provide to our global audience a lasting document to commemorate this great cycle of performances. The DSO greatly values its partnership with MGM Grand Detroit and their support of the artistic ventures that so enrich our community.

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / february 201 3

17


Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67 Ludwig van Beethoven

Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67 was first performed on December 22, 1808, along with the Symphony No. 6 in F major, Op. 68 (“Pastoral”); Beethoven conducted. It is scored for two flutes and piccolo, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons and contrabassoon, two horns, two trumpets, three trombones, timpani and strings (approx. 36 minutes).

I

t is fitting that Beethoven’s greatest symphonic expression, the one that remains the most innovative and wondrous, the “consummate example of symphonic logic,” the Fifth Symphony, was finished in Vienna in 1808 at the peak of that city’s sociopolitical reactionary period. The symphony sounds inevitable and irrefutable, as though it flowed complete from the composer’s pen; however, Beethoven did not create it overnight, and in fact, the work required a considerable gestation period. The composer actually began sketching it in 1800, even before beginning work on the Eroïca. The work is largely constructed on just two notes, with the first one being repeated three times. There is hardly a measure in the entire symphony in which this two-note formula (or a portion of it) does not appear in some recognizable form. The cyclical nature of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony makes it a forerunner of later 19th-century cyclical symphonic compositions, such as César Franck’s Symphony in D minor and Franz Liszt’s Faust Symphony. Be that as it may, the first movement is far from being a mere mosaic of short motifs; in Beethoven’s hands, this very basic material becomes exceptionally long-breathed. The secret of the movement’s psychological impact lies in Beethoven’s total control of its progress: a bar more (or less) and the entire structure would begin to teeter. Marked Andante con moto, the second movement is the closest thing the Fifth has to a slow movement. On the surface, it seems like an old-fashioned set of double variations such as Franz Joseph Haydn might have written. The fact that Beethoven linked together the third and fourth movements, and that a portion of the third is repeated literally in the fourth, caused some speculation among early writers regarding a possible programmatic

18

Perform ance / Vol . X X I / february 201 3

connection; however, the primary reason for this development has more to do with the cyclical factor and the summary nature of the fourth movement than any imagined program. While the last two movements as we know them now form a unit, this was not always to be so: there exist sketches for an abandoned finale in C minor, in 6/8 time, which was marked l’ultimo pezzo (“the last piece”). The solution that Beethoven arrived at instead — an unsettling Scherzo, in which strange mutterings alternate with passionate cries, dissolving into a C-major blaze, interrupted once by the phantom of the Scherzo – was one that appealed strongly to generations of composers to follow. Its lesson was not lost on Brahms, who exploited the minor-turned-to-major device in his First Symphony. Never before had a finale taken on such meaning and importance, resolving as it does all previous conflicts in triumphant optimism. As grand as the Finale is, it is not grandiose; it is poetic rather than rhetorical, logical rather than histrionic. Beethoven has sometimes been criticized as a poor orchestrator, and there are passages, certainly, that reflect the limitations of the instruments he was writing for at the time. But no one who listens closely to the last two movements of the Fifth Symphony will doubt that he was sensitive to instrumental color. Who has more knowingly exploited the ability of the double basses to evoke a sense of mystery? And if musical sophisticates should find fault with the outbursts of trombones and contrabassoon, or the whoops of joy in the piccolo in the finale, would they care to suggest how these might be improved upon? The DSO first performed Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony on November 12, 1915, at the (old) Detroit Opera House (off Campus Martius, likely the 1898 incarnation, as the original building from 1869 was destroyed by fire in 1897), in a program conducted by Weston Gales. The most recent DSO performance of this work was as part of a Target Family Concert in July, 2010, with Chelsea Tipton II conducting.

Classical Music with Dave Wagner and Chris Felcyn Weekdays 6 am - 7 pm

 SO Shop @ The Ma x D recommends:

Beethoven – Symphony No. 5: Carlos Kleiber conducting the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Deutsche Grammophon 447400.

wrcjfm.org A listener supported service of Detroit Public Schools and Detroit Public TV. dso.org


program notes Overture to Goethe’s Egmont, Op. 84 LUDWIG van BEETHOVEN

B. Dec. 16, 1770 (baptized) in Bonn, Germany D. Mar. 26, 1827 in Vienna, Austria

Scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings (approx. 8 minutes).

B

Classical Series The Beethoven Symphonies: 1 & 6 Thursday, February 14, 2013 at 10:45 a.m.* Thursday, February 14, 2013 at 7:30 p.m. in Orchestra Hall Leonard Slatkin, conductor

Ludwig van Beethoven Overture to Egmont, Op. 84

(1770-1827)

Symphony No. 1 in C major, Op. 21

Adagio molto - Allegro con brio Andante cantabile con moto Menuetto: Allegro molto e vivace Finale: Adagio - Allegro molto e vivace

I n ter mission Symphony No. 6 in F major, Op. 68, “Pastorale”

Awakening of cheerful feelings on arriving in the country: Allegro ma non troppo Scene by the brook: Andante molto mosso Merry assembly of country folk: Allegro Thunderstorm: Allegro Shepherd’s Song - Happy, grateful feelings after the storm: Allegretto This Classical Series concert is generously sponsored by

PVS Chemicals, Inc.

These performances are being recorded for a direct-to-digital Beethoven “box set” to be released later this year. To pre-order your copy for just $19.99, visit dso.org/beethoven. *Denotes a webcast performance

ppa elibom oG ot OSD eht no ro evil/gro.osd ta enilno hctaW

ynohpmyS ”nagrO“ ’snëaS-tniaS .m.a 54:01 ,11 yaM ,yadirF

snruteR ivräJ .m.p 3 ,1 lirpA ,yadnuS

Get the most out of each classical concert by attending pre-concert presentations, one hour prior to performances (excluding Coffee Concerts). The presentations are informal and may include special guests, lectures and music that reveal interesting facts about the program and provide a behind-the-scenes look at the art of making music. emoR fo seniP ehT ynohpmyS ”dlroW weN“ s’kářovD .m.a 54:01 ,81 yaM ,yadirF .m.p 8 ,12 lirpA ,yadrutaS noitibihxE na ta serutciP .m.p 3 ,6 yaM ,yadnuS

The DSO can be heard on the DSO, Chandos, London, Naxos, RCA and Mercury Record labels.

dso.org

eethoven’s Op. 84 is a set of incidental pieces for the 1787 play Egmont by the celebrated German writer Goethe, in which the writer masterfully captures the despair, struggle, resolve and triumph of the play’s eponymous hero. The music consists of an overture and nine additional pieces, all for full orchestra with a soprano solo in some of them, including a final “Victory Symphony” which Goethe specified in his text. The subject of the drama is the real-life Dutch nobleman Lamoral, Count of Egmont & Prince of Gravere (1522-1568), a brilliant and popular military leader in the Spanish Netherlands who ultimately gave his life for having taken a valiant stand against tyranny and oppression. The music was written during the Napoleonic Wars, at a time when the French Empire had extended its domination over a great deal of Europe. Beethoven had already expressed his outrage over Napoleon’s decision to crown himself Emperor in 1804, vehemently scratching out his name in the original dedication to the Eroica Symphony. In the Egmont music (for which he accepted no payment), he expressed his own political ideals by exalting the heroic sacrifice of a man who would not compromise what he believed in, and whose bravery and martyrdom paved the way for the Dutch winning their independence from Spain many bloody years later. The Dutch struggle for freedom struck a sympathetic chord in the composer’s philosophy, particularly as he had suffered through Napoleon’s 1809 invasion of Vienna---the fourth such assault on Austria in 18 years. The overture to the drama, which is one of Beethoven’s most concentrated and powerful dramatic statements, and which compresses the action of the play into a single work, became the unofficial anthem of the 1956 Hungarian revolution. In 1568 King Philip II of Spain sent the vicious Duke of Alba to the Netherlands, and almost immediately had Egmont arrested and imprisoned on charges of treason. Pleas for amnesty came to the Spanish court from all over Europe, including many from reigning sovereigns, but to no avail. Egmont was condemned Perform ance / Vol . X XI / february 201 3

19


to death and publicly beheaded in June of that year in the Great Square of Brussels, his strength and uncomplaining dignity before his death becoming a source of great inspiration to his fellow countrymen. Following his execution, the authorities displayed his severed head skewered on a pike in the Square in a vain attempt to stop the unrest and outcry. To the contrary, and much to their chagrin, this act became an emblem of the struggle against the cruel Spanish domination. Beethoven’s music to Egmont beautifully mirrors the plight of the valiant Dutch people and their determination to be free. In the play, following his imprisonment, Egmont’s grief-stricken wife kills herself, then appears to him in a dream as a vision of freedom the night before his execution, saying to him that his death will inspire his countrymen initially to rebellion then ultimately to the re-establishment of their freedom. It is this vision which enables Egmont to face his execution with such remarkable dignity and courage, and as the play ends with the thrilling Victory Symphony (the same music which concludes the overture), he calls out to his followers to “….save all that is dearest to you. Fall joyously, following the example I have set for you!”

piece in order to establish the central tonality in the listener’s ear, this symphony begins far removed from C major, with a sequence of tonic-dominant chords that serve to confuse the tonal landscape. The movement that follows is light and bouncy, although the thick textures and virtuosic writing for winds belie Beethoven’s hand. The second movement features a stately theme, introduced fugally, and a more subdued second theme. The lyrical writing for woodwinds, in particular for the oboe, is especially exquisite. The third movement, though labeled Menuetto, resembles the more stylized and usually faster Scherzo that would be one of Beethoven’s great contributions; this is not music for dancing, but intended to be performed by highly trained musicians in a concert hall. The finale of this work opens with another curious introduction. Here is a clear indication of the dominant: after a full-orchestra G, the first violins playfully make their way slowly up the G-major scale, creating tension that propels the tempo onward and prolonging the arrival at tonic C. The rest of the movement is lighthearted and virtuosic, featuring heavily scalar writing for the strings and strong brass parts

to bring the work to a ringing close, but not before one of Beethoven’s characteristic climactic sequences of alternating tonic and dominant chords in the final measures.  SO Shop @ The Ma x D recommends:

Beethoven – Symphony No. 1: George Szell conducting the Cleveland Orchestra, Sony 89838.

Symphony No.6 in F major, Op.68, “Pastorale” LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN

Premiered at the Theater an der Wien, Vienna, December 22, 1808. Scored for piccolo, two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, two trombones, timpani and strings (approx. 40 minutes.)

I

n the Wiener Zeitung of December 17, 1808, the concert or Akademie of December 22 was announced: “On Thursday, December 22, Ludwig van Beethoven will have the honor to give a musical Akademie in the Theateran-derWien. All the pieces are of his composition, entirely new, and not yet heard in public… Beginning at half past six o’clock.”

 SO Shop @ The Ma x D recommends:

Beethoven – Overture to Egmont: Kurt Masur conducting the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, Philips 438706.

Symphony No. 1 in C major, Op. 21 LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN

Premiered April 2, 1800 in the K. K. Hoftheater nächst der Burg in Vienna. Scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings (approx. 25 minutes).

F

ittingly, the 29-year-old Beethoven premiered his first symphony in the year 1800, at the dawn of a new century. The work is from Beethoven’s early period and is greatly influenced by his teacher, Franz Joseph Haydn. Despite its homages to the older generation, it is very much a forwardlooking work with glimmers of the innovations to come from the great composer. Beethoven challenged his listeners with new sounds from the very beginning. Whereas most classical symphonies open unambiguously in the chosen key of the

20

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / February 201 3

Supporting the ArtS Where We Work, Live, And pLAy Honigman is pleased to support the Detroit Symphony Orchestra. We believe the arts bring vibrancy, growth and culture to our lives. Honigman is a premier business law firm, working in perfect harmony with our communities and our clients in Detroit and throughout the world. For more information, visit www.honigman.com.

Honigman Miller Schwartz and Cohn LLP detroit LAnSing oAkLAnd County Ann Arbor kALAmAzoo

dso.org


This extraordinary concert, lasting more than four hours in a bitterly cold hall, thus presented the first performances of Beethoven’s Symphony No.5 in C minor, his Symphony No.6 in F major (later known as the “Pastoral”), and the Fourth Piano Concerto. Preparations for such a massive undertaking did not go well. Apparently Beethoven was so angry with the orchestra at times that the musicians demanded he leave the room during rehearsals. With generally insufficient time for rehearsal for such a demanding program, the performance of the Choral Fantasia suffered most, at one point things went so badly that the performers had to start again. The pianist Czerny reported that Beethoven made some slight changes to both symphonies “during the performance,” (probably the rehearsals), since he had never heard them before, and later sent a list of corrections to the publisher Breitkopf and Härtel for incorporation into their edition. This kind of one-off concert was typical in Vienna in the 1800s. Occasional concerts were the rule rather than exception, though concerts of this scale were most unusual. It was not until later that subscription concerts emerged as the primary vehicle for presentation of symphonic concerts in Vienna, a tradition that continues today with the subscription concerts of the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, organized by the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde. Beethoven’s Symphony No.6 is unusual in that it is written in five movements, with the last three performed without a break. Composed at the same time as the Symphony No.5, in which the third and fourth movements are also performed without a break, we can see Beethoven’s innovative treatment of form in the “Pastoral” Symphony. Although all the other symphonies are in four movements, Beethoven explored different movement schemes of many kinds, especially in his later quartets and piano sonatas. The influence of this type of formal innovation can be seen in Berlioz’ “Symphonie Fantastique” (also in five movements), and later in the nineteenth century in a number of Mahler’s symphonies. The programmatic nature of the “Pastoral” Symphony is well known. Each movement has its own title, though as Beethoven himself wrote on the handbill for the 1808 concert, they were “more the expression of feeling than painting.” Beethoven’s achievement of incorporating the extra-musical with the sublime in this symphony accounts for its popular dso.org

Celebrating excellence. Grand Valley celebrates the imaGination, creatiVity, and beauty of the fine arts. We appreciate the performances that inspire and enlighten us. And, we applaud the artists who share our commitment to excellence. gvsu.edu | (800) 748-0246

reception in the nineteenth century. At the first performance, not surprisingly the Fifth Symphony received greater acclaim. With the benefit of hindsight, however, we can view Beethoven’s exploration of the symphonic medium presented in this concert as providing the seeds for the two principal schools of symphonic composition that would emerge later in the nineteenth century, in the absolute music of composers

such as Schumann and Brahms, and in the program symphonies and symphonic poems of composers such as Berlioz, Liszt and Richard Strauss.  SO Shop @ The Ma x D recommends:

Beethoven – Symphony No. 6: George Szell conducting the Cleveland Orchestra, Sony 89838.

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / february 201 3

21


program notes Coriolan Overture, Op. 62 LUDWIG van BEETHOVEN

B. Dec. 16, 1770 (baptized) in Bonn, Germany D. Mar. 26, 1827 in Vienna, Austria

Scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings (approx. 8 minutes).

W Classical Series The Beethoven Symphonies: 2 & 7 Friday, February 15, 2013 at 8 p.m. Saturday, February 16, 2013 at 8 p.m.* in Orchestra Hall Leonard Slatkin, conductor

Ludwig van Beethoven Overture to Coriolan, Op. 62 (1770-1827)

Symphony No. 2 in D major, Op. 36 Adagio Molto - Allegro con brio Larghetto Scherzo: Allegro Allegro Molto

I n ter mission Symphony No. 7 in A major, Op. 92 Poco sostenuto - Vivace Allegretto Presto Allegro con brio

This Classical Series concert is generously sponsored by

PVS Chemicals, Inc.

These performances are being recorded for a direct-to-digital Beethoven “box set” to be released later this year. To pre-order your copy for just $19.99, visit dso.org/beethoven. *Denotes a webcast performance

ppa elibom oG ot OSD eht no ro evil/gro.osd ta enilno hctaW

ynohpmyS ”nagrO“ ’snëaS-tniaS .m.a 54:01 ,11 yaM ,yadirF

snruteR ivräJ .m.p 3 ,1 lirpA ,yadnuS

Get the most out of each classical concert by attending pre-concert presentations, one hour prior to performances (excluding Coffee Concerts). The presentations are informal and may include special guests, lectures and music that reveal interesting facts about the program and provide a behind-the-scenes look at the art of making music. emoR fo seniP ehT ynohpmyS ”dlroW weN“ s’kářovD .m.a 54:01 ,81 yaM ,yadirF .m.p 8 ,12 lirpA ,yadrutaS noitibihxE na ta serutciP .m.p 3 ,6 yaM ,yadnuS

The DSO can be heard on the DSO, Chandos, London, Naxos, RCA and Mercury Record labels.

22

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / February 201 3

riting about the Coriolan Overture, the British musicologist Basil Deane once made the statement that “There is no more explosive and violent music in Beethoven.” Indeed, the very stormy and restless nature of the music was thought by many of the composer’s contemporaries to be a kind of self-portrait, and it is entirely possible that Beethoven saw in the hero of the play by Heinrich Joseph von Collin a portrait of his own struggles and problems with society. In this powerful and dramatic concert overture there is a representation of this side of his personality which is unparalleled in any of his other orchestral works. Many people still have the impression that this overture was inspired by Shakespeare’s tragedy Coriolanus, and while it is true that Beethoven was a great admirer of The Bard’s plays, and even planned at one time to write an opera based on Macbeth (a project which never materialized), the present work was written for an 1807 performance of von Collin’s play Coriolan. Nevertheless, there certainly could have been some of Shakespeare’s great tragedy in Beethoven’s mind when he wrote this overture. The Roman aristocrat and general Gaius Marcius, hero of the battle of Corioli in the 5th century, took the name Coriolanus from his stunning victory there. The dramatic treatments of Shakespeare and von Collin are quite similar, and deal with the proud and haughty general having been banished from Rome for holding the common folk — the plebians — in contempt. To take revenge, Coriolanus joins forces with the Volscians who were bitter enemies of Rome, and leads them in laying siege to the city, rejecting in the process all pleas to spare his own people. In a final attempt to prevent a catastrophe, his wife, mother and son are sent to plead with him, and their heartfelt entreaties shake his resolve, and he ultimately decides in favor of his family and halts the siege. The furious and frustrated Volscians mutiny and surround the general, and in the Shakespeare treatment they descend on him and kill him. In von Collin’s version, Coriolanus kills himself as they are approaching. Although Coriolanus appears to have been an actual historical figure, how dso.org


much of the two dramatic settings are based on fact is very much open to question. Heinrich Joseph von Collin was a jurist, poet and court councilor who enjoyed considerable success with the original run of Coriolan, which opened in Vienna in November of 1802, with incidental music arranged from Mozart’s opera Idomeneo. It was performed regularly for the next three seasons, mainly because of the highly acclaimed performance of the title role by an actor and painter named Joseph Lange,

who was Mozart’s brother-in-law, and who also painted the last, and appropriately unfinished portrait of Mozart. Following these three seasons, the play was taken off the boards and fell into obscurity. One last performance of the play was given at the Royal Imperial Theatre in April of 1807 for which Beethoven wrote the overture, although in fact it had been performed twice before in regular subscription concerts at the home of Prince Lobkowitz in March which Beethoven himself conducted. By

THE VALUE OF TRUE ARTISTRY CAN’T BE MEASURED. WE SHOULD KNOW. At Raymond James, we specialize in understanding, enhancing and preserving the value of things. So, it’s an honor to support an exceptional organization whose tireless dedication to the arts is truly invaluable. Visit raymondjames.com to learn more about our commitment to community and those who better it. LIFE WELL PLANNED.

Raymond James is proud to support the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.

W E A LT H M A N AG E M E N T

BANKING

C A P I TA L M A R K E T S

©2012 Raymond James & Associates, Inc., member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC ©2012 Raymond James Financial Services, Inc., member FINRA/SIPC Raymond James is a registered trademark of Raymond James Financial, Inc. 12-Great Lakes RJA-0026 BS 9/12

dso.org

1807 the Prince, one of the composer’s most loyal patrons, had joined the Board of Directors of the Imperial Theatre, and it is likely that he arranged for this special performance for the specific purpose of showing off the overture in its proper setting. Whatever the case, to the best of anyone’s knowledge, the play has not been performed since. Rather than try to outline the entire drama in the overture, Beethoven decided to illuminate the critical moment in the plot when Coriolanus succumbs to his family’s pleadings and halts the siege of Rome. In so doing, he created a short and concentrated but immensely dramatic and powerful work which made a stunning impression on audiences of the day with its depiction of heroic resolve, compassion and high tragedy.  SO Shop @ The Ma x D recommends:

Beethoven – Coriolan Overture: Kurt Masur conducting the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, Philips 438706.

Symphony No. 2, in D major, Op. 36 Ludwig van Beethoven

Composed in 1801-02 and first performed on April 5, 1803 Scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, 2 trumpets, timpani and strings (approx. 34 minutes).

B

eethoven wrote Symphony No. 2 in mid-1802. It is one of his most joyous, serene compositions, yet it was written during one of the saddest times of his life. The year he composed this symphony, Beethoven left Vienna for about six months at his doctor’s orders to live in the quiet country village of Heiligenstadt. On October 8, shortly before returning to the city, he wrote a will in the form of a letter to his two brothers. It was a touching statement in which he admitted the horror and pain of the terrible realization that he was losing his hearing. “How could I possibly admit an infirmity in the one sense which ought to be more perfect in me than in other people, a sense that I once possessed in the highest perfection, a perfection such as few in my profession enjoy or have ever enjoyed! When I am with other people a terrible terror seizes me and I fear that my condition will be noticed. What a humiliation it was when someone standing next to me heard a flute in the distance Perform ance / Vol . X XI / february 2013

23


program notes or heard a shepherd singing and I heard nothing. I would have ended my life — but my art held me back. To leave the world until I have brought forth everything that I feel within me is impossible. I hasten, with joy, to meet death. If it should come before I have been able to develop all my artistic powers and would wish it to come later, even so I should be happy, for it would free me from a condition of endless suffering.” [Abridged] A few days later, he wrote a little more, even more drowned in complete hopelessness yet with internal fortitude. Beethoven completed the symphony in the late fall. A major concert on April 5th of the following year introduced Beethoven’s Symphony No. 1 and the first performance of three important works: his Symphony No. 2, Piano Concerto No. 3 and an oratorio, Christ on the Mount of Olives. He intended other vocal works to be performed too, but there simply was not time for everything. The day of the concert was also the only day of rehearsal. At five o’clock that morning, Beethoven began his long day by sending for a student to help copy some parts that instrumentalists still lacked. The rehearsal continued for many hours, and in mid-afternoon a meal was brought in for all the performers so they could continue rehearsing. The concert began at six o’clock, and it was only then that the friend whom Beethoven had asked to turn pages for him in the Piano Concerto discovered that many were totally blank, and others were nearly undecipherable. Beethoven had completely planned the solo passages but had not had time to write out the part. His friend later recalled that Beethoven signaled to him at the ends of the “invisible passages, and my ill‑concealed anxiety about missing the turning points amused him greatly.” The concert was well attended, but the new works did not meet with complete success. Critics did recognize, however, that the Symphony No. 2 showed an urge toward novelty and surprise; one critic announced that it confirmed his feeling that “Beethoven, in time, can effect a revolution in music, as Mozart did.” Now, it is as difficult to associate Beethoven’s Symphony No. 2 with musical revolution as with the terrible torment he endured in Heiligenstadt. Its first movement opens with a long, slow introduction, Adagio molto, that is at once dramatic, lyrical and even gracious, but not tragic. Beethoven organized the main section of the movement, Allegro con brio, 24

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / February 201 3

on a much larger scale than was common at the time in what we now think of as a classical manner. The second movement, Larghetto, consists of beautiful long themes, and the third is a true Scherzo (Italian for jest or joke). The symphony closes with a high‑spirited finale, Allegro molto.  SO Shop @ The Ma x D recommends:

Beethoven – Symphony No. 2: Leonard Bernstein conducting the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, Sony 61835.

Symphony No. 7 in A major, Op. 92 Ludwig van Beethoven

Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony was composed in 1812. The première took place on December 8, 1813, at the concert hall of the University of Vienna. The work is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings (approx. 36 minutes).

O

f all of Beethoven’s Symphonies, the Seventh is one of the most resistent to external explanation; yet it has received many poetic evaluations. The most famous of these comes from composer Richard Wagner, for whom it was “the apotheosis of the dance.” Wagner went on to say: “…it belongs to the Night Spirit and his crew, and if anyone plays it, tables and benches, cans and cups, the grandmother, the blind and the lame, aye, the children in the cradle, fall to dancing.” Isadora Duncan danced the work complete except for the opening Vivace in 1908. In 1938, Léonide Massine choreographed the entire work and even titled the movements: The Creation; The Earth; The Sky; and The Bacchanale and Destruction. With the opening chord, Beethoven marks out a vast musical space and defines the colors and textures that will characterize the symphony as a whole: light, transparent, with no unnecessary doubling of parts. Having abandoned the Haydnesque device of a slow introduction for the Fifth and Sixth Symphonies, Beethoven returns to it here, perhaps with the awareness that the vital, highly propulsive first movement had to begin from something. Taking Wagner’s remark about the dance to heart, it is possible to hear the first movement as a gigue on a grand scale. However, as Baroque composers knew, pure dance forms could be extended only

so far in time; even when melodically elaborate and with added harmonic interest, they could not easily be extended beyond their original sixteen or thirty-two bar framework. Here, Beethoven has not elaborated but rather simplified, reducing the dance rhythm to its most basic element, with accompanying harmonies in broad, sweeping arcs. In the Sixth Symphony, he had discovered the cumulative power of harmonic repetition; wedding this earlier technique to a repeated, vital, rhythmic unit created an irresistible force. If the first movement is the dance apotheosized, the second is a set of variations moved far beyond the realm of mere decoration. Beethoven had mastered this technique as early on as the Eroïca, and here his craft is seen at its subtlest, simplest and most effective. Rather than being added onto the theme, the variations seem instead to grow organically out of it. Thinking back, the astute listener realizes they were present all the time. Nothing remains of the traditional minuet in the third movement; it has been replaced by a peasant dance that sweeps the spectators along in its wake. It opens with a rhythmic springboard that sets the underlying meter and which sticks in the listeners’ mind even when Beethoven contradicts it. The middle trio section is said to have been based on an Austrian pilgrims’ hymn; it is repeated twice, according to the scheme Beethoven devised (and then abandoned) in the Fifth Symphony. The last movement inevitably seems fast, regardless of the tempo that is taken, but this sense of speed is somewhat deceptive. Beneath all the activity on the surface, the harmonies move quite slowly, sometimes holding in place for bars at a time. Here Beethoven applies the same formula that worked so well in the first movement, keeping an obsessively repeated rhythm firmly in place with strong harmonic anchors. The movement may be a workout for the orchestra, but the listener comes away feeling refreshed, without knowing exactly why.  SO Shop @ The Ma x D recommends:

Beethoven – Symphony No. 7: Leonard Bernstein conducting the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, Sony 61835 or Carlos Kleiber conducting the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Deutsche Grammophon 447400.

dso.org


profiles Joni Henson

Classical Series Beethoven’s Ninth Thursday, February 21, 2013 at 7:30 p.m. Friday, February 22, 2013 at 8 p.m. Saturday, February 23, 2013 at 8 p.m. Sunday, February 24, 2013 at 3 p.m.* in Orchestra Hall Leonard Slatkin, conductor Joni Henson, soprano • Kelley O’Connor, mezzo soprano Vale Rideout, tenor • Jason Grant, bass-baritone University Musical Society Choral Union Ludwig van Beethoven Selections from The Creatures of Prometheus, (1770-1827) Op. 43 Overture Adagio Finale

I n ter mission Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125, “Choral” Allegro ma non troppo, un poco maestoso Molto vivace Adagio molto e cantabile Presto - Allegro assai - Allegro assai vivace Joni Henson, soprano Kelley O’Connor, mezzo-soprano Vale Rideout, tenor Jason Grant, bass-baritone This Classical Series concert is generously sponsored by

PVS Chemicals, Inc.

These performances are being recorded for a direct-to-digital Beethoven “box set” to be released later this year. To pre-order your copy for just $19.99, visit dso.org/beethoven. *Denotes a webcast performance

ppa elibom oG ot OSD eht no ro evil/gro.osd ta enilno hctaW

ynohpmyS ”nagrO“ ’snëaS-tniaS .m.a 54:01 ,11 yaM ,yadirF

snruteR ivräJ .m.p 3 ,1 lirpA ,yadnuS

Get the most out of each classical concert by attending pre-concert presentations, one hour prior to performances (excluding Coffee Concerts). The presentations are informal and may include special guests, lectures and music that reveal interesting facts about the program and provide a behind-the-scenes look at the art of making music. emoR fo seniP ehT ynohpmyS ”dlroW weN“ s’kářovD .m.a 54:01 ,81 yaM ,yadirF .m.p 8 ,12 lirpA ,yadrutaS noitibihxE na ta serutciP .m.p 3 ,6 yaM ,yadnuS

The DSO can be heard on the DSO, Chandos, London, Naxos, RCA and Mercury Record labels. dso.org

Soprano Joni Henson is one of Canada’s most thrilling young performers. While still a member of the Canadian Opera Company Ensemble Studio, she Henson appeared on the main stage as Elisabetta in Don Carlos, the Foreign Princess in Rusalka, Fiordiligi in Mozart’s Cosi Fan Tutte, and Gutrune in Wagner’s Götterdämmerung. More recent successes include Senta in Der Fliegende Holländer for Pacific Opera Victoria, Santuzza in Cavalleria Rusticana and Leonora in Il Trovatore for Opera Hamilton, Verdi’s Requiem for the Brott Music Festival and Leonora in Verdi’s Oberto for Toronto’s Opera in Concert. In the 2012-2013 season, she looks forward to Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 with Ottawa’s National Arts Centre Orchestra and the Detroit Symphony, Desdemona in Otello for Calgary Opera, an Opera Gala for the Fairfax Symphony of Virginia and Tosca for Pacific Opera Victoria. Henson earned her Bachelor in Vocal Performance degree from the University of Toronto and also received her Artist Diploma from the University of Toronto’s Opera Division. Other roles include Nedda in Leoncavallo’s Pagliacci, Mrs. Ford in Nicolai’s Merry Wives Of Windsor and Female Chorus in Britten’s The Rape Of Lucretia. Awards have included the Opera Grand Prize at the 15th Concours International de Chant de Verviers Competition in Belgium, First Place Opera and French Melodie Awards at the Concours International de Chant de Marmande (France) and she was semi-finalist in the Metropolitan National Council Auditions. Henson attended the Music Academy of the West in Santa Barbara, where she studied with Marilyn Horne.

Kelley O’Connor

Possessing a voice of uncommon allure, musical sophistication far beyond her years, and intuitive and innate dramatic artistry, the Grammy Award-winning O’Connor mezzo-soprano Kelley O’Connor has emerged as one of the most compelling performers of her generation. In June 2011 the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Perform ance / Vol . X XI / february 2013

25


released a recording of Peter Lieberson’s Neruda Songs, featuring O’Connor. Neruda Songs has highlighted her prominence as one of the world’s leading concert artists in two significant European debuts: performances with David Zinman and the Berliner Philharmoniker as well as with the Tonhalle-Orchester Zürich. Additionally, the work served her Carnegie Hall debut in a performance with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra conducted by Bernard Haitink. Internationally in recent seasons O’Connor made her Proms Festival debut with Jirí Belohlávek and the BBC Symphony Orchestra in Mahler’s Eighth Symphony, and an Edinburgh International Festival debut with James Conlon and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra in John Adams’ El Niño. She joined Edo de Waart for Mahler’s Third Symphony with the Hong Kong Philharmonic, toured with Iván Fischer and the Budapest Festival Orchestra in Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, and sang Mendelssohn’s Elias with Ingo Metzmacher and the Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin. O’Connor has received unanimous international critical acclaim for her numerous performances as Federico García Lorca in Osvaldo Golijov’s Ainadamar. O’Connor created the role for the world premiere at Tanglewood under the baton of Robert Spano and subsequently has joined Miguel Harth-Bedoya for performances with the Los Angeles Philharmonic at Walt Disney Hall. She reprised her “musically seductive, palpably charismatic” portrayal of Lorca (Washington Post) in the world premiere of the revised edition of Ainadamar at the Santa Fe Opera in a new staging by Peter Sellars during the 2005 season, which also was presented at Lincoln Center.

Vale Rideout

Vale Rideout, Tenor,  a native of Colorado has sung with Los Angeles Opera, Minnesota Opera, Pacific Opera Victoria, Nashville Opera and companies rideout across the US. Recently, he reprised his performance as the Male Chorus in Rape of Lucretia at Cal Performances in Berkeley with Maestro Lorin Maazel conducting, sang Peter Quint in The Turn of the Screw at Central City Opera, sang Nadir in Les Pêcheurs de perles with Hawaii Opera Theater and Don Ottavio in Don Giovanni with Tulsa Opera. He sang Peter Quint in The Turn of the 26

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / February 201 3

Screw with Boston Lyric Opera, Edgardo in Lucia di Lammermoor and Sam in Susannah with Central City Opera, Alfred in Die Fledermaus with San Francisco Opera and Atis in The Fortunes of King Croesus with Minnesota Opera. His concert engagements have taken him from The New York Philharmonic performing with Maestro Lorin Maazel in Britten’s War Requiem to the Dallas Symphony where he sang the World Premiere of August 4, 1964 by Steven Stucky under Maestro Jaap Van Zweden which was recently released in a live recording. Vale sang with the Seattle Symphony in Handel’s Messiah and appeared with the Collegiate Chorale in an opera inspired program at Carnegie Hall. He appeared with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Orchestra of St Lukes, Academy of St Marin in the Fields, Pacific, Virginia, Nashville and Grand Rapids Symphonies. He recently sang the role of Tancredi in John Musto’s The Inspector at Wolf Trap Opera which was recently released as a live recording. With Florentine Opera, he sang the role of Frank in Robert Aldridge’s Grammy-winning (2012)  Elmer Gantry and the role of Igneo in Don Davis’ Rio de Sangre, both of which have recently been released as live recordings. Vale can also be heard on a live recording of Carmina Burana with the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra.

Jason Grant

This and future seasons have bassbaritone Jason Grant singing Pater Profundis in Mahler Symphony No. 8 in a return to the Virginia Symphony grant at the Virginia Arts Festival, and the Beethoven Symphony No. 9 for debuts with the Detroit and Nashville symphony orchestras. Recent highlights include performances with the New York Philharmonic of Mahler Symphony No. 8 for Lorin Maazel’s final concerts as music director, released on iTunes, following concert performances of Tosca led by Maestro Maazel and a debut in the Bach St. Matthew Passion led by Kurt Masur. A variety of concert engagements include Mozart’s Mass in C Minor at the Mostly Mozart Festival; Bach’s Mass in B Minor with the Milwaukee Symphony, Brahms’ Requiem with the Virginia Symphony and the Buffalo Philharmonic,

among others. He has sung Don Fernando in concert performances of Fidelio with the Saint Louis Symphony; Stravinsky’s Le Rossignol with the Atlanta Symphony in Atlanta and at Carnegie Hall; Stravinsky’s Pulcinella with the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra and Mendelssohn’s Die erste Walpurgisnacht with the Alabama Symphony. Grant’s many performances during seven seasons with the New York City Opera include Pooh-Bah in Jonathan Miller’s production of The Mikado, Dulcamara in Miller’s new production of L’elisir d’amore, Leporello in Don Giovanni, and Don Profondo in Il viaggio a Reims, among others. Operatic highlights include Angelotti in Tosca and Monterone in Rigoletto with the Seattle Opera; Leporello in Don Giovanni and the Four Villains in Les contes d’Hoffmann with the Dallas Opera; and multiple appearances with the Opera Orchestra of New York, including Duglas in Rossini’s La donna del lago, Attila, La battaglia di Legnano, all at Carnegie Hall. An alumnus of the Santa Fe Opera Apprentice Program, the Merola Program, and the Steans Institute at Ravinia, Mr. Grant is a graduate of the Juilliard Opera Center and the Eastman School of Music. Presented by

CLASSICAL

Celebration SATURDAY, March 9, 2013 Orchestra Hall

dso.org


program notes Selections from The Creatures of Prometheus, Op. 43 LUDWIG van BEETHOVEN

B. Dec. 16, 1770 (baptized) in Bonn, Germany D. Mar. 26, 1827 in Vienna, Austria

Scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani, harp and strings (approx. 15 minutes).

B

y the time he was thirty, Beethoven was looked upon as a celebrity in Vienna, the musical capitol of Europe, where he had lived for the past eight years. With works such as the First Symphony, the “Pathetique” Piano Sonata and his first set of string quartets, he already held a position of great prominence in Vienna, and his fame was beginning to spread elsewhere. In short, this was a classic case of the right person in the right place at the right time, and although he could not know it then, he would soon become the musical voice of the Age of the Hero. It was only logical that this young titan should be asked to write something for the Imperial Theatre, in this instance a ballet for the entertainment of the court which was conceived by one Salvatore Vigano (1769-1821), an Italian-born dancer and choreographer who had an enormous reputation all across Europe. He was one of the great dancers of the early 19th century, whose fame has been compared to such luminaries of the 20th century as Nijinsky, Nureyev and Baryshnikov. Most people thought that this was Beethoven’s first attempt at a ballet, but in fact he had already produced a ballet in his native Bonn in 1791 entitled The Knight’s Ballet. The program had identified the composer as Count Waldstein, but the count had actually paid Beethoven handsomely so he could pass off the ballet’s music as his own. It hardly mattered, as the music by the 21-year-old Beethoven was not at all distinguished. Vigano had become famous for simplifying the exaggerated and somewhat artificial movements which had characterized the old Italian style of dancing. This style was quite popular in Vienna at the time, but his natural, unaffected and appealing approach to choreography eventually pushed the older style aside. Ballet as an art form independent of opera was comparatively new, and Vigano was one of the first to give it depth and character. The Empress Maria Theresa had appointed him Master of the Ballet in Vienna in 1799, and each dso.org

year he produced an original work for the Imperial Court. Vigano was also a composer who had studied with Luigi Boccherini, and on several previous occasions he had composed the music for some of his productions. However, for the new ballet of 1801, intended as a tribute to the Empress, he realized that he was entering more ambitious territory, and so he called on the young and highlyacclaimed Beethoven to write the music for The Creatures of Prometheus. Vigano had chosen the mythological tale of the demigod Prometheus for this project because he wanted to show “The Power of Music and Dance,” which in fact became the ballet’s subtitle. The new ballet was very successful, and in its first two seasons had 23 performances in Vienna, which at the time was a remarkable run, and was later produced in Italy. As adapted for this production, Prometheus fashions a man and a woman out of clay, then brings them to life with sacred fire stolen from the gods. He gives them all the best qualities of the animals, but fails to give them the power of reason or souls or humanity. As he is about to

destroy his creations, the god Apollo rescues them and takes them to Mt. Parnassus where they learn music, sorrow, laughter, dance and the ability to enjoy themselves. After appreciating all of the beauties of nature, they set out on the journey of life accompanied by a solemn but joyous final dance. Sadly, we know next to nothing about the original staging, as Vigano’s libretto and choreography have been lost. Successful though the ballet was originally, it soon fell into obscurity and is now rarely performed, although the overture (Beethoven’s first essay in this form) and finale are still heard with regularity. In particular, the theme of the finale must have struck a very responsive chord in Beethoven’s mind, for he used it again as one of his Country Dances, composed at roughly the same time, in the 15 Variations and Fugue for Piano, Op. 35, and most significantly, as the main theme of the finale of his mighty 3rd Symphony, the so-called “Eroica” Symphony. At these concerts you will hear the overture and the finale, and in between a beautiful Adagio, which stands as the only work in which Beethoven ever used the harp. Perform ance / Vol . X XI / february 2013

27


program notes  SO Shop @ The Ma x D recommends:

Beethoven – The Creatures of Prometheus (excerpts): Kurt Masur conducting the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, Philips 438706.

Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125, “Choral” LUDWIG van BEETHOVEN

The premiere was given by Michael Umlauf and the Kärntnerthor Orchestra on May 7, 1824. Scored for two flutes, piccolo, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, contrabassoon, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, timpani, bass drum, cymbals, triangle, choir and strings (approx. 67 minutes).

N

ot since he began composing symphonies had Beethoven allowed such a gap in his output as the 12 years between his eighth and ninth symphonies. Thus, anticipation was feverish when it became known that he was planning to introduce his new symphony and Mass to the Viennese public who, for all the respect it accorded Beethoven, seemed far more interested in the operas of Rossini. The usual problems beset the undertaking: finding a theater, getting musicians from different theaters to work together, finding the extra musicians to augment the orchestra and chorus to the size Beethoven wanted, wrangling with censors and getting all the music copied in time for the two full rehearsals that could be scheduled in the theater. The composer, who had been entirely deaf for some six years, could participate only to a limited extent but still bore all the financial risk as impresario. More than once he was ready to cancel the whole affair. The premiere finally took place on May 7, 1824, in a program that began with the Consecration of the House Overture and continued with only three movements of the Missa solemnis. The event was unsuccessful financially, as income barely covered expenses, and musically since everyone acknowledged that such difficult music could not have been learned in the time available. A repeat performance on May 23 with an “easier” program featuring Beethoven’s vocal trio “Tremate, empi” and Rossini’s “Di tanti palpiti,” in place of two movements of the Missa solemnis was poorly attended because of extraordinarily pleasant weather.

28

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / February 201 3

Although it struggled at first, the Ninth is regarded today as a final affirmation of the humanitarian ideals that inspired Beethoven in his youth in the face of misunderstanding, personal isolation and the police state that Austria had become. A critical tradition going back to the mid-19th century hears the Ninth as conveying an epic quest for everything symbolized by the Ode to Joy in the finale — a utopia of universal brotherhood in which all the barriers set between humans through all-too-human conventions and prejudices might be torn down. Along the way, in the first three movements, one gets anticipations of the catchy D-major tune that addresses “Freude, schöner Götterfunken” like so many premonitions of the symbolic goal, however imperfect or quickly clouded. The first movement is idiosyncratic and vast. Hardly a single feature of the received sonata form is taken for granted: not the expected repeat of the exposition, not the return of the original tonal center at the recapitulation, not the expected tonal stability within key areas and not even the key areas themselves. The home key is D minor, and the secondary key is B-flat major instead of F major. The movement begins in an aura of timelessness, as though the materials of music itself are emerging, with effort, from some primeval ooze, a gambit that sets the pattern for many symphonies to follow. There are at most two glimpses of the D-major goal, but the movement ends with a grim funeral march and an implacably forceful statement of the principal motive in D minor. With respect to key, recurring material and sheer kinetic energy, the second movement seems an intensified continuation of the first. Though not so titled, it has the form and expressive character of a Scherzo with trio; only the Scherzo section is so expansive that it, too, can be analyzed in terms of sonata form. Here the trio, or middle section, gives the glimpse of things to come with a simple, self-repeating D-major tune, a naive pastoral that is wiped away by the Scherzo’s return. The trio attempts a comeback but is figuratively shouted down at the close of the movement. The third movement seems to proceed from an altogether different psychological basis, a mood of tender, consoling lyricism. We hear two ruminative, almost prayerful themes, one in B-flat and one in D major, each anticipating the Joy theme in a

different way, each varied in alternation with the other with two developmental episodes along the way. The second episode presents an abrupt fanfare, a call to order that shatters the lyrical mood. The unusual form of the movement seems calculated to convey a sense of profound, albeit beautiful, failure. The finale bursts upon the slow movement with terrible vehemence, almost like the Furies’ denial of Orpheus at the portals of the Elysian Fields. The music continues operatically with a recitative for low strings followed by a review and rejection of every principal theme heard so far. Finally, the Joy theme is arrived at, celebrated and cast aside. The finale is as big, structurally and expressively as four ordinary symphony movements. It comprises a mixture of things that usually do not appear together in symphonies — operatic voices, ecclesiastical hymns, Turkish marches, and learned fugues — evidently in service to the symbolic proclamation of a new order in which all received distinctions and prejudices would lose their force before the higher power of Joy. The key poetic lines, “Alle Menschen werden Brüder, wo dein sanfter Flügel weilt,” are inherently ambiguous. They can be translated as a simple declarative, “all humans shall become brothers wherever your gentle wing lingers” or as a prayer, “may all humans become brothers.” Beethoven composed it both ways. The Ninth was never just another symphony. It was a gesture of public valediction for the composer, a last attempt at communication before his withdrawal into more esoteric composition (i.e., the final string quartets). It culminated the historical development of the symphony as genre from curtain-raiser and audiencehusher into personal philosophical statement. It has been pressed repeatedly into political service, nefarious as well as noble. It has even set the limit for symphonic output. For us, it is the allpurpose ceremonial work, whether for celebrations such as New Year’s in Japan or for rituals such as the Olympic Games, which somehow never manages to lose its relevance.  SO Shop @ The Ma x D recommends:

Beethoven – Symphony No. 9: Herbert von Karajan conducting the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, Deutsche Grammophon B0008158.

dso.org


Detroit symphony orchestra musicians To read official musician bios, visit dso.org/orchestra.

Mark Abbott Horn

Ethan Allen Librarian

Stephen Anderson Acting Principal Trumpet Lee and Floy Barthel Chair

Donald Baker Principal Oboe Jack A. and Aviva Robinson Chair

Joseph Becker Principal Percussion Ruth Roby and Alfred R. Glancy III Chair

Robert Bergman Cello Victor and Gale Girolami Cello Chair

Linton Bodwin Bass

David Buck Principal Flute Women’s Association for the DSO Chair

Beatriz Budinszky First Violin

Caroline Coade Viola

Catherine Compton Viola

Robert deMaine Principal Cello James C. Gordon Chair

dso.org

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / february 2013

29


30

Marguerite Deslippe First Violin

Stephen Edwards Bass

David Everson Assistant Principal French Horn

Ron Fischer Second Violin

Monica Fosnaugh English Horn

Elias Friedenzohn First Violin

Laurie Landers Goldman First Violin

Kevin Good Trumpet

Nathaniel Gurin Assistant Principal Trombone

Alexander Hanna Principal Bass On extended leave

Randall Hawes Bass Trombone

Shelley Heron Oboe Maggie Miller Chair

Hart Hollman Viola

Marshall Hutchinson Bass

Sheryl Hwangbo Second Violin

Maxim Janowsky Bass

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / February 201 3

dso.org


Bryan Kennedy Horn

Kimberly A. Kaloyanides Kennedy Associate Concertmaster Alan and Marianne Schwartz and Jean Shapero Chair

Victoria King Bassoon

Rachel Harding Klaus Second Violin

David Ledoux Cello

Laurence Liberson Assistant Principal Clarinet E-Flat Clarinet

Shanda Lowery-Sachs Viola

William Lucas Trumpet

Michael Ke Ma Assistant Principal Bassoon

Patricia Masri-Fletcher Principal Harp Winifred E. Polk Chair

Peter McCaffrey Cello

Haden McKay Cello

Glenn Mellow Viola

Stephen Molina Acting Principal Bass Van Dusen Family Chair

Alexander Mishnaevski Principal Violia Julie and Ed Levy, Jr. Chair

Hong-Yi Mo Second Violin

dso.org

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / february 2013

31


32

Robert Murphy Second Violin

Dennis Nulty Principal Tuba

Theodore Oien Principal Clarinet Robert B. Semple Chair

Úna O’Riordan Cello

Shannon Orme Bass Clarinet Barbara Frankel and Ronald Michalak Chair

Eun Park First Violin

Karl Pituch Principal Horn

Craig Rifel Bass

Adrienne Rönmark First Violin

Alvin Score Second Violin

Marcus Schoon Bassoon Contrabassoon

Bruce Smith Second Violin

Yoonshin Song Concertmaster Katherine Tuck Chair

Laura Soto First Violin

Sharon Wood Sparrow Acting Assistant Principal Flute

Robert Stiles Principal Librarian

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / February 201 3

dso.org


Joseph Striplin Second Violin

Greg Staples First Violin

Adam Stepniewski Acting Principal Second Violin, The Devereaux Family Chair

Hang Su Viola

Marian Tanau Second Violin

Kenneth Thompkins Principal Trombone

James Van Valkenburg Assistant Principal Viola

Brian Ventura Assistant Principal Oboe

Corbin Wagner Horn

Robert Williams Principal Bassoon John and Marlene Boll Chair

Paul Wingert Cello

Hai-Xin Wu Assistant Concertmaster Walker L. Cisler/Detroit Edison Foundation Chair

Johanna Yarbrough Horn

Han Zheng Viola

Jeffery Zook Flute Piccolo

Jing Zhang Violin

dso.org

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / february 2013

33


DETROIT SYMPHONY’S CIVIC ORCHESTRA PRESENTS

BEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No. 5 in E-flat major, Op. 73

“Emperor” Leonard Slatkin conductor Emanuel Ax

piano

MONDAY

MARCH 25 AT 7:30PM ORCHESTRA HALL

Please join the Detroit Symphony’s Civic Orchestra — Michigan’s premiere youth orchestra — for this one night only special event featuring virtuoso pianist, Emanuel Ax and DSO Music Director Leonard Slatkin.

For tickets, visit dso.org or call 313.576.5111 34

Perform ance / Vol . X X I / february 201 3

dso.org


Max-imize Your Experience Share Your Photos and Videos! The DSO is active on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Pinterest, and more. We encourage you to share your best DSO pictures (no flash, please!) and videos by tagging the DSO when you post. Priority Service for our Members Subscribers and donors who give $1,000 or more annually receive priority assistance. Just visit the Member Center on the second floor of the Max M. Fisher Atrium for help with tickets, exchanges, donations, or any other DSO needs. Herman and Sharon Frankel Donor Lounge Governing Members who give $3,000 or more annually enjoy complimentary beverages, appetizers, and desserts in the Donor Lounge, open 45 minutes prior to each concert through to the end of intermission. For more information on becoming a Governing Member call Cassie Brenske at 313.576.5460. A Taste of the DSO Located on the second floor of Orchestra Hall, Paradise Lounge will be open prior to most concerts featuring small plates paired with classic cocktails, small production wines, and craft beers. Bars will continue to be available throughout

the Max M. Fisher Music Center prior to concerts and during intermission. For your convenience, you may place your beverage orders pre-concert and your drink will be waiting for you at intermission. Parking, Security, and Lost & Found Valet parking is available on Woodward Avenue in front of the main entrance for $12 per vehicle for most concerts. Secure garage parking is available for $7 per vehicle at the Orchestra Place Parking Deck on Parsons St. between Woodward and Cass. For improved traffic flow, enter Parsons St. from Cass Ave. Metered street parking is available. The DSO offers shuttle bus service to Coffee Concerts from select locations. Call 313.576.5130 for more information. DSO security personnel, dressed in red, monitor the grounds of the Max and the parking deck, as well as surrounding streets during all events and concerts. To inquire about a lost item see the House Manager or call 313.576.5199 during business hours. A Smoke-Free Environment The DSO is pleased to offer a smokefree environment at the Max M. Fisher Music Center. Patrons who wish to smoke must do so outside the building. An outdoor patio is also available on the second level of the Atrium Lobby.

Accessibility Parking is available in the Orchestra Place Parking Deck for patrons with applicable permits. There are elevators, barrier-free restrooms and accessible seating in all areas of the Max M. Fisher Music Center. Security personnel are available at the entrances to help patrons requiring extra assistance in and out of vehicles. Hearing assistance devices are also available. Please see the House Manager or any usher for additional assistance. House and Seating Policies All patrons must have a ticket to attend concerts at the Max M. Fisher Music Center, including children. The Max M. Fisher Music Center opens two hours prior to most DSO concerts. Most classical concerts feature free pre-concert talks or performances in Orchestra Hall for all ticket holders. The DSO makes every attempt to begin concerts on time. In deference to the comfort and listening pleasure of the audience, latecomers will be seated at an appropriate pause in the music at the discretion of the house staff. Patrons who leave the hall before or during a work will be reseated after the work is completed. Latecomers will be able to watch the performance on closed circuit television in the Atrium Lobby.

Please turn off all cell phones, pagers, alarms, and other electronic devices. Patrons should speak to the House Manager to make special arrangements to receive emergency phone calls during a performance. Concert Cancellations To find out if a scheduled performance has been cancelled due to inclement weather or other emergencies, visit dso.org or facebook.com/ detroitsymphony, call the Box Office at 313.576.5111, or tune in to WJR 760 AM and WWJ 950 AM. Gift Certificates Give friends and loved ones a gift that lasts all year long—the experience of a DSO performance. Gift certificates are available in any denomination and may be used toward the purchase of DSO concert tickets. Visit the DSO Box Office or call 313.576.5111 for more information. Max M. Fisher Music Center Rental Information The Max M. Fisher Music Center is an ideal and affordable setting for a variety of events and performances, including weddings, corporate gatherings, concerts, and more. For information on renting the facility, please call 313.576.5050 or visit dso.org/rent.

Administrative Staff Executive Office

Education

Information Systems

Anne Parsons President and CEO

Charles Burke Senior Director of Education Artistic Director of Civic Youth Ensembles

Laura Lee Director of IT

Paul W. Hogle Executive Vice President Patricia Walker Chief Operating Officer Anne Wilczak Managing Director, Special Events and Projects Orchestra Operations  & Artistic Planning Erik Rönmark Artistic Administrator Teddy Abrams Conducting Assistant Kareem George Managing Director of Community Programs

Emily Lamoreaux General Manager of Civic Youth Ensembles Cecilia Sharpe Manager of Education Programs Mike Spiegel Education and Jazz Studies Coordinator Facility Operations Sue Black Facilities Coordinator Larry Ensman Maintenance Supervisor

Kathryn Ginsburg Artistic Coordinator

Greg Schmizzi Chief of Security

Heather Hart Rochon Assistant Orchestra Personnel Manager

Finance

Don Killinger Operations and Popular Programming Coordinator Stephen Molina Orchestra Personnel Manager Nicole New Manager of Popular and Special Programming Alice Sauro Director of Operations and Executive Assistant to the Music Director dso.org

Donielle Hardy Controller Eric Higgs Director of Financial Planning and Analysis

Human Resources Renecia Lowery Jeter Director of Human Resources History/Archives Paul Ganson Historian Cynthia Korolov Archivist Patron & Institutional Advancement Reimer Priester Senior Director of Patron and Institutional Advancement Cassie Brenske Governing Members Gift Officer Marianne Dorais Foundation and Government  Relations Officer Bree Kneisler Patron Advancement and Research Coordinator

Sandra Mazza Accountant

Chelsea Kotula Board and Volunteer Relations Coordinator

Roná Simmons Staff Accountant

Ron Papke Corporate Relations Manager

Patron Development & Sales Angela Detlor Senior Director of Patron Development and Sales Holly Clement Senior Manager of Event Sales and Administration Joy Crawford Patron and Organizational Assistance Coordinator

Tiiko Reese-Douglas Acting Patron Service and Sales Manager Paul Yee Retail Sales Manager Patron Engagement & Loyalty Programs

Elaine Curvin Executive Assistant and Patron Teams Coordinator

Scott Harrison Senior Director of Patron Engagement and Loyalty Programs Executive Producer of Digital Media

Mona DeQuis Assistant Manager of Retail Sales

Matt Babecki Patron Acknowledgement and Gift Systems Specialist

Chuck Dyer Manager of Group Sales and Corporate Sales

Will Broner Patron Acknowledgment and Gift Systems Coordinator

Christopher Harrington Patron Development and Sales Manager

Connie Campbell Senior Manager of Patron Engagement

Jennifer Kouassi Front of House Manager

Sharon Carr Assistant Manager of Patron Systems and Ticketing Operations

Heather Mourer Neighborhood Audience Development Manager B.J. Pearson Senior Manager of Event Operations Gabrielle Poshadlo Patron Communications and Public Relations Manager Anné Renforth Patron Sales and Services Supervisor Anna Savone Food and Beverage Manager

Lindsey Evert Loyalty Programs Manager La Heidra Marshall Patron Engagement Officer Marty Morhardt Patron Engagement Assistant Juanda Pack Patron Engagement Officer Eric Woodhams Manager of Digital Media and Engagement

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / february 201 3

35


The Annual Fund Gifts received between September 1, 2011 and January 1, 2013

Being a Community-Supported Orchestra means you can play your part through frequent ticket purchases and generous annual donations. Ticket sales cover only a fraction of DSO program costs so community contributions are essential to the Orchestra’s future survival. Your tax- deductible Annual Fund donation is an investment in the wonderful music at Orchestra Hall, around the neighborhoods, and across the community. This honor roll celebrates those generous donors who made a gift of $1,500 or more to the DSO Annual Fund Campaign. If you have a question about this roster, or for more information about how you can make a donation, please contact 313.576.5114 or dso.org/donate. Platinum Baton giving of $250,000 and more

The Mandell L. & Madeleine H. Berman Family Foundation

Mr. & Mrs. Stanley Frankel Max M. & Marjorie S. Fisher Foundation

Mr. & Mrs. James B. Nicholson Samuel & Jean Frankel Foundation

Gold Baton giving of $100,000 and more Julie & Peter Cummings

Emory M. Ford, Jr.† Endowment

Cindy & Leonard Slatkin

Mrs. Karen Davidson

Herman & Sharon Frankel

Mrs. Richard C. Van Dusen

Mr. & Mrs. Phillip Fisher

Bernard & Eleanor Robertson

Silver Baton giving of $50,000 and more Mr. & Mrs. Richard L. Alonzo

Penny & Harold Blumenstein

Mr. & Mrs. Larry Sherman

Mr. & Mrs. Eugene Applebaum

Mr. & Mrs. John A. Boll, Sr.

Dr. & Mrs. Clyde Wu

Cecilia Benner

Mrs. Kathryn L. Fife

Mr. & Mrs. Bruce D. Peterson

Mr. & Mrs. Richard A. Brodie

Sidney & Madeline Forbes

The Polk Family

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond M. Cracchiolo

Mr. & Mrs. Edsel B. Ford

Marvin & Betty Danto Family Foundation

Ruth & Al Glancy

Mr. & Mrs. Alan E. Schwartz & Mrs. Jean Shapero

Ms. Leslie Devereaux

Mr. & Mrs. Morton E. Harris

Linda Dresner & Ed Levy, Jr.

Chacona W. Johnson

Arthur & Trudy Weiss

Mr. & Mrs. James Grosfeld Dr. Gloria Heppner Ms. Doreen Hermelin Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Horwitz Julius & Cynthia Huebner Foundation Mr. Sharad P. Jain Faye & Austin Kanter Mr. & Mrs. Norman D. Katz Mr. & Mrs. Bernard S. Kent Mrs. Bonnie Larson Mr. David Lebenbom Marguerite & David Lentz Dr. Melvin A. Lester Mr. & Mrs. Arthur C. Liebler David & Valerie McCammon Mr. Edward K. Miller Mr. & Mrs. Eugene A. Miller Cyril Moscow Geoffrey S. Nathan & Margaret E. Winters Jim & Mary Beth Nicholson

Mrs. Jo Elyn Nyman Anne Parsons & Donald Dietz Dr. William F. Pickard Mr. & Mrs. Gary Ran Ms. Ruth Rattner Mr. & Mrs. Lloyd E. Reuss Jack & Aviva Robinson Martie & Bob Sachs Marjorie & Saul Saulson Mark & Lois Shaevsky Mr. Stephan Sharf Richard A. Sonenklar & Gregory Haynes Mr. & Mrs. John Stroh III The William M. Davidson Foundation Ann Marie Uetz Mr. Robert VanWalleghem Mr. & Mrs. R. Jamison Williams Mr. & Mrs. Alan Zekelman Paul M. Zlotoff & Terese Sante Mrs. Paul Zuckerman†

Mr. & Mrs. Lee Barthel

Giving of $25,000 and more

Mr. & Mrs. Donald R. Simon

Giving of $10,000 and more Mrs. Denise Abrash Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Allesee Daniel & Rose Angelucci Mr. Chuck Becker Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. Bluestein Mr. & Mrs. Jim Bonahoom Ms. Liz Boone Michael & Geraldine Buckles Mr. & Mrs. Francois Castaing Lois & Avern Cohn Marianne Endicott Jim & Margo Farber Mr. & Mrs. David Fischer Dr. Saul & Mrs. Helen Forman Barbara Frankel & Ronald Michalak Dale & Bruce Frankel Rema Frankel † Dorothy & Byron Gerson Mr. & Mrs. Ralph J. Gerson Dr. & Mrs. Herman Gray, Jr. 36

Perform ance / Vol . X X I / february 201 3

† Deceased

dso.org


Giving of $5,000 and more Anonymous Mr. & Mrs. Norman Ankers Drs. John & Janice Bernick Robert N. & Claire P. Brown Mr. & Mrs. Gary L. Cowger Mr. & Mrs. Thomas A. Cracchiolo Deborah & Stephen D’Arcy Fund Jerry P. & Maureen T. D’Avanzo Mark Davidoff & Margie Dunn Ms. Barbara L. Davidson Lillian & Walter Dean Beck Demery David Elgin Dodge Mr. & Mrs. Walter E. Douglas Ron Fischer & Kyoko Kashiwagi Mr. & Mrs. Alfred J. Fisher, III Mr. Steven Fishman Mr. David Fleitz Mr. & Mrs. Gerry Fournier Mrs. Harold L. Frank Maxine & Stuart Frankel Foundation Allan D. Gilmour & Eric C. Jirgens Dr. Kenneth & Roslyne Gitlin Dr. Robert T. & Elaine Goldman Goodman Family Charitable Trust Dr. Allen Goodman & Dr. Janet Hankin Robert & Mary Ann Gorlin Mr. & Mrs. James A. Green Ms. Nancy Henk Mr. Eric J. Hespenheide & Ms. Judith V. Hicks Mr. & Mrs. Norman H. Hofley Richard H. & Carola Huttenlocher Mr. & Mrs. A. E. Igleheart Mr. & Mrs. Charles R. Janovsky Mr. & Mrs. Richard J. Jessup Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. Keegan Betsy & Joel Kellman Rachel Kellman † Michael E. Smerza & Nancy Keppelman Mr. Patrick J. Kerzic & Stephanie Germack Kerzic Dr. David & Elizabeth Kessel Mr. & Mrs. William P. Kingsley Mr. & Mrs. Richard P. Kughn Dr. Raymond Landes & Dr. Melissa McBrien-Landes The Locniskar Group Mr. & Mrs. Harry A. Lomason Elaine & Mervyn Manning Ms. Florine Mark Patricia A. & Patrick G. McKeever Mrs. Susanne O. McMillan Dr. Robert & Dr. Mary Mobley Drs. Stephen & Barbara Munk David R. & Sylvia Nelson Mr. & Mrs. Albert T. Nelson, Jr. Patricia & Henry Nickol Mr. & Mrs. David E. Nims Mariam C. Noland & James A. Kelly Mr & Mrs. Arthur T. O’Reilly Mr. Joseph Orley Mr. & Mrs. Richard G. Partrich Donald & Jo Anne Petersen Fund Mrs. Helen F. Pippin dso.org

Dr. Glenda D. Price Mr. & Mrs. Fred Secrest Elaine & Michael Serling Mr. & Mrs. Leonard W. Smith Mr. & Mrs. S. Kinnie Smith, Jr. John J. Solecki Renate & Richard Soulen Ms. Wanda & Ms. Eugenia Staszewski Professor Calvin L. Stevens Stephen & Phyllis Strome Amanda Van Dusen & Curtis Blessing Mr. & Mrs. Edward Wagner Ms. Patricia Walker Mr. & Mrs. Jonathan T. Walton Janis & William M. Wetsman / The Wetsman Foundation Dr. Amy M. Horton & Dr. Kim Allan Williams Mrs. Beryl Winkelman David & Bernadine Wu Ms. June Wu Dr. & Mrs. Robert E. Wurtz Mr. John E. Young & Ms. Victoria Keys Mrs. Rita J. Zahler Milton & Lois Zussman

Giving of $2,500 and more Anonymous Richard & Jiehan Alonzo Dr. Lourdes V. Andaya Dr. & Mrs. Ali-Reza R. Armin Mr. & Mrs. Robert Armstrong Mr. David Assemany & Mr. Jeffery Zook Mr. & Mrs. John Axe Mr. J. Addison Bartush Mr. & Mrs. Martin S. Baum Mary Beattie Mrs. Harriett Berg Mrs. John G. Bielawski Mrs. Kathleen Block Dr. & Mrs. Rudrick E. Boucher Mr. & Mrs. S. Elie Boudt Gwen & Richard Bowlby Mr. Anthony F. Brinkman Mr. Scott Brooks Mr. H. William Burdett, Jr. Dr. Carol S. Chadwick & Mr. H. Taylor Burleson Philip & Carol Campbell Mr. & Mrs. William N. Campbell Dr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Carson Jack Perlmutter & Daniel Clancy Gloria & Fred Clark Dr. Thomas Clark Jack, Evelyn & Richard Cole Family Foundation Dr. & Mrs. Charles G. Colombo Dr. & Mrs. Ivan Louis Cotman Thomas & Melissa Cragg Ms. Mary Rita Cuddohy Mr. & Mrs. Colin Darke Barbara A. David Ms. Barbara Diles Adel & Walter Dissett Mr. & Mrs. Mark Domin Ms. Judith Doyle

Eugene & Elaine Driker Paul & Peggy Dufault Mr. & Mrs. Robert Dunn Jeanne Bakale & Roger Dye Edwin & Rosemarie Dyer Dr. Leo & Mrs. Mira Eisenberg Dr. & Mrs. A. Bradley Eisenbrey Ms. Jennifer Engle Mr. & Mrs. John M. Erb Mary Sue & Paul E. Ewing Stephen Ewing Mr. David Faulkner Mr. & Mrs. Oscar Feldman Ms. Carol A. Friend & Mr. Mark T. Kilbourn Mr. & Mrs. Daniel E. Frohardt-Lane Lynn & Bharat Gandhi Mr. & Mrs. Paul Ganson Mr. William Y. Gard Mrs. Gale Girolami Dr. & Mrs. Theodore Golden Mr. Nathaniel Good Dr. & Mrs. Steven Grekin Mr. Jeffrey Groehn Sylvia & Ed Hagenlocker Alice Berberian Haidostian Dr. Algea Hale Mr. Kenneth Hale Mr. & Mrs. Tim & Rebecca Haller Robert & Elizabeth Hamel Mary & Preston Happel Randall L. & Nancy Caine Harbour Mr. Scott I. Harrison & Ms. Angela M. Detlor Cheryl A. Harvey Dr. & Mrs. Gerhardt Hein Mr. & Mrs. Demar W. Helzer Dr. Deanna & Mr. David B. Holtzman Jack & Anne Hommes Mr. Matthew Howell & Mrs. Julie Wagner Mr. F. Robert Hozian Jean Wright & Joseph L. Hudson, Jr. Fund Mr. & Mrs. Christopher Ilitch Mr. John S. Johns Mr. George Johnson Lenard & Connie Johnston Mrs. Ellen D. Kahn Martin & Cis Maisel Kellman The Stephanie & Frederic Keywell Family Fund Mrs. Frances King Mr. & Mrs. Ludvik F. Koci Ms. Rozanne Kokko Mr. & Mrs. Kosch Dr. Harry & Katherine Kotsis Robert C. & Margaret A. Kotz Mr. & Mrs. Harold Kulish Mr. & Mrs. James A. Kurz David & Maria Kuziemko Joyce LaBan Ms. Anne T. Larin Dolores & Paul Lavins Dr. Klaudia Plawny-Lebenbom & Mr. Michael Lebenbom Allan S. Leonard Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Lewis Mr. & Mrs. Robert Liggett Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Lile Dr. & Mrs. Charles Lucas

Mrs. Sandra MacLeod Mr. & Mrs. Charles W. Manke, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Patrick Mansfield Dr. Peter McCann & Kathleen L. McKee Mr. & Mrs. Alonzo McDonald Alexander & Evelyn McKeen Dr. & Mrs. Donald A. Meier Mr. & Mrs. David Mendelson Mr. Roland Meulebrouck Mrs. Thomas Meyer Thomas & Judith Mich Bruce & Mary Miller Mr. & Mrs. Leonard G. Miller Mr. Stephen & Dr. Susan Molina Eugene & Sheila Mondry Foundation Mr. Lane J. Moore Mr. & Mrs. Craig R. Morgan Ms. Florence Morris Mr. Frederick Morsches Mr. Bruce Murphy Joy & Allan Nachman Edward & Judith Narens Denise & Mark Neville Mr. & Mrs. Geoffrey W. Newcomb Joanna P. Moris & Arthur A. Nitzsche Mr. & Mrs. Stanley Nycek David & Andrea Page Mrs. Sophie Pearlstein Dr. & Mrs. Claus Petermann Mr. Charles L. Peters Mrs. Bernard E. Pincus Mr. & Mrs. Jack Pokrzywa Ms. Judith Polk Mrs. Anna Mary Postma Mr. & Mrs. William Powers The Priester Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Nicolas I. Quintana Ms. Michele Rambour Mr. & Mrs. Richard Rappleye Drs. Stuart & Hilary Ratner Drs. Yaddanapudi Ravindranath & Kanta Bhambhani Carol & Foster Redding Mr. & Mrs. David Redfield Ms. Emily J. Reid Mr. Hugh T. Reid Dr. Claude & Mrs. Sandra Reitelman Denise Reske Norman & Dulcie Rosenfeld Mr. & Mrs. Robert B. Rosowski Mr. & Mrs. Hugh C. Ross Mrs. Lois V. Ryan Dr. Mark Saffer Dr. Hershel Sandberg Ruth & Carl Schalm Ms. Martha A. Scharchburg & Mr. Bruce Beyer Mr. & Mrs. Alan S. Schwartz Mr. Merton J. & Beverly Segal Mr. & Mrs. Herbert Shanbaum Dr. Les & Mrs. Ellen Siegel Robert & Coco Siewert Mr. & Mrs. William Sirois Drs. Daniel J. & Sophie Skoney William H. & Patricia M. Smith Dr. Gregory E. Stephens Mr. Clinton F. Stimpson, Jr. Dr. & Mrs. Charles D. Stocking Dr. & Mrs. Gerald Stollman Mr. & Mrs. Ray Stone

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / february 201 3

37


Mrs. Kathleen Straus & Mr. Walter Shapero David Szymborski & Marilyn Sicklesteel D. I. Tarpinian Shelley & Joel Tauber Alice & Paul Tomboulian Mr. & Mrs. L. W. Tucker Mr. & Mrs. Charles B. Van Dusen Mr. & Mrs. George C. Vincent Mr. & Mrs. William Waak Dr. & Mrs. Ronald W. Wadle Ann Kirk Warren Gary L. Wasserman & Charles A. Kashner Mr. Patrick Webster Mr. Herman W. Weinreich Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Weisberg Mr. Donald Wells Mr. & Mrs. John Whitecar Mr. & Mrs. Barry Williams Rissa & Sheldon Winkelman Dr. & Mrs. Max V. Wisgerhof II Mr. Jonathan Wolman & Mrs. Deborah Lamm Mrs. Judith G. Yaker

Giving of $1,500 and more

Dr. Alit Yousif & Mr. Kirk Yousif

Adele & Michael M. Glusac

Anonymous Mr. & Mrs. Ismael Ahmed Mr. & Mrs. Thomas V. Angott, Sr. Dr. & Mrs. Gary S. Assarian Mr. John Barbes Mr. Mark Bartnik & Ms. Sandra J. Collins Ms. Margaret Beck Mr. & Mrs. G. Peter Blom Ms. Jane Bolender Mr. & Mrs. J. Bora Don & Marilyn Bowerman Carol A. & Stephen A. Bromberg Mr. & Mrs. Bowden V. Brown Ronald & Lynda Charfoos Fred J. Chynchuk Mr. & Mrs. John Courtney Dr. & Mrs. Lawrence Crane Mr. & Mrs. Irving Dworkin Mr. Charles Dyer Mrs. Kathryn Ellis Mr. & Mrs. Howard O. Emorey Mr. & Mrs. Anthony C. Fielek Drs. Conrad & Lynda Giles

Mr. Donald Guertin

Mr. Randall Pappal

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Hage

Noel & Patricia Peterson

Erie-St Clair Clinic

Mrs. Diane Piskorowski

Mr. Lee V. Hart & Mr. Charles L. Dunlap

Hope & Larry Raymond

Mr. Max B. Horton, Jr.

Barbara Gage Rex

Mr. Frank E. Hull

Mrs. Ann Rohr

Mrs. Harriett H. Hull

Mrs. Ann Rosenthal

Ms. Elizabeth Ingraham

Mr. & Mrs. Gerald F. Ross

Irving & Diane Keene

Mr. & Mrs. George Roumell

Dr. Jean Kegler

Mr. R. Desmond Rowan

Mr. & Mrs. Harvey Kleiman

Mr. & Mrs. R. Hamilton Schirmer

Beverly & Tom Klimko

Mr. & Mrs. James H. Sherman

Mr. Julius Kusey Mrs. Willard V. Lampe

Mr. Barry Siegel & Mrs. Debra Bernstein-Siegel

Ms. Sandra S. Lapadot

Mr. & Mrs. Andreas H. Steglich

Mrs. Stephanie Latour

Dr. & Mrs. Howard Terebelo

Max Lepler & Rex L. Dotson

Mr. & Mrs. John P. Tierney

Mr. Gregory Liposky

Barbara & Stuart Trager

Mr. Robert Lorenz

Ms. Janet Weir

Ms. Alice M. MacDermott

Mr. Marshall Widick

Ms. Mary Makulski

Rudolf E. Wilhelm Fund

John E. & Marcia Miller

Beverly & Hadley Wine

Mr. & Mrs. Richard L. Norling

Ms. Gail M. Zabowski

Dr. & Mrs. Dongwhan Oh

Mark & Allison Zeglis

Mr. Joshua F. Opperer

Frank & Ruth Zinn

Legacy Donors Members of THE Musical LEGACY Society

The Detroit Symphony Orchestra Board of Directors is pleased to honor and recognize the Musical Legacy Society. These patrons, friends and subscribers have named the Orchestra in their estate plans. For information about making a bequest or other planned gift to the DSO, please contact the Office of Patron and Institutional Advancement at 313.576.5460. Doris L. Adler Dr. & Mrs. William C. Albert Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Allesee Dr. Lourdes V. Andaya Dr. Agustin & Nancy Arbulu Sally & Donald Baker Mr. & Mrs. Lee Barthel Lillian & Don Bauder Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Benton Michael & Christine Berns Mrs. Art Blair Robert T. Bomier Gwen & Richard Bowlby Mrs. J. Brownfain Dr. & Mrs. Victor J. Cervenak Eleanor A. Christie Mary F. Christner Lois & Avern Cohn Mrs. Robert Comstock Dorothy M. Craig Mr. & Mrs. John Cruikshank Ms. Leslie Devereaux John Diebel Jeanne Bakale & Roger Dye Ms. Bette J. Dyer Edwin & Rosemarie Dyer Mr. & Mrs. Robert G. Eidson

38

Marianne Endicott Ms. Dorothy Fisher Marjorie S. Fisher Emory M. Ford, Jr.† Endowment Dr. Saul & Mrs. Helen Forman Barbara Frankel & Ronald Michalak Herman & Sharon Frankel Rema Frankel† Jane French Dr. & Mrs. Byron P. Georgeson Mr. & Mrs. Joe & Lois Gilmore Ruth & Al Glancy Dorothy & Herbert† Graebner Donald Ray Haas† Donna & Eugene Hartwig Dr. & Mrs. Gerhardt Hein Ms. Nancy B. Henk Mr. & Mrs. Thomas N. Hitchman Mr. & Mrs. Richard N. Holloway David & Sheri Jaffa Mr. & Mrs. Thomas H. Jeffs II Lenard & Connie Johnston Drs. Anthony & Joyce Kales Faye & Austin Kanter Jacob† & Rachel† Kellman June K. Kendall Ms. Selma Korn & Ms. Phyllis Korn†

Perform ance / Vol . X X I / february 201 3

Ms. Selma Korn Dimitri & Suzanne Kosacheff Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Krolikowski Mr. Jim LaTulip Ann C. Lawson Allan S. Leonard Mr. Lester H. London Harold & Elizabeth Lundquist Roberta Maki John M. Malone, M.D. Mr. Glenn Maxwell Rhoda A. Milgrim John E. & Marcia Miller Mr. & Mrs. Jerald A. Mitchell Mr. & Mrs. L. William Moll Mr. & Mrs. Craig R. Morgan Mr. Dale J. Pangonis Ms. Mary W. Parker Paul M. Huxley & Cynthia J. Pasky Mrs. Sophie Pearlstein Mr. & Mrs. Wesley R. Pelling Mrs. Bernard E. Pincus Ms. Christina Pitts Mrs. Robert Plummer Mr. & Mrs. Peter T. Ponta Fair & Steven Radom Mr. & Mrs. Douglas J. Rasmussen

Mr. & Mrs. Lloyd E. Reuss Barbara Gage Rex Ms. Marianne Reye Katherine D. Rines Bernard & Eleanor Robertson Jack & Aviva Robinson Dr. Margaret M. Ryan Mr. & Mrs. Fred Secrest Mr. Terrence Smith Mr. & Mrs. Walter C. Stuecken Mr. & Mrs. Alexander Suczek Caroline & Richard Torley Mr. Edward Tusset Mr. David Patria & Ms. Barbara A. Underwood Mrs. Jane Van Dragt Mrs. Richard C. Van Dusen Mr. & Mrs. Melvin VanderBrug Mr. & Mrs. George C. Vincent Mr. & Mrs. Keith C. Weber Mr. & Mrs. John F. Werner Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Wilhelm Mr. & Mrs. James A. Williams Mr. & Mrs. Robert S. Williams Ms. Barbara Wojtas Walter P. & Elizabeth B. Work Dr. & Mrs. Clyde Wu Ms. Andrea L. Wulf dso.org


Corporate Supporters of the DSO $500,000 and more

PVS Chemicals, Inc.

Jim Nicholson

CEO, PVS Chemicals

$200,000 and more

Gerard M. Anderson

Fred Shell

President, Chairman and CEO, President, DTE Energy Corporation DTE Energy Foundation

Alan Mullaly

President & CEO, Ford Motor Company

James Vella

President, Ford Motor Company Fund

Daniel F. Akerson Chairman and CEO General Motors Corporation

Vivian Pickard President General Motors Foundation

Tetsuo Iwamura

President and CEO, American Honda Motor Co.

$100,000 and more

The Chrysler Foundation

Brands of Chrysler Group LLC

Timothy Wadhams President and CEO, MASCO Corporation

Melonie Colaianne

Gregg Steinhafel

President, Masco Corporation Foundation

Chairman, President and CEO, Target Corporation

$20,000 and more Adobe Systems Incorporated Scott Shuptrine Interiors

Amerisure Insurance Comcast Cable Midwest Honigman Miller Schwartz Cohn $5,000 and more

BASF Corporation Contractors Steel Company Conway MacKenzie Deloitte Denso International America, Inc. Dykema

dso.org

Greektown Casino-Hotel Macy’s MGM Grand Detroit Casino

R.L. Polk and Co. Somerset Collection Talmer Bank and Trust

$10,000 and more KPMG LLP REDICO St. John Providence Health System

Telemus Capital Partners, LLC Warner Norcross and Judd LLP UHY LLP

Flagstar Bank Lake Trust Credit Union Meritor St. Joseph Mercy Health System Steinway Piano Gallery of Detroit UBS

$1,000 and more Avis Ford, Inc. Burton-Share Management Company Dickinson Wright PLLC DuMouchelles Art Galleries Co. Fifth Third Bank Hare Express, Inc. Health Alliance Plan Lakeside Ophthalmology Center

Meadowbrook Insurance Group Michigan First Credit Union Midwest Health Center, P.C. Save Our Symphony Severstal North America Taylor Ballet Americana The ITB Group, Ltd. The Village Club Welker Bearing Company, Inc.

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / february 201 3

39


Blockbuster Fund

Gifts Received between September 1, 2011 and January 1, 2013 Gifts to the Detroit Symphony Orchestra Blockbuster Fund support those exceptional projects, partnerships and performances that boldly advance the DSO’s mission “to be a leader in the world of classical music, embracing and inspiring individuals, families and communities through unsurpassed musical experiences.” Blockbuster gifts fund defining initiatives that are outside the annual budget such as touring, “Live from Orchestra Hall” webcasts, certain community engagement and education partnerships, and capital and technology infrastructure. Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Allesee Mr. & Mrs. Abraham Amit Dr. Lourdes Andaya Mr. & Mrs. Lee Barthel Ms. Cecilia Benner Ms. Tanya A. Bennett Mr. & Mrs. Seth P. Berman Dr. Victor Bloom & Dr. Shirley Bloom Bloomfield Hills Country Club Mr. & Mrs. Harold Blumenstein Mr. & Mrs. John A. Boll, Sr. Mr. Gregory Bonus Mr. & Mrs. Charles Burke Mr. & Mrs. David Burris Dr. & Mrs. Todd Campbell Mr. William V. Campbell Mr. Stephen Case Mr. & Mrs. Francois Castaing Mr. & Mrs. Thomas C. Cook Mr. & Mrs. William S. Cox Mr. & Mrs. Raymond M. Cracchiolo Mr. & Mrs. Peter D. Cummings Mr. Mark A. Davidoff & Ms. Marjorie E. Dunn Detroit 300 Conservancy Ms. Ingrid Eidnes Mr. & Mrs. Jack Elder Mrs. Marianne Endicott Mr. Christopher Felcyn Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Feld Mr. & Mrs. Christian Fenton Mr. & Mrs. Alfred J. Fisher III Mrs. Ruth Frank Mr. & Mrs. Stanley Frankel Mr. & Mrs. Stuart Frankel

Ms. Joann Freeman Mr. Kareem George Mr. & Mrs. Alfred R. Glancy III Ms. Laurie Goldman Ms. Cozette Grabb Mr. & Mrs. W Grabb Mr. & Mrs. Morton E. Harris Dr. Joseph Healey Ms. Amy Higgins Mr. & Mrs. Ronald M. Horwitz Mr. & Mrs. Keneth Hottmann Mr. & Mrs. Shyr-ing Hu Mr. & Mrs. Julius J. Huebner Mr. Michael Jalving John S. & James L. Knight Foundation Mrs. Chacona Johnson Rattner Katz Foundation Dr. & Mrs. William H. Krieg Mr. & Mrs. Richard P. Kughn Ms. Emily Lamoreaux Drs. Raymond V. Landes & Melissa McBrien Mrs. Bonnie Larson League of American Orchestras Mr. & Dr. Michael Lebenbom Lee Hecht Harrison Mr. & Mrs. Cheng Chong Lee Mr. Harry Lee & Mrs. Sophie Wu Lee Mr. Holden Lee Mr. H. F. Lenfest Dr. & Mrs. Kim K. Lie Mr. & Mrs. Stuart Lum Mr. & Mrs. Malcolm S. MacDonald Ms. Nancy Malitz & Mr. Lawrence B. Johnson

Tribute Gifts

Gifts received between November 1, 2012 and January 1, 2013

Tribute Gifts to the Detroit Symphony Orchestra are made to honor accomplishments, celebrate occasions, and pay respect in memory or reflection. These gifts support current season projects, partnerships, and performances such as DSO concerts, education programs, free community concerts and family programing. For information about making a Tribute Gift, please call 313.576.5114 or dso.org/tribute. In Memory of Ms. Sara Berman Mr. Ronald Michalak & Mrs. Barbara Frankel In Memory of Irving & Dorothy Burke Mr. Joel Brown In Honor of Mrs. Harold L. Frank Mr. & Mrs. Stanley D. Schwartz In Memory of Mr. Jim Garavaglia Mr. & Mrs. Thomas G. Taylor In Memory of Mrs. Rachel Kellman Dickinson Wright PLLC Mr. & Mrs. Robert Dunsky Mr. Rohn Goldman Mr. & Mrs. Harold Josephson Dr. & Mrs. Dennis Kash Mrs. Josephine Kessler Ms. Susan Konop Mr. & Mrs. George Nyman Mr. & Mrs. Henry Wineman II In Honor of Mr. Harold Kulish Ms. Mary Dudley

40

In Honor of Ms. Joan Leininger Ms. Anna Pycior In Memory of Luben Masheff Dr. & Mrs. Bertrand Jacobs In Honor of Mr. James B. Nicholson Ms. Julie A. Clark In Memory of Ms. Nancy Obermayer Mrs. William Kohler In Memory of Ms. Laura Sarkesian Mr. & Mrs. Martin Danekind In Honor of Ms. Margaret Spear Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Wilbert In Memory of Jay C. & Dorothy Toboldt Mr. T Scott Henrichs In Memory of Dr. Charles Vortriede Ms. Tamika Mayes In Memory of Deborah Fleitz Mr. David Fleitz

Perform ance / Vol . X X I / february 201 3

Ms. Sue Marx Max M. & Marjorie S. Fisher Foundation, Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Richard C. McBrien Mr. & Mrs. Patrick McKeever Mr. & Mrs. Patrick G. McKeever Mr. Ronald Michalak & Mrs. Barbara Frankel Michigan Nonprofit Association Dr. & Mrs. H. C. Mighion Mr. & Mrs. Eugene A. Miller Mr. & Mrs. Philip L. Milstein Mr. & Mrs. Donald A. Mott Mr. & Mrs. Stuart Nelson Mr. & Mrs. James B. Nicholson Mr. & Mrs. James M. Nicholson Mr. James A. Kelly & Ms. Mariam A. Noland Dr. Anke Nolting Olympia Paraclassics Ms. Anne Parsons & Mr. Donald Dietz Mr. & Mrs. James Peabody Mrs. Marilyn Pincus Dr. Glenda D. Price Ms. Ruth Rattner Renaissance Charitable Foundation Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Lloyd E. Reuss Mr. & Mrs. Bernard I. Robertson Mr. & Mrs. Jack A. Robinson Mr. & Mrs. Saul Saulson Ms. Nancy Schlaff Mr. & Mrs. Alan E. Schwartz Mr. & Mrs. Larry Sherman

Ching Shung-Tu Dr. Tor Shwayder & Ms. Aimee Ergas Mr. Leonard Slatkin Mr. Todd Smith Mrs. June Songe Mr. Michael Spiegel Mr. & Mrs. Mark Stockhausen Strategic Staffing Solutions Mr. Hang Su Mrs. Betty Tang Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Teisan Mr. & Mrs. James Thompson Mr. & Mrs. Peter Thurber Ms. Doris Tong Mrs. Pat Tseng Dr. Kang-Lee Tu Ms. Liang-Ruey Tu Mr. Yuan-Po Tu Mr. & Mrs. Roy Vagelos Mrs. Barbara Van Dusen Mr. & Mrs. David G. Von Oeyen Mr. & Mrs. Craig von Seeger Mr. & Mrs. Arthur A. Weiss Mr. & Mrs. Jon Wilcox Mr. & Mrs. Jonathan J. Wilcox William M. Davidson Foundation Mr. & Mrs. R. Jamison Williams Mr. Paul & Karen Wingert Ms. Julie Wright Dr. & Mrs. Clyde Wu Drs. David M. & Bernadine Wu Mr. Hai-Xin Wu & Mrs. Zhihua Tang Ms. June Kar Ming Wu Mr. & Mrs. Roger Wu

Venture Fund

Gifts received between September 1, 2011 and January 1, 2013

Gifts to the Detroit Symphony Orchestra Venture Fund are contributions that support projects, partnerships and performances taking place in the current season. Venture gifts are generally onetime and non-renewable in nature and fund initiatives that are included in the annual budget such as DSO concerts, the Civic Youth Ensembles, certain community engagement and partnerships, and the DSO Presents and Paradise Jazz concert series. Venturists, $1,000+ Mr. & Mrs. Sherman C. Barton Estate of George W. Harrison Mr. & Mrs. Herman H. Frankel Ms. Deborah Miesel The Chrysler Foundation Donors Adult Learning Institute Mr. Frank L. Arnold Mr. William Black Mr. Timothy Campbell Mr. Christopher Cocozzoli Mr. William Colburn Mr. David P. Elledge Mr. Paul Feiten Mr. James Gogola Mr. Matthew Gravel Mr. Stephen Harmes

Mr. Tracy Hoffman Mr. Aaron Kabobel A. Kahokuolani Mr. David Lawrence Mr. Dwight Love Mr. Benjamin Malonis Lisa & Brian Meer Foundation Mr. Joseph A. Mook Mr. Phillip O’Jibway Mr. John Paquet Ms. Anne Parsons & Mr. Donald Dietz Mr. Alan Semonian Mr. Monty Sepetys Dr. Gregory Stephens R. M. Sulfridge Mr. Scott Szoke Mr. Donald L. Thomas Jr. Mr. Jeffrey Wilkinson Mr. Derek S. Zachariah

dso.org


Support from Foundations and Organizations

The Detroit Symphony Orchestra acknowledges and honors the following foundations and organizations for their contributions to support the Orchestra’s performances, education programming, and other annual operations of the organization. This honor roll reflects both fulfillments of previous commitments and new gifts during the period beginning September 1, 2011 through January 1, 2013. We regret the omission of gifts received after this print deadline.

$500,000 and more

Kresge Foundation Max M. & Marjorie S. Fisher Foundation Samuel & Jean Frankel Foundation William M. Davidson Foundation

$300,000 and more Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan McGregor Fund

$100,000 and more Ford Foundation Fred A. & Barbara M. Erb Family Foundation Hudson-Webber Foundation John S. & James L. Knight Foundation Michigan Nonprofit Association Detroit Symphony Orchestra Volunteer Council National Endowment for the Arts $50,000 and more DeRoy Testamentary Foundation $10,000 and more Alice Kales Hartwick Foundation Ann & Gordon Getty Foundation Eleanor & Edsel Ford Fund Henry Ford II Fund Max & Victoria Dreyfus Foundation Moroun Family Foundation Myron P. Leven Foundation

Oliver Dewey Marcks Foundation Philip & Elizabeth Filmer Memorial Charitable Trust Sage Foundation Sally Mead Hands Foundation State of Michigan (MCACA)

$5,000 and more Benson & Edith Ford Fund Mary Thompson Foundation Herbert & Elsa Ponting Foundation Young Woman’s Home Association The Lyon Family Foundation $2,500 and more Clarence & Jack Himmel Fund Gatewood Foundation, Inc. James & Lynelle Holden Fund

The Loraine & Melinese Reuter Foundation Sigmund & Sophie Rohlik Foundation

$1,000 and more Berry Foundation Charles M. Bauervic Foundation Drusilla Farwell Foundation Frank & Gertrude Dunlap Foundation Japan Business Society of Detroit Foundation

dso.org

Jennifer Howell Harding Foundation Samuel L. Westerman Foundation Tracy Foundation Village Club Foundation

Donor Spotlight

The National Endowment for the Arts

T

he Detroit Symphony Orchestra is proud to present its first Beethoven Festival in 35 years. The entire month of February 2013 will be dedicated to performing all nine Beethoven symphonies, along with other important symphonic and chamber works. Performances will take place at historic Orchestra Hall as well as in a variety of metro Detroit neighborhood venues, immersing the region of Southeast Michigan in the work of a master who has no doubt touched the lives of everyone, classical music fan or not. Funding for this significant project comes, in part, through grants such as those awarded by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). The NEA was established in 1965 as an independent agency of the federal government. To date, the NEA has awarded more than $4 billion to support artistic excellence, creativity, and innovation for the benefit of individuals and communities. The NEA extends its work through partnerships with state arts agencies, local leaders, other federal agencies, and the philanthropic sector. In March 2012, the NEA received 1,509 eligible applications requesting more than $74 million in funding through the “Art Works” program. The 832 recommended NEA grants total $23.3 million, span 13 artistic disciplines and fields, and focus primarily on the creation of work and presentation of both new and existing works for the benefit of American audiences. Applications were reviewed by panels of outside experts convened by NEA staff and each project was judged on its artistic excellence and artistic merit. The DSO’s grant of $75,000 was among the highest awarded in Michigan. “The DSO’s Beethoven Festival allows us to look at this body of works in an intensive and comprehensive way. In addition to the performances of the symphonies, there will be ancillary events including lectures, chamber recitals and a presentation of the 32 piano sonatas,” said DSO Music Director Leonard Slatkin. “We are grateful to the NEA for helping to make this event possible.”

Perform ance / Vol . X XI / february 201 3

41


Upcoming events MONDAY

TUESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

DSO Neighborhood Series 1 Mozart and Haydn at Ford Center for the Performing Arts, Dearborn 10:45 a.m.

For tickets visit dso.org or call 313.576.5111

OH Orchestra Hall MB Music Box AH Allesee Hall

Webcast

ppa elibom oG ot OSD eht no ro evil/gro.osd ta enilno hctaW

ynohpmyS ”nagrO“ ’snëaS-tniaS .m.a 54:01 ,11 yaM ,yadirF

WEDNESDAY

March

sunday

DSO Neighborhood Series Mozart and Haydn at Kirk in the Hills, Bloomfield Hills; 8 p.m.

2

DSO Pops Series ABBA 8 p.m. OH

snruteR ivräJ .m.p 3 ,1 lirpA ,yadnuS

DSO 3 Neighborhood Series Mozart and Haydn at Grosse Pointe Memorial Church; 3 p.m.

4

emoR fo seniP ehT ynohpmyS ”dlroW weN“ s’kářovD .m.a 54:01 ,81 yaM ,yadirF .m.p 8 ,12 lirpA ,yadrutaS noitibihxE na ta serutciP .m.p 3 ,6 yaM ,yadnuS

DSO Pops Series ABBA 3 p.m. OH

5

6

DSO 7 Neighborhood Series Beethoven and Mozart at Congregation Shaarey Zedek, Southfield 7:30 p.m. Teddy Abrams, conductor David Buck, flute

ABBA

Civic & Education 10 Civic Family Experience Civic Youth Ensembles 1-6 p.m.

11

12

13

DSO Classical Series Rite of Spring Centennial! Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, conductor 7:30 p.m. OH

14

DSO Classical Series 8 Classical Roots James dePreist, conductor 10:45 a.m. OH

ppa elibom oG ot OSD eht no ro evil/gro.osd ta enilno hctaW

ynohpmyS ”nagrO“ ’snëaS-tniaS .m.a 54:01 ,11 yaM ,yadirF

DSO Classical Series 9 Classical Roots James dePreist, conductor 8 p.m. OH

snruteR ivräJ .m.p 3 ,1 lirpA ,yadnuS

Civic & Education Song Forgotten Civic Wind Symphony with Civic Chamber Music 7 p.m. OH emoR fo seniP ehT ynohpmyS ”dlroW weN“ s’kářovD .m.a 54:01 ,81 yaM ,yadirF .m.p 8 ,12 lirpA ,yadrutaS noitibihxE na ta serutciP .m.p 3 ,6 yaM ,yadnuS

Civic & Education 15 Bartók’s Concerto for Orchestra Civic Orchestra with Civic Chamber Music Charles Burke, conductor 7 p.m. OH

DSO Classical Series Rite of Spring Centennial! Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, conductor 8 p.m. OH

16

ppa elibom oG ot OSD eht no ro evil/gro.osd ta enilno hctaW

Civic Jam Session at Cliff Bell’s 6 p.m.

ynohpmyS ”nagrO“ ’snëaS-tniaS .m.a 54:01 ,11 yaM ,yadirF

snruteR ivräJ .m.p 3 ,1 lirpA ,yadnuS

emoR fo seniP ehT ynohpmyS ”dlroW weN“ s’kářovD .m.a 54:01 ,81 yaM ,yadirF .m.p 8 ,12 lirpA ,yadrutaS noitibihxE na ta serutciP .m.p 3 ,6 yaM ,yadnuS

de Burgos DSO Presents St Patrick’s Day Celebration Robert White, tenor 3 p.m. OH

17

18

19

DSO Special Event Patron Appreciation 20 Concert 7:30 p.m. OH

21

16th Annual Sphinx Competition 2 p.m. OH

ppa elibom oG ot OSD eht no ro evil/gro.osd ta enilno hctaW

ynohpmyS ”nagrO“ ’snëaS-tniaS .m.a 54:01 ,11 yaM ,yadirF

Slatkin

snruteR ivräJ .m.p 3 ,1 lirpA ,yadnuS

emoR fo seniP ehT ynohpmyS ”dlroW weN“ s’kářovD .m.a 54:01 ,81 yaM ,yadirF .m.p 8 ,12 lirpA ,yadrutaS noitibihxE na ta serutciP .m.p 3 ,6 yaM ,yadnuS

DSO Pops Series 24 Monica Mancini at the Movies Monica Mancini, vocals 3 p.m. OH

Other Presenters WSU Mondays at The Max 7:30 p.m. MB

25

Mancini

26

27

DSO Pops Series 23 Monica Mancini at the Movies Monica Mancini, vocals 8 p.m. OH

Other Presenters Promusica: Richard Kogan 8:30 p.m. OH

28

29

30

Christian McBride, Dee Dee Bridgewater, Benny Green, Lewis Nash, Chris Potter & Ambrose Akinmusire OH

Christian McBride

DSO 4 Neighborhood Series Mozart’s “Jupiter” at Congregation Shaarey Zedek, Southfield Andrew Grams, conductor Karen Gomyo, violin 7:30 p.m.

DSO 5 Neighborhood Series Mozart’s “Jupiter” at Ford Center for the Performing Arts, Dearborn Andrew Grams, conductor Karen Gomyo, violin 10:45 a.m.

DSO Classical Series 6 Mozart’s “Jupiter” Andrew Grams, conductor Karen Gomyo, violin 8 p.m. OH

DSO Neighborhood Series 11 Handel’s Water Music at Berman Center, West Bloomfield Township Christopher Warren-Green, conductor Kenneth Thompkins, trombone 7:30 p.m.

12

DSO Neighborhood Series 13 Handel’s Water Music at Berman Center, at Kirk in the Hills, Bloomfield Hills; Christopher Warren-Green, conductor Kenneth Thompkins, trombone 8 p.m.

19

Tiny Tots Concert The Chenille Sisters 20 10 a.m. Young People’s Concert It’s A Small World 11 a.m. OH

Paradise Jazz Series Monterey Jazz Festival On Tour 8 p.m.

Civic & Education Civic Orchestra with Emanuel Ax 7:30 p.m. OH

1

2

3

8

9

10

15

16

17

April

31

Civic & Education Civic Jazz Live! 6:45 p.m. MB

DSO Pops Series 22 Monica Mancini at the Movies Monica Mancini, vocals 10:45 a.m. OH

Gomyo DSO 7 Neighborhood Series Mozart’s “Jupiter” at Seligman Performing Arts Center Andrew Grams, conductor Karen Gomyo, violin 3 p.m.

Other Presenters WSU Mondays at The Max 7:30 p.m. MB

DSO Neighborhood Series 14 Handel’s Water Music at Grosse Pointe Memorial Church Christopher Warren-Green, conductor Kenneth Thompkins, trombone 3 p.m. DSO Pops Series Red, Hot & Blues! Jeff Tyzik, conductor 3 p.m. OH

21

Host Your Event at Orchestra Hall or the Max M. Fisher Music Center

DSO Pops Series Red, Hot & Blues! Jeff Tyzik, conductor 10:45 a.m. OH

DSO Pops Series Red, Hot & Blues! Jeff Tyzik, conductor 8 p.m. OH Other Presenters WSU Mondays at The Max 7:30 p.m. MB

22

23

24

For rental information please call 313.576.5050 or visit dso.org/rent

DSO Classical Series 26 Lynn Harrell Plays Dvorˇák Leonard Slatkin, conductor 10:45 a.m. OH Civic & Education Civic Jazz Live! 6:45 p.m. Paradise Jazz Series Roy Haynes 8 p.m. OH

27


g{x j{|àÇxç g{x j{|àÇxç

“Best Pre and Post Theater Dinner Venue” Pre Menu and Post Prix Fixe“Best Theater $35Theater Dinner Venue” Available Pre/Post Theatre$35 Prix Fixeonly Theater Menu Available only Pre/Post Theatre First Course

Signature Shrimp Bisque Chef ’s Soup du Jour First Course Caesar Salad Organic Baby Greens

Signature Shrimp Bisque Chef ’s Soup du Jour Caesar Salad Organic Baby Greens

Entree Course Baked OrganicEntree Orange Glazed Chicken Course White Baked Garlic Organic Polenta,Orange GlazedGlazed Carrots, Organic Chicken Orange Marmalade White Garlic Polenta, Glazed Carrots, Organic Fresh FishOrange EntréeMarmalade • changes nightly Pan-Roasted Fresh Tenderloin Tips over Exotic Mushroom & Fish Entrée • changes nightly Asparagus Risotto Pan-Roasted Tenderloin Tips over Exotic Mushroom & Asparagus Risotto Ricotta & Spinach-stuffed Shells in Creamy Tomato Broth

Ricotta & Spinach-stuffed Shells in Creamy Tomato Broth

Final Course Final Course May be enjoyed post-event. May be enjoyed Housemade Ice Cream or Gelatopost-event. Chocolate Mousse Housemade Ice Cream or Gelato

Chocolate Mousse

Add Beverage Flight $15/person Add Beverage Flight $15/person Champagne Toast, Sommelier-selected Wine & Coffee, Champagne Toast, Sommelier-selected Wine & Coffee, Cappuccino or Espresso Cappuccino or Espresso

Detroit’s most romanticrestaurant restaurantnow now serving serving dinner Detroit’s most romantic dinner seven sevennights nightsa aweek week TheWhitney.com

TheWhitney.com

313-832-5700

313-832-5700

4421 Woodward Ave, Detroit

4421 Woodward Ave, Detroit


DSO Beethoven Festival program