Page 1

VOL IV

HOLIDAYS 2017

EATERY PULSE NEWS Fresh, focused, inspired, restaurant industry news and analysis.

HOLIDAY ISSUE Holiday cocktails Wharf D.C. restaurants Restaurant leasing in new developments

RESTAURANT TECH SUMMIT Restaurateurs of the Year D.C. restaurant documentary film Republic: 2017 Casual Brunch of the Year

magazine.eaterypulse.tv | twitter.com/eaterypulse

GEORGIAN SUPRA OPENS

2018 FOOD TRENDS Coffee best practices Gusto Farm to Street expands RAMW news and updates


Studio Partners provides referral services to reputable vendors and its consulting consortium. Restaurants and retailers can benefit greatly from these services. Obtain more information from the provider by navigating to arf.studiorestaurants.com. For questions regarding Studio Solutions or Studio Partners, contact solutions@studiorestaurants.com.


editor's letter

swizzle. There’s something very special about the holiday

season and increase sales opportunity at the

season. For many, it’s a time to take stock in

same time. It's a good time to continue or start

family and friends as we honor deep-rooted

email marketing programs, too. We have some

traditions. At the same time, we can reflect on the

tips near the end of this magazine issue.

blessings of the current year, eagerly awaiting the opportunities arriving with the beginning of the

What could be a better way than to take stock in

new year. Restaurateurs see the season as an

what we have than to celebrate what is coming?

opportunity to welcome new customers and also

We’re proud to announce our second digital

celebrate the season with their regulars. There’s a

magazine label for the Washington, D.C. area in

lot of opportunity to use the season to ring up

swizzle, debuting in January, and its

sales and make the season all the merrier. Many

accompanying video show. We’re also wrapping

restaurants are making the holidays more

up Season One of Eatery Pulse TV, turning our

convenient with catering, private dining events

attention to our documentary film series. We’ve

and prepared meals to go.

already begun planning this documentary series (catch the update on page 53), filming first

Gift cards and e-gifts help set up the upcoming

in D.C., and in so doing, paying tribute to the

slow months well, and they’ll be abundant, too.

restaurateurs who helped the local, Metro-D.C.

There are so many ways that restaurateurs can

industry come of age here and enter an elite

help customers manage the stress of the

group of cities.

3 | EATERY PULSE NEWS


Along with the season of giving, the spirit of giving yields bigger opportunities for us and the local restaurant industry. We launched new sponsorship and advertising programs. Now, each new ad or

RICK ZAMBRANO  EXECUTIVE EDITOR

sponsorship will trigger a scholarship stipend that can be accessed by current and future restaurant employees enrolled in an accredited hospitality or foodservice management curriculum. We’re very excited to start giving back now that we’re past our “start-up phase.” We are seeking other like-minded organizations to help us strategize how we can increase both scholarships and participation. Please see our media kit and our new advertising guide here: http://vendors.eaterypulse.tv

ASHLEY MCCARTY  EDITORIAL DESIGN CONSULTANT SEAN COOPER    DIRECTOR, EATERY PULSE TV MATTHEW T. ROBINSON   PHOTOGRAPHER

ANTHONY COPPOLA MAX TESTA ROSHAN THOMAS BRANDY MASKELL

We constantly find news ways to help restaurant

CONTRIBUTING AND         

operators in the D.C. area: Eatery Pulse TV recently

EATERY PULSE WRITERS

created shorter-format news shows and in-sourced the talent management for its series. By working directly with local D.C. talent, we share unique opportunties with local personalities and aspiring, young actors. These new scales of efficiency keep our news programming free to foodservice professionals.

Eatery Pulse News Media’s primary goal is to become the go-to information resource for restaurateurs in the Washington, D.C.-MarylandVirginia market. We are all about increasing access to news, insights and best practices for independent and chain restaurants, while informing and investing in tomorrow’s restaurateurs. Eatery Pulse is creating a fresh, focused and inspired source of restaurant industry

Also, we are thrilled that Eatery Pulse News is on pace to hit its readership goals by June 2018. We couldn’t have done this without our avid fans & readers and industry supporters. We sincerely

news, while donating a portion of sponsorship and advertising revenues to industry scholarship. Eatery Pulse News is published and available online and on the ISSUU digital news platform. This restaurant industry trade publication is

appreciate your continued support, and the entire

dedicated to the hard-working restaurateurs who

team wishes you a safe and happy holiday season.

are making D.C. a dynamic and top food

Rick Zambrano

Rick Zambrano EXECUTIVE EDITOR

destination and written for the benefit of local foodservice professionals. Eatery Pulse News magazine is available at http://holidaymagazine.eaterypulse.tv  Eatery Pulse News, Swizzle. and Eatery Pulse TV are part of Eatery Pulse News Media, a Crown Rio Venture. Studio EP is our direct-services platform.

Residing in the Washington, D.C. area, Rick Zambrano is a marketing and menu management consultant, executive editor of Eatery Pulse News and Swizzle magazine, and producer of Eatery Pulse TV for foodservice operators in the DC-MD-VA market. As a trend analyst, research editor and writer, he developed a strong understanding of today’s most meaningful foodservice and food trends, working with research tools, and collaboratively with topical experts, forensic specialists and tend watchers.

SUBSCRIPTIONS: SUBSCRIPTIONS@EATERYPULSE.NET SALES: SALES@EATERYPULSE.NET

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2017 ISSUE COVER PHOTO: SUPRA'S GROW A PEAR COCKTAIL. THS PAGE: KHINKALI SOUP DUMPLINGS AT SUPRA. PHOTO CREDIT: ANDREW PROPP.


contents 06 WHARF D.C. The waterfront restaurant scene is making The Wharf D.C. the place to see and be seen

12 NEW DEVELOPMENT LEASING Careful lease planning can make the newest developments profitable and top destinations for restaurants

14 RESTAURANT TECH SUMMIT

09 SUPRA OPENS

A high-powered panel explored the power and future of the restaurant POS

19 HOLIDAY COCKTAIL TRENDS The season brings a variety of ingredients and techniques to quench the thirst of local imbibers

21 BREWING COFFEE EXCELLENCE Local eateries and roasters offer up best practices and key ideas

27 FOOD AND DINING TRENDS '18 The predictions and forward-looking insights for 2018 have started rolling in

46 CAVA RAPIDLY RISING 17 GUSTO EXPANDS

The RAMMYS Restaurateurs of the Year continue their breakneck expansion


WHARF D.C. OPENS HOT RESTAURANTS, BARS AT WATER'S EDGE BECKON BY ROSHAN THOMAS

REQUIN PHOTO CREDIT: REQUIN

A

fter the whirlwind Wharf grand opening at the beginning of October, residents of the DMV (D.C.-Md.-Va.) area finally have an opportunity to experience the unique offerings of this three-year, multibillion dollar development project. Now, three weeks later, as crowds of visitors begin to subside, restaurateurs may also be turning their attention to their core market: residents of the Wharf’s residential properties and surrounding neighborhoods. Among the many diverse dining options present across the 24 acres of newly-redeveloped land, here is a profile of some that have been gaining the most attention: Kith and Kin In a highly-anticipated comeback, Top Chef alumna Kwame Onwuachi’s second restaurant in the area opened in late-October in the new InterContinental Hotel. Paying homage to Onwuachi’s African, Caribbean, and Creole roots, the 96-seat restaurant showcases cuisine from these regions of the world in dishes such as tuna kitfu, honeynut squash veloute, and jollof rice. Kith and Kin is treating patrons to a unique atmosphere to go along with its one-of-a-kind menu, with sweeping views of the 6 | EATERY PULSE NEWS

waterfront visible from nearly all corners of the restaurant. Those looking to host events will also be able to do so courtesy of the 30-seat private dining room or one of the many event spaces available in the hotel. Kith and Kin is open weekdays from 6:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. and weekends from 6:30 a.m. until 11 p.m. Del Mar Fabio and Maria Trabocchi are no strangers to D.C. fine dining. The talented couple behind the hugely popular local eateries, Casa Luca, Fiola, and Fiola Mare, are adding to their collection of prime eats in prime locations with Del Mar, the newest upscale Spanish eatery to hit the Wharf. The restaurant is currently open for full service, but as an incentive to new customers, is offering 10% off bills until November 5 while its kitchen and waitstaff are fully trained. To keep things interesting, Del Mar offers a “sunset menu” from 2:30 p.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Sunday, that features an assortment of cocktails, tapas, and everyone’s favorite, paella. Other highlights from the menu include a housemade chorizo burger topped with crispy calamari and spicy aioli, the “Maria,” a three-course, low-calorie tasting adventure, and a Fall chestnut soup with jumbo lump crab and a sherry cappuccino.


Requin

seat waterfront patio that will open in the spring.

The latest jewel by renowned D.C. restaurateur,

Until then, they can pass away the cool months

Mike Isabella, and famed executive chef, Michael

to come in front of the sprawling public fire pit

Rafidi, opened in late-October and is bringing

with hot cocktails on the upcoming menu.

visitors impressive and recognizable French dishes—such as tuna tartare, foie gras, and

Whiskey Charlie

bouillabaisse—only this time, completely

As the first rooftop bar to hit the Wharf, Whiskey

revamped to offer incredible flavor profiles and

Charlie will offer cocktails with a view for

experiences. Take, for example, the lobster

customers that are willing to wait until doors

thermidor. Substituting brandied créme fraîche for

open in November. The bar will be located on the

the traditional heavy cream and coral beurre blanc

roof of the brand new 10-story Canopy by Hilton

for the melted butter topping, the dish becomes a

and boast over 2,000 square feet of intimate

flavor bombshell, reimagined by Rafidi’s

luxury. Featuring an interior lounge with

mastermind in a way you never thought possible.

porcelain and metallic tile finishes, an expansive

SOME HEALTHY CHANGE

fire pit with comfy seating, and 360-degree views

Adding to the restaurant’s impressiveness is the

of the surrounding area, Whiskey Charlie aims to

fact that it is the only stand-alone establishment

be everyone’s new favorite hangout spot. Aiming

on the Wharf development. Local residents of the

for an opening November 17, the bar will keep

Incanto and The Channel apartments will want

eager patrons updated on its website and

to come back year-round to hang out at the 40-

Facebook page.

WHISKEY CHARLIE , WHARF D.C. RENDERING PHOTO CREDIT: WHISKEY CHARLIE


THIS ISÂ YOUR MAGAZINE, TELLING r u o y e r ' YOUR STORY We send your news & events to

n o i t a m infor

tips@eaterypulse.net

d n e S . m r o f t a pl . s e i r o t s r u o y us

EATERY PULSE NEWS


PHOTO CREDIT: ANDREW PROPP

RESTAURANT OPENING

GEORGIAN SUPRA DEBUTS, UNVEILS SILK ROADINFLUENCED MENU

T

        he buzz has been growing on the opening of Supra on 11th                  Street in Northwest, Washington, D.C., bringing the traditions              and dishes from the Republic of Georgia. From Georgian Embassy fame and 25-years of experience, Chef Malkhaz Maisashvili will be overseeing the culinary creativity at the restaurant. Supra, slated for a November 7 opening, will seat 136 diners and have many design aspects and accents reflective of Georgian life.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 11


WE'RE ALWAYS WHERE YOU WANT US TO BE, COVERING WHAT IS IMPORTANT TO YOU.

EATERY PULSE NEWS and we've just begun! NEWS AND STORIES: La Puerta Verde, Roti, The Little Beet, Protein Bar, Himitsu, CPK, The Dabney, Brookland's Finest, DC Brau, Denizens Brewing Co., Big Oyster Brewing, Astro Donuts & Fried Chicken, Beefsteak, Arroz, Mike Isabella Concepts, Chop't, Sweetgreen, Rasa, Hazel, Gringos & Mariachis, Cava, Bindaas, IcyCode, PassionFish Bethesda, Kapnos, Barrel, Hank's Oyster Bar, Doi Moi, Lil'B Coffee and Eatery, MacNac Group, Social Restaurants Group, Barley Mac, Gusto Farm to Street, Compass Coffee, Bourbon Coffee, Barley Mac, Honeygrow, Kizuna, Whiskey Charlie, Requin, Del Mar, Kith and Kin, Snap Kitchen...

FORTUNE 500-CALIBER INSIGHTS: L.E.K. Consulting, Technomic, American Express Surveys, AlixPartners, Baum+Whiteman, Packaged Facts, Culinary Tides, Brewers Association, Fast Casual Executive Summit, Plant-Based Association, Beverage Marketing, Restaurant Association of Metropolitan Washington, GiftRocker, Revel Systems, National Restaurant Association, Trendystia Consulting, Beyond Payments, CohnReznick, Presenture, IFIC, ACF, ChowNow...

EATERY PULSE NEWS | 34


Modern art will be displayed from Tbilisi (White

The wine will be sourced from well-known and

Studio), Moscow (Petrovka Art Studio), and D.C.

family-owned brands, including Orgo, Pheasant’s

(Schwa Design).

Tears and Naotari. Cocktails will take on unique twist, but reflect Georgian tradition. The Chacha

Expect the menu to tap a lot of flavors that are

Sour features Georgian brandy, lemon juice, egg

central to Georgian cuisine, particularly reflecting

whites, and Angostura bitters. For a seasonal

Mediterranean influence and Silk Road maritime

indulgence, diners will sip away at the “Grow a

and travel routes integral to Eurasia’s history.

Pear,” which mixes Georgian sparkling

Co-owners Jonathan and Laura Nelms bring a

Bagrationi wine with fresh pear, pear liqueur, and

fascination and admiration of Georgian culture

Angostura bitters.

that will serve the restaurant’s diners well. A Georgian street artist, Gagosh, is expected to

Initial hours of operation:

come to D.C. to paint a mural on the bar’s brick wall.

Sunday-Wednesday 5:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. Thursday-Saturday 5:00 p.m. to midnight.

On the menu, the kitchen and bar will draw from ingredients like walnuts and pomegranate, which

Supra, 1205 11th Street Northwest, Washington,

are reflective of Georgian cooking and

D.C. 20001

indigenous ingredients. Don't be surprised with the use of unique spices, such as dried marigold petals and blue fenugreek, in addition to tried and true tastes of the region. Small plate offerings include the following:

vegetable paté-like pkhali made of spinach and green beans Pkhali of beets minced with walnuts and Georgian spices gebjalia, a fresh cheese with mint served with tomato house-made kupati sausages with pomegranate and fried pickles grilled quail makvalshi with a savory blackberry sauce khinkali soup dumpling selections A sampling of communal meal options: whole grilled branzino with pomegranate sauce chanakhi lamb with seasonal vegetables chkmeruli.rich, garlicky chicken dish, CHACHA SOUR COCKTAIL PHOTO CREDIT: ANDREW PROPP


WHARF D.C.

RESTAURANT LEASE PLANNING FOR THE NEXT BIG DESTINATION BY ANTHONY COPPOLA

A

nyone who had crossed the 14th Street Bridge recently has undoubtedly noticed all of the construction cranes dotting the skyline. The largest development project in D.C. history is underway.

long run. Encourage your attorney to visit the area and get the lay of the land. It is essential to have a proper understanding of the surroundings because they can affect your business just like anything on your premises.

The D.C. Wharf, which has been recently revitalized, reminds us all that D.C. is a riverfront city. This revitalization will create a new destination within the city and numerous opportunities for businesses.

Commercial leases often last for five years or longer. It is worth taking your time to carefully consider the terms before signing.

The waterfront and restaurant leases There will be some great opportunities for restaurants because people simply love dining on the water. And leasing opportunities are already available.

Most of these considerations apply to virtually all commercial leases, but in areas of new and ongoing construction they may become incredibly important. Construction and potential disruptions

So there is a greater chance of making mistakes that may result in irrevocable consequences.

First off, consider how potential construction could affect your business. Will there be street closings that may interrupt the flow or volume of business for days or weeks? Will you be compensated for that time? If ingress and egress will be obstructed then will you be compensated appropriately or allowed to leave? With the Wharf, like so many other mixed use developments, the residential portion of a building may be completed at a different time than the storefronts or commercial spaces. How will this affect your business? The effect would likely be substantial since most restaurants will examine their profitability based on their proximity to the number of mouths to feed.

So if you are unclear of complex or convoluted terms in a commercial lease, do not try to figure it out yourself. Go to a competent attorney who regularly deals in commercial leases. Even though it costs money, it will buy you peace of mind in the

Everyone has a ‘financial pain threshold.’ Once that’s crossed, that’s when business owners have to decide that the sacrifice is no longer worth it. How long will you be able to endure disruption to your business before you want the ability to pull

With any commercial lease, a careful review is essential. And with new construction in an area where construction is still ongoing, some planning is important and should not be overlooked. First off, commercial leases are not the same as residential leases. Residential leases offer far more statutory protections. In commercial leases, it is assumed that businesses are more sophisticated than consumers.

12 | EATERY PULSE NEWS


the plug? A lawyer can make sure that line, if crossed, gives you the ability to walk away. This is true for all leases, but especially in "construction areas.� Will there be construction noise? How loud will it be and for how long? These are some important questions for you or your lawyer to ask.

It is also important to consider whether special services that restaurants need may potentially be disrupted by construction. Or, if the restaurant is opening in a new space, whether they are hooked up and available yet. Buildings may be complete and habitable, but not yet suitable for the particular requirements of running a restaurant.

One of the nice things about commercial leases is that they tend to be very open to negotiation compared to residential leases. Things like escape clauses or conditions subsequent may be inserted so if a business just can’t make money due to construction or whatever else it can get out of the space or otherwise be compensated.

In commercial leases, rent is not always the only cost. Lessors often have to pay CAM, also known as common area maintenance fees. Lessors may be on the hook for varying amounts of their own repairs. And they may be responsible for tax payments. Careful lease review is essential for estimating the total cost of a lease and for business planning.

How new development requires special lease considerations

The new D.C. Wharf is going to offer tremendous opportunities for restaurants with beautiful views and a terrific atmosphere. But just with renting any space, it is worth doing the work to make sure that your expectations as a business owner are mirrored in the lease. More information about the D.C. Wharf and its attraction is available here: https://www.wharfdc..com/

Restaurants often need significant improvements to spaces to allow kitchens and disposal of waste. New spaces need completely new fitting. It is important to consider whether those improvements will be compensated with rent offsets or abatements

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Anthony Coppola is a member at the Alexandria, Va.-based law firm Coppola & Jabaly, which serves small businesses. He has practiced law as an appellate litigator at Greenberg Traurig. He also developed his professional skills working at the Legal Writing Pro, the D.C. Public Defender, and the U.S. Department of Labor Office of the Solicitor.

PHOTO CREDIT WHARF D.C. FACEBOOK


COHNREZNICK RESTAURANT TECH SUMMIT

INDUSTRY PANEL EXAMINES THE POWER, FUTURE OF THE RESTAURANT POS PANELISTS AND MODERATOR CINDY MCLAUGHLIN, COHNREZNICK (MODERATOR) CHRISTIAN GUIDI, CLYDE’S RESTAURANT GROUP CONTROLLER JUSTIN ROSENBERG, HONEYGROW FOUNDER AND PARTNER PAUL RUBIN, PARTECH, INC. CHIEF STRATEGY OFFICER CHRISTOPHER SEBES, HEARTLAND COMMERCE PRESIDENT

A

t the CohnReznick Restaurant Technology Summit in Washington, D.C. in October, technology heads and restaurant operators

shared insights into how point-of-sale (POS) technology is improving restaurant operations. The POS is essential, but so, too, are the data tools around it, commented Clyde’s Christian Guidi. He said data tools like those from software firm Ctuit help consolidate data so restaurant operators can understand information from their locations. “It helps with literacy” on the data, he says. Clyde’s Restaurant Group has, over time, collected disparate POS systems and moving to one POS system is a desirable next step. In many restaurants, customers won’t be interacting with POS terminals or cashiers; instead, they will be purchasing food and beverages using self-payment

Kiosks and self-order technology is growing at a rapid pace. These devices will reach $30.8B by 2024, growing at a 10.9 percent combined annual growth rate, according to mobileproduct agency Fuzz and Fast Casual magazine. Honeygrow’s Justin Rosenberg said he sees the kiosks as simply a way to process orders quickly, an understatement by most accounts. The Philadelphia-based chain makes good use of self-ordering technology, offering in-store kiosks that allow customers to customize their salads and stir-fry orders—two popular choices on their menu. Honeygrow is also making its debut in Suburban Maryland at Montrose Crossing Shopping Center in Rockville, opening December 8, according to Store Reporter. This will be Honeygrow’s third D.C.-area restaurant. The impact of the modern POS system on operations Self-ordering technology is not a way to save

tablets or kiosks that are integrated with the POS. EATERY PULSE NEWS | 14

CONTINUED ON PAGE 16


ADVERTISEMENT


on labor, Rosenberg says, as Honeygrow also deploys brand ambassadors (greeters) to help customers input their orders and speed throughput. One of the biggest takeaways from the CohnReznick summit was that each technology leader has a unique perspective on systems helping restaurants improve operations. Heartland’s POS systems, for example, are not being integrated into one system, as many would expect. Heartland management is content to run several POS platforms and they are also part of an open architecture, says Chris Sebes. The Xenial system is such a product, and is part of its latest product offerings. From an operational perspective, restaurant POS systems can add a lot of value to the equation, insists Guidi of Clyde’s. Real-time data and categorization of menu items help with server motivation, performance ranking and reporting. Clyde’s Restaurant Group taps these benefits to rank server performance and also move the lowest performers up to an acceptable average. From a Human Resources angle, the servers ranked the lowest can be evaluated and sub-par results can be addressed more readily.

Cloud-based systems are still not at 10 percent penetration, notes Paul Rubin from Partech, Inc. Cobalt is still a very prevalent coding language for point-of-sale systems, and it will take some time to move away from older legacy systems. Regardless, advances in other areas are fast-rising. Machine learning is something that will be changing the way we interact with the POS, says Rubin. It’s leading to a lot of progress. Holograms may also be something not too far off. Future iterations of next-gen POS may come in the form of speech-oriented solutions. An example would be a self-ordering device or kiosk responding to voice commands in a way that is natural, and responding to customers in a much more fluid manner. A hologram could greet customers as they enter a quick-serve restaurant and offer to take their orders. The revolution in customer-facing elements of transaction will be totally transformed in the near future. Chains like Honeygrow are tapping selfordering tools to make the process of ordering more efficient and customized, while keeping customer service reps in the mix to provide the personalized touch. Restaurants that embrace the future now stand to gain from an established learning curve as the technology evolves.

Honeygrow is currently using a third-party delivery provider, but that option may not be sustainable over the long run. Delivery service can be expensive “and take a good chunk of change,” says Rosenberg. It’s an aspect of operations that ideally will be brought inside the four walls of the restaurant. To address concerns, Heartland is addressing functionality for managing delivery orders for its customers. No more third party, says Heartland’s Sebes. The future of the restaurant POS RESTAURANT TECH SUMMIT PHOTO CREDIT: COHNREZNICK


GUSTO SALADS AND THIN CRUST PIZZA PHOTO CREDIT: GUSTO

CHAIN EXPANSION

GUSTO FARM TO STREET In the D.C.-Metro area’s vibrant fast casual dining scene, standing out and bringing novel ideas to the table is more important than ever. Gusto Farm to Street, the Bethesda-based fast casual eatery, utilizes a farm to table approach to appeal to area customers who want a healthier mid-range option.

BY MAX TESTA The D.C. fast casual scene is intensely competitive, and in an effort to maintain positive

Gusto’s menu includes creative new options like

momentum, Gusto has pursued a strategy of

“cauliflower and black bean pizza crusts, and other

aggressive expansion. After opening their most

seasonal menu items from the fresh produce we

recent branch at Westfield Montgomery Mall in

get delivered daily from local farms” says Ashley

Bethesda, the chain is now pursuing the ambitious

Keefer, Gusto’s public relations representative.

goal of opening as many as five new locations by

Gusto is building its appeal not only on culinary

2018. The chain is considering new locations in

innovation, but also by using local, farm fresh

Northern Virginia, D.C, and North Carolina.

produce for many of its signature items. The appeal of farm fresh ingredients to a health

Its most recent opening in Westfield Montgomery

conscious consumer base is a difference maker in

Mall revealed that Gusto is able to operate

Gusto’s business model, potentially setting them

effectively out of a small footprint, which opens a

apart from the rest of the D.C. fast casual scene.

wide range of real estate options for future

But a health conscious approach is not the only

locations. This means that new Gusto locations

way that Gusto markets itself to local customers;

might be popping up in malls and shopping centers

community involvement is also a key to Gusto’s strategy, with the chain hosting a multitude of local fundraisers and participating in community events at all three of its current locations in Bethesda and Silver Spring.

in the D.C. metro area soon, particularly in places where other fast casual restaurants would not traditionally be able to thrive.This is because, according to Ashley Keefer, Gusto restaurants EATERY PULSE NEWS | 17


“do not require typical venting like most fast casuals which opens up many real estate options.” To keep up with its aggressive expansion plans, Gusto has brought on several new

GUSTO PIZZA DOUGH PHOTO CREDIT: GUSTO

members to its management team, including Don Schaefer, a former director of operations for SweetGreen, Ben Protheroe, a former area manager for Cava, and Nichole Latiolas—who previously worked as regional catering sales manager for Le Pain Quotien— brought on recently as Senior Marketing Director. Stephen Smittle is another recent addition to the Gusto management team, lending his considerable experience to the position of chief operating officer (COO). Smittle has formerly served as the COO and vice president of PAUL, the

Stephen Smittle is another recent addition to the Gusto management team, lending his considerable experience to the position of chief operating officer. These additions to the Gusto management team, particularly Stephen Smittle, suggest that Gusto is serious in its goal to expand to at least

international French bakery chain, and

five new locations by the end of 2018.

also vice president of Au Bon Pain, the

Their inclusion in the Gusto team

Boston based fast-casual establishment.

sends a clear message that Gusto is

He was also a key player in expanding Le

ready to learn from its competitors

Pain Quotidien to new locations in the

while aggressively building its own

U.S., as the company’s regional director of

brand. In the competitive fast-casual

operations.

subsegment, it remains to be seen if this expansion is overly ambitious, or

EATERY PULSE NEWS | 18

the key to continued success.


'TIS THE SEASON (RAMMYS 2017 GALA) PHOTO CREDIT: M. T. ROBINSON

HOLIDAY COCKTAIL TRENDS BY ROSHAN THOMAS With summer officially behind us, our attention

cocktail is simple to make and uses ingredients that

now turns to the upcoming holiday season. Aside

most already have on hand.

from spooky costumes, cool weather, and family celebrations, there’s a lot more to look forward

Erik Holzherr, bartender extraordinaire and Owner of

to, especially in the world of drinks. Each new

the Southwest DC haunt, Wisdom, shared with us

year brings a slew of fashion and lifestyle trends,

another unique ingredient he’ll be incorporating into his

but we’re here to bring you something even

drinks this year: Advocaat. This Dutch liqueur is made

better to get onboard with: holiday drink flavor

from eggs, sugar, and brandy and has a custardy

trends and how to serve them up.

texture with a taste like eggnog. Aside from just using it to spike eggnog, Holzherr described the drink they plan

Eggs

to feature this signature ingredient in, dubbed the “Wisdom Snowman.”

No, you’re not reading the back of a brownie mix box. Eggs can actually provide a unique flavor profile to a cocktail and offer a thicker, smoother

Wisdom’s Snowman

texture to drinks. Esquire Magazine shares a “Winter Margarita” recipe that gets its name from its generously salted rim that foreshadows the snowy days to come. With just an ounce each of

1 oz of aged rum 1 oz of Advocaat 2 oz of lemonade 1 oz of soda water

reposado tequila and mezcal, a splash of lime juice and simple syrup, and one egg white, this

Pour over ice and garnish with fresh grated nutmeg.


PHOTO CREDIT: ONE EIGHT DISTILLING

Or, try the “#Insantagramable” at Hank’s Cocktail Bar in Petworth, featuring apple brandy, coffee, bittered whip, and nutmeg. One sip, and you’ll get the comfort of classic fall flavors with the kick needed to survive the holidays. Spices Allspice, clove, and cinnamon are common in many holiday dessert dishes. This season, they’re headed for your glass as well in drinks you may have never thought were possible. For a full-bodied cup of comfort, head over to One Eight Distilling in Ivy City and try their kegged cocktail called “A Twist of the Lion’s Tail.” Made with their own Rock Creek Bourbon, lime juice, and allspice soda, this drink will make you feel the warmth of the holidays with a surprising note of citrus brightness. PHOTO CREDIT: HANK'S COCKTAIL BAR

Dairy Apple

If you thought eggs were far out, prepare to be mind-boggled by our final ingredient. Certain liquors

With apple picking being such a popular fall

pair exceptionally well with creamy dairy products,

activity, it’s not surprising that this fruit will also

like half-and-half. And, since the holidays are a time

be appearing in drinks this season. There are

for indulgence, dairy cocktails provide just the right

so many apple-flavored spirits that the

kind of richness to top you up after a long day of

possibilities are nearly endless. Below, a fall

food, friends, and family.

twist on the classic New Orleans Sazerac: The Riggsby in the Carlyle Hotel at Dupont is preparing to serve guests history with a touch of mystery with its “Eggnog Allen Poe.” HalfNew Orleans Sazerac 2 oz apple brandy 0.25 oz maple syrup 3 dashes of Peychaud’s bitters Stir ingredients together with ice and

and-half, heavy cream, and nutmeg-infused milk are blended with rum, cognac, and bourbon. The mixture is then aged for six weeks to fully develop its flavor. Grab this limited-edition cocktail while it lasts!

garnish with a lemon peel.

Look for inspiration from these restaurants and distillers as you mix up your own drinks to add excitement on your cocktail menus this holiday season.


BREWING EXCELLENCE KEY IDEAS ABOUND IN D.C.’S COFFEE CULTURE BY MAX TESTA

A

s the number of independent coffee shops in the D.C. area has exploded in recent years, several best practices for serving truly excellent coffee and succeeding as an independent coffeehouse have emerged. The wide variety of new coffee houses in the area includes Compass Coffee and Lil’B Coffee and Eatery, as well as coffee houses from regions outside of the DMV (D.C.-Md.-Va.) area, like Rwandan brand Bourbon Coffee. These are just a few of the new offerings in the last few years and these businesses represent several dramatically different business models. For example, Bourbon Coffee advertises itself as an African-based development enterprise, while Lil’B Coffee and Eatery is the latest offering from celebrity chef David

PHOTO CREDIT: N. KARVOUNIS

Guas. However, there are a few ideas which seem to be mutually acknowledged by all of these shops. Variety is a common aspect across the board, with each coffeehouse offering several distinct blends, varying not only in darkness of roast but also in where the coffee beans themselves originate. Compass Coffee offers nine distinct roasts categorized from light to dark, and by the origin of the coffee beans in the three major growing regions of the world; South America, Africa, and Southeast Asia. According to David Guas, proprietor of Lil’B Coffee and Eatery, “Diversity is critical—Even if you come in every day, we will have provided six, eight, or maybe even 10 different varietals within a year’s time.” Kigali-based Bourbon Coffee

PHOTO CREDIT: LIL'B COFFEE AND EATERY


also puts a premium on variety, offering blends made with coffee grown in distinct regions across Rwanda, each with unique flavor characteristics.

PHOTO CREDIT: LIL'B COFFEE AND EATERY

For some of the most successful coffee houses, the emphasis, interestingly, is not on serving complicated coffee drinks, but more focused on the natural complexity of the coffee roast itself. Compass coffee prides itself on unlocking the naturally occurring blend of flavors present in each of their roasts. According to its website, Compass Coffee’s idea of the perfect coffee is “Nothing fancy, nothing too crazy or hard to pronounce, just really good.” In contrast, David Guas believes that “The serving and finishing styles are what truly elevate coffee programs and that is what separates a distinct coffee house from the mass-market of fast brewed coffee establishments.” But while there are disagreements about style, the substance remains the same across all of these coffeehouses; quality coffee sourcing is an absolute must for any serious coffee establishment. Lil’B Coffee and Eatery sources its roasts from Counter Culture Coffee, a high end provider based in Durham, N.C. Bourbon Coffee sources its own direct trade coffee from farms and estates across Rwanda, and Compass Coffee roasts its own, single origin coffee in-house.

PHOTO CREDIT: LIL'B COFFEE AND EATERY

Also key is the choice of pairings offered with coffee. It’s not enough to have great coffee blends and serving styles; a truly excellent coffeehouse has to bring more to the table. Lil’B Coffee and Eatery offers an adventurous take on this; founder David Guas says that “coffee is not only consumed alone or with breakfast goods or sweets, but with savory dishes as well.” Whether it’s the variety, the roasts themselves, or the pairings, it is clear that the truly excellent coffee houses are the ones that blend not only great coffee, but also encompass great ideas of what a coffee shop should be.

22 | EATERY PULSE NEWS


RAMW NEWS AND LOCAL NEWS BYTES CHRISSY'S CORNER A landmark food hall is opening in Tysons Corner, Va. by year's end. Isabella Eatery by Mike Isabella Concepts will be host to 10 eateries and occupy 41,000 SQF. Social Restaurant Group is reportedly eyeing the stunning Central Place development by JBG Smith in Rosslyn for its own food hall emporium. RAMW is partnering with area restaurants to promote their Thanksgiving dinners and catering. For more information, navigate to http://www.ramw.org/blog/celebratingthanksgiving-dc-area-restaurants The Metropolitan Cooking and Demonstration Show is fast approaching, headlined by top celebrity and James Beard award-winning chefs. Mark you calendars for December 9 outing. Sources: Eatery Pulse, Washington Business Journal and Restaurant Association of Metropolitan Washington (RAMW)

November 7: Restaurant Marketing 101 Join RAMW at Del Frisco's Double Eagle Steakhouse D.C. with media maven Nevin Martell and get prepared to promote your business for the holiday season and more! Additional esteemed guest speakers: - Vina Sananikone | Multimedia Maven, Eat Good Food Group - Rina Rapuano | Food Writer, ZAGAT & DC Refined - Julie Sharkey | Marketing Manager, Farmers Restaurant Group November 14: Educated Eats Kick-Off Event at Ivy City Smokehouse November 21: Alcohol Manager | 9:30am-2:30pm http://ramw.org/register-course November 22: 18th Annual Safeway Feast of Sharing December 12: Alcohol Manager | 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. http://ramw.org/register-course December 13: Food Safety Mgr | 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. http://ramw.org/register-course December 20: Food Safety Mgr | 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. http://ramw.org/register-course January 8: RAMW Holiday Party for its restaurant industry members


National news bytes Ruby Tuesday was acquired by NRD Capital and taken private in a deal worth $335M, the Atlantabased private equity firm’s largest to date. Same store sales for September, as reported by MillerPulse , were down 0.6 percent—and even when normalized for the storms in the South—still negative to flat. Overall, the restaurant industry continues to see challenges in the form of soft sales. In fact, MillerPulse reports two-year same store sales for September being negative three of the last five months. The two-year metric is used to factor out one-time weather events. The firm believes consumers are spending money outside of the restaurant industry.

Rasa, from the family behind Indique, is readying for a late November/early December opening The Liberty Tavern Restaurant Group is opening two restaurants in Falls Church, Va. , according to Arlington Magazine: Northside Social and Liberty Barbecue. Expect December openings

Digital-casual chain Eatsa has closed locations in New York, Washington, D.C and San Francisco citing its hurried expansion in different markets as a reason. A subsidiary of JAB Holdings finalized its $7.5B purchase of Panera Bread this summer. JAB and subsidiaries already own Caribou Coffee, Einstein Noah, Espresso House, Green Mountain Coffee, Krispy Kreme Doughnuts and Peet’s Coffee and Tea. Bloomberg expects Panera to switch to a JAB coffee brand, thereby improving its coffee and supporting its brands. There are many other possibilities this restaurant chain purchase can leverage. Amazon finalized its acquisition of Whole Foods in August and dropped prices on some of its products, including salmon, avocados, baby kale and almond butter. Foodservice companies, including restaurants, are watching how this marriage plays out with regard to its prepared meals and hot bar offerings. The National Restaurant Association (NRA) began marketing the 2018 NRA Show at McCormick Place in Chicago May 19.

+Store Openings Whiskey Charlie at the Wharf is opening November 17. D.C.-area diners are eagerly awaiting the opening of the Isabella Eatery food hall in the Tysons Corner Mall in Va. Georgian restaurant Supra is opening November 7. Honeyrow will open its third D.C.-area store in Rockville December 8. It has two existing locations in Baltimore. Ramen Factory 42 is opening in Falls Church this year; opening date tentative.

PHOTO CREDIT: HONEYGROW


ACCEPT NO IMITATIONS

EATERY PULSE NEWS FRESH. FOCUSED. INSPIRED (BY YOU). NATIONAL DEBUT: WINTER 2018 D.C.WINTERÂ ISSUE: JANUARY 2018 PHOTO CREDIT: T. KISER


T

           he Restaurant                                   Association of                                    Metropolitan Washington (RAMW) has grown its restaurant industry membership base to nearly 1,000. As it approaches a century of its work, RAMW team members are at their busiest, providing advocacy, networking and business support to the area’s restaurateurs, and preparing for the annual RAMMY awards gala this July, which celebrates the best of what the local industry has to offer. In this ICYMI interview from this spring,  the popular RAMW President and CEO , Kathy E. Hollinger, discusses the challenges and opportunities for the association, as well as past accomplishments. Hollinger previously ran her own boutique communications agency for five years after holding the position of Agency  Director and Film Commissioner for the D.C. Government under Mayor Adrian Fenty.  She is an inspiring figure in the D.C. business scene and has received a "Women Who Mean Business" award from the Washington Business Journal.

ICYMI QA: KATHY E. HOLLINGER, CEO & PRESIDENT OF RAMW CONTINUED ON PAGE 42

RESTAURANT INDUSTRY EXECUTIVE SERIES


2018 TRENDS FOOD AND DINING TREND PREDICTIONS BY RICK ZAMBRANO

W

PERCENT OF CONSUMERS WHO SAY HEALTHY ITEMS INFLUENCE WHERE THEY DINE OUT

70

PLANT-BASED FOOD SALES PROJECTION FOR 2017

$5B

                   E’VE ARRIVED AT THE TIME OF YEAR                                 WHEN TREND WATCHERS,                                                      PROGNOSTICATORS AND CHEFS FROM EAST TO WEST COAST ARE CASTING FORWARD THEIR TREND PREDICTIONS FOR THE NEW YEAR. TYPICALLY, RESTAURANT STAKEHOLDERS, INCLUDING RESTAURATEURS, FOOD PRODUCERS AND RESTAURANT CHAIN EXECS ARE ALL EARS. AT

PERCENT OF ACF CHEFS VOTING AFRICAN FLAVORS A TOP TREND IN 2017

PORTION OF PUBLIC FASTCASUAL CHAINS WITH NEGATIVE SALES COMPS IN 2017 Q3 

66

73%

THE FOUNDATION OF MANY OF THE MORE EXPANSIVE FOOD TRENDS ARE THE CONSUMER BEHAVIORS BEHIND THEM. RESEARCHERS AND SEASONED R&D EXPERTS EMBRACE THE ROOT CONSUMER TRENDS THAT MANIFEST THEMSELVES

TECHNOMIC

IN WHAT IS HAPPENING ON THE CULINARY FRONT. CONTINUED ON PAGE 29


ADVERTISEMENT


MAJOR CONSUMER TRENDS

FEEL-GOOD FOODS EVOLVE INTO FOODSERVICE MEGATREND

FEEL-GOOD EATING Consumers want to feel better about what they eat, and that extends beyond nutrition and well-being to activism, regional loyalty and  global welfare.

CULTURE OF CONVENIENCE Consumers are time-starved and want to experience dining occasions that are quick and that fit into their lifestyle and schedule.

FROM DIGITAL PARODY TO DIGITAL CONVERGENCE Life can no longer just be a parody of the digital realm. Digital is converging with real life and keeping us connected and online, i.e. virtual reality, Pokémon, augmented reality and mobile order ahead.

PLATE TRAVELER Consumers returning from travel abroad desire to try the same foods here. For political and econmic reasons, others may only travel abroad through foodservice delivery and dining experiences.

The feel-good food movement is gaining overwhelming traction and it has permeated the national conversation about eating and dining choices in the United States. An important development in the last couple of years is that being healthy is defined by consumers in their own ways, including whether food is considered nutritious, contains functional or desirable ingredients, or is free from artificial ingredients, or even allergens. According to the International Food Industry Council’s 2017 Food and Health Survey, respondents primarily identified healthy food as that which has healthy components or is clean label (“free from”). Nearly 30 percent categorized healthy food as having healthy components or nutrients, ranking that as the #1 definition. Almost 15 percent indicated food that is free from “artificial ingredients, preservatives or additives” as being their top selection criteria of eating healthy. Desperately seeking healthy, whatever it might mean

FUNCTIONAL DINER Food functionalality is being mirrored by dining functionality. Consumers expect precise service levels and wait times depending on meal occasions and dayparts. Restaurants beware.

These modern-day feelings about eating are pumping up this feelgood food megatrend. In addition to nutritional and functional goals, some consumers are gravitating toward local and sustainable ingredients because these are

part of their “healthy paradigm.” Others may seek a more traditional definition: lfoods that are ower in calories, saturated fats, salt or sugar. In 2017, research firm Technomic, Inc. cited “food beyond fuel” as an important trend to watch in 2017 and that restaurant operators expressed a balanced approach as the best way to address the desire for healthy meal options. There is certainly no doubt that the topic of healthy is part of national movement toward food that we can feel good about and improves longevity. Because healthy is being defined in a variety of ways, this ups the ante for restaurant operators on foodservice innovation and menu development to come up with a balanced set of meal options that will appeal to diners. In its State of the Industry Report, the National Restaurant Association found that 70 percent of consumers felt that healthy food options influenced where they dine out. Restaurants are responding to consumer desire for healthier options, also. An impressive 47 percent of casual-dining operators, and 51 percent of fast casuals, for example, indicated they are offering more meals that are considered nutritious, according to the report.

29 | EATERY PULSE NEWS


A healthy meal can't just be healthy for its own sake, but it must also be served in a convenient manner for today’s time-starved consumer. The success of salad chains, like Washington, D.C.-based Sweetgreen, and fast casuals, like Au Bon Pain, have proven the viability of model of providing healthier options to diners, particularly in the urban landscape —healthy as defined by nutrition or healthier attributes. Sweetgreen, which started out primarily as a salad chain, adapted to the feelgood food movement and increased its menu options over time to include veggie, grain and protein bowls, which function as heartier entrees, in addition to their time-honored, but not so traditionally-composed, salads. (See examples following this article.) Major restaurant chains respond to feel-good food movement Au Bon Pain adopted the marketplace environment (graband-go service system in which consumers pick up items like they would at a corner store or food market) at the turn of the century and at the same time increased the number of quick, healthy options it offered. Its own version of small plates in the form of mini vegetable creations, protein samplings and fruit bites were a trend-setter at the time and have evolved over time into their Bon-toGo offerings. (See examples that follow this article.)

30 | EATERY PULSE NEWS

These same healthy, to-go offerings have been emulated by other bakery-cafes and coffee houses nationwide. Au Bon Pain customers have been quick to embrace a variety of juices, fruit cups, granola packs and freshprepared muesli—items that are convenient for both purchase and consumption. The grocery channel has benefited from an increased desire for healthy and functional food that serves a specific purpose of wellness. A variety of categories found at food retailers, including salad and breakfast bars, heatand-serve meals, grilled meats, and other food offerings at the deli counters are examples. Retailer categories, including natural juices, functional drinks, smoothies, plant-based foods, and frozen foods can address consumer desire for clean, functional and nutritious meals. Aside from the success stories of heavy hitters in the juice category, including Bai beverages and Bolthouse Farms fruit and veggie smoothies, protein drinks and milkalternative products, there is the meal-replacement category, which has also benefitted and offers up lessons to quick-serve operators. “I have seen people become more and more educated and interested in the foods we eat,” says Zach Breeding, Clinical Manager at Kate Farms, which provides organic, nutrition-dense, meal-replacement shakes. “Liquid nutrition is and should not be any different, so people are reading labels more

and paying more attention to what they put in their bodies.” Clean-label growth and restaurants According to Mintel research, nearly over 40 percent of consumers consider clean-label foods healthy. “More consumers will check food labels for ingredients they know are additives, preservatives or don’t recognize when grocery shopping,” says NPD. The value of the cleanlabel foods market, broadly, exceeds $165B, according to research report syndicator Research and Markets. While the grocery industry may have been the first to see this penchant toward clean-label foods, restaurants are also witnessing it and responding. Clean-label has spilled into foodservice with a vengeance.


LIVING HEALTHY NEARLY 1 IN 5 CONSUMERS DEFINE LIVING HEALTHY AS EATING HEALTHYIFIC FOOD & HEALTH SURVEY

PHOTO CREDIT: J. BRANDT

Diners are looking for simple and clean ingredients, too. Ingredients should be easy to understand and not numerous. Meal composition should reflect minimal processing and lack unwanted ingredients, including artificial colors and preservatives. Even the growth of organic (free from pesticides) sales points to the desire for clean foods. Panera Bread said it has removed artificial ingredients from its entire menu: “100% of our food is 100% clean. That means no artificial preservatives, sweeteners, flavors and no colors from artificial sources. And it applies to our U.S. food menu and Panera at Home grocery products too,” notes a statement on its website. Just as Au Bon Pain was a trend-setter in offering quick, healthier meal and snack options in urban outposts, Panera Bread has likewise become a major player in the clean-label movement nationally, and perhaps, too, represents the face of the how the restaurant industry can respond to the desire for clean food. Breeding says that people are much more aware of foods they are consuming and that media has played a significant role. People have become obsessed with nutrition and food marketers have responded to the nutritional claims that are part of this movement to build profits. Foodservice operators should be mindful of the variety of competitive, healthy options at food

retailers, like those offered by Kate Farms, which consumers may feel have more nutrition, and to some, may be more convenient to consume as drinks than competing food options at fast-casual restaurants. Feel-good foods are requiring the need for an omnichannel-ish outlet for healthy, clean and functional meal options served and consumed with a high degree of convenience. Restaurants responding to this mega trend and keeping pace with evolving sentiment about healthy food consumption will yield more profitable results. “Fast-casual places like Chipotle and Panera Bread are big national chains that have picked up on these trends,” says Breeding. “...there still needs to be quite a bit of vetting on messaging and which ingredients are used and why. The trend is only growing.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Rick Zambrano, a Washington, D.C.-area native, is a foodservice and small business consultant, and executive editor of Eatery Pulse News. He has been involved in financial analysis, publishing, content marketing, trend analysis, video production and work at a top-tier research firm. Zambrano’s career was born in fast casual, and he later went on to be one of the earliest foodservice trade publishers to produce and distribute content on the three major app markets. With a background, that includes research and analysis, his insights and commentary have appeared in major foodservice trade publications and business magazines. 


au bon pain

sweetgreen

quick, healthy snacks and meals in marketplace

healthy, made-to-order salads and

environment, in addition to soups, made-to-order

veggie/grain/protein bowls

sandwiches, wraps and salads

BON TO GO BOX Fruit, Eggs, & Nuts Vegetarian hard boiled egg, apple, grapes, cheddar cheese, mixed nuts or Smoked Salmon smoked salmon, herb cream cheese, cucumber, tomatoes, pickled onions, greens, sprouted grain rol or Cheese & Fruit Vegetarian brie, cheddar cheese, apple, grapes, crackers SNACKS Housemade Granola Blueberry Yogurt & Wild Bluberry Parfait Greek Vanilla Yogurt & Wild Blueberry Parfait Muesli Vegetaria

NEXT ISSUE: ORGANIC FOOD AND GLUTEN-FREE TRENDS

(Warm) Harvest Bowl organic wild rice, shredded kale, apples, sweet potatoes, roasted chicken, local goat cheese, toasted almonds, balsamic vinaigrette Spicy Sabzi GT Salad organic baby spinach, shredded kale, spicy broccoli, raw beets, organic carrots, bean sprouts, spicy quinoa, basil, roasted sesame tofu, sweetgreen hot sauce, carrot chili vinaigrette (Warm) Fish Taco Bowl organic arugula, warm quinoa, shredded cabbage, cilantro, roasted steelhead, tortilla chips, sweetgreen hot sauce, lime cilantro jalapeĂąo vinaigrette

SEASONAL PORTABELLO TACO BOWL PHOTO CREDIT: SWEETGREEN


GLOBAL FLAVORS: WHAT'S NEXT, TRENDING IN U.S.? African flavors have been in the spotlight and gaining traction. Last year, 66 percent of the American Culinary Federation chefs identified African flavors, including spices, preparations and sauces, as a top trend to watch (What's Hot Survey). This year, South African flavors may be giving way to an intense interest in North African flavors, following the success of harissa. Chakalaka, a South African spicy vegetable relish, is a flavor to watch, says April Spears, VP of Marketing at Presenture, a national foodservice sales and branding agency, working primarily with food manufacturers. “Heat is not straight up, (but) served with sweet, tangy, savory and smoky flavors.” Foodservice consultancy and trend watcher Baum+Whiteman identified Filipino cuisine, Indian street food and upscale Korean concepts as top trends developing in 2018 (See “Trend Catalyst Report” in the pages that follow.) Spears adds North African and Thai

influence, also, to the trend watch list. She notes that curry, freekeh, and ‘nduja are seeing increased menu mentions. Winsight’s Technomic, a Chicago-based foodservice research film and consultancy, has also presented information that points to Southeast Asia. Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore should be next on the list, according to the firm, along with cuisine and flavors from other island nations of that region. As far as global flavors that are prepared here in the U.S., the difference between what may be considered great versus good hinges on their authenticity, says Spears. According to the Presenture executive, “Millennials, especially, have more evolved pallets and are more likely to try spicy foods from different cultures. As a result, we are starting to see those multicultural brands and establishments do well in foodservice.”

"THAI, INDIAN, KOREAN AND NORTH AFRICAN INFLUENCES ARE HOT RIGHT NOW AND ARE BREAKING THROUGH INTO FOODSERVICE IN THE FORM OF SAUCES, SPICES AND PROTEINS." April Spears, Presenture

33 | EATERY PULSE NEWS


FOOD AND DININGÂ TRENDS 2018 TREND CATALYST REPORT

PHOTO CREDIT: P. HERSHEY


PLANT-BASED GOING MAINSTREAM 83 percent of U.S. consumers are adding plant-based diets to improve health and nutrition; 62 percent are doing so for weight management Plant-based foods to top $5B in sales in 2017, according to SPINS data, lead by plantbased milks and cheese alternatives (cpg, grocery channel) Nearly one in three Americans are opting in to meat-free days, says Mintel Growth of plant-based restaurant chains, including Beefsteak (Philadelphia, D.C., Maryland) and 8-unit by Chloe (New York) Big food company acquisition of plant-based food manufacturers continues Meat from lab-grown cells are gaining traction, investment

TRAJECTORY Vegan cheese on burgers and pizzas Faux meat protein entrees on menus following success of Beyond Meat Steakhouses embrace veggie sides to eliminate vegetarian “no vote” Plant-based restaurant startups dig for gold (private equity investment) Vegetarian frozen desserts (Brooklyn’s Van Leeuwen ice cream) Fast casuals to offer “first-rate vegetarian" choices More veggie-based restaurant chains Trend souce: Baum+Whiteman

ELEVATED CHICKEN TRAJECTORY Heritage and free-range chicken (Crack Shack, San Diego) Buttermilk-brined chicken (Himitsu, D.C.) Chicken karaage and chicken teba (Daikaya, D.C.) Global chicken: Spicy Korean, Filipino adobo, Javanese curry chicken

Hainanese chicken rice with laska Indulgent chicken from the Izakaya and Japan Chicken raised with care Southeast-Asian island chicken Trend sources; Packaged Facts CuTTS Reporting, Technomic (Restaurant Business)

PHOTO CREDIT: Y. LEE HARIHANTO


NEXT-GEN GLOBAL: FILIPINO, ASIAN-ISLAND FOODS TRAJECTORY Immigration patterns; “spicy and acidically bracing, using vinegar or citrus juices... preferably calamansi" Filipino Ube Restaurants: Bad Saint and Purple Patch, (D.C.); Purple Yam, Jeepney and Ugly Kitchen, (New York)

Filipino Flavor & adobe, Filipino Bagoong Salty-sweet-sour flavor profiles, including tamis, asim, alat lumpia, sisig , longganisa, and kare-kare will be commonplace dishes Asian-Island foods: Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore Southeast Asian, open-air market foods Trend source: Baum+Whiteman, Technomic (Restaurant Business)

NEXT-GEN GLOBAL: INDIAN STREET FOOD

Chains fashionating quickserve Indian dishes and build-your-own-bowl service styles Tava Kitchen folding to “more-authentic” Curry Up Now Biju’s Little Curry Shop (Denver) Upcoming Rasa in Washington, D.C.

TRAJECTORY Unwanted effect of the colors of preparations and unfamiliarity of dishes and pronunciations yield to concepts in which the tandoori is front and center, not the steam tables Trend source: Baum+Whiteman

PHOTO CREDIT: BIJU'S LITTLE CURRY SHOP


FAST CASUALS FIGHT FOR TRANSACTIONS

Fast casuals compete with fast-food restaurants and all manner of sit-down restaurants, beating back negative sales coomp trends Adding order and pay kiosks Adding drive-thrus Upgraded design and lighting Pushing urban delivery Separate take-out pick-up counters Second cook lines for delivery/take-out Table service without tips Use of real plates Beer, wine and cocktail

TRAJECTORY Fast-casual concepts further focused and built around the drink experience Trend source: Baum+Whiteman

NEXT-GEN GLOBAL: UPSCALE KOREAN TRAJECTORY From family-style to food truck to upscale; blending drink experience and ambience with Korean-style foods and heritage Ataboy - Wide-ranging Korean small plates with California wines (New York) Ms. Yoo - Korean-fried chicken feet (a Korean Gastropub, New York) Atomox - “a kaiseki-style Korean tasting Format” (New York)

Expect to see more Upscale Korean concepts, with strong design and beverage program aspects Trend source: Baum+Whiteman

PHOTO CREDIT:HONEYGROW


CLEAN, HEALTHY AND FUNCTIONAL FOODS

PHOTO CREDIT: SNAP KITCHEN

TRAJECTORY Plant-based proteins as healthy, conceptdefining (Beefsteak, D.C., by Chloe) Feel-good foods, including clean label preservative-free, antibiotic-free, removing artificial ingredients (Amy’s Kitchen in foodservice; Panera Bread removing artifical ingredients) Protein and Paleo diets - protein and lifestyleoriented meals (True Food Kitchen, Snap Kitchen) Foods for a purpose (antioxidant in green tea, white tea; Tazo tea business, Bai drinks) Quick meal replacements compete with snacks in restaurants, grocery stores

Every food retailer and restaurant strategizing the right menu mix to keep up with consumer desire for healthy, clean and functional foods. Functional-food restaurant concepts Restaurants offering regimenspecific meal subscription services Trend souces: : Trendystia, Culinary Tides (Fast Casual)

OFF-PREMISE FOOD POPULARITY TRAJECTORY Growth of online delivery popularity Mobile order-ahead services On-demand meals for time-starved customers

Revamped pick-up areas Separate drive-thru lanes for delivery drivers “Travel-friendly fare” More heat-and-eat meals Source: Technomic (Restaurant Busines)


BAROQUE AVOCADO Designer and stylized avocado dishes Avocado latte, avolattes Designer avocado dishes, including avocado pate Bowls made of avocado slices Avocado ramen

TRAJECTORY No avocado-fixation end in sight - yet. Trend source: Baum+Whiteman

LOCAL GIVES WAY TO REGIONAL

Overuse of term “local” dilutes meaning, significance, say experts Regional global territories: “Southern Low Country, Ozarks, Appalachia, Cuba, India and the Middle East.” Regional American: New England Lobster, Nashville Chicken, Texas BBQ

TRAJECTORY An increased use of foods that have regional popularity and provenance, including discovery of regional international foods with distrinct global flavor nuances Trend sources: Culinary Tides, Jason Dowd of Intercontinental Hotels Group and Fast Casual Executive Summit (Fast Casual) PHOTO CREDIT: THE AVOCADO SHOW


NORTH AFRICAN FLAVORS TRAJECTORY 66 percent of American Culinary Federation Chefs identified African flavors as a top cuisine for 2017, and now North African spices, dishes and sauces are very much in the spotlight Morocco: Ras el hanout (cumin, ginger, turmeric, cinnamon, coriander, cayenne, allspice, fennel, clove), tagine-cooked meats, vegetables; Tunisian harissa Burnt eggplant, ras el hanout pecans, merguez sausage (Arroz, D.C.) Ethiopia: Kitfo, a minced raw meat, and gluten-free Injera bread Sudanese aseeda, coffee in Jebena; use of chapati, as in many Southeast Asianinfluenced territories

With North African harissa's big hit popularity, expect more exploration of exotic spices and authentic flavors from the North African region Growing Moroccan concepts Beverages, sauces and dressings tap North-African influence, customs, flavors Trend souces: : Foodcentric.com (PFG), Presenture, Trendystia

DRY-ISH RAMEN TRAJECTORY Mazemen-specific concepts and menus Mazemen-style, mixed noodles with sauce, instead of broth Mazemen with toppings that include bacon and eggs; ricotta, white beets and mustard greens; cured salmon and camembert; cream cheese,parmesan and minced smoked pork; chili oil and tahini; also Japanese toppings. Kizuna (Vienna, Va.), Yuji Ramen (New York, Timeout NYC)

Trend source: Baum+Whiteman

PHOTO CREDIT: YUJI RAMEN


BOOZY DESSERTS, INDULGENCES

Desserts that combine alcoholic beverages with pastries, shakes, candy, chocolate and sweet, novel flavors still going strong Boozy Banana Foster (Suga and Ice, Duluth, Ga.) Hand-dipped dark chocolate whiskey cones (Tipsy Scoop, New York) 2016 collaboration with Brooklyn Beer Hall: beer-infused ice cream (Tipsy Scoop, New York) Boozy slush: margarita, pina colada, lemonade (Taco Bell Cantina) Bourbon Pumpkin Pie Shake - seasonal (Ted's Bulletin, Downtown Crown, Md.)

TRAJECTORY Boozy sweets and indulgences will continue to pop up and foster innovation with a "buzz" Trend source: Baum+Whiteman

PHOTO CREDIT: TED'S BULLETIN


PHOTO CREDIT: M.T. ROBINSON

Eatery Pulse News: Tell us what important advocacy RAMW has on the agenda, and how members can become more involved. Kathy E. Hollinger: We had a robust and impactful year and are now positioned as one of just a few voices in the business community that is called on and leading policy discussions and direction, something we have been working toward for the past five years. Conversations on the policy front are not happening without RAMW at the table, and that is an incredible success.

We are always working hard to make sure restaurants maintain choice over business operations, so they are able to thrive and contribute to the community, as well as provide jobs. We launched a new industry of opportunity campaign with two PSAs that feature our new tagline, “Restaurants Feeding People, Careers, and Communities� which shows the public, diners, elected officials, and more that the restaurants in our membership are local entrepreneurs who choose to invest in the region. They live and work in the neighborhoods, their children go to local schools, and they create businesses that are true community gathering places. During the last couple of years, SafeTrack, including its operational disturbances, as well as reduced Metro hours of operation, have become a big obstacle for restaurants attracting business and having employees arrive as scheduled. Where do you see this headed this year and what recommendations or advocacy are you putting in place to see this improve in 2017? KEH: RAMW has over 950 members across the metropolitan region, many of which are near Metrorail stations. Our members all recognize the importance of having a safe, reliable transport system to operate their businesses. We have surveyed our members and some express concern about getting staff to and from work during

PHOTO CREDIT: M.T. ROBINSON


"THE BUZZ (ABOUT D.C. RESTAURANTS) HAS BUILT SUSTAINED GROWTH AND DIVERSIFICATION, AND WITH IT, ADDED COMPETITION FOR COVETED DINERS." Kathy E. Hollinger, RAMW

RAMW AS ACTIVE VOICE IN TRANSPORTATION ISSUES unconventional hours; others look at Metrorail to provide an affordable, convenient way for guests to reach them, while others have directly cited a reduction in sales due to the SafeTrack schedule. 2016 was an incredible year for restaurants, garnering the attention of our first Michelin Guide, and accolades from Bon Appetit naming our city the best in America. We fear that reducing Metro’s hours of operation, or increasing the cost to use the system, will slow the strong momentum among our local business at a time when we have the opportunity to thrive. We look forward to being an active voice as the Metro Board considers changes and encourage them to consider an industry whose employees and guests rely on the Metro during nontraditional hours. Beyond the Metro, what do you see as the biggest challenges for D.C. restaurant operators this year in running their restaurants? KEH: There are several issues facing restaurants in our region this year. Maintaining a friendly regulatory and legislative climate helps our members stay busy and support their staffs, but recent years we’ve seen a huge spike in competition as new restaurants are popping up in just about every neighborhood and community across the region. It has resulted in amazing accolades in the past year, and we welcome the competition, however at times it can increase the stress of operating a restaurant.

The buzz has built sustained growth and diversification, and with it, added competition for coveted diners. While it is unclear exactly how the President’s budget will affect local businesses, any time there are significant changes to federal government operations, there is an impact on business in the region. In recent years we have seen the immediate effect of snow days and government shutdowns, but if federal jobs are lost, it will shrink the pool of diners and ultimately result in reduced business for local restaurants that rely on neighboring federal offices to fill their dining rooms. Rising rent prices are a huge issue for restaurant owners. In many cases restaurant operators were pioneers, making new, emerging neighborhoods desirable to residents, but their rents are up for renewal and many are faced with the decision to close or relocate. A great deal of legislation has passed in the past four years that impacts business operations. The impact of legislative layering cannot be ignored and will be detrimental to some locally owned restaurants. D.C. is unique in that 96 percent of full-service restaurants are independently owned, which puts our industry in a precarious situation at times. Increase to the minimum wage and the tipped minimum wage (legislation we supported) will undoubtedly impact operations and bottom lines. The newly passed Universal Paid Leave legislation will also impact operations and bottom lines. .

43 | EATERY PULSE NEWS


REPUBLIC SALMON BENEDICT PHOTO CREDIT: REPUBLIC

REPUBLIC: RESTAURANT QA

RAMMYS CASUAL BRUNCH OF THE YEAR Takoma Park's Republic is a crowd favorite and an integral part of the community there. This year, the hard work of the staff and the nature of the eatery as a local hangout was recognized with a RAMMY award at the must-attend gala. In this interview with Danny Wells, executive chef, we dive deeper into what makes Republic stand out during brunch and what lessons the popular eatery can offer up as a result of its success. Eatery Pulse News: First of all, what was your reaction after winning the Casual Brunch of the Year Award at the RAMMYS? Chef Danny Wells: The RAMMYS are always fun —great bonding with your staff and fellow D.C. industry friends. They're definitely more exciting when you're nominated and winning is what really makes it a party. It was great to win for 2017 Casual Brunch because 1) it was a readers choice category and b) our staff that works brunch are our unsung heroes. Most of them also work Saturday night so to turn around after the busiest night and be right back the next morning, bringing positive energy is a difficult feat.

44Â EATERY PULSE NEWS

What is it about your brunch that you feel draws a crowd and keeps people coming back? DW: We have lots of great brunch regulars. People come back because our menu is broad with something for everyone. The year-round Takoma Park Farmer's Market every Sunday helps keep the the block busy, too. Please share with us some of your top brunch and dinner dishes that are popular. DW: Our biscuit breakfast sandwich, bbq shrimp with grilled pork belly, and the seasonal vegetable hash are our most popular brunch items. How do you engage your customers on Facebook and social media to promote brunch, when the Farm Streetand will weekend has so many other Gusto options for to diners open entertainment its third location at the their attention may be on other Food Terrace at Westfield options? Montgomer Mall September 4. DW: We like to post food pics, always showing off our favorite local ingredients and tagging the farms from A second location of Lucy's which we get them. Our brunch staff enjoys posting Ethiopian Restaurant will group selfies as well. replace GrapeSeed in midto late-November, according to Bethesda Magazine.


What are ways to stand out at brunch—things that you have learned and other restaurant operators could learn from? DW: Having several vegetarian options at brunch is a good way to set your menu apart. How do you keep the brunch and dinner menus fresh? And can you give us a preview of some holiday or winter items being considered. DW: Local ingredients drive all of our menus. We are right in the middle of the fall season, so lot's of amazing peppers, hot and sweet are all over our menus, as are sweet potatoes. Those two ingredients are brought together in our sweet potato gnocchi dish at dinner. It comes with hazelnuts, peachy mama peppers and Parmesan.

If you're interested in industry news and insights with deep analysis and an inside perspective, you're in the right place. subscribe.eaterypulse.tv Sign up  so you don't miss a single article, video or issue

REPUBLIC BAR TAP PHOTO CREDIT: REPUBLIC


RESTAURATEURS OF THE YEAR : CAVA RAPIDLY RISING CHAIN EXPANSION

BRETT SCHULMAN, CAVA GROUP CEO PHOTO CREDIT: M.T. ROBINSON

Cava was identified as one of the fastest-growing fastcasual restaurants in 2016. The Mediterranean-style chain has its roots in the D.C. area, and originally debuted in Rockville, Md. in 2006 as the Cava Mezze sit-down concept, then launching Cava Grill (now simply Cava) in 2011 in a quick-serve format. It offers customized, made-to-order entrees, including pita wraps, salads, and rice, protein & grain bowls. Last year, the chain had about 21 units, now tallying 38 stores at the time we reached out to the D.C.-based chain for this update. In addition to nearly doubling its number of restaurants in just one year, Cava continues to operate Cava Mezze sit-down restaurants. Beyond its growing restaurant business, its presence on grocery shelves has been a welcoming site to finicky consumers looking for delicious Mediterranean spreads at retail food outlets, including grocery stores and specialty food outlets. For Cava, 2017 was particularly sweet as its management team won the 2017 Restaurateur of the Year Award at the RAMMYS Gala in D.C. in July. 46 | EATERY PULSE NEWS

“It's an incredible honor to receive such a high level of recognition from our hometown restaurant industry peers, and it really reinforces what we're trying to do here at Cava—to fuel full lives through a bold and innovative food culture,” says Meg Schiffman, director of Marketing for Cava. That culture is rooted in the heritage of our founders, Ted, Ike and Dimitri—three first-generation Greek-Americans who wanted to bring the authentic Mediterranean flavors and shared experiences of their upbringing to a wider audience.” The culture that the founders cultivated is still being developed and followed by the strong Cava team they have hired, she adds. And what a culture it has been: strong-willed and focused on growth, securing the investment it needs to grow, and making inroads on West Coast, where the chain surely feels it needs to establish itself. In addition to Los Angeles, and its presence in New York City and entry into Richmond, Schiffman says the chain will expand into three new markets—Austin, Boston and Charlotte, N.C.—in 2018.


In the grocery channel, Cava is testing its popular sauces, including Green Harissa, Lemon Herb Tahini, Yogurt Dill and Spicy Turmeric Tahini flavors, at select Whole Food outlets. Thus far, the sauces have received very positive feedback. Cava is definitely a chain to watch as it expands rapidly into new markets and continues to fend off national chains, including Roti Modern Mediterranean, Simple Greek and ZoĂŤs Kitchen, and D.C.-local concepts, like Lebanese Taverna.

PHOTO CREDIT: CAVA

NEW STORE OPENINGS LEAD TO LONG LINES PHOTO CREDIT: CAVA


FAST-CASUAL EATERIES TAP CATERING FOR REVENUE GROWTH BY RICK ZAMBRANO

PHOTO CREDIT: J. KAPUSNAK


Catering is an effective way to add incremental revenue to a restaurant, particularly if it can be non-disruptive to the main operations of of the business and can be managed to leverage labor that may be underutilized at certain times of the day. Catering can also, in some cases, leverage the real estate of a restaurant, although many restaurants and restaurant chains opt to prepare catering orders at a separate facility to build certain scales of efficiencies. Independent eateries and chain restaurants are increasingly promoting catering, and this is amplified during the busy holiday season around Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day. Washington, D.C-based Taylor Gourmet—a chain of gourmet sandwich shops operating in D.C., Maryland and Virginia, and expanding soon to Chicago’s Loop—promotes catering offerings for lunch and dinner. Prices range from about $5 to $10 per serving, with additional sides priced at about $2 to $5 per serving. Notable on the Taylor Gourmet menu is a variety of traditional and healthier offerings, including “fancy fruit,” yogurt parfaits and fresh salads, many topped with grains and seeds, which may draw more fans as today’s consumer preferences, tastes and diets can be divergent and can lean toward functional and healthy eating. The marketing of catering options After having recently expanded to Westfield Montgomery Mall, the growing fast-casual Gusto Farm to Street restaurant chain is also marketing its catering options to customers. Gusto, which is known for its creative, locally-sourced menu and trendy flavors, offers a variety of salads, assembled lunch trays and boxed lunches in the $12 to $15 per serving range, with pizza options running about half as much. Pizzas include the Quattro Mia, with four types of cheeses, including Gouda, and Devil’s Wing, made with grilled chicken and “spicy diavolo sauce” and topped with fresh avocados. Through its newsletter, the chain has been increasing its marketing of catering options to its regular cadre of customers. Retention is a big part of marketing. Repeat business can lead to sizable revenue streams over the course of the year and also engender word-ofmouth promotion to other business customers. Most quick-serve catering options, including those at Taylor Gourmet and Gusto, tend to be drop off and are defined by their successful execution, including on-time delivery, order accuracy and good customer service. Another fast-casual eatery in D.C., Moxie’s, serves all dayparts with breakfast and sandwich & taco options, and is well known for its decadent, hot-pressed ice cream sandwiches. Its motto is about taking risks on the menus and offering bold flavors. Moxie’s catering menu includes bagel bites and morning sandwiches, like sausage, turkey sausage, bacon, veggie, or ham & egg, for breakfast. Wrap trays can turn up the heat with Buffalo Chicken and Spicy Chicken wraps among

the lunch offerings. One of the ways Moxie’s has been able to build its catering business is through the ezCater web platform. The website is a lead generation and referral tool for restaurants in several markets. With a text, web link or fax notification, ezCater can alert customers to what is being offered and the company has access to numerous business clients. The owner of Moxie’s, Marcus Barnett, says his catering orders were only a couple per day, initially, but have now increased significantly. As a five-year ezCater customer, orders can now easily reach about 10-12 per day. What Barnett likes about the service is that it gives him access to a staple of regular customers looking for quick, tasty options on a regular basis —pharmaceutical reps among that demographic. Additionally, there are times when regular customers may need a special or last-minute order and they contact ezCater, which then contacts its top-performing restaurants to fulfill these orders, referring him additional business.  He also cites the concierge-like service that ezCater offers, acting as an intermediary between the customer and the restaurant. This all has benefits and challenges.  The benefits for his restaurant are outsourcing the communications part of the orders and a big chunk of the marketing efforts. “They try to  49 | EATERY PULSE NEWS


“A LOT OF RESTAURANTS SHOOT THEMSELVES IN THE FOOT AND THEN THEY CAN’T DELIVER.” - Marcus Bennett, Moxie's owner

PHOTO CREDIT MOXIE'S


Not your grandfather's industry paper. Yours. keywords: foodservice media and information services. robust news and analysis. inspired content marketing. democratization of video marketing. go-to resource for restaurant industry news. industry scholarship and direct services.

EATERY PULSE NEWS ADVERTISEMENT


be the middleman and the customer service side,” says Barnett. “The restaurant focuses on the food prep and the delivery.” A challenge for Barnett, admittedly, is not having access to the ezCater customer database. This may pose last-minute communication challenges; also, it may reduce the ability to market to those customers directly. However, Barnett appreciates the platform as a partnership, and recognizes the internal efforts and costs of marketing, and how catering operations can be run more smoothly with restaurants focusing on on-time delivery and performance. Platforms like ezCater are just one of the ways that restaurants can market to business clients. In-store communication is also effective. When business customers have an on-premise meal or get take-out from a restaurant, they should visually be made aware (or reminded) of its catering options

through point-of-sale promotion materials. Tabletent cards, menus and point-of-purchase banners and posters are great ways to promote catering. Taking a cue from Gusto Farm to Street: newsletters and social media channels, including Facebook should be used, as well. Catering lessons learned For Moxie’s Barnett, catering has been a careful, gradual foray into incremental business, and not a plunge. The ezCater relationship has certainly been a benefit, but being smart about strategy has also been a boon to the his catering business. Moxie’s owner achieves success, in part, by only taking catering orders that he knows his team can execute. That doesn’t mean passing up on big orders, but knowing if the team can deliver on the order and it has sufficient time to prepare and deliver. “[I know I can’t take an order,] if I get an order at 11, but it’s for 12,” he says. “A lot of restaurants shoot themselves in the foot and then they can’t deliver.” Moxies’ has taken on sizable orders totaling $4,000 or more, when they know they can deliver to the customer on time. One such order— executed well and leaving the customer totally satisfied—recently provided the restaurant with repeat business of more than $500. “They really liked our product and our service. That’s why the same customer did repeat business.” Barnett also establishes catering order minimums and limits the delivery radius. This is another aspect of his smart catering strategy. Small orders, of course, can be disruptive and can lead to unprofitable business once fuel expenses, paper, plastic and driver labor costs are factored in. He admits that new businesses, initially, may have to have a very wide delivery radius. As a restaurant owner sees its catering business getting established, and that there is sufficient marketing, word of mouth and steady weekly revenue, then that delivery radius can be reduced to ensure consistent on-time catering delivery, reduced operating expenses and ease of operations.

GUSTO CATERING OPTIONS PHOTO CREDIT GUSTO


email tips

RESTAURANT DOCUMENTARY FILM SERIES

EMAIL IS STILL ONE OF THE BEST WAYS TO ENGAGE CUSTOMERS AND BRING THEM BACK TO YOUR RESTAURANT

EATERY PULSE ADVANCES PROJECT, PLANS WASHINGTON, D.C. CHRONICLE, SWIZZLE MAGAZINE October 28, 2017 (Washington, D.C.) —Eatery Pulse News Media, a fast-growing media and information services outlet and content marketing firm for the foodservice industry, announced planning and pre-production for its new film documentary series and is readying its second Eatery Pulse TV channel series, Swizzle, and accompanying magazine. The film is a culmination of a 16year career in food-related businesses for Rick Zambrano, a D.C.-area native and consultant, who has been involved in financial analysis, publishing, content marketing, trend analysis, video production and work at a top-tier research firm.

“We couldn’t be happier today for Eatery Pulse and Ciné, our newly-formed film unit, to take on this project whole-heartedly,” says Zambrano. “I’ve received so much support and encouragement from peers and top executives in the restaurant industry. This was a natural progression for me in my publishing and news production career to tell the story of the restaurant industry’s relationship with technology entrepreneurs without implicit bias and from the consumer’s perspective, disregarding preferences for segments, specific restaurant chains or regional attributes.”

START WITH CELEBRATION, REWARD Customers are more likely to give you permission if there is a reward or celebration going on. During the holidays, both of these can apply. Reward new email members with a free dessert, appetizer or prize.

MAKE IT EASY TO SIGN UP One of the best ways to get emails is to connect your marketing program with your inrestaurant Wi-Fi system. Providers like Zen Reach work with local consultants and restaurants to make email sign-up simple and seamless.

DON'T JUST TALK ABOUT YOURSELF Don't treat emails like advertising spots on TV. Send information that is meaningful: new dishes, special promotions, special holiday hours, community & charitable events, ticketed events you are sponsoring, and more.

ENGAGE, SELL AND FILL SEATS Send emails that include information on that which applies to your restaurant: private dining, catering, retail merchandise and gift card programs. Make it easy for your customers to contact you and give you business. Be consistent in reminding them about what you have to offer. PHOTO CREDIT: J. YAP


You: a foodservice supplier, distributor or tech company EXPERIENCE THE EATERY PULSE TV AND EATERY PULSE NEWS DIFFERENCE. D.C.'S NEXT-GEN FOODSERVICE MARKETING PARTNER IS HERE. TODAY.

Us: a media, information and content marketing services firm. Data-driven, and now in 4K UHD.

sales@eaterypulse.net | 301.944.0889 ADVERTISEMENT


Zambrano’s career was born in fast casual, and he later went on to be one of the earliest foodservice trade publishers to produce and distribute content on the three major app markets. His commitment to restaurant industry scholarship has seen him earmark a portion of Eatery Pulse news programming revenues for assistance to those working toward a career in foodservice/ hospitality management. His insights and commentary have also appeared in major external foodservice trade publications and business magazines. “I’m eager to get started and to produce this documentary—expected to start filming by late January or early February—and which will be free of charge to viewers and distributed on major viewing platforms, including iTunes,” adds Zambrano. “I’m also looking forward to reengaging and interviewing top executives who have been making their mark in the industry. We returned to the D.C. market with a great respect for the movers and shakers who made it the buzz-worthy city it is today, so filming will start here and expand to other cities. We also came here with a high degree of acumen in storytelling and trend analysis. We now bring that clarity, perspective and experience to this documentary series.” Additionally, Eatery Pulse News Media announced Swizzle Magazine [working name], and its accompanying news show, a beverage-based YouTube news and lifestyle magazine series that will debut for the D.C.-Metro market in January 2018. Eatery Pulse has been revamping its news programming and is expanding its Eatery Pulse TV channel nationally during Season Two, in addition to launching Swizzle. For more information, email film@eaterypulse.net. To subscribe to Eatery Pulse content, navigate to subscribe.eaterypulse.tv.

ABOUT EATERY PULSE NEWS MEDIA Eatery Pulse News Media is a restaurant industry media and information services network in online video format, accompanied by an informative, stylish, digital magazine for the D.C. area and national landscape, in addition to a direct- services platform managed by consultancy Studio Solutions EP. The alldigital news network responded to a need in MetroD.C. for increased access for restaurateurs and restaurant execs to cutting-edge news topics, best practices and hyper-local D.C.-area trends. Topics comprise technology, including mobile, POS and IoRT, culinary trends and insights, marketing & social media, operations, and new concept design. Ciné is its newly-formed national film unit. Contact: Rick Zambrano media@eaterypulse.net

PHOTO CREDIT: M.T. ROBINSON


IF YOUR EXISTING MENU CONSULTANT CAN ADD $35K PER RESTAURANT TO YOUR BOTTOM LINE, STICK WITH (Otherwise, get in touch.) THEM. Food costing Menu mix analysis Operational & marketing strategy Trend analysis Customer engagement

TRENDYSTIA OUTSIDE-THE-PLATE THINKING FOR RESTAURANT INNOVATION AND DATA-DRIVEN SUCCESS trendystia.com | 301.944.0889 x1 ADVERTISEMENT

Eatery Pulse News for Restaurants | Holidays 2017  
New