Page 1

12 To-Die-For Fried Chicken Sandwiches | Cooking As a First Language | Oktoc Country Store

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI Praline Pecan Southern Sweet Potato Pie

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019 $

4.95

Mississippi Food Network’s annual turkey drive www.eatdrinkmississippi.com DISPLAY UNTIL NOVEMBER 30, 2019

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 1


MISTLETOE MARKETPLACE

NOVEMBER 6-9, 2019

PRESENTED BY THE JUNIOR LEAGUE OF JACKSON MISSISSIPPI TRADE MART | JACKSON, MS

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8

ALL THAT GLITTERS PREVIEW GALA | 7-11 p.m.

GLITTER, SHINE & SHOP MARKETPLACE BRUNCH | 8-11 a.m.

Presented by The Junior League of Jackson Musical Entertainment by Memphis Soul Revue

Presented by Regions

7-9 p.m. | Walk the Red Carpet

GLITTER & GLOW BAPTIST LUNCHEON LUNCHEON & STYLE SHOW | 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

Presented by C Spire

7-11 p.m. | Shopping Hours 7-10 p.m. | Silent & Premier Auctions 9 p.m. | Live Auction 7-10 p.m. | Present Pick Presented by Lee Michaels Fine Jewelry

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7 SIP & SPARKLE MISTLETOE MORNING | 8-11 a.m. Presented by Trustmark

BUBBLES & BLUES GIRLS NIGHT OUT | 6-8 p.m. Presented by Visit Mississippi Musical Entertainment by Eden Brent

Featuring Giuliana and Bill Rancic Presented by Mississippi Baptist Medical Center Fashions by Maison Weiss featuring Lafayette 148 New York

GLITTER, SPARKLE & SMILE SANTA SNAPS | 2:30-6:30 p.m. PEACE, LOVE & GLITTER TWEEN FASHION SHOW | 4:30-6 p.m. Presented by University of Mississippi Medical Center

MUSTACHE GLITTER BASH FRIDAY NIGHT EVENT | 8-11 p.m. Presented by Southern Beverage Co., Inc. Musical Entertainment by The Mustache Band

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9 GENERAL SHOPPING HOURS Thursday, November 7 | 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Friday, November 8 | 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday, November 9 | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tickets on sale September 1, 2019. For more information or to order tickets, please visit mistletoemarketplace.com or call 1.888.324.0027

2 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

RUDOLPH’S SLEIGH BELL BASH A CHILDREN’S EVENT | 9:30-11 a.m. Presented by Ergon

GLITTER, SPARKLE & SMILE SANTA SNAPS | 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m.


YOU'VE FOUND THE PERFECT

GIFT CARD

FOR THE HOLIDAYS!

3 JACKSON FAVORITES 1 CONVENIENT CARD Available Online and In Restaurant

WWW.3IN1GIFTCARD.COM

From Our Farm to Your Table • 100% grass-fed beef and lamb • No added hormones • 100% all-natural, humane handling

VISIT OUR WEBSITE TO SHOP OUR SELECTION OF PASTURE-RAISED PRODUCTS 3720 Hardy Street, Suite 3 | Hattiesburg, MS | 601-261-2224 | www.KitchenTableNow.com

662-889-6628 2817 Douglass Rd. Macon, MS 39341 www.newgrassfarms.com

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 3


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Raise a Glass to Jackson Whether it’s happy hour after a workday, pre-dinner cocktails, or just an excuse to grab drinks, nothing beats a delicious cocktail at your favorite bar. Luckily, Jackson is not lacking in the cocktail scene, and each restaurant has their own specialties to offer. Check out some of our favorite cocktails from Jackson area restaurants. BABALU – 622 DULING AVENUE Known for their table-side guacamole and small plates, Babalu is a hot spot for birthday dinners, workday lunches, dates, and everything in between. Of course, no trip to Babalu is complete without one of their signature cocktails, including their Baba-Rita. All cocktails at Babalu are handshaken with house-made mixes, and juices are fresh-squeezed every day. The pinkish Baba-Rita is made with Patron Silver Tequila, Triple Sec, sour, agave nectar, and pomegranate juice – the perfect mixture to make a delicious margarita. Make your way to Babalu on a Monday for Margarita Mondays to snag a Baba-Rita for just $9, and check out the rest of their cocktails and margaritas here: www.eatbabalu.com/menus/#cocktails. GOLD COAST BAR AT CULTIVATION FOOD HALL 1200 EASTOVER DRIVE Mississippi’s first food hall, located in the District at Eastover, has something for everyone, whether it’s pizza, sandwiches, coffee, and even hotdogs. Along with all the food vendors is Gold Coast Bar, and they are serving up craft and seasonal cocktails to sip on in the modern and fun food hall atmosphere. Made with Mississippi-made Cathead vodka, the Woodland Club includes vodka, ginger syrup, white grape, lemon, and is topped with champagne. The lemony champagne drink is perfect anytime of the year, but especially summer with the refreshing lemon flavor. Visit Gold Coast Bar inside Cultivation for your next happy hour for this cocktail and many more. www.facebook.com/cultivationjxn/ 4 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

BARRELHOUSE – 3009 N. STATE STREET Located in the heart of Fondren, Barrelhouse is serving up delicious small plates like meatballs and tuna poke nachos, along with blue plates, sandwiches, and other fun bites. Their drink menu is just as tasty as their food menu, especially when it comes to craft cocktails like their Watermelon Cooler. Made with watermelon infused Tito’s vodka, lime juice, simple syrup, mint, muddled watermelon, and ginger ale, it’s a refreshing and tasty drink to sip on during a hot Mississippi day. Swing by Barrelhouse and enjoy their front porch with a Watermelon Cooler and appetizers to share with friends. www.barrelhousems.com/ menus/Barrelhouse_Drink.pdf BRAVO! ITALIAN RESTAURANT 4500 I-55 NORTH, SUITE 244, HIGHLAND VILLAGE A Jackson staple, Bravo Italian Restaurant (4500 I55 N, Suite 244, Highland Village) is not only serving delicious Italian classics, seafood, and lunch and brunch bites, but their selection of libations is just as delicious and extensive. Though Bravo’s wine selection was recently recognized in Wine Spectator, their cocktails are just as awesome as their wine list. Bravo’s Port O’Kirk, a seasonal cocktail, is made of Tawyn Port wine and Kirk & Sweeny ’18 to create a delicate balance of smoky vanilla rum and dried, sweetened cherries. Enjoy this drink and others before or during your dinner at Bravo or stop by for Bravo’s Social Hour from 8 p.m. to close every night. www. bravobuzz.com/ libations/


Eat, drink and be soulful in

visitjackson.com eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 5


CONTENTS October/November 2019 Volume 8 Number 6

46

54

34 in this issue 18 HOW SWEET (POTATO) IT IS Three Sweet Potato Recipes That Are Perfect for Fall

24 MISSISSIPPI MADE Redneck Foods

28 COMMUNITY

in every issue 8 From the Publisher 11 What’s Happening 12 Fabulous Foodie Finds 16 A Taste of Magnolia 55 Dining Guide 62 Events 64 Recipe/Ad Index 66 Till We Eat Again

Help Those In Need With Mississippi Food Network’s Annual Turkey Drive

30 FRESH FROM THE FARM Silent Shade Planting Company Aims to Be a ‘Farm for the Future’

34 WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER SANDWICH 12 Fried Chicken Sandwiches to Feed the Frenzy

44 INTERNATIONAL EATS ‘Cooking as a First Language’ Shares a Taste of the World With Tupeloans

48 FROM MISSISSIPPI TO BEYOND Candice Poss Creates Southern, Soulful Food in St. Louis

52 FROM THE BOOKSHELF Miss Juanita’s Delta Cuisine Juanita Emily Caldwell

54 RAISE YOUR GLASS A Spooky Twist on a Classic Cocktail

56 WHERE TO EAT Thirty-Two in Biloxi

60 FEATURED EVENT Oktoc Country Store in Starkville

40 FUN, FAMILY, AND FETTUCINE Delta Family Passes Down Tradition of Homemade Pasta

ON THE COVER: Praline Pecan Southern Sweet Potato Pie by Lisa LaFontaine Bynum, page 22

6 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


Looking for more recipes?

TAST E S OF C OLU MBU S Join Us March 26-April 4, 2020 for the 80th Annual Spring Pilgrimage

Check out our recipe collection on our website! www.eatdrinkmississippi.com

VisitColumbusMS.org for a complete list of attractions and events. Tennessee Williams Home & Welcome Center | 300 Main Street | 800.920.3533

Creamy, dreamy fudge in a jar!

Perfect for tailgating (in your school’s colors), special occasions, fundraisers, wedding favors, or just treat yourself. Order online at www.spoonfudge.com. eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 7


{ from the publisher }

I

Happy Fall, Y'all!

don’t know about you, but I haven’t had the time nor patience to brave the line at Popeyes for their new fried chicken sandwich. While I always like to try the latest culinary trend, I usually wait until the hype dies down. Well, that hasn’t happened at Popeyes yet. It seems that the world has gone absolutely nuts about this sandwich. So much so that the drive-thru line wrapped around nearly every location at all times of day. Many waited only to find out they had sold out. The sandwich has been so popular that Popeyes had to stop selling them because they couldn’t meet demand. They say it’s coming back, and fans are patiently (some not so patiently) waiting for its return. There’s no need for this nonsense. Many restaurants across the state have created incredible fried chicken sandwiches that are sure to satisfy, and you don’t have to wait in a long line to get one. We’ve put together a list of the best beginning on page 34. My favorite time of year has arrived once again...fall. I really love the flavors and flavor combinations it brings along with it – apples, cinnamon, caramel, pecans, and, of course, pumpkin spice. We’ve found some delicious items that feature these flavors that you’re sure to love, too. Check them out beginning on page 12.

Sweet potatoes are another welcomed addition to our fall tables. This year, think beyond the traditional sweet potato casserole with marshmallows on top. Lisa Bynum gives us delicious recipes that do just that. You’ll definitely want to take a look at them on pages 22-23. I’ve also included some of my favorite recipes (below) for this time of year. Best wishes for a fun and delicious fall.

J.J. Carney Publisher

Hot Fruit

Chocolate Chip Pecan Pie

By J.J. Carney

By J.J. Carney

6 tablespoons butter, melted 1-1/4 cup brown sugar, divided 1 cup chopped pecans 1 small can apple pie filling 2 cans sliced pears, drained and diced 1 large can pineapple chunks, drained, reserve juice 1 large can peaches, drained and diced 2 sliced bananas

1 stick butter, melted and cooled 1 cup sugar 1/2 cup all purpose flour 2 eggs, slightly beaten 1 teaspoon vanilla 3/4 cup chocolate chips 1 cup pecans, chopped 1 unbaked pie shell

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Pour butter into 9x13inch casserole dish. Top with 3/4 cup brown sugar and 1/2 cup pecans. Add pie filling, pears, pineapple, and peaches. Toss bananas with a little pineapple juice to prevent from turning brown. Add to baking dish. Sprinkle top with 1/2 cup brown sugar and 1/2 cup pecans. Bake for 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Stir all ingredients together until combined. Pour into pie shell. Bake for 40-50 minutes, until golden brown and set in middle.

q

“So I recommend having fun, because there is nothing better for people in this world than to eat, drink, and enjoy life. That way they will experience some happiness along with all the hard work God gives them under the sun.” Ecclesiastes 8:15

r

EAT DRINK MISSISSIPPI (USPS 17200) is published bi-monthly by Carney Publications LLC, 296 F.E. Sellers Hwy., Monticello, MS 39654-9555. Periodicals postage paid at Monticello, MS, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Please mail changes of address to P.O. Box 1663, Madison, MS 39130.

8 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


Receive recipes and the latest culinary happenings on Mississippi's culinary scene in your inbox!

November 2 and 3, 2019 www.PeterAndersonFestival.com

Visit our website to sign up for our free digital newsletter. www.eatdrinkmississippi.com

Annual Turkey Drive Thursday, November 21st

Donate a turkey Help feed those in need this Thanksgiving.

www.mugshotsgrillandbar.com

beginning at 4:30 a.m. at the following Kroger locations: I-55 N - Jackson, Spillway - Brandon Highway 51 - Madison & Clinton

Locations: Biloxi, MS Birmingham, AL Columbus, MS Covington, LA D’Iberville, MS Flowood, MS Gulfport, MS

www.msfoodnet.org

Hattiesburg, MS Meridian, MS Mobile, AL Oxford, MS Pearl, MS Pensacola, FL Starkville, MS

Tupelo, MS Tuscaloosa, AL Vestavia Hills, AL

Coming Soon Saraland, AL Pace, FL

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 9


VENDORS WANTED We are currently seeking magazine vendors in all areas of the state. If you would like to sell this magazine at your business, call 601-427-5694 or email info@eatdrinkmississippi.com for more information.

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI J.J. Carney Publisher/Editor John Carney Executive Editor Paige McKay Associate Editor Vanessa Case Account Executive

FOLLOW US! www.facebook.com/eatdrinkmississippi www.pinterest.com/eatdrinkms www.twitter.com/eatdrinkms www.linkedin.com/company/eat-drink-mississippi www.instagram.com/eatdrinkmississippi

Julian Brunt Lisa LaFontaine Bynum Divian Conner Susan Marquez Kathy K. Martin Jay Reed Contributors Victoria Walker Graphic Designer Joe Luca Newsstand Sales Consultant

b

www.eatdrinkmississippi.com

b

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI is published six times a year by Carney Publications LLC

DROP US A LINE! Thank you for your interest in this magazine. We would love to hear from you. Please understand that letters submitted become the property of eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI and may be edited for length and clarity. E-mail us at info@eatdrinkmississippi.com, leave a comment on our Facebook page, or write to P.O. Box 1663, Madison, MS 39130.

NEW ADDRESS? If you’re a subscriber and your address has changed, please let us know. The post office doesn’t provide forwarding service for the magazine and we don’t want you to miss an issue. Send your change of address to us at P.O. Box 1663, Madison, MS 39130 or e-mail us at info@eatdrinkmississippi.com. 10 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

b P.O. Box 1663 Madison, MS 39130

b 601.427.5694

b © eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced or reprinted without written consent from the Publisher. Advertising rates available upon request. Subscriptions are $24 for one year. Subscribe online or make checks payable to: eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI P.O. Box 1663 Madison, MS 39130


{ what’s happening }

Rainbow Co-op Re-opens in Ridgeland

L

ast summer, Fondren’s Rainbow Co-op closed its doors after filing for bankruptcy, leaving many disappointed. Since then, the board of directors have been working with a handful of employees to bring Rainbow back to the community, and Rainbow Co-op recently reopened their store in the newly renovated Northpark Mall in Ridgeland. The new Rainbow Co-op is a downsized version of the Fondren store, but shoppers can find dried fruits, nuts, seeds, beans, spices, loose teas, and pastas on the shelves of the Northpark shop. Rainbow is located at the main entrance to Northpark that faces County Line Road across from Med Grille, and hours are 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon till 6 p.m. on Sundays. edm

Chef Jacqueline Seavey Wins 7th Annual World Food Championship

T

he World Food Championship recently held its annual competition, and a Mississippi chef brought home $100,000 and the title of World Food Champion. Jacqueline Seavey, executive sous chef at Island View Casino Resort in Gulfport, beat out nine other category champs to claim the coveted food crown and $100,000 prize. Along with winning the largest prize purse in Food Sport, Chef Seavey’s winning dish, Kumquat Duck & Cornbread Waffle Canapes, will be featured at Antione’s in New Orleans. This famous Big Easy restaurant hasn’t made any additions to its menu in over 100 years, so it’s a huge achievement for any chef ’s culinary career. Seavey was one of ten category champions who emerged from WFC’s Main Event in 2019. After three rounds of competition, Chef Seavey proved to be the best at mastering creole-inspired cuisine, and she even impressed local restaurateurs like Dickie Brennan and Chef Lee Rich at Antoine’s throughout the competition. The search for the next World Food Champion will begin again in October in Dallas. edm RIGHT - Chef Jacqueline Seavey and her world champion dish. eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 11


{ fabulous foodie finds }

Flavors of Fall W

hen the first day of fall arrives, it brings along with it the flavor of pumpkin spice. Although pumpkin spice seems to dominate the seasonal food scene, there are many other traditional flavors of fall that still satisfy our taste buds and help us celebrate the season. Fall into autumn with these delicious treats. edm

Caramel and candy apples are always favorite fall treats. Get your apple fix this year at Nandy’s Candy in Jackson. www.nandyscandy.com

Mississippi Cold Drip offers Pumpkin Spice Cold Brew for the season. It can be served cold, over ice, or hot - it’s up to you. www.mscolddrip.com

Mississippi Cheese Straw Factory bakes more than just cheese straws. Their Cinnamon Pecan Straws combine some of our favorite flavors and are perfect for fall, especially when paired with coffee or hot cocoa. www.mscheesestraws.com

12 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


Pirouline adds a taste of fall to our favorite creme-filled wafer with limited edition pumpkin spice. These are delicious with a cup of coffee, as a bonus served with your favorite fall dessert, or on their own as a snack. www.pirouline.com

Described as creamy, dreamy fudge in a jar, Spoonfudge delights with the flavor of candy corn. This is a fun and delicious way for those with a sweet tooth to welcome fall. www.spoonfudge.com

As if pecan pie and M&Ms aren’t delicious enough on their own, the candy company has combined the two into a flavorul, sweet treat that’s sure to delight this fall. A bowl of these are likely to be welcomed at your Thanksgiving gathering. www.mms.com

Williams-Sonoma’s Caramel Pumpkin Butter could also be called fall in a jar. This yummy combination of pumpkin, caramel, and fall spices is great on English muffins or toast as well as a topping on ice cream, pancakes, and more. www.williams-sonoma.com eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 13


www.bcbsms.com Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Mississippi, A Mutual Insurance Company, is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. ® Registered Marks of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, an Association of Independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans.

14 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


If You Think Parsley Is Just a Garnish, Think Again king oySter muSHroom ‘SCAlloPS’ 2 king oyster mushrooms, brushed clean 2 cloves of chopped garlic 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons unsalted butter

Try Chef Alexander’s king oyster mushroom scallops with whipped carrots, red pepper coulis, and carrot top pesto at your next dinner party. Visit www. bcbsms.com for additional recipes. We’ve all seen the sprig of parsley used as the proverbial “cherry on top” of plated meals at our favorite restaurants, but this little herb isn’t just for good looks. The most common types of parsley are curly leaf and flat leaf. Curly leaf parsley is typically used as a garnish and flat leaf parsley works best in recipes. Chef Labron Alexander, Executive Chef at Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Mississippi, uses flat leaf parsley in a number of his dishes. “I prefer flat leaf parsley because of its fresh taste and the overall enhancement it provides to other flavors such as lemon and garlic,” said Alexander. “It is the base ingredient in a lot of our pesto, which we use in pastas, salads and even sandwiches. I also use parsley as a crust on salmon, which is a favorite among our patrons.” Parsley, one of the most well-known herbs, was first used as a garnish on plates to freshen breath and brighten monochromatic plates. “Parsley is such a vibrant green it immediately draws the eye in,” said Alexander. “One of my favorite recipes which incorporates parsley is our carrot top pesto. It can be paired with whole wheat pasta, mushrooms and marinated vegetables for the perfect light lunch option.” In some parts of the world, parsley is used for medicinal purposes to treat health conditions. Parsley is rich in vitamins A, C and K. Vitamin A is important to vision, cell growth and a healthy immune system. Vitamin C helps protect against immune system deficiencies, cardiovascular disease and is essential for the growth and repair of tissue in the body. Vitamin A is essential to maintaining healthy vision and normal function of your immune system and organs. Parsley is also rich in antioxidants such as flavonoids and carotenoids. Flavonoids may lower risk of cancer, heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Carotenoids help protect your eyes and promote healthy vision. This “super” herb can easily be grown at home or picked up from your local grocery store. Add parsley to pasta, soups, salads, pesto, your favorite meats or even a smoothie to reap the health benefits.

Slice the mushrooms into ‘scallops’, thick coin uniformed shapes. Brush any bits of dirt and trim woody stems off mushrooms. Heat a large skillet with the olive oil. Add garlic and gently fry. raise the heat to medium high, and add the butter. As soon as it melts, foams, and begins to subside add the mushroom slices in one even layer. Fry on each side until the mushrooms are golden brown and tender, about 6-8 minutes each side. Add more olive oil, if needed. to serve, sprinkle the mushrooms with salt and serve immediately. mASHed CArrotS 2 pounds of carrots (about 12 large carrots), scrubbed 4 tablespoons of earth Balance butter 1/2 cup vegetable stock Salt and pepper to taste 2 teaspoons of garlic powder (optional) Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Chop the carrots into 1” pieces. Boil for about 15 -20 minutes. drain the water and add the carrots back to the pot. Add in the butter, vegetable stock, salt, pepper, and garlic powder. mash the carrots using a hand masher until evenly mixed. to get the carrots extra smooth, purée the carrots using an immersion blender or food processor. taste to see if additional butter or salt is needed. Serve warm. red PePPer CouliS 1 cup of chopped roasted red pepper 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 1/4 teaspoon of salt in a blender, combine red peppers, olive oil, vinegar, and salt. Process until smooth. Press through fine sieve and serve. CArrot toP PeSto 1/4 cup Parmesan cheese 1 cup carrot top leaves 1/2 cup olive oil 1/2 cup flat leaf parsley 1/4 cup roasted walnuts optional 1 clove of garlic dash of kosher salt Pulse the carrots, parsley leaves, walnuts, and garlic in a food processor until coarsely ground. With the food processor on, slowly drizzle in the olive oil and process until blended well. Add the Parmesan cheese and salt, and pulse until combined.

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 15


Taste of Magnolia a

Add a Spanish Flair to Your Dinner With Empanadas by divian conner

D DIVIAN CONNER is a Mississippi mama of four ‘not so little’ little ones. Coming up with recipes, trying new ones, and feeding her crew of tweens and teens is her passion. Southern recipes, easy recipes, sorta hard recipes, but always delicious recipes is what you will find on her food blog, www.divianlconner.com. Now venturing into outdoor cooking over an open fire, Divian is fascinated with camp cooking and entertaining.

16 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

espite being in Mississippi since she was 17 years old, you can never ever tell my mother she is not a Texas girl. Born and raised there, she loves to remind us of her Longhorn-State roots, and her love for Spanish food. Growing up, it was not unusual for our Sunday dinners to consist of loaded burritos, tacos, tostadas, homemade Spanish rice, and flan for dessert. It was a diverse addition to our traditional comfort food menu of the South, and we eagerly anticipated my mother’s Spanish Sunday meals ― scarfing down every morsel while asking for more in between bites. Now that I have children of my own, the traditions of Fun Food Friday, Every Man For Himself Saturday, and Sunday Family-style Dinner remains. Of course, that also means a break from the Southerninspired dinners that are always in heavy rotation. I will admit, I am a slow cook. Everyone knows that I cook purposefully and with focus. That means what may take someone else 15 minutes to prepare will, indeed, take me an hour. This does not particularly sit well with my children, who are ready to eat the moment they hear the stove knob turn. But knowing and being able to recognize that I am a slow cook has helped me, in a way, and my children have become the happy recipients of a round of appetizers while they hang around the edge of the kitchen waiting for everything to be done. I mean, you can’t complain about how long I take to make dinner if I can provide you with a tray of snacks to tie you over, right? So, the large, white serving platter with the dotted edge detail sees more than its share of yummy ‘grabbables’ on its surface, and my crew is more than ready to leave it spotless. When having Spanish-inspired food, empanadas are my go-to for ‘grabbable’ hand-held treats. They are hearty enough that usually one can be enough to satisfy any crew until dinner is ready. They are easy to make, especially if you make the dough in advance, and you can fill the dough with anything. Plus, you can make it a family affair. Who doesn’t love to help out in the kitchen and fill their own empanada? So, the next time you decide to go the Spanish route, why not add empanadas? Also, as a bonus, they make great party treats. edm


Chipotle Lime Black Bean Empanadas 1 pound ground beef, ground chicken (optional) 1 (7-ounce) can of chipotle sauce or salsa 2 teaspoons taco seasoning 1/2 teasopon chicken bouillon Cooked black beans White corn 1/2 cup Ro-tel chili-ready tomatoes Dough (recipe follows) Avocado Crema (recipe follows) Lime slices Cook ground beef and drain any grease. Add in chipotle sauce and seasoning, stirring on low heat. Add in 2-3 tablespoons of beans and corn and the Ro-tel tomatoes. Roll dough to about 1/4-inch thickness. Cut into 3-inch circles. Add 2 teaspoons of the mixture into middle of the dough circles. Fold over and press edges using fork or spoon. Bake at 375 degrees F for 15-20 minutes until golden brown. Serve warm with Avocado Crema and lime slices.

Dough 1/2 teaspoon salt 2-1/2 cups all purpose flour 1 stick cold butter

1 egg 1/4 cup cold water (or more as needed) Mix salt, flour, and butter until crumbly in consistency. In separate bowl, beat egg and water until frothy, about 1 minute. Make hole in middle of flour mixture and pour egg/water mixture in. Push crumbly flour on top of water and begin forming the dough. Add more water if too crumbly. Knead into thick dough and roll out until thin but thick enough that it does not tear. (1/3 inch or slightly less) Cut into 3-inch circles for smaller empanadas, 4 inches for more hand pie size.

Avocado Crema 1 whole avocado Juice of 1/2 lime Salt to taste 1 tablespoon sour cream 1 teaspoon chopped cilantro Mix all ingredients in food processor or by hand until creamy. Refrigerate until ready to serve. Note: Use mini cookie cutters to cut out details to make your empanadas more fun before baking. Brush with water before placing on empanadas to make dough pieces adhere. eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 17


18 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


How Sweet (Potato) It Is By Lisa LaFontaine Bynum

T

his fall, think outside the pumpkin. There is a wide variety of produce available once the weather starts to cool – like sweet potatoes. Not only do they taste great, but they are a good source of fiber, Vitamin B, Vitamin C, and

antioxidants. Don’t limit your possibilities to the traditional sweet potato casserole laden with marshmallows (though that is a favorite). Sweet potatoes are versatile in both sweet and savory dishes. edm

Praline Pecan Southern Sweet Potato Pie

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 19


Twice-Baked Sweet Potatoes

20 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


Sweet Potato Chili with Black Beans

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 21


Praline Pecan Southern Sweet Potato Pie Serves 8 For the filling: 2 pounds sweet potatoes 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened 3 large eggs 2 egg yolks 1 cup granulated sugar 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1/4 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons bourbon 1 tablespoon molasses 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2/3 cup whole milk 1/4 cup packed dark brown sugar 1 pie crust Whipped cream, optional For the praline topping: 1/4 cup of pure butter softened at room temperature 1/2 cup packed light brown sugar 1/4 cup all-purpose flour 1/2 cup of chopped pecans 22 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

For the filling: Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Cut several slits into the sweet potatoes. Place potatoes in a microwave-safe casserole dish. Cook on high for seven minutes. Turn potatoes and cook for an additional seven minutes or until potatoes are fork tender. Allow to cool until potatoes can be handled. In a small, separate bowl, mix together praline ingredients. Set aside. Cut each potato in half and scoop out the flesh. Discard the skins. Add butter to potatoes and mash using a fork. You will have some small lumps. In a separate bowl, whisk together eggs, yolks, sugar, nutmeg, and salt. Add bourbon, molasses, vanilla, milk, and brown sugar. Gradually stir the egg mixture into sweet potatoes until combined. Pour sweet potato mixture into pie shell. Carefully sprinkle praline mixture over the filling (it will float on the top of the filling). Bake the pie for approximately 45 minutes or until center of pie is no longer wobbly. If the crust begins to brown too quickly, cover the crust with strips of aluminum foil. Remove from the oven and allow to cool to room temperature. Serve pie with whipped cream, if desired.


Twice-Baked Sweet Potatoes Serves 4 4 small sweet potatoes, about 8 ounces each 1 tablespoon olive oil 1/2 pound bulk sweet Italian sausage 1 tablespoon unsalted butter 2 cups leeks white and light-green parts only, quartered lengthwise and thinly sliced 1 teaspoon chopped fresh sage 1/4 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme Kosher salt 1/2 cup sour cream 1/4 cup grated Swiss cheese Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Poke holes in each of the potatoes with a fork. Bake potatoes in the oven until fork tender, about 1 hour to 1 hour and 15 minutes. Remove from oven and set aside to cool. In the meantime, cook the sausage in a medium skillet over medium heat. Break up the sausage into bite-sized pieces using a wooden spoon. Cook sausage until no longer pink. Using a slotted spoon, transfer to a paper towel-lined plate. Drain grease from the skillet and then return to heat. Add butter to the skillet. Once butter has melted, add leeks, sage, thyme, and 1-1/2 teaspoons salt and cook until they start to turn golden brown and become tender, about 10 minutes. Once potatoes are cool enough to handle, cut them in half and carefully scoop out the insides to within about a 1/8-inch of the side. Place flesh in a large bowl and mash with a fork or potato masher. Add sausage, leeks, and sour cream. Stir until thoroughly combined. Place an oven rack within the top third of the oven. Preheat broiler. Spoon mixture back into the sweet potato shells. Top with Swiss cheese. Arrange stuffed potatoes on a foil lined baking sheet. Broil potatoes until cheese is melted, about 4 minutes.

Sweet Potato Chili with Black Beans Serves 6 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 large onion, chopped 1 medium yellow bell pepper, chopped 3 cloves garlic minced 1-1/2 teaspoons chili powder 1-1/2 teaspoons ground cumin 1-1/2 teaspoons dried oregano leaves 3 cups beef broth 2 cans (15 ounces) black beans, drained and rinsed 2-1/2 cups cooked turkey meat shredded, or 2 cups cooked ground turkey meat 2 cups cooked and mashed sweet potato 1 can (14.5 ounces) hot tomatoes with green chilies, undrained 1/2 cup dry sherry 3/4 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon black pepper Shredded cheddar cheese, optional Heat oil in a large stock pot over medium-high heat. Add onion, bell pepper, and garlic. Cook until tender, about 8 minutes. Stir in chili powder, cumin, and oregano. Add all remaining ingredients except cheese. Stir well and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low. Simmer for 45 minutes to 1 hour, stirring occasionally. Top with shredded cheddar, if desired. eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 23


{ mississippi made }

Get a Taste of Freshly-Picked Fruits and Vegetables With Redneck Foods by susan marquez

D

an Bristow says he’s always liked to cook. “The fact of the matter is, I like to eat. And I’ve been called particular, but I just like good food!” After breaking his back during a serious car accident four years ago, Bristow was sidelined from his job in construction. “I was bored out of my gourd, and I started going through recipes collected by my mother, grandmother, and aunts. I decided to cook for my family.” He set up a makeshift kitchen in his garage and worked on a salsa recipe. “I used my mom’s recipe and combined it with another recipe and came up with a signature salsa.” His family loved the salsa, so he decided to give a jar to his friend who worked with Super Junior stores in Vicksburg. “I went back a few days later, and he raved over the salsa. He said he wanted five or six jars to see if it would sell in his store. Lucky for me, it sold like crazy!” Knowing he was on to something, Bristow went to work, making enough salsa to fill 600 jars. “I go to the Wildlife Extravaganza in Jackson each year, so I took my salsa and started sampling it there. I sold it for $10 a jar. A guy gave me his card and told me to make an appointment to talk with him. I was so busy sampling salsa, I put his card in my pocket and forgot about it.” When he returned home, Bristow remembered the business card and was surprised to see it was from Chuck Head, District Manager of Kroger. “I called him Monday morning, we met on Tuesday, and it wasn’t long before our products were in all the Kroger stores in the Delta District, which includes areas from Paducah, Ky., to Memphis, Tenn., to Jackson, Miss., to Little Rock, Ark.

24 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

Dan Bristow Founder of Redneck Foods


eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 25


At that point, his cooking hobby became a company, and Bristow decided to call it Redneck Foods. “Where I’m from, fellas who work in the garden and orchards are called rednecks, because the back of their necks gets red in the sun. I wanted people to think of the fresh taste of just-picked fruits and vegetables when they see the label and hear the name.” The label features a vintage pickup truck. “That truck was behind my house when I was growing up. It had no wheels or motor, but it had a transmission, so it could be steered. I think I drove that truck a million miles while I was growing up playing makebelieve. It reminds me of simpler times.” Thanks to his Kroger connections, Bristow developed more products and sourced co-packers who could remain true to his recipes. In addition to the original salsa recipe (which Bristow says is as good on biscuits and eggs as it is with tortilla chips), there is a spicier version, as well as a full line of jams, jellies, pickles, and sauces. “We use the highest quality ingredients possible, and we make our jams and jellies the way they did in the 1800s.” For example, Bristow says the strawberry jam has only the freshest strawberries, lemon juice, sugar, and pectin. “Our apple butter is super popular. We have a huge following for that in Texas. We also have a restaurant chain in Texas that buys our chow chow to use on their poboys. They call it their secret ingredient!” Bristow says he loves the Cajun Candy, which is a jalapeño relish. “It’s great in deviled eggs. I use a tablespoon for every six yolks, and then add a little on top for garnish. It’s also great in meatloaf, on peas and greens, and it’s wonderful on grilled cheese sandwiches.” Another product he raves about is the raspberry jalapeño jam, which is great with cream cheese and crackers, but Bristow likes to melt it down in a saucepan and use as a brush-on glaze for grilled chicken, pork chops, ribs, and hamburgers. The products are sold in Kroger stores as well as other grocery chains regionally, thanks to Bristow’s food broker. “We’re in Piggly Wiggly, Mack’s, Corner Market, Super Junior stores, and more. In Vicksburg, we sell a lot of product out of Haden Hardware.” While he does no advertising, Bristow has figured out the best way to market his products is for people to taste them. “Once they taste our products, it’s on! People keep coming back for more!” Bristow says he works festivals, hunting shows, and flea markets every weekend, as well as doing tastings in stores. “We have a website with an online store. I send out orders daily to places all over the country and even around the world. We’ve had people in the military in Iraq and Afghanistan order it, and we have also shipped to Canada. We have shipped our apple butter all over the world!” Bristow says football tailgating season is huge for Redneck Foods. “It’s ideal for all kinds of football parties.” Bristow is constantly developing new products. “I’m real excited about our new corn relish that’s about to come out. We are also coming out with a new line of dry soup and chili mixes.” In hindsight, Dan is amazed how his company has grown in only four years. “I just wanted to do some cooking for my family, but all the pieces fell into place for me to have this company. I suppose it was meant to be, but I never dreamed it would be like this. I’m grateful folks like what we’re doing.” edm Redneck Foods 601.540.1407 www.redneckfoods.net photos by debra Gallaway 26 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


Give a gift that lasts all year, a gift subscription to...

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI 12

re

ntry Sto

Oktoc Cou

VOLUME ER 6

8, NUMB

Only 24

. k n i r d . t eaMISSISSIPPI king As

iches | Coo

n Sandw

ed Chicke

r Fri To-Die-Fo

guage |

a First Lan

$

P ecan Praline ern th u So Sweet Potato P ie

eat. drink.

for six issues!

MISSISSIPPI

IPPI

k. MISSISS

eat. drin

vember

October/No

www.eatdrinkmississippi.com

k’s Networ ippi Food ey drive Mississ turk annual •1

2019 s | Com

s Ma

rket

Places

to Win

e & Din

e | Mis

sissipp

| Cor

i Me

inth

’s Slu

gbu

rger

Glucks

tadt’s

ie-For

Frie

d Chi

cken

Sandwi

ches

| Coo

king

As a

First

Langua

Germa

nFest

l

Oktoc

Country

Stor

e

ne P South ecan er Swee n t Pota to P ie

Kebabs drink.

IPPI

MISSISS

MISSISS IPPI

IPPI

MISSISS

G rille d

ge |

Prali

eat.

drink.

drink.

PatrioPetrfe ctly ic Tre a ts

ad |

Festiva

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI

12 To-D

R6

Farmer

R5

munity

redible

E 8, NUMBE

kshake

E 8, NUMBE

e Mil

eat.

eat.

Subscribe online at www.eatdrinkmississippi.com or cut out this form and mail to us at P.O. Box 1663, Madison, MS 39130

Octob

mber

ember

/Septe

er/Nov

August 2019

2019

uly 2019

June/J

SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

10 Inc

eat. d eat. d MISS rin k ISSIP . MISSISSrIPiPnI k. MISSISSrIPiPnI k. PI VOLUM

R4

E 8, NUMBE

VOLUM

rem

VOLUM

7 Ext

eat. d

bied coc enh arn a-c ola to 125th commemmuseu ann ora m firs t botiversaryte tled of cok e eat. drink

Loca win l chef s compcooking etiti ons

eat. drink

. MISS

ISSIPPI

. MISS

•1

ISSIPPI

•1

Miss

issipp annu i Food al tu Ne rkey twork’s drive eat. drink

. MISS

ISSIPPI

•1

MY SUBSCRIPTION

GIFT SUBSCRIPTION

1-year $24

1-year $24

FROM: __________________________________________ NAME __________________________________________ ADDRESS __________________________________________ CITY __________________________________________ STATE ZIP __________________________________________ PHONE __________________________________________ E-MAIL ADDRESS

PAYMENT ENCLOSED BILL ME LATER TO: __________________________________________ NAME __________________________________________ ADDRESS __________________________________________ CITY __________________________________________ STATE ZIP

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 27


28 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


{ community }

Help Those in Need With Mississippi Food Network's Annual Turkey Drive story by paige mckay | photos courtesy of mississippi food network

F

or the eighth year in a row, the Mississippi Food Network, 16 WAPT, and Kroger are teaming up for their annual Turkey Drive that’s set to take place on Thursday, November 21. The brainchild of WAPT and the Mississippi Food Network, the Turkey Drive was created several years ago when WAPT’S news director at that time came up with the idea, and it has been going strong ever since. Each year, the Mississippi Food Network and WAPT set up shop at local Kroger stores in the Jackson-metro area and encourage shoppers to purchase frozen turkeys to donate to the Food Network’s food pantry so that they can help those in need during the Thanksgiving holiday season. The Mississippi Food Network covers 56 counties in central Mississippi and is partnered with 436 agencies that help provide food for those in need. Over the last several years, the Turkey Drive has collected about 3,000 turkeys during each drive. This year, they are upping the ante and seeking to multiply that number greatly. “We, along with WAPT and Kroger, have set a goal of 10,000 turkeys this year,” said Marilyn Blackledge, Director of Development at Mississippi Food Network. The Turkey Drive kicks off bright and early at 4:30 a.m. when WAPT goes on the air, and shoppers can stop by the I-55 North Kroger in Jackson, the Highway 51 Kroger in Madison, the Clinton Kroger, and the Spillway Kroger throughout the day to purchase turkeys or give monetary donations for Mississippi Food Network volunteers to purchase turkeys. “We also have other options to make it easier for people to help us with the Turkey Drive,” Blackledge said. “You can always make a donation in person or online, and we have cards you can scan at the register, too, that will go toward the Turkey Drive.” Shoppes at Kroger can add a turkey or two to their shopping list and hand it over to the Turkey Drive volunteers upon leaving the store, and a lot of businesses and organizations even make the Turkey Drive their annual holiday project and show up in masses to purchase entire shopping cartsworth of turkeys. “Some companies will come and bring us 100 turkeys,” Blackledge said. “The community has really embraced it and come back year after year.” Once the turkeys are collected and the Turkey

Drive winds down at 6:30 p.m., the turkeys are taken to the Food Network’s food pantry and are then distributed to the families in need throughout the holiday season. “Another reason we’re upping the number of turkeys needed is so that we can provide for even more families this year,” Blackledge said. Like any event, the Turkey Drive takes a lot of manpower and an “all hands on deck” attitude, and the Mississippi Food Network is always looking for volunteers to help out on the day of the Turkey Drive. Whether it’s event staff, community volunteers, or people passing out information at the doors of Kroger, there are endless volunteer opportunities for the community to get involved. Whether you choose to donate a turkey, money, or time, you can help 16 WAPT, Kroger, and Mississippi Food Network reach their goal of 10,000 turkeys this year and help feed those in our community who need it the most. Make sure to head out to any of the four participating Kroger stores on November 21st and fill your shopping cart with turkeys or just add one to your shopping list. If you’d like to volunteer the day of the Turkey Drive, visit www.msfoodnet.org and select the Get Involved tab on the website. You can also make donations online. “Anything helps, and we appreciate any donations,” Blackledge said. edm

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 29


Canadian Born Elizabeth and Jeremy Jack and Stacie Koger show off one of Silent Shade’s tractors that includes cutting-edge technology.

Delta Grown

30 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


{ fresh from the farm }

Silent Shade Planting Company Aims to Be a 'Farm for the Future' story and photography by paige mckay

W

ith a home office in Belzoni and farmland spread across Humphreys and Holmes counties, Silent Shade Planting Company is focusing on sustainable, high quality crops and farming for the future, and that’s been the goal since it got its beginnings in 1979 when Willard and Laura Lee Jack migrated to the Mississippi Delta from Ontario, Canada. The Jacks both grew up on a farm in Canada, but rapid urbanization of the area limited the possibility of future growth for their farming operation. So, Willard and Laura Lee packed their belongings and moved to the Mississippi Delta, an area with good soil and the opportunity to grow their row crop operation. From there, Silent Shade Planting Company was born, and it’s been going strong and steady ever since. Silent Shade started out with just 1,000 acres in 1979, and all three of the Jack children worked on the farm throughout their childhood. In 2007, Jeremy Jack, the youngest of the three, returned to the Delta after working in Washington, D.C., to start learning how to run the operation. Today, Willard and Laura Lee are still very involved in the farm, but Jeremy is now the is now the CEO and COO of the operation. With close consultation with his father, Jeremy started to grow the farming operation and the team even more upon his return.

Jeremy’s sister, Stacie Koger, joined the farm team in 2009 as CFO. She manages the company finances and also markets the crop. Jeremy’s wife, Elizabeth, came on board in 2013 to handle human resources, public relations, and compliance. Though it is very much a family affair, Silent Shade also employs 20 Delta locals, and they also participate in the H2A program, which allows South African natives to obtain a work visa and work on the farm for 10 months out of the year. This helps Silent Shade fill temporary farm jobs during their busy months when they might be short on local help. Today, Silent Shade has grown to nearly 12,000 row crop acres all within a 20-mile radius of Belzoni. Willard started out farming corn, soybeans, cotton, and rice, and Jeremy has kept those as the four main staple crops to this day. One thing that sets Silent Shade apart, though, is that they are not a farm-totable farm. “Right now, we’re harvesting our corn, and it will go to south Mississippi to different chicken feed mills,” Elizabeth explained. “So, it’s not table corn.” The rice from Silent Shade, Stacie explained, goes to Producers Rice, where it is milled. Producers then determines whether the finished product gets added into soups or dried rice for the grocery store.

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 31


As for the cotton from Silent Shade, once it’s baled, it’s taken to Staplcotn in Greenwood and is distributed from there, and the soybean crops are sent to the river for export. Being that Silent Shade is such a large operation and covers thousands of acres, it could be easy to lose track of things and get overwhelmed, but with the help of cuttingedge technology, Jeremy is able to keep track of everyone and everything with ease, and they take pride in the fact that they’re always using the most up-to-date technology in any aspect possible. “Our mission statement is ‘Farm for the Future,’ and that’s really what we try to stand by,” Elizabeth said. “Jeremy, like Willard as well, has always supported trying new things, whether it be new seed varieties, crop protection services, or technology. We believe that if we aren’t changing or evolving yearly as a farm, then we will eventually become stagnant. A farm that remains stagnant will eventually be highly equipped for a 32 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


world that no longer exists.” For example, Jeremy can tap into his computer or smart phone and see exactly where every combine, every sprayer, and every other piece of equipment is at any time. He can also see the yield from each field and how good or bad the soil is in certain spots, and this helps determine how much fertilizer each acre needs. The technology aspect is extremely important to Jeremy, Elizabeth, and the rest of the crew, and it helps ensure that they are producing the highest quality product in the most efficient way possible. Though it differs from most farm-to-table operations that many people know of, Silent Shade is similar in the fact that Jeremy and his crew are intentional when it comes to farming, and they are always looking for the best ways to get the best and most high-quality products. Farming for the future is their mission, and they live that out each day by using the best technology and doing everything in their power to produce the highest quality products with the least amount of input. “We, as farmers, couldn’t meet our goal to feed the world if we don’t use the science and technology available to us to produce more with less,” Elizabeth said. “And that’s our goal.” edm

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 33


Winner, Winner Chicken Dinner Sandwich T

he recent launch of Popeyes’ spicy chicken sandwich seemed to have sent the world into a frenzy over spicy fried chicken and pickles on a bun. Customers stormed the doors of their local store, and many left disappointed

that the popular sandwich was sold out. If you never got your hands on the coveted sandwich from Popeyes, several restaurants throughout the state offer their own version of chicken sandwiches that might be even better. edm

Ariella’s NY Delicatessen - Jackson Located inside Cultivation Food Hall at The District at Eastover, Ariella’s is known for New York-style deli sandwiches ang bagels, but you can also find the “Better Than Popeye’s” Chicken Sandwich on the menu. This chicken sandwich includes pickle brined chicken breast fried in a New Orleansinspired batter, dill pickle slices, and Ariella’s fancy 34 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

sauce. With a side of battered fries, the Better Than Popeye’s Chicken Sandwich is typically available while supplies last each day at Ariella’s – it’s just that good. Check in with Ariella’s Facebook page each day to ensure you’re able to get your hands on one.


Hey Joe’s - Cleveland Hey Joe’s has been serving Cleveland and the Mississippi Delta since 2009 and prides itself in serving up quality food, craft beer, and live music. Burgers are a Hey Joe’s favorite, but two chicken sandwiches also stand out amongst other menu items. Playfully named after the NBA legend, the Larry Bird chicken sandwich includes lettuce, pickles, and mayonnaise served on a potato bun. For the spicy chicken lovers, opt for the Hot Larry Bird (right) – Nashville hot chicken, house slaw, house-made hot mix, pickles, and Hey Joe’s sauce. Spicy or plain, Hey Joe’s chicken sandwiches will satisfy any chicken sandwich craving.

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 35


Stagger In - Starkville Located in the heart of the Cotton District, Starkville’s Stagger In Sports Grill is known for its blue plates, fried cheeseburger, wings, sandwiches, and other bar bites. Their Clucking Double Wide sandwich is dubbed “the holy clucking grail of chicken sandwiches” and features two chicken breasts, fried or grilled, with melted American cheese, bacon, and ranch.

Southern Craft Stove + Tap - Oxford Though the name is Nashville hot chicken, this spicy chicken is finding its way onto more and more menus outside of Nashville, and Southern Craft Stove + Tap in Oxford is serving up their own version of the hot sandwich. Their Nashville hot chicken sandwich includes fried chicken smothered in house-made sweet and smoky sauce and is topped with signature slaw on a brioche bun.

Topher’s - Hattiesburg and Laurel With locations in Hattiesburg and Laurel, Topher’s Hot Hot Chicken Sandwich is for those who want to take the heat up a notch. It features Topher’s handmade chicken strips that have been tossed in their signature honey Sriracha sauce and topped 36 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

with buttermilk ranch, pepper jack cheese, and fried jalapeños on sourdough toast. If you can stand the Mississippi heat, then you might stand a chance with the Hot Hot Chicken Sandwich.


Southport Line - Biloxi Specializing in authentic NOLA-style poboys, craft cocktails, and daily food specials, Southport Line in Biloxi also features a Louisiana Chicken Sandwich that offers a little kick. This popular sandwich is made complete with fried Louisiana Hot Sauce-brined chicken, house ranch, homemade queso blanco, sliced cucumber, fresh jalapeno, and arugula all piled on top of a toasted bun from Liedenheimer Baking Company.

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 37


10 South Rooftop Bar & Grill - Vicksburg

Bulldog Burger - Starkville

This rooftop restaurant in Vicksburg offers beautiful views of the Mississippi River, specialty cocktails, delicious meals, and, of course, their very own chicken sandwich. 10 South’s That Famous Fried Chicken Sandwich includes juicy fried chicken, pepper jack cheese, candied bacon, and maplechili glaze for a hint of spice. Wash down your chicken sandwich with a Mississippi Sunset or River Breeze cocktail to complete your 10 South experience.

Known for signature burgers, Shipley Donuts bread pudding, and spiked milkshakes, this Cotton District hotspot also features a tasty chicken sandwich. Bulldog Burger’s Stuck On Chicken sandwich includes crispy fried chicken, bacon, lettuce, tomato, gruyere cheese, and turmeric mayonnaise on a brioche bun. For an added kick to your meal, order the Stuck On Chicken tossed in sweet Asian chili sauce. Their truffle fries or tater tots are the perfect companion to this tasty sandwich.

Seafood Shack Market and Deli - Moss Point The Seafood Shack in Moss Point is known for its fresh gulf seafood and poboys, but the burgers and other sandwiches are just as delicious. A family recipe from one of the Seafood Shack’s 38 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

cooks, the Famous Homemade Fried Chicken Sandwich at the Seafood Shack includes juicy fried chicken, bacon, cheese, onions, lettuce, and fried tomatoes.


Fenian’s Pub Jackson Located in Jackson’s Belhaven neighborhood, the chicken sandwich at Fenian’s Pub features buttermilk fried chicken from Joyce Farms, thinly sliced bacon strips, pickled cabbage, and creole honey mustard piled onto a Gil’s Bread bun. Stop by Fenian’s for a night of karaoke, cocktails, and chicken sandwiches.

Mugshots - Multiple locations Though Mugshots is often thought of when it comes to burgers, the menu also includes several other sandwiches that are just as delicious as the burgers. The Briscoe Inferno sandwich at Mugshots features fried chicken tenderloins tossed in Buffalo Jack’s Wang sauce, Swiss cheese, house-made ranch, lettuce, and tomato on a toasted sourdough bun, making it a delicious contender in the chicken sandwich game.

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 39


Family, Fun, & Fettucine Delta Family Passes Down Tradition of Homemade Pasta

D

story and photography by paige mckay

elta native Josephine Morlino grew up making homemade pasta in her home with her parents. Her mother was born here, but her father came to the U.S. from Northern Italy. So, making pasta was something she did frequently as a child. To this day, 90-year-old Josephine is still making pasta, only now it’s with her grandson, Phillip, and his young children. Phillip and his grandmother have been making pasta together for several years after Phillip learned that his oldest

40 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

son, a picky eater when he was younger, loved Josephine’s homemade pasta. “He was picky, but he’d eat her pasta,” Phillip said. From there, it became a fun, family tradition for Josephine to make pasta with her great grandchildren and her grandson Phillip. “We got a pasta maker at the house, and it was something fun that the kids could do with her,” Phillip said. “Those kinds of memories are priceless.”


Phillip and Josephine Morlino

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 41


Phillip eventually told Josephine that her pasta was so good that she should try to sell it, and that’s when Morlino’s Pasta came to be. About two years ago, when Downtown Butcher and Mercantile opened in downtown Greenville, Phillip began making his mother’s pasta recipe in a separate “pasta room” located inside the mercantile. A pasta machine was shipped over from Italy, Phillip met all the health department regulations, and he and his grandmother began making pasta to be sold in the mercantile. Several times a month, Phillip makes multiple 30-pound batches of angel hair, fettucine, or pappardelle noodles to be packaged and sold in the store, and some of the pasta even goes right down the street to Downtown Grille to be served to their customers – including ravioli. For Phillip, making pasta is something he does on the side, but it’s handled with just as much care and attention as a fulltime job. He arrives to the store early in the morning, before the store is even open, to prep and make his pasta. “No one can be here while I make the pasta due to health department regulations, so I usually come in around 5 a.m.,” Phillip said. The process takes around three hours for Phillip to prep his ingredients, mix the dough, and put it through the pasta machine. After the dry ingredients are poured into the machine, the machine binds the dough together, kneads it, rolls it into a flat sheet onto a spool, and it’s then cranked through a cutting head to make the various cuts of pasta. Once the pasta is cut, it’s placed onto drying racks in the pasta room, and it takes roughly 24 to 48 hours for it to dry completely, depending on the cut of pasta. Once it’s dry, it’s packaged to be sold at the mercantile or to be taken to

42 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


Downtown Grille. What makes Morlino’s Pasta unique, other than the fact that it’s authentic, is that it’s made the way it would be made in northern Italy. “Different areas of Italy have different kinds of pasta with different ingredients,” Josephine explained. “We make it how they make it in the northern part of Italy. We say ours is the best.” Morlino’s Pasta is made so that the noodles absorb whatever flavors it’s mixed with, such as sauces and other ingredients that might be added to a pasta dish. This way, the pasta flavor doesn’t overpower the flavor of everything else going into a dish. Phillip originally saw pasta making as a great way for his kids to bond and make memories with their great grandmother. He and his kids are still making those memories with Josephine, only now, they get to serve the Delta and surrounding areas by providing the community with a Mississippi made product that’s authentic and delicious. Morlino’s Pasta recipe has been in the family for several generations, and Phillip intends to keep the tradition going with his own kids. He says that once they’re old enough, they can take off with it and keep the business going. The Morlinos are all about keeping it in the family, and that’s what they intend to do. edm

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 43


International Eats 'Cooking as a First Language' Shares a Taste of the World With Tupeloans

F

by paige mckay

or Tupelo resident Lauren McElwain, she believes that inspirational for me to see that.” hospitality is a universal language, and she exemplifies That first cooking class was a success, and from there, that through her organization, Cooking as a First McElwain decided that she wanted to do it again. She asked Language. What started just over two years ago as a cooking the same group of mothers if they would host a sushi-making class for Japanese residents in her community has since turned class, and they agreed. After their sushi class, McElwain into a non-profit organization posted pictures on her whose mission is to break personal social media, and down barriers and build up the messages started flooding community over food and in asking when she would be cooking. hosting another class. From Cooking as a First there, Cooking as a First Language got its start when Language was born, and it has McElwain, director, realized been going strong ever since. that Tupelo has a large “People were messaging Japanese community due me after that first class to the Toyota plant in Blue offering to teach the next Springs. At any given time, one,” McElwain said. “My there are roughly 30 families friend from India reached that reside in Tupelo, whether out and said she would teach permanently or temporarily. an Indian food class, and Over the years, McElwain someone else said they could made friends with several of teach a Mexican food class.” the mothers. Since then, Cooking as “I had a personal food a First Language has hosted blog at the time, and some a different international of the Japanese mothers saw cooking class each month. that and asked if I could teach Each class is taught by a them an American cooking member of the community class,” McElwain said. “I said, who is from a particular ‘sure,’ even though I’d never culture, so it’s always done that before, but that I authentic and true to the would try.” respective culture. Whether McElwain and the group it’s Grecian, German, Lauren McElwain of mothers set up a time and Caribbean, or anything a place for their cooking class in between, each class is via Facebook messenger, and the app had a translator built in, informative and authentic. So far, classes have ranged from but once they arrived to McElwain’s house, it hit her that they American to sushi to Indian, Bangladeshi, Korean, Chinese, didn’t speak any English. But it didn’t matter. Mexican, Cuban, Caribbean, Thai, soul food, Venezuelan, “Once we got in my kitchen, it was inspiring,” she said. Ecuadorian, Filipino, and even international desserts. “We bonded so much faster over cooking together, and it was “All of those cultures are represented right here in Tupelo,” photo by Ryan Coon

44 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


McElwain said. “And that’s what’s so cool. You’d never know any of those people lived in Tupelo.” Cooking as a First Language classes are offered at least once a month, and each class, of course, has a certain international food theme. Tickets are just $22 per person and take place either at McElwain’s home or the home of whoever is teaching that night. “We want to keep Cooking as a First Language approachable and inclusive,” McElwain said. “Absolutely anyone is welcome.” During CFL cooking classes, each participant is given a task so that it’s interactive and everyone gets the chance to participate, and each class consists of two to three recipes. Along with cooking delicious, authentic meals, classes also consist of some sort of cultural eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 45


education, whether it’s an informative tri-fold board or the hosts dressing up in traditional outfits. Classes last about two hours, making it the perfect amount of time to interact and create a delicious meal to enjoy at the end of class. In conjunction with hosting monthly classes, Cooking as a First Language has also started to branch out into the Tupelo community with CFL Cares. CFL Cares is partnered with the Hunger Coalition in Tupelo, as well as several churches in town. Throughout this past summer, CFL Cares provided a summer series of meals for those in need through their partnership with a local church. They will also be going into Talbot House, an addiction treatment center, to teach a cooking class to those in treatment at the center. Along with expanding into the community with CFL Cares, CFL Kids also recently kicked off, offering fun and educational cooking classes for children so that they can learn the ropes of the kitchen, too. Not only is the Tupelo community getting involved with Cooking as a First Language, but other communities are looking into the organization, and CFL is franchising into other cities. McElwain and the leadership team have created a startup kit that describes everything anyone would need to know about starting their own chapter of Cooking as a First Language. Chapter one is in the beginning stages in Oxford, and another chapter will soon begin in San Diego, Calif. “We hope to end up in even more cities in the near future,” McElwain said. Cooking as a First Language has been McElwain’s passion 46 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


for the last two years, and her hopes for the future are bright. “The community has received it so well and been so energetic about it,” she said. Along with franchising into other communities and states, McElwain also has big plans to publish a Cooking as a First Language cookbook that will include a collection of stories and recipes from past teachers and hosts of different cultures. Through Cooking as a First Language, McElwain has been able to share her love of food and educate others about different cultures in Tupelo, and that’s been one her favorite aspects over the last couple years. “Eating the food is amazing, but it’s so much more than that,” she said. “I can’t tell you just how inspired and passionate I am about bringing these people together and celebrating different cultures, and it’s hard to put into words how much it means to me to be able to do that.” Lauren also added that while we can always find things to disagree about, we can all agree on the fact that food is good and connect over a meal. “Cooking as a First Language is about finding that foundation and building a relationship on that,” she said. “And everything is better that way.” For Tupelo locals, you can find your next Cooking as a First Language class on their Facebook page and purchase tickets through the Eventbrite link each month. Each class is typically held on Friday afternoons at 5:30 p.m. If you’re looking for delicious, international recipes that have been featured in different CFL classes, visit cookingasafirstlanguage.com to create a CFL-worthy meal in your own home. edm

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 47


{ from mississippi to beyond }

Candice Poss Creates Southern, Soulful Food in St. Louis By Kathy K. Martin

S

he didn’t attend culinary school or cook for any awardof the home became even greater, so she began catering in winning chefs, but Candice Poss has cooked her way her home alongside her cake business. “I kept reading as many to the top through the school of hard knocks and hard cookbooks as I could get my hands on and continued to teach work. myself as much as possible about new or different cooking The West Point native went from a 16-year-old new mother methods, techniques, and ingredients.” waitressing at Huddle House so she could buy diapers to a St. When her children were old enough to start school, Louis-based executive chef Candice accepted a job as a who’s launching a food truck baker and prep cook at the business, Graffiti Grub. Old Waverly Golf Club in Through the years, she has 2007, where she worked for created Southern-inspired Chef David Schnell. As she menus for restaurants, recalls all of the chefs she which reminds her of worked with over the years, her Mississippi roots. “I he remains her favorite. really realized how much I “He cooks with heart, and truly love Southern foods he really taught me the and flavors like sorghum importance of layering molasses, the holy trinity and balancing flavors, and [onion, bell pepper, and the importance of fresh celery], butter, Cajun spice, in-season ingredients.” pimento cheese, buttermilk After two years, he moved biscuits, okra, and the list on and she stayed and goes on, but these are a few worked as pastry chef and of my favorites.” sous chef for three more She credits all of the years. One day, he called many chefs she learned from and asked her to move over the years, but especially to St. Louis and work for her mother and grandmother him again at Greenbriar for showing her all of the Hills Country Club. She fine points of great Southern moved to St. Louis in the cooking. “I have a whole big summer of 2012, and after Southern family of good four years at Greenbriar cooks, and everything we do Hills, she moved to the in our family largely revolves Moonrise Hotel as sous around food. It’s how we chef. Five months later, she show love and appreciation was promoted to executive for one another.” chef. “I’ve never much cared After her job as a waitress about titles. However, I do at Huddle House from 1999 like the somewhat creative Candice Poss to 2001 advanced to cook, freedom that comes along she later moved on to a job at a grocery store/deli. “I learned with being an executive chef,” says Candice, “To me, that is the to fry, fry, and fry some more. And also to make cornbread.” most fun part about what I do. Taking ingredients and creating When the cake decorator quit one day without notice, she said something new, or my own take on something old.” that she was thrilled to fill her position. Her experience led to a Her cooking philosophy revolves around this love of home business as a cake baker and decorator. By this time, she creativity. Candice says she wouldn’t thrive in an environment had three more children, and the demands of working outside of making the same food every day and following the same

48 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 49


done-to-death recipes. She thinks this is too boring and doesn’t present a chef ’s true personality. Her job at Cork and Barrel Chop House and Spirits led to her opening 909 Public House with some former colleagues, where she developed its Southern-focused menu with items such as fried green tomatoes, blackened catfish and andouille grits, and chicken and andouille gumbo. That creative experience focusing on her hometown flavors further inspired her food truck business. “My idea is to bring really good Southern-inspired food to the streets of St. Louis. Isn’t

that what Southern hospitality is all about?” While she finalizes the food truck, she continues to work as executive chef of The Chocolate Pig restaurant, where she created another Southern menu. “I try really hard to cook with heart and passion,” she says, “I also keep an eye on details and try to use fresh, seasonal, and local ingredients when I can. I stay true to who I am and who I want to be as a chef.” She follows the advice of Thomas Keller, who said, “A recipe has no soul. You, as the cook, must bring soul to the recipe.” edm

Shrimp and Creamy Grits

grits come back up to a bubble, then immediately reduce heat to low and cover. Let simmer, checking on them occasionally and stirring to make sure they are not sticking. Continue to let the grits simmer while covered for 25-30 minutes for regular grits or 45 minutes to an hour for stone ground grits. If grits become too thick at this point, add a little cream to thin them out. Once the grits have a smooth mouthfeel and are not crunchy, they are done. Stir in the butter, cream, and salt to taste. At this point, add cheese if you so choose.

6 to 8 servings   3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 medium green bell pepper, finely diced 1 medium red bell pepper, finely diced  1 small onion, finely diced  5 to 6 strips bacon, fully cooked and chopped (optional) 1/2 pound andouille sausage, quartered and cut into 1/4inch pieces  3 garlic cloves, minced 3 to 4 tablespoons Cajun spice 1-1/2 pounds medium-sized shrimp, peeled and deveined 1 cup chicken stock, plus more to taste 4 tablespoons butter, cubed  Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste Creamy grits, for serving (recipe follows) Green onion or chives, chopped, for serving (optional)   To a large sauté pan over medium-high heat, add the oil, then the green and red bell peppers and onion, and sauté 3 to 4 minutes. Add the bacon, if using, Andouille, garlic, and Cajun spice, and sauté 1 minute. Add the shrimp and chicken stock and simmer 3 to 4 minutes, flipping shrimp to ensure even cooking.  Reduce the heat to medium, add the butter, and simmer until slightly thickened, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the salt and pepper, to taste. Serve immediately over grits garnished with green onion, if using.

Creamy Southern-Style Grits 3 cups of whole milk 1 cup chicken stock 2 teaspoons kosher salt, plus more 1 cup stone ground (recommended) or regular grits (not  instant)  1/2 - 1 cup heavy cream, or more 1/2 stick unsalted butter   Heat the milk and stock in a heavy-bottom sauce pan until boiling. Pour in grits while whisking continuously to ensure no lumps form. Stir in 2 teaspoons of salt. Let 50 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

Tips: When cooking grits, you want to cook them in water, stock, or milk. Any combination of the three is fine as long as you keep within the 4:1 ratio - 4 cups of liquid to 1 cup grits. Hold the cream until the end. Grits absorb water or milk better than heavy cream. If you begin with the cream, a lot of times your grits will remain crunchy. If you like and want the natural corn flavor to shine through, use all water or a water and stock combo. For creamy, decadent grits, it’s mostly milk, a little stock, and lots of cream and butter at the end.


Coconut Pie This is my grandmother’s recipe, and it is a family favorite. We make several of these pies every holiday, and it is always the first to go. The base of this pie is actually just an old-fashioned buttermilk pie recipe with coconut added to it. The sweetness of the coconut goes perfectly with the tanginess of the buttermilk pie. - Candice Poss 1-1/2 cups sugar 3 large eggs 3 tablespoons butter, melted 3 tablespoons all purpose flour 1 cup buttermilk 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract  Juice of one lemon 1 (7-ounce) bag coconut flakes 1 (9-inch) pie crust, unbaked, store-bought or homemade (recipe follows) Whipped cream topping (recipe follows) Toasted coconut (recipe follows) In a large bowl, whisk together sugar and eggs. Add in remaining ingredients except coconut, and whisk until combined. Once all is combined well, stir in the coconut and pour into prepared pie crust. Bake at 350 degrees F for 40-45 minutes or until center is set and color is golden brown. Remove from oven and let cool completely. Top with whipped cream topping and sprinkle with toasted coconut.  

Butter Pie Crust 1-1/4 cups all purpose flour 1 teaspoon salt  1 stick cold butter, cut into cubes 2-6 tablespoons ice water Place flour and salt into bowl of food processor. Add in cubed butter and pulse until course meal or small peasized lumps form. Add ice cold water, one tablespoon at a time, while pulsing, just until dough forms and comes together. Do not overwork dough. Take out and roll into ball , then pat into a disk. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 2 hours. Take chilled dough out of fridge, unwrap, and roll out into a 13-inch diameter circle. Work quickly as to not let dough get too warm. Once rolled out, place into 9-inch pie plate and gently press down into bottom and on sides of pan. Trim any excess or uneven overhang and then flute edges by pressing dough between your thumb and index finger. Prick the bottom of the pie crust with a fork 4 or 5 times all over. Refrigerate 20 minutes. Fill and bake.  

Whipped Cream Topping 1 cup heavy cream 3 tablespoons sugar 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract Place all ingredients into a cold bowl, and beat with an electric mixer until medium to stiff peaks form. Be careful to not over beat.  

Toasted Coconut 1/2 cup coconut flakes Spread coconut flakes out evenly onto baking sheet, and put in 325-degree F oven for 10 minutes. Half way through, take out and stir around to ensure even toasting. Return to oven for 5 more minutes or until golden brown.

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 51


{ from the bookshelf }

Miss Juanita's Delta Cuisine By Juanita Emily Caldwell Published by Sartoris Literary Group by PAIGE MCKAY

I

n Miss Juanita’s Delta Cuisine cookbook, readers can find classic, Southern dishes including casseroles, side dishes, bread, meat dishes, salads, and desserts. Written and put together by Juanita Emily Caldwell, an Itawamba county native who later moved to the Delta, this cookbook offers a walk through Mississippi Delta culinary history that spans across eight decades, and it fulfills the dream Miss Juanita had for so many years to become a writer. Growing up in the 1920s and early 1930s, Juanita Turner began reading books at an early age. She awaited the arrival of new books, and the local librarian would call to let her know when they received new books. She toyed with the idea of someday becoming a writer herself, encouraged by the fact that her grandfather, Steve Turner, helped write the Mississippi Constitution of 1890. So, reading and writing seemed to run in the family. Unfortunately, the Great Depression put a damper on her literary dreams as it curtailed the book pipeline into the state of Mississippi. Food, clothing, and even books were hard to come by during this time. More disaster came when her father’s two department stores, located in Fulton and Alabama, were destroyed. One was burned to the ground, and the other was robbed in the middle of the night. After the stores were destroyed, the only job Juanita’s dad could find was as a prison warden at Parchman Farm, Mississippi’s state penitentiary located in the Delta. So, Miss Juanita, her parents, and her two brothers packed their things and made the move to the prison housing. Miss Juanita began school at Drew High School and graduated in 1938. In the early 40s, her family moved to Greenville. At this time, Miss Juanita’s dream of becoming a writer was still on the backburner when she met her husband James L. Dickerson of Virginia, who was serving in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II and was stationed at the air base in Greenville. They married and

52 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

had a son, James, Jr., and a daughter, Susan. Miss Juanita’s husband later passed away in the early 1950s as a result of a boating accident, and she raised their two children as a single mother while living in Hollandale, only to later survive the death of her second husband, Dick Caldwell, a retired World War II U.S. Army Captain. During all this time, though, Miss Juanita had been collecting recipes for meals that were prepared daily in the heart of the Mississippi Delta. Miss Juanita saw the value of telling her story through the recipes she collected. Her cookbook is more than just recipes as it offers a look into the Delta culinary history. This collection of over 100 recipes serves as a culinary documentary that represents more than 80 years of preparing and enjoying the unique cuisine that’s offered throughout the pages of Miss Juanita’s Delta Cuisine. Some of the recipes in this cookbook, such as the one for the Thanksgiving and Christmas cornbread dressing and chicken ‘n’ dumplings, date back to the 1930s, while recipes such as Tamale Pie and Amalgamation Cake are from the 50s. Readers will also notice a “Walk on the Wild Side” chapter of the cookbook, which includes recipes for Squirrel Dumplings, Wild Dove, and marinated venison. To satisfy any sweet tooth, Miss Juanita’s most popular dessert, Frozen French Pastry, can be found in the desserts chapter, along with recipes for caramel pie, chocolate cake, Meringue Kisses, Date Nut Cake, Lemon Icebox Pie, and Toasted Coconut Pie. Miss Juanita’s Delta Cuisine not only offers delicious food but also a look into Delta history and Miss Juanita’s personal history. And at almost 98 years old, she finally fulfilled her dream of becoming a writer and has a book of her own. edm


Cornbread Dressing This was my mother’s (Rada Kinard Turner) dressing, and it was probably passed on to her from her mother. The earliest I remember eating it was in the 1930s. Certainly, we enjoyed it at Thanksgiving and Christmas when we lived on the grounds of Parchman Farms. 1 pan of cornbread, crumbled (recipe follows) 8 slices of loaf bread, torn into pieces 2 onions, finely chopped 1 cup celery, finely chopped 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon black pepper 1 teaspoon sage 1 can chicken broth 1 can cream of chicken soup 2 eggs, beaten Sauté all ingredients. If more liquid is needed, use more broth. The mixture needs to be sloppy, but not soupy. Pour in oven-safe pan(s) and bake at 350 degrees F for about one hour.

Cornbread 2 cups self-rising cornmeal 1/4 cup Crisco oil 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 eggs Mix with milk to make a sloppy mixture. Pour in a greased pan and cook at 400 degrees F until light brown. Let cool.

My Favorite Caramel Pie 3 egg yolks (save whites for meringue) 1/3 cup flour 1 can sweetened condensed milk 2 cups hot water 1/2 cup sugar 1/4 stick butter 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Pre-made pie crust In an iron skillet, slowly – and I stress the word slowly because it can burn before you know it – brown the sugar, then pour in hot water. Set mixture aside. In a 2-quart glass, microwavable mixing bowl, combine egg yolks, flour, and sweetened condensed milk. Beat well. Gradually add water with brown sugar in it. Stir well. Cook in microwave for 6 minutes at 2-minute intervals, stirring after each time. After the last 2 minutes, add butter and vanilla. Let sit. Spoon into cooked 8-by-9inch pie crust. Make meringue from saved egg whites and spread onto the pie. Brown in the oven. Let cool, slice, and serve.

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 53


{ raise your glass }

A

H

Spooky

Twist on a Classic Cocktail

alloween is all about celebrating fall with sweet treats. After the kids have feasted on their treats, chef and food personality, Leigh Ann Chatagnier (My Diary of Us), says parents deserve a treat of their own. Her twist on a classic cocktail is the perfect drink to relax with after passing out candy to all those little ghosts and goblins and enjoy all fall long. “I love a warm and cozy cocktail as soon as fall rolls around, and I thought how fun is it to make a drink that is spooky enough for Halloween?” Leigh Ann states. “This is the perfect drink to mix up in a large batch and serve it pitcher style in a thermos if you are having a Halloween party (for adults!).”

Leigh Ann Chatagnier loves to share favorite recipes with her social media followers. As the founder of My Diary of Us, Leigh Ann invites visitors to come into her kitchen and cook with her and her family. She is a frequent guest on Houston Life, and cooks up family-friendly meals on Home & Family on The Hallmark Channel and NBC Syndicated Daytime. She has been featured in Louisiana Cookin’ magazine, Red Trycycle and inRegister. Leigh Ann is the author of two cookbooks, The Unexpected Cajun Kitchen: Classic Cuisine with a Twist of Farm-to-Table Freshness (Skyhorse/2016), and Natural Baby & Toddler Treats: Homemade, Nourishing Recipes for Baby and Beyond (Skyhorse/2019). Chatagnier lives in Houston, Texas with her husband and young son. Visit her at www.MyDiaryofUs.com.

Spiced Caramel Apple Hot Toddy You will love the warmth from the cinnamon and star anise as well as the hint of sweetness from the apple cider and caramels! The drink is rounded off with a kick of bourbon to keep all the flavors in check and makes this hot toddy one that you are going to love mixing up way past Halloween! Serves 2 3 ounces Bulleit Bourbon 1 cup apple cider 1/8 cup fresh orange juice plus 1 whole orange slice 8 caramel candies 1 splash of water 1 cinnamon stick 2 star anise 8 whole cloves

In a small saucepan, combine apple cider, orange juice, 4 caramel candies, cinnamon stick, start anise, orange slice, and whole cloves, and simmer for 15 minutes until fragrant and caramels have melted stirring occasionally. In two heat-safe glasses, add 1-1/2 ounces of bourbon each. Take the remaining caramels and add a splash of water to a microwave safe bowl and microwave on high for 30 seconds to 1 minutes until caramels are melted and smooth. (Alternatively you can melt on the stove.) Strain the warmed spiced caramel apple cider into each glass equally, stir with the bourbon, and garnish with an apple slice and drizzle the melted caramels over the rim of each glass. Serve immediately. Recipes/photos reprinted with permission by Leigh Ann Chatagnier / www.MyDiaryofUs.com

54 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


Bin 612 boasts a cafe-like atmosphere popular with college students and locals alike. The Bin’s menu offers an eclectic blend of pizzas, panini, burgers and more made with fresh local ingredients.

612 UNIVERSITY DR. • STARKVILLE 662.324.6126 WWW.EATLOCALSTARKVILLE.COM MONDAY-THURSDAY 11AM-12AM FRIDAY-SATURDAY 11AM-1AM SUNDAY 11AM-10PM

618 22nd Ave., Meridian | www.harvestgrillms.com | 601-282-5069

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Only $24 for six issues!

for a taste of Mississippi all year long! 10 Inc

s | Com

s Ma

rket

Places

to Win

e & Din

e | Mis

sissipp

| Cor

i Me

inth

’s Slu

gbu

rger

ad |

Festiva

Glucks

tadt’s

Frie

d Chi

cken

Sandwi

ches

| Coo

king

As a

First

Langua

Germa

nFest

l

ge |

Oktoc

Country

Stor

e

Prali

IPPI

IPPI

MISSISS

MISSISS

IPPI

MISSISS

ne P South ecan er Swee n t Pota to P ie

Kebabs drink.

drink.

drink.

G rille d

eat.

eat.

eat.

PatrioPetrfe ctly ic Tre a ts

ie-For

R6

Farmer

R5

munity

redible

E 8, NUMBE

kshake

E 8, NUMBE

e Mil

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI

12 To-D

eat. eat. MISS rin k. MISSdISSrIPiPnI k. MISSdISSrIPiPnI k. ISSIP PI VOLUM

R4

E 8, NUMBE

VOLUM

rem

VOLUM

7 Ext

eat. d

Octob 2019

2019

uly 2019

mber

ember

/Septe

er/Nov

August

June/J

Subscribe online at www.eatdrinkmississippi.com or cut out this form and mail to us at P.O. Box 1663, Madison, MS 39130

bied coc enh arn a-c ola to 125th commemmuseu ann ora m firs t botiversaryte tled of cok e eat. drink

Loca win l chef s compcooking etiti ons

eat. drink

. MISS

ISSIPPI

. MISS

•1

ISSIPPI

•1

Miss

issipp annu i Food al tu Ne rkey twork’s drive eat. drink

. MISS

ISSIPPI

•1

MY SUBSCRIPTION

GIFT SUBSCRIPTION

1-year $24

1-year $24

FROM:

Makes a great gift! www.eatdrinkmississippi.com

__________________________________________ NAME __________________________________________ ADDRESS __________________________________________ CITY __________________________________________ STATE ZIP __________________________________________ PHONE __________________________________________ E-MAIL ADDRESS 11-19

PAYMENT ENCLOSED BILL ME LATER TO: __________________________________________ NAME __________________________________________ ADDRESS __________________________________________ CITY __________________________________________ STATE ZIP

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 55


{ where to eat }

Thirty-Two

IP Casino Resort and Spa, 32nd floor • 850 Bayview Ave., Biloxi • (228) 436-3000 story and photography by julian brunt

S

top at the corner of Bayview and Caillavet in Biloxi and look up, way up, 335 feet up in fact, and you will be looking at the top floors of the IP Casino and its famed fine dining restaurant, Thirty-Two. Its pretty impressive from ground level, but once you have been whisked up to the top floor by an express elevator and are seated at a window seat, you are in for a romantic evening like never before. The decorum can be described as elegant and classy, but subdued, earth tones highlighted by soft burgundies. Tall windows look north to the Biloxi Bay and south to the Mississippi Sound and let in just enough light to feel warm. The house lighting is kept low, too, sufficient backup so that there are no shadows and a menu can be easily read. This is the sort of attention to detail that makes Thirty-Two as good as it is. There is a large wine cellar in the middle of the restaurant, which holds close to 700 labels, all carefully selected, and you can expect your server to be able to suggest the right bottle for your meal. The menu, which is refreshed twice a year, is always impressive and was sparkling new for my visit. I have known Chef Matthew Kallinikos, Chef de Cuisine at Thirty-Two, for years, and he invited me to preview the new menu in September. The menu change is a collaborative effort between Chef Kallinikos and executive chef Shannon Johnson. We started out with three appetizers, which is always to my liking. First was an amazing small plate of thin strips of Mediterranean tuna, white bean hummus, preserved lemon

56 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

Matthew Kallinikos vinaigrette, mirepoix and parsley salad, cucumber pearls, and compressed garlic bread. Second, and ranking very high on the comfort level, was Guinness-braised Angus short ribs, potato rosti (a Swiss potato fritter), sunny side egg, and greens, and lastly, and a real show stopper, seared foie gras over a house made bourbon Pig Newton (intentional play on words).


Chicken and Dumplings eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 57


Tuna

This would be a good point to tell you that the mantra of this kitchen is “if we need something, we make it.” And that includes pastas, bacon, soups, sauces, stocks, demi glace, dry aged beef, and they buy as much locally sourced ingredients as they can. From the appetizers, we moved on to seafood, and I do have to admit, knowing the volume of food we were going to be served, it was more about tasting than sitting down to a family style meal. Chef Kallinikos brought out a lightly blackened Gulf snapper, with cornbread and herb crumble, on a bed of cherry tomatoes, corn, bacon roasted red onions, and butter beans, a very Southern inspiration. It was followed by porcini dusted seared scallops with white beans, Tuscan kale, mustard and roasted leek vinaigrette, and a tangerine lace. We ended this amazing evening with a crispy skin half chicken with herb dropped dumplings, long bone veal osso bucco with a brandy glace de veau, Mississippi Original Grit Girl polenta, and, the highlight of the evening, a New York strip progression that included a CBA strip, USDA prime strip, Wagyu strip, and a Japanese A-5 strip. If you know your beef, then you should be speechless right now. Chef Kallinikos has been cooking for 25 years, is a Culinary Institute of America Hyde Park grad, with an A.A., B.A. and two post-grad degrees from that prestigious institution and has been cooking at Thirty-Two for eight years. Chef Kallinikos is just the tip of the spear and has a dedicated and very talented staff, not to mention Chef Shannon Johnson, who is responsible for every restaurant at the IP Casino. This is a remarkable operation, from servers to kitchen staff. Thirty-Two 58 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

is AAA Four Diamond rated, has received numerous awards from Wine Spectator, and USA Today named Thirty-Two as number three out of the top ten casino restaurants in the USA. But don’t let the accolades put you off. If you are in the mood for a romantic evening but are on a budget, a couple appetizers to split and a glass of wine is not going to break your budget. Thirty-Two is simply stunning. Amazing food and service and a view of the sun going down over old Biloxi that you will never forget. It is the secret Coast. edm


Short Ribs

Foie Gras

Snapper

Osso Bucco

Scallops eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 59


60 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


{ featured event}

Take a Step Into the Past at the Annual Oktoc Country Store

N

story by paige mckay | photography by courtney hannoll

ow in its 49th year, the Oktoc Country Store is set to take place on Saturday, October 26, at the Oktoc Community Club, located just nine miles south of Starkville. This family fun-filled day in the country includes baked goods, a silent auction, quilt raffle, snack table, farmer’s market, live music, fun and games for the kids, and their famous Brunswick Stew that will be sold by the gallon and by the plate. The Oktoc Country Store got its start in 1970 and is hosted by the Oktoc Garden Club and Oktoc Community Club. The Community Club, founded four years after the Garden Club in 1927, holds monthly potluck suppers with educational and fun meetings for members of the community, and the Garden and Community Clubs work together to make the Country Store successful each year. The day kicks off at 10 a.m. where guests can shop around in the Club House for homemade pies, cakes, cookies, rolls, jams, jellies, and relishes. Favorite treats from years past show up on the bakery tables and include molasses cookies, cheese straws, dropped tea cakes, caramel cake, pecan pies, and various breads. Home canned treats include fig preserves, pear relish, and Frog Jam, which is a combination of figs, raspberries, oranges, and ginger.

Though the sweet treats are always delicious, the star of the Country Store is the Brunswick Stew. Batches of stew are made during the night and early morning hours by the men in the Oktoc community, and a stew lunch is held during the duration of the event for all attendees to enjoy. You can also buy it by the gallon the day of the Country Store to take home to enjoy. Many people line up early with gallon jugs in hand so that they can take some of the stew home to store in the freezer. Along with all the tasty food, the sounds of bluegrass music from Alan Sibley and the Magnolia Ramblers will fill the air throughout the day. And, don’t forget to purchase raffle tickets for a chance to win a beautiful, queen-sized scrappy string quilt, made by Garden Club members. Tickets are just $1 each. The Oktoc Country Store is free to the public, and proceeds from goods purchased inside the Club House go toward the upkeep of the Club House and the grounds, the District Five Volunteer Fire Department, and various other community projects. This year’s Oktoc Country Store will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Be sure to arrive early to secure your spot in line for the stew lunch. Fore more information about the Country Store, visit www.facebook.com/OktocCountryStore. edm

Oktoc Brunswick Stew The original recipe makes 220 gallons and is cooked in large cast iron pots. This has been modified and reduced for making 3-4 gallons. 1 pound beef, cubed (original uses beef and venison) 1 pound venison, cubed (if not using venison, double beef to 2 pounds) 10-12 ounces chicken 10-12 ounces pork, cubed 1 quart tomato pieces and juice 1 quart butterbeans 1 quart cream-style corn 1 quart tomato ketchup 1 quart sliced okra 1/2 pound rice 1/2 cup apple cider vinegar 2/3 pounds white potatoes, cubed 1/2 pound onion, chopped 1 ounce Tabasco sauce

2 ounces Worcestershire sauce 1 tablespoon butter Salt and pepper to taste Hot water (water evaporates in the long cooking time and must be added throughout) Boil chicken and remove bones, if necessary. Remove skin and finely chop all the meat. Cube remaining meat into 1-inch or less pieces and boil until tender. Combine all meats and broth. Add other ingredients and cook together very slowly at least 10 hours, stirring to prevent scorching. Add water as needed, and cook until each vegetable has lost its identity. Long, slow cooking is essential for a desirable finished product. Taste occasionally to see if additional seasoning is needed. eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 61


Food Festivals & Events October 5

October 5-6

Biloxi Collins - Mississippi Peanut Festival George E. Ohr Art & Beer Festival Mitchell Farms hosts the The George E. Ohr Art & Beer Festival will be held in Biloxi on October 5th. This event will offer an array of arts and crafts vendors, craft beer tents, a homebrewers’ competition, a camper rally with vintage campers, live music, food vendors, and more. Entry to the festival is free, but access to the beer tents will require the purchase of an armband. General admission bands are $35 and VIP bands are $60. For more information, visit www.georgeohr.org/event/ohr-fest-2019

October 5

Madison - Day in the Country

annual Mississippi Peanut Festival on their farm in Collins. The festival will include arts & crafts exhibitors, antiques, unique children’s clothes, jewelry, yard art, and lots of food. The peanut festival kicks off the farm’s pumpkin patch fun fall festivities. Call 601-606-0762 for details of scheduled events or visit www.mitchellfarms-ms.com.

October 11

Tupelo - 20th Annual Chili Fest The Downtown Tupelo Main Street Association (DTMSA) will host the 20th annual Chili Fest on Friday, October 11th. The one-day festival will consist of lunch and dinner, music, and a chili cook-off. Contact DTMSA at 662-841-6598, or go to www.tupelomainstreet.com for event details.

October 11-12

Cleveland - Octoberfest

Day in the Country is a community festival held on the grounds of Chapel of the Cross each first Saturday in October. It draws more than 10,000 visitors annually with families enjoying food, music, artisans, crafts, tours of the Chapel, Barbecue Cook-Off, the famous 63-Egg Cake, and children’s games and rides. This year’s Day in the Country will be held on October 5th. For more information, visit www. chapelofthecrossms.org or call 601-856-2593.

This year marks the 37th Octoberfest held in downtown Cleveland. This MBN sanctioned barbecue competition also includes two days of live music, over 100 arts and craft vendors, Southern cuisine, children’s area, and much more. For more information, call 662-843-2712, or visit www.octoberfestms.com.

To have your food festival or culinary event included in future issues, please contact us at info@eatdrinkmississippi.com. All submissions are subject to editor’s approval. 62 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


October 17-19

Greenville Delta Hot Tamale Festival The Delta Hot Tamale Festival is celebrating its 6th year with more events, more music, and more of those famous Delta Hot Tamales! The Delta Hot Tamale is perhaps the biggest culinary contribution to come from this area. Visitors from around the world will gather with local residents in Greenville to enjoy this delicious food. This three-day celebration includes everything from the Frank Carlton Hot Tamale Cooking Contest, the crowning of Miss Hot Tamale, a hot tamale Eating Contest, book signings by a number of well-known writers, a celebrity chefs’ Hot Tamale Cook-off, hot tamale storytelling, a parade, arts and crafts, food symposium, three stages featuring a variety of home-grown Delta musicians, and plenty of hot tamales to whet your appetite. Bring your lawn chairs and the entire family to Stein Mart Square in Downtown Greenville for a one-of-akind experience. For more information, visit www. mainstreetgreenville.com.

October 18-20

Natchez Great Mississippi River Balloon Race The 34th annual Great Mississippi Balloon Race will be held October 18-20th on the grounds of the Rosalie Mansion in Natchez. Enjoy a weekend full of live music, food vendors, a beer garden, fun and games for the kids, and much more. Friday night kicks of with a balloon glow and fireworks show followed by live music. Saturday and Sunday are both jam packed with balloon races and more live music, as well as Blufftoberfest, the craft beer fest that will be set up. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit www.natchezballoonrace.com.

October 20

Biloxi - Chefs of the Coast Celebrate culinary excellence on the Mississippi Gulf Coast at the annual Chefs of the Coast event. The Coast’s best restaurants serve food amid wine and beer, live music, fabulous entertainment, and a silent auction. This year’s event will be held on October 20 at the Miss. Coast Coliseum & Convention Center in Biloxi. Visit www.chefsofthecoast.org or call 228-324-0032 for more information.

November 2-9

Vardaman Sweet Potato Festival Vardaman is known for its production of sweet potatoes. The city celebrates this nutritious and delicious vegetable with its annual Sweet Potato Festival. Held in downtown November 3rd-10th, this festival features arts/crafts, 5K run/walk, antique tractor judging, sweet potato tasting booth, sweet potato pie eating contest, barbecued chicken dinner, sweet potato queen/king contest, sweet potato recipe contest, and more. For more information, call 662-682-7559 or visit www.vardamansweetpotatofestival. com.

November 14

Taste of Tupelo This business expo features over 100 businesses providing demonstrations, complimentary samples, and information. In addition to local restaurants, caterers, and bakeries, the Taste of Tupelo will feature exhibitors from various industries including healthcare, banking, manufacturing, retail, educational institutions, and more! This event is presented by the Community Development Foundation along with Barnes Crossing Auto Group and is open to adults ages 21 & over. eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 63


Recipe Index Avocado Crema, 17 Butter Pie Crust, 52 Caramel Pie, 53 Carrot Top Pesto, 15 Chocolate Chip Pecan Pie, 8 Chipotle Lime Black Bean Empanadas, 17 Coconut Pie, 51 Cornbread, 53 Cornbread Dressing, 53 Empanada Dough, 17 Hot Fruit, 8 King Oyster Mushroom Scallops, 15 Mashed Carrots, 15 Oktoc Brunswick Stew, 61 Praline Pecan Southern Sweet Potato Pie, 22 Red Pepper Coulis, 15 Shrimp and Creamy Grits, 50 Spiced Caramel Apple Hot Toddy, 54 Sweet Potato Chili with Black Beans, 23 Twice-Baked Sweet Potatoes, 23

Advertisers Index Bin 612, 55 BlueCross BlueShield of Mississippi, 14 Harvest Grill, 55 Mangia Bene, 3 Mississippi Food Network, 9 & 65 Mississippi Children’s Museum, Back Cover Mistletoe Marketplace, 2 Mugshots, 9 New Grass Farms, 3 Peter Anderson Festival, 9 Spoonfudge, 7 The Kitchen Table, 3 Visit Columbus, 7 Visit Jackson, 4 & 5

Follow us on Instagram to see some of the tasty, local bites we’ve discovered!

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI www.instagram.com/eatdrinkmississippi 64 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019


DID YOU KNOW? • Almost 1 in 4 Mississippians — about 690,000 people — don’t have enough to eat. • More than 1 in 4 children (28.7%) go to bed hungry most every night. Stomachs are growling all over the state. Hunger is a problem all across America, but in Mississippi, it’s practically an epidemic.

DONATE NOW! Every $1.00 donated provides seven meals to hungry Mississippians.

www.msfoodnet.org

12 To-Die-For Fried Chicken Sandwiches | Cooking As a First Language | Oktoc Country Store

VOLUME 8, NUMBER 6

Digital Subscriptions Available!

October/November 2019

Getting a taste of Mississippi has never been easier!

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI

Access issues on all your devices.

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI Praline Pecan Southern Sweet Potato Pie

Mississippi Food Network’s annual turkey drive eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 1

Visit www.eatdrinkmississippi.com to subscribe. eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 65


Till We Eat Again

BILL DABNEY PHOTOGRAPHY

Jay Reed, a graduate of Ole Miss, lives in Starkville where he is a pharmacist by day and a freelance food writer by day off. He is a member of the Southern Foodways Alliance and writes "Eats One Ate," a weekly column in the Starkville Daily News.

OCTOBER/NOVEMBER2019 2019 66 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER

It’s a Food-centric World We’re Now Living in

C

BY JAY REED

an we talk about food? Of course we can. Otherwise, you wouldn’t be reading this magazine. (To those of you who saw the picture to the left, observed the svelte, athletic figure and thought you were reading a Sports Illustrated, we apologize.) But we’re not just talking about food these days, and we’re not just reading about it. We’re definitely not just eating it to survive. Food is everywhere. Food meetings, food channels, food politics, food art, food music, food this, food that ― there’s even a food hotel now. We’ll check in there shortly. You can pull up just about any food or culture-oriented media and find heartfelt discussions of how food plays into everything we do. It’s fuel, and it’s fun. It’s a healer and a divider. It’s political and religious. It’s fast, and it’s slow. You cannot get away from it ― not for long, anyway. On the home front, Mississippi is right in the thick of the food revolution. You’re experiencing part of it right now. Not every state has a magazine dedicated entirely to food. South Dakota doesn’t have one. North Carolina doesn’t have one. Many of them will have food sections, and I’ve seen some impressive food-forward special editions of other state magazines, but the next month they go back to travel, fashion, home, and garden ― with recipes. We are not to be ignored in the celebrity chef biz, too. Vishwesh Bhatt of Snackbar in Oxford just won the James Beard award for Best Chef South. That’s kind of a big deal. Whitney Miller (Humphrey), from Poplarville, was the very first home chef to take home the trophy on Masterchef. Teen chef Mark Coblentz of Starkville made the top ten in Masterchef Junior and the finals of Chopped Junior. As of this writing, he is still the only one to be on both shows. And oh, he has his own show on Mississippi Public Broadcasting, called Making a Chef. (And it may or may not be true that yours truly has made a few appearances on said show.) I could name drop a long time here. Mississippi is also the host state for the Southern Foodways Alliance. The annual fall symposium is nearing; if everything goes as planned, it will be my tenth consecutive year to attend. All sorts of food things happen here: academic papers are shared, amazing meals are prepared, and we are usually treated to food-centric music, drama, or poetry ― one year, there was even a puppet show. I wouldn’t kid about something like that. It was amazing. I would be remiss if I didn’t mention all the Mississippi food writers, since this is a magazine full of them. Some are chefs who write, some are writers who cook (or just love to eat ― present company not excepted). The same could be said for a bevy of artists and photographers. Most have dipped a finger in all the pots, artistic and culinary. Even the inestimable Ms. Welty was known to write a word or two about food. I tried to find an exhaustive list of all the food festivals one could attend without leaving the state. It was a challenge ― not to find a festival, but to figure out how many there really are. I confirmed a minimum of 20, including watermelon, blueberry, sweet potato, chicken wings, slugburgers, hot tamales, catfish, crawfish, and all-the-otherfish. And that’s just a taste. (See what I did there?) My educated guess is that one could attend a food/wine festival or chef tasting event about once a week without trying very hard. My hometown of Starkville has had about eight different food events this year already. The food news that sent me down this trail of thinking was not, unfortunately, in Mississippi: The Taco Bell Hotel. It was a real thing, people. You’ve perhaps heard of pop-up restaurants; well, this was a pop-up hotel in Palm Springs, Calif. For one weekend only, they transformed a small boutique hotel into all things Taco Bell. Pool floats, wall art, yoga mats, bathrobes, nail polish, clothing, and - yes - the food. I make fun of my family when they want to make a run for the border (yes, I’m that old.) I prefer no frills street tacos. But if I’d had the chance to stay the weekend at The Bell, I would have given it serious consideration. Maybe next time Mississippi will make the hotel cut. In the meantime, we’ve got plenty to keep our eyes, ears, and bellies full. edm


Mediterranean Diet | Mississippi Vegan | SFA’s Guide to Cocktails

Mississippi’s Bicentennial | Backroads and Burgers | A Taste of Home Town

VOLUME 7, NUMBER 3

Make-Ahead

Short Rib Crostini

Bursting with Blueberries

Strawberries and Champagne Cheesecake

HOLIDAYAPPETIZERS

Sweet Tea Brined Pork Chops

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI

Christmas Breakfast Casserole

Gourmet Grilling | My Delicious Mississippi Life | Watermelon Carnival

eat. drink. eat. drink. eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI MISSISSIPPI MISSISSIPPI

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI Orange Slice Candy Cake

Deep South Dining | Turnip Greens & Tortillas | Philadelphia Ham Jam

Brunswick Stew

Cheddar Green Onion Biscuits Mississippi Cathead Vodka Shrimp

Romantic Dinner eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 1

+ The Trusty Diner + Airport Grocery + Monte’s Steak and Seafood + Skylight Grill + Morgan’s on Main

April/May 2018

+ V. Taco + Bentonia Bugs Crawfish + Crazy Cat Eat Up + Gitano Grill + White Pillars

11

Strawberry Iced Tea

at Home

+ The Rainey + Mai Little Chinese + The Anthony + Sonny’s Smokehouse + Dempsey’s Seafood & Steak

farm FRESH

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 1

Places to chill with a sweet treat

GREENVILLE RESTAURANT GETS CELEBRITY CHEF MAKEOVER

FOURTH OF JULY FAMILY PICNIC eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 1

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 1

Missing an issue? Back issues are available on our website at

www.eatdrinkmississippi.com l

Festiva

7 Ex

treme

ssippi

| Missi

Food &

Wine

Milks

hakes

| Comm

unity

Farmers

ER 4

Bistro

8, NUMB

Butter

VOLUME

eat. dri . k n i r d . eatMISSISSIPPIeat. drink.MISSISSIPPnI k. Perfe ct MISSISSIPPI rming

r Fa Oyste

d& | Brea

Marke

t | Corin

th’s Slu

gburg

er Fes

tival

VOLUME

VOLUME 8, NUMBER 5

ER 3

8, NUMB

10 Incredible Places to Wine & Dine | Mississippi Mead | Gluckstadt’s GermanFest

Patriotic T ly re at s

eat. drink.

Grilled Kebabs MISSISSIPPI

eat. drink.

h Crawfis s g in v Cra

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI

MISSISSIPPI

fish craw you dishes ve will lo

June/July

15

2019

bie coca denharn -co to co la museu m mmem 125th orate an first niversary bottl ed co of ke

I •1

SISSIPP

k. MIS

eat. drin

August/September 2019

ay 2019

April/M

Local chefs win cooking competitions

eat. drin

k. MIS

SISSIPP

I •1

*Price includes shipping. Single issues $7.95.

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 1

Natchez Food Tour | Clean Kitchen | Chefs of the Coast

Grilled Cheese Champions | The Magnolia Dietitian | Cleveland's Octoberfest

Holiday Recipes | See & Eat Mississippi | St. Jude Taste of Oxford

eat. drink. eat. drink. drink. eat. MISSISSIPPI MISSISSIPPI MISSISSIPPI all about

Back-to-School

CRANBERRY

CRAZE

apples

weeknight dinners

World's Best Hushpuppies | Instant Pot Recipes | Brandon Tablescapes

VOLUME 8, NUMBER 1

VOLUME 7, NUMBER 6

VOLUME 7, NUMBER 5

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI

PICK 5 BACK ISSUES FOR $2499* & SAVE 37%! Cooking under pressure

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI

Bacon and Black Eyed Pea Hummus Christmas Cherry Bread Easy Pecan Sticky Buns

15

appetizers we love! and where to find them

Oyster Shell Recycling

Shrimp and Grits

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 1

9

STATE FAIR inspired TREATS

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 1

December/January 2019

August/September 2018

Smoked Sausage Hash

October/November 2018

Baked Brie en Croute

4

PLACES TO RING IN THE NEW YEAR

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 1

11

KING CAKE CREATIONS and where to find them

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 1

eat. drink. MISSISSIPPI • 67


S

AM

GR

RO

SP E IN TE R

VENTS E AL I C

LY DAI

P

EXHIBITS E IV T AC BIRTHD AY IES RT PA

mschildrensmuseum.org • 601.981.5469 • Jackson, MS This project is partially funded through a grant by Visit Jackson.

68 • OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2019

Profile for Eat Drink Mississippi

Eat Drink Mississippi October/November 2019  

Our October/November 2019 issue features sweet potato recipes perfect for fall, Redneck Foods, Silent Shade Planting Company, delicious chic...

Eat Drink Mississippi October/November 2019  

Our October/November 2019 issue features sweet potato recipes perfect for fall, Redneck Foods, Silent Shade Planting Company, delicious chic...

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded