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East Hampshire Dictrict Council on behalf of Whitehill/Bordon Opportunity Outline Water Cycle Study for Whitehill/Bordon Green Town Vision Final Report March 2009


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Halcrow Group Limited Griffin House 135 High Street Crawley West Sussex RH10 1DQ Tel +44 (0)1293 434500 Fax +44 (0)1293 434599 www.halcrow.com Halcrow Group Limited has prepared this report in accordance with the instructions of their client, East Hampshire District Council on behalf of Whitehill/Bordon Opportunity, for their sole and specific use. Any other persons who use any information contained herein do so at their own risk.

Š Halcrow Group Limited 2009

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Page 61


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4I

4+ ?H@

I

. There are several old buildings on site which may be retained in the new development so places an additional constraint on siting SUDS. Prevention measures such as retaining as much green area as possible, and SUDS such as rainwater butts,

1

14.5

2

1

rills, permeable paving and soakaways are most likely to be suitable here, given the space constraints, although there may be opportunity for small basins/ponds - it may be possible to landscape courtyards between buildings so that ground levels are below the buildings ground levels. If any buildings have basements, infiltration SUDS should be used and sited with caution to avoid leakage into basements.

2

14.5

2

1

The disused railway runs through this site. As Whitehill Bordon policy is to safeguard the railway for potential reuse, SUDS should not be placed in the designated area. Infiltration SUDS should be used/located with caution to avoid waterlogged soil destabilising railway embankments.

3

14.5

2

1

There are several old buildings on site which may be retained in the new development, however, they are sited in only a small corner of the site so are unlikely to cause a significant constraint on the SUDS. If any buildings have basements, infiltration SUDS should be used and sited with caution to avoid leakage into basements.

4

14.5

2

1

5

14.5

2

1

6

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train. There is an old building on site which may be retained in the new development so places a constraint on siting SUDS. Also, if it has a basement, infiltration SUDS should be used and sited with caution to avoid leakage into the basement. Follow SUDS management train.

Page 62


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,

$

7

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

8

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

9

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

10

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

11

14.5

2

1

12

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

13

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

14

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

There is an old building on site which may be retained in the new development so places a constraint on siting SUDS. Also, if it has a basement, infiltration SUDS should be used and sited with caution to avoid leakage into the basement.

There is an old building covering most of the site which may be retained in the new development so places an additional constraint on siting SUDS. Also, if it has a basement, infiltration SUDS should be used and sited with caution to avoid 15

14.5

2

1

leakage into the basement. Prevention measures such as retaining as much green area as possible, and SUDS such as rainwater butts, rills, permeable paving and soakaways are most likely to be suitable here, given the space constraints, although there may be opportunity for small basins/ponds. It may even be considered appropriate to combine this site with site 14 in respect to SUDS.

16

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

17

14.5

2

1,2,3a,3b

Site includes Bordon Inclosure, which is part of the Ecology Corridor; if SUDS are located within this area they should be designed with sensitivity to the surrounding area but carefully designed swales and ponds might actually enhance these

Page 63


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,

$

areas. Part of the site is within the floodplain and it is Environment Agency policy to protect the river corridors so that there is space for fluvial flooding to occur. It is recommended that SUDS storage areas should also be located outside of FZ3a (and preferably outside FZ2) to avoid surface runoff taking up space in the floodplain as surface water and fluvial flooding often occur concurrently. Infiltration SUDS are preferable, but if this is not possible, runoff may be discharged to the watercourse with SUDS used to delay the discharge to provide attenuation and treatment. The landscaped areas provide opportunity for open-feature SUDS such as swales and basins/wetlands/ponds to collect and infiltrate/attenuate runoff. Whilst locating SUDS outside the floodplain is preferable, if space is an issue it may be acceptable to locate SUDS within FZ2 since this floods at 0.1% annual probability or less; in the event that the SUDS is overwhelmed by fluvial flooding the greater volume of river water provides dilution for the runoff water. An incident of groundwater flooding has occurred within this site suggesting groundwater levels may be close to the

18

14.5

2

1

surface. If so, there may be insufficient depth for infiltration SUDS. However, if the water table is only close to the surface in exceptional circumstances, infiltration may be viable provided times of high water table can be accommodated - a wetland/pond may be the best able to cope with the two scenarios. There are also two old buildings on site which may be retained in the new development which places an additional constraint on siting SUDS, and if they have basements then infiltration must not cause leakage into these.

19

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

20

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train. The disused railway runs through this site. As Whitehill Bordon policy is to safeguard the railway for potential reuse, SUDS should not be placed in the designated area. Infiltration SUDS should be used/located with caution to avoid waterlogged

21

14.5

2

1

soil destabilising railway embankments. There are also several old buildings on site which may be retained in the new development which places some additional constraint on siting SUDS, and if they have basements then infiltration SUDS must avoid causing leakage into the basements.

Page 64


+

,

$

The disused railway runs through this site. As Whitehill Bordon policy is to safeguard the railway for potential reuse, SUDS should not be placed in the designated area. Infiltration SUDS should be used/located with caution to avoid waterlogged soil destabilising railway embankments. There is currently a pond on site; it may be possible to increase the capacity so 22

14.5

2

1

that it can also hold some of the runoff (given the size of the site it is recommended that it be divided into several subcatchments with their own SUDS storage). However, this depends upon the ecological sensitivity of the lake and whether it can cope with significant increases in volume and pollution washed off surfaces - including filter strips before runoff reaches the lake can help mitigate this.

23

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

24

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

25

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

26

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

27

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

28

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

29

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

30

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

31

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

32

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

Page 65


+

,

$

33

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

34

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

35

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

36

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

37

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train. Site includes Everley Wood, which is part of the Ecology Corridor; if SUDS are located within this area they should be

38

14.5

2

1

designed with sensitivity to the surrounding area but carefully designed swales and ponds might actually enhance these areas.

39

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

40

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

41

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train. Part of the site is within the floodplain and it is Environment Agency policy to protect the river corridors so that there is space for fluvial flooding to occur. It is recommended that SUDS storage areas should also be located outside of FZ3a (and preferably outside FZ2) to avoid surface runoff taking up space in the floodplain as surface water and fluvial flooding often

42

14.5

2

1,2,3a,3b

occur concurrently. Infiltration SUDS are preferable, but if this is not possible, runoff may be discharged to the watercourse with SUDS used to delay the discharge to provide attenuation and treatment. The landscaped areas provide opportunity for open-feature SUDS such as swales and basins/wetlands/ponds to collect and infiltrate/attenuate runoff. Whilst locating SUDS outside the floodplain is preferable, if space is an issue it may be acceptable to locate SUDS within FZ2 since this floods at 0.1% annual probability or less; in the event that the SUDS is overwhelmed by fluvial flooding the greater volume

Page 66


+

,

$

of river water provides dilution for the runoff water. Part of the site is within the floodplain and it is Environment Agency policy to protect the river corridors so that there is space for fluvial flooding to occur. It is recommended that SUDS storage areas should also be located outside of FZ3a (and preferably outside FZ2) to avoid surface runoff taking up space in the floodplain as surface water and fluvial flooding often 43

14.5

2

1,2,3a,3b

occur concurrently. Infiltration SUDS are preferable, but if this is not possible, runoff may be discharged to the watercourse with SUDS used to delay the discharge to provide attenuation and treatment. The landscaped areas provide opportunity for open-feature SUDS such as swales and basins/wetlands/ponds to collect and infiltrate/attenuate runoff. Whilst locating SUDS outside the floodplain is preferable, if space is an issue it may be acceptable to locate SUDS within FZ2 since this floods at 0.1% annual probability or less; in the event that the SUDS is overwhelmed by fluvial flooding the greater volume of river water provides dilution for the runoff water.

44

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train. Part of the site is within the floodplain and it is Environment Agency policy to protect the river corridors so that there is space for fluvial flooding to occur. It is recommended that SUDS storage areas should also be located outside of FZ3a (and preferably outside FZ2) to avoid surface runoff taking up space in the floodplain as surface water and fluvial flooding often occur concurrently. Infiltration SUDS are preferable, but if this is not possible, runoff may be discharged to the watercourse

45

14.5

2

1,2,3a,3b

with SUDS used to delay the discharge to provide attenuation and treatment. The landscaped areas provide opportunity for open-feature SUDS such as swales and basins/wetlands/ponds to collect and infiltrate/attenuate runoff. Whilst locating SUDS outside the floodplain is preferable, if space is an issue it may be acceptable to locate SUDS within FZ2 since this floods at 0.1% annual probability or less; in the event that the SUDS is overwhelmed by fluvial flooding the greater volume of river water provides dilution for the runoff water. Part of the site is within the floodplain and it is Environment Agency policy to protect the river corridors so that there is

46

14.5

2

1,2,3a,3b

space for fluvial flooding to occur. It is recommended that SUDS storage areas should also be located outside of FZ3a (and preferably outside FZ2) to avoid surface runoff taking up space in the floodplain as surface water and fluvial flooding often occur concurrently. Infiltration SUDS are preferable, but if this is not possible, runoff may be discharged to the watercourse with SUDS used to delay the discharge to provide attenuation and treatment. The landscaped areas provide opportunity for

Page 67


+

,

$

open-feature SUDS such as swales and basins/wetlands/ponds to collect and infiltrate/attenuate runoff. Whilst locating SUDS outside the floodplain is preferable, if space is an issue it may be acceptable to locate SUDS within FZ2 since this floods at 0.1% annual probability or less; in the event that the SUDS is overwhelmed by fluvial flooding the greater volume of river water provides dilution for the runoff water. Part of the site is within the floodplain and it is Environment Agency policy to protect the river corridors so that there is space for fluvial flooding to occur. It is recommended that SUDS storage areas should also be located outside of FZ3a (and preferably outside FZ2) to avoid surface runoff taking up space in the floodplain as surface water and fluvial flooding often occur concurrently. Infiltration SUDS are preferable, but if this is not possible, runoff may be discharged to the watercourse 47

14.5

2

1,2,3a,3b

with SUDS used to delay the discharge to provide attenuation and treatment. The landscaped areas provide opportunity for open-feature SUDS such as swales and basins/wetlands/ponds to collect and infiltrate/attenuate runoff. Whilst locating SUDS outside the floodplain is preferable, if space is an issue it may be acceptable to locate SUDS within FZ2 since this floods at 0.1% annual probability or less; in the event that the SUDS is overwhelmed by fluvial flooding the greater volume of river water provides dilution for the runoff water.

48

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train. Part of the site is within the floodplain and it is Environment Agency policy to protect the river corridors so that there is space for fluvial flooding to occur. It is recommended that SUDS storage areas should also be located outside of FZ3a (and preferably outside FZ2) to avoid surface runoff taking up space in the floodplain as surface water and fluvial flooding often

49

14.5

2

1,2,3a,3b

occur concurrently. Infiltration SUDS are preferable, but if this is not possible, runoff may be discharged to the watercourse with SUDS used to delay the discharge to provide attenuation and treatment. The landscaped areas provide opportunity for open-feature SUDS such as swales and basins/wetlands/ponds to collect and infiltrate/attenuate runoff. Whilst locating SUDS outside the floodplain is preferable, if space is an issue it may be acceptable to locate SUDS within FZ2 since this floods at 0.1% annual probability or less; in the event that the SUDS is overwhelmed by fluvial flooding the greater volume of river water provides dilution for the runoff water.

50

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

Page 68


+

51

14.5

,

$

2

1

Follow SUDS management train. SPZ 3 so infiltrated water has some time for degradation or dilution to occur before it reaches the water supply which offers

52

14.5

3

1

an extra measure of protection. SUDS offering water quality treatment are still advisable but the level of treatment may be less stringent. However, it is important to take the nature of the pollutants into account since some types may still pose a risk to the water supply even from this distance. Part of the site is within the floodplain and it is Environment Agency policy to protect the river corridors so that there is space for fluvial flooding to occur. It is recommended that SUDS storage areas should also be located outside of FZ3a (and preferably outside FZ2) to avoid surface runoff taking up space in the floodplain as surface water and fluvial flooding often

53

14.5

2

1,2,3a,3b

occur concurrently. Infiltration SUDS are preferable, but if this is not possible, runoff may be discharged to the watercourse with SUDS used to delay the discharge to provide attenuation and treatment. The landscaped areas provide opportunity for open-feature SUDS such as swales and basins/wetlands/ponds to collect and infiltrate/attenuate runoff. Whilst locating SUDS outside the floodplain is preferable, if space is an issue it may be acceptable to locate SUDS within FZ2 since this floods at 0.1% annual probability or less; in the event that the SUDS is overwhelmed by fluvial flooding the greater volume of river water provides dilution for the runoff water.

54

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

55

14.5

2

1

Follow SUDS management train.

Table 12 - SUDS Recommendations

Page 69


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Table 13 - SUDS and Flood Risk Management Options

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Component Population

Component Total Unmetered Metered Total Unmetered Metered Unmetered Metered Average Unmetered Metered Unmetered Metered Total Total Total Total

Unit Number Number Number Households Number Number Number Occupany rate Percent % % Per capita demand l/hd l/hd Domestic demand Ml/d Non domestic Ml/d Leakage Ml/d MOD Ml/d Total demand Ml/d Table 1 - Base, projected demand existing development

2008 15,000 11,344 3,656 6,054 4,313 1,741 2.63 2.1

75.6% 24.4% 173.68 150.00 2.52 1.18 1.36 0.80 5.85

2010 15,041 11,081 3,960 6,054 4,230 1,825 2.62 2.17 2.48 69.9% 30.1% 173.50 146.54 2.50 1.18 1.36 0.80 5.84

2011 15,218 11,591 3,627 6,054 4,391 1,664 2.64 2.18 2.51 72.5% 27.5% 174.15 148.25 2.56 1.20 1.36 0.80 5.91

2012 15,326 11,700 3,627 6,054 4,398 1,656 2.66 2.19 2.53 72.6% 27.4% 174.77 149.68 2.59 1.21 1.36

2013 15,435 11,812 3,623 6,054 4,407 1,647 2.68 2.2 2.55 72.8% 27.2% 175.35 150.90 2.62 1.21 1.36

2014 15,528 11,928 3,600 6,054 4,418 1,636 2.7 2.2 2.56 73.0% 27.0% 175.89 151.99 2.65 1.22 1.36

2015 14,745 7,166 7,579 6,054 2,625 3,429 2.73 2.21 2.44 43.4% 56.6% 176.36 152.98 2.42 1.16 1.36

2020 14,523 3,460 11,062 6,054 1,071 4,983 3.23 2.22 2.40 17.7% 82.3% 175.25 157.45 2.35 1.14 1.36

2025 14,165 2,786 11,379 6,054 929 5,126 3 2.22 2.34 15.3% 84.7% 177.47 160.09 2.32 1.11 1.36

2030 13,864 2,268 11,597 6,054 807 5,247 2.81 2.21 2.29 13.3% 86.7% 179.65 163.08 2.30 1.09 1.36

2035 13,649 1,876 11,773 6,054 727 5,327 2.58 2.21 2.25 12.0% 88.0% 182.65 166.42 2.30 1.07 1.36

5.15

5.19

5.23

4.94

4.85

4.79

4.75

4.73

Option 1 Existing Ml/d New Properties Number Population Number Per capita demand l/hd Domestic demand Ml/d Non domestic demand Ml/d Total Table 2 - Option 1, projected demand new and existing development

2008 5.85

2010 5.84

2011 5.91

2012 5.15

2013 5.19

2014 5.23

2015 4.94

2020 4.85

2025 4.79

2030 4.75

2035 4.73

5.85

5.84

5.91

393 1,045 149.68 0.16 0.03 5.34

786 2,106 150.90 0.32 0.06 5.57

1,179 3,182 151.99 0.48 0.10 5.81

1,571 4,290 152.98 0.66 0.13 5.73

3,536 11,420 157.45 1.80 0.35 6.99

5,500 16,500 160.09 2.64 0.50 7.93

5,500 15,455 163.08 2.52 0.50 7.77

5,500 14,190 166.42 2.36 0.50 7.60

Option 2 Existing Domestic Ml/d Non domestic Ml/d Leakage Ml/d MOD Ml/d New Domestic Ml/d Non domestic Ml/d Total Ml/d Table 3 - Option 2, projected demand new and existing development

2008

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

2.52 1.18 1.36 0.80

2.50 1.18 1.36 0.80

2.56 1.20 1.36 0.80

1.99 1.21 1.35 0.00

1.99 1.21 1.34 0.00

2.00 1.22 1.33 0.00

1.91 1.16 1.32 0.00

1.88 1.14 1.26 0.00

1.82 1.11 1.20 0.00

1.77 1.09 1.15 0.00

1.74 1.07 1.06 0.00

5.85

5.84

5.91

0.11 0.02 4.67

0.22 0.04 4.80

0.33 0.06 4.94

0.45 0.08 4.92

1.20 0.21 5.68

1.73 0.30 6.17

1.62 0.30 5.94

1.49 0.30 5.66

Option 3 Existing Domestic Ml/d Non domestic Ml/d Leakage Ml/d MOD Ml/d New Domestic Ml/d Non domestic Ml/d Total Ml/d Table 4 - Option 3, projected demand new and existing development

2008

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

2.52 1.18 1.36 0.80

2.50 1.18 1.36 0.80

2.56 1.20 1.36 0.80

1.87 1.21 1.35 0.00

1.87 1.21 1.34 0.00

1.87 1.22 1.33 0.00

1.78 1.16 1.32 0.00

1.72 1.14 1.26 0.00

1.64 1.11 1.20 0.00

1.57 1.09 1.15 0.00

1.50 1.07 1.06 0.00

5.91

0.08 0.02 4.52

0.17 0.03 4.62

0.26 0.05 4.72

0.34 0.07 4.67

0.92 0.17 5.21

1.32 0.25 5.53

1.24 0.25 5.29

1.14 0.25 5.02

5.85

5.84

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Outline Water Study