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3200 West C Street Torrington, WY 82240 1.307.532.8200 1.866.327.8996 ewc.wy.edu

Eastern Wyoming College

Self Study October 25,26,27, 2010


Eastern Wyoming College

TABLE OF CONTENTS Preface...................................................................................................................................5 Self-Study and FoE Committees & Membership.................................................................6 List of Tables and Figures.....................................................................................................2 Chapter 1 Introduction..........................................................................................................8 Historical Perspective ..............................................................................................8 Institutional Snapshot Introduction.........................................................................11 Institutional Snapshot ............................................................................................11 Institutional Snapshot Summary.............................................................................22 Accreditation History . ...........................................................................................22 Response to Challenges from 2001 Visit................................................................23 Advice and Suggestions for Institutional Improvement.........................................27 Recommendation and Rationale.............................................................................34 Chapter 2 Organization of the Self-Study Report . ............................................................36 Chapter 3 Criterion One: Mission and Integrity ...............................................................37 Core Component 1a ...............................................................................................37 Core Component 1b ...............................................................................................39 Core Component 1c ...............................................................................................44 Core Component 1d................................................................................................46 Core Component 1e ...............................................................................................50 Summary.................................................................................................................61 Summary of Strengths, Opportunities, and Challenges .........................................61 Chapter 4 Criterion Two: Preparing for the Future . .........................................................64 Core Component 2a ...............................................................................................64 Core Component 2b ...............................................................................................75 Core Component 2c ...............................................................................................86 Core Component 2d ...............................................................................................88 Summary ................................................................................................................91 Summary of Strengths, Opportunities, and Challenges .........................................91 Chapter 5 Criterion Three: Student Learning and Effective Teaching .............................94 Core Component 3a ...............................................................................................94 Core Component 3b .............................................................................................102 Core Component 3c .............................................................................................104 Core Component 3d .............................................................................................108 Summary ..............................................................................................................110 Summary of Strengths, Opportunities, and Challenges .......................................110 Chapter 6 Criterion Four: Acquisition, Discovery, Application of Knowledge . ............113 Core Component 4a .............................................................................................113 Core Component 4b .............................................................................................116 Core Component 4c .............................................................................................123 Core Component 4d .............................................................................................125 Summary ..............................................................................................................127 Summary of Strengths, Opportunities, and Challenges .......................................127

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Eastern Wyoming College

Chapter 7 Criterion Five: Engagement and Service .......................................................130 Core Component 5a .............................................................................................130 Core Component 5b .............................................................................................133 Core Component 5c .............................................................................................138 Core Component 5d .............................................................................................143 Summary ..............................................................................................................145 Summary of Strengths, Opportunities, and Challenges .......................................145 Chapter 8 Federal Compliance ........................................................................................147 Credits, Program Length, Tuition ........................................................................147 Transfer Policies...................................................................................................148 Verification of Student Identity.............................................................................148 Organizational Compliance with Higher Education Reauthorization Act............148 Annual Financial Aid Audits.................................................................................149 Financial Aid Counseling/Standards of Satisfactory Progress..............................150 Financial Aid Disbursement/Fraud.......................................................................150 Campus Crime and Graduation Rate Statistics.....................................................151 Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act (EADA).........................................................151 Federal Compliance Visits to Off-Campus Locations .........................................151 Advertising and Recruitment Materials................................................................152 Professional Accreditation ...................................................................................152 Third-Party Comment Process . ...........................................................................152 Institutional Records of Student Complaints .......................................................152 Chapter 9 Summary Reflections and Request for Continued Accreditation . ..................154 Appendices Acronyms..............................................................................................................156 Organizational Charts...........................................................................................158 Current EWC Board of Trustees, 2010.................................................................162 Wyoming Community College Commission Staff...............................................163 Administrators, Faculty, Staff & Outreach Coordinators, 2010...........................164 Crosswalk of Foundations of Excellence速 Dimensions With Criteria Components....................................................................................168 Campus Map.........................................................................................................173 Undergraduate Students by Degree Seeking and Nondegree Seeking Status.......174 Number of Students by Residency Status of Credit-seeking Students Who Come to a Campus or Site for Instruction.....................................177 EWC Electronic Resource Room Materials List..................................................180 EWC Physical Resource Room Materials List.....................................................185 Separately Bound Appendix Foundations of Excellence Self-Study Report List of Tables, Charts, and Figures Table 1: Student Recruitment and Admissions...................................................12 Table 2: First-Time, Full-Time Student Retention by Race/Ethnicity................14 Table 3: 2009 Graduates by CIP Code................................................................14 Table 4: Licensure/Certification Pass Rates........................................................17 Table 5: Faculty Headcount by Gender..............................................................18 2


Eastern Wyoming College

Table 6: Faculty Headcount by Race/Ethnicity..................................................18 Table 7: Faculty Headcount by College Program...............................................18 Table 8: General Computer Labs for Student Use..............................................19 Table 9: Department Labs or Specific Use Labs.................................................19 Table 10: Outreach Site Labs................................................................................20 Table 11: Lecture/Lab Classrooms.......................................................................20 Table 12: Actual Unrestricted Expenses...............................................................21 Table 13: Actual Unrestricted Revenue................................................................22 Table 14: EWC Service Area Population..............................................................40 Table 15: Poverty by Race: 2000.........................................................................67 Table 16: Poverty Status of Female-Headed Households.....................................67 Table 17: Number and Percentage of Potential First-Generation College Students.................................................................................................68 Table 18: Population Demographics by Ethnicity (On- and Off-Campus)...........69 Table 19: Ten-Year History of Headcount............................................................72 Table 20: Ten-Year History of FTE Enrollment....................................................73 Table 21: Number of EWC Nontraditional, Credit Seeking Students >25 Full and Part-Time................................................................................74 Table 22: Eastern Wyoming College Foundation Assets......................................81 Table 23: Endowment Funded Scholarships.........................................................81 Table 24: Twelve-Year Average Salary Increases 1998-2010...............................83 Table 25: CCSSE 2009 Benchmark Summary Table-Enrollment Status Breakout/Part-Time Students................................................................98 Table 26: CCSSE 2009 Benchmark Summary Table-Enrollment Status Breakout/Full-Time Students................................................................99 Table 27: Bridge Program Student Retention 2006-2008...................................106 Table 28: Learning Skills Lab Usage 2008-2010...............................................107 Table 29: SmarThinking Usage 2004-2010........................................................107 Table 30: 2008-2009 Annual Enrollment Report................................................117 Table 31: Eastern Wyoming College Default Rates 2005-2007.........................149 Chart 1: FY-2010 Operating Fund Budget Revenue by Source..........................76 Chart 2: FY-2010 Operating Fund Budget Expenditures by Source...................76 Chart 3: CAAP Testing – March 2009..............................................................100 Chart 4: Comparison of Local and National CAAP Test Scores – March 2009.......................................................100

Figure 1: Self-Study Steering Committee Members..............................................7 Figure 2: Eastern Wyoming College, Circa 1968..................................................8 Figure 3: Eastern Wyoming College, Circa 2010..................................................8 Figure 4: Douglas Branch Campus........................................................................9 Figure 5: EWC Community Training Center.........................................................9 Figure 6: Collage of EWC Campus Activities.....................................................10 Figure 7: Chance Pollo, EWC Welding Student..................................................54 3


Eastern Wyoming College

Figure 8: EWC Years of Service and Retiree Recognition – April 2010...........115 Figure 9: PTK Highway Cleanup........................................................................120 Figure 10: Dr. John Nesbitt Recipient of the Spur Award...................................122 Figure 11: Academic Quiz Bowl Contest............................................................122 Figure 12: EWC Students and Instructors...........................................................122 Figure 13: EWC Student Volunteers....................................................................135 Figure 14: EWC Outreach...................................................................................140 Figure 15: Governor Freudenthal and Leland Vetter...........................................144

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Eastern Wyoming College

Preface Eastern Wyoming College embarked on a two-year journey of discovery in 2008 as it prepared for its comprehensive HLC Self-Study by reviewing where we’ve been, where we are now, and where we are going. As part of this comprehensive review, the College applied to the Foundations of Excellence® in the First College Year and was accepted for participation for the 2008-2009 year. Consequently, the College requested permission and was accepted by the Higher Learning Commission to prepare a special emphasis self-study concentrating on the First Year of College. The culmination of the Foundations of Excellence work resulted in several action plans that the College will work on during the upcoming years. During the second year, 2009-2010, of the Self-Study, the Dimension committees’ responsibilities were expanded to include a thorough review of the HLC Criteria. The work that resulted from this second phase included identifying strengths, opportunities, and challenges. Ultimately, the Self-Study should be viewed as a guiding document for the College to establish directions that will position the College as it moves into the next decade and continues to serve constituents in its 16,000 square mile service area. The entire college community participated in some way with the self-study process. Starting with the ten person team (including two students) who attended the Foundations of Excellence® launch meeting in August 2008 and concluding with the culmination of this report in August 2010, approximately 75 percent of EWC’s employees served on at least one committee. By the time the HLC team visits in October 2010, even more will have served in the research, writing, or preparation for the visit. In-service presentations and public relations activities accompanied EWC on this journey. The Steering Committee reviewed numerous drafts, and the finished document was accepted by the Leadership Team, the President, and the Board of Trustees. The journey was long and the College learned a great deal about itself. As opportunities and challenges were discovered and conversations ensued, it became more and more apparent that a successful and studentcentered community college is more about developing processes and engaging in thoughtful planning. As we focus on the future we value those who have served before us, the faculty and staff who are currently serving, and the students in the communities we serve.

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Eastern Wyoming College

Self-Study and FOE Committees & Membership Philosophy Dimension Committee #1

Organization Dimension Committee #2

Learning Dimension Committee #3

Peggy Knittel – Co-Chair Wayne Deahl – Co-Chair Tom Andersen Angie Babcock John Ely Jan Lilletvedt

Melissa Meeboer – Co-Chair Sue Schmidt – Co-Chair Aaron Bahmer Ellen Creagar Deb Doren Anne Gardetto Janan McCreery Karen Parriott

Larry Curtis – Co-Chair Patti Sue Peterson – Co-Chair Ed Bittner Rex Cogdill Ray DeWitt Teri Hauf Geri Lewis Sue McBride Marilyn Miller Tim Walter Chris Wenzel

Campus Culture Dimension Committee #4

Transitions Dimension Committee #5

All Students Dimension Committee #6

Lorna Stickel – Co-Chair Kellee Gooder – Co-Chair Casey Debus Chris Hilton Daniel Fielder Donna Charron Kim Jones Pam Capron Tina Christinck Larry Curtis Bob Creagar

Judy Brown – Co-Chair Heidi Smith-Edmunds – Co-Chair Brandy Horejs Kate Steinbock LeeAnn Forrester Janet Bass

Debbie Ochsner – Co-Chair Anne Hilton – Co-Chair Kim Barker Jake Clark Viqi Jansing Jim Maffe Lance Petsch Leland Vetter

Diversity Dimension Committee #7

Roles & Purposes Dimension Committee #8

Improvement Dimension Committee #9

Patsy Velázquez – Chair Suzanne Andrews Angie Babcock Madelon Daniels Anne Hilton Court Merrigan Marilyn Miller Diane McQueen

Monte Stokes – Co-Chair Janet Martindale – Co-Chair Tim Anderson Mike Durfee Jan King Greg Martin Court Merrigan Tyler Vasko Susan Walker Clyde Woods

Coventry Dougherty-Wooden – Co-Chair Connie Woehl – Co-Chair Andy Espinoza Dixie Kroenlein Dennis Misurell Chris Urbanek Cheryl Raboin

Publication & Marketing Committee

Compliance Committee

Resource Room Committee

Tami Afdahl – Chair Melissa Buckmiller Darci Duran Linda Evans Holly Lara Amy Smith Zach Smith Sondra Stapleton Rick Vonburg

Becky Lorenz – Chair Rex Cogdill – Chair

Lynn Wamboldt – Chair Holly Branham Darci Duran Andy Espinoza Chuck Kenyon Lori Moore Lee Myers Sue Schmidt Kimberly Russell

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Eastern Wyoming College

Self-Study Steering Committee Members

Figure 1: Steering Committee Members Top Row, Dee Ludwig, Connie Woehl, Lynn Wamboldt. 2nd Row, Lorna Stickel. 3rd Row, Melissa Meeboer, Patsy Velรกzquez, Peggy Knittel. 4th Row, Monte Stokes, Kimberly Russell, Patti Sue Peterson. 5th Row, Larry Curtis, Wayne Deahl, Janet Martindale.

Dee Ludwig, Self-Study Chair Philosophy Dimension, Committee #1 Peggy Knittel, Wayne Deahl

Roles & Purposes Dimension, Committee #8 Monte Stokes, Janet Martindale

Organization Dimension, Committee #2

Melissa Meeboer, Sue Schmidt

Improvement Dimension, Committee #9 Coventry Dougherty-Wooden, Connie Woehl

Learning Dimension, Committee #3 Larry Curtis, Patti Sue Peterson

Publication & Marketing Committee Tami Afdahl

Campus Culture Dimension, Committee #4 Lorna Stickel, Kellee Gooder

Compliance Committee Becky Lorenz, Rex Cogdill

Transitions Dimension, Committee #5 Judy Brown, Heidi Smith-Edmunds

Resource Room Committee Lynn Wamboldt

All Students Dimension, Committee #6 Debbie Ochsner, Anne Hilton

Institutional Research Kimberly Russell

Diversity Dimension, Committee #7 Patsy Velรกzquez

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Eastern Wyoming College

Chapter 1 Introduction Historical Perspective

Eastern Wyoming College celebrated its 60th Anniversary in 2008. The College was established in September of 1948 in Torrington, Wyoming, Goshen County, as the Southeast University Center, an extension of the University of Wyoming and part of the Torrington Public School District Number 3. It was housed in a vacated grade school building until 1968 when it was able to move into a new building at its current location on West C Street. In 1956, the voters of the Torrington Public School District voted to organize Goshen County Community College District as an independent political subdivision of the state with its own Board of Trustees. At this time, the name was officially changed to Goshen County Community College. Later that same year the voters added two additional public school districts, and in 1958 another public school district was added. By Fall 1965, all remaining school districts in Goshen County were added to the college district. In 1967, the name of the College was changed to Eastern Wyoming College, and in December, 1968, the name of the college district officially became the Eastern Wyoming Community College District.

Figure 3: Eastern Wyoming College, Circa 2010

Figure 2: Eastern Wyoming College, Circa 1968

The College moved in 1968 into its newly built facility on West C Street which was named after the Tebbet family who donated the land to the College District. The Tebbet Building is located on a forty-five acre site where the College has since built additional facilities. EWC’s first dormitory, now called Eastern Hall, was completed in 1970. The Veterinary Technology building was completed in 1975, expanded in 1986, and further expanded in 2008. A Large Animal facility was built in 2000 on an acquired northern campus (eight and one-half acres) to further complement the Veterinary Technology program. The Mechanical Arts building was completed in 1981 and houses the Welding and Joining Technology program as well as Agricultural programs including Farm and Ranch Management. The Fine Arts Building was added in 1982, the Activities Center and the Cosmetology Building were both constructed in 1984. This project eventually included linking the Tebbet Building to the Fine Arts Building with the construction of a Faculty Link in 1985 which houses faculty offices. In 1991, the College entered a lease agreement with the Converse County School District #1 to acquire a former public school building in Douglas, Wyoming which serves 8


Eastern Wyoming College to this day as the Douglas Branch Campus location. Also in 1991, the Activities Center was remodeled to accommodate two racquetball courts and a fitness center. In 1998, a Student Center was developed from space formerly occupied by the bookstore, and the bookstore was relocated. The Community Training Center was built in 1999. The newest addition is a second housing unit, Lancer Hall, which was completed in 2007, bringing student housing capacity to 167. In addition to programs offered at the Torrington and Douglas campus locations, both credit and non-credit classes are offered throughout the six-county service area via onsite and distance delivery methods. Total enrollment of Eastern Wyoming College reached 1109.7 FTE in FY 2009, the third straight year of gain after a low of 932.5 FTE in 2006. Approximately one-third of all student enrollments are attributed to the outreach program. Workforce Development efforts have also added to the overall growth of the college.

Figure 4: Douglas Branch Campus

Figure 5: EWC Community Training Center

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Eastern Wyoming College

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Eastern Wyoming College

Institutional Snapshot Introduction

The Institutional Snapshot provides further insight into Eastern Wyoming College. In Fall 2009, 637 students were full-time of which 277 were degree-seeking, first-year students. Nondegree-seeking full-time students totaled 119. The greater headcount comes from part-time students which totaled 1059 in Fall 2009. The percentage of full-time students has been ranging from 35-38 percent in the last three years. More students are 24 and under than 25 and over by two-thirds to one-third. Regarding student recruitment, 36 percent of the freshman applicants matriculate to Eastern Wyoming College. Fall-to-fall retention of first-time, full-time students reflect 46 percent for males and 60 percent for females. The programs with the most graduates at the College are Interdisciplinary Studies AA and AS degrees, Education (all levels), Welding and Joining, Veterinary Technology, and Cosmetology.

Institutional Snapshot 1.

Student Demography Headcounts

A.

Undergraduate Enrollments by Class

Fall 2008 Full-time Degree Seeking First Year Degree Seeking Others Nondegree Seeking

554 245 226 83

Part-time Degree Seeking First Year Degree Seeking Others Nondegree Seeking

951 138 114 699

Fall 2007 Full-time Degree Seeking First Year Degree Seeking Others Nondegree Seeking

540 254 180 106

Fall 2009 Full-time Degree Seeking First Year Degree Seeking Others Nondegree Seeking

637 277 241 119

Part-time 1059 Degree Seeking First Year 118 Degree Seeking Others 93 Nondegree Seeking 848

Part-time 1018 Degree Seeking First Year 119 Degree Seeking Others 101 Nondegree Seeking 798

B.

Undergraduate Students by Degree Seeking and Nondegree Seeking Status – Please see Appendix H.

C.

Graduate/Professional Students by Degree Seeking and Non-degree Seeking Status – Not applicable

D.

Age Range of Undergraduates

Fall 2009 24 and Under 1077 25 and Over 594 Fall 2008 24 and Under 977 25 and Over 524 Fall 2007 24 and Under 980 25 and Over 574

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E.

Number of Students by Residency Status of Credit-seeking Students who Come to a Campus or Site for Instruction – Please see Appendix I.


Eastern Wyoming College 2.

Student Recruitment and Admissions Table 1 Student Recruitment and Admissions Total Incomplete Applicants Applicants Applications Applications Admitted Matriculated Received FALL 2009 Freshman Applications Transfer Applications FALL 2008 Freshman Applications Transfer Applications

Percent Matriculated

567

0

567

203

36%

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

556

0

556

200

36%

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

3.

Financial Assistance for Students

A.

What percentages of your undergraduate and of your graduate students applied for any type of financial assistance?

2008/2009 School Year 863 applicants were offered assistance of some type FISAP enrollment was 2091 for 41.27 %

2007/2008 School Year 823 applicants were offered assistance of some type FISAP enrollment was 2054 for 40.10 %

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Eastern Wyoming College B.

How many of your undergraduate students and of your graduate/professional students received financial assistance of any type? What percentage is this of your total enrollment? What percentages of your total enrollment received assistance in each of the following categories?

Any Type 2008/2009: 716 accepted, 2091 students = 34.24 % 2007/2008: 615 accepted, 2054 students = 29.94 %

Loans 2008/2009: 243/2091 = 11.62% 2007/2008: 169/2054 = 8.23%

Federal Work Study 2008/2009: 80/2091 = 3.83% 2007/2008: 62/2054 = 3.02%

Scholarships/Grants 2008/2009: 664/2091 = 31.76% 2008/2009: 580/2054 = 28.24%

Academic Merit 2008/2009: 163/2091 = 7.80% 2008/2009: 111/2054 = 5.40%

C. Using the formula cited below, what was the tuition discount rate (TDR) for undergraduate and graduate student populations? 2008/2009 Total Institutional Dollars spent on tuition (estimated): I = $734,139 Total tuition: P = $1,478,508 TDR = I/(I + P) = 33.18%

2007/2009 Total Institutional Dollars spent on tuition (estimated): I = $698,046 Total tuition: P = $1,279,200 TDR = I/(I + P) = 35.30%

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Eastern Wyoming College 4.

Student Retention and Program Productivity

A.

What percentage of your first-time, full-time fall entering undergraduate students in the previous year returned for study during the fall semester on which this report is based? Please provide the following data in aggregate and with breakdowns by race/ethnicity per IPEDS categories.

Black

Table 2 First-Time, Full-Time Student Retention by Race/Ethnicity American Non-Res. Total Asian Hispanic White Indian Alien Males M F M F M F M F M F

Total Females

Total Students

M

F

Entering Fall 2008

5

3

2

0

1

0

7

7

127

119

2

0

144

129

273

Returning Fall 2009

1

2

1

0

1

0

3

2

59

73

1

0

66

77

143

-

100%

-

43%

-

46%

60%

52%

Percent Retained

20% 67% 50%

29% 47% 61% 50%

B.

How many students earned graduate or professional degrees during the past year and what was the distribution by race/ethnicity per IPEDS categories? Not Applicable

C.

Report the number of graduates in the previous academic year by college/program in keeping with the following Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) codes. Table 3 2009 Graduates by CIP Code Associate Degree M F Total

Program CIP Code Agriculture/Natural Resources 01.0000 General Agriculture 01.0102 Agricultural Business 01.0103 Agri-Economics 01.0104 Beef production 01.0104 Farm/Ranch Management 01.0901 Animal Science 01.1106 Rangeland Ecology & Watershed M. 03.0601 Wildlife/Fisheries Biol & Mgt

2

2

2

5 1

1

1

Certificates M F Total

1 3 1

Architecture/Engineering/Engineering Technology Biological & Physical Science 26.0101 Biology

14

1

2


Eastern Wyoming College Business 52.0201 Business Administration 52.0204 Business Administration- DL 52.0301 Accounting(AS) 52.0301 Accounting(AA) 52.0401 Business Office Technology 52.1201 Management Information Systems

1 3

1 3

4

4 1

1

1

2 3

13 4 1

15 7 1

4 4 1

16 13

20 17 1

2

10

12

1

2 3

2 4

1

Communications/Communication Technology/Fine Arts 09.0101 Communication 50.0701 Art 50.0901 Music Education/Library Science 13.1301 Business Education 13.1301 Agri-Education 13.1301 Agri-Education 13.1202 Elementary Education 13.1205 Secondary Education 13.1210 Early Childhood Education 13.1311 Math Education 13.1312 Music Education 13.1314 Physical Education Humanities/Interdisciplinary 16.0101 Languages (Foreign) 23.0101 English 24.0101 Interdisciplinary Studies (AA) 24.0101 Interdisciplinary Studies (AS) 54.0101 History Health 51.0808 Veterinary Technology 51.1101 Pre-Dentistry 51.1102 Pre-Medicine 51.1103 Pre-Pharmacy 51.1104 Pre-Veterinary 51.1199 Pre-Nursing 51.1199 Medical Technology

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Eastern Wyoming College Mathematics/Computer Science 11.0801 Web Design 11.0901 Computer Networking 11.9999 Information Technology Support 27.0101 Mathematics 27.0501 Statistics

1

2

3

1

4 1 2

5 1 2

1

Military Technology/Protective Services 43.0103 Law Enforcement Emphasis 43.0104 Criminal Justice 43.0107 Criminal Justice 43.0113 Corrections Emphasis

3 1 1

Personal Services/Consumer Services/Fitness 12.0401 Cosmetology 12.0407 Hair Technology 12.0410 Nail Technology 12.0409 Skin Technology 19.0706 Early Childhood Studies 19.0709 Early Childhood Education

1 1 2

4 2 1 2

8

8

Psychology/Social Sciences & Services 42.0101 Psychology 45.1001 Political Science 45.0601 Economics 45.1101 Sociology Trades/Production/Transportation Health 46.0000 Construction Technology 48.0503 Machine Tool Technology 48.0508 Weld & Joining Technology Grand Total

18 28

16

18 106 134

1 7 5 16 10

1 7 5 26


Eastern Wyoming College D.

List, by discipline and by name of test, the separate pass rates of undergraduate, and graduate/profes sional students sitting for licensure examinations as appropriate. Table 4 Licensure/Certification Pass Rates Graduated in 07-08 and Took Test in 08-09 Program Licensing Entity Esthetician Wyoming Cosmetology Board Nail Technician Wyoming Cosmetology Board Hair Technician Wyoming Cosmetology Board Cosmetology Wyoming Cosmetology Board Veterinary Technician Veterinary Technician National Examination Welding and Joining Technology American Welding Society Certification

5.

Pass Rate 100% 100% 100% 100% 87% 91%

Faculty Demography

A.

Indicate the headcount of faculty in the full-time and part-time categories according to highest degree earned.

Full-time/Half-time Faculty Doctorate Degree: 8 Master Degree + additional graduate coursework: 6 Master Degree: 18 Bachelor Degree: 8 Associate Degree: 3* No Degree: 4* *All CTE Instructors with Industry Credentials

Adjunct Faculty Fall Semester 2009 Doctorate Degree: 3 Master Degree: 73 Bachelor Degree: 49 Associate Degree: 2* No Degree: 4* *All CTE Instructors with Industry Credentials

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Eastern Wyoming College B.

Indicate the headcount of faculty in the full-time and part-time categories according to each of the following breakdowns.

Female Male Undisclosed

Table 5 Faculty Headcount by Gender Contracted Faculty Adjunct Faculty 21 68 26 61 0 2

Total 89 87 2

Race/Ethnicity Hispanic White Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Undisclosed

Table 6 Faculty Headcount by Race/Ethnicity Contracted Faculty Adjunct Faculty 1 1 34 97 1 6 11 27

Total 2 131 7 38

Gender

FT 8 1 5 4 4 9 7 4 0 8 3 6 5 5

Adj. 3 2 9 14 19 18 2 27 0 24 2 4 13 7

Non-teaching Areas 2 2 3 1

Table 7 Faculty Headcount by College Program Fall 2009 Semester Total Program 11 Agriculture/Natural Resources (1, 3) 3 Architecture/Engineering/Engineering Technology (4, 14, 15) 14 Biological & Physical Science (26, 40, 41) 18 Business (52) 23 Communications/Communication Technology/Fine Arts (9, 10, 50) 27 Education/Library Science (13, 21, 25) 9 Health (5,1) 31 Humanities/Interdisciplinary (5, 16, 23, 24, 30, 38, 39, 54) 0 Law (22) 32 Mathematics/Computer Science (11, 27) 5 Military Technology/Protective Services (29, 43) 10 Personal Services/Consumer Services/Fitness (12, 19, 31) 18 Psychology/Social Sciences & Services (42, 44, 45) 12 Trades/Production/Transportation Health (46, 47, 48, 49)

Continuing Education/Workforce Community Service/Education Library Distance Education

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Eastern Wyoming College 6.

Availability of Instructional Resources and Information Technology

A.

Provide an account of the technology resources dedicated to supporting student learning (library sites, residence hall hookups, internet cafes, etc.) and explain how you monitor the level of their usage.

Section One- Computer Labs and Classrooms Table 8 General Computer Labs for Student Use Number of Number of Number of Computers – Computers – Computers – Research Only Windows Vista XP (WYLD) 8 6 14 4 4

Location Student Center Library Eastern Residence Hall Lancer Residence Hall

Location

Vet Tech Academic Testing Center Testing Only Laptop Cart (T108) Learning Skills Lab ABE Limited Use Cosmetology Community Training Center (CTCC) BTC (T273) ATC (T271) PTLC (Across from Biology) Mechanical Arts Fine Arts Tebbet 216 Tebbet 219 Tebbet 260

Table 9 Department Labs or Specific Use Labs Number of Number of Number of Number of Computers – Computers – Computers – Networked Special Use Windows Vista Windows XP Printers – Only Laser Jet 6 – Avimark 5 1 Workstations 7 - Windows Vista

Number of Networked Printers – Laser Jet 1 1 1 1

Number of Networked Printers – Color Laser Jet

16 9 – Windows XP 6

1 1

1

17 16 17

1 1

3 13 1 5 5 14

1 1 1 1 1 1

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Eastern Wyoming College Table 10 Outreach Site Labs Location Douglas Glenrock Guernsey Hulett LaGrange Lusk Moorcroft Newcastle

Number & Type of Teaching Aids

Number of Computers – Windows Vista

Number of Computers – Windows XP

3 – Smartboards

12 2 1 6 7 9 2

18 1 1 6

4

Number of Networked Printers – Color Laser Jet 5 1 1 1 1 3 1

16

1

4

3 3 10

1 1 1

1 1 1

1 – Star Panel Monitor

Sundance Upton Wheatland

Classroom Number COS 12 CTCC CTCI FA 102 FA 112 MA 101 MA 116 MA 120 MA 121 MA 122 TEB 108 TEB 110 TEB 111 TEB 114 TEB 115 TEB 116 TEB 131 TEB 208 TEB 213 TEB 215 TEB 216 TEB 219

Computer Available X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

Number of Networked Printers – Laser Jet

Table 11 Lecture/Lab Classrooms Projector Printer Available Available X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

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Other Available

Smartboard

Smartboard


Eastern Wyoming College TEB 260 TEB 264 TEB 271 (ATC) TEB 272 TEB 273 (BTC) VT 101 VT 104 VT 111 VT 137

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X

Smartboard

X

Smartboard

Section Two- Residence Halls Internet access is provided by Action Communications, a local provider of cable, Internet, and phone services. At this time, the College is unable to monitor usage of this connection. The College provides student lab computers for academic uses attached to the college network in each of the residence halls.

Section Three- Wireless Wireless connectivity is available in three places on campus: Student Center, Library, and Math Lab.

Section Four- Usage Computer usage is not monitored on campus in a formal sense. Computer usage at outreach site labs is not monitored although the computers are located in close proximity to staff members who are available to help students if necessary. Firewalls are inspected on a routine basis for anomalies.

Section Five- Works in progress Eastern Wyoming College is currently replacing computers in MA 101 lab, CTCC lab, LSL lab area, and numerous faculty and staff machines. The College replaces computers on a three-year rotation, purchasing and installing around 200 units per year.

7.

Financial Data A. Actual Unrestricted Expenses Table 12 Actual Unrestricted Expenses Expenses 2009 Instructional/Departmental/Library 5,710,548 Student Services 1,453,243 Operation & Maintenance of Plant 1,611,656 Administration 2,868,454 Auxiliary 1,534,554 Total $13,178,455

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2008

5,685,187 1,518,779 1,522,704 2,282,286 1,529,900 $12,538,856


Eastern Wyoming College B.

Actual Unrestricted Revenues

Table 13 Actual Unrestricted Revenues Revenues 2009 Tuition & Fees (Gross) (From Audit) 1,478,508 State/Local Appropriations 10,770,966 Investment & Annuity Income (From 09 Budget) 79,304 Auxiliary (From Audit) 1,035,841 Other (From Audit) 169,131 Total $13,533,750

2008 1,279,200 10,505,330 297,294 1,051,187 193,898 $13,326,909

Institutional Snapshot Summary Eastern Wyoming College served 1,696 students in Fall 2009 located at the Torrington main campus or at one of the outreach locations. Full-time faculty totaled 47, while adjunct faculty totaled 131. A large majority of the faculty are white with very few in other race/ethnicity categories. The College provided adequate computer resources for its students and has adopted a three-year replacement/rotation plan for all computers. Revenues and expenses for Fiscal Year 2009 both amounted to about $13 million. 

Accreditation History North Central Correspondent status was granted to Eastern Wyoming College in 1969. This status was extended to 1970 to allow the College time to submit in May, 1972 a comprehensive status study in application for Recognized Candidate for Accreditation status. The College was granted a continuation of that status in December, 1972. The College underwent a self-study and submitted that report in May, 1975 which was followed by a team visit in November, 1975. This resulted in the granting of initial accreditation with the next comprehensive evaluation scheduled for 1980. The 1980 evaluation team visit resulted in continued accreditation for the College at the associate’s degree-granting level with a required focus evaluation scheduled for 1985-86 to review administrative organization and long-range program planning. A request was filed by the College to postpone that focused evaluation visit to October, 1986. That focused evaluation visit resulted in a required report which was filed on October 31, 1987 to reflect how the institution had responded to needed improvements in the institutional organizational chart and administrative position descriptions. A Five-Year Plan was also required to show how the College was responding to long range planning. These reports were accepted by the Commission. Following that focus evaluation, the next comprehensive evaluation was scheduled for 1990-91. That visit resulted in continued accreditation being approved for Eastern Wyoming College for ten years with the next comprehensive evaluation scheduled for 2000-2001. Three reports were required in the intervening years. In 1993, the College submitted a report focusing on the development of an institutional long-range plan and a full response to Criterion Three. The second report, in 1995, evaluated the College’s progress in achieving 22


Eastern Wyoming College the goals and objectives included in the previously submitted long-range plan. The third report, in 1997, focused on the evaluation of progress toward the 1995 revision of the long-range plan. All three reports were accepted; however, an additional 1998 planning document was required and accepted. In 2000, the comprehensive self-study was reviewed and the team visited in February, 2001. Following this team visit, the College was again granted a ten-year reaccreditation, with a progress report being required in the intervening years. In February, 2004, the interim focus report was filed and included a report on strategic planning, use of assessment data to improve student learning, and credentials of faculty teaching general education and the general education component of the AAS and certificate programs. The progress report was accepted by HLC in a letter dated April 8, 2004, and no further action was required until the next comprehensive evaluation which was scheduled for 2010-2011. Additionally, the College worked to further develop its distance learning program. Following a Request for Institutional Change in 2005, an HLC team visited in April, 2005. The result of that visit was reflected in a letter dated October 21, 2005 which indicated that the “Institutional Actions Council voted to extend your accreditation to include distance delivery of Associate degree programs in Interdisciplinary Studies, Criminal Justice, and Business Administration.” Response to Strengths, Challenges, Advice, and Suggestions From 2001 Visit In the 2001 team visit report, the team members listed the following strengths and challenges for Eastern Wyoming College: Strengths (5) 2001 Comment: EWC, in spite of being the smallest college in the state, has one of the largest and most successful outreach programs, providing services to citizens in a 16,000 square mile service area. Response: Eastern Wyoming College has continued to serve its outreach communities in a vigorous fashion. Outreach enrollment has grown to 37 percent of the total enrollment in Fall 2009. Concurrent enrollment growth accounts for a large part of the enrollment in the outreach areas. Overall concurrent enrollment, in partnership with service area high schools, accounts for 20-25 percent of all FTE at the college. Distance education enrollment has grown and now includes four complete degree programs which include Interdisciplinary Studies AA and AS programs, Criminal Justice AA program, and the Business Administration AAS program. Other courses are also available via distance including numerous general education courses, early childhood courses, and electives. 2001 Comment: The College has strong administrative leadership, resulting in student satisfaction, positive relationships, and pride in the institution. Response: Eastern Wyoming College has seen a large turnover in its administrative leadership team in the last few years. However, in an in-service activity held in January 2009, employees indicated that there remains a great deal of pride and caring among the employees. They listed under the question, “Why is Eastern a Great Decision for Students?” responses such as quality education and quality programs, caring and dedicated faculty and staff, and focused on students. The 2009 CCSSE survey showed that students felt a high level of satisfaction with the College and its services. 23


Eastern Wyoming College 2001 Comment: The College is an integral part of the community, serving as a focal point for social, cultural and educational activities, and contributing significantly to the economic base of the area. Response: Eastern Wyoming College continues to be a focal point of the community for its constituents. The community education offerings are plentiful, and EWC ranks typically either one or two among the seven community colleges on the number of people served in these activities (WCCC Annualized Enrollment Reports). In addition, Goshen Community Theatre has added to the culture in the valley by holding at least two plays per year involving dozens of community members and hosting audiences totaling in the thousands. A recent inquiry to the Goshen County Economic Development organization showed that EWC was the fourth largest employer in Goshen County, following the Goshen County School District, Banner Health, and Western Sugar including seasonal employment. The Wyoming Medium Correctional Institution (WMCI) opened in January, 2010. At this point, it has around 350 employees and promises to be one of the largest employers in the region. The partnership report submitted annually to the Wyoming Community College Commission (WCCC) shows that college relationships with organizations and businesses exist throughout the service area. The Workforce Development efforts have grown substantially in the last five years showing that more and more companies and organizations have been depending on the college to deliver training to employees. 2001 Comment: The College facilities are accommodating the needs of the community and the student population. The physical plant has been well maintained with a limited budget and staff. Response: The College continues to host numerous community events as well as the traditional college events relating to the student population. The Student Senate has become even more active hosting events such as dances, exhibits, and game nights. The Community Training Center (CTC) is utilized for workforce customized classes and organizational meetings. The CTC computer classroom hosts self-directed studies courses with open lab times throughout the week, as well as short-term non-credit courses. A Facilities Planning Advisory Committee was added in Spring 2009 which is chaired by the physical plant director. A variety of scheduled maintenance projects have been completed including new carpet and paint in numerous buildings, and air conditioning projects in Eastern Hall and the Vet Tech building. Eastern Hall is now newly renovated and remodeled with air-conditioning. It is now possible to host summer events in the two housing facilities. In addition, state retrofit grants were awarded which allocated funding for improved and more energy-efficient lighting throughout the Torrington facility, and funding for boiler replacement in the Activities Center. To assist with the opening of the Wyoming Medium Correctional Institution (WMCI) in January, 2010, the College hosted temporary offices for over 25 WMCI employees for most of the Fall 2009 semester, and allowed them to conduct their required trainings in classrooms, and their physical fitness testing in the gymnasium. 2001 Comment: The College enjoys model programs in Veterinary Technology, Rodeo, and Welding. Response: All three of these programs continue to thrive at Eastern Wyoming College. Veterinary Technology enrollment has averaged around 60 students per year for the last three years, and Welding and Joining Technology enrollment has averaged 80 students per year for the last three years. Rodeo involvement continues to attract a large number of students as the last three years shows an average of 41 participants per year.

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Eastern Wyoming College Challenges (6) 2001 Comment: The College does not have an adequate contingency or reserve fund. Response: The College’s allowable cash carryover reserve is established by Wyoming Statute 21-18-205 (f) currently set at 8 percent of the College’s biennial budget. Any remaining funds that exceed that amount are required to be returned to the State of Wyoming. Following the College’s audit for FY 2009 ending on June 30, 2009, the 8 percent carryover limit was $2.1 million. On June 30, 2009 the College’s carryover reserve was $1.5 million or 5.7 percent of the biennial budget. The College has been fiscally responsible and stable without compromising on providing quality programs and services despite the 10 percent mandatory reduction in the state allocated budget for FY 2010. 2001 Comment: The College is experiencing declining enrollments, resulting in inadequate financing and programmatic inefficiencies. Response: The College has seen a marked enrollment growth in the last three years. The FTE has shown steady growth in the last three years from 1051.00 in Fall 2007 to 1074.79 in Fall 2008, and 1211.83 in Fall 2009. The headcount for Fall 2007 was 1558, Fall 2008 was 1505, and Fall 2009 was 1696. Distance education enrollments have also grown and are averaging 7 to 8 percent of total enrollments. A review of class sizes shows that most general education classes and freshman-level classes are well enrolled. However, a review of faculty workloads for 2009-2010 shows that some sophomore-level classes including humanities, visual performing fine arts, sciences, and social science courses continue to struggle to enroll sufficient numbers in some sections. Division chairs and others address this issue by establishing courseoffering rotation schedules and working actively with advisors and others to encourage enrollment in these courses. 2001 Comment: The college culture appears to be resistant to needed change. Response: The college culture may have been resistant to change, but change has come anyway. Longterm employees have retired and new positions have been added. The College continues to encourage professional development and involvement with peers at state, regional, and national levels. Several employees indicated they have attended sessions at conferences related to organizational change. In addition, many employees have attended sessions on generational differences. New activities and programs have been added including a livestock judging team, a debate team, and women’s basketball. The college underwent some structural reorganization in 2008 which resulted in additional key functional area changes. In 2009, a statewide strategic planning initiative was undertaken by an appointed committee of citizens, legislators, and college representatives. This plan was formally accepted and contains several additional operational changes for the colleges. Eastern Wyoming College and its employees are still in the process of integrating and aligning to these various influences. 2001 Comment: The College has made significant progress in strategic planning; however, it lacks comprehensive understanding of the planning process and the relationship of a strategic plan to the management of academic, financial and physical resources. Response: Numerous changes have been made to the strategic planning process at the college. In 2008, new methods were developed which included involving the entire college community (students, employees, administrators, Board of Trustee members, and Foundation members) and representatives from the 25


Eastern Wyoming College community. Consultants were brought in for the beginning phases. The first phase was developing strategic directions the college should be involved in during the next 3-5 years, following that was the design process from which the College’s values emerged, the third phase involved a day-long in-service from which employees developed action plans for strategic objectives for the key functional areas of the College. The key functional areas included learning, student services, college relations, administrative services, institutional effectiveness, and institutional development. Administrators from these areas continued to work with teams to then prioritize the action plans which needed to include key performance indicators. These action plans were then aligned with the available budget which was allocated for both continuing and one-time dollars for each key functional area. A reporting process was also initiated which allowed the institution to track all of its action plans. A mid-year report is prepared each January and a final year-end report is prepared each August outlining the progress. This information is shared with the Board of Trustees and all employees at regularly scheduled in-service days. This process has been in place for two years now and while not perfect, it is tying the strategic directions to action plans and budgets. Further refinement is ongoing for both processes and information sharing. During the 2009 year, the Wyoming Community College Commission engaged MPR Associates, Inc. to facilitate the development of a statewide strategic plan. This involved hundreds of people and numerous meetings statewide over the course of a year. The statewide groups discussed the importance of an educated citizenry and the role of the comprehensive community colleges in achieving that goal. The meetings and eventual strategic plan resulted in a comprehensive plan that focuses on eight main strategies which include student access and success, quality programs, distance learning, alignment of programs and workforce opportunities, partnerships, coordination and collaboration, adequate resources, and a system of continuous improvement. The College is in the process of embedding these eight strategies into the overall institutional strategic planning documents and processes. February of each subsequent year has been designated as “Strategic Planning Month” and involves individuals, departments, and key functional areas in developing action plans for the upcoming year. These are then prioritized by the areas and reviewed by the leadership team which also identifies overall institutional action plans and goals. The budget is developed during March through June which allows strategic planning to be integral to the budgeting process. The Board of Trustees is also involved in developing its own action plans as well as reviewing the institution’s strategic planning documents. The strategic planning process is still being refined; however, the institution believes it has improved planning processes. 2001 Comment: While EWC has made significant progress in revising its program of general education, more work needs to be done. Specific problem areas include: (a) Not all general education faculty meet the guideline of 18 graduate hours of preparation in the discipline taught; (b) Several vocational programs do not yet contain an acceptable component of general education; and, (c) Some of the general education requirements are currently met by use of developmental courses. Response: A 2004 interim focus report was written and submitted to the Higher Learning Commission in response to this concern. The HLC response indicated that the College had adequately addressed these concerns. Eastern Wyoming College responded to this situation by involving the division chairs and program faculty in discussions and work sessions. This activity was positive, necessary program changes were accomplished, and the institutional understanding was broadened so that all general education requirements were being met by courses in the 1000 level or higher category. Additionally, faculty qualifications have continued to be reviewed by the Academic Vice President, the Associate Vice President, and Division Chairs so that all faculty members meet the definition of being qualified to carry out their duties. All programs have been mapped to see how the general education requirements are being met in 26


Eastern Wyoming College the various disciplines. Typically, Associate of Arts or Science degrees have 31 credit hours of General Education courses and Associates of Applied Science degrees have 9-14 credit hours of General Education courses. This is further explained in the college catalog; see pages 65 - 67 of the 2010 catalog. 2001 Comment: There is the absence of required critical elements in the college’s outcomes assessment plan. These include summative assessments to improve student learning and adequate and timely feedback of data for use in improving learning. Response: The College responded to this also in the 2004 Interim Focus report. This report was approved by the Higher Learning Commission. Since 2004, Outcomes Assessment has further evolved to include more summative assessments. A faculty member chairs the Outcomes Assessment committee, and the committee has spent quite a great deal of time and effort in refining the processes. Course assessments and program assessments are required on a rotating basis and all faculty members are required to submit a report each semester outlining at least one Classroom Assessment Technique that was utilized in at least one of their courses. A complete Outcomes Assessment report is compiled once each year and is available on the web page and as a bound document. At the institutional level, students completing AA or AS degrees are required to complete the CAAP instrument. The CAAP results and graduate survey results are included in the annual outcomes assessment report. Additionally, the Outcomes Assessment Committee and the Curriculum and Learning Council determined that it should request linkage reports showing COMPASS/ CAAP and ACT/CAAP results. A graduate survey is conducted in odd years in December and the College has participated in the Community College Survey of Student Engagement in Spring 2007 and Spring 2009. Please see the yearly Outcomes Assessment Summary report for more detailed information. Advice and Suggestions for Institutional Improvements (18) From the Report of a Comprehensive Visit to Eastern Wyoming College, February 12-14, 2001 The following enumerated items were listed in the comprehensive visit report from 2001. Institutional responses follow each item. 1.

The Team encourages the College to better publicize its educational initiatives so more individuals on the campus and in the community are aware of those efforts and successes.

Response: In December of 2001, the College opened the Marketing and Public Relations office with a director. A secretary was hired for the office in February of 2002. A marketing committee was formed and the first major project undertaken was a brand identity study. As a result of this study the College changed its logo. New advertisements as well as new key messages and a style guide were developed and endorsed by the EWC Board of Trustees. The marketing committee also developed a marketing plan. The office has since evolved into the College Relations department with an office assistant, two graphic designers, and a webmaster who also works with video and new media. Each year there is increased collaboration between the Learning office, the College Relations office, and the Student Services Recruiting office. Programs in need of increased enrollments are identified so that specific targeted initiatives can be applied to increasing the enrollment. A large number of initiatives are undertaken each year with the intent of increasing public awareness of the College. Examples include events, press releases, feature stories in the local media outlets, advertising in a wide variety of publications and media outlets, publications, and specialty items. Since the team’s last visit, the web site has been redesigned three times with the most recent roll-out occurring in March of 2009. This last design features a content management system that allows for increased access 27


Eastern Wyoming College of content so that it can be updated quickly by a number of individuals. There have also been increased efforts to raise the awareness of EWC in its outreach communities. This has included new signage, banners, distribution of specialty items, increased web presence and the development of a graphic with the logo that highlights all outreach centers and the branch campus. This graphic is now used in most publications and print advertisements. A campus portal product from CampusCruiser was adopted in 2009 and is known as LancerNet. This portal has provided another means to communicate with students and staff. A series of Board outreach trips have also raised community awareness of EWC and its programs. 2.

The College should consider establishing a community advisory board, which will meet regularly to discuss needs of business, industry, and other community agencies, and how the College can work with these agencies to meet identified educational needs.

Response: The College’s career and technical programs have advisory councils with business and industry representatives. The Douglas Branch Campus also established a community advisory board which meets at least once each semester. The EWC Workforce Development office has played an integral part in establishing regular Workforce Alliance meetings which involve not only business and industry representatives but also representatives from agencies such as the Department of Workforce Services and the Department of Corrections. Further, the College has a very active and involved Board of Trustees. The aforementioned Board outreach trips have also aided in communication with community members. Outreach trips were arranged whereby Board members, administrators, and others have visited all of the outreach sites and had the opportunity to meet with community members, high school representatives, and others from throughout the service area. These outreach trips will be conducted on a yearly basis typically in the fall semester. In addition, the employees of the College are important members of numerous community, state, and regional councils and committees and interact on several levels with community representatives. In Spring 2010, a series of Community members, alumni, board members, faculty, and staff helped identify directions for future planning, marketing and public relations, facilities planning, and workforce preparation for the Ag Programs during Ag Focus Group discussions. The results were analyzed by faculty and administration and new directions were planned. Recommendations from the Ag Focus report included hiring a faculty member with soils expertise, further studying facility needs, and emphasizing other credentials such as a Commercial Drivers License. Similar outreach focus groups will be conducted for other programs, starting with a focus group for the Douglas Branch Campus in Summer 2010. The questions will focus on the need for campus renovation, remodel, or rebuild. 3.

The College may wish to implement a clearly stated policy against nepotism, particularly as it relates to supervisors.

Response: The nepotism policy (Board Policy 3.10 Nepotism and Romantic Relationships) was revised in November 2005 and now reads “Relatives of a supervisor shall not be assigned to that supervisor’s area of direct responsibility. A relative is defined as a spouse, father, mother, brother, sister, son, daughter, stepson, stepdaughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law, sister-in-law, brother-in-law, nephew, niece, mother-in-law, and father-in-law. An individual who has a romantic relationship or sexual relationship with a supervisor shall not be assigned to that supervisor’s area of direct responsibility.”

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Eastern Wyoming College 4.

The College might investigate alternative methods of increasing the diversity of its faculty and staff. Examples include the establishment of a minority faculty internship or involving the local minority community in resolving the college’s monocultural atmosphere.

Response: The College continues to have a low percentage of minority students and staff. Overall, it is somewhat difficult to recruit faculty and professional staff members to small, rural towns in Wyoming, and even more difficult to recruit minority faculty and staff to small rural towns. Vacancy announcements and advertisements for vacant positions are always distributed internally via e-mail, and externally through the College’s web site, State of Wyoming Workforce Center Offices, and local newspapers. When appropriate and within budget resources, EWC solicits applications through newspapers with national, regional, and state-wide circulations. When searching for faculty or upper level administrative positions EWC may expand its advertising to specific national academic journals such as the Chronicle of Higher Education, Higher Ed Jobs.com, Diversity.com, and other two-year and four-year colleges in the region. The College also distributes announcements to professional associations and other educational institutions. All advertisements state that the College is an equal opportunity employer. The Foundations of Excellence® project included a Dimension committee which focused on diversity. From this a specific strategic action plan was developed to address issues of diversity. The College invited a well-known diversity speaker, Dr. Mario Rivas, to speak at a college-wide in-service on April 5, 2010. As a follow-up to this event, EWC will be reaching out to the local community to seek involvement to help increase minority enrollment. In addition, the College submitted a Student Support Services grant application which will benefit 140 first-generation and/or low-income participants with focused support services. Although not specifically aimed at recruiting minority students, it is believed that many of the potential minority students in EWC’s communities would indeed be first-generation college attendees. The EWC GEAR UP program which was implemented in 2005 has a higher percentage of Hispanic students as participants than the regular EWC student body population. By the time these GEAR UP students’ matriculate, the College should realize an increase in “people of difference.” Other program activities such as Adelante Niños, that invites children from Goshen County fifth grades and their parents to visit the college for a day, provide encouragement for elementary students (especially local minority students) to begin thinking about attending college. 5.

The College might consider improving student access to computing facilities by, for example, adding Internet access in the dormitories and by increasing the open laboratory hours, particularly on the weekends.

Response: The College has improved student access to computing facilities by adding computers to the library, the Learning Skills Lab, the Student Center, and student housing areas. The library and the Learning Skills Lab also have wireless connectivity. Computer pods are also placed in outlying classroom buildings and most classrooms have computers that are connected to the network and internet. A portable laptop cart was purchased and used by various teachers—most notably in the math department. The Douglas Branch Campus building added new computer lab facilities, and the other outreach locations all have some student access to computers. The Technology Advisory Committee, formed in 2008, has been actively looking at various technology issues identified by faculty and staff. A primary accomplishment includes the addition of an overall college portal purchased from CampusCruiser. The portal, known as LancerNet, has greatly increased the ability for communication between staff and students. Additionally, the decision was made to change the learning management system (LMS) from Blackboard to CourseCruiser effective in Summer 2010. This change will further increase the communications. Another initiative in Fall 2009 included the 29


Eastern Wyoming College EWC Foundation’s purchase of laptops for the Honors Program students. Mentioned frequently is the need to investigate wireless access. EWC will employ a cost benefit analysis and feasibility study to determine the best course of action. 6.

The College might consider the exploration of some international partnerships, possibly by joining consortia.

Response: Whereas, the College enjoyed one exchange with a technical school in India in 2003-2004, the efforts have not been sustained or enlarged. However, the Foundations of ExcellenceÂŽ Diversity Committee indicated this was an area that was being recommended for further exploration. Other ideas being discussed include international or intercultural exchange programs such as the Global Undergraduate Exchange Program (UGRAD) or hosting a Fulbright scholar; either of which can provide excellent, high quality opportunities that add richness to campus. Additionally, the Art Department has explored having a summer art institute in Italy which would include EWC students traveling to Italy. Although this is still in the planning phase, the College hopes to take students to Italy in Summer 2011. Additionally, the Student Services area has developed a follow-up action plan to emphasize diversity including researching international partnerships. It should be noted that two new International Studies courses were added in 2009 and will be taught in 2010. The College joined a statewide group which is developing online International Studies courses statewide to be offered by the various Wyoming community colleges. Two key staff members have been involved in these efforts and participated in a summer institute at the University of Wyoming and then a national conference in Philadelphia. Part of the initiatives will include not only the classes, but also, international speakers coming to consortium campuses including Eastern Wyoming College. 7.

The College might consider hiring a consultant to work with faculty and staff to fully develop the strategic planning process and strengthen the relationship between planning and management of academic, financial and physical resources.

Response: The College has struggled with strategic planning over the years. In 2008, the College embarked upon a new way to do strategic planning. Consultants were brought in to help the College with visioning, valuing, and planning sessions. From these sessions, value categories, strategic directions, vital initiatives, and revised mission and vision statements were developed. A strategic budgeting framework to distribute the funding for both one-time and continuing strategic objectives was part of the overall framework. This method of strategic planning has now been followed through two cycles and is still being further refined. During FY 2010, only one-time dollars were allocated for strategic planning initiatives because of fiscal constraints. During 2009, the Wyoming Community College Commission was legislatively mandated to develop a statewide strategic plan. They hired consultants, MPR and Associates, Inc. from California, to work with the seven colleges and others in the state to develop this new plan. The document was officially adopted in 2010. Strategic planning at the College has been further impacted by the fact that the College has undergone extensive senior administrative changes in the last three years with turnover in all top administrative positions. While it is still a work-in-progress, a process is in place and will be further refined as the College is now stabilizing and regaining its equilibrium as it moves in to the future. 30


Eastern Wyoming College 8.

The College is encouraged to continue to explore and expand opportunities for utilization of distance education in the delivery of programs to outreach sites and to supplement the educational opportunities on campus.

Response: The College has a rich history of serving its rural remote outreach communities. As the efforts expanded to deliver distance education, it became apparent that complete degree programs should be made available to its constituents. Therefore, in 2005, the College submitted a Request for Institutional Change to offer four complete distance degree programs. These included Interdisciplinary Studies AA and AS degrees, Criminal Justice AA degree, and Business Administration AAS degree. Additionally, a variety of general education courses, early childhood courses, social science, and computer application courses have been added to the mix. The distance enrollment has continued to grow each year and in FY 2009, the FTE amounted to 7.88 percent of total enrollment. This continues to represent an anticipated growth area as the College strives to continue to support and serve its outreach area. Other ways the College has delivered instruction to outreach areas include the mobile welding lab, the new weatherization technology mobile lab, and on site instruction as appropriate such as the delivery of CNA classes. 9.

The Team recommends that the allowable 3% carry-over be maintained as a contingency fund for unanticipated emergencies.

Response: The College has taken to heart the advice to grow its carry-over funds in case of any emergencies. The College’s allowable cash carryover reserve is established by Wyoming Statute 21-18205 (f) currently set at 8 percent of the College’s biennial budget. Any funding that exceeds that amount is required to be returned to the State of Wyoming. Following the College’s audit for FY 2009 ending on June 30, 2009, the 8 percent carryover limit was $2.1 million. On June 30, 2009 the College’s carryover reserve was $1.5 million or 5.7 percent of the biennial budget. Despite the current 10 percent budget reduction imposed for the current biennium, the College has maintained its cash reserve. While the state struggles with budget shortfalls it is anticipated that EWC may have to face further budget cuts, and having a healthy reserve is fiscally responsible. 10.

The institution is encouraged to continue to work with the Commission to establish a millage for all counties served by the College.

Response: During the statewide strategic planning discussion in 2009, finding alternative sources of funding was again on the table. Several legislators have indicated that they would sponsor a statewide millage assessment to support community colleges in Wyoming. Since Eastern Wyoming College serves some of the poorest counties in the state, it is unclear how this assessment would directly benefit the College. Although draft legislation has been developed in recent years, as of this writing, any statewide millage assessment legislation has been unsuccessful. One consideration that has been discussed is that assessing a statewide millage might result in the state reducing the regular allocation to colleges in essence supplanting dollars instead of increasing them. Another consideration is the possibility that local boards of trustees would need to add members from other counties in the College’s service area. This issue continues to be discussed on a yearly basis by legislators, trustees, and community college administration.

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Eastern Wyoming College 11.

The College needs to explore incentives to encourage adjunct faculty to obtain appropriate credentials in teaching areas.

Response: Whereas an additional amount of funding for adjunct faculty development was listed as a suggestion in the strategic planning efforts of the college for a couple of years, at this time, there has been no additional institutional money allocated to help adjunct faculty earn appropriate degrees. However, several of the high schools who partner with the College to offer concurrent enrollment opportunities have helped teachers take additional graduate classes by using BOCES or other high school funding sources. An analysis of current adjunct qualifications indicates that they are appropriately qualified for their approved courses. 12.

The College might consider bringing a consultant to campus to assist faculty in upgrading general education requirements in AAS and Certificate programs.

Response: Through the efforts of a previous Vice President of Instruction and the Instructional Advisory Council at the time, the College worked closely with faculty groups and programs to upgrade the general education requirements in the AAS and Certificate programs. It was decided that no developmental education courses could be part of any degree or certificate program and the appropriate changes were made. A focused report regarding the general education requirements was written in 2004 and was accepted by the Commission with no additional action recommended.

13.

The bookstore should consider ways to become a profit center for the college.

Response: The bookstore has taken positive steps towards improving its operations. Efforts have been made to lessen the bookstore’s reliance on institutional funds. The bookstore implemented a Point of Sale (POS) system so that inventory could be tracked more effectively and daily, weekly, and monthly reports could be generated and reviewed. Additionally, a minor remodeling project included new counters and display areas along with new carpet and paint. The bookstore staff has also made an effort to be more visible by selling merchandise at athletic events and other special events. The bookstore improved processes for handling distance education and outreach book orders. Therefore, the reliance on institutional funds in recent years has been lessened. 14.

The College needs to develop an updated marketing and recruitment plan to assist with enrollment growth.

Response: The College was able to add a second recruiter position in 2007. This helped with the coverage of the large service area and surrounding regions. Recruitment was placed under Marketing and Public Relations, but in the reorganization in 2008, reverted back to Student Services. Then, after the Fox-Lawson study was completed in 2010, the long-term recruiter was promoted to be the enrollment manager and now oversees all of the recruiting. A recruitment plan (located in the electronic resource room) was developed so that the college has a more targeted approach to recruitment. The overall goal of the plan is to increase the number of first-year students attending Eastern Wyoming College, specifically targeting students from several neighboring states and increasing enrollment from those states by 10 to 15 percent by 2012. The plan also includes outlined actions, timelines, and activities. The overall marketing of the college has improved with a dedicated marketing office which works with an operational plan that includes increased collaboration between the Learning office, the College Relations 32


Eastern Wyoming College office, and Student Services Recruiting. Programs in need of increased enrollments are identified so that specific, targeted initiatives can be applied to increasing the enrollment. Out of this increased collaboration, a trial project utilizing strategic planning dollars was implemented for the Veterinary Technology program. All key individuals met and set enrollment goals for the program. Strategic budgeting dollars allowed for Google advertising as well as a new ad campaign on Wyoming Public Radio. Each year the College tries to maintain all effective marketing efforts and strategies while also exploring and adding new initiatives to the marketing mix. This collaboration will continue as programs are identified for targeted efforts. Collaboration and communication between community colleges in Wyoming help direct students to programs. For example, EWC has the only Cosmetology program at a community college in the state. Social media is also utilized including blogging and Face Book presence. 15.

The College might consider bringing an external facilitator to campus to assist with understanding and accepting change.

Response: Change is an inevitable part of any institution. Eastern Wyoming College has seen a great deal of change in personnel in the last few years as more employees have retired or left employment. At a recent in-service the College President said, “Our direction is as critical as our speed.� The College needs to grow in targeted focused ways with careful planning. Professional development opportunities have been supported for employees, and several reported they have attended sessions on working with generational differences and understanding organizational change. As described earlier in the response to advice item #7, extensive administrative personnel have occurred which have brought about change to the college in numerous areas. Several changes that have had long-term beneficial impact include the support and expansion of distance education and outreach, the addition of a Workforce Development office, and support and extended reach of the Foundation and Institutional Development office. 16.

The Team recommends the College work on redirecting the focus of the Institutional Research Office and enhancing the staff and faculty utilization of data in the planning processes.

Response: The Institutional Research office operated with a staff of one person. As part of the Institutional Effectiveness area, one of the strategic action plans of this department has been to expand the utilization and understanding of data in the planning process. Concomitant with this effort was the demand from state, regional, and federal authorities for reporting additional data. A yearly data report calendar has been developed for more timely reporting to the Board of Trustees and college constituents. Data reports to aid in strategic planning, program reviews, and other college-wide initiatives have increased and become more consistent. The web page contains more data facts, reports, and links under the data and planning section. With the office of Institutional Effectiveness merging with Learning, the Institutional Research office will again report to the Vice President for Learning as it did previous to the reorganization in 2008. 17.

The Team recommends that the College analyze the effectiveness of positions and take steps to more effectively deploy human resources.

Response: The College has worked through some competing and conflicting visions of efficient and effective use of all its human resources. For example, establishing a three vice president structure is appropriate for the size of the College. As resignations and retirements occur at any level, it has become the College practice to closely analyze all such vacancies and review each one individually to ascertain if 33


Eastern Wyoming College responsibilities can be shifted to others or if the position needs modified or refilled. Eastern Wyoming College engaged Fox Lawson & Associates in 2009 to assist with updating the classification and compensation systems for all non-faculty positions, and to update the compensation system for faculty positions. The study focused on internal and external parity for employees. The entire report can be found in the physical resource room. A variety of the Fox Lawson recommendations have already been implemented. Analyzing the effectiveness of positions and human resources remains a key focus point for the College. 18.

The College might consider collecting data to help it resolve its apparent institutional ambiguity regarding mandatory placement.

Response: A defined COMPASS placement test or appropriate ACT score is required for placement in math, English, reading, and some other courses such as Biology and some Veterinary Technology courses. At the state level, there is a movement to further standardize the cut scores for these same courses across all of the community colleges. The statewide strategic plan suggested that all Wyoming community colleges should have the same cut scores and efforts are underway to facilitate that suggestion. The college catalog reflects the institutional guidelines for placement in courses. The guideline is clear and non-ambiguous. Recommendation and Rationale (From the Report of a Comprehensive Visit to Eastern Wyoming College February 12-14, 2001) Recommendation The Team recommends that the next comprehensive visit to be conducted in 2010-2011. In addition, the College must provide to Commission staff a progress report by February 2004 that provides:

Evidence of implementation of a comprehensive strategic plan that includes enrollment management strategies and is directly linked to the fiscal year budget.

Evidence that feed back data are being used to improve student learning in courses and programs.

Evidence that progress has been made toward assuring that all general education faculty have appropriate credentials and that the general education component of the AAS and certificate program contains recommended amounts and levels of general education.

Rationale The rationale for the progress report in the above three named areas includes the following determinations by the Team: 1.

That while significant progress has been made in institutional/strategic planning, the College has not integrated individual unit plans into a comprehensive plan, with institutional priorities clearly delineated and tied to budgeting strategies. There was little evidence of enrollment management/recruitment planning and how that impacts overall priorities of 34


Eastern Wyoming College

the College. Most unit plans appeared to be for one year, with little emphasis on long-term strategies. Also, there is a lack of institutional research to assist in the setting of plans and priorities.

2.

Again, the College has made significant progress in the implementation of student outcomes assessment strategies. Faculty appears to support the concept in general, but have little to no hard data feedback to utilize in improving classroom instruction. Faculty need to identify and implement measures tied to evaluating specific class instruction, as well as to program outcomes, and the Institutional Research Office needs to provide more timely feedback of data analysis to faculty for use in evaluating their courses/programs.

3.

Although on-campus, full-time faculty in general education areas have the appropriate credentials, a number of part-time faculty, especially in the outreach areas, lacked appropriate qualifications for teaching in the particular subject area. The Team is cognizant of the difficulty of finding fully credentialed part-time faculty, given the sparse population base of the service area, and the lack of a requirement for a Master’s degree on the part of the public school system. However, the College needs to develop strategies to assist good faculty in achieving needed credentials. Of greater concern is the lack of general education found in AAS and Certificate programs. While the College has a well-developed program of general education in its transfer programs, minimal standards of general education are found in AAS and Certificate programs. The College is using remedial/developmental courses to fulfill the requirement, and is attempting to use the state’s political science (government) course to fulfill its cultural diversity requirement. The number of required hours or general education for these areas was found to be minimal, at best.

The Team deliberated as to the appropriate forum for the College to validate its progress in the abovementioned areas of concern. The consensus of the team members was that the College could provide adequate documentation to demonstrate its achievements in all three areas in a progress report, there is an understanding and desire on the part of the Academic leadership of the College to correct the stated deficiencies, and the College would be better served focusing its energies and resources on solving these concerns than in preparing for another visit. Official Response The progress report was submitted to the Higher Learning Commission in February 2004 addressing these recommendations. The Commission replied,

“On behalf of the Commission, I accept the progress report focused on (1) a strategic plan, (2) use of assessment data to improve student learning, (3) credentials of faculty teaching general education and the (4) general education component of AAS and certificate programs. No further reports are due. The institution’s next comprehensive evaluation is scheduled for 2010-2011.”

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Chapter 2 Organization of the Self-Study Report This Self-Study report is organized around the five evaluative criteria with one chapter being devoted to each criterion. However, the request for a special emphasis self-study focusing on the first year of college, had the nine Dimension committees which were formed as part of that first year of the self-study take the components of the criteria and weave them into the Dimension topics. This crosswalk which is included in Appendix B reflects how the criteria were divided and studied by the Dimension committees. The crosswalk document was developed and then borrowed with permission from Itasca Community College. The special emphasis approach was guided and encouraged by the Higher Learning Commission and the HLC Liaison. While continuous improvement is an ongoing activity at Eastern Wyoming College, the actual self-study process for this PEAQ accreditation cycle began in 2008. The Vice President for Institutional Effectiveness, the Vice President for Learning, and the Vice President for Student Services served as co-liaisons for the Foundations of Excellence® in the First College Year Self-Study. The nine Dimension committees were co-chaired by faculty and staff members. These same Dimension committees undertook additional work as they added the HLC criteria to their review for the 2009-2010 academic year. Three additional committees were added in the second year of the self-study to prepare for the actual required self-study and team visit. These committees included Publications and Marketing, Compliance, and Resource Room. The committee membership is included on page iv of this self-study. The self-study answers the questions of: • Where have we been? • Where are we now? • Where are we going? • Where do we want to go? • How do we get there? • How do we do it? • How do we know when we’ve done it? William Foster said, “Quality also marks the search for an ideal after necessity has been satisfied and mere usefulness achieved.” As the College strives for improvement, it is as important to look back on what the College has done as it is to set directions for the future. While the Foundations of Excellence® project took all of 2008-2009, the self-study work continued throughout 2009-2010 with the committees meeting numerous times. Most committees assigned work to subgroups which each took one or more of the sub criteria. These components were further studied and documented. Committee chairs forwarded pieces to the self-study coordinator who threaded the pieces together by criteria components. The drafts of the completed document were reviewed starting in February and running through July. At that time, the document was turned over to the Publications and Marketing committee for final editing and publication. This volume of the self-study and the volume representing the Foundations of Excellence® project from 2008-2009 were forwarded directly to the visiting team members. Preparation for the visit will continue through the summer and early Fall. Eastern Wyoming College looks forward to hosting the team on October 25, 26, and 27, 2010.  36


Eastern Wyoming College

Chapter 3 Criterion One: Mission and Integrity Criterion One: Mission and Integrity

Eastern Wyoming College operates with integrity to ensure the fulfillment of its mission through structures and processes that involve the board, administration, faculty, staff, and students. Eastern Wyoming College is one of seven community colleges in the state of Wyoming, and while the Wyoming Community College Commission (WCCC) provides oversight, it is an independent institution with a locally elected board of trustees. As a result, EWC mission and vision statements, as well as its goals, are unique to EWC. In 2008, the current mission and vision statements were revised as part of a college wide strategic planning process. A steering committee met frequently to begin the planning process. Planning sessions encouraged employees to dream and discover in focus group meetings. Participants included students, employees, administrators, community members, and Board of Trustees and Foundation members. The entire college community considered a mission and vision, in particular, at a day-long session. A mission statement and a vision statement resulted from this effort. An employee committee revised the drafts and submitted them to the Board of Trustees. The Board approved the current statements at their regular meeting on June 10, 2008. The more detailed explanation of strategic planning processes is included in the response to Advice and Recommendation #7 in chapter 1. Eastern Wyoming College has continually evolved in its sixty-year history, and its mission and vision have changed accordingly. Eastern Wyoming College Mission Eastern Wyoming College is a student-centered, comprehensive community college that responds to the educational, cultural, social, and economic needs of its communities with quality, affordable educational opportunities for dynamic lifelong learning. (June 2008) Eastern Wyoming College Vision Statement Eastern Wyoming College will be a dynamic center for education, acting as a catalyst for individual growth, community engagement and global impact. (June 2008) Criterion One: Core Component 1a Eastern Wyoming College’s mission documents are clear and articulate publicly the organization’s commitments. The current Mission Statement replaces the document approved in 1999. The earlier statement (see the 2007-2008 catalog) was wordier and the sort of mission prevalent at the time of its creation. Not only was the task of the planning process to examine itself and create a vision for the future, it was also to create a more clear description of what Eastern Wyoming College does and should do. A comparison of the documents reveals the greater clarity of the current document. The same is true of the Vision Statement. The previous statement, approved in 1998, was more a descriptive statement of what the college did than 37


Eastern Wyoming College a forward-looking vision. As witnessed above, the current Vision provides specific directions for Eastern Wyoming College. The Mission Statement, Vision for the Future, and Strategic Directions for the college are published in the EWC catalog, posted on the web site, contained in the Strategic Plan Executive Summary (which was distributed throughout the college community on and off campus), posted in meeting areas including the Board Room (Tebbet 274) and the Activities Center Conference Room, and in the student handbook. All outreach sites and other campus locations have mission/vision combo posters placed. An additional reminder of the mission and vision was distributed in the form of bookmarks to all employees at the Fall 2009 in-service meeting, provided to all adjunct instructors, included in student orientation packets, and distributed to outreach students. The two statements appear at the top of all Board of Trustee agendas. A contest was held in 2009 in the Student Center with free sodas given to anyone who could recite the mission and vision statements. Growing out of the planning process (as described in the Strategic Plan 2008-2009 Executive Summary) were strategic goals directly related to the college’s mission and vision. The Strategic Directions are: Strategic Direction #1 – Thoughtfully prepare our organization and our people for changing and dynamic times; Strategic Direction #2 – Promote high quality, accessible learning experiences through responsive programs of distinction aligned with current & future opportunities; Strategic Direction #3 – Embrace and invest in technology and modern facilities; Strategic Direction #4 – Enhance the quality of life for individuals, families, the community and region, and positively influence the economy, and; Strategic Direction #5 – Recognize and extend our global reach. Under each of these strategic directions, the College developed vital initiatives and action plans to help the College meet the needs of its constituents throughout its service area and to prepare for the future. It is this planning process which guides budgeting and decision-making toward achieving the mission and reaching the future vision. Eastern Wyoming College participated in a Foundations of Excellence® in the First College Year through the Policy Center on the First Year of College in 2008-2009. As that study showed, there is no philosophy statement or mission statement directly related to the first year experience. The Dimension committee which studied this area identified that weakness and recommended that a philosophy or first year statement be developed. The recommendation included a draft statement, and the Curriculum and Learning Committee has been assigned the task of working with and refining that first year statement. The functions of these statements are to serve as guidelines for Eastern Wyoming College’s commitment to academic excellence and serve as a public expression of its priorities, values, and goals. Recommendations of where the mission and vision statements should be displayed included the following places: 38


Eastern Wyoming College

• • • • • • • • •

On the front page of the Web site On job application forms and on the Employment section of the Web page Class schedule In all college facilities including campus housing Employment contracts Athletic facilities In-service packets New student orientation Syllabi

Strengths The College implemented an inclusive and thorough process to develop and adopt the current Mission and Vision Statements. The Mission and Vision Statements are appropriate for the College. Evidence of the organization’s commitment to the mission is included in the Board of Trustees minutes, College catalog, community education brochures, posters in all academic buildings, strategic planning documents, student handbook, and the web site. The College participated in the Foundations of Excellence® in the First College Year Self-Study in 20082009 which shows the College embraces the concepts of continuous improvement. Opportunities and Challenges The Mission and Vision Statements need to be reviewed regularly by the College, and the College should develop a written process that clearly shows how the College should address the accuracy of the Mission Statement for changing and dynamic times every three to five years. Criterion 1: Core Component 1b In its mission documents, Eastern Wyoming College recognizes the diversity of its learners, other constituencies, and the greater society it serves. As stated in the Diversity Dimension Report, which was submitted for the Foundations of Excellence® Self-Study Final report, EWC reflects its geographic and homogenous demographics. The following census data table indicates relatively low ethnic population in each county throughout the college service area, and academic program offerings reflect limited opportunities as regards attracting diverse populations. The low minority population in the service area counties is reflective of the low minority representation in the EWC student body.

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Eastern Wyoming College Table 14 EWC Service Area Population Service Area County Total Population Minority Population (shown as percent of total population) Goshen 12,129 11% Crook 6,255 2.7% Converse 12,861 7.8% Niobrara 2,253 3.2% Platte 8,588 7.5% Weston 6,762 5.4% Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 Eastern Wyoming College utilizes the ACT COMPASS placement exam to place all new degree-seeking students in English, math and reading coursework. In the Fall 2009 COMPASS demographic report, 18 percent of examinees indicated they are ethnic minority. Of those, 44 percent were Hispanic. However, data from EWC Institutional Research shows that 4 percent of all EWC students are Hispanic. These students have relatively few peers to seek out for support, and even fewer staff members. There is one minority faculty member, one professional staff member, and four other minority staff—two custodial/ maintenance, a bus driver, and a secretary. The newly crafted Mission and Vision Statements do indicate an understanding of diverse needs of learners with the wide application of areas to be served as per the words “cultural” in the Mission Statement, and “global impact,” in the Vision Statement. This is not to say, however, that diversity has been achieved. Indeed, since the Advice and Suggestions for Institutional Improvement from the Report of the Comprehensive Visit to EWC on February 12-14, 2001, the diversity issues are still being addressed. The College recognizes and is still seeking to expand and improve services to under-represented populations. The report’s suggestions #4 and #15 regarding these issues and further information about how or whether they have been addressed are as follows: #4. The College might investigate alternative methods of increasing the diversity of its faculty and staff. Examples include the establishment of a minority faculty internship or involving the local minority community in resolving the college’s monocultural atmosphere.

According to the Diversity Dimension committee report, the college’s written policies for students (in the catalog and policy manuals), “strongly communicate behavioral expectations regarding respect, professionalism, and acceptance of diversity… the Policies and Administrative Rules provide clear interventions, sanctions and due process guidance.”

There are no staff members from other cultures (non-Anglo) or foreign countries. The college professional staff has 24 females and 14 males, with no minority representation; 21 full-time female faculty members and 25 full-time male faculty members, of whom only one is minority.

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Eastern Wyoming College

Of the six administrative positions, two are female and four are male; none are minority. Of 43 full and part-time benefited classified staff, 30 are females and 13 are males, with five minority members of which three of these are in the custodial area.

The College is aware of the need to continue to represent a diverse environment both on the college web site and in college publications. The web page for EWC Athletics and the student newspaper are examples of the inclusion of diversity in both these areas. The college Athletic program is home to the majority of international and African American students on the main campus.

#15. The College might consider bringing an external facilitator to campus to assist EWC employees with understanding and accepting change. Though this suggestion does not overtly address diversity, a theme consistent with diversity can be implied as at least a portion of the suggestion. One initiative brought a nationally known speaker on campus to address this very issue, as well as the embracement of diversity. The College Leadership team and College Board invited Dr. Rivas to an in-service training on April 5, 2010. This speaker helped create awareness among staff of the targeted populations’ (first generation, low income, disabled) socio- economic and diverse backgrounds, and helped them in understanding their role in working with these students. Other solutions are being discussed and include the proposed establishment of an ongoing diversity committee. Adult Basic Education EWC currently has in place several programs or initiatives indicating the College’s efforts to recognize the diversity of its learners. The Adult Basic Education program at EWC teaches ABE/GED/ESL classes at 16 locales throughout the EWC service area. Last year this program was responsible for providing instruction to 403 students at the College outreach sites, local detention centers, and at partner programs sites Even Start and Head Start. Of the 403 students enrolled in ABE programs, 78 obtained their GED and 20 enrolled in postsecondary education, primarily at EWC. In terms of cultural diversity, the ESL program enrolled 51 students whose home countries were from many areas around the world; Mexico, China, Ukraine, Yugoslavia, and other former Russian republics. Incentive Programs EWC offers Goshen County high school seniors a scholarship whereby they can enroll in college courses at no charge for tuition for dual enrollment. In Fall 2009, 47 students enrolled in regular college courses which may have counted for dual enrollment. This opportunity brings a greater variety of students to EWC. Another example is the Bridge Program (held the week prior to the commencement of the fall semester), which is designed to help up to twenty-four students who are identified as high risk for dropping out and/ or failing college. Additionally, the EWC Learning Skills Lab provides tutors, academic workshops, and on-line tutoring through SmarThinking (an on-line academic tutoring program). The College provides various scholarship opportunities to students such as the First Generation Scholarship, Part-time Grant-inAid, and other forms of EWC financial aid assistance. EWC encourages programs working with “at risk” and diverse students by providing opportunities to visit the campus, meet with faculty, sit in on classes, learn about financial aid, and begin career exploration. All of these efforts contribute to further diversifying the College’s student populations as many ethnic minority students come from first generation or low income backgrounds. 41


Eastern Wyoming College Gaining Early Awareness Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) is a federal discretionary grant program and is designed to increase the number of low-income students who are prepared to enter and succeed in postsecondary education. GEAR UP provides six-year grants to states and partnerships to provide services at high-poverty middle and high schools. GEAR UP grantees serve an entire cohort of students beginning no later than the seventh grade and follow the cohort through high school. GEAR UP funds are also used to provide college scholarships to low-income students. The EWC GEAR UP program serves 300 low-income students, 20.5 percent represent a minority population. This office which is housed on the EWC main campus serves 18 schools in the EWC service area and has an established partnership with Eastern Wyoming College. Last year they had 39 seniors of which all graduated and 15 are currently enrolled at EWC, while the others are enrolled at other colleges. Other projects on campus recognizing diversity among students are the Adelante Niños program and the First Generation Scholarship initiatives which have included members from the local minority community in planning and development. The Adelante Niños conference was piloted in May, 2004, with Goshen County School District’s (GCSD) Trail Elementary School’s graduating fifth graders. Participation rates have expanded from 160 to 300 (including parents) over the five-year period of sponsorship for this program. The population served by the program includes all fifth grade students from Goshen County. The First Generation Scholarship program, begun in 2007, was developed with the assistance of a committee made up of members with minority backgrounds from the school district, EWC students, and members from the community at large. This committee, which also included college staff, developed guidelines which included scholarship applications, advertising for the scholarships, and the selection of scholarship recipients. The Adult Peer Counselor program involves nontraditional-aged students, with the help of their advisor, to lead student success and academic workshops. The Adult Peer Counselors also sponsor events through the Domestic Violence Awareness Program and facilitate service projects such as Halloween and Santa’s Workshop programs, the latter two of which target children from the community’s low-income families (but welcome all community children). The Adult Peer Counselors are recipients of EWC Activity Grants. Students selected to serve as Adult Peer Counselors participate with the Student Services Specialist in the design, development, and implementation of special educational activities to increase the development and success of nontraditional students. Initiatives Events which expose participating students to other cultures have included the Afghan Women’s Project which included photos/stories by photojournalist Peggy Kelsey whose visit to Afghanistan afforded the opportunity for students and community members to learn the plight of the Afghan women. The Chinese Golden Dragons Acrobatic production brought in for a Fine Arts performance exposed students and community members to a form of art they typically do not see in rural Wyoming. Additionally, Public Policy and You discussions held each year encourage students to express and hear divergent opinions about state and national issues. The Domestic Violence Awareness Month events serve to educate and inform students and community members about how domestic violence cuts across race and economic differences. The College, in Fall 2009, hosted a Nontraditional Career Fair attended by some 300 high school girls from the region. The event was geared towards educating young women regarding nontraditional careers which are available to them.

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Eastern Wyoming College On the Foundations of Excellence New Student Survey, some 44.7 percent of students indicated the College was doing a “fairly good job” of exposing them to students from differing backgrounds and cultures, while on the Foundations of Excellence Faculty/Staff Survey, 36.4 percent of faculty/staff scored this at high/very high. Furthermore, nearly 60 percent of faculty/staff believe the college is not doing enough to encourage exposure to diverse individuals outside of the college, while 39.4 percent of students believe they receive exposure to diversity outside of the college. According to the Institutional Research office, 48 percent of all students are from high schools with 99 or fewer students in their graduating class, which would correlate to a need for exposure to diversity in the world around them. To learn about people from other cultures leads to a better understanding and appreciation of the world, including the richness and texture provided by various experiences. To help students gain a wider perspective, it isn’t always necessary to “go” somewhere as an understanding can be developed through presentations, sharing through technology, and appreciating the salad bowl effect of the world in which they are preparing to work. A TRIO Student Support Services program grant proposal has been submitted to further develop work with low-income, first generation, and disabled students and to foster an institutional climate supportive of the success of under-represented students. This program is a definite step toward helping the College serve under-represented students. Until recently, a University of Wyoming Educational Opportunity Center (EOC) office had been housed on the EWC main campus to assist first-year students with the financial and other access issues pertaining to enrollment in postsecondary education. Unfortunately, as of January 18, 2010, the EOC office on the campus was eliminated because of budget cuts at the University. Students who require these services must now contact an EOC representative outside of the EWC service area. The representative serving the college in Cheyenne now has expanded the area to include EWC’s service area and visited the Torrington campus several times in Spring 2010. The Foundations of Excellence® Diversity Dimension committee noted that the College Studies course, which most freshman students take, provides opportunity to emphasize diversity. Not all students are required to enroll in College Studies if they are transfer students with more than 30 hours, are in a certificate program which does not require it, or have been allowed to participate in an exemption via a Challenge Exam. The committee determined that in order to successfully deliver elements of diversity through an integrated curriculum, all instructors must be supportive of the concept. An action plan that emanated from the self-study focused on improvement of the College Studies course. A committee was formed which developed a more scripted approach to teaching the course and developed common student learning outcomes. The improvements will be in place for the Fall 2010 semester. The new curriculum plan is available in the physical resource room. Several campus constituencies are excited and encouraged by the attention given to redesigning a critical course. The Foundations of Excellence® Diversity Dimension committee recommended the College take the following steps:

• • •

Encourage programming that promotes diverse multi-cultural topics. Increase campus awareness of existing library resources encompassing diverse authors and backgrounds. Emphasize EWC policies and administrative rules regarding acceptance, discrimination, and overall expectations of student behavior in new student orientation, College Studies, syllabi, and classroom expectations. 43


Eastern Wyoming College

• • • • • • • •

Encourage faculty to include diversity in classroom topics. Form a committee to enhance diverse activities throughout the EWC service area. Review and revise college courses to appropriately include diversity. Include students from diverse backgrounds in campus event planning and existing committee structure. Continue institutional support to augment diversity by continuing support to bring guest speakers, exhibits, programs, and studies to campus. Examine and improve recruiting efforts. Review and examine EWC’s hiring policies to increase diversity among members of the EWC staff and faculty. Seek to infuse diversity in appropriate areas of EWC via the curriculum, catalog, syllabi, campus environment, and faculty and staff.

These recommendations were embedded into a strategic action plan for the College to address in the future. The College will focus on short-term and long-term strategies regarding diversity. Strengths Several programs or initiatives indicating the College’s efforts to recognize the diversity of its learners are present. These programs include ABE, GEAR UP, Goshen County High School Student Scholarship program, the summer Bridge program, the Learning Skills Lab, First Generation Scholarship program and other financial aid awards, Adelante Niños program, Adult Peer Counselor program, cultural activities, and a nontraditional career fair. Opportunities and Challenges Not all students are required to enroll in College Studies which delivers elements of diversity. The College should study this practice. The College can encourage programming and practices that focus on diverse multi-cultural topics collegewide. Review policies and practices that relate to nondiscrimination, recruiting and hiring of minorities, and other diversity areas. Identifying and attracting qualified faculty applicants to a small rural community college presents unique challenges. Criterion 1: Core Component 1c Understanding of and support for the mission pervade Eastern Wyoming College. Day-to-day activities at Eastern Wyoming College give evidence that “understanding of and support for the mission pervade” the college. The mission states that EWC is a “student-centered comprehensive community college.” What the Board of Trustees, the administration, the faculty, and the staff do every day centers around meeting the needs of the students, both on campus and in outreach sites. The employees work to deliver quality, affordable educational opportunities for students, with well-qualified faculty, 44


Eastern Wyoming College modern facilities, and the appropriate technology for the Associate Degree, Certificate, and Workforce programs. In keeping with the College’s mission as a comprehensive community college, EWC also offers a variety of community education courses, as well as numerous cultural and social offerings to “enhance the quality of life of individuals, families, the community, and region.” EWC is responsive to the economic needs of its communities as is evidenced by the expanding Workforce Development programs and the collaboration with the Department of Corrections new prison opening in Torrington. EWC has experienced significant changes in administration in the past two years including the retirement of the President in 2007, the hiring of a new President who served only December 2007-March 2008, the hiring of the current President in the Summer of 2008; the retirement and replacement of the Vice President/Dean of Instruction in 2007 and the Dean of Student Services in 2008; the retirement and replacement of the Vice President of Financial Affairs in 2008 and again in 2009; the resignation of the Vice President for Learning in 2010; and the reorganization of other administrative positions under the changing regimes. The focus is on achieving stability, gaining equilibrium and consistency, and continuing working together and responding “to the educational, cultural, social, and economic needs of our communities” in keeping with the college mission. Even in the midst of a “climate of change” during the past two years, a strong institutional commitment has advanced to improve teaching and learning as evidenced by EWC’s undertaking of the Foundations of Excellence® in the First College Year project in 2008-2009, a project which involved 75 percent of the College’s overall employees. Although EWC is only in the early stages of implementing recommended actions identified by the Foundations of Excellence® Self-Study, the process has been valuable in helping EWC identify areas that can be improved. One of the self-study strategic action plans is to adopt a “First Year Experience Philosophy” statement and incorporate it into the College culture. The Foundations of Excellence® New Student Survey results included students reporting that while they were aware of some institutional changes, they [the students] were focused on learning and stable faculty and were not affected by organizational shifts. Since the last PEAQ self-study, EWC has made significant progress in tying its mission and strategic planning to its budget process. Administrative and board decisions are now more mission-document driven. Preparation of annual budgets aligns with strategic directions and strategic action plans, and the strategic planning process at EWC is based on the College’s mission and strategic directions. The following excerpt from the “EWC Strategic Plan 2008-2009 Executive Summary” booklet clearly shows this link between budgets and strategic plans:

“A proposed strategic budgeting framework to distribute the funding for both the institutional strategic directions and the departmental strategic objectives will utilize both one-time and continuing sources of funding. Both one-time and continuing sources of available funding may be set aside to accomplish the overall institutional strategic directions which will be identified by the Leadership Team. The remaining one-time and continuing resources would be available for distribution by formula to accomplish the key functional areas strategic objectives….. Each major functional area shall allocate funding toward its strategic objectives, according to priorities that have been collaboratively determined through the action planning process. For strategic budgeting purposes, seven areas have been identified that include: Trustees/President’s Office, Learning, Student Services, College Relations, 45


Eastern Wyoming College

Administrative Services, Institutional Effectiveness, and Institutional Development. (emphasis added)

The College’s seven “functional areas” identified above (Trustees/President’s Office, Learning, Student Services, College Relations, Administrative Services, Institutional Effectiveness, and Institutional Development) prepare annual strategic plans, and requests for budget dollars must clearly show which of the strategic directions and strategic action plans the requests would support. Similarly, functional areas annually report progress they have made in the strategic directions and objectives during the previous year. These progress reports are collated, distributed, made available on the web site, and are available in the resource rooms. In light of shrinking state budget dollars and the possible budget cuts for Eastern Wyoming College in the next biennium, the understanding of and support for the mission will be ever more important guides to the College’s decision making and budgeting processes. Strengths Implicit understanding of and support for EWC’s Mission is widespread among staff, students, and constituents. Opportunities and Challenges Work on completion and implementation of First Year Experience recommendations has begun, and is continuing. Establishing a firm timeline will benefit the completion of the seven action plans developed under this initiative. Regularly reexamine the College’s Mission, Vision, and Strategic Directions every five years. Align the institution’s strategic plan with the “Wyoming Community College Statewide Strategic Plan” which was adopted in 2010. Criterion 1: Core Component 1d Eastern Wyoming College’s governance and administrative structure promote effective leadership and support collaborative processes that enable the organization to fulfill its mission. Eastern Wyoming College has a well-defined structure through which decisions are made and articulated to the various concerned entities, including college employees, students and the public. The Board of Trustees has the Mission Statement and Vision Statement and Strategic Directions printed on the cover of the agenda each month (Board Agendas). Governance and administration is primarily the purview of the Board of Trustees and the chief administrative officers of the College, although faculty, staff, students, and the public have input into administrative decisions.

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Eastern Wyoming College Board of Trustees The Board of Trustees is the primary governing body of Eastern Wyoming College. The Board consists of seven members elected to four-year terms by eligible voters from within the College District. The Board themselves elect board officers each December. These positions include the President, Vice President, Secretary, and Treasurer. The Board’s primary responsibility is that of hiring the college President. In addition, their responsibilities include fiscal oversight and formulating college policy that is in accordance with Wyoming state law and the college policies and administrative rules that support the college mission. The Board receives information and recommendations from the college president. The Board publicizes its policies through local media outlets, holds public hearings, and posts policies on the college web site. Guidelines relative to the election and term of office of Board members, the rotation of offices within the Board and monthly public meetings are located in the EWC Policy Manual, Governance Section. The Board agenda and minutes of the meetings are sent to all employees via e-mail and are posted for public access. The Board has engaged itself with thorough policy review. It has reviewed and revised several key policies in the last year including Policy 3.3 Continuing Contracts/Tenure, Policy 3.29 Contract, and numerous Administrative Rules. The Personnel Advisory Council is finishing a year-long review and revision of all personnel policies. Part of the goal has been to clarify broad Board policies and separate the administrative rules sections or process sections into separate documents. This process is leveraging change and providing direction for the administrators and the College. While EWC is not a part of any permanent joint powers boards; EWC and City of Torrington did have an agreement until recently regarding the Fitness Center. This agreement was dissolved in Spring 2009. As mentioned earlier, partnerships exist with service area public schools, businesses, industries, and state agencies. Administrative Officers The President of EWC is the chief executive officer. He, along with members of his leadership team, is responsible for carrying out the EWC Board’s policies and directives. He also provides to the Board, on behalf of the college employees and public constituencies, information related to the College’s well-being. The President’s leadership team includes other members of the administration: Vice President of Finance and Administrative Services, Vice President for Learning, Vice President for Student Services, Institutional Development Director, College Relations Director, Associate Vice President for Learning and Outreach, and the Executive Assistant. The specific duties of each of these positions are included in their job descriptions located in the Human Resources Office. A list of current leadership team members is available on the college web site under Administration (Administrative Rule 2.0.1). The Leadership Team meets regularly and prior to each meeting of the Board of Trustees to review and discuss the agenda of the Board meeting and to share any relevant issues, concerns, or newsworthy items. The team is encouraged to provide the President with input and insight into matters before going to the Board. This is one of the stated duties of the leadership team according to Policy Manual Administrative Rule 2.0.1. The President informs the Leadership Team of his recommendations and possible outcomes. The Leadership Team demonstrates the College’s commitment to collaboration among a cross-section of the college within the context of EWC’s mission and governing documents. 47


Eastern Wyoming College In recent years, there have been changes in the titles and job descriptions of the administrative positions at EWC. While the President’s job title and duties have remained essentially the same since the last self-study in 1999-2000, many positions once titled “dean” have been changed to “vice president,” and “associate vice presidents” replaced associate deans. Responsibilities have been confirmed along with adjustments to salaries. The Learning Office, in particular, took on new responsibilities while losing support staff. Effective May, 2010, the College again reorganized and has three vice presidents, combining the duties of the Vice President for Institutional Effectiveness with the Vice President for Learning under that title. In 2006, the Institutional Research Director held focus groups to gather information and ideas related to increasing EWC’s enrollment. The report generated after the focus groups were finished indicates that people were open and honest in their positive and negative comments. The consensus was that EWC needed to listen and then do something with the information. At that time, EWC’s enrollment was declining and people believed there was a lack of leadership and vision. Problems are being successfully addressed with the new administration, and enrollment has been steadily increasing (Employee Enrollment, Recruitment and Retention Focus Groups Report, November 6, 2006). Academic Curriculum and Processes All curriculum decisions involve the Curriculum and Learning Council. The Curriculum and Learning Council addresses academic standards as well as catalog and schedule changes. The council, chaired by the Vice President for Learning, is composed of the Vice President for Learning, the Associate Vice President for Outreach and Learning, the Vice President for Student Services, the three Division Chairs, the Outcomes Assessment Chair (also represents the Arts, Humanities, Social & Behavioral Sciences Division), one faculty representative from the Division of Business and Technology, one from the Division of Sciences, the Director of Library and Media Services, and the representative from the ABE/GED/Developmental Studies area (Administrative Rule 2.0.2). Communication from the Learning Office has been a concern but is, in part, explained by the lack of support staff in that office as addressed above. With the reorganization effective May, 2010, the communication has improved on the instructional side of the house and regular meetings with the Curriculum and Learning Council are occurring with minutes being distributed collegewide. Academic departments, individual instructors, and administration initiate new courses and programs or changes to current programs and courses. The decision to do so is often prompted by the needs of the community or advisory boards. Examples of new programs or initiatives in the last few years are construction technology, livestock judging, forensics, computer applications, entrepreneurship, and weatherization. New courses and programs, once proposed by faculty, are sent to their respective division chair and then on to the Curriculum and Learning Council. Any new courses, or changes to the old, are brought to the attention of the other institutions in the Wyoming community college system for informational purposes via the Academic Affairs Council, composed of academic vice presidents, which is convened on a regular basis by the Wyoming Community College Commission. This is especially important since the seven community colleges and the University of Wyoming have a common course numbering system. New programs are required to meet the approval of the Board of Trustees. New programs are reviewed and forwarded to the same statewide Academic Affairs Council, then reviewed by a subcommittee established by the Wyoming Community College Commission staff, sent on to the Executive Council, and then on 48


Eastern Wyoming College for final approval by the Wyoming Community College Commission. The Wyoming Community College Commission is a statewide entity consisting of seven individuals appointed by the governor. The faculty structure at EWC consists of the Vice President for Learning and the Division Chairs of the Science Division, Business and Technology Division; and Arts, Humanities, Social & Behavioral Sciences Division (see Organizational Charts in Appendices). The Associate Vice President for Learning and Outreach provides oversight of the Douglas Branch Campus and the other outreach sites in the service area. The Douglas Branch Campus has a director and the other outreach sites have outreach coordinators. Workforce and community education efforts are coordinated through the Learning office and staff work collaboratively with the divisions and outreach coordinators to provide credit and noncredit offerings. The Division Chairs, which must be tenured faculty members, are voted for by their constituents, appointed by the Vice President for Learning, and remain on faculty contracts. They are given a half-time load release to handle items such as schedules, budgets, evaluations, and student complaints. Individual faculty members serve on various committees and the Division Chairs serve on the Curriculum and Learning Council. There is no existing faculty organization at the College; faculty do not serve on the President’s Leadership Team, nor are there any designated faculty to speak at Board meetings. However, faculty members are welcome at all Board meetings and invited to express their viewpoints. College Employees, Students, and the Public Eastern Wyoming College is committed to involving as many of its constituencies as possible in the governance and administrative decisions of the college. Their involvement is normally participating on committees that serve a decision-making or advisory function. Most full-time employees of the college are assigned to at least one college committee. Other than the Curriculum and Learning Council addressed above, the decision-making committees include the Advisory Council for Student Services, the Professional Development Committee, the Personnel Advisory Committee, the Student Fee Allocation Committee, and the recently added Facilities Planning Advisory Committee and the Technology Advisory Committee. The lists of committee membership are available in the College Administration Policies and Administrative Rules section of the Policy Manual (Administrative Rule 2.0). These committees have representation by both faculty and staff. These committees, as well as ad hoc committees, provide a valuable opportunity for faculty and staff members to participate in the administration of specific aspects of the college’s operation and in formulating and executing college policy. Committee meeting minutes are available in either the electronic or physical resource room. Each career and technical education program at EWC is supported by a technical advisory committee that meets at least once a semester to provide input and guidance in the continued development of the specific career and technical program. Membership in these committees consists primarily of community and business members who have an interest in the particular program, students and/or recent graduates, and the faculty in each area. A list of current technical advisory committees and their membership is available in the back of the EWC catalog. The Student Senate is designed to express student concerns and proposals on behalf of the student body. The leaders of Student Senate are encouraged to express student concerns to the appropriate department or administrator. They also provide a monthly oral report to the Board of Trustees. Students are encouraged to participate in student associations and activities to foster involvement in student life. 49


Eastern Wyoming College Through these means, employees, students, and community members can maintain an active role in the structure and governance of the institution. Strengths The governance and administrative structure of the College is sound and responsive to its constituents. Opportunities and Challenges Consider providing more faculty information and discussion sessions to encourage faculty engagement in professional development topics. Criterion 1: Core Component 1e Eastern Wyoming College upholds and protects its integrity. Eastern Wyoming College is one of seven community colleges in Wyoming. The Wyoming Community College Commission mission and purpose is to provide coordination, advocacy, and accountability for the Community College System on behalf of the State of Wyoming. EWC abides by all its policies. The integrity of these relationships is ensured by fair, clear, and consistent policies and procedures; commitment of resources and expertise by the offices of the President and Vice Presidents; oversight of federal, state, system, and external auditors, and the accreditation process. The College ensures a consultative process to involve input from employees. This section focuses on legal compliance, data privacy and security, training, safety, and procedural fairness. To the extent that integrity can be defined as “doing what you say you will do,” EWC upholds its integrity as its mission statement indicates, by being a “comprehensive community college that …offers…. quality, affordable educational opportunities” in response to “the educational, cultural, social, and economic needs of its communities.” These opportunities include on-campus and distance education courses for transfer and career and technical programs, community education offerings, workforce development training, as well as social opportunities and cultural offerings. A very visible commitment to upholding EWC’s integrity is boldly stated on the college web site, in the President’s “Welcome.” Those of us who call Eastern Wyoming home promise to take you seriously. We will enthusiastically partner with you as we become actively involved, sharing your responsibility for learning. When we say “you’ve made a great decision,” we mean And that’s backed up with caring faculty and staff…We guarantee a quality educational experience supported by a community of professionals that will enable you to confidently and competently realize your best choices. Join us.

it.

Instructional Practices EWC strives for fairness and consistency in interactions with its students, and in the enforcement of its academic policies. The college catalog clearly outlines programs, degree requirements, and academic policies. The College has established policies for the acceptance of transfer credits from other institutions, 50


Eastern Wyoming College and for credit by examination (such as AP, CLEP, and Dantes). The catalog and Student Handbook discuss Academic Honesty, the Student Code of Conduct (Board Policy 5.14), the Student Grievance process, and the Sexual Harassment Policy (see Student Handbook p. 9-14). Files of student grievances and their disposition are maintained by the Vice President for Student Services office. New faculty and adjunct faculty receive a copy of the Faculty Handbook which outlines EWC’s academic policies (available in electronic resource room). Course syllabus format is defined and available to all faculty (available in electronic resource room). Course syllabi serve as the avenue for communicating course requirements and individual instructor policies and expectations to students. EWC courses are aligned with courses of other Wyoming Community Colleges and the University of Wyoming with common course names and numbering, as evidenced in the “2008-2009 Wyoming Higher Education Transfer Guide.” The College has block transfer agreements in place for its Associate’s Degrees to the University of Wyoming, Black Hills State University, Chadron State University, National American University, Regis University, South Dakota School of Mines, Upper Iowa University, Valley City State University in North Dakota, and the University of Great Falls (available in the physical resource room). Legal Compliance EWC abides by all federal, state, and local laws. The WCCC is accountable to the Governor, and all member institutions are bound by all state laws, regulations, policies, and procedures. Additionally, EWC is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (HLC), thereby indicating compliance with all its guidelines and regulations. EWC is also affiliated with the U.S. Department of Education, the National Student Clearinghouse, and the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS), abiding by all policies. The EWC Board of Trustees governs the institution and is responsible for ensuring the legal, honest, and fiscally responsible conduct of the institution as stated in Board policy. Legal counsel from Hickey & Evans Law Firm in Cheyenne exists as a resource to provide expert guidance to the institution. Upholding integrity also involves “playing by the rules” – namely, adhering to the local, state, and federal laws that govern the institution. EWC is governed by Federal Law, Wyoming State Statutes, the Wyoming Community College Commission Rules, and EWC Board Policies. The Wyoming governor urged Wyoming citizens in March 2010 to live by the principles expressed from “the Code of the West” (book by James Owen). The principles are “… to live courageously, take pride in their work, finish what they start, do what’s necessary, be tough but fair, keep promises, ride for the brand, talk less and say more, remember that some things aren’t for sale, and know where to draw the line.” EWC adheres to the standard Federal Regulations: Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Graham Leach Bliley Act (GLBA) for data security and privacy, Americans with Disabilities Regulations for appropriate accommodations, Title IV of the Federal Higher Education Reorganizing Act for federal financial aid rules and regulations, Student Right to Know Act of 1990 for disclosure of institutional information, Title VII Civil Rights Act of 1964 for addressing Sexual Harassment, Campus Security and Jeanne Clery Acts for reporting of crime statistics, and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (now the Patsy T. Mink Equal Opportunity in Education Act of 2002) for athletics. The College is subject to internal and external audits, and completes all public reporting of institutional data as required. 51


Eastern Wyoming College EWC regularly conducts “compliance training” for faculty and staff at in-service days (concerning Sexual Harassment policies, FERPA, Drug-Free Work Place, etc), and in additional training sessions for new employees and new faculty. Training and orientation sessions are also conducted for all new Board of Trustees members. The EWC Policy Manual (available on the EWC web site) documents the policies in place to guide its interactions with its employees and students and interactions with the public, and to establish fairness and consistency. Evaluation of employees is outlined in Board Policy 3.30 Evaluation, and Administrative Rule 3.30.1 Purpose of Evaluation which speaks to upholding the integrity of the institution in stating that one purpose of evaluation is “To upgrade the effectiveness of employees by increasing accountability of each individual” (emphasis added). Affirmative Action, Sexual Harassment, Drug-Free Work Place, NonDiscrimination on Basis of Disability, and Grievance policies are in place (see Board Policies 1.7, 3.0, 3.1, 3.12, 3.16). Files of employee grievances and their disposition are maintained by the President’s Office. Policies are reviewed regularly by the Personnel Advisory Committee and other appropriate committees. Eastern Wyoming College is accountable to its accrediting organizations: The Higher Learning Commission (HLC), the American Veterinary Medicine Association (AVMA) which accredits the EWC Veterinary Technology Program (see AVMA Accreditation Report – available in physical resource room), and the American Welding Society (AWS) which accredits the EWC Welding Test Site (see AWS Accreditation Letter of September, 2009 in electronic resource room). The Cosmetology program must adhere to the standards set forth in the Wyoming Cosmetology Act regarding licensure of Cosmetology Schools. In addition, the College is accountable to the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) and the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association (NIRA) for the College’s Athletic and Rodeo programs. College animal welfare is under the oversight of the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) and subject to USDA regulations. Financial Integrity Regarding financial integrity, the driving force behind EWC’s procedures is Wyoming Statute 16-4: “Uniform Municipal Fiscal Procedures Act.” Also, some fiscal guidance, particularly with regard to debt financing and budget development and approval, is provided in Wyoming Statutes 21-18: Community Colleges. From these guiding statutes, EWC then follows Board Policy and Administrative Rules. To assure financial integrity, EWC separates financial duties between college personnel. For example, the employee collecting funds is not the employee disbursing funds and the employee monitoring the bank accounts is also not receipting or disbursing funds. Eventually all actions are reviewed by the Vice President for Finance & Administrative Services for final acceptance. All transactions are backed up by a paper trail and very little is transacted with cash. Cash transactions at the bookstore or cafeteria, for example, have procedures in place to match inventory with disbursements and receipts. Simply, a “checks and balances” system is in place to assure the financial integrity of the College’s accounts. With regard to purchasing issues, EWC has a variety of Board policies that comply with state and federal laws and guide the parameters and approval processes the institution is allowed to follow. Board Policy 6.0 Purchasing Policy and Board Policy 6.6 Credit Card Procedures provide specific guidelines for procurement of materials as well as travel expenses. 52


Eastern Wyoming College Another area of financial integrity is the management of assets to include their acquisition, disposition, and use. Board Policy 6.1 Use of College Facilities, Board Policy 6.4 Use of College Resources and Equipment, and Board Policy 6.5 Vehicle Use provide guidelines on how EWC manages college assets. Investment policy is also driven by guidelines established in Wyoming Statutes and further defined by Board Policy 6.7 Investment Policy. Audits Auditors monitor and ensure compliance with the law. EWC’s processes and finances, including federal financial aid, are reviewed yearly by an independent auditor for improprieties. To assure compliance with all rules and procedures, EWC is required by state statute to be audited annually by an independent accounting firm. This is specifically required in Wyoming Statute 16-4-121 <http://legisweb.state.wy.us/ statutes/statutes.aspx?file=titles/Title16/Title16.htm>. EWC operates with financial transparency and honesty in stewardship of resources and preparation of budgets. There are uniform purchasing policies (with appropriate forms and approval processes) and a formal bid process for the purchase of equipment, goods, and services to ensure consistency in fiscal practices. The College has an external audit annually by a private certified public accounting firm, and the audit reports are available for public inspection. The Wyoming Community College Commission (WCCC) also receives and reviews the college audit reports. The college audit for the year ending June 30, 2009 shows “No Significant Deficiencies in Internal Control” related to the Financial Statement Audit. The report does however show three deficiencies in Internal Control for Federal Awards, namely:

1) “…a lack of control in place over timely return of Federal Family Education Loan Funds to the applicable lender or over the transferring of Title IV funds into the College’s accounts (Pell, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, and Academic Competitiveness Grants) This lack of control resulted in several instances of funds being returned outside of the 45 and 60 day deadlines.”

2) “…several instances in which the date reported for a student status change was not consistent with the status change in the school files.”

3) “…six [student status] changes were incorrectly reported to the National Student Loan Clearinghouse (NSLC) or the lender.”

These deficiencies have been addressed, and procedures have been implemented to ensure that FFEL loan funds are returned within the 45 and 60 day limits, and to ensure that student status changes are properly reported. The items involved totaled less than $100 in student loan refunds and involved a misunderstanding of how to calculate the semester days. Additional cross-training of financial aid personnel has been added as part of the corrective action. The Vice President for Finance and Administrative Services carefully supervises the business practices of the auxiliary budgets for the Bookstore, Housing, Food Services, Copy Center, and Bus/Shuttle Bus accounts.

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Eastern Wyoming College External Practices EWC upholds its integrity in presenting itself accurately and honestly to the public. All regular Board meetings are open to the public, and proceedings are reported in the local newspaper, The Torrington Telegram. Internally, board meeting summaries are sent via email to the Lancers’ Distribution List. Press releases are issued in a timely fashion. College Relations has a positive working relationship with departments at the College. See Current Students/Press Releases on left hand tabs on EWC web site for links to press releases 2002-present <http://www.ewc.wy.edu/pr/index.cfm>. EWC and EWC’s activities are very visible in the community. In fact, a search of “The Torrington Telegram” web site for articles with “EWC” in the headline from October 29, 2000 to October 29, 2009 found 296 articles, a search for articles with “Lancers” in the headline for the same time period found 96 articles. It should be noted that the Torrington Telegram is published bi-weekly (on Wednesdays and Fridays). Articles about EWC activities in outreach areas are published in area newspapers as well. EWC is a valuable asset to Torrington, Goshen County, and its service area as the only institution of higher education in the immediate area, and as one of the major employers in Goshen County. EWC has a good reputation locally and throughout the region. The Foundations of Excellence New Student Survey asked EWC students “Why did you select EWC?” and numerous student respondents stated that they came because the school or its particular programs were recommended to them, or because their perception was that EWC is a good school with a good reputation (see Foundations of Excellence® Final Report p. 81-90). Some examples of evidence to support these perceptions include:

• • • •

EWC transfer students’ success rate at UW (see UW Transfer Student Assessment Report). EWC Veterinary Technology graduates have had a 94 percent or higher pass rate over the past 10 years on the Veterinary Technician National Exam (VTNE). Cosmetology students have had a 100 percent pass rate on State Boards for many years. EWC welding student Chance Pollo won the 2007 US Welding Competition, competed in the Irish Invitational Welding Contest in Cork, Ireland, and competed and placed seventh in the World Skills Competition in Shizuoka City, Japan. EWC welding instructor Leland Vetter received the American Welding Society “Image of Welding Award” in 2007, and the AWS District 20 “Educator of the Year Award” in 2000. EWC concurrent welding student Brendon Edwards placed first at the 2010 National Skills Competition in Kansas City, Figure 7: while the Douglas High School welding fabrication team Chance Pollo, Welding Student placed second. EWC welding student Blake Parks placed third at the 2010 National Skills Competition in Kansas City. 54


Eastern Wyoming College Other notable outcomes are reflected in the Outcomes Assessment Summary Reports posted on the web page and available in the electronic resource room. Campus Safety and Wellness EWC accepts its responsibility to employ security measures that ensure students enjoy their time at EWC as free as possible from any threats to safety and well-being. Crime is a national problem that affects all communities and college campuses in this country, even those in a rural area such as Torrington. EWC has been fortunate in not experiencing a significant number of crimes. To minimize the occurrence of such incidents, college administrators, competent residence life and physical plant staff members, the city and county law enforcement authorities, and the students themselves must work together to ensure that students and their possessions are protected as much as possible. Recently, staff training has occurred relating to OSHA compliance and the handling and disposal of chemicals and other hazards. The Vice President for Student Services annually reports campus crime statistics to the U. S. Department of Education. EWC’s Crime Statistics Report on the U.S. Department of Education “Campus Security Data Analysis Cutting Tool” web site shows that there were no reported criminal offenses on campus, in the residence halls, or in public areas on either the Torrington or Douglas campuses in 2006, 2007, or 2008. In the Foundations of Excellence New Student Survey results, 84.7 percent of the student respondents reported that they felt physically safe at EWC at either the high or very high level (see Foundations of Excellence® Final Report, p. 41-42). The Vice President for Student Services also oversees campus security and the EWC Board of Trustees and the Torrington Police Department cooperatively instituted a U.S. Department of Justice Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) grant-funded resource officer for the Torrington campus to provide safety and security, maintain a high level of visibility around the campus, maintain order, and provide a range of general and emergency services. In addition to this part-time Campus Resource Officer, EWC maintains a close working relationship with both the Torrington Police Department and the Goshen County Sheriff’s Department. The Torrington police routinely patrol the streets and parking lots on campus as well as the residence hall areas. They respond to both routine and emergency calls, and provide the college with timely information relating to criminal activity in the community so that college employees and students may act to protect themselves and assist in crime prevention efforts. Programs sponsored by community/campus organizations, residence life, college staff, and local law enforcement personnel provide sessions each academic year on topics including personal safety awareness and security, domestic violence/sexual assault, the prevention of theft and vandalism, and alcohol and drug abuse. Information on safety and security issues is provided to students and employees regularly through bulletins, crime alerts, posters, brochures, and college and community newspapers. During business hours, EWC (excluding residence halls) is open to students, parents, employees, contractors, guests, and invitees. The residence halls are locked at all times and accessible by key for students and staff. During non-business hours, access to all EWC facilities is by key, or by admittance via the Physical Plant staff. Over extended breaks, the doors of all halls are secured around the clock. Some facilities may have individual hours, which may vary at different times of the year. Examples are the Student Center, the Library, and the Learning Skills Lab. In these cases, the facilities will be secured according to schedules developed by the department responsible. 55


Eastern Wyoming College EWC does not employ a campus police staff; however, the Physical Plant staff members who work past regular business hours have the authority to ask persons for identification and to determine whether individuals have lawful business at EWC. Criminal incidents are referred to the Campus Resource Officer or the local police department who have jurisdiction on the campus. Community members, students, faculty, staff, and guests are encouraged to report all crimes and public safety related incidents to local law enforcement, the Vice President for Student Services, and/or the Physical Plant staff in a timely manner. Programs and Initiatives Crime prevention programs and sexual assault prevention programs are offered on a continual basis with specific programs designed to inform students and employees about campus security. Upholding integrity additionally involves being concerned for campus safety. As evidence of the College’s commitment to assuring a safe campus environment, the following statement appears in EWC’s Crime Statistics web site:

Many students and parents are concerned about the issue of personal safety on college campuses. Eastern Wyoming College (EWC) shares that concern and accepts its responsibility to employ security measures that ensure our students enjoy their time at EWC as free as possible from any threats to safety and well-being (emphasis added).

Safety features in place on the EWC campus include adequate lighting in parking lots, security cameras in residency halls, night security in the dorms, and emergency telephone towers on walkways located throughout campus. The Torrington police routinely patrol the streets and parking lots on campus as well as the residence hall areas. The EWC Board of Trustees and the Torrington Police Department cooperatively instituted a Campus Resource Officer program to provide additional safety and security via a COPS Grant written by the Torrington Police Department. EWC has a Crisis Response Team and a Crisis Management Committee. This committee is responsible for crisis planning, and distributed an “Emergency Procedures” flip-booklet to all employees in 2006. The booklet is currently being revised. The committee established a Pandemic Flu Plan in Summer 2007 and at the Fall 2009 In-Service meeting presented information about H1N1 flu planning. Faculty members were also given a copy of the booklet titled “Keeping Yourself and Your Classrooms Safe.” In 2008, Eastern Wyoming College, in partnership with the City of Torrington, Goshen County, and the Goshen County Unified School District, purchased the program “CodeRed” which allows EWC officials the ability to deliver recorded emergency notification or informational messages to employees and students via phone. The College also utilizes the CruiserAlert portion of LancerNet, EWC’s campus portal, for emergency notification of students and staff via text messaging, phone calls, emails, and web page announcements. A common theme of all awareness and crime prevention programs is to encourage students and employees to be aware of their responsibilities for their own security and the security of others. In addition to seminars, information is disseminated to students and employees through crime prevention awareness packets, security alert posters, electronic displays, videos, and articles in college newspapers. When a sexual assault victim contacts Eastern Wyoming College, the Torrington Police Department or Goshen County Sheriff’s Office will be notified as well. The victim of a sexual assault may choose for the investigation to be pursued through the criminal justice system, and Eastern Wyoming College, or only the latter. A college employee will guide the victim through the available options and support the victim in his 56


Eastern Wyoming College or her decision. Various counseling options are available from the EWC Counseling Center and other staff on campus. Counseling and support services outside EWC can be obtained through the Goshen County Task Force on Family Violence and Sexual Assault and Peak Wellness. Eastern Wyoming College’s Student Code of Conduct prohibits “Participating in any actual or threatened non-consensual sexual act.” It further outlines disciplinary proceedings, and guidelines for cases involving sexual misconduct. The accused and the victim will each be allowed to choose one person who has had no formal legal training to accompany them throughout the formal grievance procedure. Both the victim and accused will be informed of the outcome of the grievance procedure. A student found guilty of violating the EWC Student Code of Conduct could be criminally prosecuted in the state courts and may be suspended or expelled from the College for the first offense. Student victims have the option to change their academic and/or on-campus living situations after an alleged sexual assault, if such changes are reasonably available. The Eastern Wyoming College crime statistics, policies, and procedures may be found on the web site by clicking on “Campus Crime” at <http://ewc.wy.edu/administration/security.cfm>. In accordance to the “Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act” of 2000, which amends the Jacob Wetterling Crimes Against Children and Sexually Violent Offender Registration Act, the Jeanne Clery Act, and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, EWC provides a link to the information regarding registered sex offenders in Goshen County available through <http://goshensheriff.org/SexOffenders/Default.asp> and in Wyoming available through the < http:// attorneygeneral.state.wy.us/dci/so/so_registration.html>. EWC follows federal OSHA guidelines, fire and building codes and inspection procedures, prepares mandated plans (such as Pandemic Flu Preparedness training), and provides mandated health and safety training to pertinent staff as appropriate. The Physical Plant Department maintains all college buildings and grounds with a concern for safety and security. OSHA upgrades are made on a regular basis. Staff inspects campus facilities regularly; promptly making repairs affecting safety and security, and responding immediately to reports of potential safety and security hazards, such as broken windows and locks. The campus is well-lighted. Lighting surveys are conducted on a regular basis to ensure that lights are in proper working order. EWC is committed to maintaining a drug-free work place in accordance with the requirements of the U.S. Drug-Free Work Place Act of 1988, Pub. L. No. 100-690, 5151-5160. EWC certifies that it will provide a drug-free work place by publishing a statement notifying employees that the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession or use of a controlled substance is prohibited in the work place and specifying the actions that will be taken against employees for violation of such prohibition, and establishing a drug-free awareness program to inform employees. Additionally, the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance is prohibited at EWC. Such an act is a crime under Wyoming State Laws. Compliance Training Policies and procedures are implemented by the Board of Trustees. Administrative-driven duty days provide opportunities for training and education about changes to policies and procedures. In addition to presentations during in-service days, communication of policies, procedures, and law are provided through 57


Eastern Wyoming College face-to-face training, e-mail notices, and posted notices. Examples include: Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, sexual harassment, and drug-free work place information sessions, posting of copyright policies, and communication about other institutional policies. Specialized trainings related to specific job duties are also coordinated. These include faculty-directed trainings on relevant material like learning management systems, library resources, advising procedures, and education conducted by departments such as in the area of financial aid. Resident Assistants and Fitness Center employees receive training including CPR certification and job-specific instruction. Maintenance and Grounds employees receive training in use of equipment and chemicals. Other Practices The College has in place several activities that lend to the overall understanding of processes for students and staff. Summer Pre-Registration programs are held two to three times during the summer. Sessions are included for parents highlighting College processes, expectations, and the overall safety of their student. Student orientation activities are held prior to the start of the fall semester each year. For distance and outreach students, the information is handled via advising and outreach coordinator interaction. Student Services educational programming for students includes three to four special sessions each semester. Topic sessions are things such as how to study more effectively, or balancing family home and studies. Residence Hall educational programming is scheduled two times monthly during the academic year. These sessions include topics such as date rape, living with your roommate, alcohol education, and sponsored leisure activities. The Goshen County Task Force on Family Violence and Sexual Assault offers sexual assault education and information programs to college students and employees upon request. Educational programming and literature on date rape education, risk reduction, and EWC response is available through Residence Life and other Student Services offices. The required freshman orientation course, College Studies, includes topics on how to help students be more successful. College Studies sections are offered every semester both distance and on-site. The fall semester typically has ten to twelve sections of College Studies. Improving College Studies is one of the Foundations of Excellence速 action plans and has already begun with a year-long ad hoc committee which recommended a common course outline with objectives. These changes will take effect in Fall 2010. The College is committed to wellness. An agreement is in place with the Goshen County Public Health Office to provide some medical services or referrals to students at no charge. An example of this cooperation was a sponsored H1N1 flu shot clinic held in October 2009 for students. All students, except those medically exempted, desiring to receive an Associate of Arts Degree or an Associate of Science Degree from EWC are required to take two different physical education activity courses, at least one being a physical activity course. Various intramural sport opportunities exist for students as well as access to the Fitness Center. The EWC Fitness Center is designed to promote healthy lifestyles for clients and to assist in attaining and maintaining individual fitness goals. An individualized fitness program is developed for each individual by ACSM (American College of Sports Medicine) certified personnel. Progress toward individual goals is monitored and charted periodically.

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Eastern Wyoming College Data Security and Privacy EWC policy on data security is mandated by the Federal Trade Commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Safeguards Rule and the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLBA). The procedures related to this policy describe the Program elements pursuant to which Eastern Wyoming College intends to:

1)

Ensure the security and confidentiality of covered records, and;

2)

Protect against any unauthorized access or use of such records or information in ways that could result in substantial harm or inconvenience to students.

The Vice President for Learning is responsible for appointing a Program Officer responsible for overseeing the tasks of the Data Security Program such as: risk identification and assessment, employee training and management, information systems and information processing, detecting, preventing, and responding to attacks, and document retention, security, and disposal. Additional information and the specific actions of the institution can be found in EWC Board Policy 6.8 Information Security Program Policy and the subsequent administrative rules. EWC has the responsibility for effectively supervising any access to and/or release of official data/ information about its students. Certain items of information about individual students are fundamental to the educational process and must be recorded. This recorded information concerning students must be used only for clearly defined purposes, must be safeguarded and controlled to avoid violations of personal privacy, and must be appropriately disposed of when the justification for its collection and retention no longer exists. The retention of business office records are carefully monitored and secured appropriately. In this regard, EWC is committed to protecting to the maximum extent possible the right of privacy of all individuals about whom it holds information, records, and files. Access to and release of such records is restricted to the student concerned, to others with the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s written consent, to officials within the college, to a court of competent jurisdiction, and otherwise pursuant to law. Students will receive annual notification regarding the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (Statute: 20 U.S.C. 1232 g; Regulation S: 34 CFT Part 99). Only the personal representative (executor/ executrix) or parents of a deceased student may authorize the release of education record information regarding the deceased student, for a period of ten years after the death of the student. Beyond such time, access to anyone requesting the deceased studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s education records, is permitted without permission. Records Retention EWC is currently renovating the existing procedure for storage of student records. Hard copies of student files are kept for three years and then microfilmed. Those records are retained indefinitely. Out-of-date hard copies are shredded. Copies of microfilm records are stored in the Student Services vault and a copy of the microfilm is sent to the State of Wyoming archives. These procedures are in line with State of Wyoming mandated policies. Electronic student records are maintained through the Colleague software system and stored indefinitely. Access is password protected. The server on which academic records are housed is purchased by the State of Wyoming and maintained by EWC.

59


Eastern Wyoming College Public Information EWC has a College Relations Office that is responsible for updating the catalog, writing press releases, and coordinating other publications for the College. College Relations has both internal and external audiences. The process of conducting self-studies for the Foundations of Excellence® indicated a need for increased ease of access to published college documents, specifically electronically. Many official publications, including Board Policies and Administrative Rules, the EWC Catalog, and Data & Planning reports are available online. A webmaster within the College Relations Office is responsible for maintaining and updating the College’s web site. Some individual department representatives have been instructed in the content management software in order to ensure the timely updating of information. Fairness to Internal Constituencies EWC strives to create a working and learning environment that is desirable for all employees and students. In compliance with federal and state law, EWC follows clear and fair policies regarding the rights and responsibilities of its internal constituencies: students, faculty, and staff. College policies specifically prohibit sexual harassment and discrimination. The Director of Human Resources is responsible for administering and coordinating the College’s Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity Program. Sexual harassment of employees or students is reprehensible, illegal and will not be tolerated at EWC. Such activity which influences employment decisions or the academic success of students is contradictory and antithetical to the environment provided by this institution, and prompt and remedial action will be taken by EWC upon any finding of sexual harassment. All complaints of sexual harassment will be investigated. Employee complaints are filed with the complainant’s immediate supervisor or the Affirmative Action Officer. Student complaints are registered with the relevant Division Chair or the Affirmative Action Officer. If the complaint cannot be resolved at this level, the College Grievance Procedure under EWC Board Policy 1.7 Grievance Policy is followed. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Compliance is reflected by the Board Policy 3.1 Nondiscrimination on Basis of Disability which reads:

Eastern Wyoming College does not discriminate on the basis of disability in the admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, its programs or activities. The Office of Personnel has been designated to coordinate compliance with the nondiscrimination requirements contained in section 35.107 of the Department of Justice regulations. Information concerning the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the rights provided thereunder, are available from the ADA coordinator.

Students at EWC have the right to appeal final grades. The process for making appeals is detailed in the student handbook as stated, “Grade appeals may only be made in the subsequent fall/spring/summer semester and must be made following the posting of grades, but no later than the end of the first two weeks (14) days of the subsequent semester of enrollment.” Employee rights and responsibilities are held in high regard at Eastern Wyoming College. The Human Resources Office insures consistency in hiring practices, affirmative action policy, and the gathering of 60


Eastern Wyoming College faculty and staff credentials or other information across the College. Faculty and staff receive one-onone orientation by the Director of Human Resources and are provided with a policy manual. Faculty responsibilities focus on facilitating student learning and supporting the mission and strategic directions of the College. Eastern Wyoming College supports the concept of academic freedom in higher education. Faculty members have the right to expect significant autonomy in the classroom within the framework of meeting the educational expectations of the discipline, department, and the College. Faculty members are expected to comply with college policies, rules and procedures, and to fulfill the expectations of the job description and Administrative Rules 4.0.1-4.0.4. Informal and formal grievance procedures are detailed in the EWC board policies. The informal complaint procedure may be utilized to resolve any student or personnel problems arising at the College. If the grievance cannot be resolved through this informal procedure, the person or persons involved may avail themselves of the formal grievance procedure. Strengths Policies and practices are in place to insure that EWC operates with integrity and in accordance with state and federal laws. EWC upholds its integrity and reputation. EWC works to insure a safe campus environment. Opportunities and Challenges The Faculty Handbook will be updated and distributed. Policies and procedures need to be continually updated with widespread involvement by employees. Engage the campus committees on crisis management to ensure campus readiness in case of emergencies. Furthermore, this needs to be a regular topic at in-services so that all employees are made aware of expectations and practices.

Summary of Criterion One The College meets all of the components of Criterion One. It operates with integrity to ensure the fulfillment of its mission through structures and processes that involve the board, administration, faculty, staff, and students. Chapter Summary of Strengths, Opportunities, and Challenges for Criterion One Strengths 1.1

The College implemented an inclusive and thorough process to develop and adopt the current Mission and Vision Statements.

61


Eastern Wyoming College 1.2

The Mission and Vision Statements are appropriate for the College. Evidence of the organization’s commitment to the mission is included in the Board of Trustees minutes, College catalog, community education brochures, posters in all academic buildings, strategic planning documents, student handbook, and the web site.

1.3

The College participated in the Foundations of Excellence® in the First College Year in 2008-2009 which shows the College embraces the concepts of continuous improvement.

1.4

Several programs or initiatives indicating the College’s efforts to recognize the diversity of its learners are present. These programs include ABE, GEAR UP, Goshen County high school student scholarship program, the summer Bridge Program, the Learning Skills Lab, First Generation Scholarship program and other financial aid awards, Adelante Niños program, Adult Peer Counselor program, cultural activities, and a nontraditional career fair.

1.5

Implicit understanding of and support for EWC’s mission is widespread among staff, students, and constituents.

1.6

The governance and administrative structure of the College is sound and responsive to its constituents.

1.7

Policies and practices are in place to insure that EWC operates with integrity and in accordance with state and federal laws.

1.8

EWC upholds its integrity and reputation.

1.9

EWC works to insure a safe campus environment.

Opportunities and Challenges 1.1

Regularly review the College Mission and Vision Statements and develop a written process that clearly shows how the College should address the accuracy of the Mission Statement for changing and dynamic times every three to five years.

1.2

Study the practice of not requiring all students to enroll in College Studies which delivers elements of diversity.

1.3

Encourage programming and practices that promote diverse multi-cultural topics college-wide.

1.4

Review policies and practices that relate to nondiscrimination, recruiting and hiring of minorities, and other diversity areas.

1.5

Continue working on completion of First Year Experience recommendations and establish a timeline for the completion of the seven action plans developed under this initiative.

Regularly reexamine the College’s Mission, Vision, and Strategic Directions every five years.

1.6

62


Eastern Wyoming College

Align the institutionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strategic plan with the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wyoming Community College Statewide Strategic Planâ&#x20AC;? which was adopted in 2010.

1.7

Consider providing more faculty information and discussion sessions to encourage faculty engagement in professional development topics.

Update and distribute the Faculty Handbook.

1.8

1.9

Update policies and procedures on a continual basis with widespread involvement by employees.

1.10

Engage the campus committees on crisis management to ensure campus readiness in case of emergencies. Furthermore, this needs to be a regular topic at in-services so that all employees are made aware of expectations and practices.

63


Eastern Wyoming College

Chapter 4 Criterion Two: Preparing for the Future Criterion Two: Preparing for the Future Eastern Wyoming College’s allocation of resources and its processes for evaluation and planning demonstrate its capacity to fulfill its mission, improve the quality of its education, and respond to future challenges and opportunities. The College manages and plans its allocation of resources carefully and has been able to build its reserves at the same time that state funding support has been decreased. Student credit and non-credit enrollment have been steadily increasing over the last ten years. Constituents throughout the College’s six-county, 16,000 square mile service area are well served and the workforce training opportunities along with distance education courses have been expanded. Technological advances including establishing a replacement plan for computers have been achieved. The Foundation has grown its resources, and grant funding has been increased. The College is preparing for the future and providing quality educational opportunities for its constituents. Criterion Two: Core Component 2a Eastern Wyoming College realistically prepares for a future shaped by multiple societal and economic trends. Eastern Wyoming College is well prepared for known factors in the future that may affect the institution’s abilities to meet its mission. This preparation includes regular assessments of the College’s status and resources, maintaining the ability to adapt to changing needs, and making and updating plans for the future. A number of emerging societal and economic trends have recently had a significant impact on the planning and operations at EWC and will continue to be examined in the future. The College will identify and address energy challenges that may be emerging as companies have been offering oil and gas leases to property owners. Student Enrollment A significant trend that is affecting the institution today is increasing student enrollment. This has been a trend since the inception of the institution. Enrollment in the last 10 years illustrates this trend: EWC’s full-time equivalent (FTE) raised from 901 in 1999-2000 to 1109 in 2008-09, an increase of 23 percent. Increasing enrollment has required the College to meet growing needs regarding physical and human resources. The construction of a new dormitory and the renovation of offices and buildings have helped EWC meet the needs of a growing student population. A more detailed account of on-campus and offcampus facilities is included in Core Components 2b and 5d. In the last 10 years, the number of faculty has increased to meet the growing demand for instructors as credit hours offered increased. The number of fulltime faculty has increased from 37 in 1999-2000 to 47 in 2008-09, an increase of 27 percent (Enrollment Reports in resource room). Faculty members have been replaced as a result of attrition and retirements after a thorough position review.

64


Eastern Wyoming College Tuition Revenue A second trend is an increase in tuition revenue, resulting from increases in both tuition and student enrollment. Full-time resident tuition has risen 48 percent in the past 10 years, from $526 per semester in 1999-2000 to $780 per semester in 2008-09. Non-resident tuition has risen 48 percent in that same time frame, from $1,578 in 1999-2000 to $2,340 in 2008-09 (Tuition Rate history). Given decreases in state funding, the College has worked to ensure financial security, maintain reserve funds for emergency situations, and to manage other college services. Further details concerning the budget and financial resources are included in Core Component 2b. Technological Advancement Another trend affecting the future of the institution involves the College’s more focused attention to, familiarity with, and dependency on technology. EWC is forward-thinking in its approach to technological advancements. It has several committees that work on advancing technology. On campus, almost all of the lecture classrooms are equipped with computer, projector and screen, and other equipment designed to enhance the educational experience. There are also mobile carts equipped with laptops that can be moved into any room upon request. The EWC web site offers constituents valuable information about and access to the College, its programs, and its personnel. Perhaps most significant, technological advancements have allowed the College to offer instruction in a variety of nontraditional settings, including web-based instruction, compressed video instruction, and web-enhanced components of traditional classroom-setting courses. EWC’s commitment to technological advancement for the benefit of the student body also supports another trend at this institution and across America: EWC’s students are demanding easier access to courses. EWC’s web-based and web-enhanced courses offer students viable alternatives to the traditional classroom delivery setting. EWC also meets this demand for easier access by offering courses at several locations throughout its service area in traditional classroom settings, via compressed video, and through concurrentcredit classes in area high schools. The College also offers evening classes and summer sessions. Core Component 3c provides further information about enrollment trends in web-based courses and compressed video and other technological enhancements in the classrooms. There are areas of concern resulting from expanding delivery options of courses to multiple locations and online to outreach populations whose technology may not be ready for distance education. One concern is an increased need to assess the equity and effectiveness of these types of courses. Another concern is to ensure sufficient and effective assistance for faculty and students who may struggle with technology. A third concern is the administration of and registration for these courses, a function which has been handled by different offices over the past several years. Finally, an ongoing concern is the age and maintenance of the technology on campus and at the outreach sites, especially the compressed video system which is provided by the Wyoming State Department of Education. The Wyoming Senate Enrolled Act 52 passed in 2010 is concerned with equity and access to postsecondary options for high school students throughout Wyoming. A statewide committee has been established to study these issues with recommendations being developed by Fall 2010. EWC recognizes the trends affecting its operation and providing opportunities for growth and change in the future. With this recognition and understanding, the College is better able to assess its success with regard to the College mission and to meet future challenges. 65


Eastern Wyoming College Societal Trends The cultural, educational, social, and geographic isolation of the target service area presents barriers to equal educational opportunity. These barriers include low population density, large geographic expanses, lack of human service-resources, unstable/failing economies, and educational access limitations. These factors compound numerous social problems and human service needs of the College service area rural residents and contribute significantly to an overall inequity in opportunities and resources related to many quality-oflife measures in the rural area served by Eastern Wyoming College. Further magnifying the critical nature of the aforementioned conditions is the fact that the EWC service area represents the poorest economic region in the state (Wyoming Department of Employment, Research and Planning, 2008). According to the Wyoming Market Research Center, over 40 percent of Goshen County’s families make less than $25,000 which speaks very dramatically to the significant number of families living in poverty. Moreover, it should be noted that one quarter of the county’s families make less than $15,000 affecting 1,235 households (WY Market Research Center, 2009). High poverty rate is also revealed through the Goshen County School District Free and Reduced Lunch Program statistics wherein 64.6 percent of the total school district’s children qualified for the federal program during the 2009-2010 school year. An article in the local paper went on to explain that the 15.9 percent increase in qualified students over last year was not due to increased enrollment (Torrington Telegram, June 9, 2010). Correspondingly, the average weekly all-industry wages of Goshen County rank the lowest in relation to the average weekly wage for the State of Wyoming, with a $548/weekly rate compared to a state average of $798 (Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages, Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2010). Economic realities such as these typically impact members of EWC’s ethnic minority and female population even more severely. Statistical research supports this assertion as demonstrated in Tables 15 and 16.

66


Eastern Wyoming College

Geography

Table 15 Number with income in 1999 below poverty level One Race Native American Hawaiian Black or Idian and and Other Two or Hispanic Nonmore or Latino Hispanic African Alaska Pacific White American Native Asian Islander races origin White 448 3,956 45,732 310 4 1,662 5,772 43,436

Wyoming COUNTY 5 34 Converse 1,245 11 0 22 2 4 Crook 523 0 0 0 0 59 Goshen 1,415 0 0 26 0 5 Niobrara 293 0 0 5 0 11 Platte 923 0 2 8 0 22 Weston 593 0 0 10 7 135 6-county area 4,992 11 2 71 Percent below poverty level in 6-county area 11.1 15.9 30.7 17.2 100.0 13.3 Source: Economic Analysis Division – Wyoming State Data Center

108 0 302 11 124 9 554

1,226 523 1,331 293 845 587 4,805

23.5

11.0

Table 16 demonstrates that the minority population of EWC’s six-county service area is twice as likely as the white non-Hispanic population to be in poverty. This may demonstrate a causal link to education and employment challenges. Table 16 Poverty Status of Female-Headed Households EWC Target Six County Area Service County Percent of Families Headed by Women Who Live Below Poverty Level Goshen 31.6% Niobrara 28.8% Platte 25.9% Converse 41.5% Weston 32.4% Crook 27.2% Average 31.0% Source: 2000 Census—Income and Poverty Status The critical economic characteristics highlighted above, further frame the inequities arising from the demographic realities of this rural area and may dramatically affect family conditions and educational access. The significance of understanding the status of female single parents is also derived from the fact that 94 percent of Student Support Services (SSS) grant eligible student parents are of single parent status, which speaks to support service considerations. 67


Eastern Wyoming College Another characteristic of the educational isolation of the service area is the absence of college degrees as demonstrated in Table 17. Table 17 Number and Percentage of Potential First-Generation College Students Percentage 25 Number 25 Number 25 Service Counties 2000 Population Years & Over Years & Over Years & Over Without Degree Without Degree Goshen 12,538 6,130 72.9% 6,130 Niobrara 2,407 1,365 78.9% 1,365 Platte 8,807 4,701 77.9% 4,701 Converse 12,052 6,112 78.2% 6,112 Weston 6,644 5,627 79.7% 3,627 Crook 5,887 2,989 76.9% 2,989 Totals 48,335 26,924 77% 24,924 Source: 2000, Census Selected Characteristics, Educational Attainment – Economic Analysis Division

As the above table indicates, 77 percent of adults residing in the College service area are without a college degree—among the highest in the state (Digest of Education Statistics). Thus, these figures also indicate a very high number of first-generation students to be served. This further illustrates the College’s potential to reach students in the service area that do not have a “college going” background in order to achieve a higher socio-economic level for its citizens. Clearly, the demographic data presented on the previous pages demonstrate that EWC may have an even greater opportunity for providing educational access and opportunity to a predominantly “high need” area populace. Regarding student diversity on campus at Eastern Wyoming College, Table 18 demonstrates population demographics of the United States, Wyoming, Goshen County, Eastern Wyoming College Students (on-and off-campus), and Eastern Wyoming College Employees (on-and off-campus).

68


Eastern Wyoming College Table 18 Population Demographics by Ethnicity (On-and Off-Campus) Population EWC EWC EWC Demographics Goshen Faculty and USA Wyoming College College 2009 County Professional Students Employees (as a percent) Staff Asian 3.6% <1% <1% <1% White, not Hispanic 75.1% 92.1% 93.8% 70.6% 91.3% 98.8% Black/African American 12.3% <1% <1% <1% Hispanic or Latino 12.6% 6.4% 8.8% 3.5% 8.7% 1.1% Native Hawaiian/ Pacific Islander <1% <1% <1% <1% Native American <1% 2.3% <1% <1% Reporting 2 or more 2.4% 1.8% 1.1% <1% 1.1% races Unknown 5.5% 2.5% 3.7% *22.7% Non-Resident Alien <1% Source: US Census Data 2000; EWC Institutional Research Office *registration forms were redesigned to include appropriate places for data input regarding ethnicity effective for Fall 2010 While Eastern Wyoming College is somewhat representative of the State of Wyoming, it lacks appropriate representation by county demographics as evidenced in the above table. EWC needs to improve the diversity of its student body to better match Goshen County and the State of Wyoming. The high school Hispanic drop-out rate and other issues remain challenges to this goal. Data from EWC Institutional Research office shows that 3.5 percent of EWC students are Hispanic with 17.7 percent Hispanic representation across Goshen County School District. Torrington public schools indicate Hispanic student representation at 20.3 percent (EWC Institutional Research, 2010; EWC SSS Grant, 2009; GCSD Office of the Assistant Superintendent, 2/2010). Similarly, EWC employee statistics of faculty, professional staff and administration status, show a lack of diversity. It should be noted that the HLC Visiting Team of 200 also cited the fact that EWC was primarily “monocultural” (“Advice and Suggestions for Institutional Improvement,” from the Report of a Comprehensive Visit to EWC, February 12 – 14, 2001). This represents an ongoing challenge for the College. While EWC does not contribute to the statistical disparity, two initiatives specifically designed to increase the access and retention of students by age and ethnicity include the First Generation Scholarship created by the EWC Board of Trustees, December of 2007, and the Adult Student Peer Counselor Activity Grants. Both measures serve to increase access and retention and student development for members of EWC’s under-represented populations, waiving tuition costs for approximately 12 students under each program. The vitality of academic programs and budget resources is tied to student enrollment. Therefore, in order to restore greater enrollment and fiscal stability to the institution, the College must broaden its 69


Eastern Wyoming College base and increase access of student prospect pools, including not only the traditional student but also the nontraditional student to accommodate managed growth and to meet the educational needs of the population within EWC’s service area. Economic Trends Research indicates that there is a correlation between low educational attainment levels/educational access and the poor economic status of the EWC service area. As noted in the Wyoming Department of Employment newsletter Labor Force Trends (September 1993), “Community and state economic development groups in Wyoming should be very interested in citizens’ educational levels and access to education. Educational access and attainment are intrinsic to diversifying Wyoming’s economy.” Although this quotation is dated, the advice still holds true as The National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education concurs, citing in their 2008 State Report Card on Higher Education, “A small proportion of Wyoming residents have a bachelor’s degree and this substantially weakens the state’s economy.” Nationwide, 8 percent of Hispanics have a bachelor’s degree compared to 24 percent of whites. Paul Romer, Graduate School of Business, Stanford University/Hoover Institution states, “Support for higher education is the leverage by which the government can move the entire economy.” That statement supports the notion that indeed, education is the key to improving socio-economic status of constituents. According to the Economic Analysis Division of the State of Wyoming, the state’s mining industry contributed approximately one third of both the state’s total earnings growth and job growth. Wenlin Liu, Ph.D., State of Wyoming senior economist stated “…the multiplier effect associated with the acceleration in the mining industry resulted in upward movement in many other industries such as construction, wholesale trade, transportation, and professional and business services” (2007). The global recession, however, has turned that result around wherein the State of Wyoming is not immune to the economic downturn facing the nation. The Economic Analysis Division reported that “…natural gas production dragged Wyoming’s economy into a recession this past year (2009). Employment in the state decreased by 10,970 jobs or 3.6 percent—the worst performance since 1987 (the bust of the oil industry). With energy-related industries no longer able to provide the support they once did, momentum in other industries also slowed—construction, mining jobs, retail businesses, automobile sales. As a result, a massive amount of workers have been pushed into the job market [or unemployment lines]” (Wyoming Economic Analysis Division, Economic Summary: 3Q09). Many area railroad workers have also been furloughed due to this downturn. The mining and petroleum industries, although less dominant within the six-county target area, have also diminished during this recession period. Agriculture, the driving economic force of Goshen County, has also seen decline both on a local and statewide basis. According to the Wyoming Economic Analysis Division, Wyoming’s farm proprietors have experienced negative income in nearly every quarter since 2006. Analysts add that, “Total annual farm earnings in the state were below $100 million in recent years. Agricultural prices have plummeted since the financial crisis started. Amid the global recession, the weak demand for quality beef continues to hamper prices” (Wyoming Economic Analysis Division, Economic Summary: 3Q09). Agriculture is still very strong in Goshen County. Goshen County is ranked #1 in the state as to number of farms in a county. Further it is ranked high in the production of alfalfa, corn, and cattle. Ag focus groups held in Spring 2010 helped frame the direction for the EWC Ag programs. One of the suggestions included emphasizing soils in the curriculum, and a new instructor was hired with that background. 70


Eastern Wyoming College While the economic downturn presents a challenge to EWC, at the same time, it also presents an opportunity for the College to respond to the needs of displaced workers, homemakers, under-employed, and others pursuing professional career changes. Within the economically depressed College service area is an opportunity for enrollment growth. EWC worked collaboratively with the Goshen County Economic Development to determine and survey area businesses to identify expanded employment options. According to the Wyoming Community College Commission, “…meeting Wyoming’s future workforce needs will require the WCCC and colleges to strengthen their partnerships with the Department of Workforce Services (DWS), the Department of Employment, the Workforce Development Council (WDC), and the Wyoming Business Council (WBC). Each of these entities is already heavily involved in projecting and planning for future needs, and aligning those efforts with the community college system’s strategies will benefit the state” (WCCC Statewide Strategic Plan, 2009). The Commission goes on to state that, “By targeting programs to growing occupations that will offer self-sufficiency wages to employees, Wyoming community colleges can help more state residents reach their personal self-sufficiency standard.” In response to this recommended initiative, EWC has developed a thriving Workforce Development Department which continues to see dynamic growth in course offerings, participation rates, organized scheduled training, and partnership development. Coordination has been made with the Department of Corrections throughout the EWC college service area including Lusk, Newcastle, and the new Wyoming Medium Security Corrections Institution (WMCI) in Torrington. EWC continues to provide instructional training for the Wyoming Law Enforcement Academy in Douglas and coordinates very closely and efficiently with the ETSS (Employment and Training for Self Sufficiency) program wherein 71 area adults have completed CNA training alone. While entry level, this training is in high demand and provides access to advanced occupational training opportunities in the nursing field. Other trainings available under ETSS include: Business Office Technology, Criminal Justice, Computer Networking, Farm/Ranch Management, Information Technology Specialist, Veterinary Technology, Welding and Machinist Training. The College is currently seeking applicants for the workforce director position. Projected Workforce Development training includes:

• • • • • • • •

Welding classes onsite at the Department of Corrections facilities in Newcastle, Lusk, and Torrington using the Mobile Welding Lab A new green and sustainable Mobile Weatherization Training Lab to provide trainings on renewable energy including solar and wind technology Increased Commercial Driver’s License courses in partnership with Wyoming Contractors Association Electrical Apprenticeship Program taught on campus and at convenient times for workers and employers Underground Storage Tank certification prep class for gas and service stations regionally ENERGY STAR RATER certification for residential energy audits Certified Medical Assistant curriculum OSHA/MSHA Safety

The economic benefit of the new Wyoming Medium Correctional Institution and its $72,587,755 projected budget should have a dynamic multiplier effect for Goshen County and the surrounding region (Wyoming Department of Corrections, 2010). Families of employees and inmates, and the inmates themselves, should 71


Eastern Wyoming College positively impact EWC enrollment. Student support services may be critical to targeted families of prison inmates in the pre-enrollment and transitional process back to school. Potential opportunities include officers’ training, completion of GEDs or associate degrees, and collaboration with prison industries. Student Enrollment The Wyoming Community College System Annual Enrollment Report 08-09 provides a “Ten-Year History of Headcount” (1999-2009) for each of the seven community colleges, including Eastern Wyoming College, as presented in Table 19. Table 19 Ten-Year History of Headcount WYOMING COMMUNITY COLLEGE SYSTEM Ten-Year History of Headcount* Enrollment Year

Casper

Central Eastern

LCCC

1998 - 1999 1999 - 2000 2000 - 2001 2001 - 2002 2002 - 2003 2003 - 2004 2004 - 2005 2005 - 2006 2006 - 2007 2007 - 2008 2008 - 2009

4222.0 4361.5 4308.0 4144.0 4563.5 4536.0 4531.5 4738.0 4501.5 4756.5 4816.5

2139.0 1859.5 1705.0 1802.0 2016.5 1983.0 1968.0 1798.0 1814.0 2154.0 2339.5

1699.5 1646.0 1562.5 1573.5 1588.0 1707.0 1667.0 1564.0 1565.0 1663.0 1712.0

4714.0 4228.0 4126.0 4432.5 4876.5 5250.0 5337.0 5512.5 5569.0 5701.0 5970.0

1973.0 1876.5 1847.5 1712.0 1797.0 1853.0 1897.0 1873.0 1912.5 1916.0 2089.5

10-Year Change 14.08% 9.37% 5-Year Change 6.18% 17.98% 2-Year Change 7.00% 28.97%

0.74% 0.29% 9.39%

26.64% 13.71% 7.20%

5.90% 12.76% 9.25%

Western

Total

Percent Change

3099.5 3023.5 2964.5 2947.0 2710.0 2782.5 2941.5 3229.0 3285.0 3769.0 4621.5

2965.0 2930.0 2784.5 2859.5 2933.0 2949.5 3293.5 4231.5 4354.5 4148.5 4725.5

20812.0 19925.0 19298.0 19470.5 20484.5 21061.0 21635.5 22946.0 23001.5 24108.0 26274.5

N/A -4.26% -3.15% 0.89% 5.21% 2.81% 2.73% 6.06% 0.24% 4.81% 8.99%

49.10% 66.09% 40.68%

59.38% 60.21% 8.52%

26.25% 24.75% 14.23%

Northwest NWCCD

*These counts include on-campus, distance education, auditing, compressed video and telcourse students Source: Wyoming Community College Commission Date: 1-Sep-09 In reviewing the headcount enrollment pattern over the last selected 10-year period, the pattern has been fairly static with downward fluctuations, experiencing a 10-year low of 1562 (Enrollment Year 2000-2001) and a high of 1712 (Enrollment Year 2008-2009). Although the headcount is mostly static, students are enrolling in more credits resulting in increased Full-time Equivalency (FTE). EWC administration interviewed attributed this most recent 2-year change to the growth of traditionalaged student clientele, including the positive impact of the Hathaway Scholarship; concurrent enrollment (initiated in 1995); FTE’s generated through the Wyoming Law Enforcement Academy (beginning Fall 2006); Workforce Development (created into a stand-alone program Spring 2007), including CNA accredited classes; the hiring of a second recruiter; retention efforts; lower tuition fees and living expenses 72


Eastern Wyoming College as compared to other state and regional community colleges; and the current economy motivating people to seek additional education and training. A total of 310 students have attended EWC (on and off campus) under the Hathaway Scholarship since its inception Fall 2006. This scholarship program rewards eligible students with scholarship money to attend the University of Wyoming or a Wyoming community college and provides merit- and need-based awards to eligible students (EWC Financial Aid Office, February, 2010). Concurrent enrollment, initiated in 1995, is a dynamic factor in FTE generation. As of Spring 2009, 24 percent of EWC’s FTE count was generated by concurrent enrollment (including outreach and Goshen County). FTE’s generated by the Wyoming Law Enforcement Academy (WLEA) add a significant boost bringing the total impact of concurrent enrollment and WLEA to 38.8 percent of EWC’s FTE count (Spring 2009 data, EWC Institutional Research Office). Fall 2009 data shows similar results with a total of 510 students enrolled under concurrent enrollment (part-time and full-time) and 41 students enrolled under the WLEA for a total of 551 students. Concurrent enrollment and WLEA generated 355.3 FTE (Fall 2009) resulting in 30 percent of EWC’s FTE total count of 1211.84 (EWC Institutional Research Office). As of Fall 2009, traditional-aged students comprised 63.5 percent of EWC’s total headcount, while nontraditional students accounted for 35 percent of the total headcount. Of EWC’s 642 degree-seeking students enrolled in six or more credit hours, 53 percent are at the 100 percent poverty level (SSS Grant, 2009). Correspondingly, of those students from Wyoming, over 76 percent are from the economically deprived EWC Service area. Almost half of EWC students are from high school classes graduating 99 or fewer students, with one third from classes of 50 or fewer students (SSS Grant 2009). Table 20 depicts the Ten-Year History of FTE Enrollment (1999-2009) for each of the Wyoming community colleges. WYOMING COMMUNITY COLLEGE SYSTEM Ten-Year History of FTE Enrollment Enrollment Year Casper Central Eastern LCCC Northwest NWCCD Western Total Percent Change 1998 - 1999 3225.3 1342.5 951.8 2729.2 1733.3 1800.2 1892.5 13674.8 N/A 1999 - 2000 3224.4 1270.7 901.1 2539.8 1636.6 1818.5 1933.9 13325.0 -2.56% 2000 - 2001 3137.0 1151.9 895.5 2582.0 1682.3 1801.1 1797.3 13047.1 -2.09% 2001 - 2002 3125.5 1231.9 925.6 2808.1 1645.2 1764.5 1782.7 13283.5 1.81% 2002 - 2003 3349.4 1377.0 985.1 3104.9 1640.1 1704.9 1888.9 14050.3 5.77% 2003 - 2004 3373.9 1428.6 1027.7 3292.4 1715.3 1772.1 1981.7 14591.7 3.85% 2004 - 2005 3267.1 1356.7 968.3 3465.8 1756.2 1850.2 2110.6 14774.9 1.26% 2005 - 2006 3376.2 1253.0 932.5 3527.5 1713.5 1943.3 2215.6 14961.6 1.26% 2006 - 2007 3259.1 1245.1 955.7 3666.4 1768.2 1908.2 2147.3 14950.0 -0.08% 2007 - 2008 3454.5 1440.7 1040.6 3714.7 1776.9 1953.4 2054.4 15450.1 3.35% 2008 - 2009 3544.9 1562.9 1109.7 3939.9 1810.8 2183.1 2243.8 16395.2 6.12% 10-Year Change 9.91% 16.42% 16.58% 44.36% 4.47% 21.27% 18.56% 19.89% 5-Year Change 5.07% 9.40% 7.97% 19.67% 5.57% 23.19% 13.22% 12.36% 2-Year Change 8.77% 25.52% 16.11% 7.46% 2.41% 14.41% 4.49% 9.67% Source: Wyoming Community College Commission Date: 1-Sep-09 73


Eastern Wyoming College As Wyoming’s smallest community college (currently at 1109.7 FTE, 6.8 percent of the state average), EWC is competitive and keeping pace with the percent average increases statewide, with the 10-year change at 16.58 percent compared to the state average across the system at 19.89 percent. EWC’s 5-year change is 7.97 percent compared to the state average of 12.36 percent, but surges to 16.11 percent for a 2-year change, topping the state average of 9.67 percent 2-year change average across the state. As preceding data indicates, EWC is behind all other community colleges across the state both in headcount and FTE over the last 10 years. Cognizant that a new funding allocation has decreased total dollars, the College must remain vigilant regarding its enrollment management and growth. Enrollment of nontraditional age students, defined as greater than age 25, fluctuates and represents about 7 percent of the total student body. The average age of EWC students currently on and off campus is 27.8 years of age (EWC Institutional Research Office, 2010). Table 21 Number of EWC Nontraditional, Credit Seeking Students >25 Full and Part-time 2004-2005 Percent

738

7.76%

2005-2006 Percent

636

2006-2007 Percent

6.27%

707

7.12%

2007-2008 Percent

725

6.93%

Data obtained from WCCC Annual reports 2004-2008 In reviewing the figures presented in Table 21, it is apparent that enrollment of nontraditional aged students could be increased. The fact is the number of adults currently gaining access to post-secondary education and enrolled at EWC is an under-representation when compared to college averages across the state and in relation to the documented educational needs of the targeted adult population of the area. Nationwide, community colleges serve as an access point for all adults; including displaced homemakers, workers needing retraining, and those seeking skill upgrades. These adults represent a primary growth sector for enrollment. This information is encouraging and provides a focus for planning. Strategies to broaden the base of student prospect pools including traditional and nontraditional students must be pursued to provide an enhanced institutional condition and to better meet the educational needs of the EWC service area. A very recent article in the Chronicle of Higher Education, entitled: “To Reach Obama’s 2020 Goal, Colleges Need to Support Adult Students” (January 19, 2010) states:

Many more adults will need to enroll in college for the United States to meet President Obama’s goal of having the world’s largest share of college graduates by 2020, government officials and higher-education experts said at a panel discussion on Capitol Hill Tuesday. The panelists encouraged colleges to take nontraditional students’ needs into consideration and urged lawmakers to replicate and expand successful programs that support adult students.

The underlying strength of Eastern Wyoming College, the capability of its faculty/staff, as well as its achievements, provide a basis for future optimism in terms of appropriate enrollment growth and right sizing.

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Eastern Wyoming College Strengths Eastern Wyoming College has been growing in enrollment in the last ten years, showing a 16.58 percent increase. The College has made significant technological progress in the last ten years. Tuition and fees are relatively low compared to nationwide averages. Distance learning enrollments have grown and represent a continued responsibility and opportunity to provide access to learners. Workforce development has contributed significantly with new initiatives and new enrollments in the last few years. Concurrent enrollment represents a substantial component for the College and has shown significant growth. Opportunities and Challenges The College service areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic and rural conditions can represent significant educational barriers to its constituents. The College should continue to find ways to identify and mitigate all such barriers. The College needs to work closely with emerging economic initiatives throughout its service area to help improve the job and professional opportunities for its constituents. The College is under-enrolled in ethnic minorities compared to its service area ethnic population. The College should explore additional initiatives to enroll ethnic minorities. The College must continue investing in appropriate technology infrastructure, equipment, applications, and training. The College needs to ensure that it promotes quality as well as access in its distance and concurrent courses. Criterion Two: Core Component 2b Eastern Wyoming Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resource base supports its educational programs and its plans for maintaining and strengthening their quality in the future. Eastern Wyoming College receives general fund revenues from the federal, state, and local governments through the following sources: the state funding model, federal and state grants, work study programs, local property taxes, and tuition and fees. Eastern Wyoming College Foundation is also a strong supporter of EWC financially especially in the area of student scholarships. Other Foundation support includes fundraising for the Endowment Challenge and procuring annualized giving which provides usable discretionary funds for projects such as landscaping for the main campus. Interest and dollars are growing to assist EWC in making good choices and changes.

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Eastern Wyoming College The State of Wyoming initiated two primary programs that have benefited community colleges in Wyoming. The Endowment Challenge allows colleges to fundraise dollars that are matched one-to-one from the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coffers to help colleges grow and prosper. Secondly, the Hathaway Scholarship program started in 2006 benefits Wyoming graduates in scholarship tiers (see Hathaway report in electronic resource room). Operating Revenues The FY 2010 Operating Fund Estimated Revenues by Source are shown in the following chart: Chart 1

Operating Expenses The FY 2010 Operating Fund Budget Expenditures outline the major expenditure areas as related to salaries and benefits and operating expenses. Chart 2

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Eastern Wyoming College State Funding The state funding model used to allocate money to the community colleges within the state is determined by the Wyoming Community College Commission (WCCC) and represents more of a distribution model than a funding formula. Wyoming Statute 21-18-205 created a statewide community college system operations funding mechanism based upon a statewide community college system strategic planning process which attached funding to state interests. This method of resource allocation has proven disadvantageous to Eastern Wyoming College as outlined in the following paragraphs. Fixed Costs An outside consultant reviewed and recommended revisions in the allocation formula and helped develop goals for the funding. One goal acknowledged that colleges have fixed costs whether enrollment is one student or 10,000 students. While there was a large push to add a higher fixed cost component so that small colleges, such as EWC, could cover the larger plant costs per student credit hour, there was also a component whereby the staffing patterns affected the fixed cost ratio. The smaller colleges argued for a “small school supplement” to no avail. In addition, EWC argued for transitional money or “hold harmless” money again to no avail. Early in the statewide discussions, the Wyoming Community College Commission considered adding a higher fixed cost component so that small colleges such as EWC could cover the larger plant costs per student credit hour. The final EWC fixed cost percentage was set at 57.2 percent. Variable Costs The next goal attempted to acknowledge funding levels based on the costs of various levels of classes. These educational “funding levels” of courses, designated as 1, 2, or 3; show a level 1 (multiplier of 1) being used to indicate a lower-cost lecture type of course such as English or math; level 2 (multiplier of 1.5) being used to indicate a somewhat more expensive lecture/lab type of course such as computer or physical education courses; and a level 3 (multiplier of 2.0) being used to indicate more expensive laboratory courses such as welding or veterinary technology. EWC’s percentage of level 3 classes is lower than many of the other colleges. In addition, the colleges argued for additional start-up funding for new programs which would have helped fund level 3 types of programs to no avail. The final percentage for variable cost for EWC was set at 42.8 percent. Enrollment Growth The goal to provide funding for enrollment growth was not realized, nor was a funding pool to respond to rapid growth. The statewide distribution of this part was funded by State Fiscal Stabilization Funds (SFSF) which the governor designated to community colleges for enrollment impact or growth. Even this was not based or distributed upon who grew fastest or saw the largest increases in enrollment but reflected back upon the fixed and variable costs. The $538,000 was allocated among the seven community colleges based on the 2003-2009 actual enrollment numbers. Major Maintenance The Wyoming Community College Commission decided to allocate ARRA funds to replace the diminished major maintenance dollars the Wyoming community colleges would have received in past years. EWC’s share of these dollars is expected to be $1.2 million over the biennium. However, these dollars must be fully expended by June 30, 2011. 77


Eastern Wyoming College Analysis An annual college base funding amount was determined for each of the community colleges in the state and then separated into fixed and variable costs. While the statewide discussion concerning allocation of state resources initially appeared fair, in the end, other factors influenced the model and two of the colleges, including EWC, received significantly less dollars than in past years. As mentioned before, EWCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s percentages were calculated as 57.2 percent fixed and 42.8 percent variable. It should be noted that if the sum of system-wide variable costs and system-wide fixed costs exceeds the system-wide adjusted biennial budget appropriation for state aid, the difference will be attributed to enrollment growth, and such difference can only be funded by means of an approved exception budget request. In FY 2010, the College absorbed a 10 percent reduction in state funding. This was followed by an addition 5 percent reduction for FY 2011. Consequently, not only was EWC disadvantaged in the newly revamped allocation distribution model, but it also had to decrease its overall budget in additional ways. What this means for EWC is that the new biennial budget allocation is 16.9 million, which is 1.2 million less than the 18.1 million allocation from the previous funding formula. This is in spite of EWCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enrollment growth in the last four years. Projected continued enrollment increases will provide additional tuition revenues and the college is proactive in cooperating with Executive Orders from the governor regarding non-essential spending and hiring restrictions (EWC FY 10 Adopted Budget). The Wyoming Community College Commission determines statewide tuition costs, but individual colleges can control the level of additional student fees. One method the College used to address these budget shortfalls was to examine closely all vacated positions and filling only those which were deemed critical to the college mission. It also recommended no personnel raises for FY 2011. While the College is not allowed to increase its tuition rates since it accepted statewide American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding, it will study student fees and recommend increases as appropriate. The College has pursued additional grants in an effort to further leverage services to constituents and programs which address workforce needs. Outside of the funding formula is a provision which allows the colleges to maintain a reserve of up to 8 percent, but the College is not allowed to use the State Fiscal Stabilization Funds to increase the reserve. As mentioned previously in this self-study, Eastern Wyoming College currently holds a reserve of 5.7 percent. Overall, EWC is practicing fiscal responsibility. Grant Funding and Work Study Program From the EWC Institutional Effectiveness office, information showed that grants are an important source of funding to EWC. Since July 1, 2009, grants approved and in place total $1,417,374. In addition, grants under review total $1,433,700, and grants in progress included another $250,000 plus additional unknown amounts. This represents a three-fold gain in grant awards in the last two years. Overall grant funding has greatly increased in the last few years as the College has purposely pursued several different avenues primarily in the Workforce Development area (see Grant Analysisâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Institutional Effectiveness Office). The Federal Workstudy program provided $29,550 last year to the College. This, combined with institutional dollars provided employment for 115 students for the year. In addition to helping the students offset their cost of attendance, it also helped the institution as it filled a need for part-time clerical, custodial, grounds, and kitchen helpers.

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Eastern Wyoming College Eastern Wyoming College Foundation Established in 1964, the Eastern Wyoming College Foundation is as an independent non-profit corporation engaging community interest and enhancing the quality and scope of EWC programs beyond state support. Foundation funding for college programs is not intended to supplant state or other support, but to supplement programs and activities that add the extra measure of quality and excellence in student opportunity. The Foundation raises, receives, and manages private gifts to support programs and projects throughout the College and to build strong community relationships as a basis for future support. The focus of the Foundation is to support the strategic direction of the College as identified through the College’s planning process and identification of priorities. Specific projects are presented to the Foundation Board of Directors from the College President, although scholarship funding is based on the year-to-year funding produced through investment and application of Foundation investment and expenditure policies. The Foundation Board of Directors is currently made up of 14 individuals, including the College President. Two of these individuals are from outside the College district, but are within the College’s service area. The Foundation is in the process of revising its by-laws in order to expand the Board membership. Additional members from the service area, as well as at large members from outside the service area but who have strong ties and ability to support the College, are being considered. Foundation members are becoming more aware of their roles and taking on increased responsibility for their own giving, as well as developing relationships with donors and friends of the College. Members are selected by a Foundation Board nominating committee. People asked to serve on the Foundation represent all areas of business in the district and service area, including banking, agriculturally related business, investments and real estate, ranching and farming, law, medicine, and higher education. The College is fortunate to have individuals serving on its Foundation who are committed to the College’s success. Though the Foundation has been in existence for over 45 years, it has not “acted” as a strong fund raising organization until 2003 when the College determined that a full-time development officer would be needed. At that time, the staff for the development office, and also in support of the Foundation, faced an immediate need to develop a plan of campaign for major giving for construction. The EWC Foundation has not, therefore, been positioned with trained staff and a direction to actively raise funds based on a strong case for support, for most of its existence. The Foundation receives and manages private gifts as endowments, trusts, outright gifts, and cash. Foundation investment activity is conducted by the Foundation Board Finance and Investment committee. The committee manages and invests gifts within its approved investment and expenditure policies. Investment policies are designed and intended to preserve or increase the value of gifts for the long term support of the activities noted above. The Foundation uses professional investment managers whose institutional performance is reviewed within its policies. The Foundation additionally works within certain state and national guidelines for investment management provided through the Uniform Prudent Management of Institutional Funds Act as approved by the State Legislature. The Foundation has been active in fund raising during the past six years with a major gift campaign to support construction and expansion of facilities. The campaign was titled “A Great Decision.” These projects included construction of a new college dormitory, expansion of the College’s nationally recognized welding program, and an addition to the College’s well-recognized program in Veterinary Technology. The Foundation led the campaign, which raised slightly over $1.2 million for these projects. In show of support 79


Eastern Wyoming College for the College and its programs, eighty-nine college employees contributed $99,298 towards the campaign. The campaign also helped identify additional potential donors for future programs. At virtually the same time as the campaign for the construction needs was ongoing, the State of Wyoming established a matching program for endowment. The endowment challenge matching program matched up to $4.5 million in endowment giving on a dollar for dollar basis. This program continues at Eastern Wyoming College, and the Foundation has received slightly over $1.2 million in endowment gifts toward the $4.5 million cap. The endowments have created the Marian McElheney endowments for technology development, creation of endowed cultural and speakers programs, landscaping endowments, and funds for educational materials. Additional private giving created a major source of scholarship funding for the Veterinary Technology program. Significantly, an EWC employees’ endowed scholarship has been created through gifts from the College’s faculty and staff and is matched by the State through the challenge program. Somewhat unfortunately in terms of timing, the endowment matching program was implemented by the State at the same time the College was raising funds for its construction program through the “Great Decision” campaign. Donors were making commitments to the campaign and could not be asked at that time to make additional endowment contributions. The Foundation and College completed pledge giving in 2008, and now can begin to reconnect with donors on the potential for the endowment program. Given the relatively small size of the Goshen County donor base and the recent completion of a major campaign, it is not deemed to be the best time to ask people to again provide large endowment contributions at this time, although the Foundation will continue to inform its donors and friends about the endowment program. There will be endowment gifts matched; however, the Foundation must work in the near term to build relationships and expand its annual giving program. The need to increase unrestricted funds available to the college has become apparent. With that in mind, the Foundation has undertaken a stronger annual giving process, not only to raise greater amounts of unrestricted funds, but to expand its donor base. The Foundation has approximately $100,000 in unrestricted funds, which are not expended unless the College President makes the request for them. The annual giving program is designed to grow and to allow the Foundation to help the College in areas of “leverage,” where relatively small gifts can make a larger impact. For example, the Foundation approved a request from the College’s new Honors Program in 2009 and was able to provide twelve new laptop computers for students’ use in the program. The Foundation has additionally allocated funds to create faculty and student “mini grants” for innovate projects that support student success and faculty and staff development. The Foundation has undertaken a stronger marketing and information program, through publication of Lancer Luminaries. This magazine (resource room) has been published in past years, but on an irregular basis. This information to donors and friends about the College and the Foundation is critical on an ongoing basis as a building block for fund raising. The magazine publishes stories related to student, program, and staff success. Since 1991, the Foundation has annually recognized a distinguished alumnus of the College. This program has been able to demonstrate the quality of education provided to EWC students and has identified 18 successful individuals who began their educational careers at EWC. Individuals recognized include a current president of a Torrington bank, Wyoming’s most successful bonding attorney, a major agriculture equipment sales owner (who is also currently the Chair of the Board of Trustees at the University of 80


Eastern Wyoming College Wyoming), and a senior vice president for research for DuPont Chemical Company. The quality and personal success of EWC graduates and alumni speaks highly of the historically excellent programs and teaching quality at this college. In 2009, one Foundation member and distinguished alumni was nominated and recognized at the Wyoming Community College Trustee Conference for his work as chairman of the “Great Decision” major gift campaign. The assets of the Foundation have grown significantly from 2004 to 2009, as follows:

2004 $1,925,541

Table 22 Eastern Wyoming College Foundation Assets 2005 2006 2007 2008 $2,593,337 $2,824,597 $2,732,195 $2,821,120

2009 $3,994,807

Assets are primarily invested cash, with approximately $444,000 (2009) invested in property and an investment loan to the College to support the College’s construction technology program. Scholarship funding has been the primary focus of Foundation expenditures during the above period. Scholarship allocations from endowed funds are determined based on a 3.5 percent allocation on the endowment as valued on June 30 of each year. Other scholarship awards are direct expenditures not from endowment but are fully funded per donor direction or special programs such as the State Employment and Training for Self Sufficiency (ETSS) program or the NASA space grant program. Endowment funded scholarships are listed as follows:

2005 $58,000

Table 23 Endowment Funded Scholarships 2006 2007 2008 $68,500 $76,000 $77,000

2009 $83,000

In 2005, the Wyoming Legislature approved the establishment of the Excellence in Higher Education Endowment, funded through state sources. (This program is not related to the endowment challenge program.) The corpus of this fund is held and invested at the State of Wyoming level. Funds are used to create and support new and innovative programs at the community colleges. Eastern Wyoming College receives a quarterly distribution on that corpus which has supported the creation and ongoing costs related to the EWC Livestock Judging program. This funding has been essential to the success of that program. The Foundation is staffed by the Institutional Development Director who serves as the de facto executive director of the Foundation. The Institutional Development office has one additional staff member who functions as administrative assistant and is involved in all areas of scholarship allocation, event and alumni activity, as well as some fiscal matters. The Foundation’s fiscal operation is managed by the College’s Vice President for Finance and Administrative Services through a memorandum of understanding between the College Board of Trustees and the Foundation Board of Directors. The Institutional Development Director and the Vice President for Finance and Administrative Services coordinate investment strategies and recommendations and provide development and oversight of Foundation policies related to receipt of gifts, expenditure of endowment income, and investment policy. The Foundation and Institutional Development office additionally coordinate all donor stewardship functions and requirements. 81


Eastern Wyoming College The Development/Foundation activity has not traditionally focused on alumni programs, although there is an ongoing effort to increase the College’s awareness of the locations of its former students. College records for location of alumni prior to 1995 were not current, and this is a focus for efforts because these are the people who have the capacity to assist the college in a stronger way than more recent graduates or students who have attended the College. More effective and efficient methods of locating older alumni are being developed and implemented. Since 2007, the Foundation and the Agriculture Program staff and students have coordinated an annual fund raising event for the Agricultural Program. This event nets approximately $12,000 annually. The implementation of a more aggressive annual giving program is designed to spread support beyond the Agriculture Program into other areas of the College, based upon requests from the President of the College to the Foundation. A Foundation-operated annual golf tournament raises approximately $8,000 in unrestricted funds for Foundation programs. The Foundation works within certain state and national guidelines for investment management provided through the Uniform Prudent Management of Institutional Funds Act as approved by the State Legislature. In summary, the Development/Foundation activity at Eastern Wyoming College has only begun to assertively identify potential donors (both alumni and other major prospective donors) and connect them with the College for fundraising purposes for about the last 10 years. Prior to that point, no staff member at the College had responsibility for support of the Foundation or for structured fundraising activities. Since the mid 90’s, only two staff members have held this position. The Foundation Board is becoming more aware of its role in fundraising and creating and maintaining positive relationships with the community and current and potential donors, and its members are being invited to join this rewarding and necessary activity. Human Resources As of Fall 2009, Eastern Wyoming College employed 145 full-time equivalent personnel, including 12 administrators, 61 instructors, 27 professional staff members, and 45 support staff members (IPEDSDFR2009). Sixty-five percent of the current operating funds are used for salaries and benefits. All persons hired for positions at EWC are selected based on qualifications and guidelines of an equal opportunity institution. Open positions are reviewed to assure that the institution is using its human and financial resources most effectively. In the last five years, restructuring and new programs have been the force for the following new positions: Livestock Judging Coach/Ag Instructor, Honors Director, Construction Technology Instructor, Criminal Justice Instructor, Webmaster, GEAR UP Director, GEAR UP Coordinator, GEAR UP Clerk, Science Instructor – Douglas, Early Childhood Instructor, Social Science Instructor, Financial Aid Specialist, Evening Custodial Supervisor, Grounds Assistant, Veterinary Technology Animal Caretaker, Women’s Basketball Coach/Instructor, Workforce Development Director, ETSS Grant/Workforce Coordinator, Grant Writer, Software Specialist, Entrepreneurship Instructor, Purchasing Coordinator, Recruiter, Portable Welding Lab Instructor, Assistant Housing Director, Health Technology Instructor, Vice President for Institutional Effectiveness, Administrative Assistant for Institutional Effectiveness, and Buildings & Grounds Manager – Douglas which was funded by Converse County #1 BOCES. In addition, professional development opportunities resulted in salary schedule moves for 15 individuals. All of these professional development salary schedule moves were fully funded. Professional development opportunities also included tuition waivers and travel assistance. The State of Wyoming recognized the 82


Eastern Wyoming College importance of a healthy workforce and provided employees with an opportunity to reduce their medical insurance premiums by participating in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Healthier Wyomingâ&#x20AC;? program. The Wyoming community colleges strive to offer attractive compensation for employees. In 2009-2010, five of the seven community colleges gave modest raises. Competitive salaries continued to be an important concern to the administration of Eastern Wyoming College. In 2002, significant increases in salaries were supported by the legislature in an attempt to bring the community college system to competitive levels (15.97 percent for faculty, 16.85 percent for staff, and 15.45 percent for administration and non-teaching professionals). Since that year, the Board of Trustees has supported yearly increases ranging from a low of .33 to a high of 20.30 percent. The average increases (excluding one time adjustments) for the last 12 years are as follows: Table 24 Twelve-Year Average Salary Increases 1998-2010 Faculty 5.98% Staff 5.88% Administration and non-teaching professionals 4.98% Note: See Salary Increase History available in electronic resource room In Fall 2009, Eastern Wyoming College reviewed the recommendations of the Fox Lawson Salary Study. The consulting firm reviewed the salary structure of the College and provided the College with recommendations to achieve internal equity and move toward external standards to bring the College closer to comparator levels. The FY 2010 budget plan allowed for an overall 4 percent salary increase and an increase to the federal minimum hourly wage rate. The total amount available for cost of living and market salary adjustments was $348,327. It should be noted that 65 percent of the operating budget is earmarked for salaries and benefits for EWC to maintain high quality, competitive workers who provide the best quality education to students. It is essential that EWC continues to examine regional and national comparators and provide competitive salaries to attract and retain high quality personnel. Tuition The Wyoming Community College Commission is responsible for the establishment of uniform tuition rates for all Wyoming Colleges. In October 2006, the Wyoming Community College Commission staff studied national and regional community college tuition trends. The information gathered during this study guided the establishment of a long-term tuition policy for the Wyoming community colleges for the following five years. The tuition policy was approved by the Wyoming Community College Commission on October 27, 2006. The policy determined that Wyoming community college tuition would be reviewed annually under the following criteria: Guiding principles: A.

Accessibility. Tuition rates approved by the Commission will promote access to postsecondary educational programs and services. 83


Eastern Wyoming College B. C. D. E.

Affordability. The Commission will strive to make postsecondary educational opportunities affordable for Wyoming citizens. The setting of tuition rates will honor the mandate in the Wyoming statutes that “Wyoming’s Community Colleges are low tuition, open access institutions.” Predictability. As far as practicable, increases in tuition and fees will be predictable to students and their families by adjusting tuition rates no more frequently that once each year. Annual tuition increases are not inevitable. Competitiveness. Tuition will be set competitively with the goal of retaining Wyoming citizens as students and attracting non-resident students. Cost Sharing. Tuition rates will ensure the cost of education is shared by the student, state, and local community.

Based on an annual analysis, an increase in tuition may be proposed if both of the following criteria are met:

1. 2.

Current average resident tuition for Wyoming colleges is 98 percent or less than the current average resident tuition in the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE—15 western states excluding California and including Nebraska). The ratio of current average resident tuition to Wyoming’s median household income is 98 percent or less than the average ratio for the WICHE states (excluding California and including Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, Wyoming).

Wyoming Community College Commission staff conducted an analysis of 2008-09 tuition data from WICHE to determine if the aforementioned tuition policy criteria were, indeed, met. In both cases, Wyoming community college average tuition and tuition-to-income ratio were far below the 98 percent threshold. In comparing average Wyoming tuition to average WICHE tuition (excluding California and including Nebraska) for the 2008-09 academic year, the ratio was 69.87 percent. In comparing the ratios of median household income (MHI) to average tuition rates for WICHE states (excluding California and including Nebraska) in 2008-09, the final ratio was 4.34 percent, a slight decrease from the 2007-08 ratio of 4.39 percent <http://communitycolleges.wy.edu/business/Reports/TuitionStudy.htm>. For fiscal year 2010, credit tuition was raised 4.6 percent for part-time and full-time students. Room charges were increased by 5.4 percent also, though student activity and use fees remained constant. These fees are within the individual control of the colleges. A healthy enrollment gain, tuition rate increase, scholarship allowance increase, and targeted focus on workforce development generated increases in revenues. Tuition history shows that tuition has been maintained at a level affordable to students (see Tuition Rate History in electronic resource room). Facilities EWC Strategic Direction # 3 emphasizes the commitment of the College to embrace and invest in technology and modern facilities. In 2007-2008, Paulien and Associates performed a Space Needs Analysis and Planning Concepts study which outlined the Master Facilities Plan. Several capital improvement 84


Eastern Wyoming College projects were recommended (see Space Needs Analysis and Planning Concept Report; Master Plan Final 2-23-08.pdf). Eastern Wyoming College has recently undertaken major capital projects. The construction of Lancer Hall, the replacement of doors and windows and upgraded heating/cooling/ventilation in Eastern Hall, new kennels and cattery addition to Veterinary Technology Building, interior renovation of Cosmetology Building, and renovation of College Relations and Community Education offices all occurred in 2008-2009. All projects were within the Master Facilities Plan which is developed as part of the ongoing strategic planning process and demonstrates the ability and desire of the College to provide and maintain excellent facilities and equipment to support academic programs. It is important to recognize that the Wyoming Community College Commission allocation formula for major maintenance has also affected EWC negatively. Total major maintenance funding dollars remained the same as the last biennium, but EWCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s share was reduced from $1.4 million to $1.15 million because of the new prorated space per college according to the allocation formula. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding has been made available to offset major maintenance funding reduction. Flexibility EWC Strategic Direction #1 states that the institution will thoughtfully prepare our organization and our people for changing and dynamic times. As discussed in the human resources area above, the institution has recently been reorganized with reallocation of human resources. In determining the amount of continuing fiscal resources available, consideration is given to fixed cost increases including institutionwide compensation adjustments, cost of living allowances, benefit changes, professional development awards, early retirement benefits, scholarship budget changes, and utilities and insurance costs increases. Consideration is also given to establishing continuing funding pools to accomplish institutional strategic directions. Board reserves are monitored so that sufficient resources can be set aside for emergency expenditures and other contingencies. Again, the allowed reserve is 8 percent and EWC currently has a reserve of 5.7 percent (Approved Strategic Budgeting Framework, May 13, 2008; FY 2010 Supplementary Budget Schedules). This allows for the institution to respond to unanticipated needs for program reallocation, downsizing, or growth. Eastern Wyoming College has responded to the loss of allocated state funding by looking seriously at reductions in budget while mitigating any negative effects on institutional effectiveness and student learning. Strengths The Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fiscal resources have increased significantly in the last ten years. Grant funding efforts have increased and helped fund initiatives at the College. The Eastern Wyoming College Foundation has grown and is well managed. The Major Gifts Campaign and the State Endowment program have benefitted the College. Human resources have increased and the sizes of routine salary increases have varied but have been significant.

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Eastern Wyoming College Opportunities and Challenges The current state allocation formula did not benefit the College. The federal ARRA funds have been used to help offset the current biennial shortfall; however, strings are attached. This is a temporary revenue stream. The Foundation will continue to identify additional donors. Criterion Two: Core Component 2c Eastern Wyoming College’s ongoing evaluation and assessment processes provide reliable evidence of institutional effectiveness that clearly informs strategies for continuous improvement. Evaluation and assessment continues to be a focal point for the faculty and administration of Eastern Wyoming College. In Spring 2008, EWC applied to be admitted to the Academic Quality Improvement Plan (AQIP) for accreditation. Because of the timing of the PEAQ visit (October 2010), the application was denied, but this shifted the College’s emphasis to a year of working within the Foundations of Excellence® in the First College Year (FoE) program to study EWC’s experience for first-year students. The Foundations of Excellence® in the First College Year Self-Study assessment findings are included throughout this selfstudy. Seven strategic action plans were developed as a result of the Foundations of Excellence work. Eastern Wyoming College is one of seven community colleges in Wyoming which are members of the Wyoming Community College system. These independent, yet collaborative, colleges are coordinated by the Wyoming Community College Commission which has a system office in Cheyenne and employs an Executive Director and a 16 member staff. The Wyoming Community College Commission (WCCC) board has seven, governor-appointed, commissioners. The mission and purpose of the Commission is to provide coordination, advocacy, and accountability for the Community College System on behalf of the State of Wyoming. WCCC’s rules and regulations require colleges to submit timely and accurate reports on various accountability measures. These required reports include (among many) enrollment reports, Hathaway scholarship reports, financial aid, and core indicator reports. The Data Request/Submission Schedule for Statutory Reporting is included on the WCCC web site <http://communitycolleges.wy.edu/business/AdminDocs.htm>. In addition, legislation required the WCCC to undertake a statewide strategic planning process which occurred in 2009 utilizing the services of MPR and Associates, Inc. The complete statewide strategic plan is also located on the web site. Institutional Research Eastern Wyoming College has a dedicated staff member in the Institutional Research Office who provides the data for the required reports to the WCCC as well as to other entities such as the Wyoming and Federal Departments of Education, Institutional Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS), and other state and national agencies. Other personnel assist in the data collection and reporting as it pertains to specific areas. This culture of assessment has developed steadily at Eastern Wyoming College but is now being evidenced 86


Eastern Wyoming College more and more by the increase in institutional information and data requests and by the recent Foundations of Excellence self-study examining studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; first year of college. Regular reporting to all internal audiences, administration, and the Board of Trustees is established by a yearly timeline of Institutional Research reports. Outcomes Assessment Outcomes assessment has seen quite a rich history at Eastern Wyoming College starting early in the 1990s as it formed its first Outcomes Assessment Committee and strived to develop an understanding of what the role of that group would be. Several faculty members have served as chair of this committee and helped the institution develop a culture of understanding. Faculty members participate in classroom assessments, program assessments, course assessment, and program reviews. The College has participated in the Community College Survey of Student Engagements twice, the first time in Spring 2007 and the second time in Spring 2009. A more detailed description of the work of this group is included in the next chapter of this self-study specifically in component 3a. General Education Eastern Wyoming College faculty developed five general education requirements which are described in detail on page 62 of the current college catalog. They include communication skills, analytical and quantitative reasoning, technology skills, social awareness, and information literacy. These requirements are reviewed on a regular basis and refined. Degree requirements including specific courses are maintained and updated by the Curriculum and Learning Council which also maintains the integrity of all of the Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s programs and courses. For Associate of Arts and Associate of Science degrees, requirement categories include orientation; constitutional requirement; English composition; intensive writing; mathematics; lab science; humanities; visual, performing, fine arts; cultural awareness; and physical activity. Please reference the current catalog pages 62-68 for a more complete description. Personnel Evaluation The Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s employees are evaluated by the appropriate administrator on an ongoing and annual basis. Evaluation policies and practices include an appropriate probationary timeline, student evaluations of instructors, Division Chair evaluations of instructors, and administrator evaluations. The Board of Trustees evaluates the president. The Human Resources Director maintains and communicates a timetable for completing evaluations. The personnel policies and administrative rules are reviewed by the Personnel Advisory Council and updated as appropriate. Strengths The College continues to develop a comprehensive culture of assessment and evaluation. The statewide strategic planning process and subsequent documents highlight the importance of planning for the College.

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Eastern Wyoming College Opportunities and Challenges The College needs to communicate and utilize the data and information it gathers to better inform decision making. The College needs to align its initiatives appropriately with the statewide strategic plan. Criterion 2: Core Component 2d All levels of the planning align with Eastern Wyoming College’s mission, thereby enhancing its capacity to fulfill that mission. The primary planning document at EWC is the Strategic Plan, which is aligned with the College Mission, Vision, and Strategic Directions. All major departments work to formulate the structure and direction of the strategic plan. The connection between all levels of planning at EWC ensures that the College is fulfilling its missions and continues to prepare for the future. Not unexpectedly, many items surfaced in statewide plans. This awareness strengthens both college and state effectiveness. The Process In 2008, EWC involved the college community in developing a new method of strategic planning. The process started in January with sessions that encouraged employees to dream and discover in focus group meetings. Participants included students, employees, administrators, community members, Board of Trustees members, and Foundation members. Five strategic directions emerged from these initial focus group meetings. The next phase was the design process. Many stakeholders brought their “value” objects and discussion ensued on what values should guide the institution in the next few years. The Data Analysis Team helped narrow the categories. Twenty vital initiatives were identified. The third phase involved a day long in-service of developing action plans which outlined strategic objectives for key functional areas of the College. The key functional areas included Board of Trustees/ President’s office, Learning, Student Services, College Relations, Administrative Services, Institutional Effectiveness, and Institutional Development. The administrators in these areas worked with all employees to identify priorities, research costs, and refine plans. The Strategic Planning 2008-2009 Executive Summary highlights the primary action plans from each group according to the Strategic Directions. The strategic plan helped EWC move into the future in a dynamic and forward-thinking manner. The document which is updated annually contains all the action plans written by the key functional areas of the institution and should be viewed as a “work in progress.” The strategic objectives should be measurable and help position the College to move toward a continuous quality improvement process of planning (Strategic Planning 2008-09 Executive Summary). Strategic Planning Annual Timeline In January, the mid-year report containing the progress-to-date on the action plans is presented to the Board of Trustees. The Institutional Effectiveness office sends out requests to employees to provide a progress 88


Eastern Wyoming College report on the strategic action plans in their areas. This is an ongoing process and continues through the rest of the fiscal year with a final report compiled in July and presented to the Board of Trustees in August. In February, action plans are developed for the institution overall and key functional areas for the next fiscal year. In March, action plans are summarized for the next fiscal year. In April, the action plan summaries, for the next fiscal year, are reviewed by the Leadership Team. Institutional overall action plans are considered for inclusion in the next fiscal year budget. In May, the new annual strategic plan is presented to the Board. June is the deadline for each department’s Strategic Objective Worksheets and Strategic Budget Requests for the previous year strategic plan. In August, as mentioned above, the final Strategic Plan Report for the previous year is presented to the Board (EWC Strategic Planning Timeline). Planning Processes In addition to the strategic plan, several other routine planning processes occur throughout the College to further enhance the College’s ability to fulfill its mission. All of these planning processes are either directly or indirectly represented in the Strategic Plan. The budgeting process is an integral part of institutional planning. The College President and the Vice President for Finance and Administrative Services review all new funding and other available resources. They make a joint determination as to the amounts that are available to be distributed annually by an established formula to accomplish departmental strategic objectives. Both one-time and continuing sources are reviewed and considered. One-time sources of available funding include cash carryover identified from the previous fiscal year and established Board reserves. Consideration is given to the adequacy of Board reserves so that sufficient resources are set-aside for emergency expenditures and other contingencies. Funding from one-time sources may be set aside to accomplish institutional strategic directions. The remaining one-time resources are available for distribution by established formula in the following fiscal year, and these resources shall be used to accomplish strategic objectives (FY 2010 Annual Budget Book). The academic progress of students is measured through the Outcomes Assessment plan. It is comprehensive and includes students, teachers, staff, and the processes and resources of the College. The plan produces clear evidence of student learning, instructor effectiveness, and institutional integrity. The plan is ongoing and integrated across the institution and is useful on a practical level because it is channeled back through the institution (Outcomes Assessment Summary Report 2008-09). In Summer 2008, EWC began a process of self-study focusing on the first year of college. Guided by the Policy Center on the First Year of College and using its Foundations of Excellence® in the First College Year Self Study process, an inquiry was organized which focused on the first year student experience. The areas of study termed Foundational Dimensions® were: Philosophy, Organization, Learning, Campus Culture, Transitions, All Students, Diversity, Roles and Purposes, and Improvement. The sources of evidence for the study came from student and staff surveys, professional knowledge, interviews, institutional 89


Eastern Wyoming College records, and other primary references. Seven strategic action plans were developed and are in the process of implementation. These action plans will be developed into projects and timelines over the next several years (Foundations of ExcellenceÂŽ Final Report, 2009). Accomplishments The College has undertaken and made progress on several initiatives. A campus card system has been installed which allows a single identification card to be used by students for cafeteria, student center, library checkout, bookstore purchases, door access, vending machine purchases, and fitness center time and attendance tracking. A consulting firm, Fox Lawson, was hired to perform a compensation study. This study allowed salaries to be placed at appropriate market rates, reclassified positions, and improved internal equity. The replacement of one-third of the desktop computers was a large one-time expenditure to update student labs and offices. This was followed by an initiative to implement a three-year cycle of purchasing replacement computers. An additional amount of money for overall institutional priorities has been identified in the budget as continuing and one-time money. Collaborative initiatives with other Wyoming community colleges are ongoing and include such initiatives at the Wyoming Distance Education Consortium web page project and the sharing of distance classes among institutions (Strategic Planning 2008-09 Executive Summary). Concerns While the accomplishments have been a start, the College will benefit from more direction in its strategic planning processes. Over the last two years, final reports seem to point to the purchase of equipment and things rather than pursuing specific, measurable objectives. With leadership at the College undergoing many changes, the key functional areas need to address specific, measurable action plans. This has also been affected somewhat by the statewide strategic planning processes that were finally adopted in February 2010. The strategic planning processes at the College seem to be immature and need to be further developed and strengthened in the next couple of years. Further, it needs to shift its emphasis from operational planning to more substantive strategic planning initiatives (Annual Strategic Planning Reports). Strengths The College engages in an improved strategic planning process which was initiated in 2008 with widespread input from employees and constituents. An annual timeline for strategic planning activities exists and is known to employees. The Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budgeting process is tied to strategic planning action plans. Other planning processes include the Outcomes Assessment activities and an intensive self-study focusing on the first year of college undertaken in 2008-2009.

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Eastern Wyoming College Opportunities and Challenges While the new strategic planning process was started in 2008, the College must attend to further developing processes that lead to significant change and improvements. The College will benefit from developing specific action plans or objectives with measurable outcomes. The budgeting process will benefit from strong association with strategic plans that continue to develop.

Summary of Criterion Two The College meets all of the components of Criterion Two. Eastern Wyoming College realistically prepares for a future shaped by multiple societal and economic trends. Chapter Summary of Strengths, Opportunities, and Challenges for Criterion Two Strengths 2.1

Eastern Wyoming College has been growing in enrollment in the last ten years, showing a 16.58 percent increase.

2.2

The College has made significant technological progress in the last ten years.

2.3

Tuition and fees are relatively low compared to nationwide averages.

2.4

Distance learning enrollments have grown and represent a continued way to provide access to learners.

2.5

Workforce Development has contributed significantly with new initiatives and new enrollments in the last few years.

2.6

Concurrent enrollment has shown significant growth.

2.7

The Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fiscal resources have increased significantly in the last ten years.

2.8

Grant funding efforts have increased and helped fund initiatives at the College.

2.9

The Eastern Wyoming College Foundation has grown and is well managed. The Major Gifts Campaign and the State Endowment program have benefitted the College.

2.10

Human resources have increased and the salary increases have varied in size but not been at a consistent percentage.

2.11 The College continues to develop a culture of assessment and evaluation throughout its operation. 91


Eastern Wyoming College 2.12

The statewide strategic planning process and subsequent document highlighted the importance of planning for the College.

2.13

The College engages in strategic planning processes which were initiated in 2008 with widespread input from employees and constituents.

2.14

An annual timeline for strategic planning activities exists and is known to employees.

The Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budgeting process is tied to strategic planning action plans.

2.15

2.16

Other planning processes include the Outcomes Assessment activities and an intensive self-study focusing on the first year of college undertaken in 2008-2009.

Opportunities and Challenges 2.1

Explore ways to further break down significant educational barriers for constituents resulting from the College service areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic and rural conditions.

2.2

Work closely with emerging economic initiatives throughout the service area to help improve the job and professional opportunities for constituents.

2.3

Explore additional initiatives to enroll ethnic minorities.

2.4

Remain current in technology.

2.5

Promote quality as well as access in distance and concurrent courses.

2.6

Continue efforts to influence change in the state allocation formula which currently does not benefit the College.

2.7

Use a temporary revenue stream of federal ARRA funds to help offset the current biennial shortfall.

Increase Foundation efforts to identify potential donors.

2.8

2.9

Communicate and utilize the data and information gathered to better inform college decision making.

2.10

Determine exactly how the College will align its own planning initiatives with the statewide strategic plan.

2.11

Further develop the capacity for planning to make a difference by building on the new strategic planning processes started in 2008.

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Eastern Wyoming College 2.12

Develop action plans or objectives with measurable outcomes to benefit the College.

â&#x20AC;&#x192;

Reflect strategic planning in the budgeting process to a greater extent.

2.13

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Eastern Wyoming College

Chapter 5 Criterion Three: Student Learning and Effective Teaching

Criterion Three: Student Learning and Effective Teaching Eastern Wyoming College provides evidence of student learning and teaching effectiveness that demonstrates it is fulfilling its educational mission. Eastern Wyoming Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s students and alumni report via surveys and in-person that their experiences at EWC helped prepare them for the next steps in their lives whether that means transferring to a university or four-year college or entering the workforce. Student satisfaction surveys, graduate surveys, and other institutional data pieces further support the student learning and teaching effectiveness that takes place at the College. Core Component 3a Eastern Wyoming Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goals for student learning outcomes are clearly stated for each educational program and make effective assessment possible. Assessment at Eastern Wyoming College is an important part of the educational process, tied to the Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission, vision, and strategic directions. The rationale of assessment is to improve student learning, to improve instructor effectiveness, and to reaffirm institutional integrity. Assessment at Eastern Wyoming College refers to efforts that obtain information regarding both student learning style along with content, course instruction quality, and instructional programs. Eastern Wyoming College is committed to implementing a comprehensive plan of direct and indirect assessment activities, which include a variety of different levels in order to measure how well the College meets these goals. The Outcomes Assessment Committee annually updates the assessment plan with departments conducting assessments and reporting results that are then reviewed by the committee and disseminated. These results are also linked to departmental strategic planning that takes place each February. The yearly Outcomes Assessment Summary Reports are organized into sections including the Program Assessment Plan, the Course Assessment Plan, the Classroom Assessment Plan, the Student Assessment Plan, and the Distance Delivery Assessment Plan (available in resource room and on web page). Program Assessments Program Assessments evaluate how students perform on the various required activities embedded in the overall Outcomes Assessment Plan. Program goals and objectives are written by the faculty and measured through required activities. Program assessments evaluate how student performance on various required program assessment activities taken by all graduating majors during the semester of graduation on campus and through distance delivery. Results are distributed to the Outcomes Assessment Committee, Curriculum and Learning Council, and program technical advisory committees to document student learning, improve curriculum, review programs, and plan for strategic budgeting. 94


Eastern Wyoming College Program assessments within the college vary by departments but include the following:

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Departmental exam Exit Interview/Oral Exam Capstone Course/s Student Portfolio Show/Demonstration Capstone Project State Board Exams Industry-based Exam Capstone Web Page Construction Journal Performance Recital with Outside Critique Proficiency Assessment of Five General Education Competencies Departmental Essays Written and Oral Comprehensives National Competency Test Rubrics-based Assessment

These assessments are used for all programs EWC offers, including the Associate of Arts, the Associate of Science, the Associate of Applied Science, and all certificates regardless of length. Feedback to students concerning their performance in the assessments is provided in various ways including one-on-one conferences, letters, and other communications of test scores. Examples of program assessments are summarized below.

The Welding Program requires all program students to take a national competency test. In 2009, the instructors found lower than expected written test scores, so a comprehensive review will be included in the curriculum next year.

The Veterinary Technology Program uses a capstone three-credit course, VTTK 2750 Clinical Problems, plus written and oral comprehensive exams. The faculty in 2009 was satisfied with the results and recommended no significant changes. The program will continue with significant rigor in all areas, utilizing classroom and laboratory assessments as effectively as possible.

In assessing the agricultural degrees (Agricultural Economics, Farm/Ranch Management, General Agriculture, Agricultural Business, and Animal Science), the faculty uses a two-credit Ag Capstone class, AGED 2395, that requires either a business plan (Farm/Ranch Management) or a research paper consistent with students’ degree field. As a result of business plans received, faculty have determined that more emphasis will be placed on finances and marketing in the existing curriculum. A student survey (Ag Outcomes Assessment Report, 2008- 2009) revealed that some Animal Science students felt that a stronger assessment would be the research topic, so the faculty implemented that change. This survey demonstrated that students want to take a marketing class on-campus with a full-time faculty member rather than online or by an adjunct instructor. 95


Eastern Wyoming College

â&#x20AC;˘

Cosmetology students are assessed by a one-credit comprehensive assessment class and by state board exams. Faculty have found that the program needs to strengthen the relationship between the general education requirements and program courses. Students need to establish relevance and correlate the importance of the general education requirements with their content-specific courses. Writing skills are carried into the studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; writing of directions for clients and in record keeping. Math skills are practiced with cash register discounts, percentages, and proportions. Instructors also encourage the students to understand the political system under which they live.

Evaluation of general education is conducted in part through CAAP testing. All students graduating with an associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree are required to take the CAAP Test; results from the 2009 test of writing skills, math, reading, critical thinking, and science showed 90 percent were above the national mean in one or more of the above-mentioned subject areas. Since Spring 2005, those percentages have ranged from 91-86 percent above the national mean. In addition to monthly meetings with commission staff, chief academic officers, and chief student services officers from all seven Wyoming community colleges meet yearly in September with the University of Wyoming (UW) academic administration to discuss current topics. The colleges receive information regarding transfer students from the University of Wyoming at this meeting. Data shared at these meetings show that EWC transfer students, historically, continue to do as well or better than UW native students. Statistics also show the more credits an EWC student transfers in to UW, the higher the first semester UW GPA. The Outcomes Assessment Committee is recommending that transfer data from other institutions such as Black Hills State and Chadron State College be examined. Another yearly assessment is the Perkins Grant Program Assessment which provides increased opportunities for career and technical education faculty to obtain professional development and to provide students with experiences in all aspects of an industry. Program technical advisory committees make recommendations to help guide program updates, changes, and enhancements based on community and industry needs and requirements. Program Reviews Program reviews are conducted every three years on a rotating basis. All faculty members who are part of a particular program participate in the writing and analysis of the review. This process ensures that program reviews occur on a continuing basis and are faculty driven. Additionally, EWC assesses program accountability through the successful transferring of graduates to other colleges, certification tests, and job placement. Until three years ago, EWC had an agreement with the State of Wyoming Department of Employment, and they were able to track EWC graduates and report to the College. At this time, the College does not have a formal instrument for tracking purposes; however, employer surveys have been conducted and all career and technical education programs have technical advisory committees made up of business and industry representatives who provide feedback on how well the programs are meeting the needs of employers.

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Eastern Wyoming College Course Assessments Course assessments are done by all instructors when evaluating their courses to show that course objectives address the program goals and objectives and overall college general education requirements. Results of the course assessments show an increasing awareness by all faculty of the importance of linking student learning to a defined set of goals and objectives. During the past ten years, many courses have been redesigned based on these assessments, and emphasis has been placed on the core competencies. Faculty and staff of Eastern Wyoming College have defined five core competencies or general education requirements. These are communication skills, analytical and quantitative reasoning, technology skills, social awareness, and information literacy. On a yearly basis, faculty identify how the core competencies are being met for a selected course of their choice. Courses are reviewed on a three-year cycle. Since faculty often teach the same courses within their discipline, they will often repeat the course assessment for a given course, enabling them to once again examine the course and its relationship to meeting the goals and objectives of the program, as well as the faculty-defined core competencies. Assessments used to evaluate student progress in the courses include a variety of approaches and learning modalities: minute papers, class demonstration, tests, in-class writing assignments, student presented lectures, application exercises, and student portfolios. Multiple assessments exist to document student learning. Faculty members from all Wyoming community colleges meet yearly with their University of Wyoming program counterparts to discuss curriculum and student outcomes during articulation meetings. Faculty use the information from these meetings along with input from the technical advisory committees and prospective employers to update program requirements and course outcomes. In Fall 2010, a new approach to working with adjunct and concurrent faculty in the 16,000 plus square mile outreach will be instituted to ensure course consistency. A team of Division Chairs, faculty, the Associate Vice President for Outreach and Learning, and the Vice President for Learning will be traveling to several sites to discuss textbooks, syllabi, teaching methodologies, and assessment. Reports from the outreach coordinators show that the adjuncts and concurrent teachers are excited about the meetings. Classroom Assessments Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) examine how learning is taking place in the classroom and confirm soundness of current activities or encourage a change in teaching strategies. Many faculty members are developing assessments more closely tied to the defined outcomes of the course, along with program and core competencies. Through the use of various classroom assessment techniques, faculty are finding implications for student learning in the areas of knowledge and skills, learner attitudes, values, selfawareness, and learner reactions to instruction. The classroom assessments indicate changes are needed in learner outcomes for courses and methodology of instruction that reaches all types of learners over the generational span. All benefitted instructors are asked to complete and report at least one classroom assessment each semester. During the school year 2008-2009, 45 of the 49 faculty members reported a CAT in the fall, and 38 completed a CAT report in the spring. Instructors complete multiple CATs but are only required to report one per semester. Examples include minute papers, empty outlines, teacher designed feedback forms, muddiest point, and five minute writings. 97


Eastern Wyoming College During the Foundations of Excellence® in the First College Year Self-Study process, five initiatives in assessment used for improvement included: new student orientation, College Studies course, preregistration sessions, the web site, and special focus workshops. A committee was appointed to work on improvements for the College Studies course, HMDV 1000, during 2009-2010. These improvements will be implemented in Fall 2010. Evaluation of non-credit courses is also conducted in both Community Education and Workforce Development to determine the effectiveness of the courses. Feedback from these assessments is used in planning for the next offering of the given course. Student Assessments The Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) was administered in Spring 2009 for a second time at the College. The entire Wyoming Community College system participated in this statewide CCSSE initiative to further document student engagement. This was in conjunction with the Foundations of Excellence® in the First College Year project. The CCSSE Benchmark Summary compares EWC with other Wyoming Consortium members. As shown in the tables below, EWC students ranked higher than the consortium in most categories with part-time students feeling better about their experience than full-time students. Part-time students gave positive marks for student-faculty interaction and support for learners. Full-time students felt strongest about the support that they were given and student-faculty interaction. Students reported a general overall dissatisfaction with their student effort with active and collaborative learning in both part-time and full-time status. The CCSSE results will continue to be reviewed by the appropriate committees such as the Outcomes Assessment Committee, Curriculum and Learning Council, and division chairpersons who will share and discuss the information with college instructors. Table 25 Community College Survey of Student Engagement 2009 Benchmark Summary Table – Enrollment Status Breakout Part-Time Students Benchmark Active and Collaborative Learning Student Effort Academic Challenge Student-Faculty Interaction Support for Learners Source: CCSSE 2009

Part-Time Students Comparison Group Statistics Your College 2009 CCSSE Consortium Benchmark Score 45.1 45.1 Score Difference 0.0 Benchmark Score 45.7 47.1 Score Difference 1.4 Benchmark Score 42.4 47.2 Score Difference 4.7 Benchmark Score 47.7 55.0 Score Difference 7.4 Benchmark Score 47.7 52.9 Score Difference 5.2 Number of 7 Colleges 98

Cohort 46.4 -1.3 47.0 0.0 46.5 0.7 46.8 8.2 48.3 4.6 663


Eastern Wyoming College Table 26 Community College Survey of Student Engagement 2009 Benchmark Summary Table – Enrollment Status Breakout Full-Time Students Benchmark Active and Collaborative Learning Student Effort Academic Challenge Student-Faculty Interaction Support for Learners Source: CCSSE 2009

Full-Time Students Comparison Group Statistics Your College 2009 CCSSE Consortium Benchmark Score 59.7 59.0 Score Difference -0.8 Benchmark Score 54.0 49.0 Score Difference -5.0 Benchmark Score 56.2 55.9 Score Difference -0.3 Benchmark Score 61.4 61.7 Score Difference 0.3 Benchmark Score 56.6 58.3 Score Difference 1.7 Number of 7 Colleges

Cohort 55.8 3.1 54.9 -5.9 55.1 0.8 55.7 6.1 53.6 4.7 663

Benchmark Score: Each benchmark score was computed by averaging the scores on survey items that comprise that benchmark. To compensate for disproportionately large numbers of full-time students in the sample, all means used in the creation of the benchmarks are weighted by full- and part-time status. Benchmark scores are standardized so that the weighted mean across all students is 50 and the standard deviation across all participating students is 25. Institutions’ benchmark scores are computed by taking the weighted average of their students’ standardized scores. Score Difference: The result of subtracting the comparison group score (same size colleges or 2009 CCSSE Cohort) from your college’s score on each benchmark.

Additionally, student assessment is conducted by way of graduate surveys. The Institutional Research Director administers the graduate surveys on odd-numbered years in December. Faculty and administration are asked to write personal notes to the students on the survey requests to generate higher respondent rates. However, despite these attempts, the return percentage rate was 38 responses out of 151 students for a response rate of only 25 percent in Fall 2009. Even with the low response rate, the College can see that responding students were very satisfied with their experiences at EWC. Survey respondents’ comments from the 2009 survey included praise for the small class sizes, the personal treatment students received from their instructors, student safety, academic advising, and the programs that provided all necessary preparation to attend a four-year institution or secure a good position in the workforce. In the past, a student survey was administered to EWC students who transferred to the University of Wyoming. The survey was discontinued in 2009 because of very low response rates. The Outcomes Assessment Committee recommended that more information be retrieved from transfer students at the University of Wyoming, Chadron State College, and Black Hills State University along with new ways to increase the response rate on all surveys. In addition, when students withdraw from school, they are given the withdrawing student survey to determine the reasons for leaving. The College requires the COMPASS placement test or an equivalent ACT score. The placement tests are given to incoming students who do not have an ACT score or have not placed high enough for collegelevel classes. Students take tests in math, reading, and English, which now can be correlated to their exit CAAP test. The COMPASS/ACT and CAAP linkage reports were ordered from ACT in Spring 2010. The Outcomes Assessment Committee analyzes the results. 99


Eastern Wyoming College Students who earn an Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degrees at Eastern Wyoming College are required to take the Collegiate Assessment of Academic Proficiency (CAAP) tests in the spring semester prior to graduation. Results of these tests are used to assess the learning outcomes at an institutional level and are communicated to administration and faculty. Results of the Spring 2009 CAAP tests showed that of the 76 EWC students who tested, 68 attained an achievement level at or above the national mean in at least one of the given subject areas (writing, mathematics, reading, critical thinking, and science), and 25 attained an achievement level at or above the national mean in all five subject areas. Note that one student did not complete the Critical Thinking and Science tests. Chart 3 CAAP Testing March 2009

Eastern Wyoming College students performed above average in all five subject areas, but the subscores for mathematics show EWC students with a mean score of 14.4 and the national mean at 14.1 for college algebra. Chart 4 Comparison of Local and National CAAP Test Scores March 2009

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Eastern Wyoming College On another point, one possible concern is that no assessment is in place for the general education requirements of social awareness and information literacy, and the CAAP tests are not required for non-transfer students who are seeking a Certificate or AAS. Another way to assess general education requirements may need to be developed to assess general education in AAS and Certificate programs, which are mainly technical programs, and to assess the outcomes in the areas of social awareness and information literacy. This area needs further exploration and discussion among faculty members. Student evaluations are administered each semester for all faculty members. For those who are tenured, one class per semester is evaluated. For faculty who are not tenured, every class is evaluated by the students. This includes all adjuncts teaching on-campus, online, and at all outreach sites. The information is passed on to the individual instructors and their respective Division Chairs. Noncredit classes are also evaluated. In the past, an evaluation form was used to evaluate community education offerings. For the past two years, the Community Education office has been doing informal, verbal feedback. However, in March 2010, they developed a more formal feedback form to be distributed to each class participant. Full-time faculty involvement in assessment processes averaged 85 percent over the past six years according to records kept by the Outcomes Assessment Coordinator. This has resulted in a number of activities geared towards improving the student experience and learning environments. However, Eastern Wyoming College must more fully involve part-time, adjunct, and concurrent instructors in the assessment process. The Outcomes Assessment Committee has been actively involved with disseminating information to the constituents through the use of the College web site and assessment resources. Eastern Wyoming Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s assessment program has been an evolving effort. Faculty members have designed assessment activities to measure learning goals and outcomes. Within the courses are the five core competencies as defined by the faculty and staff of the college: communication skills, analytical and quantitative reasoning, technology skills, social awareness, and information literacy. Courses are reviewed on a three-year cycle. All new or redesigned classes are reviewed and approved or denied by the Curriculum and Learning Council, whose members include administration, faculty, and staff. Changes have been made in the classrooms, in programs, and in the strategic planning budgeting process based upon various assessment information. Strengths Eastern Wyoming College has effective course, program, and general education assessment measures in place. EWC students perform above the national norm on CAAP tests. The Outcomes Assessment Committee is involved in reviewing the various institutional assessments and making recommendations for other assessments. Measures for the evaluation of full-time and part-time instructors are appropriate and carried out. In particular, student evaluations are a part of the campus culture. The College has participated in CCSSE for two complete cycles with mostly positive results indicated by students and staff. 101


Eastern Wyoming College Learning is a dynamic process and Eastern Wyoming College should champion change by encouraging and supporting all faculty in the assessment processes. Opportunities and Challenges Incorporate more CCSSE results into the Outcomes Assessment report and disseminate to the college community at in-service and faculty meetings. Then, goals need to be written to improve identified areas. Improve knowledge of assessment techniques by posting job aids, updating the EWC Outcomes Assessment web site, and providing more information and training to distance educators and adjuncts about CATs and their value. Continue to find ways to close the assessment loop and communicate to students. Continue developing the plan to receive transfer information from other receiving institutions such as Black Hills State College and Chadron State College. Address student effort, active and collaborative learning activities and all current effective pedagogies as indicated in the CCSSE results. Research and review appropriate evaluation methods for the online and hybrid courses supported by CourseCruiser, the new LMS. Include outreach sites in the participation and dissemination of the CCSSE to determine differences in engagement and learning styles. Criterion 3: Core Component 3b Eastern Wyoming College values and supports effective teaching. Eastern Wyoming College values and supports effective teaching in a variety of ways. Faculty representation is included on numerous College committees such as Curriculum and Learning Council, Outcomes Assessment Committee, Distance Learning Committee, and the Personnel Committee. Other evidence includes faculty participation at in-service activities and division meetings. The Human Resources Department hiring practices include cross-sectional representation on committees. Support for effective teaching begins with the instructors who independently collaborate, mentor and rely on each other to teach, and support all students. This is followed by encouragement from senior academic leaders, Division Chairs and department heads. Support for faculty extends across campus through partnerships between departments, programs, and the personnel that lead them. Faculty members are encouraged to understand the characteristics of their students and to use collaborative and active learning and problem based case studies and scenarios. Division Chairs, senior faculty members, and others meet with individual faculty members to share thoughts and ideas about what is being done and what could be done to engage, challenge, and build rapport with students. Division Chair classroom observations, student course evaluations, and informal and formal evaluation methods are the primary ways in which instructors and senior academic leaders monitor progress. 102


Eastern Wyoming College The foundation of this support for effective teaching begins with a common understanding of objectives or student learning outcomes for each course along with the mission and vision of the institution. Instructors identify course objectives or student learning outcomes in their syllabi. Their course outcomes assessment form, which faculty complete once per year, also aligns courses with program goals and core competencies. Faculty members work directly with Learning Services and various support areas on an individualized basis. For example, they recommend student tutors and refer students to the Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Learning Skills Lab when they become concerned about a studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s progress in class. Faculty members participate in the Advisor Alert program whereby they can notify Student Services about a student who is struggling in a class. Student Services in turn notifies the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s academic advisor, along with other professionals, about the situation and assigns someone to contact the person. Midterm deficiency grades are turned in to Student Services by instructors. Then the Vice President for Student Services sends letters to any student receiving a deficiency which outlines support services that will help the student be successful. They urge everyone to be approachable and to take the time to meet with students on an individual basis. Division Chairs and others encourage collegial discussions among faculty and staff to better understand the student body as a group. Caring and concern must remain authentic in an effort to connect with students. In order to be effective partners in learning, faculty members are also encouraged to emphasize emerging social changes and emerging industry technologies in their disciplines. Therefore, faculty members are asked to pay particular attention to understanding broad trends and issues in the education of new and non-traditional students and rising generations. To achieve this, updates via articles and papers, newsletters, attendance at professional development seminars, regional and national conferences and articulation conferences, and participation in webinars are encouraged. Faculty are encouraged and supported to keep up with their disciplines, attend faculty and division meetings, serve on various campus committees such as the Outcomes Assessment and Technology Advisory committees, attend regional and national conferences and seminars, and develop goals and objectives for outcomes assessment purposes. Division Chairs relate that most discussions on effective teaching are done informally through frequent conversations where different methods, approaches, evaluations, and assessment techniques are discussed. Professional Development EWC values effective teaching by encouraging professional development of faculty. The College actively supports the growth of staff, faculty, and administrators through policy and funding (Board Policy 3.8 Professional Growth and Development). EWC commits funds to professional development of staff, faculty, and administrators each budget cycle. Employees, in collaboration with immediate supervisors, are encouraged to set annual goals for professional development. Faculty members are compensated for developing new courses and redesigning existing courses for on-line delivery. Employees may take one EWC course each semester utilizing a tuition waiver and may also use a tuition waiver for a course at the University of Wyoming each semester including distance courses. The College schedules in-service days and trainings each semester. These days provide college-wide training on strategic planning, legislative initiatives affecting community colleges, technology upgrades, and other departmental and college initiatives. Faculty and staff responses to the Foundations of Excellence Faculty/Staff survey indicated that the College provides opportunity and support for professional development activities. 103


Eastern Wyoming College Sabbaticals All full-time tenured faculty are eligible for sabbaticals after five full years of continuous service. Due to the unique teaching assignments of many faculty at EWC, who are “one-person” departments, the option of taking a half-time sabbatical is available. An instructor is permitted to teach part-time and engage in sabbatical activities part-time over the course of two semesters (Board Policy 3.8 Professional Growth and Development). Sabbatical activities support lifelong learning and inquiry by providing faculty with the opportunity to advance knowledge and skills in their discipline. Advanced coursework, research, travel, and other relevant activities are fully supported. Representative sabbatical projects include:

A criminal justice instructor collaborating with the Department of Corrections as a new medium security prison opens in the community. A science instructor conducting research on the impacts of water resources in this region and as a result involves local landowners, farmers and ranchers in the research process.

Strengths The College has an involved and dedicated faculty group. The College has involved and dedicated student services support professionals. Professional development opportunities and sabbaticals are encouraged and supported. Opportunities and Challenges Develop workshops and task forces to update and mentor faculty, staff and administration in current best teaching practices. Implement a mentoring system for newly hired faculty members. Appropriately fund and promote professional development avenues. Document, communicate, and consistently implement, faculty evaluation policies and procedures. Facilitate and encourage formal and informal faculty exchanges focusing on pedagogy of engagement, student traits and learning styles, and other professional development topics. Recognize, acknowledged, and reward excellence in teaching students. Criterion 3: Core Component 3c Eastern Wyoming College creates effective learning environments. Faculty members at EWC display responsibility for effective learning environments by providing academic advising, student schedule preparation, stating expectations in course syllabi, setting and maintaining office hours, providing contact information to students, involvement in extracurricular activities, submitting midterm grades and advisor alerts, and following registration and withdrawal procedures. The principles 104


Eastern Wyoming College declared in the college mission and vision require the integration of objectives, learning and outcomes for each course and program. Employing a comprehensive Outcomes Assessment plan involving students, teachers, staff, and all of the resources of the College arguably shows clear evidence of student learning, instructor effectiveness, institutional integrity, and a self sustaining shared commitment to successful learning. Outcomes Assessment planning is facilitated by a faculty-lead committee which reviews and recommends changes to the plan based upon results and recommendations from departmental faculty members. The Student and Learning Services personnel provide and support the following activities that enhance learning environments: counseling and placement testing, skills workshops, financial aid information and assistance, involvement with campus activities, and extended office hours. Support services include face-toface tutoring and SmarThinking tutoring for all students including on- and off-campus and distance students. Reasonable accommodations are provided for learning disabled students and accommodations for physically disabled students. Personnel convey information to students through the copy center/information office, web site, school newspaper, posters, and easel boards. Student Services personnel support student academic success with campus housing, food services, a fitness center, community education opportunities, and campus ministry opportunities. Personnel conduct themselves in a professional and friendly manner to all students, assist with graduation, sponsor club/groups, and support the EWC Foundation. Student Services employees attend professional development opportunities, faculty and staff orientations, and studentoriented events. The President, Vice Presidents, and Division Chairs recognize that an effective learning environment is critical in attracting students. Services for students must be rendered in an efficient manner and activities for students are important because it creates a bond between the student and the College. Significant and meaningful methods to add to the sense of â&#x20AC;&#x153;belongingnessâ&#x20AC;? are ways to retention. Orientation should be utilized for transitioning students to the College learning environment. Eastern Wyoming College began a process of self-study in 2008 which focused on the first year student experience, and for many of the students, the freshman year of college is also their first experience away from home. EWC strives to provide a safe, supportive, and friendly learning environment so that students have the opportunity to be successful as they mature and grow through their college experience. Students come to EWC with a variety of goals. Many come to pursue a technical program which prepares them to go directly into the workforce. Others want to get basic courses in an environment with small class size and a low teacher-to-student ratio before transferring to a larger school to complete a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree. Some students need developmental courses to prepare them for college work and help them to decide on career goals. EWC has many non-traditional students who are returning to school to finish a degree or who are coming to college for the first time. Each student is unique and needs the individual help and attention EWC can provide. Effective learning environments are also reflected by the physical appearance of the campus and the classrooms. Up-to-date technology, comfortable classroom and library furniture, new paint and carpet, clean classrooms and restrooms, all contribute toward providing a welcoming atmosphere for all students and other constituents.

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Eastern Wyoming College Another way to provide effective learning environments includes student clubs and organizations. Student clubs and organizations are closely aligned with fields of study, special interests, and a variety of nationally recognized student groups. Twenty-two student clubs are found on campus. Registration and Orientation Summer registration is an important time for faculty, staff, and students. During this time, students whose ACT scores do not place them into college level classes take the COMPASS test to help advisors direct them into the classes they need. One of the most critical elements for student success is placement into classes that will challenge but not overwhelm the student. Students are encouraged and advised to enroll in classes that will help them to be successful, including reading improvement and developmental classes that will help to prepare them for college work. Many instructors are available to aid in the registration process, giving students the opportunity to meet the advisors and others with whom they will be working in the fall. Parents are encouraged to attend information sessions designed to answer questions and address concerns. Freshman Orientation takes place before classes begin each fall. During this time, students attend sessions in which they are given information about college policies, programs, and procedures. Motivational and inspirational sessions are also included. Students have the opportunity to meet as a group with instructors and other students in their major during lunch. This â&#x20AC;&#x153;lunch with advisorâ&#x20AC;? icebreaker session facilitates connections among the students and between faculty and students. They are also able to review schedules with their advisor and make any necessary changes. The day is designed to answer studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; questions, ease the transition to college, and make students more comfortable on campus. Other Programs and Initiatives In 2005, EWC began offering the Bridge Program for students who tested into developmental classes. This program, which meets for a week before classes begin, offers students a review of math, writing, and reading. Most sessions are facilitated by on-campus faculty which allows the students to get to know those instructors before regular classes begin. During this week-long training, the students also have a chance to begin developing peer relationships and to become familiar with the campus and the community. At the end of the week, students are allowed to retake the COMPASS test to determine if course placements should be changed. Follow-up data shows that most students test into at least one higher level class for math, writing, or reading. Sessions are also offered in Dealing with Stress, Financial Literacy, Study Skills, and Healthy Choices. The following table shows the retention of the Bridge program students. Table 27 Bridge Program Student Retention 2006-2008 2006 2007 2008 Total Students 19 21 22 Total Students Retained 9 13 13 to Following Year

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2009 17 Not Available


Eastern Wyoming College Tutoring and SmarThinking Tutoring is available through the Learning Skills Lab (LSL) for all students. Students may make an appointment or walk in to get help in most college courses. Instructors often refer students to the LSL for tutoring. Tutors have completed at least one semester at EWC and are recommended by instructors for the position. Tutors are from a variety of backgrounds ranging from traditional college freshman to returning students. The diversity among the tutors gives students choices in selecting someone with whom to work. The following tables show the Learning Skills Lab usage for the last three years and the SmarThinking usage for the last six years. SmarThinking usage was down in 2009-2010; however, plans are in place to better market and hold informational sessions. SmarThinking activities are embedded in the new College Studies class.

Fall 2008 Students Served Tutoring Hours

Table 28 Learning Skills Lab Usage 2008-2010 Spring Total Fall 2009 2009 2008-2009

Spring 2010

Total 2009-2010

690*

232

922

378

371

749

827:56

350:49

1178:45

443:02

437:15

880:17

Note: These numbers do not reflect â&#x20AC;&#x153;drop-inâ&#x20AC;? students who are not required to log in. *This number includes Bridge Program students who were required to do tutoring in Fall 2008. The Fall 2009 Bridge Program did not require tutoring sessions.

Total Users Total Interaction Time Math Writing Other Subjects

2004-2005 342

Table 29 SMARTHINKING Usage 2004-2010 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 226 846 457

2008-2009 604

2009-2010 271

149:38

83:49

88:56

69:45

249:10

163:59

22:19 108:40

9:02 73:40

16:47 70:25

16:09 37:41

29:37 206:04

13:46 145:29

19:21

2:53

2:16

16:05

14:31

19:30

Strengths EWC facilities promote an effective learning environment. Faculty, student services, and administrators demonstrate an understanding of and support for an effective learning environment. Programs such as Freshman Orientation, Bridge Program, Learning Skills Lab tutoring, SmarThinking online tutoring, and special workshops demonstrate further support the learning environment. 107


Eastern Wyoming College Opportunities and Challenges Continue investigating facilities and resources that are effective for learning. Continue enhancing the physical environment to provide an attractive user friendly campus which will encourage students to complete their educational goals at EWC. Criterion 3: Core Component 3d The learning resources at Eastern Wyoming College support student learning and effective teaching. Eastern Wyoming College, the Board, administration, faculty, and support staff believes that learning resources are critical to creating an environment for quality teaching and student learning. Physical facilities, equipment, finances, and staff are available to support instructors and students in the quest for successful learning by students at EWC. EWC Library The library, located centrally on campus, in an attractive facility is a welcoming place for research and study. Housing over 41,000 volumes and approximately 65 databases of full text journals, e-books and multimedia, as well as a student computer lab; the library plays a vital role in the educational experience of students, faculty support and the life-long learning of the community. The library staff encourages and helps students and others find their way through the extensive information available through print and electronic sources. Access to library materials is made available through WyLDCAT (the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s online catalog system), interlibrary loan services, WorldCat, and online databases. These resources are made available to any patron who visits the library and to distance education students via a proxy server. Distance education students have equal access to online resources that on campus students enjoy. Additionally, the students can utilize interlibrary loan and may call, email, or chat with a librarian during library hours. The library participated with a Wyoming Academic Library Consortium, and the State of Wyoming supports the community college libraries with a grant of over 2 million dollars biennially. This grant allows for consortium purchases of databases and has allowed for individual purchases of library materials, both print and electronic. These purchases allow each college to meet the individual and unique needs of each college. This benefit has a direct impact on all students and faculty and enhances the libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to support the curriculum. The Wyoming community colleges have cooperated on creating tutorials on a variety of information literacy subjects as well as providing general information on subjects, library services, and public relations. Learning Skills Lab The EWC Learning Skills Lab is a dedicated space where EWC students can receive help from studenttutors in most subjects that are taught at EWC. The lab is staffed by a Learning Skills Lab Coordinator and student-tutors who are recommended by instructors and hired, trained, and supervised by the coordinator. Faculty and students can work with the staff to schedule tutoring sessions, study groups, or review sessions. Hours for the Learning Skills Lab are Monday through Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Friday 7:30 a.m. to 108


Eastern Wyoming College 5 p.m. Special tutorial sessions are scheduled prior to midterm week and final exam week. Each semester a Tutor Schedule flyer is developed that identifies the tutors for each subject area and the times that each tutor is available. This schedule is available on the web page, and flyers are posted in various places around the campus. Students who are not able to come to campus can call toll free during scheduled tutor hours and talk directly to an EWC tutor. In addition, tutors are available two to four evenings per week in the Veterinary Technology Building to utilize resources only available in that building for tutoring Veterinary Technology students. EWC has funded SmarThinking, an online tutor service for students to utilize. Students can access SmarThinking twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. SmarThinking can be used by students who are on campus as well as those who are off campus. Instructions on how to access SmarThinking are posted on the EWC web page, embedded in distance learning courses, and on flyers and posters that are distributed throughout the College including outreach locations. Bridge Program Eastern Wyoming Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bridge Program helps students transition from high school to their first semester of college. After students complete their COMPASS tests for placement into English, math, and reading and have tested into developmental courses, their scores are evaluated by the Learning Skills Lab Coordinator. Those students who might benefit from a concentrated review of English, math, and/or reading are invited to apply for the Bridge Program. The twenty students who are selected for the program come to campus for seven days prior to the start of the fall semester and participate in intense academic sessions, study skill sessions as well as social activities to help prepare them for college. At the conclusion of the week, the students are given the opportunity to re-take the COMPASS tests so that they may register for a higher level English, math or reading course. The Bridge Program is free to EWC students. Adult Basic Education The ABE/GED/ESL program provides educational support services for adults in the communities that are served by EWC. On campus, the ABE/GED/ESL Program is housed in a section of the Learning Skills Lab. The Douglas Branch Campus, ten of the EWC outreach sites, county detention centers, and the Torrington Even Start Facility serve as ABE/GED/ESL sites with outreach coordinators and at least one instructor available at each location. The ABE Director supervises the Learning Skills Lab Coordinator, the local ABE/GED/ESL site, as well at each of the outreach sites. Those who need to improve their academic skills, prepare for and complete the GED, prepare for the WorkKeys examination, develop their English Language skills and prepare for the U.S. Naturalization test may benefit from the services available through the ABE/GED/ESL sites. The TABE Assessment is available to help students determine specific academic areas that they need to work on for successful completion of the GED. Students may schedule the GED tests with the Academic Testing Coordinator on campus or through the Outreach Coordinator at each of the outreach sites. BEST PLUS, the Basic English Skills Test, is utilized to determine the appropriate level of instruction for students who want to improve their English language skills. Instruction in the various areas is available in small group sessions, through computer programs, by individual one-on-one sessions as well as via various other resources.

109


Eastern Wyoming College Strengths The EWC Library, with the ability to utilize state resources and work with other community colleges, has been able to add databases, as well as print and electronic resources to meet the continuing needs of instructors and students. The ABE/GED/ESL programs are successful in assisting adults in reaching their individual educational goals. Of the 2010 GED graduates, 25 percent have enrolled in college classes through EWC for Fall 2010. Opportunities and Challenges Encourage library staff to develop and implement a plan to assure that information about new purchases of print and electronic materials, databases, and tutorial materials is made available to all instructors and library patrons. Develop a plan for the training of EWC staff and patrons on databases that become available. Work with faculty to improve integration of library resources into specific curricula. Identify specific funding to enhance the dedicated space, personnel, and resources available for tutoring of on campus and outreach students. Formalize the evaluation process of the Bridge Program in orde to determine if the program is successful in preparing students to improve their COMPASS scores and to succeed at the level of English, math, or reading that they ultimately test into.If warrented, additional dollars may need to be identified to increase the number of students that can be served by the Bridge Program.

Summary of Criterion Three The College meets all of the components of Criterion Three. Eastern Wyoming College provides evidence of student learning and teaching effectiveness that demonstrates it is fulfilling its educational mission. Chapter Summary of Strengths, Opportunities, and Challenges for Criterion 3 Strengths 3.1

Eastern Wyoming College has effective course, program, and general education assessment measures in place.

EWC students perform above the national norm on CAAP tests.

3.2

3.3

The Outcomes Assessment Committee is involved in reviewing the various institutional assessments and making recommendations for other assessments.

3.4

Measures for the evaluation of full-time and part-time instructors are appropriate and carried out. In particular, student evaluations are a part of the campus culture. 110


Eastern Wyoming College 3.5

The College has participated in CCSSE for two complete cycles with mostly positive results indicated by students and staff.

The College has an involved and dedicated faculty group.

3.6

3.7

The College has involved and dedicated classified staff, professional staff, and administrators.

3.8

Professional development opportunities and sabbaticals are encouraged and supported.

Student learning outcomes are clearly stated for all programs.

3.9

3.10

Faculty, student services, and administrators demonstrate an understanding of and support for an effective learning environment.

3.11

Programs such as orientation, Bridge Program, Learning Skills Lab tutoring, SmarThinking, and special workshops demonstrate further support for the learning environment.

3.12

The EWC Library, with the ability to utilize state resources and work with other community colleges, has been able to add databases, as well as print and electronic resources to meet the continuing needs of instructors and students.

3.13

The ABE/GED/ESL programs are successful in assisting adults in reaching their individual educational goals.

Opportunities and Challenges 3.1

Incorporate more CCSSE results into the Outcomes Assessment report and disseminate to the college community at in-service and faculty meetings. Then, goals need to be written to improve weak areas.

3.2

Improve knowledge of assessment techniques by posting job aids, updating the EWC Outcomes Assessment web page, and providing more information and training to distance educators and adjuncts about CATs and their value.

3.3

Continue to find ways to use assessments to communicate openly with constituents and move toward program and course improvements.

3.4

Continue developing the plan to receive transfer information from other receiving institutions such as Black Hills State College and Chadron State College.

3.5

Address student effort, active and collaborative learning activities, and all current effective pedagogies as indicated in the CCSSE results. 111


Eastern Wyoming College 3.6

Research and review appropriate evaluation methods for the online and hybrid courses supported by CourseCruiser, the new LMS.

3.7

Include Outreach sites in the participation and dissemination of the CCSSE to determine differences in engagement and learning styles.

3.8

Develop workshops and task forces to update and mentor faculty, staff, and administration in current best teaching practices.

3.9

Implement a mentoring system for newly hired faculty members.

3.10

Appropriately fund and promote professional development avenues.

3.11

Document, communicate, and consistently implement faculty evaluation policies and procedures.

3.12

Facilitate and encourage formal and informal faculty exchanges focusing on pedagogy of engagement, student traits and living styles, and other professional development topics.

Recognize, acknowledge, and reward excellence in teaching students.

3.13

3.14

Identify resources for maintaining and enhancing facilities that are effective for learning.

3.15

Continue to update the physical environment to provide an attractive user friendly campus which will encourage students to complete their educational goals at EWC.

3.16

Encourage library staff to develop and implement a plan to assure that information about new purchases of print and electronic materials, databases, and tutorial materials is made available to all instructors and library patrons.

3.17

Develop a plan for the library training of EWC staff and patrons on databases that become available.

3.18

Work with faculty to improve integration of library resources into specific curricula.

3.19

Identify specific funding to enhance the dedicated space, personnel, and resources available for tutoring of on campus as well as outreach students.

3.20

Formalize the evaluation process of the Bridge Program in order to determine if the program is successful in preparing students to improve their COMPASS scores and to succeed at the level of English, math, or reading that they ultimately test into. If warranted, additional dollars may need to be identified to increase the number of students that can be served by the Bridge Program. 112


Eastern Wyoming College

Chapter 6 Criterion Four: Acquisition, Discovery, and Application of Knowledge Criterion Four: Acquisition, Discovery, and Application of Knowledge

Eastern Wyoming College promotes a life of learning for its faculty, administration, staff, and students by fostering and supporting inquiry, creativity, practice, and social responsibility in ways consistent with its mission. Eastern Wyoming College encourages its faculty, administration, staff, and students to be actively engaged in all avenues of learning. The organization demonstrates this by providing appropriate policies, upholding general education requirements, and practicing socially responsible behaviors. As evidenced in its mission statement, the College provides “quality, affordable educational opportunities for dynamic lifelong learning.” Criterion Four: Core Component 4a Eastern Wyoming College demonstrates through the action of its board, administrators, students, faculty, and staff, that it values a life of learning. The Mission Statement for Eastern Wyoming College indicates its underlying commitment to a studentcentered institution that focuses on the needs of the community with opportunities for lifelong learning. Wyoming has only one baccalaureate institution and seven community colleges. The number of universities or community colleges in the state is restricted by state statute. This law has required colleges such as Eastern Wyoming College to expand and have a wide service area. The service area of Eastern Wyoming College is 16,492 square miles and includes Goshen, Niobrara, Platte, Converse, Weston, and Crook counties. The responsibilities of the community colleges in Wyoming are varied, and community colleges are expected to prepare students to join the workforce, continue their education at a four-year institution, upgrade workforce training skills, enroll in adult basic education, and participate in classes such as those offered through community education. Community colleges are expected to do more with less, and even with rising enrollments, EWC has been able to tighten its belt without loss to educational opportunities for constituents. Eastern Wyoming College recognizes the responsibility of being good stewards of the fiscal resources that are afforded by the state and other entities. Taxpayers and students expect EWC to prioritize needs to best serve communities and students. As mentioned before, in June 2008, the Board adopted a new mission statement based on concepts shared during strategic planning sessions in the spring of that year. Five strategic directions were also written and adopted including Strategic Direction 2 which is most closely aligned with Criterion Four.

“Promote high quality, accessible learning experiences through responsive programs of distinction aligned with current and future opportunities.”

As noted in Core Component 3b, professional development is supported for all EWC benefitted employees. In addition, professional sabbatical experiences are funded for tenured faculty members upon application and approval by the administration and the Board of Trustees. 113


Eastern Wyoming College The Eastern Wyoming College Board of Trustees has policies set to support lifelong learning by committing resources and opportunities for faculty, staff, and administrators in order to engage in a variety of professional development activities. Additionally, a variety of student organizations and initiatives exist to support learning beyond the classroom. Student Learning Opportunities Class sizes are small, with enrollment caps of 20 or 24 on most classes with some career and technical classes having less capacity than that depending upon the technology that is required. This ensures that students have ample opportunity to engage with the instructor and peers in learning activities. The College supports extracurricular activities including student activities, student clubs, and intramurals. The community education offerings are robust and full-time students may take one such class each semester utilizing a scholarship fund for students. The Fine Arts Council and community theatre group provide an average of six to eight performances per year that are open to students and to community members. These performances typically have nominal fees attached, but do provide an exposure to the arts and other cultural events. Students’ responses to the CCSSE survey indicated that they felt they had the opportunity to interact with faculty (CCSSE Student survey items 4k-4q). As far as resources, students felt the College provides adequate opportunity for a variety of learning experiences (CCSSE Student survey items 9b-9f). Students who attend Eastern Wyoming College are fortunate to have a variety of scholarship and activity grant sources to fund their college education. Students may use their Hathaway state scholarships at Wyoming community colleges. Additionally, the EWC Foundation through its donors provides private scholarships to benefit students. Presentations Faculty and staff give presentations on campus, in the community, and at professional conferences. Examples include:

• • • •

Wyoming Distance Education Consortium (WyDEC) conference Water Symposium-Fall 2009 Annual chemistry demonstrations for local schoolchildren Annual programs on health for elementary and middle school students

Recognition of Student Achievement EWC recognizes students who have earned academic honors in a variety of ways. The College publishes the President’s Honor Roll, The Dean’s Honor Roll and the Associate Dean’s Honor Roll in community newspapers. Students receive congratulatory letters from the appropriate offices for honor roll achievements. This distinction is also noted on the student’s official transcript. Annually, scholarship recipients are invited to a Donor Dinner to meet representatives of the entities or families who have made scholarships available to students. At the annual athletic banquets, those student athletes who have earned academic honors are introduced individually. Student athletes who have earned All-American Academic honors are acknowledged by having a photograph displayed in the commons area of the activities center. Students who belong to Phi Theta Kappa receive special recognition at graduation. In the 2008-2009 school 114


Eastern Wyoming College year, 25.6 percent of students received some scholarship aid. These students are fortunate being able to take advantage of Hathaway state scholarships and private scholarships from the EWC Foundation. Many programs at EWC honor their graduates and students with end of the year celebrations for students and their families such as the annual Ag and Athletic banquets held in the spring of each year. Bridge program students are awarded certificates of participation. Press releases are written and sent to studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; hometown newspapers highlighting special achievements or recognition. The EWC web page contains stories and pictures of students and activities. The Student Senate sponsors Civitas Awards in recognition of students, faculty, and staff displaying special acts of kindness or helpfulness to others. These recognitions are made at monthly Board meetings. Staff and Faculty Recognition Each May, the College recognizes all staff, faculty, and administrators with 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 year awards. Those who are retiring from the College are also acknowledged. The Board of Trustees may choose to honor faculty and staff with Emeritus or Honored Retiree Status. With this honor, retirees receive the right to use the Fitness Center and admittance to athletic events in appreciation for years of service among other rights. Recipientsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; photos are on display in the Fine Arts building lobby. On a related note, employees hired before 2004 are eligible for recognition of service through their ability to access and benefit from an early retirement package. Faculty and staff awards and accomplishments are posted on the College web site and in local and regional newspapers. Feature stories highlighting accomplishments or involvement of faculty members are frequently published in local newspapers or featured on the local radio station. Figure 8: Years of Service and Retiree Recognition April 2010 Strengths Benefitted employees are provided opportunities and resources for professional development activities. Tuition waivers for EWC classes and UW classes are available to benefitted employees, and part-time employees may take one EWC class each semester. Students are encouraged and have numerous opportunities to interact closely with faculty and staff because of small class sizes and the quality of classroom and laboratory experiences. Faculty and staff are contributing to their professional affiliations and communities by giving presentations to organizations and being active, involved community members. Students, staff, and faculty members are recognized for their achievements through numerous avenues. Opportunities and Challenges Explore ways the College can better support part-time and adjunct faculty members to participate in professional development opportunities. 115


Eastern Wyoming College Improve processes to better support student activities for part-time and distance education students. Ensure consistent methods and processes are in place so that all student achievement is recognized including athletic, academic, technical and skills attainment, and other exemplary activities. Criterion 4: Core Component 4b Eastern Wyoming College demonstrates that acquisition of a breadth of knowledge and skills and the exercise of intellectual inquiry are integral to its educational programs. The College mission supports “… quality, affordable educational opportunities for dynamic lifelong learning.” The actions of the board and administration support this mission through the maintenance of an open enrollment policy, and funding support services such as tutoring, community education, adult education, professional development, concurrent enrollment, student clubs, and workforce development activities and classes. Students involved in extracurricular activities are demonstrating their commitment to learning and developing skills. Examples of this are participants in the Skills USA and Criminal Justice clubs. Members of these clubs participate in competitions on a regional and national level and even international level. Veterinary Technology club members raise funds to attend a major veterinary conference at least once a year. This helps students see the value of what they have learned and become aware of the various educational opportunities that are available. Block and Bridle Club members attend the Range Beef Cow Symposium which provides educational opportunities and allows them to network with people in the profession who value advancement of knowledge in the industry. The Art club organizes workshops, visiting artists, and trips to museums and art communities. The Biology club provides guest speakers and trips to wildlife centers in Wyoming. There are numerous other clubs providing similar learning opportunities to enhance student knowledge. News stories about EWC faculty, staff, and students acquiring and applying knowledge are seen in the newspapers throughout the service area and heard on the service area radio stations. Faculty and staff engage in numerous activities to further their knowledge and community engagement. EWC houses an Adult Basic Education center. The center offers instruction for GED, English as a Second Language, Civics, WorkKeys Preparation, and adult literacy. The EWC library is a member of the Wyoming libraries databases (WyLD.) Libraries in the WyLD system participate in statewide borrowing and lending to patrons holding WyLD library cards. The library also follows the principles stated in the American Library Association’s Library Bill of Rights, the Freedom to Read, the Freedom to View, and the Intellectual Freedom statements. This supports convenient access to educational materials to people from the entire service area and encourages intellectual inquiry. In further support of learning, peer tutors are available to help students in such academic areas as math, biology, English, psychology, political science, accounting, veterinary technology, economics, and chemistry. Workforce development offers training in areas such as Commercial Trucking, Certified Nursing Assistant, Occupational and Mine Safety, Welding and Joining, Business Continuing Education, CPR and First Aid, and Computer Training including: Vista, Excel, QuickBooks, and A+ Certification. These programs aid the community members in continuing their education and becoming more valuable in the workforce. 116


Eastern Wyoming College Eastern Wyoming College Board of Trustees The Board of Trustees and administration have maintained a commitment to a low student-faculty ratio. This means that sometimes adjunct faculty members are hired to cover classes to ensure that class sizes are low. Adjunct faculty qualifications are the same as those of full-time faculty. Adjunct faculty members are encouraged to communicate with the full-time faculty and Division Chairs for any assistance they might need to be successful. During the 2008-2009 reporting period, Eastern Wyoming College had an 18-to-1 student-faculty ratio. This is among the lowest ratio in the state. The only institution that had a lower ratio was Western Wyoming Community College in Rock Springs with 17-to-1. The overall state average was 20 to 1. Students appreciate the fact that Eastern Wyoming College has small class sizes and they are able to get individualized attention when they need assistance. Table 30 2008-2009 Annual Enrollment Report College Student Faculty Ratio Casper College 3544.9 199 18:1 Central Wyoming College 1562.8 74 21:1 Eastern Wyoming College 1109.7 62 18:1 Laramie County Community College 3939.9 164 24:1 Northwest Community College 1810.9 97 19:1 Northwest Community College District 2183.2 110 20:1 (Sheridan) Western Wyoming Community College 2243.8 132 17:1 (Source: Wyoming Community College System Annual Enrollment Report, 08-09) During the monthly board meetings, formal presentations are given from the leaders of different areas of the College on the progress and future directions of their areas. Written and oral reports usually include reports from the President, Vice President for Institutional Effectiveness, Vice President for Learning, Vice President for Students, Institutional Development, College Relations, and Human Resources. Many Board members attend different functions on campus including the Evening of Elegance, Retirement Honors, Christmas Dinner, In-Service events, and graduation. Learning does not necessarily have to be derived from class work; it can also come from attendance at professional workshops. Eastern Wyoming College supports employees going to workshops by sending faculty to their representative annual articulation meetings. Administration, professional staff, and classified staff also have opportunities to attend different workshops, conferences, and professional meetings throughout the year. In addition, the College supports symposiums and guest speakers to the campus. One recent example was the sustainability symposium held in 2010. Another example was the Afghan Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Project which included numerous presentations to students, staff, and community members. Faculty Involvement with Life of Learning Eastern Wyoming College has great faculty members who are active in their disciplines and keep up to date about the best teaching practices of their profession. Examining the past three years shows the level of commitment faculty have towards life of learning. In this timeframe, faculty have taken, and been approved through the Professional Development Committee, 103.5 credits resulting in five vertical salary schedule moves. On average two-thirds of all benefitted faculty members utilized Eastern Wyoming 117


Eastern Wyoming College College tuition waivers including waivers for the fitness center in the last three years. This represents a total dollar benefit amount of $13,795. The University of Wyoming tuition waivers which are offered because EWC is a cooperating agency were utilized by 13 employees. In the past ten years, since the College’s last accreditation report, three faculty members have earned doctoral degrees and numerous others have earned degrees or credentials. A life of learning is not only about taking classes and attending workshops and conferences; it is the sharing of knowledge. In addition to normal workloads, 29 faculty members have put together 68 classes that were offered through Community Education to serve other employees, students, and the community at large. Some of these classes included, Digital Photography, Cake Decorating, So You Want to Start a Business?, Upscale E-Mail, Piano Lab, Hair Braiding for Moms and Daughters, Youth Rodeo Camp, Garden Landscaping, Computer classes, EWC Lancer Volleyball Camp, 2009 Lancer “MVP” Basketball Camp, Reading Wyoming “Living Between Fences,” Birds, Bees, and Plants Field Trip for Kids, and Green Building Techniques. In addition to preparing classes to be given through Community Education, several faculty members have presented at conferences or symposiums such as the Wyoming Distance Education Consortium conference or discipline specific conferences. Many faculty, staff, and administrative members serve on different boards in the community and across the state. Some boards that are represented include the City Council, Wyoming Community Development Authority, Planning Commission, Chambers of Commerce, Prison Community Partnership Committee, and numerous service organizations. The annual Partnership Report is submitted to the Wyoming Community College Commission and includes numerous other examples. Professional Staff Involvement with Life of Learning The professional staff at Eastern Wyoming College actively participates and promotes a life of learning through various actions. In the past three years, staff participation in the tuition waiver program has increased from 42 percent using it in 2007 to 67 percent taking advantage of tuition waivers in 2009. Over this same time period, professional staff members have earned 257 credits through the professional development process resulting in ten salary moves while improving overall knowledge or specific skills. Professional staff members have earned or are pursuing further degrees including masters’ degrees in various areas. Professional staff members have also participated in courses or activities offered by Community Education. Some of these classes include, Continuation of the Short Game for Golfers, Book Binding, An Evening with Charlie Russell, Tomato Cage Christmas Trees, Let’s Make Fairy Wings, Digital Photography, and Silver Sneakers. Classified Staff Involvement with Life of Learning Classified staff members continue their education and value a life of learning. The turnover among classified staff makes tracking progress a bit more difficult. However, in the last three years, about half of the classified staff was able to take advantage of the tuition waivers. Examples include staff members finishing associate degrees, bachelors’ and even masters’ degrees.

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Eastern Wyoming College Community-at-Large Involvement with Life of Learning Community members often take classes just for the fun or interest of taking classes. These classes are for both credit and non-credit. Senior citizens, defined as over age 60, receive tuition waivers to take credit classes. Eighty-seven tuition waivers were given in 2007, 90 in 2008, and 96 in 2009. In the past three years, members of the community, who are not employed by Eastern Wyoming College, have taught 336 different classes through Community Education. Some of these classes include, Best Friends Dog Agility Class, The Coffee Class, Fly Fishing, Conversational Spanish, Positive Living, Bridge Made Easy for Beginners, Hunter Safety, Beginning Quilting, Horsemanship Fundamentals, Buying and Selling on E-Bay, Getting to Know Your GPS, Youth Basketball, Start Smart Wee Ball, Exercise classes, Arts and Craft classes, Patio Gardening, and Give Your Computer a Tune-Up. All of the outreach communities also offer numerous community education activities. Taking workshops and classes that are not related to one’s job are ways to obtain more life skills without it leading to a degree or “acknowledgement” that is tangible. Learning is something that people enjoy, and a “life of learning” involves the sharing of knowledge, just not the gaining of knowledge. Breadth of Knowledge and Skills General education is integrated into all of EWC’s programs to foster a culture of learning and to help students build a foundation of knowledge. Graduates of EWC demonstrate competencies in five general education areas (2009-2010 EWC catalog, pps. 60-61). These general education requirements were identified by the faculty as integral educational areas and have been revised periodically to update the skill levels needed in the constantly changing educational and workplace environment. Currently, the areas are as follows:

1. 2. 3. 4.

5.

Communication Skills: Graduates will be able to understand and communicate ideas and information in written and spoken English that reveals a mastery of terminology appropriate to their disciplines. Analytical and Quantitative Reasoning: Graduates will be able to solve problems through critical thinking involving analytical and quantitative reasoning at a level appropriate to their disciplines. Technology Skills: Graduates will be able to demonstrate competence using technology appropriate to their disciplines. Social Awareness: Graduates will be able to demonstrate an awareness of the relationship between the individual and the world. Information Literacy: Graduates will be able to locate, evaluate, and use information effectively.

While required courses in the area of general education are embedded in the AA and AS programs, these competencies are taught in the coursework of technical programs specific to the individual program. For example, Welding and Joining Technology students learn computer-aided drafting as part of their technology skills, and Veterinary Technology students use analytical and quantitative skills in the pharmaceutical calculations course. Learning outcomes are measured for all programs to demonstrate that the students have acquired a breadth of knowledge and skills.

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Eastern Wyoming College Students are encouraged to become involved in college athletics, organizations, and activities. Through their experiences in clubs, organizations, and athletics, Eastern Wyoming College students develop social, leadership, and interpersonal skills. One way that students develop leadership skills is by holding office in these organizations. They also become involved in the community, and develop social awareness and civic responsibility. An example would be when the Lancer Men’s Basketball team members visit a local school to interact with the elementary students and teach them basic basketball skills. The Adult Peer Counselor members host a number of activities for EWC students, such as a discussion series on public policy and a display about the prevention of physical and emotional abuse. The Journalism Club sponsored a mock presidential election in November 2009.The Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society members participate in the community by performing highway cleanup. The athletic department facilitates an “adopt an athlete” program to encourage community members to befriend and support the college athletes, many of whom are far away from home for the first time.

Figure 9: PTK highway cleanup

Although student organizations actively recruit members, the number of students who participate in activities, organizations, and athletics is relatively small. At this time, the only organization that recruits members from Outreach areas is Phi Theta Kappa, an academic honor society for community colleges. The number of students who participate in extracurricular activities needs to be increased, and there also needs to be more opportunities for students in the Outreach areas to participate in organizations and clubs. This may be accomplished by meeting on weekends or through virtual means.

Internship Experiences Students enrolled in technical and transfer programs have opportunities to expand their skill levels through internships and work experiences. Many certificate and AAS programs require students to complete internships as part of the curriculum. All internships or clinical experiences include processes for completion with appropriate guidelines. Several memorandums of understanding exist with cooperating agencies or businesses. Internships or clinical experiences include: • Beef Production, Certificate – AGEC 1970 Ag Internship • Business Administration, AAS – BOTK 1970 Occupational Internship I • Business Office Technology, AAS – BOTK 1970 Occupational Internship I and BOTK 2970 Occupational Internship II • Computer Science, Information Support Specialist, Certificate – CMAP 1970 Occupational Internship • Computer Science, Computer Information Systems, AAS – CMAP 1970 Occupational Internship I and CMAP 2970 Occupational Internship II • Criminal Justice, Law Enforcement Emphasis, AAS – CRMJ 2690 Supervised Lab Experience • Criminal Justice, Corrections Emphasis, AAS – CRMJ 2690 Supervised Lab Experience • Veterinary Technology, AAS – VTTK 2510 Clinical Experience I, VTTK 2520 Clinical Experience II, and VTTK 2950 Clinical Experience III • Certified Nursing Assistant – HLTK 1510 (includes clinical component) 120


Eastern Wyoming College All of the Education majors are required to take the EDUC 2100 Practicum in Teaching course where they gain work experience as part of their study in an accredited school under the supervision of a certified teacher. Eastern Wyoming College offers several education degrees. The education degrees in agriculture and business are Associate of Science degrees, while degrees in elementary education, early childhood, secondary education, and music are Associate of Arts degrees. Academic freedom, a cornerstone of higher education, is explicitly guaranteed for faculty in Board Policy 4.0.1 Academic Freedom. The studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; right to inquiry is described in the Student Handbook. The College supports the individualâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right to access resources and discussion of ideas as part of the learning experience. The College library is committed to free speech in adherence to the American Library Association Library Bills of Rights, including free and open access to resources including those on-line. Students in outreach areas of the College can access a variety of databases through the on-line library site. Bulletin boards are free speech zones; groups or individuals may post materials in accordance with the Posting of Flyers, Notices, or Posters policy. Individual faculty members invite a variety of speakers to campus and often schedule additional sessions so that all students and members of the community are able to attend. These events are advertised across campus and in local news outlets. Creative and Scholarly Work Eastern Wyoming College supports the value of intellectual inquiry through action research in teaching and learning. Faculty members are encouraged to publish findings and make professional presentations. Additionally, faculty in the creative arts disciplines publish original work and display their work to the college community and the surrounding communities. An English faculty member is a published author and recently received a national award for writers of the western genre. Employees are involved in activities that capitalize on their personal strengths and abilities. Other employees volunteer to judge speech meet activities, Academic quiz bowl contests, and Young Authors activities. The professional contribution made by employees is not quantifiably measureable but is extensive and diverse.

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Eastern Wyoming College

Figure 11: Dr. Tom Armstrong and Academic Quiz Bowl Contestants

Figure 10: Dr. John Nesbitt recipient of the Spur Award

Figure 12: EWC Students and Instructors

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Eastern Wyoming College Strengths The College has established general education requirements for programs that are taught and assessed. Many programs have internship courses required to provide real-world and hands-on experiences. Student clubs and activities provide a wider perspective for students outside of the classroom experience. Students enjoy and the College promotes a low faculty-to-student ratio of 18 to 1. All employee groups demonstrate an involvement in and strong commitment to lifelong learning activities. Opportunities and Challenges Explore further the role that student clubs can play in providing social awareness and responsibility through service learning and topical discussion areas. Criterion Four: Core Component 4c Eastern Wyoming College assesses the usefulness of its curricula to students who will live and work in a global, diverse, and technological society. The Eastern Wyoming College catalog states the following about the programs of instruction: “Eastern Wyoming College expects that its graduates will have an educational foundation that prepares them for a complex and rapidly changing world. The curriculums offered will allow the development of general education competencies necessary for the participation in society as well as the development of specialized knowledge necessary within a given discipline.” As described in the previous section, five general education areas that every EWC student will demonstrate competency in have been developed. Whereas, course assessments are conducted by faculty members on a rotational basis, it would be desirable to have regular review of every course in a program followed by analysis to ensure that the program as a whole is providing students with the opportunity to meet the expectations of EWC as stated in the catalog. In addition, others should be involved in curricular evaluations such as alumni, employers, and other off campus constituents. The Foundations of Excellence® Diversity Dimension committee found via interviews with instructors that course syllabi throughout the College or topics taught in class may not reflect a world view on diversity but, rather, reflect a Eurocentric viewpoint, even though course descriptions in the catalog do reflect elements of diversity. While that might not be uncommon in the United States, the Diversity Dimension committee felt that it could be improved at this college. Foundations of Excellence New Student and Faculty/Staff survey results indicated a very low emphasis on diversity across the curricula. Efforts are already underway to further emphasize diversity. College instructors have joined a statewide global studies grant which is a consortium of Wyoming community colleges and the University of Wyoming. One of the goals of this program is to develop study abroad coursework, as well as international studies distance learning courses to be shared among the colleges. The College art instructor has been working on an initiative for students to study art in Italy. Not since EWC’s Spanish students visited Mexico in the 1990’s has an out-of-country program been offered. The College joined with Wyoming’s other community colleges and the University of 123


Eastern Wyoming College Wyoming in bringing a science research program on campus through a National Institute of Health INBRE grant. Other ideas include hosting a Fulbright scholar and participating in the Federal Eurasian Exchange Program (IREX). Advisory councils in many CTE programs help assess the relevance of program curriculum as it pertains to transfer and career readiness. Programs with existing advisory councils include Agriculture, Welding/ Machine Tooling, Veterinary Technology, Business and Technology, Cosmetology, Criminal Justice, Construction Technology, Weatherization Technology, Early Childhood Education, and Heath Technology. Advisory Councils represent a mix of secondary and post-secondary instructors, business and industry professionals, and administrative professionals. An advisory council of community leaders and business and industry representatives for the Douglas Branch Campus is convened at least twice a year. Co-curricular activities are sponsored by a variety of departments and clubs on campus. These activities and projects are also integrated into the assessment process and serve as a demonstration of knowledge in the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program. For example, all graduating art majors must hold either a demonstration or art show in their final semester. Other areas that sponsor academic oriented extra-curricular activities include the Student Senate and the Learning Skills Lab among others. Programs offered recently include, the Afghan Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Project; Project Stay; Managing Home, Family, and Studies; Classroom Expectations, Improving Test Scores, and Making the Grade; the Symposium on Water; Public Policy and You; The Faces of Addiction; and the Sustainability Symposium. Currently, there is room to expand co-curricular and extracurricular offerings at Eastern Wyoming College. Technology The Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strategic planning efforts have contained numerous action plans on updating technology across the college. One of the most significant of these has been the implementation of a planned replacement schedule for computers college wide. This is important because before this plan was implemented, departments varied widely on the age or replacement of its computers resulting in many inequities. Now, the responsibility to replace computers has been placed at an institution-wide level. The computer replacement schedule has applied only to computers and not to peripherals or other technology that is needed. Some projectors are set for replacement and funded through departmental or instructional budgets. A Technologyl Advisory Council was formed in 2008-2009 with cross-functional representation. This committee has developed and championed several action plans that students and employees have said were important directions. The most important accomplishment to date of this group has been the institution wide adoption of a campus portal from Campus Cruiser. This last year, a distance learning faculty committee also voted to adopt the learning management system from the same company as a replacement to Blackboard. The entire portal and learning management system is known to students and staff as LancerNet. This provides a familiar face and a completely integrated approach to student functions such as registration, access to email for students, college announcements as well as a platform for distance and hybrid courses. Other initiatives developed by the Technology Advisory Council have not been implemented yet such as wireless connectivity across the campus. This is something that students and patrons have indicated they desired. Wireless connectivity is available in a few key locations. Campus wide need and implementation are under ongoing review. Other technology having nothing to do with computers is embedded in programs throughout the College. Grant dollars, in particular Perkins grants, have been beneficial in helping CTE programs stay up-todate with industry technology. Examples of this include the x-ray machines for Veterinary Technology 124


Eastern Wyoming College or welders and lathes for Welding and Machine Tooling. Other improvements include the addition of a mobile welding lab that has been used extensively for workforce training and a soon-to-be acquired mobile weatherization lab which will be used in the new Weatherization Technician program along with workforce classes. Several discussions have centered on virtual labsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;even a virtual welding simulation. It is a challenge to provide current technology for the various programs and for the College as a whole. Indeed, technology improvements including the campus ID system, the automation of financial aid processes, and the content management system with the web page have been recent initiatives to help move the College forward. New avenues for funding have been developed and the strategic planning processes have aided in this effort. Strengths The College has active and involved advisory councils in planning and directional focus for its career and technical education programs. Joining international and intercultural activities including the statewide consortium emphasizing international studies is a positive initial step toward achieving a greater awareness of global diversity. Technology has improved through the establishment of a technology advisory committee, a computer replacement plan, acquisition of a campus portal, adoption of a learning management system, and grant funded acquisitions. Opportunities and Challenges Broaden college efforts to embrace global awareness among its students and faculty including interaction of intercultural and discipline-specific activities. Keep technology improvements in the forefront of planning efforts in order to retain and maintain strong programs and provide needed services to students. Criterion Four: Core Component 4d Eastern Wyoming College provides support to ensure that faculty, students, and staff acquire, discover, and apply knowledge responsibly. The acquisition, discovery, responsible use, and secure use of information are important to Eastern Wyoming College. The College has in place adequate practices, policies, and resources to support this understanding by faculty, staff, and students. The College encourages the use of knowledge resources among its staff and students. Concomitant with this is the responsibility to give credit where credit is due and to protect the individual rights of its staff and students including privacy and practices that provide security assurances. Student Code of Conduct Eastern Wyoming College Board Policy 5.13 Student Code of Conduct, addresses the various actions that students may take that are prohibited; these actions include the wrongful utilization of goods, services 125


Eastern Wyoming College or information. The policy specifically identifies “plagiarism, cheating and other forms of academic dishonesty, or facilitating any such act” as being prohibited. Possible disciplinary sanctions for violations are included within the policy; the sanctions may include probation, suspension or disciplinary dismissal of the student. This board policy is included in the Eastern Wyoming College Student Handbook which can be found on the EWC web site under the Current Student heading. In addition, the policy does outline a grievance policy for those students who are accused of violating the Student Code of Conduct. Academic dishonesty by students is also addressed in the EWC Catalog in the section on Academic Regulations. In this section, academic dishonesty is defined as “inappropriate dependence upon the aid of other persons in carrying out class or laboratory assignments; plagiarism; and cheating on quizzes, tests, or examinations.” The catalog identifies the options that are available to an instructor of a class in which a student commits one or more academic dishonesty offenses. Students who have been accused of academic dishonesty may follow the EWC Grievance Policy as outlined in Board Policy 5.14. Individual instructors may address specific course regulations regarding cheating or plagiarism in course syllabi. Results of the Foundations of Excellence New Student Survey, Fall 2008, student responses indicate that EWC is communicating to students the importance of academic integrity. The survey results listed 63.7 percent of the students surveyed gave EWC a high/very high rating for communicating the importance of standards of behavior in an academic community. Further, 64.5 percent of the respondents rated EWC as high/very high in the area of communicating the importance of acknowledging the source of ideas not your own. And 78.5 percent of those who completed the survey gave EWC a high/very high rating for communicating the importance of academic honesty, and 67.7 percent rated EWC high/very high for communicating the importance of ethical conduct. Intellectual Property The Eastern Wyoming College Distance Learning Handbook addresses Intellectual Property specifically related to materials that are developed and utilized in the delivery of courses through distance education mediums. The handbook specifically addresses the use of materials by another instructor and the reproduction of materials by students. EWC has established remuneration guidelines to faculty members for the development of distance learning courses. It is the intention of EWC to compensate the faculty member for their time and effort in getting course materials into the necessary format for delivery through the specific distance education medium for that course. The handbook explains that compensation for development of a distance education course carries an assumption that the instructor will continue to teach the course through the distance education medium for subsequent semesters. If that instructor declines to teach the course and another instructor takes on the teaching of the course through a distance education medium, the new instructor would be paid at a lesser rate because they would only be revising the course. The Distance Learning Handbook does address the importance of the 1976 Copyright Act and the 2002 TEACH Act which cover the use of copyrighted materials. Instructors of distance learning are asked to include a statement in each course syllabus that addresses the limitation of student use of materials included on the course web site to only those students who are registered for the course. While neither act is documented in its complete form in the handbook, instructors are encouraged to review the laws in their entirety. Copyright Act information is posted near the copier in the EWC Library and in the Copy Center. 126


Eastern Wyoming College Strengths The College exhibits its belief in an educated and civically responsible citizenry. It encourages students and staff to be accurate, be thorough, be honest, be well intended, and to care about others. EWC has a Student Code of Conduct that is covered by board policy, this code of conduct addresses issues such as plagiarism and cheating by students. It includes specific actions that may be taken when a student violates the Code of Conduct; it also includes specific actions that a student may take to grieve their punishment for violating the Code of Conduct. The EWC Distance Learning Handbook addresses ownership of materials that a distance education instructor develops and uses for the delivery a distance education course. The Copyright Act and the TEACH Act are addressed in the EWC Distance Learning Handbook. Opportunities and Challenges Develop a process that assures that all students are aware of the Code of Conduct and the possible ramifications for violating the Code of Conduct. Explore the development of faculty, staff, and administration code of conduct and then incorporate these areas into new employee orientation sessions. Review the current course syllabus format and discuss adding a required section on academic honesty and the consequences of a student violating the academic honesty policy. Develop a process that requires students to be aware of and accept the conditions of responsible computer use when using EWC computers and include acceptable use guidelines.

Summary of Criterion Four The College meets or exceeds all of the components of Criterion Four. The value of lifelong learning is evident in multiple activities and programs. Further, its employees take pride in being active and involved citizens in their communities. Chapter Summary of Strengths, Opportunities, and Challenges Strengths 4.1

Benefitted employees are provided opportunities and resources for professional development activities.

4.2

Tuition waivers for EWC classes and UW classes are available to benefitted employees.

4.3

Students are encouraged and have numerous opportunities to interact closely with faculty and staff due to small class sizes and the quality of classroom experiences. 127


Eastern Wyoming College 4.4

Faculty and staff are contributing to their professional affiliations and communities by giving presentations to organizations and being active, involved community members.

4.5

Students, staff, and faculty members are recognized for their achievements through numerous avenues.

4.6

The College has established general education requirements for programs that are taught and assessed.

4.7

Many programs have required internship or clinical experience courses which provide real-world and hands-on experiences.

4.8

Student clubs and activities provide a wider perspective for students outside of the classroom experience.

Students enjoy and the College promotes a low faculty-to-student ratio of 18 to 1.

4.9

4.10

All employee groups demonstrate an involvement in and strong commitment to lifelong learning activities.

4.11

The College has active and involved advisory councils in planning and directional focus for its career and technical education programs.

4.12

Joining international and intercultural activities including the statewide consortium emphasizing international studies is a positive initial step toward achieving a greater awareness of global diversity.

4.13

Technology has improved through the establishment of a technology advisory committee, a computer replacement plan, acquisition of a campus portal, adoption of a learning management system, and grant funded acquisitions.

4.14

The College exhibits its belief in an educated and civically responsible citizenry. It encourages students and staff to be accurate, be thorough, be honest, be well intended, and to care about others.

4.15

EWC has a Student Code of Conduct that is covered by board policy, this code of conduct addresses issues such as plagiarism and cheating by students. It includes specific actions that may be taken when a student violates the Code of Conduct; it also includes specific actions that a student may take to grieve their punishment for violating the Code of Conduct.

4.16

The EWC Distance Learning Handbook addresses ownership of materials that a distance education instructor develops and uses for the delivery a distance education course.

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Eastern Wyoming College 4.17

The Copyright Act and the TEACH Act are addressed in the EWC Distance Learning Handbook.

Opportunities and Challenges 4.1

Explore ways it can better support part-time and adjunct faculty members to participate in professional development opportunities.

4.2

Improve processes to better support student activities for part-time and distance education students.

4.3

Ensure consistent methods and processes are in place so that all student achievement is recognized including athletic, academic and technical skills attainment, and other exemplary activities.

4.4

Explore further the role that student organizations/services can play in providing social awareness and responsibility through service learning and topical discussion areas.

4.5

Broaden college efforts to embrace global awareness among its students and faculty including interaction of intercultural and discipline-specific activities.

4.6

Keep technology improvements in the forefront of planning efforts in order to retain and maintain strong programs and provide needed services to students.

4.7

Develop a process that assures that all students are aware of the Code of Conduct and the possible ramifications for violating the Code of Conduct.

4.8

Explore the development of a faculty, staff, and administration code of conduct and then incorporate these areas into new employee orientation sessions.

4.9

Review the current course syllabus format and discuss adding a required section on academic honesty and the consequences of a student violating the academic honesty policy.

4.10

Develop a process that requires students to be aware of and accept the conditions of responsible computer use when using EWC computers and include acceptable use guidelines.â&#x20AC;&#x192;

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Chapter 7 Criterion Five: Engagement and Service Criterion Five: Engagement and Service As called for by its mission, Eastern Wyoming College identifies its constituencies and serves them in ways both value. Eastern Wyoming College has excellent relationships with its communities and constituents, especially those in Goshen County. Often serving as the “hub” of community activity, it provides educational opportunities, cultural activities, athletic events, and a meeting and conference place for many individuals, organizations, and businesses. It serves its constituents well. Criterion 5: Core Component 5a Eastern Wyoming College learns from the constituencies it serves and analyzes its capacity to serve their needs and expectations. Eastern Wyoming College’s Mission and Vision Statements show that it identifies itself as an organization that wishes to serve its constituencies and analyze its capacity to serve their needs and expectations. The Mission and Vision Statements newly crafted in 2008, following a comprehensive self-examination wherein all employees participated in strategies for planning and improving services to and for college constituents. The college strategic planning process entails identifying constituencies being served, how well they are being served, analyzing college capacity to serve their needs and expectations, and improving such service. As the mission statement states, EWC will act as a, “comprehensive community college that responds to the educational, cultural, social, and economic needs of its communities.” The comprehensive process to rewrite the mission statement involved various members of the college and external communities. The resulting mission statement clearly indicated a strong commitment to meeting the needs of the communities served by EWC. Identifying Needs and Expectations of Constituencies To understand the changing needs of its constituencies and their communities, EWC must periodically assess those needs. Currently, there are several mechanisms in place to assess the needs within the communities. The Douglas Branch Campus has a community advisory board that meets at least twice a year. While there is not a general community advisory board for the Torrington campus, the Board of Trustees and the Foundation Board are comprised of community members who reflect the interests of the community at large. Most career and technical programs at EWC have advisory councils that represent a mix of secondary and post-secondary instructors, industry professionals, and administrative professionals. Programs with existing advisory councils include Agriculture, Welding/Machine Tooling, Veterinary Technology, Business and Technology, Cosmetology, Criminal Justice, Construction Technology, Early Childhood Education, and Heath Technology. These councils help aid the individual programs in assessing the needs of the various consistencies served by the career and technical programs. Additionally, before the creation and approval of new programs, a needs assessment must be completed to determine the degree to which the proposed program meets the needs of the college constituents. 130


Eastern Wyoming College Other needs assessment tools include the process of outcomes assessment which reviews individual courses and programs and the strategic planning process. The strategic planning process is designed to allocate resources to corresponding constituent needs. Eastern Wyoming College involved the college community in developing a new method of strategic planning. The process started in January, 2008 with sessions that encouraged employees to dream and discover in focus group meetings. Participants included students, employees, administrators, community members, and Board of Trustees and Foundation members. As mentioned before five strategic directions emerged from these initial focus group meetings.

• Strategic Direction #1 – Thoughtfully prepare our organization and our people for changing and dynamic times; • Strategic Direction #2 – Promote high quality, accessible learning experiences through responsive programs of distinction aligned with current & future opportunities; • Strategic Direction #3 – Embrace and invest in technology and modern facilities; • Strategic Direction #4 – Enhance the quality of life for individuals, families, the community and region, and positively influence the economy, and; • Strategic Direction #5 – Recognize and extend our global reach.

Under each of these strategic directions, the College developed vital initiatives and action plans to help the College meet the needs of constituents throughout its service area and to prepare for the future. Each semester, a Student Profile is developed by the Institutional Research office. This profile reflects the overall make-up of the student body and the information can help guide decisions as they relate to the needs of students, based on their demographics. In order to fully analyze this component, however, the College must also reach out to its constituents, identify their needs, and make a commitment to respond to those needs. This is being done by various departments, divisions, and outreach coordinators. EWC meets the needs of the community by offering programs, activities, and classes in the following areas: cultural and training programs and entertainment through the Community Education Office and in conjunction with the Goshen Community Theatre; exercise/wellness programs through the Fitness Center; adult education through its ABE/GED program; and on and off-campus special training and regular coursework. On-campus student needs and expectations are being addressed with the aid of the following tools: • • • • •

Foundations of Excellence® surveys of on-campus students and staff Advisory boards for career and technical education programs Library survey Community College Student Survey of Engagement (CCSSE) Feedback garnered by faculty and staff who serve on various area boards and participate in a variety of community organizations and activities • Partnership Report – updated annually (community organizations and boards) Serving the Needs The Community Education and Workforce Development staffs work closely with community members, businesses and organizations to identify and deliver needed services/training opportunities. The Community Education office offers diverse coursework within varying timeframes, from one day to several weeks in 131


Eastern Wyoming College length. Programs offered include coursework to improve employee production and upgrade their skills, and self-improvement programming. Classes are offered for every age group, young to old. The College works with the community theatre group and Fine Arts Council to bring cultural events to the community. The office also offers affordable bus trips to sporting, cultural, and entertainment events in and out-of-state. The Workforce Development staff works with regional and local businesses to provide requested training. Fall 2009, coursework has included resume workshops, CDL training, EMT training, and health-related coursework. An example of a direct response to business requests is the mobile welding lab which travels to remote areas in the six-county service district to provide training to employees on-site, saving companies travel/lodging/meal costs as well as time, by bringing on-site training to their employees. Soon to follow in 2010 will be an energy technology mobile lab which will bring weatherization technology, home energy audits, and solar voltaic green technology training to industry-related employees, as well as farmers, ranchers, and small municipalities in the service area who wish to install these energy and cost saving devices for their own use. The College participated with the Goshen County Economic Development Corporation to conduct surveys and interviews with businesses in order to study business retention and expansion. EWC has partnered with the Department of Correction to develop numerous training programs such as the plate welding certificate and computer applications certificate program. EWC has had a long standing commitment to serving the educational needs of its vast service area, providing outreach courses through the WEN Compressed Video Network and online courses. EWC offers concurrent enrollment coursework to service area high school students, allowing them the ability to get a jump on their college studies. Approximately one-third of EWC FTE is generated through outreach. EWC’s Strategic Direction #2 states that the College will “promote high quality, accessible learning experiences.” Accessibility is a significant issue for EWC site-bound students. The College also offers distance learning classes in both academic and technology areas. Since its last accreditation visit, the College has implemented four on-line Associate Degree programs, which HLC approved in November 2005. Additionally, EWC responds to identified outreach community needs through:

• • • • • •

Annual Board Trips to Outreach Sites Foundations of Excellence® surveys of outreach students (and staff) Distance Education Committee Outreach Coordinator meetings and Outreach advising Douglas Advisory Board (Douglas, WY campus) Goshen County Economic Development activities

The College main campus is home to the University of Wyoming Outreach School’s Eastern Regional Center which provides both undergraduate and graduate coursework to citizens, thus collaborating with the university to provide the means for area residents to continue their four-year education close to home. The Wyoming Medium Correctional Institution opened in January, 2010, in Torrington. Since the announcement that the prison would be coming to the EWC service area, college administrators, faculty, and staff have worked with the Department of Corrections (DOC) to facilitate learning opportunities for inmates and staff. The College has served DOC facilities for a number of years, already having in its service area the Wyoming Women’s Center in Lusk and, the Wyoming Honor Conservation Camp and Wyoming Boot Camp in Newcastle. Various strategies are being developed to address serving DOC needs. The college mobile labs are already being utilized as a tool to train inmates so they will have the skills to become 132


Eastern Wyoming College productive workers/citizens once they are released. The College also had a criminal justice instructor on sabbatical working with the DOC to train and learn the process of starting a correctional facility from the ground up. Officer and staff training along with inmate training is being further explored. EWC has committed to continue to find ways to serve its constituents by launching the Foundations of ExcellenceÂŽ study of student first year experiences during the 2008-2009 term. The results of the study over that year are being utilized to build a stronger program to serve EWC communities. One recommended action item resulting from the study is to adopt a First Year Experience Philosophy in Fall 2010 to be utilized in new student orientation and other ways. Strengths The College addresses the needs of businesses, individuals, outreach sites and its three Department of Corrections facilities by developing training programs as well as cultural and entertainment opportunities. Many programs have been developed in response to request from business. Examples include the EWC Mobile Welding Lab and the soon to be deployed Weatherization Mobile Lab which travel across the region to bring instructors and classroom equipment to a variety of locations. Opportunities and Challenges Continue the work on completion of First Year Experience recommendations and action plans. Work closely with the Department of Corrections and develop additional opportunities for collaborative education and training. Address funding issues and market the College as an important component of the community college framework in Wyoming and, as such, one that needs to receive fair and equitable funding from the legislature and appropriate allocations through the Wyoming Community College Commission. Criterion 5: Core Component 5b Eastern Wyoming College has the capacity and the commitment to engage with its identified constituencies and communities. EWC serves a variety of internal and external constituencies. Internally, the student body mainly consists of traditional-aged students and adults while external constituents include parents of the traditionalaged students, alumni, and organizations that collaborate with the Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s curricular, co-curricular, and extra-curricular initiatives. The Board of Trustees, faculty, administration, and staff represent EWC in relationships with these constituencies. For 63 years, EWC has had a strong partnership with the community to meet their exciting and ambitious aspirations enabling the College to improve the lives of those constituents which the institution serves. The success of an institution depends on the effectiveness with which it meets the needs and expectations of its constituencies. Increased emphasis has been placed on assessment and collaborative programming that will help the College increase engagement with constituents by engaging students, faculty, and staff in the 133


Eastern Wyoming College educational experience. The constituents of the College are encouraged to help identify needs, determine whether the needs help EWC achieve its mission, and assess its capacity to fulfill those needs. Eastern Wyoming College offers concerts, theatrical performances, art exhibits, and athletic events open to the community. Each year invited guests are asked to sponsor dialogues and discussions among the campus and community constituents. EWC also seeks to meet the needs of the community by making its facilities available for use. The College sponsors several community groups, provides technical assistance as needed, and provides other forms of support. Eastern Wyoming College engages with the community in a variety of ways including:

• Regional high schools--EWC participates in high school career fairs to provide post-secondary information to high school students, parents, and counselors. • Wyoming Academic Challenge • Regional High School Math Contest • Employee representation in several civic organizations • Business Community--County Fair, State Fair, Tech Day, Job Expo • Community Education—Classes, Activities, Trips, Events • Department of Corrections—temporary office space, Fall 2009

Evidence of Commitment to Engage with Constituencies and Communities Creating innovative and collaborative partnerships with cultural, educational, and governmental agencies help to serve constituents and fulfill EWC’s mission. EWC recognizes these positive working relationships as a vital role to help strengthen community development, economic vitality and individual growth. To support this engagement with the community, EWC has partnerships with several community organizations. Partnerships with the Community are demonstrated in a variety of ways. Eastern Wyoming College provides customized credit and non-credit training for local businesses through workforce development. The Wyoming Distance Education Consortium (WyDEC) is a group of distance learning representatives from the seven Wyoming community colleges, the University of Wyoming, and the Wyoming Community College Commission who collaborate to provide a common web site that lists all of the distance education courses available in Wyoming. EWC and Department of Workforce Services have formed a workforce alliance in Goshen County that includes many community partners from agencies and businesses. Monthly meetings are held to discuss workforce issues. In partnership with Goshen County Economic Development, St. Joseph’s Children’s Home, Care and Share, and Goshen County School District, a TANF grant (Temporary Assistance to Needy Families) was received to help with the educational costs for welders, nursing assistants, and other certificate programs. EWC has partnered with Department of Labor on several grant initiatives, delivered classes on Department of Correction sites, provided course work for prison employees, hosted job fairs, informational sessions, meetings, and temporary office space for Department of Correction employees. Through the Wyoming Postsecondary Education Options Program, 13 school districts have agreements with EWC to enhance learning opportunities for qualified high school juniors and seniors by offering concurrent enrollment courses in the high schools. The high schools in the EWC service area include Torrington, Southeast, Lingle-Fort Laramie, Douglas, Wheatland, Guernsey, Glenrock, Lusk, Newcastle, Moorcroft, Upton, Sundance, Chugwater, Glendo, and Hulett. EWC provided 194 courses within these 15 high schools. EWC has Eastern Wyoming Board of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES) agreements with seven school districts in the six-county service area. The purpose is 134


Eastern Wyoming College to provide communities with additional opportunities for educational services including post-secondary education and adult education. The emphasis on community enrichment activities for rural communities resulted in a non-credit headcount of 4,014 for this year. Concurrent enrollment costs such as textbooks are also a benefit of this partnership. The University of Wyoming Eastern Regional Outreach office is located on the EWC Torrington campus, as well as the use of facilities at EWC’s 12 outreach sites. The university offers 9 bachelor’s degrees, 1 minor, 11 master’s degrees, 4 endorsement programs, and 5 certificate programs supported by the U.W. Eastern Regional Outreach office. Facilities and equipment are shared. There are graduate students and undergraduate students taking university classes within the EWC service area under this arrangement. Building Partnerships is a statewide non-credit community education group that was developed in 2008 to share information and partner as appropriate. A formal Memorandum of Understanding exists between the local Department of Workforce Service office and EWC to allow a mutual exchange of client information. The organization’s co-curricular activities engage students, staff, administrators, and faculty with external communities. Participation in volunteer service projects, internships, community groups, and other co-curricular activities adds a valuable dimension to the community. Making a commitment to participate develops a personal experience within the community. EWC encourages staff and students to become involved in these learning opportunities to become an active member in the community.

Figure 13: Student Volunteers

Volunteerism is evident among employees and students. Examples include: • Employees: Fire Department, Rotary, Kiwanis, PCPC (Prison), Blood Drives, Health Fairs, Fine Arts Council, Humanities Council, Chamber of Commerce, Dad for a day, Muffins for Moms, College Bowl • Students: Dog Wash, Can Drive, Operation Christmas Child, Santa’s Workshop, Halloween Party, junior basketball and volleyball camps, highway clean-ups. Student service professionals sponsor Project Stay which is a presentation for students who are feeling stressed by external factors currently impinging upon their academic student status. Students who are on academic probation are invited to attend.

Additional support group workshops have included topics such as Depression and Fatigue: Road to a Healthier/Happier Life, How to Form a Study Group, Preparing for Exams and Test Taking Strategies, The Challenges of Age Differences, and Financial Aid Opportunities. Campus Ministries (provided by local churches) offer dorm dinners, Bible study, picnics, activities, recreation, and support for EWC students. There are several organizations for students to engage in including the Adult Student Peer Counselors, which though available to all students is especially attuned to the needs of returning adult students who often times face multiple responsibilities, roles, and special needs. Other community engagement activities include working with the Wyoming Youth ChalleNGe program affiliated with the National Guard Camp in Guernsey to assist with planning for college. The capital letters in the word ChalleNGe are purposeful signifying National Guard involvement. This program targets 1618 year olds who have dropped out of high school. College Goal Sunday is held a Sunday in February and encourages high school seniors and their parents to come to the college and fill out financial aid forms and 135


Eastern Wyoming College visit with financial aid experts about paying for college. Another event was the Water and Sustainability Symposium which helped raise awareness about natural resources. Eastern Wyoming College has a Fine Arts Council which represents a cross section of the community and Goshen county members volunteering their time to offer wisdom, work, and wealth for fine art offerings throughout the year. This group brings in four to six performances each year and ensures that the offerings are varied. Invitations are extended to the Goshen County public schools to participate in artist workshops or performances. In a similar vein, the Goshen Community Theatre group provides opportunities for EWC students and staff to collaborate with community members in producing several theatrical performances each year. Community theatre performances involve artists and volunteers, including students and staff members. EWC’s educational programs connect with external communities. In the area of Community Outreach, the Adult Basic Education program offers ABE, ESL, GED and citizenship courses along with Work Keys—a workplace competency credential. At the Douglas Branch Campus, EWC hosts a chapter of Pro-Literacy of America which provides literacy services to Douglas community members. The Even Start program (benefitting parents with children) is affiliated with EWC’s Adult Basic Education program and serves a similar function. The annual Adelante Niños program served to familiarize elementary school students with college life and encourages students to think about college. Community education courses are provided in Torrington and at all of the outreach centers. All of these programming efforts help EWC connect with its external constituents. Student Services and educational partnerships include several notable initiatives:

• GEAR UP: (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) is a partnership with the University of Wyoming, the 7 community colleges and local school districts. The program focuses on students from low-income schools to help build an education pipeline for students to realize their college dreams. The EWC GEAR UP program services 6 counties: Goshen, Platte, Niobrara, Converse, Weston and Crook counties.

• Practicum Sites for Veterinary Technology: The Veterinary Technology Program worked with more than 20 veterinary practices to provide practicum sites for veterinary technology students.

• Intern Sites for Criminal Justice: The Criminal Justice Program worked with 2 law enforcement agencies to provide practicum sites for criminal justice students.

• Practicum Sites for Education: The Education Program worked with 3 schools in Torrington and schools in Newcastle, Douglas, Guernsey, Wheatland, Rawlins, and Sheridan to provide practicum sites for education majors.

• Practicum Sites for Early Childhood Education: The Early Childhood Education Program worked with childcare centers in Cheyenne, Rawlins, Newcastle, Douglas, Laramie, Torrington, and Upton to provide practicum sites for Early Childhood Education majors.

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• Intern Sites for Computer Networking: The Computer Networking Program worked with 6 Torrington community businesses for practicum sites for program majors.

• Intern Sites for Business: The Business Office Technology Program and Business Administration Program work with Torrington community businesses to provide practicum sites for program majors. Businesses in Douglas and Newcastle also provide practicum sites. Twelve sites were used this year.

The organization’s resources – physical, financial, and human – support effective programs of engagement and service which are demonstrated in numerous ways. The community frequently uses EWC’s facilities such as for sporting events, local organizations and club meetings and gatherings, and community meetings. The classrooms are available to the school district for in-service or other meetings, state government agencies, and local organizations and clubs. The Fine Arts Auditorium is used by the Fine Arts Council for events, the hosting of local and regional high school events such as music festivals, and for various governmental agency meetings and conferences. The Fine Arts Council programs averaged 300 attendees per event per year. The College recently hosted a state convention for 180 individuals and has hosted the Wyoming Association for Career and Technical Education conference. The Community Training Center is used extensively by local businesses and industries for various customized trainings and meetings. It is also used by the school district, governmental agencies, and local organizations and clubs for meetings and trainings. The Institutional Development Office works toward developing effective alumni connections. It honors one outstanding alumnus each year as a featured speaker at commencement. The College enjoys great community support for its intercollegiate athletics which include men’s and women’s basketball, volleyball, rodeo, and golf. The basketball games have a net attendance of 1,800 to 2,500 per year, whereas volleyball games net 800 to 1,000 per year. The annual spring rodeo brings in 2,400 spectators. The EWC Lancer Club is a sports booster club which promotes participation in and support for EWC athletics. Other recreational services and programs include various basketball camps, volleyball camps, Junior League basketball, and Junior League volleyball. Intramural activities include basketball, bowling, racquetball, softball, volleyball, and wallyball. The College’s Fitness Center also serves community needs by a partnership with the Senior Friendship Center to promote senior fitness, Silver Sneakers aerobic class for seniors, and many other community patrons. The Fitness Center averages 250 community members per year in addition to the regular EWC students and staff members. EWC provides a venue for the Wyoming Health Fair to administer health screening for EWC employees, student, family members, and community members. Strengths The College provides a wide variety of community activities that benefit all constituencies. EWC has numerous strong academic, business, and community partnerships. 137


Eastern Wyoming College Opportunities and Challenges Explore other activities and partnerships it can provide or participate in throughout the entire service area. Criterion 5: Core Component 5c Eastern Wyoming College demonstrates its responsiveness to those constituencies that depend on it for service. Eastern Wyoming College accepts and recognizes the responsibility for its constituencies as this responsibility drives the Mission Statement, the Vision Statement, and the Strategic Plan. In particular the Strategic Directions #2 and #4 pertain to this criterion. Strategic Direction #2 – “Promote high quality, accessible learning experiences through responsive programs of distinction aligned with current and future opportunities” and Strategic Direction #4 – “Enhance the quality of the life of individuals, families, the community and region, and positively influence the economy.” Throughout the past ten years and the evolution of culture, community, economics and educational strategies, EWC has continued to grow and meet the evolving needs of the students and the communities which it serves. EWC provides open access for all Wyoming High School graduates and will “admit any high school graduate or anyone who, in the judgment of the College, will benefit from one of its programs” (2009 College Catalog, p. 19). This policy encourages access for all to higher education. Students More specifically, EWC student constituency can be defined as: students on-campus studying for transfer or career degrees; and students in the service area studying for transfer or career degrees via various outreach/ distance education delivery platforms. Additional constituencies include: EWC’s local community defined as Goshen County citizens and all of the EWC outreach service area counties as well as businesses and industries in the EWC service areas which require and request workforce development. The Fall 2009 EWC student body consisted of 64.5 percent traditional-aged students, students under the age of 25 (42.5 percent male and 57.5 percent female), and 35.5 percent non-traditional students, students over age 25 (33.7 percent male and 66.3 percent female). Students come to Eastern Wyoming College with extremely diverse academic preparation backgrounds as illustrated by the fact that for the Fall 2009 semester, of students enrolled with a minimum of 6 credit hours and who were degree seeking, 70 percent tested into a developmental course (information from SSS grant research). Regardless of the academic preparedness of the students, EWC reaches out, meets the students where they are, takes their hands, and escorts them along the pathway to the accomplishment of their goals. Every attempt is made to ensure the success of these underprepared ‘at-risk’ students. Students not having an ACT score of 18 in English and a 21 in Mathematics are required to complete the COMPASS assessment tests. COMPASS assessment scores are used by academic advisors to insure the proper placement of students in classes. EWC advising practices require student placement in classes based on scores from the COMPASS assessment. Developmental classes are offered in reading, writing, and 138


Eastern Wyoming College mathematics both on campus and at four of the Outreach Centers. During summer registration, students identified either by ACT or COMPASS scores as at-risk students are invited to participate in the summer Bridge Program. The Bridge Program, initiated Summer 2008, gives freshman students intense refresher courses. The Bridge Program is offered the week prior to the beginning of classes and the courses are taught by College instructors. Participants are being tracked to determine the effectiveness of the program. On-campus students have access to the Learning Skills Lab for assistance in spelling, writing, and mathematics, as well as, free tutoring for specific classes with peer tutors providing the tutoring. Oncampus, outreach, and distance students all have access to SmartThinking an online tutorial program. Eastern Wyoming College’s Counseling and Disability Services offers reasonable accommodations to students with documented learning disabilities. The rights of students with disabilities attending EWC are protected under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008. EWC has strong partnerships with all Goshen County High Schools and all high schools in its outreach area to provide a seamless transition for students with disabilities from high school to college. All of these activities demonstrate how EWC addresses Strategic Direction #2. Providing Access In order to meet the needs of service area students and site bound students, distance education classes for EWC are offered through a variety of venues including, on site classes for EWC’s Outreach Centers, compressed video format, and online/internet classes. Due to the assessed need in the Douglas branch campus, a science teacher was added on site in 2008. Online class offerings have increased and compressed video class offerings have also increased. However, the frequency of the compressed video classes being offered is limited. Outreach students generated 37.1 percent of EWC’s total FTE count Fall 2009 (2009 Fall Enrollment Report). Telecourses have a documented start in 1998 and the first online class was offered in 1999. EWC offered 42 distance education classes in Fall 2009 and 58 distance education classes in Spring 2010. With the growth of online course offerings, EWC is able to offer four Associate Degrees online including an AA in Interdisciplinary Studies, an AS in Interdisciplinary Studies, an AA in Criminal Justice, and an AAS in Business Administration. These online degree programs were approved by The Higher Learning Commission on October 10, 2005, effective October 21, 2005. While EWC exists as a ‘dynamic center for education’ (Vision Statement), the College is well aware that education involves the whole person. Consequently, social and cultural activities are offered to the various demographic parts of the student body population. Some students may be interested or assisted by such activities as Project Stay, Managing Home, Family and Studies, and Santa’s Workshop while other students may be more interested in such activities as, Women’s Volleyball, Men’s Basketball, Men’s and Women’s Rodeo, and Golf. In recent years, the College has added the following activities: Debate/Forensics (2006), Livestock Judging Team (2006), and Women’s Basketball (2006). Clubs, under the auspices of Student Senate, are funded by the allocation of student fees by the Student Senate and sponsored by faculty members. Active clubs are driven by student interest on campus. In Fall 2009, a Shooting Sports Club was formed as students showed an interest in the activity. Clubs recognized by Student Senate include: Adult Peer Counselors, Ambassadors, Art Club, Biology Club, Block and Bridle Club, Cosmetology Club, Criminal Justice Club, Creative Writing, Debate, Gear-Up, Housing Council, International Horse Showing Association, Journalism Club, Livestock Judging Team, Non-Traditional Student Organization, Phi Theta Kappa, Rodeo Club, Shooting Sports Club, Skills USA, Spirit Club, Student Senate, and Vet-Tech Club. 139


Eastern Wyoming College Extracurricular and club activities are also part of the educational experience and are open to all students with some targeted interest or discipline-specific areas. The successful graduating student at EWC usually does one of two things: 1) transfers to another institution; or 2) goes to work in the chosen field. The graduating student may transfer to another institution with ease due to block transfer agreements, development of course transfer guides, and annual statewide articulation meetings. Block transfer agreements are in place for the following institutions: University of Wyoming; Chadron State College; Black Hills State University; South Dakota School of Mines; Valley City State College; University of Great Falls, and Regis. EWC graduates choosing to attend the University of Wyoming are among the most successful community college transfers as evidenced by the transfer student data provided by the University of Wyoming each fall semester. EWC graduates do as well or better than native UW students in most instances. Chadron State College receives a number of EWC graduates often in the education or criminal justice fields. Academic Partnerships Eastern Wyoming College is aware of its location in the least populous state and the need to provide a wide range of educational services to six counties, 13 outreach sites including the Douglas Branch campus, and the main campus in Torrington. The residents depend on Eastern Wyoming College to truly be a hub of educational activity for their community and community surveys often note that the College is one of the primary strengths or assets of the community it serves.

Figure 14: University of Wyoming Outreach Eastern Wyoming College Campus Academic partnerships are integral to the way that Eastern Wyoming College responds to its constituencies. For example, the partnership with the University of Wyoming results in a University of Wyoming regional center on the EWC Torrington campus, as well as use of facilities at EWCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 12 outreach sites. Facilities and equipment are shared. There are undergraduate and graduate students taking university classes within the EWC service area under this arrangement. Through the Wyoming Postsecondary Education Options Program, thirteen school districts have agreements with Eastern Wyoming College to enhance learning opportunities for qualified juniors and seniors by offering concurrent enrollment courses in the high schools. Mentioned earlier in the self-study is a reference to other partnerships including Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) and Adult Basic Education programs. These two programs have formed partnerships with all of the public schools throughout the service area. Eastern Wyoming College was awarded Outstanding Center, Outstanding ABE/GED Student, Outstanding Special Program Effort, and Outstanding Local Director at the Fall 2007 statewide Adult Basic Education Conference held in Cheyenne. The Wyoming Distance Education Consortium (WyDEC) is a group of distance learning representatives from the seven Wyoming community colleges, the University of Wyoming, and the Wyoming Community College Commission who collaborate to provide a common web site that lists all of the distance education courses available in Wyoming. 140


Eastern Wyoming College Workforce Development provides customized credit and non-credit training for local and regional businesses. These efforts contain several key partnerships such as the one with the Department of Workforce Services which provides a grant program, Employment and Training for Self Sufficiency (ETSS), whose goal it is to serve poverty-level parents to become self sufficient by providing employment training through career technical education programs and training at Eastern Wyoming College so the participants may successfully enter the workforce. Eastern Wyoming College’s Workforce Development partnered with the Department of Corrections to deliver a shielded metal arc welding course (WELD 1755) to prisoners incarcerated at the Newcastle Honor Camp using the Mobile Welding Lab. The students were selected based on factors such as pending release dates, ability and interest to be successful, and career interests. In Fall 2010, the College partnered with the Department of Corrections to provide a training site for DOC employees, office space for DOC employees and classes for DOC employees. Serving Diverse Communities The organization’s programs of engagement give evidence of building effective bridges among diverse communities. For example, the “Adelante Niños – The I’m Going to College” Conference seeks to familiarize elementary school students with college life. The program also introduces a philosophy of “expected attendance” into the early school careers of children under-represented in higher education across the nation. In addition, parents are provided information on how to be effective partners in their children’s success. Through the Adult Peer Student Counseling Program, several student service programs for special populations are provided for all interested persons: Classroom Expectations, Improving Test Scores and Making the Grade; Managing Home, Family, and Studies – Returning Adult Students Share Their Experiences; Project Stay, Organizing Study Groups, Living and Learning – A Monthly Support Group; Halloween “Trick or Treat” in the EWC Residence Halls; Santa’s Workshop. On October 8, 2009, Eastern Wyoming College in cooperation with the Wyoming Council for Women’s Issues hosted the Nontraditional Career Fair 2009 for 280 Wyoming and Nebraska high school girls and their sponsors. Students learned about an ever-changing job market, new professions, career options, salaries, benefit packages, and future employment outlook for different careers. Eastern Wyoming College presents First Generation College Student Awards. This Eastern Wyoming College Board of Trustees Award is designed to increase access to higher education for first generation students. The College submitted a TRiO grant for Student Support Services in 2010, but has not been awarded yet. This will represent the first time the College has received such a grant award. The Eastern Wyoming College Veterans certifying official works with the Department of Veterans Affairs to facilitate educational opportunities for eligible veterans. High School Activities Technology Day is hosted by the Eastern Wyoming College Recruiters for high school students to participate in hands-on learning activities at Eastern Wyoming College. The Fall 2009 Technology Day was attended by 149 students from 24 high schools. The students were involved with learning activities sponsored by the following departments: Criminal Justice, Cosmetology, Agriculture, Welding, Veterinary Technology, Construction Technology, and Computer Science. 141


Eastern Wyoming College Wyoming high schools partner with Eastern Wyoming College to host a yearly Academic Challenge. The purpose of the Academic Challenge is to provide a knowledge bowl for Wyoming high school students to compete against each other in various academic areas. These examples illustrate the College’s commitment to a high level of responsiveness in its interactions both within the college and with the community it serves. Contracts The College enters into multiple contracts as it serves its constituencies. A few of the services are utilized in the Learning Skills Lab and through the Adult Basic Education Program. An example is the PLATO Instructional Software agreement. This contractual arrangement allows Eastern Wyoming College to help students improve their scores on the GED, COMPASS, ACT, WORKKEYS, and in other academic areas. Another is the KeyTrain Instructional Software which assists students who want to be successful on the WorkKeys exams which qualify them for the Wyoming Career Readiness Certificate. SmarThinking provides online tutoring, writing services, and homework help that assists students in achieving academic success. Business and Industry In response to community and industry needs, many Workforce Development programs are offered by the College. The Workforce Development office was launched in 2006 with the objective of working with employers to assist them in better preparing their employees for specific jobs. Initially, the office provided workshop trainings such as CPR/First Aid as requested by Diversified Services Incorporated. Today, the office has evolved into more intense job related and specific training with the potential for the students to earn certificates. While working collaboratively with the academic divisions, the following programs have been developed to date: Certificate of Machine Tooling, requested by the power industry, the coal mining industry, and the UP and BNSF railroads; Beef Production Certificate as recommended by the Agriculture Advisory Committee; Construction Technology Certificate initiated in August of 2007; Hair Technology Certificate initiated in July of 2006; Certified Nursing Assistant Certificate initiated in August 2005; Early Childhood Certificate, requested by local community members to fill need for day care and head start personnel; Commercial Driver’s License Certificate initiated in Summer 2009; Massage Therapy Certificate initiated in Fall 2010; Weatherization Technician Certificates initiated in Fall 2010; and Computer Applications Certificate initiated in Fall 2010. A proposed Licensed Practical Nurse Certificate, requested by the community of Douglas, WY is being explored. During the decision-making process of where to locate the Wyoming Medium Correctional Institution in the state, the College played a key role in providing information and participating on committees. These activities contributed to the overall community effort to have the prison located in Goshen County. Community Additionally, the College supports a Community Education office that takes to heart the fact that EWC is indeed a “community college.” The office provides a variety of non-credit educational offerings brought forth from the community. The office publishes three brochures (Fall, Spring, and Summer) each year with listings of all the current offerings. Samples of these brochures are available for viewing in the resource room. Community Education offerings have also increased throughout the service area. 142


Eastern Wyoming College The community of Torrington has developed an intense interest in the area of performing arts. The Goshen Community Theatre (GCT) was organized in 2002 when EWC was approached by local citizens who recognized a void in Goshen County regarding the performing arts and desired to fill that void. EWC has a MOU agreement signed each summer with the citizen organization that allows GCT to utilize EWC facilities. The GCT has allowed many students and community residents alike the opportunity to participate in various aspects of play production from scene building to lighting, to directing, to actual performing. Facilities No entity can serve its constituencies without buildings and facilities. The College strives to provide students and its communities with updated and current facilities for residency, learning activities, workforce development, political forums, irrigation district meetings, state insurance meetings, state Health Fairs, DOC fitness testing, and DOC organizing and planning. The Student Center was remodeled in 2009 and a new state of the art residence hall (Lancer Hall) was dedicated in Fall 2007. Eastern Hall has also been remodeled and air conditioned. EWC anticipated a “housing crunch” in Fall 2009 as Torrington prepared for the opening of a medium security prison. With this in mind, EWC leased housing from St. Joseph’s Children’s Home to insure students would have residency facilities. Recognizing the exponential growth of computer usage and the need for additional availability of computers, revisions were made in the computer labs, with fourteen computers placed in the library and eight more placed in the Student Center in Spring 2007. The college facilities are used on a regular basis by groups and members of the communities it serves. Through all these efforts, EWC demonstrates its responsiveness to its constituents. Strengths The College is responsive to community needs, student needs, and business and industry needs. The College serves as a pillar and is recognized as a strength in the community providing a focal point for community events. Opportunities and Challenges Review and study how the College attempts to respond to many community requests while considering the resources and staffing that are available. Criterion 5: Core Component 5d Internal and external constituencies value the services Eastern Wyoming College provides. External constituencies provide evidence that they value services provided by EWC by their participation. According to the Workforce Development Director, EWC has had 134 trainings with 1,688 people in attendance which led to 306 credit hours taken by those participating through workforce development activities during the past year. The Workforce Development office staff members are very visible and active in the community and at state-level meetings and conferences. Community and business leaders frequently 143


Eastern Wyoming College call to request specialized or customized training for their employees. A recent example was the OSHA safety training delivered to the county and city employees. EWC offers a wide range of service programs that are well received by the community and outreach areas. Most of these have already been discussed, but include community education classes, fine arts events, GEAR UP activities, and Adult Basic Education services. Special programming includes specially developed seminars such as Project Stay and Public Policy & You. Numerous other activities include things such as food drives, dog walks, and volunteer highway cleanup. EWC provides its facilities to many community organizations. Some examples are Goshen Community Theatre, Wyoming Arts Alliance, Law School Admissions Exam, Relay for Life, and the National Guard. The coordination of such activities is organized through the EWC information center. Many organizations have used the facilities on more than one occasion. Community members attend the events, use the facilities, and support the college in multiple ways. The Fitness Center and racquetball courts are open to the public, and community members walk the hallways during the winter for exercise. Evaluation of services includes community education evaluations, informal feedback from patrons, and Fine Arts surveys from patrons. Informal feedback is probably the most common as community members will call the appropriate office to register any concerns or other issues that they may have with events or activities at the college. Figure 15: Governor Freudenthal and Leland Vetter, EWC Welding Instructor

Community Testimony Community leaders testify to the usefulness of EWC’s programs of engagement. After touring the EWC mobile welding lab, Governor Dave Freudenthal was quoted in a February 2009 press release as saying, “This is exactly the kind of responsiveness we’ve hoped for from the state’s community colleges. These institutions are uniquely suited to efforts like this one that work with industry and enable students to gain the skills they need to stay in Wyoming and contribute to the state’s economy.” The Northeast Veterinary Technician Educators Association Regional Conference was held at Eastern Wyoming College on July 20-21, 2002. Partnering organizations for the conference included Nestle Purina and the Wyoming Vet Tech Association (WYCTA). The focus of the conference was current and future trends in Veterinary Technology. A Certificate of Appreciation from Converse County School District #1, Douglas, WY was awarded to a faculty member in recognition of valuable contribution to the ninth annual Wyoming Health Occupations Care Fair 2006. A Torrington family, in appreciation for the surgery and care of their Labrador dog, sent a gift and letter of appreciation to the EWC Vet Tech Program. In a February 5, 2010 interview with an EWC Welding and Joining Technology instructor, it was noted that “Wyoming Machinery in Casper, Western Mine Service in Gillette, and Egging Company in Gurley, NE 144


Eastern Wyoming College all keep returning to the Eastern Wyoming College Welding and Joining Technology program for training, certification, updates, and to hire program completers.” Banner Health’s Chief Executive Officer and the Personnel Director of Community Hospital in Torrington, Wyoming attest to the effectiveness of EWC’s Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) certificate program. EWC is the main provider to Community Hospital’s CNA positions, and they are very pleased with the level of skill and experience that EWC graduates bring to this local hospital. Strengths EWC provides workforce and community education services to its constituents that are valued and requested. The College has a good reputation for its responsiveness to constituents. Opportunities and Challenges Explore ways to maintain its quality services to constituents while working with budget constraints.

Summary of Criterion Five The College meets all of the components of Criterion Five. The constituents value and participate in the activities and training provided by the College. Chapter Summary of Strengths, Opportunities, and Challenges Strengths 5.1

The College addresses the needs of businesses, individuals, outreach sites, and its three Department of Corrections facilities by developing training programs.

Cultural and entertainment opportunities are provided for community members.

5.2

5.3

Many programs have been developed in response to request from business. One example is the EWC Mobile Welding Lab which is scheduled across the region to bring instructors and classroom equipment to a variety of locations.

5.4

The College provides a wide variety of community activities that benefit all constituencies.

EWC has numerous academic and community partnerships.

5.5

5.6

The College is responsive to community needs, student needs, and business and industry needs.

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Eastern Wyoming College 5.7

The College is recognized as a strength in the community providing a focal point for community events.

5.8

EWC provides workforce and community education services to its constituents that are valued and requested.

The College has a good reputation for its responsiveness to constituents.

5.9

Opportunities and Challenges 5.1

Continue to work on completion of First Year Experience recommendations and strategic action plans.

5.2

Collaborate closely with the Department of Corrections for additional education and training opportunities.

5.3

Address funding issues and market the College as an important component of the community college framework in Wyoming and, as such, one that needs to receive fair and equitable funding from the legislature and appropriate allocations through the Wyoming Community College Commission.

5.4

Explore other activities and partnerships the College can provide throughout the entire service area.

5.5

Review and study how the College attempts to respond to many community requests while considering the resources and staffing that are available.

5.6 â&#x20AC;&#x192;

Explore ways to maintain its quality services to constituents while working with budget constraints.

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Eastern Wyoming College

Chapter 8 Federal Compliance Eastern Wyoming College meets the requirements outlined in the Commission’s Chapter 8 – Federal Compliance Program. Evidence demonstrating this compliance is outlined in the following paragraphs. Credits, Program Length, and Tuition Eastern Wyoming College credits are calculated in semester hours with each hour consisting of 50 minutes. A credit hour comprises work through one semester. EWC’s academic calendar consists of a fall semester and a spring semester, both of which are comprised of 15 weeks of instruction and one week of final examinations, and a summer semester. In 2010, the summer semester had three (3) sessions; one which was sixteen (16) weeks in length and, imbedded within it were two eight (8) week sessions. The College also offers hybrid classes (some face-to-face contact and some online), online classes, and compressed video classes. Credit for lecture classes is based on the number of 50 minute sessions the class meets each week. For example, a class that meets for three lecture hours a week for 15 weeks equates to three (3) hours of credit. If a lab session is required along with the lecture section, the credit for the lab is added to the credit granted for the lecture session. For example, Chemistry (CHEM) 1020 is offered for 4 credit hours. Three hours are lecture hours and one hour is for the lab. Lab hours are usually figured on a ratio of 2 contact hours of lab equals 1 semester hour of credit. All seven Wyoming community colleges along with the University of Wyoming use a common course prefix and numbering system which provides a degree of uniformity within the public colleges in Wyoming and helps ease the transfer of course credit between institutions in the state. Eastern Wyoming College offers the following degrees for study: Associate of Arts (minimum of 64 credit hours); Associate of Science (minimum of 64 credit hours); Associate of Applied Science (minimum of 62 credit hours); and varying length Certificate programs. Students studying for an Associate of Arts or Science degree must complete 31 credit hours of general transfer credit. Specific program information is located on the EWC web site and in the College Catalog. Tuition rates are determined annually by the Wyoming Community College Commission and are consistent among all of the Wyoming community colleges. Fees are determined by the EWC Board of Trustees and are printed in the EWC Catalog and online at <www.ewy.wy.edu> as are the tuition and fees for In-State, Out-of-State and those students attending from W.U.E. (Western Undergraduate Exchange) states. W.U.E. students pay 1 ½ times the resident tuition rate. Other groups receiving tuition waivers (per Board of Trustees Policy) include: Wyoming residents 60 years or older (see 2010 EWC Catalog, p. 171); employees (with some restrictions) (Administrative Rule 3.8.3); employee immediate family members (1/2 of tuition rate) (Administrative Rule 3.8.3); and EWC emeritus or honored retiree status (with some restrictions) (Administrative Rule 3.4.1). EWC offers classes to high school students in its service area via concurrent and dual enrollment under separate agreements with each school district (see 2010 EWC Catalog, p. 171, and Board Policy 5.12 High School Student Tuition). Activity and use fees are consistent for EWC students with $16 per credit hour being charged to each student attending class on-campus (Torrington) and $8 per credit hour charged for classes offered at the 147


Eastern Wyoming College Douglas Branch Campus and at any of the outreach sites. Activity and use fees are capped at 16 hours per semester. Students taking more than 16 credit hours in a semester pay fees on the first 16 hours in which they are enrolled. Additional course fees are charged for certain classes that, by their nature, incur extra cost to the institution (e.g. specialized welding materials). Tuition and fee information can also be found on the College Cost Sheet disseminated by Eastern Wyoming College. Transfer Policies The 2010 EWC College Catalog (pp. 173 – 174, Transferring) identifies three universities that offer opportunities for students to complete a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree, once they have completed their Associate’s degree with EWC, and remain in their home community. These institutions are: University of Wyoming; University of Great Falls; and Upper Iowa University. The catalog identifies other colleges/ universities that regularly accept EWC credits and degrees. With regards to the acceptance of transfer credit, the EWC Catalog (see p. 22, Military Credit) states that it uses the American Council on Education’s Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Forces in evaluation of military credit. The College’s catalog (see p. 42) states that “Actual acceptance of transfer credit is dependent on the curriculum pursued by the student. No transfer hours will be recorded until the student has enrolled and completed at least one credit course through Eastern Wyoming College.” Additional transfer policies are found in the Admissions section of the EWC Catalog (see p. 21, Transfer Applicants Who Have Not Previously Attended Eastern Wyoming College). Verification of Student Identity Eastern Wyoming College offers several online and blended courses. Course information, for the student, can only be accessed through use of a login and a password. Some instructors require that tests be proctored and the student’s identity verified by presenting a photo ID at the time of the test. The student then accesses the test using a password the College has forwarded to the proctor. Organizational Compliance with the Higher Education Reauthorization Act Eastern Wyoming College complies with the requirements of the Higher Education Act Reauthorization Act (Title IV) as amended in 1998 and reauthorized in 2008. The default rates for the last three years available are outlined in the following table taken from the U.S. Department of Education web site <http:// wdcrobcolp01.ed.gov/CFAPPS/COHORT/cohortdata.cfm>. Eastern Wyoming College has never been the subject of an investigation for its default rate.

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Eastern Wyoming College

OPE ID

Table 31 Eastern Wyoming College Default Rates 2005-2007 School Type Control PRGMS Default Rate

003929

Eastern Wyoming College 3200 West C Street Torrington WY 82240-1603

Associate’s Public Degree

Both (FFEL/ FDL)

FY 2007 8.4%

FY FY 2006 2005 10.1%

9.7%

No. in Default

12

16

15

No. in Repay

142

158

154

The Eastern Wyoming College Program Participation Agreement (PPA) expires on March 31, 2015. The EWC Eligibility and Certification Renewal (ECAR) also expires on March 31, 2015. These agreements allow EWC to receive federal funds for student aid programs. It also ensures that the programs EWC offers meet contact hours and program length as well as assurance of the quality of the programs. The Program Participation Agreement and Eligibility and Certification Renewal are stored in the EWC Financial Aid Office and are available in the resource room. EWC has not received any visits from a federal program review team or notification of any limitations, suspensions, or termination proceedings. Annual Financial Aid Audits EWC conducts an annual compliance audit in late May or early June to cover all Title IV transactions that have occurred during each fiscal year. The College falls under the Single Audit Act in accordance with the Office of Management and Budget Circular A-133. The audit is conducted by an independent CPA firm and the results are submitted to the U.S. Department of Education, Wyoming Department of Education, Wyoming Community College Commission, and Wyoming Department of Audit. The audit report, covering the period July 1, 2007 – June 30, 2008, advised EWC to provide a corrective action plan related to the administration of the Title IV, 34 CFR & 668.22(j), Return of Title IV Funds. The audit stated two findings: 1) Federal student loan and Pell Grant funds were not returned within the required 45 days (Return of Title IV Funds and Return of Loan Funds); and 2) Student status changes were incorrectly reported to the National Clearinghouse (NSLDS) (Reporting Student Status Changes). A corrective action plan was submitted to the U.S. Department of Education in October, 2008. In addition to the corrective action plan, the EWC Financial Aid Director reviewed the student files and completed the appropriate corrections in February, 2009. The audit report, covering the period July1, 2008 – June 30, 2009, advised EWC to provide a corrective action plan related to the administration of the Title IV, 34 CFR & 668.22(j), Return of Title IV Funds. The audit stated three findings: 1) Federal student loan and Pell Grant funds were not returned within the required 45 days (Return of Title IV Funds Paid Late); 2) Student status changes were incorrectly reported to the National Clearinghouse (NSLDS) (Inaccurate Reporting of Borrower’s Enrollment Status to the NSLDS); and 3) The institution failed to exclude the number of days in scheduled break for the total calendar days in the semester (Incorrect Return of Title IV Funds Calculations). 149


Eastern Wyoming College The EWC Financial Aid Director reviewed the student files and completed the appropriate corrections in June, 2009 and a corrective action plan was submitted to the U.S. Department of Education in October, 2009. It should be noted that all three findings were for very small amounts totaling less than $100. As a result of the findings during the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 annual audits, the U.S. Department of Education conducted an additional file review in March and April, 2010 on the Return of Title IV findings and change in enrollment status. The audit resolution process is underway and the final report was submitted on April 24, 2010. Upon receipt of the file review, the Department will make a final audit determination. Financial Aid Counseling / Standards of Satisfactory Progress All of the EWC Financial Aid Office staff are available to help individuals navigate the financial and scholarship application process. Walk-in, telephone, and electronic communication is available. In accordance with the 1986 amendments to student aid programs under Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965, students receiving federal assistance (i.e. Pell Grants, Direct Loans, Federal Work-Study, etc.) must meet and maintain qualitative and quantitative academic and satisfactory progress standards to remain eligible to receive such assistance each term. The EWC Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy, found in the EWC Catalog (see pp. 31 – 33, Satisfactory Progress Requirements) and in the Financial Aid section on the College’s web site at <http://ewc.wy.edu/future/finaid/satacadprog.cfm>, identifies the factors that must be evaluated and outlines how a student’s status is determined. The standards are evaluated at the end of each term. This evaluation includes all terms attempted regardless of whether or not the student received financial assistance. Academic progress requirements for scholarships are defined by the respective donors and maintained in the EWC Financial Aid Office. A student may also request a copy of the Satisfactory Academic Progress policy from the EWC Financial Aid Office. A student not meeting the EWC Satisfactory Academic Progress standards may appeal a suspension status (see EWC Catalog, pp. 32 – 33, Reinstatement of Eligibility). The student must provide documentation supporting the mitigating circumstances which led to such status. Financial Aid Disbursement / Fraud Students receiving financial assistance have their federal financial aid or scholarships posted directly to their student accounts. Grant and scholarship funds from all sources credit tuition and fees first, unless the specific aid is targeted to other educational costs. Credit balances are paid within 14 days of the first day of the semester. Funds received after that date are processed and credit refunds paid once a week. Credit refund balances may be obtained from the EWC Copy Center or mailed directly to the student. Funds are credited according to the number of credit hours in which the student is enrolled on the last day of late registration (see EWC Catalog, pp. 29 – 30, Method of Payment of Aid). Students receive information regarding financial aid disbursement in the form of an award letter. The policy outlining the disbursement policy is also outlined in “Method of Payment of Aid” located in the Financial Aid section of the EWC Catalog. Federal Work-Study/Institutional Employment payments are paid directly to the student after each month of employment. 150


Eastern Wyoming College Regulations governing cash management of Title IV funds are communicated and coordinated with a number of institutional offices. The internal control requirement that establishes checks and balances is managed by the EWC Financial Aid, Business, Student Registration/Records, and Admissions offices. The coordination for separation of duties is in place to prevent fraud and abuse in its administration of Title IV programs, and the misuse of federal funds. Separation of duty, with regards to disbursement of funds, is outlined in the EWC Financial Aid Policies and Procedures manual. The annual compliance audit covering all Title IV transactions confirms internal controls are in place. Campus Crime and Graduation Rate Statistics Eastern Wyoming College discloses information with respect to completion or graduation rates, or campus safety policies and procedures to current and prospective students, and employees for enrollment or employment. Federal disclosure reports such as EWC’s Graduation/Completion and Transfer-Out rates, Athletic Graduation/Completion and Transfer-Out rates are available on the College’s web site at <http:// www.ewc.wy.edu/pdf/data/StudentRight2006Cohort.pdf>. These data sources are also available on the Integrated Post Secondary Education Data System (IPEDS) web site. Eastern Wyoming College complies with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act. The EWC Catalog contains information regarding campus safety and campus crime reports. The EWC Crime Statistics may be found at the following web site: <http://ewc.wy.edu/ administration/security.cfm> which also includes information regarding the College’s Drug & Alcohol policies, and Housing Security Information. Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act (EADA) Eastern Wyoming College is in compliance with the guidelines regarding equity of athletic opportunities. The College offers Women’s Volleyball, Men’s and Women’s Basketball, Men’s and Women’s Golf, and Men’s and Women’s Rodeo. The Athletic Director, Human Resources Director, Vice President for Finance and Administrative Services, and the Institutional Research Director work in collaboration to complete the annual survey. Federal Compliance Visits to Off-Campus Locations Eastern Wyoming College works with Outreach Coordinators at 11 separate locations within its six-county service area. Both credit and non-credit classes are offered at these locations. In 1981, the Douglas location was identified as an off-campus site. This site was designated as a Branch Campus on August 15, 2007. The primary programs offered at Douglas are Accounting, Business Administration, Elementary Education, Interdisciplinary Studies, and Secondary Education. Off-Campus Sites are located at Lusk, Newcastle, and Wheatland as these are locations where a student can complete 50 percent or more of the courses leading to a Title IV eligible certificate. The following degrees can be completed at these sites: Associate of Science and Associate of Applied Science in Business Administration; Associate of Arts and Associate of Applied Science in Criminal Justice; and Associate of Arts and Associate of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies.

151


Eastern Wyoming College The remainder of the locations identified above are considered Course Locations (students can complete less than 50 percent of a degree program or a Title IV eligible certificate) and are located at Glendo, Glenrock, Guernsey, Hulett, Moorcroft, Sundance, and Upton. Advertising and Recruitment Materials Eastern Wyoming College’s advertising and recruitment materials comply with the Higher Learning Commission’s Federal Compliance Program that addresses Advertising and Recruitment Materials (8.2-3). The EWC Catalog is the primary reference source published by the College. It is printed each spring for the upcoming academic year and is reviewed regularly prior to each printing. Information about the College is also available on the EWC web site at <www.ewc.wy.edu>. The College does four major mailings each year to over 8,000 individuals living in the EWC service area and surrounding counties. These mailings are 1) Fall Community Education Schedule of Classes; 2) Spring Community Education Schedule of Classes; 3) Summer Community Education Schedule of Classes; and 4) Full Year EWC (for credit) Schedule of Classes. The Catalog identifies the Higher Learning Commission as a professional organization accrediting Eastern Wyoming College. The HLC local phone number and URL are listed along with the organization’s name as required in The Higher Learning Commission Handbook of Accreditation – Version 1:10/03. This information is also found on the EWC web site at <http://ewc.wy.edu/pdf/catalog/collegegoalsfinal09.pdf> and at <http://www.ewc.wy.edu/data/accreditation.cfm>. Professional Accreditation Additional organizations that accredit EWC programs include the American Veterinary Medical Association and the American Welding Society. The EWC 2009 Catalog (see p. 11, Accreditation) identifies these organizations and lists their address, telephone number, and URL. Third Party Comment Process Eastern Wyoming College has notified its public of the accreditation process it is participating in and the upcoming visit from the HLC visitation team. In this notification EWC requests comments from third parties. Information regarding the visit is posted on the College’s web site <www.ewc.wy.edu> and has been announced via press releases and paid advertisements. Institutional Records of Student Complaints Eastern Wyoming College maintains a record of all student complaints received in the office of the President, Vice President for Learning, and the Vice President for Student Services. The College has received few written complaints, as defined in HLC’s The Handbook of Accreditation – Version 1:10/03, in the last three years. A log of all complaints is maintained in the office of the Vice President for Student Services. Complaints at EWC are first addressed through the Informal Grievance procedure as outlined in the EWC Student Handbook. Complaints that are not resolved using the Informal Grievance procedure are resolved 152


Eastern Wyoming College using the Formal Grievance Procedure also outlined in the EWC Student Handbook. The Handbook contains the EWC Student Code of Conduct (Board Policy 5.13 Student Code of Conduct) that addresses how behavioral and other issues, including student complaints, are addressed by the College. A copy of the EWC Student Handbook will be available in the resource room and also in electronic format. Compliance Summary Eastern Wyoming College stays abreast of all required components and demonstrates compliance with federal and state laws, regulations, and rules. It operates with integrity and follows its policies and procedures while protecting the rights of students, faculty, and staff.

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Eastern Wyoming College

Chapter 9 Summary Reflections and Request for Continued Accreditation Eastern Wyoming College is a rural, comprehensive community college with a six-county service area which encompasses more than 16,000 square miles. The average headcount per semester is about 1,600 students with an average full-time equivalent (FTE) hovering around 1,000. It consists of a main campus in Torrington, a branch campus in Douglas, and outreach sites located in twelve small communities on the eastern side of Wyoming. Torrington and Douglas are almost twin communities each with about 5,600 people, and the entire service area has less than 50,000 people. It has oftentimes been said that the service area has more antelope or cattle per square mile than it does people—and that is true. However, Eastern Wyoming College’s story is about the people it serves and the people who serve it. For more than sixty years, EWC has been offering quality, affordable, accessible educational opportunities for its constituencies—and it does so proudly as it improves and enriches the communities it serves. Learner Centered Many of the students, whether they transfer to other colleges or go on to succeed in careers and in life, come back to tell us what the College meant to them. They indicate how much the caring and friendly atmosphere that permeates the classrooms and the support services has helped them become advocates for themselves and for others. The students tell us how well prepared they have been for the next steps in their educational and workplace journeys, thanks to the rigor and quality of their programs and classes. They express appreciation for the distance learning offerings that allow them to finish degrees and earn job promotions and raises. Lifelong friendships are formed among the students, the staff, and the faculty members. And, yes, they also tell us how much fun they had. Community members throughout the service area tell us how much they appreciate the college and the support it provides to their everyday lives. If it’s a Fine Arts Council event, they tell us how great it is that the College is able to bring this type of cultural programming to its small communities. They express an appreciation for the facilities when it comes to hosting such things as district and regional basketball and volleyball tournaments. Patrons tell us they appreciate the college sponsored trips to the Denver Art Museum or a Rockies baseball game. In community surveys, patrons cite the College as one of the primary assets of Goshen County. In outreach communities, learners tell us how important the access to higher education is, and how much they appreciate the distance learning opportunities and the support from the outreach centers. Connectedness The employees and the students are connected to the communities in which they live and learn. The employees serve on various boards, join service organizations, lead community efforts and are supporters for economic and community development. State representatives and senators are alumni of Eastern Wyoming College and advocate for the small communities which they represent. Partnerships with the College are strong with the public school systems, business and industry, community groups, and economic development organizations. The College is committed to providing a wide array of services and programs. Legislators are committed to supporting Eastern Wyoming College. William James said, “I will act as if what I do will make a difference.” Eastern Wyoming College has made a difference in the lives of the people in its service are and will continue to do so. 154


Eastern Wyoming College Journey of Discovery This accreditation self-study spanned more than two years beginning with the Foundations of Excellence focus on the first year of college which it joined in 2008. The work from the nine Dimension Committees represented areas and data sources that had never before been studied in a substantive fashion. It included reviewing the experiences freshmen students are most likely to have in common, such as orientations and College Studies. Out of that year-long study emerged seven strategic action plans from which the College is now developing specific programs and directions. Further, it represented a turning point for the College in that it revealed how important data informed decisions are to the future of the College. It represented the College’s first institution-wide effort toward a continuous quality improvement initiative. The second year of the self-study expanded the Dimension Committees’ work to include the Higher Learning Commission criteria. Through a cross-walk of the criteria with the Dimension Committee emphasis areas, the groups reviewed Mission and Integrity; Preparing for the Future; Student Learning and Effective Teaching; Acquisition, Discovery, and Application of Knowledge; and Engagement and Service. Oftentimes, three or four committees were assigned the same sub-criterion. Consequently, the reports submitted brought in different perspectives which represented rich and varying viewpoints. For the editors of the self-study, this made it more difficult at times to develop a cohesive and consistent voice; however, the process was made more meaningful because of this approach. The identified strengths, opportunities, and challenges will provide a roadmap for the College to follow for the near and not-so-near future. Future Directed The history of the College has been richly rewarding for learners and employees alike. Difficult times have been related to budget concerns, changing personnel, or transitioning programs. The College has grown from a small outreach entity of the University of Wyoming to a great little college which knows that it must plan carefully and thoughtfully as it continues to an even brighter future. The focus must be on listening to its constituents, making good decisions, and providing those programs and services which are deemed most vital to its people. William Foster said, “It is always the result of high intention, sincere effort, intelligent direction, and skillful execution; it represents the wise choice of many alternatives.” The College plans for the future and commits itself daily to the vision statement, “Eastern Wyoming College will be a dynamic center for education, acting as a catalyst for individual growth, community engagement, and global impact.” Request for Continued Accreditation Eastern Wyoming College has engaged in a thorough examination of itself through the self-study process. It embraces its mission and vision statements which permeate the culture of the organization. The College acts with integrity and engages in planning and assessment processes which support the five identified strategic directions identified in its Strategic Plan. The College is preparing, promoting, embracing, investing, enhancing, recognizing, and extending its reach throughout the service area. It provides high quality teaching and learning experiences and commits itself to improving technology, diversity, and serving its constituents. In the final analysis, it becomes apparent that Eastern Wyoming College is all about action as it prepares for the future. Eastern Wyoming College respectfully submits this self-study report to The Higher Learning Commission and requests continued accreditation for a period of ten years. 155


Eastern Wyoming College

Appendix A List of Acronyms AA - Associate of Arts AAS - Associate of Applied Science ABE - Adult Basic Education ACT - ACT is an independent, not-for-profit organization that provides a broad array of assessment, research, information, and program management solutions in the areas of education and workforce development. ADA - Americans with Disabilities Act AQIP - Academic Quality Improvement Plan ARRA - American Reinvestment Recovery Act AS - Associate of Science AVMA - American Veterinary Medicine Association AWS - American Welding Society BEST PLUS - Basic English Skills Test PLUS BOCES - Board of Cooperative Educational Services C N A - Certified Nursing Assistant CAAP - Collegiate Assessment of Academic Proficiency CATs - Classroom Assessment Techniques CCSSE - Community College Survey of Student Engagement CDL - Commercial Drivers License CIP - Classification of Instructional Programs COMPASS - set of untimed computer adaptive tests created by the American College Test (ACT) Program COPS - U.S. Department of Justice Office of “Community Oriented Policing Services” CPR - Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation CTC - Community Training Center CTE - Career and Technical Education DOC - Department of Corrections DOL - Department of Labor DWS - Department of Workforce Services EADA - Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act ECAR - Eligibility and Certification Renewal EMT - Emergency Medical Technician ESL - English as a Second Language ETSS - Employment and Training for Self Sufficiency EWC - Eastern Wyoming College FERPA - Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act FFEL – Federal Family Education Loan FISAP - Fiscal Operation Report and Application to Participate FoE - Foundations of Excellence® FTE - Full Time Equivalency FY - Fiscal Year GCSD - Goshen County School District GCT - Goshen Community Theatre GEAR UP - Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs 156


Eastern Wyoming College GED - General Education Diploma GLBA - Graham Leach Bliley Act GPA - Grade Point Average HIPAA - Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act HLC - Higher Learning Commission IACUC - Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee INBRE – IdeA Networks of Biomedical Research Excellence IPEDS - Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System LMS - Learning Management System LSL - Learning Skills Lab MHI - Median Household Income MOU - Memorandum of Understanding MSHA - Miner Safety and Health Administration NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration NCA - North Central Accreditation NIRA - National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association NJCAA - National Junior College Athletic Association NSLC - National Student Loan Clearinghouse NSLDS - National Student Loan Data System OSHA - Occupational Safety & Health Administration PCPC - Prison Community Partnership Committee PEAQ - Program to Evaluate and Advance Quality PLATO - PLATO Learning Product - PLATO® Web Learning Network POS - Point of Sale PPA - Program Participation Agreement PTK - Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society SFSF - State Fiscal Stabilization Fund SSS - Student Support Services TABE - Test of Adult Basic Education TDR - Tuition Discount Rate TEACH Act - The Technology, Education and Copyright Harmonization Act of 2002 TRIO - Federal outreach and student services programs designed to identify and provide services for individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds USDA - United States Department of Agriculture UW - University of Wyoming WBC - Wyoming Business Council WCCC - Wyoming Community College Commission WDC - Workforce Development Council WEN - Wyoming Equality Network WICHE - Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education WLEA - Wyoming Law Enforcement Academy WMCI - Wyoming Medium Correctional Institution WYCTA - Wyoming Career/Technical Assessment WyDEC - Wyoming Distance Education Consortium WyLDCAT - Wyoming Libraries Database Catalog

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Appendix B Organizational Charts

Eastern Wyoming College Organizational Chart Board of Trustees College President

Adult Basic Education

Strategic Planning

Computer Services

Enrollment Management

Financial Aid

Intramurals/Activities

Counseling

Student Services

Bookstore

Learning Skills Lab

Learning Services

Copy Center

Athletics

GEAR UP

Admissions

Registration and Records

Fitness Center Institutional Research

Residence Life

Student Center

Food Services

Campus Safety

Institutional Development

Testing Center

Grants

Accreditation

Library Services

Instructional Technology

Instructional Divisions

Outreach & Learning

Community Education

Arts, Humanities, Social & Behaviorial Sciences Business & Technology Division Science Division

Information Center

Finance & Administrative Services Business Office Accounts Payable Accounts Receivable Purchasing Human Resources Payroll Physical Plant Custodial Services Facilities Maintenance Grounds

Douglas Campus Outreach Sites

College Relations

Alumni Relations Donor Relations Foundation Activities

Workforce Development

Marketing Public Relations Website

September 1, 2010

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Tami Afdahl, Director

159

Vacant - Supervisor Don Snyder, Assistant

Grounds

Pat Eilert, Specialist Eme Escamilla, Specialist

Facilities Maintenance

Henry Prado, Evening Supervisor Tracy Benson, Custodian Vacant - Custodian J. R. Gutierrez, Custodian John Hale, Custodian Cindy Hiegel, Custodian Vacant - Custodian

Custodial Services

Keith Jarvis, Director

Darci Duran, Webmaster

Public Relations Website

Linda Evans, Graphic Designer Sondra Stapleton, Graphic Designer

Marketing

Kim Jones, Senior Admin Asst

Science Division

Ashley Harpstreith, Associate Director Vacant - ETSS Grant Coordinator Vickey Kutsch, Admin Asst

Workforce Development

(See attached sheet for list of coordinators)

Outreach Sites

Douglas Campus

Sue McBride, Campus Director Jamie Sullivan, Administrative Specialist Teri Griffin, Adult Learning Center Coordinator Craig Corley, Maintenance Supervisor

Connie Woehl, Associate Vice President Judy Branson, Admin Asst

Outreach & Learning

Mike Durfee, Associate Director Susie Schafer, Senior Admin Asst

Community/Continuing Education

(See attached sheet for list of instructors)

Patti Sue Peterson, Chair Viqi Garcia, Vetrinary Technology Director Kate Norton, Animal Caretaker

Rick Vonburg, Chair Leland Vetter, Welding Director

Physical Plant

Testing Center

Janet Martindale, Coordinator

Grants

Accreditation

Library Services

Marilyn Miller, Library Director Becky Lorenz, Library Assistant Director Casey Debus, Technician

Aaron Bahmer,Technologist

Kim Russell, Director

Instructional Technology

Payroll

Lori Moore, Specialist

Jan Lilletvedt, Director Marlise Brower, Senior Admin Asst

Fitness Center

Strategic Planning

Institutional Research

Connie Woehl, Chair

Instructional Divisions

Computer Services

Alumni Relations Donor Relations Foundation Activities

Oliver Sundby, Director Holly Lara, Administrative Specialist

Campus Safety

Eric Sharp, Campus Resource Officer

Sue Schmidt, Administrative Specialist Amy Smith, Records Senior Admin Asst

Registration and Records

Admissions

Zach Smith, Coordinator Debra Doren, Senior Admin Asst

Mell Cooper, Associate Director

Financial Aid

Molly Williams, Director Terri Hauf, Specialist Holly West, Technician

September 1, 2010

Student Center

Elaine Rush, Asst Manager

Food Services

Laurie Mueller, Manager Deb Eutsler, Cook Nick Gompert, Cook Judy Iverson, Cook Shelby Martindale, Cook Bobbi Stuck, Cook Lynda Young, Cashier/Cook

Kellee Gooder, Director Jamie Black, Coordinator

Residence Life

Judy Brown, Director Aaron Wolf, Coordinator Sandra Golden, Administrative Asst Sally Mason, Technician

GEAR UP

Athletics

Lance Petsch, Coordinator

Intramurals/Activities

Counseling

Debbie Ochsner, Director Karen Posten, Senior Admin Asst

Verl Petsch, AD/Volleyball Coach Casey Jones, Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Basketball/Golf Coach Tom Andersen, Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Basketball Coach Jake Clark, Rodeo Coach Patricia Velazquez, Senior Admin Asst

Student Services

Dr. Rex Cogdill, Vice President

Enrollment Management

Institutional Development

Jim Maffee, Information Technology Admisistrator Tyler Vasko, Information Technology Administrator Chuck Kenyon, Telecommunications Coordinator Chris Urbanek, Information Technology Specialist Greg Martin, Information Technology Specialist

Business & Technology Division

College Relations

Information Center

Dixie Kroenlein, Senior Admin Asst

Court Merrigan, Coordinator

Learning Skills Lab

Copy Center

Vonda Soester, Admin Asst

Diane McQueen, Director

Adult Basic Education

Suzanne Andrews, Supervisor Tina Jepson, Technician

Bookstore

Learning Services

Dr. Dee Ludwig, Vice President Lynn Wamboldt, Administrative Specialist Carmie Howe, Administrative Specialist

Arts, Humanities, Social & Behaviorial Sciences

Tom McDowell, Director Affermative Action Officer ADA Compliance Officer

Human Resources

Clyde Woods, Coordinator

Purchasing

Brandy Horejs, Technician

Accounts Receivable

Trisha Colby, Technician

Accounts Payable

Karen Pariott, Director

Business Office

Bob Cox, Vice President

Finance & Administrative Services

Dr. Tom Armstrong

College President

Sherri Lovercheck, President Julene Asmus Jim Davis George Nash Jeff Rose Carl Rupp Mike Varney

Board of Trustees

Eastern Wyoming College - Organizational Chart

Eastern Wyoming College


Eastern Wyoming College

Instructional Divisions Arts, Humanities, Social & Behavior Science Division Daniel Fielder, Art Ellen Creagar, Social Science & Business Larry Curtis, Criminal Justice Wayne Deahl, English Heidi Edmunds, Psychology & Sociology Jennifer Hart, Social Science Anne Hilton, Political Science & Honors Director Chris Hilton, English John Nesbitt, English & Spanish Rick Patterson, Criminal Justice Katherine Steinbock, Early Childhood Development Joe Wilson, Education Connie Woehl, Division Chair Adjunct Instructors Business & Technology Division Tim Anderson, Welding Lynn Bedient, Technical Aubrey Braden, Cosmetology Kim Capron, Cosmetology Donna Charron, Cosmetology Coventry Daugherty, Science, Douglas Campus Rob Eirich, Agriculture/Livestock Judging Coach John Ely, Weatherization Andy Espinoza, Computer Applications Grant Harpstreith, Technical Austin Hawks, Agriculture Earl Kisiel, Entrepreneurship Melissa Meeboer, Business & Computer Applications Lee Myers, Computer Science Instructor Tim Nyquist, Weatherization Kerry Stewart, Business/Computer Applications, Douglas Campus Leland Vetter, Welding Instructor and Director Rick Vonburg, Agriculture, Economics & Statistics, Division Chair Adjunct Instructors

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Science Division Tom Andersen, Physical Education Ed Bittner, Veterinary Technology Jake Clark, Rodeo Robert Creagar, Math Tina Christinck, Biology Ray DeWitt, Math Viqi Garcia, Veterinary Technology Casey Jones, Physical Education Peggy Knittel, Biology & Veterinary Technology Geri Lewis, Math Jan Lilletvedt, Physical Education Patti Sue Peterson, Veterinary Technology; Division Chair Verl Petsch, Jr., Physical Education Cheryl Raboin, Math Lorna Stickel, Chemistry Monte Stokes, Veterinary Technology/Agriculture Susan Walker, Veterinary Technology Chris Wenzel, Biology Vickie Winney, Health Technolgy, Douglas Campus Gwen Yung, Health Technology Adjunct Instructors

Outreach Coordinators Jody Ash, Chugwater Connie Woehl, Douglas Sandy Engling, Glendo Margaret Farley, Glenrock Kim Weitzman, Guernsey Laura Lynn, Hulett Cathy Stoddard, LaGrange Magan Paulson, Lusk Melissa Buckmiller, Moorcroft & Sundance Kim Conzelman, Newcastle Candice Watt, Upton Sue Trautwein, Wheatland

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Appendix C Eastern Wyoming College Board of Trustees 2009-2010

First Elected 2000 2000 2006 2008 2008 1998 2002

Term Expires 2012 2012 2010 2012 2012 2010 2010

Member Sherri Lovercheck, President Carl Rupp, Vice President George Nash, Secretary Mike Varney, Treasurer Julene Asmus Jim Davis Jeff Rose

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Appendix D

Wyoming Community College Commission 2020 Carey Avenue, 8th Floor, Cheyenne, WY 82002 Phone (307) 777-7763 Fax (307) 777-6567 Dr. Jim Rose Executive Director E-mail: jrose@commission.wcc.edu (307) 777-7763 Dr. Joe McCann Programs Team Manager E-mail: jmccann@commission.wcc.edu (307) 777-6290 Amy Brockel Workforce & Education Program Manager E-mail: abrockel@commission.wcc.edu (307) 777-8703 George Pitt Policy Analyst E-mail: gpitt@commission.wcc.edu (307) 777-7226 Gail Anderson Director of Federal Programs E-mail: ganderson@commission.wcc.edu (307) 777-7763 Marcia Hess ABE Program Manager E-mail: mhess@commission.wcc.edu (307) 777-7885 Carolyn Chelsvig GED Program Manager E-mail: cchelsvig@commission.wcc.edu (307) 777-5897 Tully Holmes System Administrator E-mail: tholmes@commission.wcc.edu (307) 777-6832

Matt Petry Deputy Director/Chief Financial Officer E-mail: mpetry@commission.wcc.edu (307) 777-5859 Larry Buchholtz Fiscal Operations Team Manager E-mail: lbuchholtz@commission.wcc.edu (307) 777-7068 Jean Sconyers Administrative Services Manager E-mail: jsconyers@commission.wcc.edu (307) 777-7227 Cayse Cummings Enrollment Auditor E-mail: ccummings@commission.wcc.edu (307) 777-7013 Rosann David Administrative/Fiscal Support Specialist E-mail: rdavid@commission.wcc.edu (307) 777-7763 Susan Weakland Fiscal Analyst E-mail: sweakland@commission.wcc.edu (307) 777-7763 Joe Moreland Information Technology Supervisor E-mail: jmorelan@commission.wcc.edu (307) 777-7218 Tyler Christopherson Webmaster/Database Developer E-mail: tchrisopherson@commission.wcc.edu (307) 777-6293

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Eastern Wyoming College

Appendix E

Eastern Wyoming College Administration, Faculty, Staff and Outreach Coordinators 2010 Administrators Tami Afdahl, Director of College Relations Dr. Tom Armstrong, College President Holly Branham, Executive Assistant to the President Judy Brown, GEAR UP Director Dr. Rex Cogdill, Vice President for Student Services Bob Cox, Vice President for Finance and Administrative Services Kellee Gooder, Director of Residence Life Keith Jarvis, Director of Physical Plant Janice Lilletvedt, Director of Fitness Center Dr. Dee Ludwig, Vice President for Learning Susan McBride, Director of the Douglas Campus Tom McDowell, Director of Human Resources Diane McQueen, ABE/GED/ESL Director Marilyn Miller, Library Director Debbie Ochsner, Director of Counseling Karen Parriott, Business Office Director Verl E. Petsch, Jr., Director of Athletics Kimberly Russell, Director of Institutional Research Oliver Sundby, Institutional Development Director Molly Williams, Director of Financial Aid Connie Woehl, Associate Vice President for Outreach and Learning/Division Chair-Arts, Humanities & Behavioral Sciences Professional Staff Aaron Bahmer, Instructional Technologist Mell Cooper, Associate Director â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Enrollment Management Darci Duran, Webmaster Mike Durfee, Community Education Associate Director Teri Griffin, Adult Learning Center Coordinator, Douglas Ashley Harpstreith, ETSS Grant/Workforce Coordinator Chuck Kenyon, Telecommunications Coordinator Becky Lorenz, Library Assistant Director James Maffe, Information Technology Administrator Janet Martindale, Testing Center Coordinator Court Merrigan, Learning Skills Lab Coordinator Lance Petsch, Coordinator of Intramurals & Activities, Asst. Volleyball Coach Zach Smith, Admissions Coordinator Tyler Vasko, Software Administrator 164


Eastern Wyoming College Aaron Wolfe, GEAR UP Outreach Coordinator Clyde Woods, Purchasing Coordinator Faculty Tom Andersen, Women’s Basketball Coach/Instructor Tim Anderson, Welding/Portable Lab Lynn Bedient, Welding Dr. Edwin C. Bittner, Veterinary Technology Pamela Capron, Cosmetology Donna K. Charron, Cosmetology Tina Christinck, Biology Jake Clark, Rodeo Coach/Instructor Ellen Creagar, Social Science/Business Robert D. Creagar, Mathematics Lawrence Curtis, Criminal Justice Wayne Deahl, English Ray DeWitt, Mathematics Coventry Dougherty-Woodin, Science Heidi Edmunds, Psychology Robert Eirich, Livestock Judging Coach/Instructor John Ely, Construction Technology/Weatherization Andy Espinoza, Workforce Computer Instructor Daniel Fielder, Art Viqi Garcia, Veterinary Technology Grant Harpstreith, Welding Jennifer Hart, Social Science Austin Hawks, Agriculture Anne Hilton, Political Science, History Chris Hilton, English Casey Jones, Men’s Basketball/Golf Coach/Instructor Earl Kisiel, Entrepreneurship Dr. Peggy Knittel, Microbiology/Zoology Geraldine Lewis, Mathematics Melissa Meeboer, Business Lee Myers, Computer Science Dr. John D. Nesbitt, English/Spanish Tim Nyquist, Construction Technology/Weatherization Dr. Richard Patterson, Criminal Justice Patti Sue Peterson, Veterinary Technology/Division Chair – Sciences Cheryl L. Raboin, Mathematics Catherine Steinbock, Early Childhood Education Dr. Lorna A. Pehl Stickel, Chemistry Dr. Monte Stokes, Veterinary Technology Leland J. Vetter, Machine Tooling/Welding Richard L. Vonburg, Ag/Economics/Statistics/Division Chair – Business & Technology Dr. Susan L. Walker, Veterinary Technology 165


Eastern Wyoming College Christopher R. Wenzel, Biology/Zoology/Botany/Rangeland Ecology/Watershed Mgmt Joe Wilson, Education Gwendolyn Yung, Health Technology Staff Suzanne Andrews, Bookstore Supervisor Tracy Benson, Custodian Marlise Brower, Fitness Center Senior Administrative Assistant Trish Colby, Accounts Receivable Technician Casey Debus, Library Technician Debra Doren, Admissions Senior Administrative Assistant Pat Eilert, Facilities Maintenance Specialist Emeterio Escamilla, Facilities Maintenance Specialist Debbie Eutsler, Cook Linda Evans, Graphic Designer Nick Gompert, Cook James Goodro, Custodian J. R. Gutierrez, Custodian John Hale, Custodian Terri Hauf, Financial Aid Specialist Cindy Hiegel, Custodian Brandy Horejs, Accounts Payable Technician Carmalee Howe, Learning Administrative Specialist Judy Iverson, Cook Tina Jepson, Bookstore Technician Kim Jones, College Relations Senior Administrative Assistant Dixie Kroenlein, Information Center Senior Administrative Assistant Holly Lara, Development Administrative Specialist Greg Martin, Information Technology Specialist Shelby Martindale, Cook Sally Mason, GEAR UP Technician Lori Moore, Payroll Specialist Laurie Mueller, Food Services Manager Kate Norton, Animal Caretaker Michael Norton, Custodian Karen Posten, Counseling Senior Administrative Assistant Henry Prado, Evening Custodial Supervisor Elaine Rush, Assistant Food Services Manager Susan Schaefer, Community Education Senior Administrative Assistant Sue Schmidt, Registration & Records Administrative Specialist Amy Smith, Records Senior Administrative Assistant Don Snyder, Grounds Assistant Vonda Soester, Copy Center Administrative Assistant Sondra Stapleton, Graphic Designer Jamie Sullivan, Douglas Campus Administrative Specialist Chris Urbanek, Information Technology Specialist 166


Eastern Wyoming College Patricia Velรกzquez, Athletics Senior Administrative Assistant Lynn Wamboldt, Learning Administrative Specialist Holly West, Financial Aid Technician Lynda Young, Cook Outreach Coordinators Jody Ash, Chugwater Melissa Buckmiller, Moorcroft & Sundance Kim Conzelman, Newcastle Sandy Engling, Glendo Margaret Farley, Glenrock Candice Watt, Upton Laura Lynn, Hulett Magan Paulson, Lusk Cathy Stoddard, LaGrange Kim Weitzman, Guernsey Sue Trautwein, Wheatland

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Eastern Wyoming College

Appendix F

Eastern Wyoming College Higher learning Commission Reaccreditation Self-Study Plan Foundations of Excellence Dimensions & Higher Learning Commission Criteria Replication by Permission - Itasca Community College --author FoE Dimension 1 – Philosophy—Committee 1: Foundations Institutions intentionally cultivate learning environments for new students that emerge from a philosophy of two-year colleges as gateways to higher education. The philosophy is explicit and easily understood. It is consistent with the institutional mission, reflects a consensus of internal and external constituencies, and is widely disseminated. The philosophy is also the basis for organizational policies, practices, structures, leadership, and resource allocation to support the new student experience. HLC Criteria: 1a, 1c, 1e, 5a, 5c 1a. The organization’s mission documents are clear and articulate publicly the organization’s commitments. (Mission and Integrity) 1c. Understanding of and support for the mission pervade the organization. (Mission and Integrity) 1e. The organization upholds and protects its integrity. (Mission and Integrity) 5a. The organization learns from the constituencies it serves and analyzes its capacity to serve their needs and expectations. (Engagement and Service) 5c. The organization demonstrates its responsiveness to those constituencies that depend on it for service. (Engagement and Service)

FoE Dimension 2 – Organization—Committee 2: Foundations Institutions provide a comprehensive, coordinated, and flexible approach to the new student experience through effective organizational structures and policies. These structures and policies guide and align all aspects of the new student experience. Through effective partnerships, critical stakeholders such as instructional, administrative, and student services units provide a coherent experience for new students that is enhanced by ongoing faculty and staff development activities and appropriate budgetary arrangements. HLC Criteria: 1d, 2a, 2b, 2d, 4a, 4d, 5b, 5d 1d. The organization’s governance and administrative structures promote effective leadership and support collaborative processes that enable the organization to fulfill its mission. (Mission and Integrity) 2a. The organization realistically prepares for a future shaped by multiple societal and economic trends. (Future) 168


Eastern Wyoming College

2b. The organization’s resource base supports its educational programs and its plans for maintaining and strengthening their quality in the future. (Future) 2d. All levels of planning align with the organization’s mission, thereby enhancing its capacity to fulfill that mission. (Future) 4a. The organization demonstrates, through the actions of its board, administrators, students, faculty, and staff, that it values a life of learning. (Knowledge) 4d. The organization provides support to ensure that faculty, students, and staff acquire, discover, and apply knowledge responsibly. (Knowledge) 5b. The organization has the capacity and the commitment to engage with its identified constituencies and communities. (Engagement and Service) 5d. Internal and external constituencies value the services the organization provides. (Engagement and Service)

FoE Dimension 3 – Learning—Committee 3: Foundations Institutions deliver curricular and co-curricular learning experiences that engage new students in order to develop knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors consistent with the institutional mission, students’ academic and career goals, and workplace expectations. Both in and out of the classroom, these learning experiences promote critical thinking, ethical decision making, and the lifelong pursuit of knowledge. HLC Criteria: 1c, 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d, 4a, 4b, 4d 1c. Understanding of and support for the mission pervade the organization. (Mission and Integrity) 3a. The organization’s goals for student learning outcomes are clearly stated for each educational program and make effective assessment possible. (Learning and Teaching) 3b. The organization values and supports effective teaching. (Learning and Teaching) 3c. The organization creates effective learning environments. (Learning and Teaching) 3d. The organization’s learning resources support student learning and effective teaching. (Learning and Teaching) 4a. The organization demonstrates, through the actions of its board, administrators, students, faculty, and staff, that it values a life of learning. (Knowledge) 4b. The organization demonstrates that acquisition of a breadth of knowledge and skills and the exercise of intellectual inquiry are integral to its educational programs. (Knowledge) 4d. The organization provides support to ensure that faculty, students, and staff acquire, discover, and apply knowledge responsibly. (Knowledge) FoE Dimension 4 – Campus Culture—Committee 4: Foundations Institutions make new students a high priority for faculty and staff. A culture of responsibility for the experiences of new students characterizes these institutions. This culture is realized through high-quality instruction, services, and support as well as substantial interaction with students both inside and outside the classroom. Campus leaders nurture this culture and support it by appropriate institutional recognition and rewards.

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Eastern Wyoming College HLC Criteria 3b, 3c, 3d, 4c 3b. The organization values and supports effective teaching. 3c. The organization creates effective learning environments. 3d. The organization’s learning resources support student learning and effective teaching. 4c. The organization assesses the usefulness of its curricula to students who will live and work in a global, diverse, and technological society.

FoE Dimension 5 – Transitions—Committee 5: Foundations Institutions facilitate appropriate student transitions beginning with outreach and recruitment and continuing throughout the period of enrollment. They communicate clear curricular/ co-curricular expectations and possibilities, and they provide appropriate preparation and support for educational success. They are forthright about their responsibilities to students as well as students’ responsibilities to themselves and the institution. These institutions create and maintain communication with secondary and other postsecondary institutions, families, employers, community agencies, and other sources of support for students. HLC Criteria: 1e, 5a, 5c, 5d 1e. The organization upholds and protects its integrity. (Mission and Integrity) 5a. The organization learns from the constituencies it serves and analyzes its capacity to serve their needs and expectations. (Engagement and Service) 5c. The organization demonstrates its responsiveness to those constituencies that depend on it for service. (Engagement and Service) 5d. Internal and external constituencies value the services the organization provides. (Engagement and Service) FoE Dimension 6 – All Students—Committee 6: Foundations Institutions serve all new students according to their varied needs. These institutions anticipate, identify, and address the needs of traditional and non-traditional students in response to their individual abilities, backgrounds, interests, and experiences. These efforts are subject to assessment and adjustment as needed. Institutions also ensure campus environments that are inclusive and safe for all students. HLC Criteria: 3d, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d 3d. The organization’s learning resources support student learning and effective teaching. 5a. The organization learns from the constituencies it serves and analyzes its capacity to serve their needs and expectations. (Engagement and Service) 5b. The organization has the capacity and the commitment to engage with its identified constituencies and communities. (Engagement and Service) 5c. The organization demonstrates its responsiveness to those constituencies that depend on it for service. (Engagement and Service) 5d. Internal and external constituencies value the services the organization provides. (Engagement and Service)

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Eastern Wyoming College FoE Dimension 7 – Diversity—Committee 7: Foundations Institutions ensure that new students experience ongoing exploration of diverse ideas, worldviews, and cultures as a means of enhancing their learning and participation in pluralistic communities. Institutions cultivate an open and civil community in which students interact with people from varied backgrounds and cultures. These institutions guide students to reflect on ideas and values different from those they currently hold, and explore their own cultures and the cultures of others. HLC Criteria: 1b, 3c, 4c 1b. In its mission documents, the organization recognizes the diversity of its learners, other constituencies, and the greater society it serves. 3c. The organization creates effective learning environments. 4c. The organization assesses the usefulness of its curricula to students who will live and work in a global, diverse, and technological society. FoE Dimension 8 – Roles & Purposes—Committee 8: Foundations Institutions promote student understanding of the various roles and purposes of higher education and those unique to two-year institutions, both for the individual and society. These roles and purposes include learning for personal growth, career enhancement, workplace preparation and retraining, transfer for additional education, engaged citizenship, and serving the public good. Institutions encourage new students to examine their motivation and goals with regard to higher education in general and to their own college. Students are exposed to the value of both a general education and focused study in an academic or career field. HLC Criteria: 1a, 1c, 4a, 4b, 5c 1a. The organization’s mission documents are clear and articulate publicly the organization’s commitments. 1c. Understanding of and support for the mission pervade the organization. 4a. The organization demonstrates, through the actions of its board, administrators, students, faculty, and staff, that it values a life of learning. 4b. The organization demonstrates that acquisition of a breadth of knowledge and skills and the exercise of intellectual inquiry are integral to its educational programs. 5c. The organization demonstrates its responsiveness to those constituencies that depend on it for service. FoE Dimension 9 – Improvement—Committee 9: Foundations Institutions conduct assessment and maintain associations with other institutions and relevant professional organizations in order to effect improvement. Assessment provides feedback to new students to guide their learning, to faculty to guide their teaching, and to the institution to guide planning, resource allocation, decision making, and improvement of programs and policies. As a way to facilitate improvement, these institutions are knowledgeable about current practices at other institutions as well as relevant research and scholarship. HLC Criteria: 2b, 2c, 3a, 4c 2b. The organization’s resource base supports its educational programs and its plans for maintaining and strengthening their quality in the future. 171


Eastern Wyoming College 2c. 3a. 4c.

The organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ongoing evaluation and assessment processes provide reliable evidence of institutional effectiveness that clearly informs strategies for continuous improvement. The organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goals for student learning outcomes are clearly stated for each educational program and make effective assessment possible. (Learning and Teaching) The organization assesses the usefulness of its curricula to students who will live and work in a global, diverse, and technological society.

Self-study coordinator: Dee Ludwig, PhD, Vice President for Institutional Effectiveness dee.ludwig@ewc.wy.edu (307) 532-8221 â&#x20AC;&#x192;

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Eastern Wyoming College

Appendix G

Eastern Wyoming College Campus Maps

A

A. B. C. D. E. F.

D

B

E

Cosmetology Torrington Learning Center Lancer Hall Eastern Hall Fine Arts Center Faculty Link

C

G. H. I. J. K. L.

F

G

Legend

H

Tebbet Classroom Building Library Student Services Student Center/Cafeteria Activities Center Fitness Center

M. N. O. P. Q.

G

I

J

K

L

Veterinary Technology Mechanical Arts Com Training Center (CTC) Softball Field Large Animal Complex

M

N

O

Q

N

P

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Eastern Wyoming College

Appendix H

Undergraduate Students by Degree Seeking and Nondegree Seeking Status Appendix H Wyoming Community College Enrollment Summary for Eastern Wyoming College 07/FA Full-Time Credit Black Amer. Indian Asian or White Non-Resident Unknown Grand Total Students Non-Hispanic or Alaskan Pacific Isle Hispanic Non-Hispanic Alien Ethnicity All Students Degree Seeking M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F First-Time 3 1 0 2 0 1 5 8 75 87 3 2 0 1 86 102 First Year All Other 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 3 23 36 0 0 0 0 26 40 First Year All Other 4 1 1 1 0 0 3 2 54 113 1 0 0 0 63 117 Students Non-Degree 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 49 51 0 0 1 0 52 54 Seeking Total Full-Time 8 2 2 4 1 2 10 15 201 287 4 2 1 1 227 313 Students Part-Time Credit Students Degree Seeking First-Time 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 6 15 0 0 2 0 9 16 First Year All Other 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 19 67 0 0 4 0 23 71 First Year All Other 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 10 19 68 0 0 0 0 21 80 Students Non-Degree 0 1 1 0 0 0 10 14 314 455 0 0 2 1 327 471 Seeking Total 1 1 1 3 0 1 12 27 358 605 0 0 8 1 380 638 Part-Time Students Grand Total, 9 3 3 7 1 3 22 42 559 892 4 2 9 2 607 951 All Students

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Eastern Wyoming College

Appendix H Wyoming Community College Enrollment Summary for Eastern Wyoming College 08/FA Full-Time Credit Black Amer. Indian Asian or White Non-Resident Unknown Grand Total Students Non-Hispanic or Alaskan Pacific Isle Hispanic Non-Hispanic Alien Ethnicity All Students Degree Seeking M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F First-Time 4 3 1 0 0 0 3 7 89 91 1 0 1 0 99 101 First Year All Other 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 15 26 1 0 1 0 19 26 First Year All Other 3 1 0 0 2 1 6 11 85 113 3 1 0 0 99 127 Students Non-Degree 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 43 35 0 0 0 1 46 37 Seeking Total Full-Time 7 4 2 0 2 1 13 19 232 265 5 1 2 1 263 291 Students Part-Time Credit Students Degree Seeking First-Time 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 20 0 0 17 1 24 21 First Year All Other 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 18 68 0 0 0 1 20 73 First Year All Other 0 0 0 2 0 1 2 8 19 82 0 0 0 0 21 93 Students Non-Degree 0 0 0 1 0 0 7 10 254 413 0 1 9 4 270 429 Seeking Total Part-Time 2 1 0 3 0 1 10 21 297 583 0 1 26 6 335 616 Students Grand Total, 9 5 2 3 2 2 23 40 529 848 5 2 28 7 598 907 All Students

175


Eastern Wyoming College

Appendix H Wyoming Community College Enrollment Summary for Eastern Wyoming College 09/FA Full-Time 2 or more Credit Black White race NonStudents NonAmer. Indian Asian or NonNonResident Unknown Grand Total Degree Hispanic or Alaskan Pacific Isle Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic Alien Ethnicity All Students Seeking M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F First-Time 6 0 1 1 0 3 2 3 87 85 0 0 3 0 7 5 106 97 First Year All Other 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 4 24 38 0 0 0 1 3 1 29 45 First Year All Other 2 2 0 0 2 2 4 6 88 121 0 2 1 0 6 5 103 138 Students Non-Degree 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 49 44 0 0 0 0 8 12 60 59 Seeking Total Full-Time 9 2 1 2 3 6 9 15 248 288 0 2 4 1 24 23 298 339 Students Part-Time Credit Students Degree Seeking First-Time 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 15 0 0 0 0 14 1 18 17 First Year All Other 1 0 0 0 0 3 2 1 22 47 0 0 0 0 2 5 27 56 First Year All Other 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 2 12 60 0 0 0 0 4 11 18 75 Students Non-Degree 0 1 3 4 3 7 10 18 170 330 0 2 0 0 116 184 302 546 Seeking Total Part-Time 1 1 4 4 3 12 14 22 207 452 0 2 0 0 136 201 365 694 Students Grand 10 3 5 6 6 18 23 37 455 740 0 4 4 1 160 224 663 1033 Total, All Students

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NOVEMBER 06 VERSION WYOMING COMMUNITY COLLEGE ENROLLMENT SUMMARY FOR: E a s t e r n W y o m i n g C o l l e g eþ TERM: 07/FA LAST.DROP.DATE: 09/10/07 REPORTED BY: krussell REPORT DATE: 02/15/08 PART B - ENROLLMENT FOR CREDIT STUDENTS - UNDUPLICATED HEADCOUNT BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE ********************************************************************************************************************************** FULL TIME PART TIME GRAND TOTAL GRAND TOTAL LINE MEN WOMEN MEN WOMEN MEN WOMEN FTE NO. COUNTY (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) ********************************************************************************************************************************** 1 ALBANY 5 3 0 0 5 3 11.09 2 BIG HORN 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 3 CAMPBELL 4 4 2 1 6 5 13.26 4 CARBON 2 2 0 0 2 2 7.26 5 CONVERSE 22 49 79 145 101 194 177.13 6 CROOK 5 12 30 49 35 61 55.01 7 FREMONT 4 4 0 2 4 6 11.92 8 GOSHEN 57 91 185 268 242 359 306.55 9 HOT SPRINGS 1 0 0 0 1 0 1.51 10 JOHNSON 1 2 0 0 1 2 3.92 11 LARAMIE 16 6 0 2 16 8 31.71 12 LINCOLN 0 3 0 0 0 3 3.59 13 NATRONA 5 3 5 2 10 5 14.59 14 NIOBRARA 2 8 5 37 7 45 21.13 15 PARK 1 2 0 1 1 3 3.76 16 PLATTE 4 17 34 49 38 66 62.96 17 SHERIDAN 1 2 0 0 1 2 4.51 18 SUBLETTE 4 4 0 0 4 4 11.26 19 SWEETWATER 3 4 0 0 3 4 10.76 20 TETON 2 0 0 0 2 0 2.84 21 UINTA 5 4 0 0 5 4 12.84 22 WASHAKIE 0 3 0 0 0 3 3.67 23 WESTON 6 6 33 69 39 75 60.51 24 TOTAL WYOMING ST 150 229 373 625 523 854 831.63 *** OUT OF STATE *** 25 COLORADO 11 6 0 3 11 9 24.67 26 IDAHO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 27 MONTANA 4 11 0 0 4 11 20.09 28 NEBRASKA 31 38 6 6 37 44 91.63 29 NORTH DAKOTA 0 1 0 0 0 1 1.34 30 SOUTH DAKOTA 14 7 1 3 15 10 30.76 31 UTAH 3 0 0 1 3 1 4.09 32 OTHER STATES 12 18 0 0 12 18 40.42 33 TOT. OUT OF ST 75 81 7 13 82 94 212.96 34 FOREIGN COUNTRY 2 3 0 0 2 3 6.42 35 UNSPECIFIED 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 36 GRAND TOTALS: 227 313 380 638 607 951 1051.01

Eastern Wyoming College

Number of Students by Residency Status of Credit-seeking Students who Come to a Campus or Site for Instruction

Appendix I

177


Eastern Wyoming College

JANUARY 08 VERSION WYOMING COMMUNITY COLLEGE ENROLLMENT SUMMARY FOR: E a s t e r n W y o m i n g C o l l e g e TERM: 08/FA LAST.DROP.DATE: 09/08/08 REPORTED BY: krussell REPORT DATE: 02/13/09 PART B - ENROLLMENT FOR CREDIT STUDENTS - UNDUPLICATED HEADCOUNT BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE ********************************************************************************************************************************** FULL TIME PART TIME GRAND TOTAL GRAND TOTAL LINE MEN WOMEN MEN WOMEN MEN WOMEN FTE NO. COUNTY (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) ********************************************************************************************************************************** 1 ALBANY 7 5 0 0 7 5 16.76 2 BIG HORN 2 1 0 0 2 1 4.34 3 CAMPBELL 2 4 1 4 3 8 9.51 4 CARBON 1 2 0 1 1 3 4.09 5 CONVERSE 17 32 78 141 95 173 163.01 6 CROOK 8 14 22 69 30 83 60.17 7 FREMONT 4 3 0 4 4 7 11.76 8 GOSHEN 80 92 156 213 236 305 321.46 9 HOT SPRINGS 2 0 0 0 2 0 3.26 10 JOHNSON 1 0 0 1 1 1 2.51 11 LARAMIE 18 9 3 1 21 10 44.09 12 LINCOLN 1 3 0 0 1 3 5.76 13 NATRONA 3 3 0 2 3 5 8.92 14 NIOBRARA 6 4 6 27 12 31 23.26 15 PARK 1 1 0 0 1 1 2.17 16 PLATTE 10 13 20 57 30 70 65.17 17 SHERIDAN 2 1 0 1 2 2 3.51 18 SUBLETTE 2 2 0 0 2 2 4.92 19 SWEETWATER 0 2 0 0 0 2 2.84 20 TETON 0 1 0 0 0 1 1.09 21 UINTA 0 1 0 0 0 1 1.01 22 WASHAKIE 1 2 0 2 1 4 5.67 23 WESTON 6 10 48 80 54 90 73.09 24 TOTAL WYOMING ST 174 205 334 603 508 808 838.21 *** OUT OF STATE *** 25 COLORADO 17 14 0 1 17 15 41.76 26 IDAHO 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.26 27 MONTANA 4 12 0 0 4 12 22.34 28 NEBRASKA 39 33 1 6 40 39 93.17 29 NORTH DAKOTA 0 1 0 0 0 1 1.42 30 SOUTH DAKOTA 13 9 0 4 13 13 30.92 31 UTAH 1 2 0 1 1 3 4.59 32 OTHER STATES 13 14 0 0 13 14 37.84 33 TOT. OUT OF ST 87 85 1 13 88 98 232.26 34 FOREIGN COUNTRY 2 1 0 0 2 1 4.34 35 UNSPECIFIED 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 36 GRAND TOTALS: 263 291 335 616 598 907 1074.80

178


PART B - ENROLLMENT FOR CREDIT STUDENTS - UNDUPLICATED HEADCOUNT BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE ******************************************************************************************* FULL TIME PART TIME GRAND TOTAL GRAND TOTAL LINE MEN WOMEN MEN WOMEN MEN WOMEN FTE NO. COUNTY (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) ******************************************************************************************* 1 ALBANY 5 2 0 2 5 4 12.42 2 BIG HORN 2 0 0 0 2 0 2.26 3 CAMPBELL 3 5 0 6 3 11 14.59 4 CARBON 0 2 0 2 0 4 2.67 5 CONVERSE 28 37 87 187 115 224 186.34 6 CROOK 9 23 37 64 46 87 81.84 7 FREMONT 9 6 0 4 9 10 23.26 8 GOSHEN 85 84 139 240 224 324 312.42 9 HOT SPRINGS 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 10 JOHNSON 1 0 0 0 1 0 1.09 11 LARAMIE 18 8 0 6 18 14 39.51 12 LINCOLN 3 3 0 0 3 3 9.51 13 NATRONA 7 2 0 3 7 5 12.92 14 NIOBRARA 12 6 1 27 13 33 31.84 15 PARK 2 2 0 3 2 5 8.09 16 PLATTE 11 15 26 65 37 80 74.92 17 SHERIDAN 1 2 0 1 1 3 4.26 18 SUBLETTE 2 1 1 1 3 2 6.42 19 SWEETWATER 2 3 0 0 2 3 8.92 20 TETON 1 1 0 2 1 3 4.01 21 UINTA 1 0 1 0 2 0 1.67 22 WASHAKIE 0 1 0 0 0 1 1.09 23 WESTON 5 12 62 72 67 84 78.26 24 TOTAL WYOMING ST 207 215 354 685 561 900 918.17 *** OUT OF STATE *** 25 COLORADO 18 24 0 0 18 24 56.01 26 IDAHO 0 3 2 1 2 4 4.76 27 MONTANA 4 12 0 0 4 12 21.59 28 NEBRASKA 35 48 8 4 43 52 113.67 29 NORTH DAKOTA 0 1 0 0 0 1 1.42 30 SOUTH DAKOTA 12 12 1 2 13 14 34.09 31 UTAH 1 2 0 1 1 3 4.26 32 OTHER STATES 18 21 0 1 18 22 52.42 33 TOT. OUT OF ST 88 123 11 9 99 132 288.17 34 FOREIGN COUNTRY 3 1 0 0 3 1 5.51 35 UNSPECIFIED 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 36 GRAND TOTALS: 298 339 365 694 663 1033 1211.84

JUNE 09 VERSION WYOMING COMMUNITY COLLEGE ENROLLMENT SUMMARY FOR: EASTERN WYOMING COLLEGE TERM: 09/FA LAST.DROP.DATE: 09/14/09 REPORTED BY: KRUSSELL REPORT.DATE: 02/01/10

Eastern Wyoming College

179


Eastern Wyoming College

Appendix J

EWC Electronic Resource Room Materials List Category: Policies and Procedures Board Policies & Administrative Rules BOCES Agreement CodeRed Agreement College Catalog Concurrent/Dual Enrollment Agreements Department of Corrections Agreement Dept. of Workforce Services MOU EWC Bookstore, Outreach and Distance Learning Purchase and Mailing Procedures Faculty Handbook Goshen Community Theatre MOU High School Tuition Waivers Hours of Operation for Library, Learning Skills Lab, Student Center, Outreach Centers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; computer access Job Advertisements Marketing Style Guide Posting Flyers Procedure Resident Handbook Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy Student Code of Conduct Student Handbook Student Record Retention Procedures WCCC web site Category: Planning Documents Ag Focus Group Discussion Summary Board of Trustees Outreach Trips Crisis Response Team and Crisis Management Committee CTE Programs Advisory Committees Diversity Strategic Action Plan Douglas Branch Campus Community Advisory Board EWC Board of Trustees Agenda FoE College Studies Strategic Action Plan FoE Strategic Action Plans Foundation Membership and Fact Sheet Fox Lawson Salary Study In-Service Activity, January 2009- A Great Decision Marketing Plan Master Facilities Plan Philosophy Statement Recruitment Plan Statewide group developing online courses Strategic Plan Executive Summary, 2008-09 180


Eastern Wyoming College Strategic Planning Final Summary Reports Strategic Planning Process Strategic Planning Startup Strategic Planning Timeline Strategic Plans WCCC Mission and Purpose WCCC Statewide Strategic Plan Yearly Data Reporting Timeline Category: Governance and Committees EWC Board of Trustees Facilities Planning Advisory Committee Instruction Advisory Council, Faculty Council, Curriculum & Learning Council Job Description for Administrators Leadership Team Personnel Advisory Committee Professional Development Committee Technology Advisory Committee WCCC Website Wyoming Statutes Category: Budget and Finance ABE Grant Report 2008-2009 Approved Strategic Budgeting Framework EWC Bookstore Budget Research First Generation Scholarship Initiatives Foundation Membership and Fact Sheet Grant Analysis Perkins Grant Program SSS Grant Application Category: Accreditation Accreditation Postcard1 AVMA Biennial Report September 2007 AWS Accrediting Letter, September 2009 Foundations of ExcellenceÂŽ Final Report What is accreditation1 Email Category: Publications Adelante Ninos Afghan Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Project Chinese Golden Dragons Acrobatic Distance Learning Degree Programs Brochure Distance Learning Rotation Schedule Douglas 5-Year Plan Brochure EWC Activity Calendars Healthy Choices Presentations for Students 181


Eastern Wyoming College India Exchange In-Service Agenda, April 5, 2010 - Mario Rivas Presentations In-Service Presentation, Fall 2007 (Pandemic Flu Plan) In-Service Presentation, Fall 2009 (H1N1 Flu) Lancer Post 4-21-09 Press Releases Public Policy and You Discussions Schedule of Classes Brochure Student Center Contest Flyer - mission/vision statements The Torrington Telegram Category: Statistical Reports 2006 Institutional Research Focus Group Report 2008 State Report Card on Higher Education, National Center for Public Policy ABE/GED/ESL Student Numbers Ag Focus Group Discussion Summary CAAP Test Results Campus Security Data Analysis Cutting Tool Report COMPASS Demographic Report, Fall 2009 Economic Analysis Division of the State of Wyoming, 2007, 2009 3Q09 Economic Indicators Enrollment Reports EWC Administration Survey or Interview note EWC Employees - list of councils, committees, etc FT Faculty numbers FTE numbers Goshen County School District Data Graduate Survey Results Instructional Program Review Statistical Data IPEDS Feedback Reports Partnership Report to WCCC Position Upgrades & New Positions Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages, Bureau of Labor Statistics Salary Increase History SMARTHINKING Usage Reports SSS Grant Survey Results Fall 2008 Tuition Rate University of Wyoming Transfer Student Assessment WCCC Enrollment & Level of Instruction Audit Report, 2010 WCCC Reports WCCC Web Site Wyoming Department of Corrections Wyoming Department of Employment Research and Planning Wyoming Market Research Center

182


Eastern Wyoming College Category: Academics College Studies Committee Course Syllabus Format Faculty Qualifications Outcomes Assessment Summary Reports Program Maps Category: Student Services Campus Resource Officer Program Intramural Sports Learning Skills Lab Programming Pre-Registration Information - Parents Program Residence Hall Educational Programming Student Services Educational Programming Category: Foundations of Excellence® Evidence Advising Handbook 2007-2008 Afghan Women’s Project – Postcard and Presenter Itinerary Ambassadors Team Purpose Athletics – Volleyball Questionnaire and Welcome Letter Bridge Program Discussions Bridge Program Documents FA08 Catalog Fragments – Philosophy Evidence CCSSE Partial Survey Results 2007 Centennial Singers Poster College Activity Calendars 2008 – August – November College Studies Challenge Process College Studies Course Evaluations FA07 College Studies Course Syllabi College Studies Survey Results COMPASS Demographics COMPASS Testing Summary Report 2008 Concurrent Enrollment Agreement Course Syllabus Format Distance Learning Documents Diversity Pictures – Evidence of Diversity on Posters, Flyers, Bulletin Boards Domestic Violence Awareness Month Poster Domestic Violence Awareness Workshop Poster Drug-Alcohol Resources FA08 EWC Student Clubs EWC Overview Booklet 2007-2008 EWC Partnerships 2008 EWC Service Area Map EWC Student Clubs – Sponsors and Activities EWC Web Site – Catalog Flow Charts – Enrollment, Recruitment, Retention Taskforce FoE Faculty/Staff Survey Results – Open Ended Questions Summary 183


Eastern Wyoming College FoE New Student Survey Summary – Open Ended Questions FT Employees – Breakdown by Gender and Ethnicity GEAR UP Brochure GEAR UP Demographics GEAR UP Forms Package Great Decisions – Compilation Results of SP08 In-Service Activity In-Service Activities FA08 Interviews – College Studies Instructors Letter Requesting Students’ Favorite Recipes and Baby Picture Letter to Rodeo Participants’ Parents Library Survey SP08 Managing Home, Family and Studies Workshop Brochure and Memo Marketing Initiatives New Faculty Session Topics Orientation – Packet Checklist Outcomes Assessment Summary Report 2007-2008 Policy Manual Pre-Registration Interviews Summary Presentation of FoE – FA08 In-Service Presentation of FoE – SP09 In-Service Project Stay Workshop Brochure and Memo Public Policy and You Series – Program Description Public Policy and You Workshop Flyer Recruiting – Application, Campus Map, and View Book Recruitment Poster Registration Add – Questions for Future Student Registrations Resident Student Handbook Returning Adult Students Programming Brochure FA08 Senior Leadership Interviews Serve the Public Good – Student Organizations and Clubs SmarThinking Usage Report 2008-2009 Special Focus Workshops Interviews Summary Strategic Plan – Action Plans 2008 Strategic Plan Summary Brochure 2008 Student Center Remodel Project Student Code of Conduct Student Orientation Packet Materials Student Senate Civitas Procedures Syllabi – Examples Transitions Dimensions Q&A Tutor Schedule FA08 Unit-Level Academic Administrator Interviews Web Site Interviews Summary

184


Eastern Wyoming College

Appendix K

EWC Physical Resource Room Materials List Category: Policies and Procedures College Catalogs Emergency Procedures Booklet Faculty Handbook Student Handbook Category: Planning Documents Ag Focus Group Discussion Summary Crisis Response Team and Crisis Management Committee CTE Programs Advisory Committees Facilities Planning Advisory Committee Marketing Plan Space Needs Analysis and Planning Concepts Study Strategic Plans Strategic Planning Process Strategic Planning Startup WCCC Statewide Strategic Plan Workforce Alliance Group Category: Governance and Committees EWC Board of Trustees Facilities Planning Advisory Committee Instruction Advisory Council, Faculty Council, Curriculum & Learning Council Leadership Team Category: Budget and Finance EWC Annual Budget Books Financial Statement Audits GEAR UP Program Retrofit Grants WCCC Funding Allocation Model Federal Student Aid Program Participation Agreement Category: Accreditation 2001 HLC Team Visit Report AVMA Biennial Report September 2007 Foundations of Excellence速 Final Report Letter from HLC (accepting progress report), April 8, 2004 Letter from HLC (extending accreditation to include distance delivery), October 21, 2005 Progress Report to HLC, February, 2004 Report of a Comprehensive Visit, 2000 Request for Institutional Change, 2005 185


Eastern Wyoming College Category: Publications Emergency Procedures Booklet Healthy Choices Presentations for Students Lancer Luminaries Lancer Post Issues Press Releases Schedule of Classes Brochure Category: Statistical Reports An Ethnographic Study of WY National Guard Civilian Outsiders Looking In BOCES Reports CCSSE Reports University of Wyoming Transfer Reports Category: Academics Block Transfer Agreements College Studies Committee Course proposals for WMST courses Distance Learning Committee Faculty Workloads Interpreting COMPASS and ACT Placement Scores Outcomes Assessment Summary Reports Student Evaluations Wyoming Higher Education Transfer Guide Category: Student Services Student Orientation Information Packet Category: Foundations of Excellence速 Evidence Steering Committee Notebooks Guidebook Presentations and Information

186


Eastern Wyoming College Outreach Service Area

Torrington

Douglas

Chugwater l Glendo l Glenrock l Guernsey Hulett l LaGrange l Lusk l Moorcroft Newcastle l Sundance l Upton l Wheatland

W Y O M I N G


Eastern Wyoming College  Foundations of Excellence® Final Report    August 19, 2009    Submitted by  Dr. Dee Ludwig, Vice President for Institutional Effectiveness, Co‐Liaison  Dr. Rex Cogdill, Dean of Student Services, Co‐Liaison  Dr. Richard Holcomb, Vice President for Learning, Co‐Liaison  and the Administration, Faculty, and Staff of Eastern Wyoming College 


ii   


With Special Appreciation to these    Steering Committee Members    Dee Ludwig – Co‐Liaison  Rex Cogdill – Co‐Liaison  Richard Holcomb – Co‐Liaison  Kimberly Russell – WESS Administrator  Lynn Wamboldt – FoEtec Technician  Peggy Knittel – Co‐Chair, Philosophy  Wayne Deahl – Co‐Chair, Philosophy  Melissa Meeboer – Co‐Chair, Organization  Sue Schmidt – Co‐Chair, Organization  Larry Curtis – Co‐Chair, Learning  Patti Sue Peterson – Co‐Chair, Learning  Lorna Stickel – Co‐Chair, Campus Culture  Kellee Gooder – Co‐Chair, Campus Culture  Judy Brown – Co‐Chair, Transitions  Heidi Smith‐Edmunds – Co‐Chair, Transitions  Debbie Ochsner – Co‐Chair, All Students  Diane McQueen – Co‐Chair, Diversity  Patsy Velázquez – Co‐Chair, Diversity  Monte Stokes – Co‐Chair, Roles & Purposes  Janet Martindale – Co‐Chair, Roles & Purposes  Tami Afdahl – Co‐Chair, Improvement  Connie Woehl – Co‐Chair, Improvement  Josie Davison – Student Representative  Steven Vetter – Student Representative     

Pictured left to right:  Sue Schmidt, Monte Stokes, Diane McQueen, Rex Cogdill, Patsy Velázquez,  Richard Holcomb, Janet Martindale, Larry Curtis, Judy Brown, Dee Ludwig, Melissa Meeboer, Lynn  Wamboldt, Heidi Smith‐Edmunds, Peggy Knittel, Lorna Stickel, Kellee Gooder

 

iii   


Foundational Dimensions Committee Members  Philosophy Dimension  Committee 

Organization Dimension  Committee 

Learning Dimension  Committee 

Peggy Knittel – Co‐Chair  Wayne Deahl – Co‐Chair  Tom Andersen  Angie Babcock  Andrea Bryant  John Ely  Carmie Howe  Jan Lilletvedt   

Melissa Meeboer – Co‐Chair Sue Schmidt – Co‐Chair  Aaron Bahmer  Kitson Brown  Ellen Creagar  Deb Doren  Darci Duran  Anne Gardetto  Kay Gardner  Mel Hanson  Lance Korell  Janan McCreery  Karen Parriott 

Larry Curtis – Co‐Chair  Patti Sue Peterson – Co‐Chair  Ed Bittner  Ray DeWitt  Teri Hauf  Geri Lewis  Sue McBride  Marilyn Miller  Tim Walter  Chris Wenzel   

  Campus Culture Dimension  Committee  Lorna Stickel – Co‐Chair  Kellee Gooder – Co‐Chair  Casey Debus  Chris Hilton  Daniel Fielder  Donna Charron  Kim Russell  Kim Jones  Pam Capron  Tina Christinck  Larry Curtis  Bob Creagar 

Transitions Dimension  Committee 

All Students Dimension  Committee 

Judy Brown – Co‐Chair

Debbie Ochsner – Chair  Kim Barker  Jake Clark  Josie Davison  Annie Hilton  Viqi Jansing  Jim Maffe  Lance Petsch  Leland Vetter 

Heidi Smith‐Edmunds – Co‐Chair 

Brandy Horejs  Kate Steinbock  LeeAnn Forrester  Janet Bass 

  Diversity Dimension  Committee 

Roles & Purposes  Dimension Committee 

Improvement Dimension  Committee 

Diane McQueen – Co‐Chair  Patsy Velázquez – Co‐Chair  Suzanne Andrews  Madelon Daniels  Andy Espinoza  John Nesbitt  Marilyn Miller  Diana Quealy‐Berge  Coventry Dougherty  Adrianna Deleon  Winston Harris  Shelly Miller  Zach Serda 

Monte Stokes – Co‐Chair Janet Martindale – Co‐Chair  Mike Durfee  Jan King  Dru Rafferty  Susan Walker 

Tami Afdahl – Co‐Chair  Connie Woehl – Co‐Chair  Dixie Kroenlein  Dennis Misurell  Lynn Wamboldt  Sandy Haynes  Deb Eutsler  Kim Conzelman  Chris Urbanek  Judy Brown  Cheryl Raboin  JD Sexton  Becky Lorenz 

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Table of Contents  Preface and Acknowledgements ......................................................................................... vi  Executive Summary .............................................................................................................. 1  Chapter 1:  Introduction and Overview ............................................................................... 2  Chapter 2:  Philosophy ......................................................................................................... 5  Chapter 3:  Organization ...................................................................................................... 8  Chapter 4:  Learning ........................................................................................................... 16  Chapter 5:  Campus Culture ............................................................................................... 25  Chapter 6:  Transitions ....................................................................................................... 32  Chapter 7:  All Students ..................................................................................................... 37  Chapter 8:  Diversity ........................................................................................................... 44  Chapter 9:  Roles and Purposes ......................................................................................... 51  Chapter 10:  Improvement ................................................................................................ 58  Chapter 11:  Action Items & Recommended Actions ........................................................ 63  Chapter 12:  Reflections & Next Steps ............................................................................... 68  Appendices  A.   Key to Acronyms ........................................................................................... 70  B.   Timeline ......................................................................................................... 71  C.   Foundations of Excellence New Student Survey .......................................... 74  D.   Foundations of Excellence Faculty/Staff Survey ......................................... 104  E.   Agreement Between Eastern Wyoming College and The Higher Learning  Commission  for Special Emphasis Self‐Study ............................................ 130  F. Current Practices Inventory ........................................................................ 138  G. Foundations of Excellence Handout at The Higher Learning Commission  Annual Meeting Poster Session .................................................................. 146  H. Strategic Action Plans .................................................................................. 148   

 

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Preface and Acknowledgements  Eastern Wyoming College’s Foundations of Excellence® Steering Committee is proud to  present this final report to the EWC community and outside constituents.  It represents  the efforts of a great many people including staff, faculty, administrators, and students  who served on committees as active researchers and participants.  We thank these  participants and all others who perhaps cheered us on from the sidelines.    In addition, we wish to express our gratitude to the Policy Center on the First Year of  College for allowing us to be one of the 2‐year colleges selected to participate in the  2008‐2009 Foundations of Excellence® in the First College Year.  We did not know, in the  beginning of this project, the true depth of the journey we would be embarking upon or  the discoveries along the way.  The Policy Center provided valuable resources and help  the entire way.    This endeavor started as an action item that was written utilizing our new method of  college‐wide strategic planning.  It was a substantive step toward a quality improvement  journey that we hope is just a beginning and will continue for years to come.  The  knowledge gained will be used to write additional action plans that will focus on helping  Eastern Wyoming College improve how it works with new students in several key areas  including student advising, orientation programs and courses, retention initiatives, and  professional development among others.  The institution decided to submit a request to The Higher Learning Commission to allow  us to pursue a special emphasis self‐study.  The Agreement between Eastern Wyoming  College and The Higher Learning Commission on a Special Emphasis Self‐Study Option  for the Comprehensive Evaluation Scheduled for 2010‐2011 with a Special Emphasis On:   The First Year of College was signed by Dr. Sylvia Manning, President of The Higher  Learning Commission, on December 4, 2008.  Eastern Wyoming College’s Self‐Study  Coordinator was Dr. Dee Ludwig, Vice President for Institutional Effectiveness.   

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Executive Summary  Eastern Wyoming College applied to The Higher Learning Commission for permission to  conduct a special emphasis reaccreditation self‐study on the first‐year experience.  The  year‐long Foundations of Excellence (FoE) project was an exciting self‐study of the  College’s practices as it relates to first‐year students.  The nine Dimension Committees  included Philosophy, Organization, Learning, Campus Culture, Transitions, All Students,  Diversity, Roles & Purposes, and Improvement.  The Dimension Committee Co‐chairs,  three co‐liaisons, the survey administrator, and the FoE Technician then formed the  overall steering committee.  The overall participation rate of employees on the  committees reflected 75 percent.      Information gathered included student surveys, faculty/staff surveys, a current practices  inventory, in‐person interviews, and numerous anecdotes and opinions.  Throughout  the process, the committees were diligent in their pursuit of information and thorough  in their reports.  From these pieces flowed the final reports, the assigned dimension  grades, and the recommended actions.    The 63 recommended actions were reviewed by the steering committee and co‐liaisons  who then grouped them into seven primary theme or cluster areas.  These groupings  included first‐year communication improvements, advising improvements, College  Studies improvements, retention initiatives, diversity improvements, assessment tools &  institutional data usage, and professional development improvements.  Strategic action  plans were developed for these seven areas.  The strategic action plans were embedded  into the institutional strategic planning documents.  Over the course of the next year,  the plan is for these strategic action plans to be addressed by the appropriate  institutional committees.       As we look forward to the next academic year, 2009‐2010, our Dimension Committees  will expand their role and continue the self‐study to include the criterion components,  which have been interspersed throughout the nine areas. The overall self‐study will be  completed by early summer 2010 and sent to The Higher Learning Commission.  The  College’s accreditation visit is scheduled for October 25‐27, 2010.     

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Chapter 1—Introduction and Overview    Eastern Wyoming College (EWC) is a two‐year, state‐supported, comprehensive  community college.  The main campus is located in Torrington, Wyoming, with a branch  campus located in Douglas, Wyoming.  Both communities have populations of about  6000 people.  Torrington and Douglas are the largest towns in the EWC service area,  which spans 16,343 square miles and includes six counties on the eastern side of  Wyoming.  Twelve smaller communities in the service area have outreach sites for the  college and have part‐time or full‐time outreach coordinators.    EWC offers programs leading to associate of arts and science degrees, applied associate  degrees and certificates.  Whereas more than 40 degrees and certificate programs are  offered, signature degrees/programs include Criminal Justice, Welding and Joining  Technology, Veterinary Technology, Cosmetology, Business, Education, Agriculture, and  Interdisciplinary Studies.  The college maintains a strong commitment to its outreach  programs and is equally supportive of the transfer part of its mission.    Student enrollment over the last ten years has varied slightly but averages about 1000  Full‐time Equivalent (FTE) or about 1600 headcount.  Most of the enrollment is from in‐ state with over 40% of the enrollment coming from Goshen County, where Torrington is  located.  Another 20% of EWC’s enrollment comes from Converse County, the location  of the Douglas campus.    The college has a student/faculty ratio of 10.8 students per faculty member.  Many of  the students come from a graduating high school class of 50 or fewer students and from  small, rural communities.  An earlier survey conducted for a grant project indicated that  students come to EWC because of the low cost of tuition, the rural setting, and the  programs.  It is felt that, for some, EWC offers a gradual transition between high school  and a four‐year school.    In an effort to better serve EWC students more consistently, the college administration  researched programs that would help demonstrate continuous quality improvement  through the Higher Learning Commission.  A group of college representatives attended  an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) session at the 2008 Higher Learning  Commission Annual Meeting.  AQIP is an alternative accrediting process to the  traditional PEAQ self‐study used by most colleges and universities.  Participation in AQIP  would allow the college to embark on an annual continuous quality improvement  process instead of a 10‐year self‐study, which requires preparation time of up to two‐ three years.   After presenting the AQIP information to various campus groups, the  college decided to apply for acceptance into the AQIP program.  The timeline to  complete the application was short, and the college needed to be ready to proceed if it  was approved for AQIP.  Although EWC heard from the Higher Learning Commission late  2   


in the summer of 2008 that the timeline was too short to be accepted into AQIP for this  accreditation cycle, the college maintained its interest in participating in the First Year of  College.   EWC remains committed to pursuing admittance into AQIP once the current  cycle of the PEAQ self‐study and accreditation visit is completed.      Eastern Wyoming College applied to the Policy Center on the First Year of College in  May, 2008, to participate in the Foundations of Excellence® project.  The college was  informed of its acceptance in July and made plans to attend the launch meeting in  August, 2008, in Asheville, North Carolina.  EWC took a group of ten to Asheville, which  included two students, three administrators, three faculty, and two staff members.  We  were the only group with students in attendance at the meeting.    At the launch meeting, ideas were developed for identifying co‐chairs and the  membership lists for the nine Dimension Committees.  EWC appreciated the time that  was built into the launch meeting that allowed for our participants to work as a cohort  group and make substantive progress with the project development.  An initial steering  committee meeting was held after the group returned.    At the 2008 Fall In‐service meeting (held prior to the start of the 2008 Fall semester), a  campus‐wide presentation was made to inform all EWC personnel about the  Foundations of Excellence® (FoE) project.  In addition to the co‐liaisons, the Dimensions  Co‐Chairs were included in the presentation.  This was a good activity because it not  only informed the campus community about the project but it also served as a method  to solicit additional volunteers for the Dimensions Committees.  The initial participation  rate of college employees on the committees was 75%. A rather ambitious timeline was  developed so that any action plans that were recommended for immediate  implementation could be part of the college’s overall strategic planning process for the  upcoming year.    The FoE Faculty/Staff and New Student Surveys were distributed in September and  October, 2008.  The Faculty/Staff Survey participation rate was 81.9%, and the New  Student Survey participation rate was 66%.  The New Student Survey was administered  via paper/pencil whereas the Faculty/Staff Survey was administered online.   Unfortunately, we did not have the capacity to administer the New Student Survey  online, or the return rate might have been even higher.  The Steering Committee,  however, was satisfied with the participation rate on both surveys.    During the fall semester and into the spring semester, the Steering Committee  continued to hold monthly meetings.  The Co‐Liaisons met more often and sometimes  on a weekly basis.  The Dimensions Committees met throughout the fall semester, and  most of them finished their meetings and were analyzing their data by the end of the  fall semester.  The first Dimension reports were submitted to the Policy Center in  December, 2008, with the last ones being submitted in March and early April of 2009.   The FoE final comprehensive report was completed at the end of May.    3   


Participation at the webinars sponsored by the Policy Center was sporadic and  committee members attended as schedules allowed.  It was convenient to have the  webinars and information available on the FoEtec system as supplied by the Policy  Center.    As the Dimensions Committee reports came to the Steering Committee, certain themes  began to emerge.  For example, improving advising as an action recommendation  seemed to come up in almost every report.  The Dimensions Committee Chairs utilized  various approaches to help their members research, understand the data, and bring  about consensus and develop recommendations to improve Eastern Wyoming College’s  processes and practices in working with new students.    The Foundations of Excellence® is a comprehensive, externally guided self‐study process  which has as an end result recommendations for the college’s improvement in working  with first‐year students.  How these recommendations are implemented and carried  forward is up to the college, and it is anticipated that some of the resulting action plans  will take a short amount of time to implement while some will take far longer, possibly  several years.      Eastern Wyoming College applied to the Higher Learning Commission to use the  Foundations of Excellence® in the First College Year as a special emphasis self‐study for  its comprehensive evaluation scheduled for 2010‐2011.  The memorandum of  understanding approving the request was signed by The Higher Learning Commission  President Sylvia Manning on December 4, 2008.    

 

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Chapter 2—Philosophy Dimension  Foundations Institutions intentionally cultivate learning environments for new students that emerge from a philosophy of two-year colleges as gateways to higher education. The philosophy is explicit and easily understood. It is consistent with the institutional mission, reflects a consensus of internal and external constituencies, and is widely disseminated. The philosophy is also the basis for organizational policies, practices, structures, leadership, and resource allocation to support the new student experience.

The Philosophy Dimension Committee was led by Wayne Deahl, Division Chair Arts,  Humanities, Social & Behavioral Sciences, and Dr. Peggy Knittel, Science Instructor.   These two long‐term faculty members are well acquainted with Eastern Wyoming  College’s practices and policies. The Philosophy Dimension Committee was charged with  examining three performance indicators relative to the status of a philosophy statement  and application for the first‐year experience at Eastern Wyoming College. The indicators  are 1) whether such a statement exists; 2) if a statement exists, its influence on current  practices and policies related to the first‐year experience; and 3) to what extent the  statement has been disseminated to various departments, divisions, Outreach sites and  other areas of the college.  With regard to the first performance indicator, the committee agreed that a philosophy  statement specific to the first‐year experience does not exist at Eastern Wyoming  College. This provides, then, the obvious answer to the #2 and #3 indicators. Given the  lack of a statement addressing the first‐year experience, there is no subsequent  influence on EWC policies and practices.  However, the committee agreed that, after examining the results of the FoE surveys,  there is evidence of an implied philosophy, or philosophies, existing at Eastern Wyoming  College. This is supported by the Faculty/Staff Survey where approximately 61% of the  respondents indicated that a philosophy for working with new students had been at  least moderately communicated to them. Almost one‐third of the faculty/staff rated this  as high to very high.   Similar or greater results were noted in responses to the following questions: "Has a  department/unit philosophy for working with new students...been communicated to  you?" (yes‐64.2%); "Does this institution operate from a commonly held philosophy  about the new student experience?" (yes‐61.2%); and “Does your department/unit  operate from a commonly held philosophy for working with new students?" (yes‐ 69.4%). Slightly more than one‐third of the faculty/staff rated all three as high to very  high indicating a clear perception of an implied philosophy. Even greater survey  numbers indicated belief in the value of a first‐year philosophy (yes‐85.7%) and that  Eastern Wyoming College is committed to the success of their first‐year students (yes‐ 87.7%).   5   


Key indicators of this implied philosophy, as found by the Philosophy Dimension  Committee, are found in fragments of the EWC college catalog, in the college’s current  strategic plan, the college’s mission and vision statements, and in the organization of  the EWC student orientation. EWC student housing has started work on a new  statement of philosophy which will be included with the 2009‐2010 materials. Other  indicators were found in EWC coaches' conversations with student athletes, in a  comprehensive document from Student Services, and in recruiting letters from specific  programs sent to prospective students. Some of the strongest indicators of a first‐year  philosophy were found in the EWC Bridge Program materials and in Distance Education  brochures and letters.  However, these documents affect only one segment of the  college’s first‐year student population.    All of these indicators suggest that a written philosophy statement is needed for Eastern  Wyoming College. The Philosophy Dimension Committee forwarded the following draft  of a possible statement.  The Steering Committee reviewed the statement and agreed  that it serves as a starting point for the creation of a philosophy statement addressing  the student’s first year at EWC.    Eastern Wyoming College is committed to providing a First‐Year Student  Experience that promotes student academic success in a challenging but  supportive environment, facilitates the transition to college for first‐time  students, and helps students identify and achieve their personal goals.  EWC's  First‐Year Student Experience is designed to foster personal growth, increasing  independence, ethical behavior, and personal responsibility for learning.   EWC's First‐Year Experience also affords opportunities for student involvement  in activities to enhance social development.  Other comments and concepts considered by the Philosophy Dimension Committee for  addressing this issue include the following:   valuing student success, giving students  personal attention, stressing the importance of academic success for first‐year students,  addressing other first‐year student needs, requiring College Studies class in the first  semester of attendance, and addressing the importance of character development.  A  complete list of comments can be found in the Philosophy Dimension report.  Recommended Action Items:  •

Create a formal statement regarding the first‐year experience of EWC students.   (High priority) 

Draft a philosophy statement for the first‐year experience at Eastern Wyoming  College. (High priority) 

Formally, adopt the first‐year philosophy statement and encourage its practice  throughout the college. (High priority) 

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Publish and disseminate the first‐year philosophy statement as widely as  possible. The committee recommends that the statement should be published in  the college’s catalog, on the EWC website, and in all appropriate documents  prepared for current and prospective students, faculty, staff, and general public.  (High priority) 

The Philosophy Dimension Committee assigned a grade of “D” for this area.      

 

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Chapter 3—Organization Dimension  Foundations Institutions provide a comprehensive, coordinated, and flexible approach to the new student experience through effective organizational structures and policies. These structures and policies guide and align all aspects of the new student experience. Through effective partnerships, critical stakeholders such as instructional, administrative, and student services units provide a coherent experience for new students that is enhanced by ongoing faculty and staff development activities and appropriate budgetary arrangements.

The Organization Dimension Committee was co‐chaired by Melissa Meeboer, a faculty  member in the Business Department, and Sue Schmidt, Records Administrator in  Student Services.  The committee’s first meeting time was spent reviewing the  Dimension’s Performance Indicators (PI’s) and discussing how, in general, Eastern  Wyoming College was organized to address the standards set forth in the Organization  Dimension.  Committee members were to gather materials to be used as evidence in  support of the college’s efforts to meet these standards.  Once this evidence was  identified and gathered, it was combined with the results of the FoE Faculty/Staff and  New Student surveys in completing a final report.  The committee also reviewed  material showing which criteria from the Higher Learning Commission’s self‐study  aligned with the FoE Organization Dimension.  PI 2.1  First‐Term Students – To what degree does Eastern Wyoming College’s  organizational structure facilitate the following actions as they apply to first‐term  students?  Identification of “First‐Time‐at‐EWC” Students:  Students are identified on course  section enrollment rosters (provided to the instructor prior to the first class meeting) as  either FH (first‐time post high school), FT (first time), or TR (transfer).  While this is  useful in identifying first‐time students, most faculty members are either unaware of the  meaning of the codes or do not see this as an important factor in how they  communicate with or relate to the first‐time student (as compared to how they relate  with returning students).  These faculty do not discern between the first‐time and  returning student when looking at risk factors associated with student success.   Targeted Communication to First‐Time Students:  EWC targets a number of  communications to first‐time students in a variety of formats both prior to and after  their arrival on campus.  These include telephone calls and personalized mailings to  students who have indicated an interest in EWC and those who have actually enrolled in  the college.  Letters are sent to new students informing them about summer  registration and also about fall orientation.  Similar communications are sent to  identified groups such as those who have been out of school for longer than a year  (older than 19 years of age) and online students.  The letters to online students contain  information about how to log in and participate in an online class.  8   


First‐time students are invited to fall orientation and given the opportunity to meet with  their academic advisor individually and as a group (with advisees having the same  major).   Communications targeted to first‐time students appear to be adequate as evidenced in  results found in both the Faculty/Staff and New Student surveys.  In the Faculty/Staff  survey, 63% of the respondents expressed belief that EWC, to a moderate degree, had  developed an integrated approach to the first year that supports routine  communication.  In addition, almost 87% of the students surveyed felt that the college  moderately to very highly communicated its expectations related to financial aid.  Not all targeted communications efforts, however, were as effective as they might have  been, which leaves room for improvement.  For example, the advisors are not provided  with any set agenda when meeting with their students at fall orientation.  This allows  the possibility for a less than effective contact with students at this early point in the  semester.  It is also less than clear as to who has the responsibility for advising  “interdisciplinary students” and those who have not declared a major.  Without this  determination, it is difficult to target communication regarding academic advising to  these first‐time students.  Early Warning Initiatives Include Special Attention to First‐Time Students:  EWC  attempts to identify and help at‐risk first‐time students prior to the start of their college  career.  Most students applying to the college have taken the ACT.  Students whose ACT  or COMPASS scores indicate a need for developmental coursework in math, English, or  reading are informed about EWC’s Summer Bridge program that takes place the week  prior to the start of the fall semester.  Participants take one week of coursework in  math, English, and reading basics and are then re‐tested to determine their proper  placement in developmental or college level courses.  At this time there has been no  follow‐up study on the success of those students who move from developmental to  college level courses due to their participation in the Summer Bridge program.  This will  need to be done in order to assess the long term effectiveness of the academic skills  they attained in this week‐long course.  This early warning initiative, however, can be circumvented at a number of places.  For a  number of reasons, not all admitted students take the ACT, which can make course  placement difficult.  Students who have not taken the ACT are required to take the  COMPASS test for placement purposes, but sometimes this does not take place until the  day before the start of the fall semester.  Thus, not only do the students miss out on the  opportunity to participate in the Summer Bridge program, but they also run the risk of  not being able to get into the proper developmental course because all sections are full.   This limits the classes in which they may enroll, and because of their academic  deficiencies, it compromises their ability to do well in the classes they do take.  Since developmental coursework does not count towards the attainment of a degree or  certificate, many students are reluctant to enroll in these classes, even though they  9   


greatly increase their chances of degree/certificate completion.  Students who are  unable or unwilling to enroll in developmental classes at the beginning of their academic  career run the risk of failing the college level courses in which they enroll.  Thus, the  efforts of this early warning initiative are thwarted by the limitation of the number of  course offerings as well as poor planning on the part of the student.  Advising Includes Special Attention to First‐Time Students:  While students are given  the opportunity to meet with their academic advisors at pre‐registration or at summer  registration, there is no documented special attention given to first‐time students.  First‐ time and returning students are treated as one with the advisor explaining the academic  program’s requirements, helping the student develop a course schedule, and assisting  them with the registration process.    Since students may register for classes at any of the summer pre‐registrations or even  during a campus visit, there may��not always be an academic advisor present to help  them with their course scheduling.  In these cases advisors, who are not part of the  faculty or faculty who do not teach in the area of the student’s interest, may be called  upon to assist the student in developing a course schedule.  This may result in students  being placed in courses that are inappropriate for them or out of sequence, which can  frustrate these students.  In addition, these students will miss out on some of the other  aspects of academic advising which include a review of placement scores, discussion of  career aspirations, and non‐classroom opportunities that might be available as they  move through their academic coursework.   PI 2.2  Continuing Students – To what degree does Eastern Wyoming College’s  organizational structure facilitate the following actions as they apply to any enrolled  student who has not achieved sophomore status?  Monitoring Progress Toward Degree/Certificate Completion:  The college catalog is  updated annually, and students, in consultation with their academic advisors, use it to  develop their course schedules.  There is no standardized method used by the academic  advisors to track their advisees’ progress toward degree/certificate completion,  although the college’s student information system, LancerNet, provides a degree audit  that lists the classes the students have successfully completed and those needed in  order to graduate.    Other methods the college uses to track student progress include 1) the requirement  that a student must obtain the Vice President for Learning’s signature in order to enroll  in 19 credits or more in one semester; 2) the use of Advisor Alert notices that are sent to  the Student Retention Committee (a copy is sent to the student’s advisor) whenever an  instructor feels a student is struggling academically in a class.; and 3) the use of midterm  deficiency reports (sent to students at the midpoint of each semester), which indicate if  the student is receiving either a “D” or “F” in any class in which they are enrolled.   

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Opportunities for improvement include a more universal use of LancerNet for advising  students.  LancerNet will allow students to register for classes, check grades, and  perform unofficial degree audits.  Faculty receive little training on how to use this tool,  and the committee feels that a regular, standardized approach would increase and  improve the effectiveness of advising through use of LancerNet.  Standardized  procedures have also not been developed for follow‐up on advisor alerts and midterm  deficiencies.  Regular, standardized training on the use of these tools and identified  procedures for utilizing them would greatly increase their effectiveness in addressing  students’ progress toward academic completion.  Make it Easy to Connect to Appropriate Sources of Campus‐Based Assistance:  Printed  signs and posters are regularly distributed across campus announcing special events and  activities, meetings, and exams.  Because of the size of the campus, faculty and staff are  familiar with the services provided by the various offices and are able to direct students  to these resources.  In the FoE New Student survey, students expressed a high degree of  confidence (81.4%) that they were receiving proper directions by faculty and staff to  campus‐based assistance.  The committee used the New Student and Faculty/Staff surveys to examine a number of  areas where students were directed to campus‐based assistance.  These areas included  1. Administrative Assistance:  Students surveyed indicated that 77.4% of them  either highly or very highly felt that the college was organized to answer  administration questions.  Almost 74% of the faculty felt at least highly confident  that they could correctly refer new students with administrative questions to the  proper source.  In this area both students and faculty felt confident and  knowledgeable about where students should go with administrative questions.  2. Non‐Academic Assistance:  In the non‐academic areas, faculty and students felt  less sure of how the College was organized to provide assistance.  Over half  (58.3%) of faculty felt at least highly confident that they could correctly refer  new students for help about personal issues.  Less than half (49%) of students  knew where to go for money management, family matters, and other personal  issues.  In answering demographic questions on the COMPASS tests, students  indicated a need for help in a number of areas including financial aid, off‐campus  work, and personal concerns.  The FoE New Student survey results showed that  almost 72% of EWC students felt that the college moderately to very highly  connected them with community resources and support services to alleviate  household issues.  Information regarding other modes of assistance such as  SMARTTHINKING (online tutoring program) and the Learning Skills Lab is made  available to the student on the campus website.  Individual course syllabi contain  information about available resources for academic help, and links are found  throughout the online course materials that connect to services such as the  library, tutoring services, or technical help.  3. Coursework Assistance:  Both students and faculty expressed confidence that  they knew where to refer students for assistance with their coursework.  Almost  11   


75% of the faculty felt at least highly confident that they could correctly refer  new students for help with their coursework, and almost 72% of the students  felt highly confident that they knew where to seek help with coursework.   Answers to demographic questions on the COMPASS tests indicated that 30% of  the students tested requested help with reading skills, study skills, writing skills,  or math skills or any combination of the four.  4. Academic Rules Assistance:  Again, both the students and faculty were fairly  knowledgeable about where to refer students with questions regarding  academic rules.  Almost 75% of the faculty felt at least highly confident they  could correctly refer new students to the proper office with questions regarding  academic rules.  Over 69% of the students highly or very highly understood  where they could go to answer questions regarding academic rules.  5. Involvement in College Organization/Event Assistance:  Students lack an  understanding of the organization of the college in seeking information about  being involved with a college‐sponsored organization or event (51.8% had  moderate to no understanding).  Faculty similarly lack confidence in directing  students to these experiences (43.4% had moderate to no understanding).  The committee felt that new students could receive information regarding resources for  assistance and involvement with college‐sponsored organizations and events through an  improved orientation and also through more quality communication from Student  Services with new students prior to their arrival on campus.  Better organized and more  frequent communication to faculty (and especially new faculty) about sources of  assistance can also improve students’ knowledge of these areas for help.  Special Attention for Students Repeating Courses:  Registration forms flag students  repeating courses with an “R.”  However, this could include a student who registered for  a course and then exited from it early in the semester.  This is the only specific  procedure at EWC for monitoring students who are repeating courses.  Special Attention for Students with Grade Point Averages Below 2.0:  Students with a  GPA below 2.0 after their first semester are referred to Project Stay, a retention strategy  workshop presented each semester which includes discussion on study skills, time  management, how academic standing affects financial aid, and more.  EWC has a  Student Retention Team that identifies at‐risk students and assigns staff to monitor  students’ progress and meet with them to determine strategies for success.  Follow‐up is key in determining the success of these efforts and in the cases of Project  Stay and the Student Retention Team, this is lacking to some extent.  Students who are  placed on academic probation receive a letter from the Dean of Student Services  outlining the requirement to attend Project Stay, but there is no follow‐up as to  whether or not this occurs.  Likewise, the person on the Student Retention Team may  not always make contact with the student or be able to follow up with the student. 

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Special Attention for Returning Students After a Break in their Enrollment:  Little is  formally done to identify the student who returns to campus after a break in his or her  enrollment.  Students may use the academic amnesty option to remove grades from  past semesters, or they may have a hold on their account for past bills.  If the returning  student is identified as a returning “adult” student, they may be contacted by the  Student Services Specialist to receive help from the Adult Student Peer Counselors.  All  of these efforts, however, are minimally coordinated and not very well targeted to the  students who need the most help.     PI 2.3   Partnerships – To what degree does Eastern Wyoming College’s organizational  structure facilitate partnerships between units/departments that result in an  integrated approach to the new student experience (e.g., student services and  instruction)?    Partnerships between the units/departments at EWC vary in their organization and  effectiveness and are not always part of an integrated approach to the new student  experience.  For example, the (newly formed) Faculty Council, composed of members of  the faculty, collaborates with other units only when the issue in question affects both  parties.  Faculty work directly with the various Student Services areas on an individualized basis.   Faculty recommend student tutors and refer students to the college’s Learning Skills Lab  when they become concerned about a student’s progress in class.  Faculty also  voluntarily participate in the Advisor Alert program whereby they notify Student  Services about a student who is struggling in a class.  Student Services in turn notifies  the student’s academic advisor, along with other Student Services professionals, about  the situation and assigns someone to contact the person.  Unfortunately, the student  sometimes cannot be contacted through the usual means (cell phone, e‐mail,  telephone), and the effort to help the student usually ends there.  The EWC faculty and professional staff also participate as instructors in educational  workshops hosted by the Adult Student Peer Counselors, who target adult students but  are open to all EWC students.  Faculty allow announcements to be made in their class  regarding upcoming events and often grant credit to students who attend these events.  The Athletic Department requests that faculty submit grade reports for student athletes  to the coaches in order to monitor these students’ academic and scholarship eligibility.  Many faculty assist with summer pre‐registration and also with the fall orientation.  This  allows them to help with course scheduling so students receive proper advising when  registering for their first semester of classes.  While there exists evidence of a number of organizational partnerships on the Eastern  Wyoming College campus to help with the new student experience, the general feeling  of the faculty is that more can be done.  The FoE Faculty/Staff survey results showed  13   


that only 26.5% of the faculty felt there was at least a high degree of institutional  organization that allows for collaboration between the academic and student services  areas.  In addition, 40.4% of the faculty felt that student services and faculty  partnerships were only slightly or not at all encouraged by senior institutional leaders.   Lastly, 63.6% of the faculty responded that they did not have a voice in decisions about  new student issues.  This was well above the rates recorded from comparable  institutions and all institutions in general that responded to the survey.       PI 2.4   Financial Resources – Which of the following statements best describes the  financial resources to support effective management of the new student experience?  To the aforementioned question, the committee selected the following response:  Funding varies somewhat from year to year and/or is not fully adequate. 

Information from the EWC Financial Aid Office for the 2007/08 academic year showed  that 76.6% of the new student cohort received financial aid.  Overall, 39.2% of the  awards went to this new student cohort.      Results from the FoE Faculty/Staff survey showed that 88.5% of the faculty and staff  rated EWC as being moderate to very high in providing adequate resources (personnel  and fiscal) for entry‐level courses.  The results were similar for academic support  services (86.9%) and extracurricular activities (79.1%).      Even with these findings, certain areas were identified as lacking in adequate funding.   Funding for one area, orientation, was mentioned as needing help.  The number of  students attending the fall orientation has grown from 187 in 2005 to 227 in 2008.   Meanwhile, the amount budgeted for this event has remained at $3,000, even though  expenses were $8,000 for 2008.    Recommended Action Items:     Advising Initiatives (High priority)  • Provide professional development for faculty on the use of status codes on course  rosters and the importance of recognition of first‐time students.  • Set an advisor agenda for topics discussed with advisees at orientation meeting.  • Determine who advises "interdisciplinary students" and who advises "undecided  majors" as two separate student needs populations.  • Improve advising by "non‐academic" staff.  • Provide professional development for advisors on the use of the degree evaluation in  LancerNet or revise the evaluation so that it does not require additional analysis by  student services personnel.  • Create in‐house professional development for faculty advising.  • Review the "R" designation for repeat courses and develop a stated procedure for  assistance to students repeating courses.    14   


Early Warning Initiatives (High priority)  • Determine effectiveness of Bridge program in ultimate success of participants  completing college‐level required math and English courses.  • Develop a stated procedure for advisor alert follow‐up.  • Develop a stated procedure for midterm deficiency follow‐up.  • Determine the effectiveness of the Student Retention Team.  • Create in‐house professional development for early warning initiatives.    Targeted Communication Initiatives (High priority)  • Restructure the orientation information process to include non‐academic assistance  and college‐sponsored organization/event assistance.  • Develop a systematic referral of students to appropriate campus personnel for  assistance.    Financial Resources (High priority)  • Increase funding levels for orientation and recruitment activities such as Technology  Day.    The Organization Dimension Committee assigned an overall grade of "C" to this area.

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Chapter 4—Learning Dimension  Foundations Institutions deliver curricular and co-curricular learning experiences that engage new students in order to develop knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors consistent with the institutional mission, students’ academic and career goals, and workplace expectations. Both in and out of the classroom, these learning experiences promote critical thinking, ethical decision making, and the lifelong pursuit of knowledge.

The Learning Improvement Dimension Committee was led by Patti Sue Peterson,  Veterinary Technology Director and Instructor and Division Chair of Science and Math,  and Lawrence P. Curtis, Criminal Justice Instructor.  Five high enrollment courses for  new students were identified in the current practices inventory (CPI) for review.  The  committee studied six performance indicators as they related to those courses.    PI 3.1 Learning Goals:  To what degree has the institution established common  learning goals specifically for new students?  Current Situation:  Eastern Wyoming College has established common learning goals for the campus as a  whole that are consistent with the college's mission and vision. However, that set of  goals does not address first‐year students as a unique entity. First‐year students  generally learn about the institution's goals from the college catalog, the college  website, campus visitation days, student orientation, the Bridge Program, and the  college studies course. Goal number one of EWC's common college goals states that the  college will strive to provide experiences that "prepare students for expectations of the  workforce, the responsibilities of citizenship in the community, and the rigor of further  academic pursuits." College goal number two commits to offering an "educational  system that is articulated with other higher education institutions and with K‐12  institutions." Thus, the common goals are inferred to be consistent with students' career  goals, workplace expectations and align with the expectations of senior institutions.  First‐year students generally plan their academic programs with faculty advisors.  However, it is unclear if understanding program goals are a priority. Therefore,  articulating institution’s common learning goals and individual program goals is a prime  opportunity to further the students’ understanding.    Instructors are also required to identify course goals in their syllabi. Their course  assessment instrument, which faculty complete once per year, align courses with  program goals and core competencies.  The FoE New Student Survey indicated that approximately 12 % of the students had  little to no awareness of the institution's intended learning goals and only 58% had a  high degree of awareness. The FoE Faculty/Staff survey indicated that approximately  20% of the faculty and staff had little to no awareness of the intended educational goals  for new students, with only 43% indicating a high degree of awareness. The surveys  16   


suggest that the aforementioned methods of informing students, faculty and staff about  the institution's learning goals could be improved.  Opportunities and Challenges:  Opportunities  • The institution's common learning goals and the program goals are articulated to  students by faculty advisors.  • EWC's common college goals and individual program goals are posted on the  college's website (mirroring what is in the catalog);  • The common college goals and program goals should be included in the  course  syllabi;  • Introductory classes for first‐year students should address the common college goals  and correlation between those goals and general education requirements.  Challenges  • During the first class, faculty advisors and individual faculty miss the opportunity to  discuss the goals of the institution, program and courses with students.  • The current mission statement should be present in all college literature and on  display for viewing.    PI 3.2 Engaging Students:  To what degree does the institution document instructional  methods used in each course and evaluate their effectiveness in engaging students in  learning? (Using five high enrollment new student courses)  Current Situation:  HMDV 1000: Faculty do not know what various instructional methods are used in each  section of the course.  Therefore, it is not possible to evaluate what other instructional  methods are effective in engaging students in learning. However, other FOE committees  also surveyed college studies instructors, and reviewing that data may be helpful.     Individual instructors evaluate effectiveness by student participation in classroom  discussions and the student responses to questions pertaining to the application of  material on final examinations.  ENGL 1010 & ENGL 1020:  The instructors of ENGL 1010 and ENGL 1020 at Eastern  Wyoming College utilize several different techniques to engage students in learning.  These include, but are not limited to, peer and paper reviews, learning for the sake of  learning, ability to ask "one question" on the first day of class, and encouragement for  cooperative learning inside and outside of the classroom. These techniques are  constantly reviewed and modified by each instructor to fit both the instructor's  personality and the personality of the class.  Measurement of the effectiveness of any technique described is evaluated by  instructors and modified on an “as needed” basis as determined by instructors as they  see fit for their instructional goals.  17   


PEAC 1032:  The course syllabus and the Fitness Center Manual describe the  instructional methods utilized to teach students how to correctly use the equipment in  the Fitness Center to improve their health and physical fitness. Paperwork and activities  completed during the three hour Fitness Center orientation provide documentation that  students are ready to participate in individual workouts in the center.  MATH 0920:  The instructors of Math 0920 at Eastern Wyoming College utilize several  different techniques to engage students in learning, including having students work  problems in class and having class discussions about the solutions; answering questions  from previous assignments; daily exit exams; fielding students' questions during lecture;  prompting students for response during lecture; encouragement of cooperative learning  inside and outside of the classroom; and homework quizzes. Measurement of each  technique's effectiveness is evaluated by the instructor and modified on an as needed  basis to meet instructional goals.  Opportunities and Challenges:  Opportunities  • Instructors could use varying techniques for engagement and more interactive  activities to help keep classes "fresh" and remove any "dullness" that might be  perceived by the students.  • HMDV 1000 is a class taken by nearly all first‐year students at EWC. This class is an  opportunity for instructors to provide information, guides and pathways to accessing  information for new students. It is a prime opportunity to set the foundation for  study skills, to utilize the resources, and explain strategies to achieve academic  success.  There has also been some discussion about offering sections of HMDV 1000  for specific programs of study.  Challenges  • Finding time to develop new strategies for the classroom for engagement of  students is a challenge. Students have been conditioned to "sit and listen" to a  standard lecture and often are resistant to change where they are expected to be an  "active" part of the class.  • There is a large number of instructors from a variety of disciplines and backgrounds  for HMDV 1000. This makes it difficult to have consistent instructional methods for  all sections of the course without interfering with each instructor's individual stamp  on his/her section.  • In PEAC 1032 students complete the workouts for the course on their own time  schedule.  There is no direct supervision of students’ individual workouts. The final  grade is based on the students’ computer data entries of what the student has done  in each of his/her workouts. This process makes it difficult to evaluate the success of  instructional methods beyond the orientation to the course.  Sources of Evidence:  Data obtained from instructor interviews, CAT reports to the  assessment coordinator, syllabi and the Fitness Center Manual. 

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PI 3.3 Course Outcomes:  To what degree does the institution document and evaluate  student learning outcomes across all sections of each course? (Using five high  enrollment new student courses)  Current Situation:   HMDV 1000:  Instructors of HMDV 1000 meet but do not discuss or complete the  evaluation of learning outcomes by all students in all sections. How instructors  determine if objectives for the course have been met by individual students varies  significantly from instructor to instructor.    ENGL 1010 & ENGL 1020:  Outcomes or course objectives are measured by each English  instructor at Eastern Wyoming College. The method of outcomes assessment is as  diverse as the faculty. Some examples of how student learning outcomes are  documented include, but are not limited to, advisor alerts, mid‐term deficiency alerts,  unit testing, CATs, in‐class discussions, rubrics, pre‐ and post‐testing, self assessment  and student generated test results. Assessment of learning is a continuous process that  involves using tools, both formal such as testing and informal such as classroom  discussion to measure a student's understanding of the material.    Math 0920:  Outcomes or course objectives are measured by each math instructor at  Eastern Wyoming College. The method of outcomes assessment is as diverse as the  faculty. Some documented examples of student learning outcomes include, but are not  limited to, advisor alerts, mid‐term deficiencies, unit testing, CATs, in‐class discussions,  rubrics, pre‐ and post‐testing, self‐assessment and student‐generated test results.  Assessment of learning is a continuous process that involves both formal tools such as  testing and informal tools such as classroom discussion to measure a student's  understanding of the material.  PEAC 1032:  Those students who complete the orientation to the Fitness Center must  document that they have worked on each of the 12 machines in the circuit. This  documentation includes the student's beginning workout weight for each machine.  Information on progress from future workout sessions is entered in the Fitness Center  computer by the student.  Opportunities and Challenges:  Opportunities 

• • • •

Encourage students to participate more in class discussions to assist in measuring  their understanding of the concepts being presented.  Increase the number of students who come to instructors for assistance, either in  the classroom or during office hours.  Develop an evaluation process for student learning outcomes for HMDV 1000.  Assess each student progress on the twelve machines of the circuit at the end of the  term to determine achievement.     

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Challenges  • Accommodate busy students whose schedules lack the flexibility with faculty office  hours that allow access to faculty for extra assistance.  • Encourage student participation in class discussions with class participation points or  decreasing their points for not participating.  • Facilitate an agreement on HMDV learning outcomes with common evaluation  methods for those learning outcomes.    • Schedule final assessment of students on the twelve machines in the Fitness Center  during Final Exam week.  • Supervise and document each student’s progress of his/her workouts.    Sources of Evidence:  Assessment Report, instructor interviews, course syllabi.  PI 3.4 High D/Failure/Withdrawal/Incomplete/ (DFWI) Rates:  To what degree does  the institution attempt to address the causes of high DFWI rates in the courses  reported? (Using five high enrollment new student courses)  Current Situation:   The Eastern Wyoming College Student Services office gives accommodation reports to  instructors of students who may need extra help to become successful in the classroom.   Also, Advisor Alerts are sent to advisors regarding their advisees who are at‐risk of  failing a course as well as to the Student Retention Team who may intervene to assist  students.  Exit interviews of students who withdraw from school are also conducted so  the institution can learn of and address issues within its control.  The college has not  developed specific strategies to address the DFWI rates in the new student courses.  HMDV 1000:  EWC’s 6.25 % DFWI rate for HMDV 1000 is not viewed as a high rate.   Instructors do not formally address the causes of students receiving DFW or I but may  have an opinion. Students who abandon class may receive an F or a W, and that may be  documented in an instructor's grade book. The specific causes or reasons for the  students receiving DFWI in this course are not addressed by the institution.  PEAC 1032:  Students who do not have enough workouts in the Fitness Center to earn  the letter grade they want may withdraw from the course by signing a request. The  request to withdraw can be completed through the last open hour of the Fitness Center  on the last day of finals week.  Opportunities and Challenges:  Opportunities  • If dropped classes are due to a time or scheduling issue, EWC could offer more  classes online where students could work on their courses at their convenience. The  institution would have to monitor and closely enforce student placement in courses  that have prerequisites for admission.      20   


Challenges  • Some students come to EWC, an open campus, without the proper background for  obtaining a higher education. These students struggle with their course load until  they are adequately prepared for higher education. Unfortunately, many times  these students drop out of college before they acquire the prerequisite skills needed  to be successful.  • Offering more classes online takes instructors out of the classroom as they must  monitor and maintain these classes. While online classes may work for some  students, they do not work for all. Students enrolled in the high DFWI classes may  oftentimes be the ones who are at a higher risk of being un‐successful, as face‐to‐ face instruction is more effective for them and gives them a stronger motivation to  attend class.  • Some advisors do not follow the guidelines for prerequisites of courses for their  advisees and place those students in inappropriate courses. Thus, if these students  are not "caught" early, they will be in a course where they will not have the best  chance of being successful.   

PI 3.5 Placement:  To what degree does the institution intentionally place new  students in appropriate courses to address deficiencies in academic preparation and  to provide academic challenge for the above‐average student?    Current Situation:  At Eastern Wyoming College all new student ACT scores are evaluated. Students with a  Math ACT score of 20 or lower and an English ACT score of 17 or lower are required to  take the COMPASS placement tests. After an appraisal of the COMPASS testing results  for reading, writing and mathematics, an academically deficient student will be advised  into appropriate classes. A Bridge Program, which is a one week refresher course, is  offered to a limited number of students during the full week prior to the beginning of  the Fall Semester. At the conclusion of that week, students are given the COMPASS test  again for placement into appropriate reading, writing and mathematics courses.   What follows then is a series of continuous evaluations of performance by instructors.  They issue "advisor alerts," sometimes as early as the third week in the semester,  followed by mid‐semester academic alerts for deficiencies. Additional monitoring of  progress can also be found through student interaction with tutors, their employment  of the SMARTTHINKING on‐line tutoring service, the use of the Learning Skills Lab  resources which include computers, language lab assistance for Spanish and English, and  workshops. Developmental classwork indicates a student's progress.  Follow‐up  placement into appropriate courses is then directed by counselors and advisors.  The students' opinions about their placement into appropriate courses are revealed in  their answers to the Foundations of Excellence survey questions: To what degree was  the (selected) course appropriate for your reading skill level? Results showed 8.9% felt  the course was "difficult" or "too difficult." The survey results of "difficult" or "too  21   


difficult" for writing skills was 8.7%, math skills 28.0%, computing skills 14.1% and library  research skills 13.8%.  If, following appraisal of students' ACT scores, they are found to be academically above  average, they may be advised about options that includes CLEP or DANTES testing or a  Challenge Exam through an instructor. This does not happen very often.  Success in that  testing allows the students to advance into more difficult and challenging courses. Then,  once enrolled in these classes, students have the additional resources of the Learning  Skills Lab to challenge their abilities, including SMARTHINKING, an on‐line tutoring  service. Opportunities are also offered to high achievers as paid tutors or to take a  tutoring class to become unpaid tutors.  The new EWC Honors Program, which is focused on higher achieving students, in  conjunction with the Art Department, will also sponsor the Perspectives Series each  semester. The series is designed to approach a question or subject through an  interdisciplinary approach and encourages student engagement outside of the  classroom. The most recent topic in the Series was "A Symposium on Water." The  Honors Program is set to kick off in the Fall 2009 Semester. It will be an interdisciplinary  program directly targeting academically ambitious and highly motivated students. These  students will experience curricular Honors courses and co‐curricular opportunities  designed to enhance their understanding of the humanities and arts. The program will  cultivate student involvement, promote collaboration and critical thinking and  encourage a higher level of work, academic learning and personal growth. This will be  accomplished by providing students the opportunity to interact with faculty members in  small, innovative classes, participate in field trips and cultural experiences, and other  Honors events.  EWC's focus on challenging higher achieving students is not directly evaluated by the  FoE student survey. However, data from the overall student population survey shines a  light on that subject. Student opinions about their level of academic preparation show  that 28.3% felt their writing skills made the course (they identified) as "easy" or "too  easy." Other results for "easy" or "too easy" included reading skills at 32.2%,  mathematical skills 27.5%, computing skills 30.1% and library research skills 31.6%.  Opportunities and Challenges:  Opportunities  • The college effectively uses testing and programs to place students into appropriate  courses. However, those students with very low reading scores are still placed into  college level classes. The advising process may require instructors of those college  level courses to play a more intensive and deliberative role in the placement of  academically deficient students.  • The college recognizes that issues in student advising and generational culture may  contribute to the struggle to change past practices.        22   


Challenges  • Whether academically deficient or higher achievers, only a small number of students  take advantage of the tutoring opportunity provided, even when given incentives by  instructors such as extra points.  PI 3.6 Out of Class Learning:  To what degree does the institution document new  student learning outcomes of out‐of‐class events and activities (e.g., lectures,  concerts, clubs/organizations, and volunteer activities)?  Current Situation:  Of the 59 faculty/staff that responded to the 2008 FoE survey, 47% said that they  encourage students to participate in out‐of‐class activities (question #65). This  information is supported in the FoE student survey when 232 students responded to the  same type of question (question #61), with 57% saying that they were encouraged to  participate in out‐of‐class activities. Students were much more likely to participate in  these activities when required by an instructor or degree.    The activity list includes classroom field trips, conferences, student organizations,  internships, clinical experiences, guest lecturers, grand rounds, competitions (livestock  judging, Skills USA, debate, student newspaper, intramural or competitive sports,  rodeo), classroom observation, student tutoring, campus ministry, college musicals, and  community concerts or plays, Community Education sponsored trips, and art exhibits.  This list is not all‐inclusive.  Additional out‐of‐class resources for students include the library with numerous on‐line  resources, GEAR‐UP program (a pre‐college program), Blackboard course enhancement,  Testing Center and actions involving ADA accommodations. The college also makes on‐ line tutoring available at no additional cost to students.  Opportunities and Challenges:  Opportunities  • The greatest opportunity for out‐of‐class learning would be to have more instructors  build these events (field trip, an off‐campus lab, a guest lecturer, etc.) into course  syllabi. A single page survey of the activity could document the learning and extra  credit, or a graded assessment would increase participation.  • Promoting, reporting, and supporting out‐of‐class experiences would likely increase  student interest and learning. Avenues for promotion include the EWC Web page  and utilizing other media. Reporting could be as simple as the single page survey  mentioned. Support may come from many sectors:  student fee allocation,  departmental budgets, foundation budget, endowments, Perkins funding, and  fundraising events.  Challenges  • The biggest challenge is the availability of time. The instructor is trying to cover  required material in a course. The student is often trying to balance work, classes,  23   


study, and social life. Secondary to time, adequate funding and transportation would  likely be obstacles to overcome.  Stimulating student interest and participation in any of the activities listed above  would be a challenge. If the activity is classroom related, required and graded, this  may force participation. Participation in many of the listed activities is not required;  thus, turnout may be limited. Many activities also involve either direct costs for  participation or indirect costs (missed pay, child care, etc.). One might even argue  that for the size of the student population, there may be too many choices, thus  diluting numbers at individual events.  A third challenge to student engagement in learning, whether in‐class or out‐of‐ class, is student preparation. Many freshmen are simply not prepared for the rigors  of college material. The outcome might be poor grades with little interest in self‐ directed learning or, hopefully, a devotion to improvement. 

 

Sources of Evidence:  Course syllabi with specific dates for out‐of‐class activities are available. Additional  evidence for what was learned varies but includes student presentations, graded  assessments or extra credit, and papers or summaries. Internships also include hourly  records and sponsor evaluations.    The FoE surveys show that students are encouraged to participate. College vehicle use  records also provide evidence of these activities. Other sources of evidence might be  library records, GEAR‐UP and tutor lab use, and registrations for Community Education  events and educational conferences.    Recommended Action Items:  • Communicate or work to improve course, program and college learning goals.  (High priority)    • Improve percent of faculty and staff with knowledge of college's educational  goals and outcomes. (High priority)    • Develop, implement and communicate processes and procedures that enforce  common program and college educational goals for first‐year students. (High  priority)    • Have HMDV faculty identify instruction methods to follow to engage students in  learning, then communicate those to all instructors. (High priority)    • Establish a cross‐functional committee to review learning outcomes for HMDV  1000 and introduce a minimum set of these outcomes for all sections. (High  priority) The Learning Dimension Committee assigned a grade of “B” for this area.     24   


Chapter 5—Campus Culture Dimension  Foundations Institutions make new students a high priority for faculty and staff.  A  culture of responsibility for the experiences of new students characterizes these  institutions. This culture is realized through high‐quality instruction, services, and  support as well as substantial interaction with students both inside and outside the  classroom. Campus leaders nurture this culture and support it by appropriate  institutional recognition and rewards.    The Campus Culture Dimension Committee was led by Kellee Gooder, Director of  Residence Life and Dr. Lorna Stickel, Chemistry Instructor.  The committee investigated  four performance indicators, analyzed the staff and student survey questions, and  conducted additional surveys with key employees.      PI 4.1 Institution‐level Encouragement by Senior Academic Leaders   Senior academic leaders, President, and Vice‐Presidents were asked to respond to the  following survey questions (five responses received):   1. Describe how you encourage faculty to use pedagogies of engagement.   2. Describe how you encourage faculty to understand the institution‐wide learning goals  for new students.   3. Describe how you encourage faculty to understand the characteristics of new  students.   4. Describe how you encourage faculty to understand broad trends and issues in the  education of new students.      Current Situation:   Use pedagogies of engagement: Senior academic leaders encourage faculty to use  collaborative learning, active learning, and problem‐based case studies and scenarios.  Senior academic leaders meet with individual faculty members to share thoughts and  ideas about what is being done and what could be done to engage, challenge, and build  rapport with students. Classroom observations, semester evaluations, and appreciative  inquiry are primary ways in which senior academic leaders monitor progress.     Understand institution‐wide learning goals for new students: EWC does not have  documented institution‐wide learning goals for new students. In past years, senior  academic leaders implemented new faculty orientations that emphasized the  importance of the comprehensive community college philosophy, i.e., that it is  important to celebrate all of our students and to help them achieve their goals.   The only documented institution‐wide learning goals for all students are found in the  core competencies (Communications Skills, Analytical and Quantitative Reasoning,  Technology Skills, Social Awareness, and Information Literacy) and course‐specific  objectives that support program goals.   Understand the characteristics of new students at this institution: Senior academic  leaders encourage faculty to understand the traits and learning styles of new students,  25   


be effective partners in learning, and facilitators of emerging technologies. They  encourage faculty to be cognizant of the various student populations: technical,  academic, traditional, and non‐traditional. They urge everyone to be approachable and  to take the time to meet with students. Senior academic leaders encourage collegial  discussions among faculty and staff to better understand the student body. Caring and  concern must remain authentic in an effort to connect with students.     Understand broad trends and issues in the education of new students: Senior  academic leaders distribute articles and papers to faculty, publish newsletters, attend  professional development seminars/conferences and articulation conferences, and  participate in webinars. Discussions, both formal and informal, are important among  faculty and staff for understanding these trends and issues.     Opportunities and Challenges:   Opportunities   • Policies and procedures regarding the evaluation of faculty need to be documented,  communicated, and consistently implemented.   • Newly hired faculty orientation needs to be reinstated.   • Brownbag lunches that focus on pedagogies of engagement, student traits and  learning styles, and professional development need to be reintroduced.   Challenges   • The FoE Faculty/Staff survey asked the question, "To what degree is faculty  involvement with new students considered important by institution leaders."  Survey  results indicate 55.1% of employee respondents perceive the institution’s leaders  consideration of the importance of faculty involvement with new students as high or  very high, 27.6% perceive it as moderate, and 17.3% perceive it as slight or of no  importance.   • There are no institution‐wide learning goals for new students.   • Excellence in teaching new students needs to be acknowledged, recognized, and  rewarded.   • Communication of goals and expectations about the first‐year student experience  through faculty encouragement by senior leadership needs to be emphasized. This will  improve faculty understanding, implementation, and accountability.     PI 4.2 Unit‐level Encouragement by Unit Level Academic Leaders   Unit level academic administrators, division chairs, and program directors were asked to  respond to the following survey questions (four responses received):  1. Describe how you encourage faculty to use pedagogies of engagement.  2. Describe how you encourage faculty to understand unit‐level goals for entry level  courses.  3. Describe how you encourage faculty to understand discipline‐specific trends and  issues related to entry‐level courses.   Current Situation:   Use pedagogies of engagement: Unit‐level academic administrators relate that most  encouragement is done informally through frequent discussions. Informal group  26   


discussions are encouraged to compare different methods and approaches, evaluation,  and assessment. Sessions of team‐taught classes are planned together. Training for  teachers includes lecture, discussion, demonstration, and skill training practice.     Understand unit‐level learning goals for entry‐level courses:  Unit‐level academic  administrators discuss learning goals, course objectives, collegiate standards, and  articulation objectives for transfer courses with faculty. Continuous mentoring is very  important. Faculty are encouraged, for outcomes assessment purposes, to develop  learning goals and objectives. Some faculty utilize training manuals to communicate  student learning goals for the courses.     Understand the discipline‐specific trends and issues related to entry‐level courses:   Unit‐level academic administrators read industry journals and encourage faculty to do  likewise. Faculty are encouraged to stay current with their disciplines and attend  regional and national conferences and seminars. Informal discussions are encouraged  concerning articles of interest, discoveries, and industry successes.     Opportunities and Challenges:   Opportunities   • Establish a formal mentoring system for new faculty.   • Provide professional development opportunities for unit‐level administrators and  faculty.   • Fund and promote professional development opportunities specific to the first‐year  experience.   Challenges   • The Faculty/Staff survey asked the question, "To what degree is faculty involvement  with new students considered important by department/unit leaders." Survey results  indicate 65.7% of employee respondents perceive the department/unit leaders’  consideration of the importance of faculty involvement with new students as high or  very high, 24.2% perceive it as moderate, and 10.1% perceive it as of slight importance  or not all important.   • Acknowledge, recognize, and reward excellence in teaching new students.      PI 4.3 Communication of Expectations   Personal interviews regarding the communication of expectations for involvement with  new students were conducted with the following groups: newly hired full‐time  instructors, newly hired part‐time/adjunct instructors, newly hired academic  support/student services staff, continuing instructors, and continuing academic  support/student services staff.     Current Situation:   Newly hired full‐time and adjunct instructors:  Division Chairs serve as informal  mentors to new instructors and provide guidance and support in the routine tasks and  responsibilities of faculty members. College standards and academic expectations for all  students are informally addressed by the mentor. This guidance and support generally  27   


focuses on all students, rather than new students specifically.     Based on the Faculty/Staff survey responses, 17.2% of newly hired faculty rated new  faculty orientation as high or very high in addressing their responsibilities relating to  new students, while 41.4% rated it as moderate, and 41.4% rated it as slight or not at  all.     Newly hired academic support/student service staff:  Student services staff clearly  communicate that new students are facing specific challenges as many of them are  leaving home for the first time. Emphasis is placed on the recruiting staff's first contact  with the student to develop a personal connection with each student. The recruiting  staff utilizes a mentoring system to help new staff understand the challenges that new  students are facing and to make them feel comfortable in the college environment.  Student services staff also address confidentiality issues in dealing with students. This  information is focused on all students, rather than new students specifically. The job  descriptions for student services/academic support staff include responsibilities specific  to dealing with students but do not specify responsibilities for dealing with new  students.     Continuing instructors and continuing academic support/student services staff:   National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development (NISOD) Innovation  Abstracts are distributed to faculty. These abstracts contain information that addresses  the general student population, although there are periodic articles specific to new  students.     The fall In‐service session introduced all employees to the Foundations of Excellence®  Dimensions and self‐study process to be completed in 2008‐2009. Human Resources  does not distribute any information pertaining to new students to newly hired  employees.     The Dean of Student Services holds periodic meetings with staff to discuss current  student issues. Some members of the Student Services staff attended a conference  which addresses strategic enrollment and recruiting. The Faculty/Staff survey responses  indicate that 24.5% of continuing employees rate the position descriptions reviewed  during the hiring process as high or very high in addressing their responsibilities relating  to new students, while 28.6% rate it as moderate and 46.9% rate it as slight or not at all.   The Faculty/Staff survey also indicate that 19.6% of continuing employees rate the  candidate interview as high or very high in addressing their responsibilities relating to  new students, while 26.1% rate it as moderate and 54.3% rate it as slight or not at all.     All Staff/Faculty:  Currently, all students are treated alike, and instructors and student  services staff are expected to be available and flexible to meet the students' needs.  Identifying those new and/or first‐year students is accomplished via class rosters that  identify 1) first‐time enrolled students who have been out of high school more than 1  year (FT), 2) first‐time enrolled students who enrolled the fall or spring semester  28   


immediately following high school graduation (FH), and 3) students enrolled as  freshman having less than 30 semester hours (FR).     Opportunities and Challenges:   Opportunities   • Reinstate new faculty orientation and conduct orientation sessions for new student  services staff to address expectations of working with new students.   • Student Services staff is currently examining the training for Student Ambassadors to  enhance their interaction with new students.   • Incorporate materials that emphasize strategies for identifying and successfully  interacting with "First‐Year Students" into the New Employee hiring packets, faculty  handbook, and personnel manual.   • Revise pertinent job descriptions so that responsibilities specific to first‐year students  are addressed.   • Provide professional development opportunities related to the "First‐Year Experience"  for all college employees.   Challenges   • Implement clearly defined goals and expectations for the first‐year experience.   • Devote resources toward FoE implementation, which will assist faculty and staff  already active in multiple initiatives for the college.     • Develop a comprehensive approach for the "First‐Year Experience" with each  employee understanding his/her specific role in this process.      PI 4.4 Recognition of Retention as a Responsibility   The following survey questions were presented to faculty members, student services  personnel, senior administrators, and EWC staff members:   1. To what degree do you recognize student retention [as a significant responsibility]?   2. What are some of the activities you see or participate in that address retention?  3. In your mind, who has the ultimate responsibility of retention?  4. Any thoughts on what EWC could do better or differently to retain students?    Current Situation:   Faculty: Faculty members at EWC display responsibility for retention by providing  academic advising, preparing student schedules, stating expectations in course syllabi,  setting and maintaining office hours, providing contact information to students,  participating in extracurricular activities, submitting midterm grades and advisor alerts,  and implementing withdrawal procedures.     The committee administered faculty survey indicates that 60% of the respondents  recognize retention as a high priority while 40% rate it as a moderate priority.     Student Services Personnel:  Student Services personnel provide and support the  following activities that enhance student retention: counseling and placement testing,  skills workshops, financial aid information and assistance, involvement with campus  activities, and extended office hours. They support services such as tutoring for  29   


traditional and non‐traditional students, reasonable accommodations for learning  disabled students, and accommodations for physically challenged students. Student  Services personnel convey information through the copy center/information office,  website, school newspaper, posters, and easel boards. Student Services support student  academic success with campus housing, food service, a fitness center, community  education opportunities, educational workshops, and campus ministry opportunities.  They conduct themselves in a professional and friendly manner to all students, assist  with graduation, sponsor clubs/groups, and support the EWC Foundation. In addition,  they attend professional development opportunities, faculty/staff orientation, and  student‐oriented events. The committee administered Student Services survey indicates  that 66.6% of the respondents recognize student retention as high priority while 33.3%  rate it as a moderate priority.     EWC Staff:  Of the EWC staff members surveyed, all agreed that student retention is  rated as a high priority. One staff member stated that it is easier to retain a student than  to recruit a new student. They frequently observe activities and services provided by  faculty and student service personnel. Each staff member surveyed indicates that every  college employee plays an important part in student retention. The committee  administered staff survey indicated that 100% of the respondents recognize student  retention as a high priority.     Senior Administration: The senior administrator survey respondents recognize that  student retention is critical in maintaining enrollment. They stated that services for  students must be rendered in an efficient manner, and at‐risk students must be  identified early on and monitored more effectively. They also feel that activities for  students are important because they create a bond between the student and the  college. Orientation should be utilized for proper advising and transitioning students to  the college environment. Senior administrators list the following activities that address  retention: College Studies course, clubs, orientation activities, Evening of Elegance, and  new meal plan options. Each senior administrator respondent stated��that retention is  everyone's responsibility. The committee administered senior administration survey  indicated that 100% of respondents recognize student retention as a high priority.     Opportunities and Challenges:   Opportunities   • Implement a systematic approach to retention with identified steps that include  creative and meaningful interventions as well as a method to track the progress of at‐ risk students.    • Enhance and provide additional resources for student activities.   • Provide an attractive user friendly campus, which will encourage students to complete  their educational goals at EWC.   • Encourage and endorse community participation in our retention efforts.   Challenges   • Devote resources to the first‐year experience.   • Define the goal and the expectations of the first‐year experience.   30   


• Develop a comprehensive approach for the first‐year experience with each employee  understanding his or her specific role in this process.   • Assess the academic effort and success of students who want to be retained in  comparison to students who do not want to be retained.       Recommended Action Items:  •

Develop institution‐wide learning goals for new students. (High priority) 

Implement and encourage participation in informational workshops and  professional development opportunities for all employees to better understand  new students and their diverse characteristics. This includes providing sufficient  resources (time and funds) for these pursuits. (High priority) 

Devise a method to acknowledge, recognize, and reward excellence in teaching  new students. (High priority)  

Develop orientation and mentoring programs for recently hired faculty and  student services staff with an emphasis on understanding new student issues  and concerns. Implement training for continuing faculty and staff with an  emphasis on the same. (High priority) 

Revise new student orientation activities. (High priority) 

Review and revise existing retention efforts, and include goals and policies  specific to new student retention in faculty handbooks and new employee hiring  packets. (Medium priority) 

Bring focus to the prominence EWC places on the first‐year student experience  through established levels of communication between senior academic leaders  and faculty. (Medium priority) 

The Campus Culture Dimension Committee assigned a grade of “D+” for this area.   

 

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Chapter 6—Transitions Dimension  Foundations Institutions facilitate appropriate student transitions beginning with  outreach and recruitment and continuing throughout the period of enrollment.  They  communicate clear curricular/co‐curricular expectations and possibilities, and they  provide appropriate preparation and support for educational success. They are forthright  about their responsibilities to students as well as students’ responsibilities to themselves  and the institution. These institutions create and maintain communication with  secondary and other postsecondary institutions, families, employers, community  agencies, and other sources of support for students.    The Transitions Dimension Committee was led by Judy Brown, GEAR‐UP Director and  Heidi Smith‐Edmunds, Psychology Instructor.  The committee spent time at their first  two meetings developing a deeper understanding of their overall Dimension and of the  performance indicators.  They then assigned the reporting and research pieces to  members of the committee and developed a reporting timeline.       PI 5.1 Communications to Students: To what degree does the institution communicate  effectively with new students?  The committee reviewed several communication methods currently in use at Eastern  Wyoming College.  The committee found the website confusing, not user friendly, and  difficult to navigate. Specifically, it provided information that was out‐of‐date and had  not been modified to reflect changes in faculty or institutional information. In addition,  the links could be confusing and, at times, different information was provided  depending on the "path" one took to reach a particular page.  The committee thought  the college catalog was not well organized and that information for new students was  difficult to find.  According to the FoE Faculty/Staff Survey, strengths of the institution concerning  communication with new students include an intimate, welcoming environment, the  ability to provide student individual attention, and the Bridge Program.  Faculty and  staff identified the following as weaknesses related to effective communication with  first‐year students: a lack of a program or support specifically geared towards first‐year  students, little or no semester‐long communication between students and advisors  (advisors meet with students only to enroll them in classes), an ineffective orientation  for new students, and lack of a useful retention program.  The New Student Survey  results indicate a general satisfaction (59 to 71 percent indicating high or very high  effectiveness) with communication of varied information.  PI 5.2 Communication of the Student Experience: To what degree does the institution  effectively communicate the realities of college life?  Website:  The Transitions Dimension Committee found that the EWC website is a source  of information on the realities of college life. However, the committee felt that the  website is not currently designed to best meet the needs of the contemporary user.  32   


Committee members viewed the website as difficult to navigate and confusing, making  it frustrating and time consuming to utilize as a consistent or efficient source of  information. EWC currently utilizes Blackboard to provide online enhancement to  classes and to deliver fully online courses and LancerNet to allow students to register for  classes and view their schedules and grades. At this time, no system is in place to  provide EWC students institutional email accounts or related tools. In March 2009, the  EWC website underwent a massive renovation utilizing a new Content Management  System (CMS) that allows individual departments to keep their content areas up‐to‐ date.  Online Communication Technologies: The committee could not locate evidence of any  online communication to students (e.g., instant messaging, blogs, YouTube, email,  Facebook, MySpace).  A Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) was  administered in the Spring 2009 Semester and included questions about social  networking.  Results of that survey will be known in September 2009.  Admissions Print Materials and Other Media:  The committee found a great deal of  marketing material such as letters, brochures, posters, and advertisements  communicating the student experience. Campus tours are provided, but committee  members have observed inconsistency in the duration, amount and type of information  provided, and their overall quality.  The committee felt that the tours should inspire  students to attend EWC and be of the highest quality. One of our committee members  took a tour at LCCC in Cheyenne and told of how it was very thorough, interactive, and  inspiring. The students left feeling that they were all important and knew much more  about the college.  PI 5.3 Communication to others: To what degree does the institution communicate to  the following groups their role in facilitating student success in college?    Secondary School Personnel:  Pam Palermo, Director of Financial Aid, indicated that  Financial Aid staff coordinates with high school counselors to provide information on  financial aid, the admissions process, budgeting, etc.  Families of New Students:  According to information gained from the New Student  Survey, nearly 35 % of students felt that EWC has slightly or not at all helped their family  feel a part of the college experience. Only 30 students out of 228 responding to the  question felt that EWC assisted in this experience to a very high degree. Some evidence  of the institution's attempts to involve family members included College Goal Sunday  sponsored by Financial Aid.   Other Support Networks:  The committee looked throughout the college for evidence  of support networks and was unable to locate anything that directly addresses this  issue.  

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PI 5.4 Establishing Connections: To what degree does your institution structure and  implement experiences in which new students establish connections?  The New Student Survey results indicate that only half of student respondents feel that  EWC is highly effective in connecting them with other new students. Significant numbers  of students also indicated no or only slight satisfaction with EWC's effectiveness in  connecting them with continuing students (18 %), faculty members (33 %), and  academic support such as tutoring and advising (18 %).  Faculty/Staff Survey results show a different picture as several people indicated that  orientation and activities during the first few weeks of college are strengths of the  institution.  Recent orientation activities have been inconsistent. For example, in the fall of 2008,  students were placed in rooms with faculty from their academic program during  orientation. No standard instructions were provided to faculty about what experience  students were to have. This was the only structured opportunity for students to connect  with advisors and faculty, and they were only exposed to specific instructors based on  their majors.  There also appears to be inconsistency in the HMDV 1000 College Studies course  required for all new students. This course is taught by a wide range of instructors with  very little homogeny between sections. The Faculty/Staff Survey results indicate some  current dissatisfaction with the College Studies course.   PI 5.5 Academic Advising:  The Transitions Dimension Committee looked at the academic advising practices at  EWC. Currently, there is little evidence to suggest a consistent advising approach. While  individual advisors may be effective, there is no evidence at the institutional or program  level that indicates the presence of advising standards, protocol, or training. In 2008‐ 2009, the monthly workshops for new employees were not maintained, a setting in  which some advising training had previously been taking place. The combination of  these factors has resulted in a very inconsistent advising experience among students.  For example, the New Student Survey results indicate that nearly 69% of respondents  found that academic advisors explained the requirements of specific degrees to a high  or very high degree. However, nearly half of students felt that advisors only slightly or  moderately discussed future enrollment plans with them.  Faculty/Staff survey results indicate dissatisfaction with current advising practices. Many  suggestions relevant to this issue were provided by staff and faculty. Through  examination of these suggestions, the main areas of frustration appear to be 1) a lack of  training and protocol for advisors resulting in low quality advising for students, 2) a lack  of consistent advising year‐round including summer pre‐registration days, and 3)  advisors not communicating effectively and meeting the specific needs of each  individual advisee (e.g., enrolling working students in too many hours, enrolling students  34   


who intend to transfer in non‐transferrable courses or programs). It is also evident that  advising loads are unbalanced, and there is a wide range of both faculty and staff  advising students.  Recommended Action Items:  •

Communication needs to be standardized so each student receives the same  information. Update information to be appealing to new students coming to  EWC. (High priority) 

Standardize the campus tour process to ensure that all prospective students  have similar experiences, as well as the opportunity to meet with staff and  faculty, visit class, meet with advisors and/or coaches, and gain an awareness of  the campus. This can be accomplished by having a standardized tour as well as  training tour guides. (High priority) 

Develop and distribute a family handbook to inform family members of relevant  information. Suggested information includes FERPA, Financial Aid, activities  schedules, contact information, ways to stay involved with your student, etc.  This handbook should be relevant to not only parents of students but also family  members of non‐traditional students as well. (High priority)  

Offer appropriate sessions to family members at orientation and pre‐registration  days to inform them of ways to assist in first‐year student success. (High priority)  

Update the website and EWC Catalog link to ensure the information is easy to  access. Make sure the information is both concise and consistent. (High priority) 

Implement online access to forms such as Application for Admission, Transcript  Request, Program Requirements checklist, etc. (High priority)  

Develop a Student Handbook to provide information regarding many aspects of  the EWC experience to students, particularly first‐year students. (High priority) 

Institute a more relevant orientation for students of all ages and situations (i.e.  sessions geared towards on‐campus vs. off‐campus or traditional vs. non‐ traditional). Provide useful and current information to students about the  college. (High priority) 

Create and utilize an effective retention program. (High priority) 

Restructure student orientation to further benefit new students. Utilize this  opportunity to create connections between students and instructors, staff, and  services. (High priority) 

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Standardize HMDV 1000 to provide students with similar experiences and use  this time to facilitate connections with fellow students, instructors, and staff.  (High priority) 

Support the faculty with improved trainings for assessments and advising. Adjust  orientation to meet the students' needs. Students must be linked to appropriate  academic advisors as soon as possible, and students who are undecided in their  major or high risk should be placed with a specialized advisor. It is important to  distinguish between undecided and Interdisciplinary Studies majors. In the event  that students need to be advised by someone outside of their program, develop  a checklist form for all departments indicating the curriculum needs for their  majors or course of study to insure consistent advising. Standardize the summer  pre‐registration sessions to ensure adequate advising in all disciplines. (High  priority) 

The Transitions Dimension Committee assigned a grade of “C+” for this area.     

 

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Chapter 7—All Students Dimension  Foundations Institutions serve all new students according to their varied needs. These  institutions anticipate, identify, and address the needs of traditional and non‐traditional  students in response to their individual abilities, backgrounds, interests, and experiences.  These efforts are subject to assessment and adjustment as needed. Institutions also  ensure campus environments that are inclusive and safe for all students.  The chair of the All Students Dimension Committee was Debbie Ochsner, Director of  Counseling & Testing.  The committee’s first meeting was held on September 8th.   Agenda items included discussion of the basic committee structure, a review of the nine  foundational dimensions, and an overall review of the committee’s major  responsibilities.  The All Students Committee initially met bi‐weekly, and later on,  weekly for approximately 16 weeks to complete its work.  During this time, it reviewed  appropriate FoE information, gathered information from a variety of sources, analyzed  the results of the FoE New Student Survey, and formulated a recommended set of  actions.  In developing the recommended actions, the committee also considered  insights, recommendations, and comments from individual students, faculty, and staff.  Over the course of their work, the committee members became even more aware of the  variety of diverse backgrounds that students bring to Eastern Wyoming College.  The  students rated a majority of the performance indicators assigned to the committee as  being in the high or very high category.  This meant that, according to the student  respondents, EWC is doing very well at identifying student needs, addressing these  needs, providing a positive experience for students, and providing students with a  physically and psychologically safe learning environment.   PI 6.1  Identified Needs – To what degree does Eastern Wyoming College identify the  needs of individual new students in the following areas?  Academic Needs:  The academic needs of the new student are identified at Eastern  Wyoming College in a variety of ways.  It is strongly recommended that applicants to  EWC provide the College with an official transcript of their secondary school record, GED  certificate, and/or transcripts from colleges previously attended.  These credentials are  of importance for the purposes of, among other things, academic advisement.  All  associate degree‐seeking students must take placement exams (ACT/COMPASS test) in  English, math, and reading prior to registration to aid in proper class placement and to  maximize academic success.  All certificate and nondegree‐seeking students must take  the placement exams prior to enrolling in certain English or math courses.  The results of  these exams determine course placement, and students with low results are advised  into Developmental (remedial) Studies classes to provide them with an optimum  learning experience and with the best opportunity for success in the classroom.   Academic advisors receive instruction on how to interpret the test results and make  recommendations for student placement.    37   


Academic needs are further identified throughout the semester with the use of such  tools as the Advisor Alert (identifies students struggling in class for any of a variety of  reasons) and Midterm Deficiency notices (informs students of those courses in which  they have a “D” or “F” grade at the midterm).  Social/Personal Needs:  Individuals who apply to live on campus (many of which are  new students) are asked about a religious preference and if they have any special  interests or hobbies.  This information is used in roommate/suitemate placement and  provides Residence Life with information about those activities that might be of interest  to the individual student.    PI 6.2  Addressed Needs – To what degree does Eastern Wyoming College address the  identified needs of individual new students in the following areas?  Academic Needs:  As noted previously, EWC provides Developmental Studies classes, in  both the fall and spring semesters, for those students whose test scores indicate a need  for remedial help in the areas of English, math, and reading.  New students have the  option of participating in EWC’s Summer Bridge Program that takes place the week  before the start of the fall semester.  This program provides a review of the basics in the  areas of math, English, and reading in an attempt to refresh students’ skills in these  areas to prepare them for the coming semester or for re‐testing.  Academic survival  skills such as time management and study skills are also discussed during the week.  In addition, Eastern Wyoming College provides a plethora of other services to students  to help meet their academic needs.  These include 1) a recently revised academic  standing policy that heavily emphasizes the importance and advantage of repeating  failed classes before proceeding on to more rigorous coursework; 2) counseling services  to address personal issues, including substance abuse; 3) the Learning Skills Lab that  provides a variety of services, including free tutoring; 4) services for the student with a  disability (the EWC Director of Counseling & Testing helps arrange for reasonable  accommodations); 5) mandated study tables/sessions for student athletes; 6) a Human  Development class – College Studies‐‐recommended for all new students in their first  semester at EWC; 7) a newly formed Honors Program to provide academically gifted  students with a more rigorous college experience; 8) Project Stay – a program designed  to address the academic needs of all students, especially students  who have fallen on  academic or financial aid probation or suspension;  9) SmartThinking – an online  tutoring service provided free of charge to all EWC students including outreach  students; and 10) Adult Peer Counselor organization sponsored workshops on such  topics as managing home, family and studies, as well as a variety of educational topics.   In addition, EWC’s library provides a variety of educational services designed to help  students address their academic needs.    Social/Personal Needs:  EWC does a good job of addressing the identified  social/personal needs of its students.  These needs are addressed through the activities,  clubs and organizations sponsored by Eastern Wyoming College.  These include 1)  38   


orientation activities held the first few weeks of the fall semester; 2) academic and  interest‐based clubs sponsored on campus; 3) intercollegiate athletic teams and fine  arts events hosted on campus; 4) residence life activities sponsored for students who  live on campus; and 5) intramural and student life activities sponsored by the Student  Activities Office.  Counseling services offered by the College address personal as well as  academic needs of the students.        On a small campus like Eastern Wyoming College, the academic and the social/personal  needs of students are often identified and addressed by the same groups.  Groups such  as the Student Retention Committee, Campus Activities Team, Student Senate, Strategic  Planning Committee, and Student Services Department address areas in both the  academic arena and the social/personal context.  Results of the New Student Survey show that 76.1% of the respondents rated EWC in  the high or very high category with regards to meeting the academic needs of the  student.  Similar results exist for the question regarding whether or not EWC met the  social needs of its students.  In this area, 61.9% of the respondents placed EWC in either  the high or very high category.  The approximate 15% difference between the two areas  seems to indicate that EWC should increase the efforts to meet the social/personal  needs of its students.  Suggested areas for improvement include the development of a formalized process for  collecting information about student academic and social/personal needs (especially in  the social/personal area).  This process would gather input from faculty, staff, and  students for distribution to the appropriate groups for review, consideration, and  possible action.  In the area of social/personal needs, it is recommended that funding be  increased for student activities, clubs, and organizations.  Incentives should be offered  to organization and club sponsors to increase the scope and number of academic and  interest groups on campus.    PI 6.3  Student Experiences – To what degree does Eastern Wyoming College assure  that all new students experience the following?  Individualized Attention from Faculty/Staff:  Individualized attention from EWC faculty  is made possible because of the College’s low faculty/student ratio (10.8:1).  In addition,  all students are required to meet with an advisor when selecting classes and developing  a program of study.  This allows an opportunity for the advisor to discuss with the  student such things as career planning, job searches, and issues that may affect the  student’s ability to be successful in the classroom.  All faculty are required to post and  keep office hours which provides the opportunity for them to meet with students one‐ on‐one.  During these meetings students can discuss with the faculty any concerns or  questions they might have relating to classroom requirements or grades.   The small student population also affords them the opportunity to meet with staff and  administration on an individual basis.  During these meetings students have the  39   


opportunity to discuss issues of concern to them or ask questions that are non‐academic  in nature.  At the outreach sites, site coordinators are available to meet with students  and discuss their questions and/or concerns.  Academic Support Outside the Classroom:  At Eastern Wyoming College, academic  support outside of the classroom can be found in a number of areas.  This includes the  free tutoring and technical support for students provided by the Learning Skills Lab,  availability of computer labs in the library and the Student Center, free personal  counseling and/or ADA accommodation services provided by the College’s counselor,  assistance provided by the library staff, and free Internet access in each of the residence  hall rooms.  The College also purchases 10 hours of online tutoring assistance from  SmartThinking for each EWC student (including those at the outreach sites) that can be  used at any time of the day.  Project Stay and other educational programs offered on  the Torrington campus provide short presentations about the skills each student needs  to succeed in the classroom.  All workshops and Project Stay are free and open to any  enrolled student at EWC.  A few faculty make their lectures available electronically for  students to review at their discretion (It is hoped that this practice will become more  widespread among the faculty as they become comfortable with the technology.)    Opportunities for Campus Involvement:  A little over 85% of the respondents to the  New Student Survey reported either at the high or very high level a feeling that they  “belonged” at EWC.  Students feel they belong on the Torrington campus by becoming  involved in a number of ways.  EWC sponsors over 20 clubs, activities, and organizations  in which the student may choose to participate.  Some of the groups are Instructional  Clubs, which are associated with or are extensions of a specific academic division,  program, or course.  Others are Student Services Clubs, which are formed to enhance  the social, recreational, educational, or cultural needs of students and are open to any  registered EWC student.  Both types of clubs receive financial support on an annual  basis through activity fees charged to students.  In addition to these clubs, students may  elect to become involved with the Student Senate, which is the governing body of the  EWC student body.  Non‐traditional students may participate as Adult Student Peer  Counselors and provide personal and academic support to other non‐traditional  students on campus.  Opportunities to become involved in the College’s residence halls  exist through membership in the Housing Council.  This group is open to all EWC  students who reside on the Torrington campus.  The Housing Council helps coordinate  activities in the residence halls and provides feedback to the staff on issues that affect  those students who live on campus.    Inclusive Campus Environment:  With the exception of the Instructional Clubs  mentioned above, all campus‐based groups are open to any EWC student.  While  participation in some activities is limited to ability (athletics, Phi Theta Kappa Honor  Society, etc.), most are open to students who have an interest in the group’s activities  and a willingness to participate.   

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The New Student Survey reported that 87.4% of the participants felt, either at the high  level or very high level, that EWC instructors treated all students fairly regardless of  gender/race/ethnicity.    PI 6.4  Physical and Psychological Safety – To what degree does Eastern Wyoming  College assure a campus environment in which new students are?  Physically Safe:  The New Student Survey reported that 87.4% of the student  respondents felt physically safe at EWC at either the high or very high level.  Safety  features in place on the EWC campus include adequate lighting in the parking lots,  security cameras in the residence halls, and emergency telephone towers on walkways  located throughout the campus.    The Torrington police routinely patrol the streets and parking lots on campus as well as  the residence hall areas.  They respond to both routine and emergency calls and provide  the college with timely information relating to criminal activity in the community so that  college employees and students may act to protect themselves and assist in crime  prevention efforts.  EWC also participates with the Torrington Police Department in a  part‐time Campus Resource Officer program.  This helps provide safety and security for  the campus while maintaining a high level of visibility.  Eastern Wyoming College adheres to the various policies of the Family Educational  Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).  Each year new and returning employees are briefed on  FERPA and updated on any recent changes that have occurred with the act.  EWC Computer Services likewise strives to meet the standards of information security  outlined in FERPA.  In doing so, adequate firewall protection has been installed on the  appropriate computer equipment to protect students’ privacy.  In addition, a complex  password logon system is in place, along with password aging, to guard against illegal  access to student confidential information.   In 2008 Eastern Wyoming College, in partnership with the City of Torrington, Goshen  County, and the Goshen County Unified School District, purchased the program  CodeRed from Emergency Communications Network, Inc. of Ormond Beach, FL.  The  CodeRed system gives EWC officials the ability to deliver pre‐recorded emergency  notification/information messages to targeted areas of the College.   Psychologically Safe:  Psychologically, most of the students participating in the New  Student Survey felt safe at Eastern Wyoming College.  In response to the question  addressing respect, 75% of the students rated EWC in the high or very high category  when asked if they felt respected by others at the College.  To a lesser extent, 63.1% of  the student respondents rated EWC in the high or very high category with respect to the  question, “To what degree do you feel you can express your beliefs without concern  about how others will react?”  That said, one student shared with the committee a story  in which an instructor asked a class for their opinions on a government program.  When  41   


the student voiced his analysis, the instructor questioned and disagreed with the  student in the classroom setting.  The student was confused and offended that his  opinion was diminished in front of his peers after being encouraged to verbally  participate in class.   Opportunities for improvement in the areas of physical and psychological safety include  a call for increased lighting in the parking areas and an increase in the use of security  cameras in and around campus.  It should be noted that the lack of a presence on  campus by full time, professional security staff is troubling to many students, staff, and  faculty.  Thus another area for improvement is the employment of a full time security  officer on the campus.  An increase in the attention given to guiding students about  healthy involvement with their peers and with faculty/staff would improve the  psychological safety and issues related to belonging.           Recommended Action Items:  All Student Dimension Recommendations (High priority)    This committee found that EWC offers a broad set of student services to new students,  but there is a great need to organize the process of assessment and referral so that  students are supported fairly and equally by these services. This recommended action is  designed to address all of the above All Students Dimension Performance Indicators as  they relate to new student needs and experiences.     An additional recommendation is the addition of a department designed and staffed  specifically to provide a methodical, reliable, and valid program of student assessment  coupled with recommended actions.  All new students would be encouraged, and those  at risk required, to utilize the services of this department.  This department would be  directed by a professional educated in macro‐level and micro‐level social systems theory  and individual systems theory. This department's responsibilities would include, but not  be limited to, the following:  1.  Provide an assessment protocol for analyzing each new student's needs that is bio‐ psycho‐socially oriented.  2.  Assess students individually that are perceived as lacking or would be challenged in  any area of life at EWC.  3.  Link these students to those EWC services, departments, supports deemed  appropriate according to the assessment protocol.  This might include tutoring, clubs  and organizations, counseling services, Community Education offerings, etc.).  4.  Link students to community supports when their needs are beyond the scope of  EWC's services.  These would include Public Health Offices, day‐care providers, repair  shops, Peak Wellness Center, etc.).  42   


5.  Provide a formal assessment process to determine what EWC and the Torrington  community presently offer to address the needs of students and what services are  lacking. Recommendations for improvements or changes would be submitted to the  appropriate department, the Leadership Team, the Board of Trustees or whatever  group can best address and implement the services that students require in order to  be successful at EWC.  The All Students Dimension Committee assigned an overall grade of "C+" to this area.   

 

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Chapter 8—Diversity Dimension    Foundations Institutions ensure that new students experience ongoing exploration of  diverse ideas, worldviews, and cultures as a means of enhancing their learning and  participation in pluralistic communities. Institutions cultivate an open and civil  community in which students interact with people from varied backgrounds and  cultures. These institutions guide students to reflect on ideas and values different from  those they currently hold and explore their own cultures and the cultures of others.  The co‐chairs of the Diversity Dimension Committee were Diane McQueen, Director of  Adult Basic Education, and Patricia Velazquez, Athletics secretary.  The committee  started meeting in mid‐September 2008 and completed their report in early February  2009.    In researching this dimension, the committee reviewed a number of documents  published by Eastern Wyoming College as they pertain to diversity, including the  College’s philosophy and mission statement, the college catalog, course descriptions,  randomly selected syllabi, and College Studies courses.  In addition, the committee  examined EWC’s environment for evidence of diversity related opportunities available  to students such as guest speakers, the calendar of events, club bulletin boards, and  student group activities.  The committee spent a considerable amount of time arriving  at a definition of “diversity.”  Members of the committee felt it was important, in  considering the definition of diversity, to think about ethnicity, gender, socio‐economic  background, age, and world view perspective.   PI 7.1  Identified Needs – To what degree does Eastern Wyoming College assure that  new students experience diverse ideas and worldviews through the following?  Initiatives Based in the Curriculum:  The committee started by reviewing the course  descriptions in the EWC catalog to determine if the curricula offered by EWC reflected  diversity.  It then identified courses which may or may not contain examples of diversity.   The course syllabi for over 20 courses were pulled and further scrutinized for elements  of diverse ideas and worldviews.  From this review of syllabi, the committee found that,  although the course descriptions found in the catalog indicated the presence of  elements of diversity, the discussion and/or topics taught in class (per interviews with  instructors) did not reflect a true worldview on diversity but rather one that was more  Euro‐centric in nature.  Assuming that the course syllabi provide an accurate depiction  of what actually transpires in the classroom, the committee found that there seems to  44   


be, in some instances, a discrepancy between the course descriptions (as outlined in the  EWC catalog) and the topics actually taught in the classroom. The committee agreed  that if courses do include elements of diverse ideas or worldviews, this should be  reflected to some degree in the syllabus.  The committee determined that an opportunity exists for EWC to utilize the College  Studies courses to emphasize diverse ideas and other issues.  College Studies (HMDV  1000) is a course designed to enable the student to explore and understand the whole  college environment and utilize campus resources that will enhance his/her academic  experience.  One of the current problems with the College Studies course, however, is  that it does not have a common syllabus.  In addition, some instructors teach this course  because one of their other courses did not make due to low enrollment, and they are  not fully vested in emphasizing a curriculum that includes diversity.  The committee  determined that, in order to successfully deliver elements of diverse ideas and  worldviews, all instructors must be supportive of the concept and follow a standardized,  common curriculum.     Overall, the committee felt that while there was potential in EWC’s curricular offerings  to introduce students to diverse ideas and worldviews, the current set of classes, as  taught, did so at a minimal level.  The results of the Faculty/Staff Survey confirmed this  conclusion as only 31% of the faculty/staff ranked EWC in the “High” or “Very High”  category when asked if the curriculum at EWC included appropriate attention to diverse  ideas and worldviews.  The survey also reported that 34% of the respondents rated EWC  in the “Not at All” or “Slight” categories in this area.  This was more than twice the  response reported by other participating institutions in the same Carnegie classification.        Initiatives Based in the Co‐Curriculum (Campus Sponsored Out‐of‐Class Activities):  In  reviewing the co‐curricular offerings at Eastern Wyoming College, the committee  examined such items as wall posters and  fliers advertising upcoming events and  interviewed students.  It concluded that co‐curricular events which expose students to  diverse ideas and worldviews were minimally available and, in many cases, too costly for  many students.    The results of the Faculty/Staff Survey confirm this conclusion.  When asked if out‐of‐ class activities for new students included appropriate attention to diverse ideas and  worldviews, 49% of the respondents rated EWC in the “Not at All” or “Slight” categories.   Only 15% of the respondents felt that EWC should be rated as “High” or “Very High.”      Respondents of the New Student Survey, likewise, agreed that EWC does not do a good  job of exposing students to diverse ideas or worldviews.  In a series of questions, the  45   


survey asked the students to what degree EWC exposed them to different (diversity  related) issues/ideas.  The various issues/ideas and percentage of respondents are as  follows:  • World Cultures – 44.6% (“Not at All” or “Slightly”)  • World Religions – 58.6% (“Not at All” or “Slightly”)  • Political Perspectives – 45% (“Not at All” or “Slightly”)  • Issues related to Social Class/Economic Status (Poverty vs. Privilege) – 38.9%  (“Not at All” or “Slightly”).    Initiatives Integrated Across the Curriculum and Co‐Curriculum:  The committee did  not identify any diversity related initiatives that were integrated across the curriculum  and co‐curriculum.  It did, however, discuss the new Honors Program as having the  potential to introduce EWC students to diverse ideas, worldviews, and cultures.  This  could be accomplished through the expansion of resources for students to study  abroad, participate in internships, and explore in‐depth the social and political factors  facing students as they prepare to enter the world of work.  PI 7.2 Interactions – To what degree does Eastern Wyoming College structure  opportunities for new students to interact with individuals from backgrounds and  cultures different from their own within the following categories?  Faculty/Staff at EWC:  The committee examined the employment patterns at the EWC ‐  Torrington campus and found that of the 46 full‐time faculty employed at the  institution, 21 are females and 25 are males, with one identified as being from a  minority classification.  Of the six upper level administrative positions, two are female  and four are male, with none being from a minority classification.  Of the 43 classified  benefited (full‐ and part‐time) staff members, 30 are females, 13 are males, with three  in the minority classification.  Of the 40 professional staff (full‐ and part‐time, 24 are  female and 16 are male with no one identified as being in the minority classification.      The relative lack of racial minorities on the faculty/staff thus limits the opportunity for  students to interact with individuals from backgrounds and cultures different from their  own (92.8% of students at the EWC‐Torrington campus are white non‐Hispanic).   Respondents of the New Student Survey, however, were evenly split on the question  ”To what degree does EWC provide opportunities for interaction with faculty and staff  from differing backgrounds and cultures?”  The answers fell into the following  categories:  “Not at All” or “Slightly” – 31.6%; “Moderately” – 33.8%; and “High” or  “Very High” – 34.6%.      46   


Respondents, however, to the Faculty/Staff Survey reported a different finding.  To the  same question discussed in the previous paragraph, 41% of the faculty/staff placed EWC  in the “Not at All” or “Slight” categories; 26% reported EWC as being in the “High” or  “Very High” categories.  The 41% reported in the “Not at All” or “Slight” categories is  well above the percentages reported (on this same question) by institutions in the same  Carnegie Class (26.7%) or All Institutions (19%) that participated in this survey.       Other Students at EWC:  The EWC – Torrington campus has a minority population of  7.2%, slightly higher than the 6.3% average of the college’s service area.  Given this,  opportunities for white students at EWC to interact with students from backgrounds  and cultures different from their own are somewhat limited.  The committee felt that  while many of the activities sponsored by the college did not allow for diversity related  opportunities, there did exist, in athletics, the opportunity for students to interact with  those from different backgrounds and cultures.      The EWC Student Senate actively supports student clubs and organizations.  These clubs  and organizations are closely aligned with fields of study at EWC, special interests,  and/or honor societies.  Students interviewed by members of the committee had the  perception that the student clubs found at EWC seem to reflect the agricultural values  of the college's service and recruiting area.  After review, however, the committee  found that of the 22 student clubs on the Torrington campus, only four (4) were geared  towards agriculture (thus contradicting the student perspective).  The results of the Faculty/Staff and New Student Surveys were somewhat similar in  examining this question.  The faculty/staff was almost evenly split when asked the  question “To what degree does EWC provide opportunities for students to interact with  other students at the institution who have different backgrounds and cultures?”   Faculty/staff respondents to this question rated Eastern Wyoming College in the  following categories:  “Not at All” or “Slight” – 31.3%; “Moderate” – 32.3% and “High”  or “Very High” – 36.4%.  Student ratings to this same question were slightly more  positive; “Not at All” or “Slightly” – 21.3%; “Moderately” – 34% and “High” or “Very  High” – 44.7%.      Individuals Outside EWC:  The committee interviewed a number of students and was  told that there are many events (that offer the opportunity for contact with individuals  from different backgrounds/cultures outside of EWC), both sponsored by EWC or in  cooperation with other entities, in which students may participate, but attendance is  often sporadic.  Students interviewed claimed that attendance at these events is often  dependent upon whether food is served or extra class credit is offered.  Furthermore,  the themes of some of the activities do not always appeal to students.  Some of the  47   


recent activities the committee examined were 1) Dr. (s) Kambutu and Nygana  presentation on a program of the lessons learned in the role of immigrants, diversity,  and education; 2) The "Afghan Women's Project"; 3) The Golden Dragons Acrobatic  Production (sponsored by the Goshen County Fine Arts Council); and 4) Public Policy and  You discussions, sponsored by the Adult Peer Counselors which were held for six weeks  in the Fall 2008 semester.  Other examples included Domestic Violence Awareness  Month, which was held throughout October 2008; Adelante Niños (program targets fifth  grade learners and their parents); and A Night of Elegance (students dress in formal  attire for a meal in the cafeteria).  Student interviews also indicated that many students  felt the cost of some of the programs, such as those sponsored by external entities, was  too expensive for them to attend.    College sponsored activities are usually announced by means of bulletin boards,  handouts, flyers, posters, college calendars, and the EWC website.  The committee  reported, unfortunately, that items on bulletin boards are often vandalized, possibly  because of the diversity content and focus.    The results from the New Student Survey and the Faculty/Staff Survey seemed to  indicate a need for more opportunities for students to meet with others outside of EWC  who come from different backgrounds/cultures.  Results of the New Student Survey to  the question “To what degree does EWC provide opportunities for interaction with  individuals from outside of the college who have differing backgrounds and cultures?”  are as follows:  “Not at All” or “Slightly” – 39%; “Moderately” – 30.7% and “High” or  “Very High” – 30.3%.  The faculty/staff survey respondents were more critical of the  institution in this area.  The results of this survey were:  “Not at All” or “Slight” – 58%;  “Moderate” – 30% and “High” or “Very High” – 12%.  The results of the Faculty/Staff  Surveys from colleges in the same Carnegie Classification as EWC rated their  institution(s) as being “Not at All” or “Slight” – 40% and “High” or “Very High” – 24%.   These results confirm the committee’s call for increased activities in the area of diversity  awareness.    PI 7.3 Behaviors – To what degree does Eastern Wyoming College convey to new  students the standards of behavior it expects for participants in a diverse (While  diversity can be broadly defined, the way diversity is experienced on any campus is  institution‐specific.) open and civil campus community?    The committee reviewed some of the college’s written publications (catalog, residence  life policies, student policies and administrative rules) and found that they strongly  communicate the behavioral expectations regarding respect, professionalism, and  48   


acceptance of diversity.  In addition, the policies and administrative rules found in the  Student Code of Conduct provide clear interventions, sanctions, and due process  guidance.  Members of the committee visited with staff in the Student Services area and  were told that little discussion took place during student orientation regarding student  conduct and/or behavior.    The results of the New Student Survey and the Faculty/Staff Survey show that EWC does  a fairly good job of conveying to new students their expectations of student behavior.   The Faculty/Staff Survey results were fairly even in addressing the question of to what  degree EWC communicates to new students the importance of respecting others with  differing opinions (“Not at All” or “Slight” – 28.3%; “Moderate” – 34.3% and “High” or  “Very High” – 37.4%).  In answering the question regarding the degree EWC  communicates to new students the importance of standards of behavior in an academic  community, the responses were:  “Not at All” or “Slight” – 19.2%; “Moderate” – 33.3%  and “High” or “Very High” – 47.5%.  These results were similar to those of colleges in the  same Carnegie classification, although all were lower in the “High” or “Very High”  categories.     Respondents of the New Student Survey gave EWC high ratings in the area of  communicating (to new students) the importance of respecting others with differing  opinions.  The ratings for the college were:  “Not at All” or “Slightly” – 12.4%;  “Moderately” – 24.3% and “High” or “Very High” – 63.3%.      The committee felt that EWC would benefit from ensuring that all college employees  and students are aware of the documents, policies, procedures, and expectations  regarding student behavior.  This can be accomplished in a variety of ways such as being  a part of new student orientation and being included in the College Studies classes.   Ongoing reinforcement of these expectations could occur through course syllabi,  bulletin boards, displays, presentations, and guest speakers throughout the academic  year.  The committee also felt that EWC employees should be encouraged to not only  reinforce college expectations of conduct and behavior but to role model them as well.     Recommended Action Items:     High Priority  • Encourage programming that focuses on diverse multicultural topics.  • Increase campus awareness of existing library resources encompassing diverse  authors and backgrounds. 

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• Emphasize EWC policies and administrative rules regarding acceptance, 

• • •

• •

discrimination, and overall expectation of student behavior in new student  orientation, College Studies, in syllabi review, and in classroom expectations. This  must be done both in writing as well as reinforced orally at various points throughout  a student's enrollment at EWC.  Continue institutional support to bring guest speakers, exhibits, programs, and studies  to EWC to augment existing diversity related efforts on campus.    Examine, change, and modify recruiting efforts in order to increase diversity on our  campus.    Seek to infuse diversity in all aspects/areas of EWC.  This must be done in the  curriculum, co‐curriculum, and in the college catalog.  Faculty should be encouraged  to include diversity in their syllabi whenever possible.  Encourage faculty to include diversity in classroom topics.    Form a committee to enhance diverse activities throughout the EWC service area.   This committee should be representative of as many diverse populations as possible  from our service area. This committee can work as a liaison with established on‐ campus and community representatives who work with students from various diverse  backgrounds.  Review and revise EWC courses to emphasize diversity.  One course that needs special  attention is the College Studies course in which incoming first‐year students are  strongly encouraged to enroll.  As this is only a one credit course, it may not be able to  carry the bulk of the opportunity to reach new students.  Thus, the committee  suggests that elements of diversity be included in as many college level courses as  possible. 

  Medium Priority  • Include students from diverse backgrounds in campus event planning and in the  existing committee structure.  The Diversity Dimension Committee assigned an overall grade of "D" to this area.     

 

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Chapter 9—Roles & Purposes Dimension  Foundations Institutions promote student understanding of the various roles and  purposes of higher education and those unique to two‐year institutions, both for the  individual and society.  These roles and purposes include learning for personal growth,  career enhancement, workplace preparation and retraining, transfer for additional  education, engaged citizenship, and serving the public good. Institutions encourage new  students to examine their motivation and goals with regard to higher education in  general and to their own college. Students are exposed to the value of both a general  education and focused study in an academic or career field.   

The Roles & Purposes Dimension Committee was lead by Janet Martindale‐Academic  Testing Center Coordinator, and Monte Stokes‐Agriculture and Veterinary Technology  instructor.  The committee investigated three performance indicators of this dimension.   

PI 8.1 Purposes To what degree does the institution effectively communicate to new  students its vision for the following purposes of higher education?   

(a) Knowledge acquisition for personal growth  Current Situation:  A little over 68% of students surveyed rated as high to very high how  attending college increases their knowledge for personal growth. While the definition of  personal growth may be open to interpretation, the evidence supports the students'  belief that by attending Eastern Wyoming College, they increase their knowledge for  personal growth. Over 38% of the staff and faculty rated this survey question in the  moderate category while 38.2% of the staff and faculty rated this question in the high to  very high category.   

Sources of Evidence:  The committee feels that all courses and activities at EWC  contribute to personal development. Many courses focus on skills such as goal setting,  organization and resume writing (HMDV 1000, 1500, and 1550). The college’s vision  statement expresses that EWC values academic achievement, lifelong learning, and  cultural enrichment. A goal of the college is to provide students sound educational  experiences in a supportive environment which prepares students for the expectations  of the workforce, the responsibility of citizenship in the community, and the rigor of  further academic pursuits. Student orientation provides an opportunity for students to  begin meeting with their academic advisors. Advisors assist students in identifying goals  and developing plans to achieve them. Many jobs are available either through the  college work study program or in the community. These jobs allow students to earn  extra income and provide personal growth opportunities. Also available are activities  and organizations to which every student is urged to become an active member. Thus,  there are many opportunities for personal growth which include participation in clubs  and organizations, participation in community education classes and trips, and  attendance at EWC Fine Arts Council performances and Goshen Community Theater  performances.   51   


Opportunities for Improvement: If the college is committed to providing opportunities  for students to increase knowledge for personal growth, a systematic plan should be  developed to effectively communicate to new students the EWC vision of personal  growth.  The following elements should be included within the plan:  1. All first‐year students should be required to attend either orientation or College  Studies,   2. The college should continue to provide opportunities to foster the advisor‐ student relationship, and  3. The college should provide consistent advisor training.  (b) Learning to prepare for future employment  Current Situation: The survey results support the committee's opinion that Eastern  Wyoming College does a very good job��of preparing students for future employment.  Over 92% of the students thought EWC's ability to prepare students for future  employment was moderate to very high. The Faculty/Staff survey showed that 94.4% of  the faculty and staff felt the same as the students. Many of the college's programs are  geared toward employment upon completion, especially the technical programs in  business, computers, cosmetology, criminal justice, machine tooling, nurses' assistant,  veterinary technician, and welding. These programs provide students with basic life  skills, which are needed in the workplace (such as being on time and interpersonal skills)  along with sound educational experiences which prepare them for further academic  pursuits.  Sources of Evidence:  Many of the college’s programs teach to industry‐approved  curriculum, which allows a student to leave Eastern Wyoming College with recognized  certifications or courses that will attract an employer. Examples include certifications  from American Welding Society, NCCER (Construction Technology), Energy Star  (Construction Technology), OSHA (Safety) and CCNA (Cisco Networking). Others have  curriculum that prepares students to pass industry exams including Veterinary  Technology (National Vet Tech exam; 95.4% pass rate), Cosmetology (State Board of  Cosmetology; 100% pass rate), and Certified Nursing Assistant.  The Workforce,  Community Education, Career and Technical Education Departments, Adult Basic  Education (ABE/GED/ESL), WorkKeys and Student Services all serve the needs of the  student to gain employment through training, testing, and certifying individuals in  multiple areas. In the 2007‐2008 school year workforce non‐credit continuing education,  which included OSHA, Computers Skills, Networking Skills, Intermediate/Advanced  Intravenous Therapy, Welding, QuickBooks, Electrical Code, Equipment Operation and  customized training for workers, increased 410% from the previous year.  Evidence of the effectiveness of the communication of learning to prepare students for  future employment may be found in the Outcomes Assessment annual report. Examples  cited in this report include the results from the Collegiate Assessment of Academic  52   


Proficiency (CAAP) tests, the University of Wyoming Transfer Student Assessment, and  the graduate survey responses.   Opportunities for Improvement:  The committee found three areas where EWC could  improve.   1. Outreach efforts are growing, but greater attention to the Douglas campus and  the Newcastle area would open up a market to people who could greatly use  Eastern Wyoming College's ability to help them become employed or improve  their current employment prospects.   2. EWC’s physical facilities limit our ability to grow, modernize and improve our  current offerings. At some point, the college’s reputation will suffer if it is unable  to keep up with other institutions in terms of salaries, facilities, and technology.  3. Increase the college’s interaction with industry to produce programs that mirror  the jobs of the EWC service area. This would include expanding or developing  offerings in such areas as agriculture, welding, forestry, wind power, electronics,  computers, logistics and shipping, geology, and construction technology.   (c) Learning for engaged citizenship (Engaged citizenship is defined as participation in  civic, community, and political life. This participation could include on‐campus  involvement in student government or other organizations as well as involvement in the  social and political life of the external community, region, nation, and world.)  Current Situation:  New Student survey results revealed that 58% felt Eastern Wyoming  College "Prepares you to be an involved member of your community" at a high to very  high level while only 14% felt that the college does a slight to not at all job. However,  the faculty and staff survey results revealed only 21% felt Eastern Wyoming College  "helps new students explore active engagement in the community" at a high to very  high level and 48% felt the college does slight to not at all for this purpose of higher  education. The committee is in agreement that the wording of the questions and the  different perceptions of a faculty/staff member versus those of new students explain  much of this discrepancy. The committee ranked Eastern Wyoming College's role in  "helping new students explore . . . active engagement in the community" as high.  Sources of Evidence:  The number of student clubs and organizations at Eastern  Wyoming College are listed in the sources of evidence. Twenty‐two clubs and  organizations are recognized in the Eastern Wyoming Catalog. During the first week of  school there is a "rush" night for clubs to present information to first‐year students.  Many advisors encourage students to be part of an organization on campus in order to  meet people and begin to network for future career opportunities and personal  development. Most of the clubs provide opportunities for students to run for an office  (leadership) position or be part of fund‐raising events which help develop leadership  skills. Most of the active student organizations provide activities for the student body or  are part of some type of community service project that can involve students.   53   


Throughout the years, Eastern Wyoming College has provided an opportunity for the  public, including students, to meet political candidates for local and state offices. There  have also been meetings on campus, facilitated by college employees, to discuss/debate  public policy. These opportunities are evidence of the college's commitment to the core  competency of Social Awareness: Graduates will be able to demonstrate an awareness  of the relationship between the individual and the world.  Eastern Wyoming College also employs many people who are members of different  community organizations or hold public office. The committee believes that EWC’s small  campus allows the student body an opportunity to know the faculty and staff, often by  first name, and students look to the faculty and staff as good examples of how to be  actively engaged in the community.  Opportunities for Improvement:  Some schools require that students are active in some  activity. The college should offer more clubs and organizations and make sure all  academic advisors are aware of the clubs and what they do through training or use a  checklist of items to be discussed with every advisee. Club advisors need to be  compensated for the time they devote to sponsoring and chaperoning activities.  Another opportunity for improvement is for faculty to add service‐learning activities to  courses.  (d) Learning for serving the public good (Serving the public good is defined as working  for the betterment of society within a framework characterized by justice, freedom, and  equality. Service for the public good occurs with or without remuneration and is often  undertaken on behalf of the less fortunate – those individuals who lack power,  education, or essential financial resources.)  Current Situation:  Survey results indicate that 61.3% of the students who responded  believe the college helps them understand how attending college prepares them to  contribute to the betterment of society. On the other hand, 48.5 % of the staff and  faculty responses were in the not at all or slight categories (while students' responses  were 14.1% for this range). Only 27.3% of the faculty and staff surveyed rated the  college’s performance in this category as high to very high.   Sources of Evidence:  The college's Strategic Plan (Strategic Direction #5 .2) states that a  goal of EWC is to "Provide all students and employees with opportunities to expand and  meet challenges of an ever‐changing world." Several campus organizations and activities  provide opportunities for students to serve the public good. Strengths of EWC regarding  the way it conducts the first year of college are described in the responses noted in the  Faculty/Staff survey open‐ended questions include Student Senate has a very active  participation and seems to engage first‐year students," and "Fairly active  encouragement of students to engage in various student organizations."  Weaknesses of EWC regarding the way it conducts the first year of college were  described in the Faculty/Staff survey open‐ended questions with such responses as  54   


"While out‐of‐class learning activities are available on the main campus, at this time,  students in Douglas have very few available to them that are organized by the college,"  and "Not offering/requiring out‐of‐class and/or community involvement."  The sources of evidence indicate that the college is doing well in communicating this  purpose of higher education, although many staff/faculty are not aware of the many  opportunities provided through the college's clubs and organizations.  Opportunities for Improvement:  Although students indicate that learning for the public  good has been communicated effectively to them, committee members were unaware  of any particular sources of evidence in the category. This presents an opportunity for  more publicity both inside and outside of the college about the ways that students serve  in the community.  PI 8.2 Motivation To what degree does the institution intentionally provide  opportunities for new students to examine their personal motivation for pursuing higher  education?  Current Situation:  The New Student survey results revealed that 62.6% ranked Eastern  Wyoming College as high or very high when asked, "To what degree have faculty/staff  advisors discussed how college can help you achieve your life goals." The Faculty/Staff  survey asked a similar question, "To what degree does this institution help new students  explore their motivation for getting a college education in terms of achievement of their  life goals." The faculty/staff response was 43.6% in the high to very high ranking. The  committee ranked EWC as high in regards to intentionally providing opportunities for  new students to examine their personal motivation for pursuing higher education.  Sources of Evidence:  All new students and all transfer students with less than 30  college credit hours are required to take HMDV 1000 College Studies. The course  description from the college catalog and examples of syllabi can be found in the sources  of evidence. This course provides an excellent opportunity for Eastern Wyoming College  to address the student's personal motivation for pursuing higher education.   Students are also required to get their advisors' signatures before they can register for  classes. This is a way of encouraging students to meet with their advisors and go over  academic and career goals and how the college can fit into those plans. Students are  also encouraged to meet with their advisors during lunch the first day of college  orientation. This is another time for students to learn about expectations of the college  and about opportunities that college can create for them.   The college also has job fairs that allow potential employers to meet with students and  review their resumes. Many new students also attend these job fairs to see what is  potentially available for future employment. This is another place where Eastern  Wyoming College intentionally provides the student with motivation to complete the  chosen curriculum.   55   


Many of the clubs on campus (as a group) attend workshops, trade shows, symposiums,  visit museums, visit transfer college campuses, go to college sporting events, etc. These  club activities are examples of different ways students may be exposed to other  educational opportunities and be motivated to go on to a four‐year school or complete  their degree so they can be more employable.  Opportunities for Improvement:  The college can improve advisor training or provide a  current list of material to be covered with each advisee to improve new student  retention. The committee also felt that the HMDV 1000 College Studies course is so vital  to the success of new students that it needs to be standardized and improved so that all  new students have a similar experience.   PI 8.3 Rationale To what degree does the institution effectively communicate its  rationale for the following?  (a) Required courses  Current Situation:  Communication for the rationale for required courses is included in  each course syllabus as required in the EWC Course Syllabus Format guidelines. There is  no data to confirm if students read or understand these rationale statements. While  another method of communicating the rationale may be accomplished through  academic advising, this topic is not addressed in the EWC Handbook for Academic  Advising.  Sources of Evidence:  The main sources of evidence include the EWC catalog Programs  of Instruction section and the EWC Course Syllabus Format guidelines. The Programs of  Instruction section of the college catalog clearly outlines the courses required for each  program, and the rationale for which courses are required in each program is provided  in the program descriptions. For example, the description of the cosmetology program  states, "The cosmetology program includes not only the 2000 hours of cosmetology  course work as required by Wyoming law but additional studies to broaden the scope of  opportunities in the field." Instructors are required to add a section to each course  syllabus that outlines the rationale for that specific course.   Opportunities for Improvement:  It is recommended that the EWC Handbook for  Academic Advising be revised to include a section on how to communicate the rationale  for required courses when advising students. It is also recommended that faculty be  provided training to develop program curriculum maps. Curriculum maps identify how  each course in the curriculum relates to the program‐level student outcomes and to the  institutional core competencies.      56   


(b) Required competencies (e.g., library skills, computing, writing)  Current Situation:  The required general education requirements of Communication  Skills, Analytical and Quantitative Reasoning, Technology Skills, Social Awareness, and  Information Literacy are communicated to students in the college catalog, in all of the  course syllabi, and on the college’s website. For example, in the catalog the rationale  states "Eastern Wyoming College expects that its graduates will have an educational  foundation that prepares them for a complex and rapidly changing world."   

Sources of Evidence:  Sources of evidence include the EWC catalog General Education  Requirements section, the EWC Course Syllabus Format guidelines, and the EWC  website.   

Opportunities for Improvement: Information about the rationale for required  competencies could be delivered in alternative ways such as in an interactive  presentation on the college's website or as posters such as the ones that were  developed for the Civitas Project that are displayed throughout the college. There also  needs to be an increased emphasis of the core competencies in the classroom setting.    (c) Requirements for entry into programs/majors  Current Situation:  At this time, there are no requirements for entry into specific  programs and majors at the college, so this category is not applicable.   

Recommended Action Items:  • Revise HMDV 1000 College Studies course to include more opportunities for  first‐year students to explore the roles and purpose of higher education. (High  priority)    •

Recommend that first‐year students be encouraged to participate in one activity,  organization, or sport for at least one semester. (High priority)    • Increase publicity of students' involvement in the community, both internally  and externally. (High priority)    • Increase funding for programs that need facilities to compete in our service area.  (High priority)    • Develop a strategy to make the general education requirements more visible.  Suggestions include that posters be displayed to highlight the general education  requirements or that these core requirements be communicated on a monthly  basis such as a Communication Skills month. (Medium priority)    • Provide training to advisors in the areas of student motivation, campus clubs and  organizations, courses and programs, and availability of student services.  (Medium priority)    The Roles and Purposes Dimension Committee assigned a grade of “B+” for this area. 57   


Chapter 10—Improvement Dimension  Foundations Institutions conduct assessment and maintain associations with other  institutions and relevant professional organizations in order to effect  improvement.  Assessment provides feedback to new students to guide their learning, to  faculty to guide their teaching, and to the institution to guide planning, resource  allocation, decision making, and improvement of programs and policies. As a way to  facilitate improvement, these institutions are knowledgeable about current practices at  other institutions as well as relevant research and scholarship.  The Improvement Dimension Committee was led by Connie Woehl, Associate Dean of  Outreach and Learning, and Tami Afdahl, Director of College Relations.  The committee  held their first meeting a little later than the other dimension committees because they  were waiting on the co‐liaisons to identify the list of first‐year initiatives that were to be  included.  In addition, the committee spent time in understanding the dimension itself.   They eventually focused on one key statement from the FoE Guidebook which indicated  “Institutions improve by conducting assessment but more importantly by using the  results of assessment to drive institutional change.”  The Improvement Dimension was asked to investigate the institution's level of  systematic assessment of important first‐year initiatives and the overall institutional use  of that assessment. Performance indicators also ask whether ongoing assessment has  yielded better understanding of important student behaviors, and whether faculty and  staff are in touch with external and internal sources of information and expertise about  the first year.  Based on the current practices inventory (CPI), the FoE self‐study liaisons identified the  five initiatives that have the most significant impact on first‐year students. Those  initiatives identified were New Student Orientation, College Studies Course, Pre‐ Registration Sessions, Website, and Special Focus Workshops.  PI 9.1 Assessment: To what degree does each initiative include systematic  assessment? Systematic assessments are appropriately timed, focused, and based on  data collection and analysis methods that provide high quality information for  decision making.  Current Situation: Through personal interviews conducted by members of this  committee of those individuals responsible for each of the initiatives indentified above,  the committee found the following:  New Student Orientation ‐ There is not a formal and systematic assessment in place.  Current practices include involvement by the Student Senate members in determining  programming for the day. Students, faculty and staff were interviewed and asked to  share their thoughts on orientation. It is the committee's conclusion that a formal  58   


evaluation of the event for students, faculty and staff to complete would assist in future  planning and improvement.  College Studies Course ‐ Interviews and surveys conducted regarding College Studies  revealed that now is perhaps the right time to implement some changes. Several  suggestions were made, but perhaps the best course of action is a committee charged  with looking at College Studies and addressing the concerns. A survey of current College  Studies instructors was conducted. This survey revealed the top three most important  topics covered in the course, the three things that need the most improvement, and  three suggestions on how the course could be more effective. Results are in the FoE  evidence library.  Formal course evaluations are conducted, and results from one semester have been  included in the evidence library.   Pre‐Registration Sessions ‐ Interviews were conducted with faculty and staff regarding  the college's pre‐registration events and process. It was found that there is not a  systematic assessment in place. Plans for pre‐registration are based on what has worked  in the past. There used to be a planning committee in place, but that has now been  disbanded.  Website ‐ There is not a systematic assessment in place for the EWC website. The  current practice involves staff involved with the website participating in professional  development opportunities to stay abreast of current trends and best practices.  Special Focus Workshops ‐ Interviews of the individuals involved with special focus  workshops were conducted. The committee found that most planning and assessment is  based on workshop participation and feedback from participants. The only formal  evidence gathered on workshops is a usage report of SMARTHINKING.  Whereas other  attendance reports might exist for other workshops, this evidence was not reviewed by  the committee. This report indicates the number of hours being used by EWC students  on‐campus and off‐campus.  PI 9.2 Use of Assessment: To what degree have assessment results been used to  improve existing practices across the following initiatives?  Current Situation:  New Student Orientation ‐ Interviews show that adjustments are  made based on comments received from student participants, faculty, and staff.  College Studies Course ‐ There are course evaluations performed for College Studies. It  appears that many instructors tailor the delivery of topics based on the students  enrolled.  Pre‐Registration Sessions ‐ Interviews show that adjustments are made based on  comments received from student participants, faculty, and staff.  59   


Website ‐ It was found that staff involved in the development of the website attended  professional development sessions and workshops, and that same staff also spends time  evaluating other websites to stay abreast of trends and best practices. Student, faculty  and staff input was used in the development of the new college website.  Special Focus Workshops ‐ Interviews conducted show that feedback from participants  is the main evaluation used for future planning.  PI 9.3 Understanding: To what degree have recent assessment activities improved  institutional understanding of the following elements of student success?  The following areas were evaluated using the Foundations of Excellence student survey:   1) student allocation of their time, 2) student/student connections, 3) student/faculty  connections, 4) student use of campus services, 5) student class attendance patterns,  and 6) patterns of student involvement.  This committee also reviewed the results of the Community College Survey of Student  Engagement (CCSSE) that was conducted in 2007 and the results of a survey conducted  in the fall of 2008 that was used as background information for a TRIO (Educational  Opportunity Center) grant application.  Current Situation:  Student allocation of their time‐When asked the average number of hours spent  outside the classroom with course preparation, 30.3% responded 6‐10 hours and 29.9%  responded 1‐5 hours (FoE New Student Survey). These responses may be affected by  the fact that 63% of respondents are currently employed (TRIO survey).  Student/student connections‐When asked to what degree has this college connected  you with other new students, the response was 50% indicating high to very high; in the  question about connecting you with continuing students, the response was 48.9%  indicating high to very high (FoE New Student Survey).  Student/faculty connections‐When asked to what degree has this college connected  you with faculty members outside of class, the response was 32.6% indicating high to  very high, 34.3% indicating moderately, and 33.1% indicating not at all to slightly (FoE  New Student Survey).  Student use of campus services‐When asked as a new student about the degree EWC  has connected students with community resources and support services to alleviate  household (family) issues, the response was 56.8% indicating moderate to high (FoE  New Student Survey). When asked to what degree this college has communicated the  importance of out‐of‐class activities, the response was 45.5% indicating high to very  high (FoE New Student Survey). EWC is above the mean for on‐campus services and  helping students cope with non‐academic responsibilities such as work and family  60   


(CCSSE). However, 66% of students do not participate in college sponsored activities  (CCSSE). There were only 192 SMARTHINKING tutoring hours used from 8/1/08 to  3/3/09 (SMARTHINKING usage report) when each student can use ten hours per  semester.  Student class attendance patterns‐When asked what are some of the reasons you have  missed or would miss class, 59.5% indicated personal illness, 36.1% indicated family or  children's illness, and 25.4% indicated that they don't miss class (TRIO survey).  Patterns of student involvement‐When asked to best describe the level of activity in  campus‐sponsored, out‐of‐class activities, 36.3% indicated they are somewhat involved  and 32.7% indicated they have no involvement (FoE New Student Survey).  PI 9.4 Strategies: To what degree have the following strategies been used by your  institution to improve the experiences of new students?  Each of the following areas was evaluated using the Foundations of Excellence  faculty/staff survey:  1) Attendance at higher education meetings, 2) Participation in  multi‐institutional initiatives focused on new students, 3) Institution‐wide exposure to  external experts, and 4) Broad exposure to institution‐based knowledge and expertise  about the new student experience.  Current Situation:  Attendance at higher education meetings‐When asked to what degree are faculty and  staff engaged in the following professional activities focusing on the first year: attending  conferences or workshops, the response was 61.9% indicating not at all to slight. When  asked to what degree are faculty and staff engaged in the following professional  activities focusing on the first year: attending national/regional conferences or  meetings, the response was 62.9% indicating not at all to slight (FoE Faculty/Staff  survey).  Participation in multi‐institutional initiatives focused on new students‐There was no  evidence of participation in multi‐institutional initiatives focused on new students.  Institution‐wide exposure to external experts‐The only evidence related to this topic  that could be found is the college's participation in the Foundations of Excellence  project.  Broad exposure to institution‐based knowledge and expertise about the new student  experience‐When asked to what degree has the following information directly  influenced working with new students: faculty and staff using demographic information  from this institution's databases, 61.8% indicated not at all to slight.  Since the majority  of EWC's student body graduates from very small schools with graduating classes of 1‐ 49, this information may be helpful to faculty and staff in retaining these students by  61   


understanding the individual attention to which they are accustomed. When asked to  what degree has the following information directly influenced working with new  students: faculty and staff's use of student evaluations, assessments, or feedback, 37.6%  indicated high to very high and 38.5% indicated moderate (FoE Faculty/Staff Survey).   Summary  The following results came from the FoE Faculty/Staff survey:  Overall, please rate this institution's assessment capabilities relevant to the first year of  college: 42.5% rated the college's assessment of what is relevant as fair.  Overall, please rate this institution's assessment capabilities relevant to the first year of  college: disseminating results in a timely manner. Some 32.1% rated this element very  poor to poor, 41.3% rated it fair, and 26.6% rated it good to excellent.  Overall, please rate this institution's assessment capabilities relevant to the first year of  college: using results for improvement. The responses were 30.8% indicating very poor  to poor, 37.4% indicating fair, and 31.8% indicating good to excellent. With two‐thirds of  the faculty and staff reporting that assessment is not being used for improvement, the  college needs to direct attention to the information at hand.  Recommended Action Items:  •

An assessment tool should be developed to use for the five identified initiatives  utilizing the recognized method of planning "plan‐do‐check‐act (PDCA) cycle,”  which is a four‐step model for carrying out change.  Planning groups should be  utilized and then kept in place to ensure the continued improvement of these  and other initiatives. (High priority) 

Develop a committee to enhance College Studies which is cross functional in  nature to develop new strategic action plans for that component of student  success. (High priority) 

In‐service speakers or activities that focus on student success should be  presented or provided for all administration, faculty and staff. (High priority) 

The Improvement Dimension Committee assigned a grade of “C‐” for this area.   

 

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Chapter 11—Action Items & Recommended Actions  The recommended actions from all nine dimension committees were compiled and then  clustered into seven primary areas.  Many of the recommended actions were similar in nature,  but for the purpose of including all of the committee members' work, this chapter includes all of  the recommended actions.  It should be noted that the committees assigned mostly high or  medium priorities to these recommended actions.  From that work, action plans were then  developed for the seven areas.  It is the recommendation of the FoE Steering Committee that  these seven areas be assigned to appropriate College subcommittees from either the newly  created Curriculum and Learning Council or the Student Retention Team so that the genesis of  this work can continue and result in overall improvement in the College's interactions with new  students.  These seven action plans are included in Appendix J.  First‐year Communication Improvements (Strategic Action Plan 1)  1. Create a formal statement regarding the first‐year experience of EWC students. (High  priority)  2. Draft a philosophy statement for the first‐year experience at Eastern Wyoming College.  (High priority)  3. Adopt the first‐year philosophy statement formally and encourage its practice  throughout EWC. (High priority)  4. Publish and disseminate the statement as widely as possible. The committee  recommends that the publication should be in the catalog, on the website, and in all  documents related to students, faculty, and staff. (High priority)  5. Restructure the orientation information process to include non‐academic assistance and  college‐sponsored organization/event assistance. (High priority)  6. Develop a systematic referral of students to appropriate campus personnel for  assistance. (High priority)  7. Increase funding levels for orientation and recruitment activities such as technology day.  (High priority)  8. Communicate or work to improve course, program and college learning goals. (High  priority)  9. Improve percent of faculty and staff with knowledge of college's educational goals and  outcomes. (High priority)  10. Develop, implement and communicate processes and procedures that enforce common  program and college educational goals for first‐year students. (High priority)  11. Develop institution‐wide learning goals for new students. (High priority)  12. Revise new student orientation activities. (High priority)  13. Communication needs to be standardized so each student receives the same  information. Update information to be appealing to the new type of students coming to  EWC. (High priority)  14. Standardize the campus tour process to insure that all prospective students have similar  experiences, as well as the opportunity to meet with staff and faculty, visit class, meet  with advisors and/or coaches, and gain an awareness of the campus. This can be  accomplished by having a standard tour as well as training tour guides. (High priority)  15. Develop and distribute a family handbook to inform family members of relevant  information. Suggested information includes FERPA, Financial Aid, activities schedules,  contact information, ways to stay involved with your student, etc. This handbook should  63   


16.

17. 18. 19. 20.

21. 22.

23. 24. 25.

26.

be relevant to not only parents of students but also family members of non‐traditional  students as well. (High priority)  Offer appropriate sessions offered to family members at orientation and pre‐ registration days to inform them of ways to assist in first‐year student success. (High  priority)  Update the website and EWC catalog link to insure the information is easy to access.  Make sure the information in both is concise and consistent. (High priority)  Implement online access to EWC forms such as application for admissions, transcript  request, program requirements checklist, etc. (High priority)  Develop a Student Handbook to provide information regarding many aspects of the  EWC experience to students, particularly first‐year students. (High priority)  Institute a more relevant orientation for students of all ages and situations (i.e. sessions  geared towards on‐campus vs. off‐campus or traditional vs. non‐traditional). Provide  useful and current information to students about the college. (High priority)  Restructure Orientation to further benefit new students. Utilize this opportunity to  create connections between students and instructors, staff, and services. (High priority)  Emphasize EWC policies and administrative rules regarding acceptance, discrimination,  and overall expectation of student behavior in new student orientation, College Studies,  in syllabi review, and classroom expectations. This must be done both in writing as well  as reinforced orally at various points throughout a student's enrollment in the college.  (High priority)  Increase publicity of students' involvement in the community, both internally and  externally. (High priority)  Increase funding for programs that need facilities to compete in our service area. (High  priority)  Bring focus to the prominence EWC places on the first‐year student experience through  established levels of communication between senior academic leaders and faculty.  (Medium priority)  Develop a strategy to make the general education requirements more visible.  Suggestions include posters be displayed to highlight the general education  requirements or that these core requirements be communicated on a monthly basis  (such as a Communication Skills month). (Medium priority) 

Advising Improvements (Strategic Action Plan 2)  1. Provide professional development for faculty on the use of status codes on course  rosters and the importance of recognition of first‐time students. (High priority)  2. Set an advisor agenda for topics discussed with advisees at orientation meeting. (High  priority)  3. Determine who advises "interdisciplinary students" and who advises "undecided  majors" as two separate student needs populations. (High priority)  4. Improve advising by "non‐academic" staff. (High priority)  5. Provide professional development for advisors on the use of the degree evaluation in  LancerNet or revise the evaluation so that it does not require additional analysis by  student services personnel. (High priority)  6. Create in‐house professional development for faculty advising. (High priority)  7. Review the "R" designation for repeat courses and develop a stated procedure for  assistance to students repeating courses. (High priority)  8. Support the faculty with improved trainings for assessments and advising.  Adjust  orientation to meet the students’ needs.  Students must be linked to appropriate  64   


advisors as soon as possible, and students who are undecided in their major or high risk  should be placed with a specialized advisor. It is important to distinguish between  undecided and Interdisciplinary Studies majors. In the event that students needs to be  advised by someone outside of their program, develop a checklist form for all  departments indicating the curriculum needs for their majors or course of study to  insure consistent advising. Standardize the summer pre‐registration sessions to insure  adequate advising in all disciplines. (High priority)  9. Provide training to advisors in the areas of student motivation, campus clubs and  organizations, courses and programs, and availability of student services. (Medium  priority)  College Studies Improvements (Strategic Action Plan 3)  1. Have HMDV faculty identify instruction methods to follow to engage students in  learning and then communicate those to all instructors. (High priority)  2. Establish a cross‐functional committee to review learning outcomes for HMDV 1000 and  introduce a minimum set of these outcomes for all sections. (High priority)  3. Standardize HMDV 1000 to provide students with similar experiences and again use this  time to facilitate connections with fellow students, instructors, and staff. (High priority)  4. Revise HMDV 1000 College Studies course to include more opportunities for first‐year  students to explore the roles and purpose of higher education. (High priority)  5. Develop a committee to enhance College Studies which is cross functional in nature to  develop new strategic action plans for that component of student success. (High  priority)  Retention Initiatives (Strategic Action Plan 4)  1. Create and utilize an effective student retention program. (High priority)  2. Determine effectiveness of Bridge program in ultimate success of participants  completing college‐level required math and English courses. (High priority)  3. Develop a stated procedure for advisor alert follow‐up. (High priority)  4. Develop a stated procedure for midterm deficiency follow‐up. (High priority)  5. Determine the effectiveness of the Student Retention Team. (High priority)  6. Create in‐house professional development for early warning initiatives. (High priority)  7. Recommend that first‐year students be encouraged to participate in one activity,  organization, or sport for at least one semester. (High priority)  8. Review and revise existing retention efforts and include goals and policies specific to  new student retention in faculty handbooks and new employee hiring packets. (Medium  priority)  Diversity Improvements (Strategic Action Plan 5)  1. Encourage programming that focuses on diverse multi‐cultural topics. (High priority)  2. Increase campus awareness of existing library resources encompassing diverse authors  & backgrounds. (High priority)  3. Continue institutional support to bring guest speakers, exhibits, programs, and studies  to EWC to augment existing diversity‐related efforts on campus. This should include  students, faculty and staff from diverse backgrounds. (High priority)  4. Examine, change, and modify recruiting efforts in order to increase diversity on our  campus. (High priority)  65   


5. Seek to infuse diversity in all aspects/areas of EWC. This must be done in the curriculum,  co‐curriculum and college catalog.  Faculty should be encouraged to include diversity in  their syllabi whenever possible. (High priority)  6. Encourage faculty to include diversity in classroom topics. (High priority)  7. Form a committee to enhance diverse activities throughout the EWC service area. This  committee should be representative of as many diverse populations as possible,  however small they may be, from our service area. This committee can work as a liaison  with established on‐campus and community representatives who work with students  from various diverse backgrounds. (High priority)  8. Review and revise College courses to emphasize diversity. One course which needs  special attention is the College Studies course that all incoming freshmen are strongly  recommended to enroll in. Because this is only a one credit course, it may not be able to  carry the bulk of the opportunity to reach new students; thus, the committee suggests  that elements of diversity be included in as many college‐level courses as possible. (High  priority)  9. Include students from diverse backgrounds in campus event planning & existing  committee structures. (Medium priority)  Assessment Tools & Institutional Data Usage (Strategic Action Plan 6)  1. Add a department designed and staffed specifically to provide a methodical, reliable and  valid program of student assessment and recommended action. All new students would  be encouraged, and new at‐risk students would be required to utilize this department's  functions. This department would be directed by a professional educated in macro‐level  and micro‐level social‐systems theory and individual systems theory. This department's  responsibilities would include, but not be limited to, the following:  a. Provide an assessment protocol for new student's needs that is bio‐psycho‐ socially oriented.  b. Assess students individually that were recognized as lacking or challenged in any  area, by any faction of EWC; Student Retention Team, Advisory Alerts, faculty,  Director of Resident Life, organization sponsors, roommates, librarians, ...  c. Link these students to EWC services, departments, supports... deemed  appropriate according to the assessment protocol; tutoring, clubs and  organization sponsors, counseling, Community Education, workstudy...)  d. Link students to community supports when their needs are beyond the scope of  EWC's services:  Public Health, day‐care providers, repair shops, physical  therapy, Peak Wellness Center...  e. Provide a formal assessment process regarding what EWC and the community  presently offers to address the needs of students and what is lacking. Submit  recommendations for improvement or additions to the appropriate  department, the Leadership Team, the Board of Trustees or whoever can best  address and implement the services that students are requiring in order to be  successful. (High priority)  2. An assessment tool should be developed to use for the five identified initiatives utilizing  the recognized method of planning, "Plan‐do‐check‐act (PDCA) cycle,” which is a four‐ step model for carrying out change. Planning groups should be utilized and then kept in  place to ensure the continued improvement of these and other initiatives. (High priority)    66   


Professional Development Improvements (Strategic Action Plan 7)  1. Implement and encourage participation in informational workshops and professional  development opportunities for all employees to better understand new students and  their diverse characteristics. This includes providing sufficient resources (time and  funds) for these pursuits. (High priority)  2. Devise a method to acknowledge, recognize, and reward excellence in teaching new  students. (High priority)  3. Develop orientation and mentoring programs for recently hired faculty and student  service staff with an emphasis on understanding new student issues and concerns.  Implement training for continuing faculty and staff with an emphasis on the same. (High  priority)  4. In‐service speakers or activities that focus on student success should be presented or  provided for all administration, faculty and staff. (High priority) 

 

 

67   


Chapter 12—Reflections and Next Steps    Eastern Wyoming College has learned about itself from this year of self‐study  and analysis.  The involvement with the Foundations of Excellence—The First  Year of College®— represents the first time the College has looked at the  experiences of its new students and  tried to understand the experiences and  pitfalls that are a part of a college student’s journey.  The overall involvement of  the campus community was instrumental in gathering the evidence and writing  the final dimension reports.  The voices of many are reflected in these chapters  as the co‐chairs and committee members proceeded in slightly different  directions.  The differing voices have been left in this final report in order to tell  the story from various perspectives.       As each dimension report came in to be reviewed by the Steering Committee  members, it was somewhat surprising to see consistent themes developing.  In  the end, the recommendations coming from the Dimension Committees were  sorted into these themes, which eventually became the seven action plans that  are contained in Appendix H.  The overall grade for the institute’s efforts in the  First‐Year Experience average is a C‐.    The next steps are to assign these action plans to specific entities of the college  to ensure that follow‐up action is taken in all seven areas.  Some of these actions  have already started.  For example, a NACADA advising team has been formed to  attend an advising workshop in Kansas City in June.  A College Studies  subcommittee will be formed to review and revise the curriculum of this  important first‐year course.  The other themes include retention initiatives,  diversity improvements, assessment tools and institutional data usage,  professional development improvements, and first‐year communication  improvements.    This final report should be considered volume 1 of 2 as we continue preparing  for the institutional re‐accreditation.  Volume 2 will contain additional chapters  on the required criterion review while still keeping our dimension committees in  place.  A crosswalk of the criterion components, originally developed by Itasca  Community College, will be utilized as we continue on the journey of Eastern  Wyoming College’s self‐study.  Fall in‐service activities will be the start of this  next step and will include a visit from the college’s Higher Learning Commission  staff liaison.      In closing, it should be remembered that the activities that occurred in 2008‐ 2009 will be just the beginning of our overall improvement of working with the  first‐year students who attend Eastern Wyoming College.    68   


APPENDICES 

 

69   


Appendix A – Key to Acronyms  EWC 

 

Eastern Wyoming College 

FTE 

 

Full‐Time Equivalent 

AQIP 

 

Academic Quality Improvement Program 

PEAQ   

Program to Evaluate and Advance Quality 

FoE 

 

Foundations of Excellence® 

PI 

 

Performance Indicator 

ACT 

 

American College Testing 

COMPASS 

Placement Testing for Reading, English, and Mathematics 

GPA 

 

Grade Point Average 

CPI 

 

Current Practices Inventory 

HMDV   

Human Development 

ENGL   

English 

PEAC   

Physical Education Activity 

MATH   

Mathematics 

CAT 

Classroom Assessment Technique 

 

DFWI   

High D/Failure/Withdrawal/Incomplete 

CLEP 

College Level Examination Program 

 

DANTES 

Defense Activity for Non‐Traditional Education Support (test) 

ADA 

Americans with Disabilities Act 

 

CCSSE   

Community College Survey of Student Engagement 

LCCC 

 

Laramie County Community College 

CMS 

 

Content Management System 

FERPA   

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 

NCCER   

National Center for Construction Education and Research 

OSHA   

Occupational Safety and Health Administration 

CCNA   

Cisco Certified Network Associate 

ABE/GED/ESL  Adult Basic Education/General Education Diploma/English as a Second Language  CAAP    Collegiate Assessment of Academic Proficiency  TRIO 

The Federal TRIO Programs are educational opportunity outreach programs  designed to motivate and support students from disadvantaged backgrounds.  

 

  70   


Appendix B – Project Timeline  Eastern Wyoming College 2008‐2010  Foundations of Excellence® in the First College Year—Special Emphasis Self‐Study  Overall Project Timeline & Self‐Study Timeline  2008  | May 2008 ‐  Submitted application to Foundations of Excellence ®  | June 13 – Foundations of Excellence® webinar  | August 4‐5 – Launch Meeting, Asheville, NC  | August 18 – Introduce the FoE self study to the campus community to encourage campus‐ wide participation on the FoE Task Force, sign up for Dimension Committees  | August – Determine who will serve as Dimension Committee Chairs  | August – Determine others who will serve on the Steering Committee  | August & September – The Steering Committee manages the process of developing the  Current Practices Inventory (CPI)  | September 3 – Additional Survey Questions due to liaisons  | September 4 – Co‐liaisons meeting with Betsy Griffin (1:00p.m.‐Dee’s office)  | September 5 – Order the Faculty/Staff Survey  | September 5 – Order New Student Survey  | September 7 – Majority of the CPI data should be complete  | September 8 –23 – Dimension Committee meetings to begin working on assigned  dimension analysis  | September 9 ‐ WESS Administrator Role – webinar hosted by Policy Center (Dee Ludwig,  Kim Russell & Lynn Wamboldt)  | September 18 – Develop faculty/staff population file  | September  24 – Launch Faculty/Staff Survey  | September – Develop New Student Survey population file  | October 1 – Launch New Student Survey  | October 8 – Participate in webinar hosted by Policy Center (1:00‐2:00p.m., Board Room)  | October 17 – Close Faculty/Staff Survey 

71   


| October – Faculty/Staff Survey results available for review  | October – Dimension Committees continue working on assigned dimension analysis and  report  | October 29 – Participate in webinar hosted by Policy Center (1:00 – 2:00p.m., Board Room)  | October 31 – Close New Student Survey  | November – Dimension Committees continue working on assigned dimension analysis and  report  | November 2008—Submitted MOU to Higher Learning Commission to participate in a  Special Emphasis Self‐Study  | November – New Student Survey Results available for review  | November 19 – Participate in webinar hosted by Policy Center (1:00 – 2:00p.m., Board  Room)  | December – Dimension Committees continue working on assigned dimension analysis and  report  2009  | January  – Accreditation presentation to Board  | January 28 – Participate in webinar hosted by Policy Center (1:00 – 2:00p.m., Board Room)  Webinar Topic:  FoE at Mid‐Point  | January – Dimension Committees continue working on assigned dimension analysis and  report   | February – Strategic Planning month for FY10 (due by March 1)  | February – Dimension Committees continue working on assigned dimension analysis and  report  | February 27 – Completion of all dimension reports  | March – Steering Committee manages the development of the FoE Final Report and  Implementation Plan  | March 25 – Participate in webinar hosted by Policy Center (1:00 – 2:00p.m., Room TEB131)  Webinar Topic:  Comprehensive Final Reports  | March 30 – Steering Committee completes the development of the FoE Final Report and  Implementation Plan   | April‐‐ FoE recommendations and action plans are input into the college’s Strategic  Planning & Budgeting Process 

72   


| April—Institutional Team attends HLC Annual Meeting & Conference  | May & June—Prepare report on FY 09 Strategic Planning accomplishments  | June—Prepare summary of FY10 Strategic Planning directions  | July 31, 2009 – End Date for Policy Center Advisor consulting  | August‐May—Implement FoE Action Plans & Assess Outcomes  | August In‐service—Presentation to college community on FoE and Special Emphasis Self‐ Study by Andrew Lootens‐White, The Higher Learning Commission  | September‐February—Dimension Committees continue meeting to further discuss HLC  Criteria  2010  | January  In‐service—Re‐emphasis presentation to college community on FoE and Special  Emphasis Self‐Study by Andrew Lootens‐White, The Higher Learning Commission  | January‐May—Additional committees identified to address GIRs, complete Institutional  Data forms, address concerns from last accreditation  | February—Strategic Planning month for FY11 (due by March 1)  | May & June—Prepare report on FY 09 Strategic Planning accomplishments  | May 1—All committee reports due to Institutional Effectiveness  | June—Prepare summary of FY10 Strategic Planning directions  | May‐July—finish writing and editing complete Special Emphasis Self‐Study  | August 1—Mail self‐study and access to electronic resources to HLC  | July 31, 2010 – End date of two‐year access to FoEtec.  (Note:  Will request PEAQ  accreditation team access until scheduled HLC visit)  | Fall 2010 or Early Spring 2011—Host accreditation team visit  2011  |  Apply for alternative accreditation process 

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Appendix C – Foundations of Excellence New Student Survey  If EWC were to build a new library, how important are the following items (please mark all that apply)? 

Proximity to  residence halls 

Access to  computers  1 

           1  1 

Friendliness and  helpfulness of  staff 

Hours of  operation 

Food  and  drink  allowed 

Other 

1  1 

1  1 

1  1 

Cheaper copy machine 

More books for pleasure reading 

1  1 

1  Library access from the internet. 

All office programs on all computers. 

1  1 

Head phones attached to computers. 

1  Material available 

74   


Proximity to  residence halls  1 

Access to  computers 

Friendliness and  helpfulness of  staff 

Hours of  operation 

Food  and  drink  allowed 

1  Updated Books  Private workstations, private computer rooms, Mac  computers for graphic/Web students.  1 

1  1 

1  1 

Quality of resources found in library.  1 

1  1 

1  1 

1  1 

1  1 

Really Good Books!!  Variety of reference/resource books and pleasure  reading books. 

Other 

75   


Proximity to  residence halls  1 

Access to  computers 

Friendliness and  helpfulness of  staff 

1  1 

Hours of  operation 

1  1 

New Chairs at Tables.  Children's area to accommodate single or 2 parent  households. 

1  1 

1  1 

Other 

Food  and  drink  allowed 

1  1 

1  1 

1  1 

76   


Proximity to  residence halls  1 

Access to  computers 

Friendliness and  helpfulness of  staff 

Hours of  operation 

Food  and  drink  allowed 

More variety of books for vet tech students. 

Other 

Vending machines in case you need a snack during study  time. 

1  1 

1  1 

welding books, osha regulations 

77   


Proximity to  residence halls  1 

Access to  computers  1 

Friendliness and  helpfulness of  staff  1 

Hours of  operation 

Food  and  drink  allowed 

Other 

1  1 

1  1 

1  1 

1  1  1 

1  1 

1  1 

Later hours 

Extensive library resources  1  Wider book selection 

More selection of books, authors of different races 

1  1 

More books and friendlier staff.  I feel like I'm bothering  the staff when I need help. 

More updated books for lending out on a broad range of  subjects.  Wish we had a larger library with more quiet  areas 

78   


Proximity to  residence halls 

Access to  computers 

Friendliness and  helpfulness of  staff 

1  1 

Hours of  operation 

Food  and  drink  allowed 

Other 

1  1 

1  1 

Child can come 

Don't live on campus, doesn't effect me.  1 

1  1 

1  1 

79   


92 

217 

204 

199 

105 

39% 

92% 

86% 

84% 

45% 

Percentage is based on 236 responses 

   

 

80   


I chose EWC because they have a great Cosmo program. I selected EWC because it is a small school, and it was relatively close to home. It has a good program in the ranch management. It is in a rural area and an ag dominant college.

1

I am a resident of Torrington

1

Location, cost, class choice, academics Because of the distance from home and I got a rodeo scholarship

1

1

1

There are very few vet tech programs out there, and when I did my research, this one was the best price and had the best education opportunities. It was also centrally located from all of my family Because they offer the major I wanted.

1

Other

Friendly

Staff

FRCH/A G

1

1

Basketball

1

1

Rodeo

1

1

Faculty

1

1

Because I got a lot of recommendations to join their vet-tech program.

1

1

1

VTTK 1

1

Rodeo

1

VTTK

1 1

Because they have WUE. And they have a vet tech program.

VTTK

1

1

1

1

It is a great welding program and has many benefits. 1

WELD

1 1

Cause of the welding program and the cost and the friendly campus.

1

1

WELD

1

I was offered a good scholarship Because I wanted to get out of Colorado, and my horses are up here. They have a good welding program, ag programs, and rodeo team.

1

1

WELD AG Rodeo

1

WELD Rodeo

1

I got a scholarship Because it had the major that I wanted to become in life. It also helped with money, and it was close to home and small enough to function. Good welding and rodeo programs

Athletics

CSMO

1

Less costly; close to home town

Recommended

1

Relatives in town, some who have attended college here. The programs well recommended

I selected EWC because it was close to home. Plus I always heard positive things about EWC. How the instructors are always willing to help, they make learning fun!

Family Member Attended

Size

CSMO

Smaller number of students attending, resulting in smaller classes and more faculty knowing you personally.

Rodeo program, distance from home

Program Name

1

I got a basketball scholarship. 1

Scholarship Grants

Why did you select EWC? It had to be the best cosmo program in the state

Program

Cost

Location

   

1

1

1

1

1

81   


1

Close to home but not close enough.

1

Because I only travel a few miles to get here. Also I was impressed with what I was told about EWC, and now that I’m here I’m even more impressed. It's a great college, especially for cosmetology!

1

I selected EWC because of the cost and because it is close to home.

1

1

It was cheap and closer to home.

1

1

Because of location and cost!

1

1

Location was close, cost was lower than other places.

1

1

Because all my life I had heard the best cosmetologist in the state came from here. I have several family members go to school here, and it's close to home.

1

1

Other

Friendly

Staff

1

1

1

1

1

CSMO

1

CSMO

1

WELD

1 1

1

1

1

1

BWEB

1

I was offered an athletic scholarship

1

1

Because I wanted to be a welder, and I couldn't seem to come up on a better school for it. If it wasn't for the welding program, I wouldn't be here. 1

WELD

1

1

They sent me information, then I applied and was accepted. They kept sending me more information, then I came to visit, and I liked it.

The vet tech program and rodeo

WELD

1 1

The welding program.

I was previously at an out-of-state four year school but withdrew. I am here to complete my education on the cheap until I can transfer somewhere more suited to my needs.

Faculty

Athletics

Recommended

1

1

Because I have heard many good things about my degree's program. And it's close to home. Small classes, friendly people, I have a lot of friends here.

Can pay with grants and scholarships and can live/work off campus still…"close to home"

Size

1 1

It was a good choice because it wasn't too expensive but yet has seemed to offer a good experience so far. Money and it was a 2 year school

My dad is a professor here, so that really helped me to make my decision, plus my sister and brother both attended school here and really liked it. I selected EWC because of the program they offered me. No other school in a community college setting offered web design based on budget and place.