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EASTERN The Magazine of Eastern University

FALL 2020

reset


Each of us shin A Season to in unique ways and Ref lect


nes light Rest s. Dear Alumni and Friends,

Throughout the Psalms, we see the authors pausing and reflecting on God’s steadfast faithfulness, especially amidst hardship. This humble posture had the power to recenter and refresh their souls despite their circumstances.

This past year has been filled with many unknowns and countless questions. However, this year also allowed many of us additional time to reflect, to be still, and like the psalmists, to reset our perspectives on many important topics. As a nation, we are confronting issues of race, justice, protecting the vulnerable, and priorities in our personal lives when many of our normal routines have been stripped away.

This latest issue of EASTERN magazine encourages us to think through the concept of being “reset.� The articles compiled in this issue feature many different stories from our community that exemplify the resiliency and adaptability that is so often necessary to renew our minds and impact our world for the glory of God.

As you meditate on these stories, may you be empowered to continue to reset your way of thinking, bringing Faith, Reason, and Justice to your communities and beyond.

With you on the journey,

Ronald A. Matthews, President


C O N T E N T S

06 RACE, RELATIONSHIP, & RESET Eastern’s Department of Social Transformation reflects on how the events of 2020 have sparked action and change at Eastern University.

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COMMUNITY 12

F E AT U R E 18

SPOTLIGHTS

Unprecedented. World-wide. Pandemic.

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ACA D E M I C S 28

AT H L E T I C S 32

ALUMNI

26 UNPREDICTABLE PARENTHOOD After struggling with infertility, Palmer alum Joe Gratzel and his wife Denise grew a beautiful multi-ethnic family through adoption.

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10 BUILDING BRIDGES The Chamberlain Interfaith Fellowship provides students with an immersive Jewish-Christian learning experience.

12 FEATURE: COVID-19 CHRONICLES Students, faculty, and staff reflect on the pandemic and share what they’ve learned, how they’ve managed to stay connected with others, and how they’ve experienced a reset in their perspectives.

ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT / MICHAEL THOMAS, MBA ’18, PSYD Editor IN Chief / KELLY GODDARD Creative Director & Lead Designer / DANIEL PEIRCE Photographer & cover photography / ELYSE GARNER ’13 EDITOR & CONTENT PRODUCER / ALLY (HOLMES) ROSARIO '14 Designer / ALAINA MOSSO ADDITIONAL PHOTO & ILLUSTRATION CREDITS / JASON JAMES (15-17) MARISA ALBRECHT (18) RAVEN B. VARONA (21)

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Please send comments or article suggestions to:

ATHLETIC HIGHLIGHTS

Alumni news should be sent to: alumni@eastern.edu

Eastern adds esports to its athletic offerings. COVID-19 disrupts seasons. The gym undergoes major renovations. Bingaman becomes the first Associate Athletic Director for Performance, Health, and Wellness.

media@eastern.edu Palmer Seminary alumni news should be sent to: palmeralum@eastern.edu PUBLISHED BY Marketing and Communications at Eastern University ONLINE AT eastern.edu/MAGAZINE

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a co l l a bo r at i o n b e tw e e n m e mb e rs o f t h e c h a p el wo rsh i p t e a m pro du c e d o r i gi n a l wo rsh i p m u s i c fo r t h e e ast e rn c o mm u n i t y B y K r i s ta F l e m m e n s ' 2 0

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These lyrics come from a series of original songs

Each song originated with a team member – inspired

penned by a group of six talented artists in Eastern

by a thought, life experience, or longing – and was

University’s Chapel Worship Team. Over the period

then molded, established, and brought to life. The

of several months, the team collaborated on writing

result was four unique and beautiful expressions of

and recording these pieces in a recording studio.

faith, reflecting the diversity of the team.

“The vision was to write songs meant for

“Our team is full of different giftings – from lyric

our community, birthed from our collective

writing to instrumentation, production, and design,”

experiences, that spoke directly to God’s character,

shares Mariella DiStefano ’20. “Each person brings

actions, and people,” shares music composition

their own style and their own message that the

major Joshua Guenther ’21.

Lord has placed on their heart, and the way these pieces come together to create something beautiful is like nothing I've ever seen.” The opportunity to create original music for the

I believe that God uses music as a connection not only to Him, but as a deep

EU community has allowed the team to use their talents as an extended way of worship, creating community, and reset. “Music truly is a refuge where I find space to reset my intentions, attitude, and mentality,” Mariella shares. “I believe that God uses music as a connection not only to Him, but

way for communities

as a deeper way for communities to declare truths

to declare truths about

about him together.”

him together. MARIELLA DISTEFANO ’20

CHECK OUT THE CHAPEL WORSHIP TEAM'S NEW MUSIC AT EASTERN.EDU/CWTMUSIC.

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C O M M U N I T Y

R A C E, R E F L EC T I O N, & R ES E T B y t h e D e pa r t m e n t o f S o c i a l T r a n s f o r m at i o n

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How the events of 2020 have sparked action and change at Eastern University On May 25th of this year, George Floyd, an un-

key components of what it means to bring the

armed Black man, was killed by a White police

gospel. Eastern University has birthed a long list

officer who knelt on his neck as he cried out, “I

of alumni, faculty, and staff who have been pro-

can’t breathe.” This incident, though not the first

phetic voices calling for reform. Together, they

of its kind, was captured on camera and widely

have condemned racism and urged social, eco-

shared, sparking an eruption of outrage. The

nomic, systemic, and legislative change. Among

result of George Floyd’s death was what may be the largest protest movement in U.S. history.

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these are Rev. Brenda Salter McNeil, DMin '00, Howard Stevenson ’80, Bryan Stevenson ’81, Iola Harper '08, Rev. Lori Pearson Banfield, MTS '14,

The protest movement declared the rallying

DA ’18, Jonathan Wilson Hartgrove '03, Rev. Lori

cry, “Black Lives Matter,” a motto that emerged

Person-Baynard, MTS '10, Shane Claiborne '97,

back in 2012 after the tragic killing of Trayvon

Rev. Dr. Tony Campolo '56, BD '60, ThM '61,

Martin, a teen shot and killed by a self-appoint-

and many others pushing for housing reform,

ed vigilante. The phrase at its core is a charge,

racial empowerment, criminal justice reform,

a cry to remind us that Black lives are valuable

and much more.

and indispensable.

REFLECTION: Past & Present

Today, we must continue to be introspective and evaluate the ways in which institutional

Eastern University began as a seminary founded

racism, as well as unconscious bias and

in 1925 by the American Baptist denomination,

microaggressions, have adversely impacted

which includes a very large contingent of Black

our own community. As a Christian institution,

churches and has a rich history of opposing

we must be the vanguard, acknowledging

slavery. While Eastern Baptist Theological

and addressing our shortcomings, speaking

Seminary was considered progressive for its

prophetically to our culture at large, and

time, the seminary was sadly influenced by

advocating for change. To paraphrase Psalm 139,

cultural norms and excluded Black students

we must continue to pray, “Search us, God, and

from living in the residence halls and using the

know our heart; test us and know our anxious

Seminary’s swimming pool until the 1950s. This

thoughts – See if there is any offensive way in us,

history reminds us to be vigilant in reflecting

and lead us in the way everlasting.”

on how unjust social norms can negatively influence our communities today.

RENEWal: New Initiatives With the valuable feedback offered to us by stu-

As time went on, Eastern’s passion for bring-

dents, faculty, and staff of color, as well as allies

ing the “whole gospel to the whole world for

and advocates, Eastern is now engaging in new

whole persons” expanded to encompass social

initiatives against racial injustice. “During the

justice and racial equity as core values and

dawn of this new social movement, protests

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C O M M U N I T Y continue to expose the systemic, national, and even

In addition to these new initiatives, this fall Eastern

global reaches of racism,” shares Dr. Sharon Gramby-

appointed Dr. Randolph Walters as Special Assistant

Sobukwe, Director of the Campolo Institute for

to the President for Diversity, Equity, and Belonging.

Applied Research in Social Justice. “Likewise, our

“Dr. Walters has served Eastern University since 1995

aim in classrooms, research, and administration of

in many roles. He possesses a tested faith, a prophetic

academic life, must expansively transform our own

authority, and a generous and charitable heart,”

thinking, beliefs, and actions.”

shares President Ronald Matthews. “He is a bridgebuilder, leader, and a facilitator for often difficult

These new initiatives involve many facets of expres-

conversations that produce greater understanding and

sion, education, and conversation around race that

just actions.”

will be implemented within our community: In this position, Dr. Walters will identify and mobilize ●

● ●

Redesigning curricula to educate students on im-

new initiatives, projects, and community participation

plicit bias and racism, while encouraging students

through conversation, training, curricula, program-

to engage in introspection and change

ming, and research. Eastern’s goal with this position

Offering an educational film series on racism

is to bring equality, transparency, transformation, and

and incarceration in America

growth to our community and beyond.

Creating safe spaces to work toward and engage in racial reconciliation and justice. “The Well,” a

RESET: Moving Forward

new campus-wide initiative, is a series of small

As we think and pray through the future of our Eastern

group racial reconciliation discussions that will

University community, we invite you to join us in

use the “Be the Bridge” curriculum to facilitate

considering how we can reset our understanding of

conversations

how deeply Black lives not only matter, but should be

“Justice Talks”: a series offered by the Campolo

treasured, celebrated, and honored. Let us engage,

Institute focusing on the contours of systemic

advocate, give voice, and through the Gospel, fight to

racism in the criminal justice, education, and

tear down barriers, eradicate hostility, fight for reform,

healthcare systems of the U.S.

and preach the hope of peace that comes from Christ

Required sensitivity training for Faculty and Staff

(Ephesians 2:14). ¹ New York Times, July 3, 2020.

GROW & LEARN

READ

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LISTEN

REFLECT

RESEARCH


MAKE AN IMPACT

“ L E A R N TO D O R I G H T; S E E K J U S T I C E. DEFEND THE

O P P R E S S E D.”

A D V O C AT E

SUPPORT

D O N AT E

ISAIAH 1:17

P R AY

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The Chamberlain Interfaith Fellowship provides students with an immersive Jewish-Christian experience.

B y K r i s ta F l e m m e n s ' 2 0

RIGHT OUTSIDE THE CITY OF BOSTON, four Eastern sophomores

high school students from Temple Beth Shalom make their way to Eastern

step out of their van and are welcomed by the crisp New England air. A

and experience life on a Christian college campus.

buzz of excitement and curiosity surges within the group, as they stretch their legs and shake off the remnants of a five hour drive. Their arrival in Needham, Massachusetts marks the official beginning of their interfaith fellowship with Temple Beth Shalom.

This fellowship was founded in 2015 with the intention of creating a safe space to engage in interfaith conversations and to honor the friendship between the late Dr. Ted Chamberlain, Eastern’s former Dean of Students and Vice President of Student Development, and David Feldman,

Rooted in shared learning and growth, the Chamberlain Interfaith

an active member of Temple Beth Shalom, program visionary, and

Fellowship (CIF) is a partnership between Temple Beth Shalom and

benefactor of the fellowship.

Eastern University that provides students with an immersive JewishChristian interfaith experience. Every year, four Eastern students make their way to New England to stay with a host family to learn and participate in Jewish culture and faith traditions. Later in the year, four

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Ted and David grew up five houses apart in Needham, Massachusetts and spent a major part of their childhood together. “We came from very separate religious backgrounds – Ted grew up in a very strict Baptist


Students not only learn a lot about their faith, but learn how to build bridges with other faith communities to appreciate both similarities and differences.

household and my family were Reformed Jews.” From this friendship,

rejoined the community for a month-long internship where she

generations of interfaith relationships were formed between their

worked on her senior thesis: an ethnography on the culture of

wives, children, and even grandchildren.

“belongingness” at the temple.

“One of Ted’s most positive traits was a strong adherence to his

“My experience with CIF made me value the voices of what

faith combined with curiosity, respect, and sincere interest about

Christians may consider ‘the others,’” Jaclyn expressed. “It taught me

religions which differed from his own,” David shares. This curiosity

that we should work to make everyone feel welcome, no matter what

and mutual respect between Ted and David set the groundwork for

space we may find ourselves in.”

the interfaith fellowship.

The fellowship not only reset her perspective on Christianity and

“As a part of CIF, our students are challenged to think hard about

interfaith relationships, but her own faith and future direction as

their own faith from a different perspective and engage in something

well. “My faith was revitalized – I was previously in a place where I

new – these interfaith experiences are essential for learning what it

was grasping to find God independently, trying to make my faith my

means to follow Jesus and love our neighbors,” conveys Joseph B.

own, but being at Temple Beth Shalom taught me the importance of

Modica, Eastern University’s Chaplain. “Students not only learn a

community and how much impact that can have on our faith. Moving

lot about their faith, but learn how to build bridges with other faith

forward, I want to do more interfaith work to bring people together

communities to appreciate both similarities and differences.”

to see that we all have more similarities than differences.”

Anxious at first, Jaclyn Favaroso ’20, a fellow from EU’s third cohort, immediately connected with the community at Temple Beth Shalom and found her life changed through her experience. She even later

Learn more about the Chamberlain Interfaith Fellowship at eastern.edu/interfaith.

Eastern students connect with Temple Beth Shalom students at an interfaith event.

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F E A T U R E

THE COVID-19

Unprecedented. World-wide. Pandemic. These words scroll continuously along the bar below newscasters on TV and echo in our minds. The COVID-19 pandemic has flipped our entire world on its head,

For our Eastern community, most of 2020 has been

altering life across the globe.

But this season of change and reset is not one that

a whirlwind of continual reset: leaving campus in the middle of the Spring semester, adjusting to virtual teaching and learning, updating policies and protocols, then returning to campus in the Fall and attempting to establish a new sense of “normal” in these very “un-normal” times.

has just happened on a university and global scale, but on an intimate, personal level as well. In an effort to reflect on, document, and share personal experiences, our Eastern family was asked to reflect on their time during this season and share what they’ve learned, how they’ve managed to stay connected with others, and how they’ve experienced a reset in their perspective of the world around them.

BY ALLY (HOLMES) ROSARIO ’14

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Colette CAGS School Counseling ’21 “This season of being homebound has been stressful, hopeful, and also inspirational. This time has enabled my husband and I to spend a great deal of time with our four-year-old son who has special needs and who was really struggling with school prior to COVID's arrival. My husband also lost his job unexpectedly in April due to COVID. However, I know that God has a plan, not solely for my family but for each of us if we are open to it. There are a lot of uncertainties, but this time at home has been a reset. A reset to my connection to God. A reset to my role as Mother. A reset as I try to show up for my husband. And a reset for my career as I work towards some big professional goals. I can't predict the future, but I do know that God didn't bring us this far to drop us.”

“Over the summer, I really took seriously my hobby of mountain biking with my brother. It was a great way to get outside and be together, but still stay socially distanced from others. Through these trips, I grew closer to my brother and was able to discover something that I have a passion for. Going through a summer of quarantine made me realize that I should not take seeing someone every day for granted. I have been pushed to grow my relationships past the level of just greeting each other every day into something deeper. It has also given me a new-found love of being outdoors, and a consciousness for the environment. Both of these help me feel grounded moving forward because I know I have a place I can retreat to and get my thoughts together.”

Ryan Business ’23

Desirae Pre-med/Psychology ’22 “I think the biggest takeaway from this COVID season was seeing that I have a support system. As someone who likes to plan ahead, this virus has actually made me realize that not all things go according to plan and that’s okay, because God has bigger plans for me and for those around me. I think being a COVID tester helped stretch me in a way that I cannot grasp. I love helping even if it is risking my own health for others to become mentally and physically stronger. Being a part of the Latino culture, family is one of the biggest values that we carry. During the pandemic to ensure family safety, my family would stay home and have game nights every Thursday. During our game night zoom calls, my cousin would host while my titis, my mom, brother, sister, and primas would go on and play. We had a lot of fun!”

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P s a l m 2 3 : 2 -3

Jeff Professor of Biochemistry “The closure of campus meant that for the first time in 14 years, we were not able to operate our Summer Research Program on campus in the Chemistry and Biology Departments. For me, this is one of the highlights of the academic year. Thankfully, an opportunity arose to collaborate virtually throughout the summer with my student Logan McEntire (Biochemistry '21) as we worked together on a computerbased project. Logan carried out the work from his home and we met regularly by Zoom to discuss his results and plan next steps. This helped to restore a bit of normalcy in the midst of the disruptions caused by the pandemic.”

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“One of my biggest takeaways from this COVID-19 season is that anything can happen unexpectedly. You really have no idea how tomorrow or the next week is going to go. However, I have been able to grow both spiritually and personally during this time. Although quarantine was annoying, it gave me some alone time to talk to Jesus more. This summer has helped me to reset my perspective on a lot of things, one of the main ones being that it has helped me reset my relationship with Christ. This summer has allowed me to learn more about how Jesus feels about me, and what he wants for my life. Without quarantine, I doubt that would have happened.”

Ashley Nursing ’22

Emily Exercise Science ’24 “During this time, I've been able to serve virtually as a student leader at my youth group. I was able to have more meaningful conversations with friends and family, too. My family and I would even have movie nights during quarantine – that's something we'd never do. Personally, I have experienced exponential growth in my faith this past year. I've been able to serve people via Zoom and help those feeling emotional. Many people would say “this is the worst year ever,” but witnessing the amount of challenges people have overcome this past year, I would say this was a year of growth, and it showed how much people came together as one in these times of need.”


“Even as we are walking through the valley, God is always there with us walking with us. We're not walking through the darkness – we're walking through light because God is shining His light on us as we go. I've been able to grow both spiritually and personally through prayer, praise, spending time with God, sharing daily devotions on Facebook, and being active.”

Marie Early Childhood Studies ’20 “My relationship with God suffered at the beginning of the pandemic because I didn't know what He was trying to teach me. It's hard to hear God with a lot of noise in my head and loss in my heart. I lost my mother in April and my dad passed in May. I miss my parents so much, but I know that God has plans for all those left behind. I pray more, stay in the Word, and apply the Bible to my reaction to what I see around me. I talk to my sons and pray for them to be safe and live a life of peace and happiness. We need to rely on God now more than ever before to guide us, heal us, and love us.”

Megan

Jabre

Student Ministries

Youth Ministry & Biblical Studies ’22

“When the pandemic hit I was desperate to do something to help, so I signed up as a volunteer with the Philadelphia Medical Reserve Corps (MRC). I have had several deployments from April through the summer, serving at the quarantine and isolation location in Center City for people experiencing homelessness and coming from rehab who had been diagnosed positive for COVID-19. In August I was invited to be a Volunteer Captain for the MRC based on my previous service in my deployments and will continue to volunteer with them this fall in flu vaccine clinics and when we get a COVID-19 vaccine.”

"THE NEW NORMAL" T W E N T Y-T W E N T Y

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S P O T L I G H T

GRIEF HAS A VOICE

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How one social work alumna’s writing empowers teens as they process the grief of their parents’ cancer journey B y K r i s ta F l e m m e n s ' 2 0


CHANGE COMES IN A VARIETY OF shapes and sizes

This personal encounter with cancer drew her into the field of

throughout our lives. At times, change is anticipated and

oncology. “My clinical placement during my master’s program

welcomed. Other times, it’s jarring, whisking us away into

was in a cancer center. It allowed me the opportunity to work with

a current of unknowns. Change forces the mind to reset its

teenagers processing their parents’ cancer diagnoses,” Brie shares.

perspective and learn to adapt to a new reality.

It was through this experience that she realized the great lack of

One far too common and life-altering change for families around the world is the delivery of a cancer diagnosis. For Brie (Pazda)

resources for families, and children in particular, as they attempt to navigate these life-altering seasons.

Bernhardt ’14, LCSW, OSW-C, two seperate cancer diagnoses

“The teens I worked with expressed that they felt there were limited

within her family not only changed her life in the most obvious

resources that specifically spoke to their experience – something

ways, but completely transformed the trajectory of her career and her life’s passion. Brie has always had a heart for helping people, but finding a career that aligned with her passion proved to be more difficult than she thought. She bounced back and forth between several majors trying to find her niche —eventually landing in the social work department at Eastern. “Eastern moved me toward a place of seeking social justice for the marginalized and powerless, but in a tangible way,” she shares. “To me, social work was the

I had always felt, too.” Validating the experience of these families and giving them a voice in the depths of their grief became Brie’s motivating passion. These teenagers and their stories inspired Brie to author Making

Sharing our

it Mine: Stories of Teens Who Found Themselves In Their Parents’ Cancer.

stories gives us

the opportunity to put words to an experience that may feel intangible

best way I could find to do this.” Unfortunately, Brie was no stranger to feeling powerless. When Brie

This

powerful

resource

combines

stories, interviews, quotes, and poems written by teenagers as well as adults who were teens at the time of their parents' diagnoses. The compilation explores the loss, grief, and reset that cancer brings — creating a safe space for readers to sit, process, and find purpose in their grief. “Sharing our stories gives us the

was 18, her mother was diagnosed with breast cancer. Several

opportunity to put words to an experience that may feel intangible,”

months later during her first year at Eastern, Brie’s father received

Brie explains. “It allows us to wrap our arms around something that

a cancer diagnosis as well. Navigating college is often complex

once felt elusive, separate, and distant – it’s a powerful way to

enough, but this mental, physical, and emotional shift in her

promote healing, for both the writer and the reader.”

family was a lot to process. However, when she reflects now on this time in her life, Brie believes it was incredibly formative and ultimately helped shape her future career.

Though once voiceless in her own story, Brie utilized the reset in her life to empower herself and others. Through her own story and interactive book, Brie has provided an invaluable resource to countless families desperate for a voice.

Check out Making it Mine at eastern.edu/brie.

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S P O T L I G H T

VISION BOARDS TO

A-LIST TOURS

Music alum Steve Epting ’15 reflects on God, living to the fullest, and touring with Beyoncé, Kanye, and Jay-Z B y A l ly ( H o l m e s ) R o s a r i o ' 1 4 SITTING ON A DEFLATED AIR MATTRESS in

These reflections were amplified when tragedy struck

his LA studio apartment, Steve Epting ’15 stared at

Steve’s family. In 2017, his younger cousin was tragically

the words on his vision board. His goals and dreams

shot and killed by police in Chicago. Steve was struck

seemed so close, and yet so far away.

by the grief over the lost opportunities that echoed

A vocal performance major and Chicago native, Steve was handed his diploma and ready to take on the world. He had studied and performed hard at

– to its fullest?” Steve set his mind to being present and living in the

and built confidence in his gift. Through nurturing

moment, while continuing to pray expectantly. He

relationships and rigorous training, his experience

created a vision board on which he wrote down his

at Eastern had shaped him into a man fully poised to

greatest desires, visualized his goals, and admired his

catch his break in the music industry.

progress. On this vision board Steve had written “visit

more of a culture shock than the musical break he

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myself – what am I doing to live this life – this one life

Best Semester in Nashville, honed his musical talent,

But moving to Los Angeles, California proved to be

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in his cousin’s void. “My cousin’s death made me ask

two countries,” “write my own music,” and “I will tour with Kanye West,” among other artists. But still, he waited.

anticipated. Steve worked several arbitrary jobs trying

"God, why do I have this vision and dream, but nothing

to make ends – and his dreams – meet. Those days,

is lining up?" Steve remembers asking, lying on the

weeks, and months of trying to “make it happen”

floor of his studio apartment. “God is the source of

involved more questions, loneliness, and tears than

opportunities and he has the power to make things

glamour and success. But in those dark times, Steve

happen – but he wasn’t.” Despite his questioning,

learned a lot about his purpose, “wants” versus

Steve continued to lean in closer to God, relying on

“needs,” God’s call, and making the most of his life.

him to open doors in his timing.

S P O T L I G H T


Several days later, Steve’s friend encouraged him to show up to a performance opportunity for an A-list performer. Steve turned it down for a prior engagement, only to later learn that he had missed his chance at singing with Beyoncé. He was devastated. However, a couple of weeks later, another friend called with another vague opportunity that Steve was determined not to pass up. When he arrived, he learned that this was not only the same opportunity he had previously missed, but was the first rehearsal with the entirety of Beyoncé’s band and music director. Steve had managed to skip the entire audition process and had landed a spot as one of Beyoncé’s background vocalists at the Coachella music festival. From Coachella in 2018, Steve was called to join Beyoncé for the On the Run II Tour where he traveled all over the world! The next year, he even had the opportunity to perform at Sunday Service with Kanye West. Since his experience, Steve has reflected on his vision board and all that God has done in his life. “I wanted to visit two countries, but God provided beyond what I had dreamed – Spain, South Africa, United Arab Emirates, and India to name a few. And I didn’t just tour with Kanye as I had hoped, but Beyoncé and Jay-Z too – I couldn’t believe it!” In addition to performing with these artists, Steve is also currently working on some of his own original work. As Steve reflects back on God’s faithfulness throughout his journey, he encourages us all, “Come to God the way you are, communicate with him authentically, and expect him to move in incredible ways.”

“Come to God the way you are, communicate with him authentically, and expect him to move in incredible ways.”

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A C A D E M I C S

DATA SCIENCE

FOR ALL

Eastern University’s new Master’s in Data Science offers an innovative approach for an in-demand field B y K e l ly G o d d a r d

IN OUR DATA-DRIVEN and technological age, individuals with skills and knowledge in data science are more valuable than ever. But for many of us, earning a Master’s in Data Science sounds daunting. Where will I get the

format 100% Online; self-paced within 7-week semesters

money? How will I balance my other

time to completion

commitments? What if I have no

as little as 10 months

background in data science? Eastern University’s new MS in Data Science clears away all of these roadblocks. On the theme of data, check out a few of these stats:

start dates Every 7 weeks Cost Only $9,900 for both tuition and fees. That’s approximately 50-80% less than most other schools’ programs. (Alumni also receive a 20% discount!)

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QA +

Q: What if students have no prior data science experience?

with Dr. Greg Longo, Program Director

Q: What exactly is data science?

A: We take a "data science for all" approach, meaning we want every capable student to be able to join our program. We teach everything from the ground up, assuming no specific coding, database, or statistical experience. We know many didn't have the opportunity

A: In simple words, data science is a way to pull

to learn these basic skills in their earlier education,

meaningful conclusions out of complex data. Data

because this type of education simply was not around.

science is an interdisciplinary field at the center of

And we want capable students to be able to get into this

math and statistics, programming and computer

field, despite the lack of prior knowledge.

science, and domain knowledge. Data scientists do so many different things, from processing raw data, to machine learning, to data visualization, and much,

Q: Does Eastern’s foundation of Faith, Reason, and

much more.

Justice impact the way the department views and interacts with data science as a whole?

Q: Why is data science important?

A: It definitely does. Data science can be applied in many ways that can be positive. But some applications

A: As we are increasingly able to collect vast

can stretch ethical boundaries, or even help implement

swaths of data, data science becomes increasingly

or exacerbate practices that are unfair, biased, and

relevant to our lives. Many people are aware of data

harmful. We're increasingly confronting these situations,

science being used to generate Amazon or Facebook

such as racial bias in facial recognition algorithms,

recommendations, for example. But there are an

implications of facial recognition technology and

increasing number of applications people might not

policing, and targeted marketing in elections. In our

be aware of, such as the prediction of cancerous

program, we have a capstone course on Ethical and

tumors, identification of bias in healthcare, sports

Philosophical issues in Data Science in which we tackle

analytics, self-driving cars, and personalized

these very problems.

assistants like Amazon's Alexa™. Q: This magazine’s theme is "RESET." How do you Q: Who is the new program designed for? A: Our program is designed for anyone who wants to improve how they work with data. That could be someone who wants to become a data scientist, or someone who has to deal with a lot of data with their jobs and wants to get better with it. Because data is so ubiquitous, almost everyone could benefit from some of the skills in our program.

feel like this theme relates to our new data science program? A: This theme is particularly relevant for our program because our program is targeted at working professionals who want our "data science for all" approach. We're hopeful that we can help people "reset" their careers and lives — improve their data skills, alter their career trajectory, or find a new way of looking at problems. Almost all of our students are looking to our program to achieve one of these things.

LOOKING TO RESET YOUR CAREER? LEARN MORE! VISIT EASTERN.EDU/DATA

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A C A D E M I C S

Esperanza College Introduces New TV Studio Production Lab B y D r . D av i d H u r ta d o

BRIGHT STUDIO LIGHTS. Microphones in place. A rush of adrenaline.

producing digital media using state-of-the art equipment in this new

The students behind the camera cue those in front – 3, 2, 1.

lab. Students are able to work side by side with professionals at Teatro

And we’re live! — with the initial phase of Esperanza College’s new Television Studio Production Lab, completed this summer. The new lab is part of Esperanza College of Eastern University’s (ECEU) effort

Esperanza and other local media entities in a variety of productions including assisting with coverage of the 2020 elections and their impact on the community.

to help alleviate poverty in the community by preparing students to

The new studio was funded through a Title V grant given by the U.S.

work in the high paying fields of media and technology, while helping

Department of Education to eligible Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSI).

ensure students have the skills and opportunities to be a voice for the

Esperanza College, with a student population that is more than 80%

community in the media.

Hispanic, is one of only two HSI’s in Pennsylvania. HSI’s play a pivotal

This fall, five media production courses are being offered in the studio as part of Esperanza’s Digital Communication and Media & Technology

role educating Hispanic students, empowering Hispanic communities, and providing them with the opportunities to break the barriers of poverty.

programs. In addition to media production, these programs also

With a legacy of providing economic opportunity to the community for

include courses in social media marketing, web design, and mobile

over 20 years, we at Esperanza are thrilled about the ways that the new

app development.

TV studio will open countless doors for students to successful careers

Plans are being developed to also use the TV studio for podcast recordings, live webcasts, and a variety of other productions that provide the students with real-world experience. Students in the media and technology program will have firsthand experience

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and meaningful impact.

Dr. David Hurtado is Director for Digital Communication and Media & Technology at Esperanza College.


NEW!

Theatre Major An Interview with Theatre Director Lois Abdelmalek B y A l ly ( H o l m e s ) R o s a r i o ' 1 4 EASTERN HAS ALWAYS had a vibrant

Q: What new changes can be expected with

theatre program, but we are thrilled to

the new major?

officially offer a new major in theatre! With exciting study abroad opportunities, a dynamic curriculum, and creative faith integration, the new program equips students to become threedimensional, well-rounded artists making an impact in the world. What sets Eastern University’s Theatre program apart from the rest?

LA: We are excited for all of the study abroad opportunities that the major will bring, like an immersive summer theatre study tour in London and the chance to spend a semester at the Los Angeles Film Studies Center. These opportunities cultivate our students’ voices as artists and sharpen their sense of vocation and purpose.

LA: Eastern's theatre program welcomes

Q: What are some ways Theatre majors can

students of all backgrounds and experience

make an impact in the world?

levels, creating an inclusive space that honors the diversity of each student. We also provide students with opportunities to integrate faith into their creative process. God is the most creative being there is, so we want to create with Him rather than apart from Him. What role does Theatre play in students' personal development? LA: Theatre helps us become more comfortable

LA: Art can be a powerful form of activism. Theatre provides a response to global events in creative, engaging, purposeful, and needed ways. I hope our students challenge some of the inherent racism, sexism, ageism, and all other “isms” in a field that aims to “live truthfully under imaginary circumstances” as Meisner would describe it, embracing the truth of each other and accurately portraying the diversity in the world, in all its beauty, on stage.

in our body and voice, while developing the art of storytelling. Theatre classes improve collaboration, confidence, and critical thinking

Learn more at eastern.edu/theatre

– encouraging perceptivity and the celebration of diversity among artists. This is why students from all majors benefit from taking our classes.

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P A L M E R

UNPREDICTABLE PA R E N T H O O D

UNEXPECTEDLY, THE PHONE RANG. The person on the other end gushed: “Someone in my childbirth class wants her baby to be adopted by a Christian family; are you interested?”

How the Gratzels Grew a Beautiful Multi-Ethnic Family Through Adoption By Daniel Peirce, mts '22

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Joe and Denise Gratzel’s journey to parenthood didn’t exactly follow a predictable path. After that phone call, life seemed to pivot in surprising ways. Earlier that year, Joe Gratzel had applied to Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary. However, the life-altering joy of adopting their first child delayed Joe's admission to seminary and proved to be the first of many times that God would intervene in their plans to grow their family. Balancing new parenthood and an emotional, costly battle with infertility, Joe, MDiv '88, finally started at Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary (now Palmer Seminary) in the fall of 1985. Though burdened, coming home to their seminary family made Joe and Denise feel surrounded with love, care, and financial support. Very tangible gifts started arriving — literally at their dorm room door! Once they even found a bag full of money collected by everyone on their floor.


There's a story for every one of our kids. God just kind of plopped them in our lap and we couldn't say no. J o e g r at z e l , M D i v ' 8 8

As the Gratzels stayed open to adopting additional children, miraculous events continued to happen. While adopting their second child, friends generously offered them money, declaring, “I'll be insulted if you don't ask me for money to help you.” Later, when considering a third adoption, they had been in conversation with a certain agency about international adoption. A plot twist occurred when soon after they received a call from a different agency. “A U.S. adoption has fallen through. Would we be interested in the baby? And we're like, ‘We never applied to you. We have no money.’ Then they said, ‘Well, what could you afford?’ and my wife said, ‘$1000.’ ‘Okay, we'll take it,’” Joe laughs. Thirty years later, the Gratzels are a multi-ethnic family with seven adopted children. Their children, now adults ranging in ages from 22-37, have their own beautiful children, and represent a beautiful array of diversity. As Joe recounts, “There's a story for every one of our kids. God just kind of plopped them in our lap and we couldn't say no.” A few of their children were previously told in foster homes that they would be adopted, only to be dissapointed. The stability of finally being adopted by loving parents was a deep longing fulfilled. The Gratzels have grown through many adversities and joys together, one of them being their first son’s intellectual

disability. When traveling in public, the siblings would rally around their brother to form a “secret service” style shelter. On one occasion when he was hospitalized, the family would travel over three hours to visit him for only one hour. Watching compassion grow in their children has been a profound blessing for the Gratzel parents. Growing up, both Joe and Denise lived in integrated communities and had racially diverse circles of friends. Their value for racial unity was certainly progressive in the '60s near the beginning of the civil rights movement. Later in life, they were blessed by the way Eastern Seminary’s commitment to inclusion and diversity aligned with their own convictions. As they raised their children, they passed on these important values. “We were intentional about where we went to church, where we vacationed, and how we exposed our kids to varieties of cultures and people whose practice of faith was very different from our own.” Looking back, Joe reflects on starting out as a parent —“young and scared.” He muses, “At the beginning, we thought, we can only adopt kids that look like us; and now we have a rainbow.”

From their younger years, pictured TOP: (girls l-r) Arkell, Iris, Josie, and Sarah; (boys l-r) Michael, Chris and Gavin.

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A T H L E T I C S

B y d a n m o u w, d i r e c t o r o f At h l e t i c c o m m u n i c at i o n s

spring 2020

COVID-19 DISRUPTS SEASONS Everything happened so quickly. With teams back from spring

COVID-19 had a profound effect on the entire department.

break trips ready to start league seasons and two athletes in North Carolina for the NCAA Indoor Track and Field Championships, steps to limit the size of in-person gatherings began to take shape. Each day brought about a new level of concern, and the MAC made plans to suspend competition for two weeks. Hours later, with Eastern Softball on the field for a doubleheader against Cabrini, the NCAA announced that it would be canceling winter championships. Soon after, it became apparent that the spring seasons would not be resumed and that the rest of the academic year would be done online. COVID-19 had a profound effect on the entire department and the fall seasons for 2020 have been postponed until the spring of 2021. The NCAA gave a blanket waiver granting an extra season of eligibility to athletes whose seasons were shortened last spring, but many Eastern athletes graduated in May and will not use that eligibility. Eastern Athletics hopes to honor senior athletes from the class of 2020 as competition resumes with fans in 2021.

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goeasterneagles.com

By dan mouw

NEW LEADER FOR PERFORMANCE, HEALTH, AND WELLNESS

Eastern University took advantage of a summer without

Brian Bingaman joined Eastern athletics just as the COVID

camps and clinics to make major renovations to its historic

crisis shut many things down this spring. He became the

gymnasium. The Eagles have long had a strong home court

Department’s first Associate Athletic Director for Performance,

advantage in their home space. The project will make

Health, and Wellness. He arrived at Eastern after working 17

Eastern’s gym, which will become known as “The Nest,” a

years in Strength and Conditioning at the Division I level.

great place to play.

Bingaman’s enthusiasm for seeing individuals thrive is

The most noticeable upgrade is the installation of a 16 x 9

matched by his ability to organize for large groups. In his first six months, he has built a staff to manage the fitness center, team workouts, and COVID protocols for the entire department. Bingaman will also play a role in overseeing game management for the Athletic Department. While he works in Athletics, Bingaman sees his role as serving the entire University community and looks forward to a time when the facility will again be operating at full capacity.

MAJOR GYM RENOVATIONS

foot video board that will help the fans follow the game and know the score. The 4K display can show highlights and premade video packages as well as various scoreboards and stat displays. The video board also came with a fully integrated sound system. In addition to athletics, the board can be used for watch parties and other campus events. A new LED lighting system will make the gym more energy efficient and brighter. Each of the 25 panels can be dimmed and the gym will have custom settings for every event. A rebranded floor and new baskets and bleachers will give the gym an updated look and will make the space safer for players and spectators. “We have big plans for growth in our department,” said Athletic Director Eric McNelley. “The renovation of our indoor

BRIAN BINGAMAN

competition space is another step forward. I believe that our entire student body will benefit from this upgraded space.”

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A T H L E T I C S

Gaming competitively

eagles nest into

By coach stephen haberman

This fall, Eastern launched a brand new addition to our athletic offerings: Esports. If you’re wondering “What in the world is that?,” this article is for you.

WHY ESPORTS?

Our teams will compete at the varsity level in

While Esports is technically short for “electronic

conference with other top programs from all across

sports,” it’s much more than that. Esports is

the country. Esports is also the only sport at Eastern

the culmination of a passion for gaming and a

where we will be able to offer scholarships to

dedication to improving one's ability to strategize

incoming players.

the National Association of Collegiate Esports

and engage in high-level team competition. Esports is rapidly becoming a popular athletic offering in colleges across the nation in keeping up

OUR NEW FACILITY

with the emerging technological age. Our athletic

This summer, the old nursing lab in the Eagle

director Eric McNelley announced this new program

Learning Center was converted into our new

by sharing, "We see esports as a great platform for

esports facility. This 1200-square-foot room now

growth in our University and Department – I look

showcases 16 high-end PCs as well as comfortable,

forward to seeing us build a winning program in this

state-of-the-art gaming chairs.

exciting and popular competition.”

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This new facility will provide valuable skill-based

Eastern University’s new esports teams run the

training in technical support, public speaking,

gamut of video game categories including first-

IT, social media management, and livestream

person controlled experiences, character combat

broadcasting. Students will develop skills in

wrestling matches, and digital athletic contests – even

team building and cooperative competition, all

rocket-powered cars playing soccer. The sport is coed

while presenting the school with an entirely new

and allows any current, full-time student to try out.

population of potential future Eagles.

A T H L E T I C S


WATCH LIVE: TWITCH.TV/EASTERNESPORTS LEARN MORE ABOUT ESPORTS AND HOW TO SUPPORT THE TEAM AT EASTERN.EDU/ESPORTS

money for Doctors Without Borders or participating in other gaming marathons for a specific cause. Eastern’s new esports venture gives our institution a new, modern way of conveying our foundation of Faith, Reason, and Justice to a unique and untapped audience.

POSITIVES OF ESPORTS an “anti-social” or “aggressive” group of individuals

EXPERIENCE ESPORTS FOR YOURSELF!

who release their energy on digital opposition.

It’s one thing to have esports explained to you, but

However, Eastern’s approach to gaming capitalizes

it’s another to experience it for yourself. We invite

on the positive effects of esports by celebrating

you to join us and watch Eastern’s new esports

collaboration, promoting competition, and

team in real time!

The gaming community has long been stigmatized as

integrating our unique faith-based values.

We are extremely excited about our first competitive

Additionally, our team will also be active in “paying

season as an official EU team. As they say in gaming,

it forward,” whether that be competing to raise

GL and HF! (Good Luck and Have Fun!)

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A L U M N I

Alumni Class Notes

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Eastern and Palmer Alumni Class Notes

1950 S William Zulker B.A. '53, D.Min. '78 and his wife Isabel, celebrated their 70th wedding anniversary on June 10, 2020 in their home at Richland, PA. Bill was a member of the first class to graduate from Eastern’s campus at St. David’s, PA. A Presbyterian minister, he returned in 1960 to become the College’s first Director of Admissions, with the added title in 1962 as the first Director of Financial Aid. In 1976, he was appointed as the first full-time campus minister with the title Dean of Christian Life; and then Assistant to the President in 1983 until his retirement in 1990. Bill also earned the

Academy called and asked Beverly to begin a

Foreign Policy Association and Osher Lifelong

choir program. Her only training for this she

Learning Institute.

received at Eastern in a choral conducting class; however, she has kept active in church and community choirs and can play the piano. Beverly has a lay ministry degree which led to the second job as volunteer hospital chaplain. She is on the chaplaincy board of the hospital and has been a chaplain for ten years. She loves both positions, saying, “the kids keep me young and the chaplaincy keeps my counseling credits valid plus I love the people and the challenge.”

John Zehring '69 has a new publication: Music of the Spheres: Hymns on Loving and Tending the Earth Series: Spiritual Growth Series: Hymn Meditations and Stories by John Zehring, Published: April 15, 2020. “Music of the Spheres” contains twenty meditations and stories of hymns about loving and tending the earth. The hymns we sing about God’s creation inspire singers to love the earth, care for the earth, advocate for the earth’s health and future, and give of themselves in service

S.T.B. Degree from Temple University and a M.A.

Charles Blum '66 is leading virtual discussions

to God who entrusts to us the stewardship of

from Villanova University. He is the author of the

on foreign and domestic policy issues at

our environment.

biography John Wanamaker: King of Merchants,

Phoenix Committee on Foreign Relations,

published in 1993. Bill’s wife Isabel was first employed by Eastern as the Swim Club Assistant and then became the Manager of the College Bookstore for twelve years until her retirement in 1988. Their daughter, Elizabeth Zulker Mellon graduated from Eastern in 1978 (BA). Her son,

James Mellon, the Zulker’s grandson, earned the B.S. degree in 2004 and the M.B.A. in 2008 at Eastern and was the first, third-generation family member to graduate from the college.

1960 S In September of 2018, Frederick Daugherty '61 completed 11 years of serving as interim minister of 3 churches in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. This was after 9 years as Vice President of Field Services with the American Baptist Foundation. In May of 2019, he moved from Pennsylvania to Lincoln, NE. Frederick had served 34 years in pastorates in West Virginia, Kansas, and Nebraska. Beverly (Clark) Morris '61 has one paying job and one volunteer position. The Christian Life

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1990 S

2000 S

During Arthur Salvagno, Sr.’s '97 last

Vanessa (Barr) Briggs '00 was appointed

14 years of his 36-year career in law

the President CEO of the Brandywine

1950s

enforcement, he and his wife founded

Health Foundation.

Robert Vining ’53 / March 1, 2020

Janet Coston, '05 has authored two books,

1960s

Escape to Pray and A Portrait of Mommy—

David Horton ’60, MDiv ’63 / April 7, 2020

Battle4Children Charities to raise awareness about Child Sexual Abuse and Human Trafficking. Through their ministry they have raised thousands of dollars for organizations providing trauma specific therapy and services to traumatized youth. The Annual Battle of the Christian Bands is their most popular event, followed by the Annual Clean

Expressions of Love, Faith, and Perseverance. She developed an online prayer course

1990s Grace (Miller) Smith ’91 / May 5, 2020

at escapetopray.com 2000s

with a Purpose events. Art Salvagno not only

as lead pastor of Lord of Lords Bible

leads Worship at his home church, but also

Community Church.

Art himself is a musician and songwriter, recently releasing his first Christian

Mary Silva, MBA '08, BSN, RN, CCHP has been named senior vice president and chief nursing officer for Corizon Health.

CD, "Hope Is Alive." All sales benefit Battle4Children Charities to help provide awareness and funding to agencies. Visit Battle4Children.org for more information.

2010 S Elizabeth (Lyle) Malchon '11 married Michael

Rev. Dr. Albert Reddick '98 has published

Malchon in October of 2018. Elizabeth works

his second book, Becoming One: The Diversity

in the dance field where she currently teaches

Salad Bowl Open Mind. This is the second

dance at various studios. She has taught a guest

volume following his first book, Becoming One.

artist class at Moravian College and at

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Neil Rendall ’65 / March 26, 2020

Jesus and has developed an online presence

Comedy Night, Axe Throwing and Painting

Methodist Church every 2nd and 4th Sunday.

Nancy (Kinsman) Curtis ’62 / April 19, 2020

entitled A Closer Look at the Prayer Life of

Daniel Ulrich '07, MDiv '18 was installed

at area churches such as Bensalem United

EASTERN UNIVERSITY AND PA L M E R S E M I N A R Y IN MEMORY BY CLASS YEAR:

Alexander Mbewe ’08 / April 28, 2020 FA C U LT Y / S TA F F Jene Beardsley / July 24, 2020 Webster Fitzgerald / April 22, 2020 William Mayo / July 28, 2020


In Motion Dance Company in New Jersey.

their dances in their studio at an informal

Stephen Daniel Yates, son of Dan and Leesa

She has also taught guest artist classes in

showing at DeSales and then the students

Yates of Walkertown, North Carolina. Kaitlyn

the summers at studios around the greater

at the summer intensive got to ask all the

is a graduate of Manheim Central H.S. and

Philadelphia area and Lehigh Valley area. She

choreographers on the panel questions about

Eastern University; employed at Gochenauer

choreographs for competition dance teams,

their work and process. Recently, Elizabeth is

Kennels, The Booking House, and Assistant

where her choreography has won a number

now the Artistic Director of Junior and Senior

Volleyball Coach at Lancaster Bible College.

of special awards and choreography awards.

Ballet Company at one of the studios she

Stephen is a graduate of Gospel Light Christian

Elizabeth had the opportunity to judge for That’s

teaches at, Doylestown Dance Centre.

School, Bob Jones University, and Northland

Entertainment Performing Arts Competition in 2014. After college from 2012-2014, she had a dance group called ecdancecohesion, which performed her choreography around the Philadelphia and Lehigh Valley areas. Elizabeth had the pleasure of presenting her choreography for her dance group at ETC Performance Series, InHale Performance Series, Artistry Unfolded, Jam 4 Jess Benefit Dance Concert, Cabaret Nights with the Lehigh Valley Dance Exchange, SpringUP Dance Fest and

Lisa Butzer, Landisville, PA is delighted to announce the engagement of her daughter, Kyra Butzer '15 to Tyler Barnett, son of Mike and Patty Barnett, Holtwood, PA.

International University; employed at Dan Yates Construction and coaches basketball. Kaitlyn and Stephen will be married in November 2020 in Lancaster, PA.

Kyra, an Eastern University graduate, is a

Caitlin McDonald '18 is starting her Master's

second-grade teacher at Landisville Primary

in Bible and Theology this fall at Columbia

Center. Tyler, a Millersville University

International University and working at the

graduate, is a Culinary Services Supervisor

West Palm VA Hospital.

at Willow Valley Communities. A December 2020 wedding is planned.

Koresh Artist Showcase. In the summer of 2014,

Joseph and Cynthia Gochenauer of Manheim

she sat on a panel of choreographers for the

are excited to announce the engagement of their

DeSales Summer Intensive. They showcased

daughter Kaitlyn Elizabeth Gochenauer '16 to

MEET YOUR NEW ALUMNI & FAMILY ENGAGEMENT TEAM MEMBER! Our team is committed to strengthening alumni connections with Eastern and will be working on a variety of projects including class and affinity reunions, area engagement events, online webinars, Homecoming, and more! SYDNEY TILLEY Coordinator of Alumni & Family Philanthropic Engagement Sydney earned her BA in Communication with dual emphases in Business Communication and Relational Communication at Trinity International University in Deerfield, IL. While earning her degree, she worked in their dedicated Alumni and Advancement office for three years. Sydney also served as the Assistant Director of Student Engagement at Earlham College in Richmond, IN. Sydney has always valued and seeks to create experiences for alumni to share their stories and rekindle friendships. In every situation she finds herself in, Sydney seeks to develop young leaders and equip them to navigate the complexities of life with wisdom, courage, and vulnerability. Sydney’s passions include advocating for women’s mental health within the

SYDNEY

church, paddle-boarding, and Taco Tuesdays. She is excited to begin her journey toward a MA in Clinical Counseling with a focus in Trauma at Eastern!

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Eastern Puzzler 1

B y K r i s ta F l e m m e n s ' 2 0

2

3

4

5

6

7 8

9

10

11

12

13 14 15

16

17

18

Answers at

eastern.edu/crossword

ACROSS

DOWN

1

__________ Fellows Program

2

ELC stands for ___________________

3

McInnis houses our kinesiology, biology, and _______ labs.

5

Newest sport to be added to athletics.

4

You have to walk across one of these to get from any residence building to a classroom.

6

8

The library includes _____ floors of study space and research materials.

______ C. Howard Center is the addition that was added to the library in 2005.

11

Eastern University's Engineering program is a 4+1 partnership with _________ University.

7

The social sciences include programs such as Missions & Anthropology, Criminal Justice, Political Science, and _________.

12

Eastern University has campuses in St. Davids (main campus), Philadelphia, and __________.

9

The Office of Talent and ______ Development.

10

The Gatehouse is a miniature version of this other building on campus.

13

Number of active residence halls on campus.

17

The turf field is also known as _____ field.

14

The music building on campus.

15

Andrews Hall is part of the original estate of Charles Walton. Andrews Hall was Charles Walton's ______.

16

The building that holds the President's Office and the Provost's Office.

18

Solar panels to power the campus can be found on top of this building.

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“A thrill of hope; the weary world rejoices...” like each student who receives your financial gift this year A gift to The Eastern Fund or The Palmer Annual Fund is a long-term investment of hope in our students. Each year, your support helps provide innovative learning opportunities, financial aid, and other resources for bright, deserving students.

Your gift brings hope and joy to our students! SUPPORT STUDENTS THROUGH

THE EASTERN FUND & THE PALMER ANNUAL FUND EASTERN.EDU/DONATE


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