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| NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2011

MICA (P) 040/11/2011

p34

THE FUTURE OF TRACEABILITY JANUARY

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THAILAND • VITAFOODS ASIA

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• FOOD INGREDIE ASIA (FI ASIA)NTS TH 1

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tional Interna Jakarta Expo Indonesia Jakarta, 3-5, 2012 er Octob SU

• FOOD & HOTEL MO 1

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www.apfoo donline.com

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• Exhibition

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dates subject

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to changes

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IA

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TU

28 Ce ai Sh ntr ation New al Ju anghe Ex ly 18 ai, po to China 20 , 20 12 WE

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• INTERFOOD • ALLPACK INDONES

FOOD SHOW MO 17

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EXPO 2012

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30 • ANUGA FOODTEC29 • FOOD INGREDIE NTS CHINA (FIC)

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• THAIFEX - WOF ASIA • WORLD OF HALAL

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• PROPAK CHINA • CHINA BEVTEK

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• FOOD & HOTEL ASIA (FHA)

TH 14

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EXHIBITION PLANNER 201 2

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TU 15

• SIAL MIDDLE FR 7

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• PROPAK ASIA

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• VIETFISH

WE 4

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Sha TUnghai WE Exh TH Co14ibition World Shanventio & 15 Expo 16 Ma nghai, n Ce rch nte 28 China r to 30, 201 2

MO 13

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& HOTEL • SIAL CHINA

FR 13

SU 12

SU 11

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SA 11

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TU 8

WE 11

FR 10

FR 9

SU 8

MO 7

TU 10

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TH 8

• INTERNATIONAL HALAL SHOWCASE (MIHAS) WE 2

MO 9

WE 8

• SEOUL FOOD

NOVEMBER

A Hearty Insight

TH 5

SA 4

SA 3

MO 2

TU 1

MAY

WE 4

FR 3

• PROPAK VIETNAM

APRI L

Translating The Texture Experience

MO 2

WE 1

FEBRUARY

TU 30

WE 31

FR 30

SU 30

by show organisers.

MO 31

Your Personal Exhibition Planner Inside


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Enquiry Number

2913

International Flavors & Fragrances Inc.


Season’s Greetings

Justyna Furmanczyk, UK

We thank you for your continuous support and wish you a prosperous new beginning with us in 2012!


Fill one bulk bag per week or 20 per hour at the lowest cost per bag Flexicon’s extra-broad model range, patented innovations and performance enhancements let you exact-match a filler to your specific cost and capacity requirements FILLER FOR PALLET JACK BAG REMOVAL Low profile version of patented TWIN-CENTREPOST™ filler allows removal of filled bags using a pallet jack, eliminating the need for a forklift or roller conveyor. Low cost standard models offered with many performance options.

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+1 610 814 2400 +44 (0)1227 374710 +27 (0)41 453 1871 +56 2 415 1286

©2011 Flexicon Corporation. Flexicon Corporation has registrations and pending applications for the trademark FLEXICON throughout the world.

Z-1087

USA UK SOUTH AFRICA CHILE

Enquiry Number

AUSTRALIA sales@flexicon.com.au +61 (0)7 3879 4180

2936

See the full range of fast-payback equipment at flexicon.com.au: Flexible Screw Conveyors, Pneumatic Conveying Systems, Bulk Bag Unloaders, Bulk Bag Conditioners, Bulk Bag Fillers, Bag Dump Stations, Drum/Box/Container Tippers, Weigh Batching and Blending Systems, and Automated Plant-Wide Bulk Handling Systems


CONTENTS

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2011

4

PROCESSING

PACKAGING

FLAVOURS & ADDITIVES

STORAGE & HANDLING

www.apfoodonline.com

volume 23 no. 8

36

PACKAGING & PROCESSING 26

Coding & Labelling: Brand Protection Adopting the right practices to enable effective supply chain management, while preventing mistakes that could lead to product recalls and a loss of public goodwill. By Didier Lacroix, Cognex

30

Hot Looks For Food In the food industry, it is essential to carefully control the temperature of perishable goods throughout production, transportation, storage, and sales. Thermal imaging cameras are such a tool. Contributed by Denise Cheng, Flir Systems

34

INGREDIENTS & ADDITIVES 36

A product’s mouthfeel and texture can make the difference between a consumer’s acceptance and rejection. By Shahnawaz Abdul Hamid

The Future Of Traceability

The future of food traceability will require business decisionmakers to adapt their current strategies to comply with government mandates while utilising today’s technology to efficiently track what is most important in their day-to-day commerce. By Andrew Tay, Zebra Technologies, Asia Pacific

30

Word Of Mouth

40

Translating the Texture Experience Food formulators can translate consumer experience into scientific methodologies that can be used to measure and characterise textural differences and similarities among products. This data and information can support the development of novel textures and new products. By Tan Ai Tsing, National Starch

52

44

HEALTH & NUTRITION 44

Science At Heart

Recent westernisation of Asian diets resulting in increased total and saturated fat consumption, and as a consequence increases in serum cholesterol, may have caused an increase in CHD in Asian countries. By Peter Wisler & Oliver Hasselwander, Danisco

48

A Hearty Insight Coenzyme Q10 and its active form ubiquinol show promising effects for a healthy heart. By Dr Stefan Siebrecht, Kaneka

BEVERAGE 52

Fortified Dairy: The Milky Way Technological advances in nutrient forms have allowed for better enrichment capabilities and created opportunities to combine nutrients into more effective consumer products. By Fennywaty Sjafeih, DSM


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• Simple: Easy to use and set up • Intelligent: Integrated analyzer and feed controller • Reliable: Robust solution with easy maintenance • Batch or continuous flow • Low level of chemical consumption

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Grundfos’ Oxiperm Pro generates a chlorine dioxide disinfectant that is a powerful, long lasting and safe method to use in the Food Industry. Through its state-of the art technology, it is a cost effective and efficient process to secure that your product is not compromised in any way.


CONTENTS

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2011

6

PROCESSING

PACKAGING

FLAVOURS & ADDITIVES

www.apfoodonline.com

STORAGE & HANDLING

volume 23 no. 8

64

56

60

FEATURES 56

Testing What Varies In Dairy Aside from monetary implications, texture analysis in this sector is a significant step in managing the often changeable and unpredictable subject matter as much as is possible. By Jo Smewing, Stable Micro Systems

60

Wastewater Treatment: A Green Solution To be smarter in the decision-making processes, there is a need to better understand the specific local nature of water challenges and the specific impacts of activities on freshwater resources. By Michel Otten, Biothane Asia Pacific, and Mathieu Le Noir, Veolia Water Solutions & Technologies.

64

The Salt-Lover’s Saviour Recent trends indicate that salt consumption is rising, and can lead to chronic diseases if not kept in check. Nevertheless, food manufacturers have been quick to provide healthier alternatives that promise the same mouth-watering taste. By Shahnawaz Abdul Hamid

66

for Advertisers’ Enquiry Numbers

DEPARTMENTS 08 10 12 22 70 80A 80B

66

69

10

Refer to Advertising Index on Pg

Editor’s Note Advertiser’s List Business News Product Highlights Calendar Of Events Reader’s Enquiry Form Subscription Information

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY is published 8 times a year by Eastern Trade Media Pte Ltd. The Publisher reserves the right to accept or reject all editorial or advertising material, and assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited artwork or manuscripts. All rights reserved. Reproduction of the magazine, in whole or in part, is prohibited without the prior written consent, not unreasonably withheld, of the publisher. Reprints of articles appearing in previous issues of the magazine can be had on request, subject to a minimum quantity. The views expressed in this journal are not necessarily those of the publisher and while every attempt will be made to ensure the accuracy and authenticity of information appearing in the magazine, the publisher accepts no liability for damages caused by misinterpretation of information, expressed or implied, within the pages of the magazine. All correspondence regarding editorial, editorial contributions or editorial contents should be directed to the Editor. The magazine is available at an annual subscription of S$176.00. Please refer to the subscription form or contact the subscription department for further details at FAX NO: (65) 6379 2806 Address changes should be notified, in writing, to our circulation executive: EASTERN TRADE MEDIA PTE LTD 1100 Lower Delta Road EPL Building #02-02 Singapore 169206

A Grip With Sustainability Helping manufacturers address ‘green’ manufacturing with vacuum technology. By Josef Karbassi, Piab

EXHIBITION & EVENTS 69 74 76 78 79

Exhibition Outlook Preview: Anuga Food Tech Review: Food Ingredients Asia Review: Food & Hotel Malaysia 2011 Review: Interfood & AllPack Indonesia 2011

Cover Picture Courtesy Of Zebra Technologies • Printed by Fabulous Printers Pte Ltd

THE CIRCULATION OF THIS PUBLICATION IS AUDITED BY BPA INTERNATIONAL THE ADVERTISERS’ ASSOCIATIONS RECOMMEND THAT ADVERTISERS SHOULD PLACE THEIR ADVERTISEMENTS ONLY IN AUDITED PUBLICATIONS

MICA (P) 040/11/2011 • PPS 1566/5/2012 (022756) ISSN 0218-2734 • Co Reg No: 199908196C


Non-compliant to new OHS regulations Inefficient warehouse planning Outdated storage systems Labour intensive operation Unable to meet KPI Lack of local support

Infinite Logistics Solutions

Poor use of available headroom Too many error in piece picking operations Non-compliant to FEM safety standards

Schaefer Provides You With The Logistics Success Formula.

Schaefer has the formula to add up all your logistics woes and convert them into successful solutions. Our Integrated Storage Solutions is the answer. It improves your warehouse operations with high-performance order picking, greater picking accuracy, faster movement of picked orders and many other customisable possibilities. Plus all these add up to cost savings for you.

“The reason for our Asian success and growth is the provision of Innovative Cost-efficient solutions to the logistics market.�

Learn how Schaefer can help you at www.ssi-schaefer-asia.com Schaefer Systems International Pte Ltd 73, Tuas Avenue 1 Singapore 639512 Phone +65/ 6863 0168 Fax +65/ 6863 0288 eMail regionalmktg@ssi-schaefer.sg

Enquiry Number

2787


EDITOR’S NOTE managing director Kenneth Tan

8

editor Tjut Rostina tjutrostina@epl.com.sg

A View For

Freshness

In ensuring the safety of a food product, it is important to take care of the product’s quality every step of the way along the supply chain. In conveying the right information to consumers, there is a need to make sure that the information, such as manufacturing and expiry dates are accurately printed on the label. To protect a company’s branding and product, Cognex’s Didier Lacroix, shares that with “greater visibility into the chain, properly printed codes allow the manufacturer to track where the product has been delivered to and the different points in the chain where the product changed hands. This helps to ensure the integrity of the supply chain and prevents counterfeit products from entering the distribution system.” (Page 26) In the case of perishable goods, the maintenance of temperature throughout the chain is key to keeping a product fresh. To do this, Flir Systems suggest the use of a thermal imaging camera, which will detect when there is a variation in temperature. The cameras act as ‘smart’ non-contact sensors for inspections, measuring the temperature of equipment, refrigerated products, and cooked foods as they exit the cooking process. (Page 30) The importance of food traceability is further emphasised by Zebra Technologies, and businesses are looking at ways to use today’s technology to enable a track-and-trace solution. Having visibility on the whole supply chain gives an extra layer of protection when a food borne illness occurs. An example of how installing an automated pallet labelling and identification system has benefited a customer in the baking industry is also cited. (Page 34) With the conclusion of 2011, it is time to look back and plan for the new year. In the meantime, we wish you happy holidays!

writer Shahnawaz Abdul Hamid Shahnawaz@epl.com.sg editorial assistant Audrey Ang audreyang@epl.com.sg assistant art director Libby Goh libbygoh@epl.com.sg business development manager Randy Teo randyteo@epl.com.sg advertising sales manager Peh Sue Ann sueannpeh@epl.com.sg asst sales manager Tracy Cheo tracycheo@epl.com.sg senior circulation executive Brenda Tan brenda@epl.com.sg contributors Andrew Tay Didier Lacroix Denise Cheng Dr Stefan Siebrecht Fennywaty Sjafeih Jo Smewing Josef Karbassi Peter Wisler Oliver Hasselwander Michel Otten Mathieu Le Noir Tan Ai Tsing board of industry consultants Dr Aaron Brody Managing Director Packaging/Brody, Inc Dr Alastair Hicks Adjunct Professor of Agro Mae Fah Luang University, Thailand Professor Alex Büchanan Professional Fellow Victoria University Dr Nik Ismail Nik Daud Head, Food Quality Research Unit Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia/ President Malaysian Institute of Food Technology Kathy Brownlie Global Program Manager Food & Beverage Ingredients Practice Frost & Sullivan Sam S Daniels Consultant World Packaging Organisation

Tjut Rostina

Jean Scheijen, Maastricht, Netherlands

Executive Board chairman Stephen Tay group executive director Kenneth Tan financial controller Robbin Lim

etm

Eastern

TradeanMedia Pte Ltd Eastern Holdings Ltd company

Head Office & Mailing Address Eastern Trade Media Pte Ltd 1100 Lower Delta Road, EPL Building #02-05, Singapore 169206 Tel: (65) 6379 2888 Fax: (65) 6379 2805 Email: apfood@epl.com.sg


RESTORE ANTI-INFLAMMATORY NUTRIENTS MEAN OPPORTUNITY

Download your FREE Tech Paper “The Role of Anti-Inflammatory Nutrients” at fortitech.com/restore tel +60 3 3182 3888

email infoasiapacific@fortitech.com

©2011 Fortitech, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

blog fortitalk.com

follow us

Enquiry Number

2939

Food & Beverage Custom Fortification is the Key. There’s a growing market for products that can provide relief and help restore your active lifestyle. Consumers are turning to nutrition for help with everything from controlling daily discomfort, to managing chronic inflammation conditions like auto-immune disease and arthritis. Meet the demands of this motivated consumer segment with Fortitech custom nutrient premixes. Any nutrient. Any application. Anywhere in the world.


ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY ADVERTISING INDEX ENQ NO

ADVERTISERS

2933

ALMOND BOARD OF CALIFORNIA

2877

ASHWORTH BROS INC

2918

BASF

2884 2758 2825 2859

PAGE

ENQ NO

ADVERTISERS

47

E885

INTERFOOD INDONESIA 2012

15

2913

INTERNATIONAL FLAVORS & FRAGRANCES

OBC

2937

JUNGBUNZLAUER INTERNATIONAL AG

13

CAMA GROUP

IBC

2925

KALSEC INC

39

CARGILL INTERNATIONAL TRADING PTE LTD

51

2528

CERMEX SIDEL GROUP

11

KE HUA FOODSTUFF MACHINERY INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE CO LTD

59

2935

KH ROBERTS PTE LTD

21

2926

NOVOZYMES (CHINA) INVESTMENT CO LTD

17

2927

PAUL LEIBINGER GMBH & CO KG

29

6028

PIAB ASIA PTE LTD

63 37

CONNELL BROS

23

2934

FHA 2012

75

E880

FIC 2012

72

PAGE 73 1

2936

FLEXICON CORPORATION (AUSTRALIA) PTY LTD

3

2939

FORTITECH ASIA PACIFIC SDN BHD

9

2657

PURAC ASIA PACIFIC PTE LTD

2928

GRUNDFOS FOOD

5

2787

SCHAEFER SYSTEMS INTERNATIONAL PTE LTD

2800

GUANGDONG WANTTONE FOOD CO LTD

59

2932

SIAL CHINA 2012

2874

GUANGZHOU SUNSHINE FOOD & PACKAGING MACHINERY CO LTD

E881

SIAL CHINA 2012

72

67

2930

SIDEL

IFC

2931

HEAT AND CONTROL PTY LTD

33

2929

THAIFEX 2012

71

E882

HKTDC FOOD EXPO 2012

72

2924

HYDROSOL

41

E883 & E884

THAIFEX 2012

73

2938

INNOPHOS INC

19

2577

UNITECH INDUSTRIES LTD

45

2940

INT FOOD CO LTD

70

2941

ZEBRA TECHNOLOGIES ASIA PACIFIC PTE LTD

25

This index is provided as an additional service. The publisher does not assume any liability for errors or omissions.

HEAD OFFICE

SINGAPORE EASTERN TRADE MEDIA PTE LTD 1100 Lower Delta Road #02-05 EPL Building Singapore 169206

Contact Peh Sue Ann Tracy Cheo Tel: 65-6379 2888 Fax: 65-6379 2805

MEDIA REPRESENTATIVES CHINA Wan Xin Xian Tel: 86-20-3411 4806 Fax: 86-20-3411 4805

JAPAN Ted Asoshina Tel: 81-3-3263 5065 Fax: 81-3-3234 2064

TAIWAN Tom Lin Tel: 886-22619-2798 Fax: 886-22619-2799

The closing date for placing advertisements is not less than FOUR WEEKS before the date of publication. Please contact our nearest advertising office for more details.

In The Season Of Giving, APFI’s Buyer’s Mart Gives You The Platform To List Your Business FOR FREE! Sign up from now till December 31, 2011 to enjoy this service! www.apfoodonline.com

7 80


Idées & Compagnie

3-DIMENSIONAL EXPERTISE

u SHRINK-WRAPPING

u CASE PACKING

u PALLETIZING

sales.asia@cermex.fr

CERMEX – Headquarters 87, route de Seurre - B.P.3 - 21910 Corcelles-lès-Cîteaux - France Tel.: +33 (0) 380 707 100

Enquiry Number

CERMEX South Asia Pacific Co. Ltd. 5th Floor, Suite #501 - Iyara Tower 2/22 Chan Road, Tungwadon, Sathorn - 10120 Bangkok - Thailand Tel.: +66 (0) 2 678 5190

2825

www.cermex.asia


BUSINESS NEWS INDUSTRY & MARKET

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2011

Singapore Polytechnic Unveils US$5.5M Facility Singapore: The Food Innovation and Resource Centre (FIRC) unveiled its S$7 million (US$5.5 million) premises at Singapore Polytechnic (SP), on November 2 this year. The centre has a combined floor area of 1,500 sq m and comes with a pilot plant that allows local food enterprises to test their products on a smaller scale before scaling-up for commercial production. Launched in 2007 as a joint initiative between SPRING Singapore and SP, FIRC is the first Centre of Innovation in Singapore that is set up to cater to the needs of local

food enterprises. The facilities will enable it to further help Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) grow their businesses by harnessing the technologies available to create value-added products and services in order for them to compete more effectively in the global market. The facility is divided into four main sections: a cook studio with consumer suite, a pilot plant with pack studio for developmental work in meats, ready-to-eat meals, sauces and beverages; and a mix & bake section that focuses on Asian specialty sweets and bakery products. As part of the launch, guests and industry partners at the event were treated to a guided tour of the centre’s facilities where they witnessed the developmental journey of a food product from its conception in the test kitchen to the final stages of production in the pilot facilities. A series of new products that are due to hit the shelves next year from clients that include Ellaziq, Buckwheat Healthcare and Score bakery were also showcased, with FIRC pledging to continue in their work as the contact point for a network of food-related expertise across both private and public sectors locally and abroad. “In this age of fast-changing consumer tastes and lifestyles, our local food companies need to continually reinforce their competitive edge through product innovation and packaging. With the new facility, FIRC will be an invaluable industry resource for new product development, process innovation and packaging. I strongly encourage all food companies to leverage FIRC’s expertise and services. Companies can also tap on SPRING’s programmes for funding support in developing new innovative products,” said Ted Tan, deputy chief executive, Spring Singapore. Companies interested to create and develop innovative food products can apply for support through Spring’s ‘Innovation Voucher Scheme and Technology Innovation Programme’. ____________________________________ Enquiry No: 0800

www.apfoodonline.com For everything you want to know about food technology


BUSINESS NEWS

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2011 ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY

13

INDUSTRY & MARKET

Kraft Foods Opens Biscuit R&D Center In Europe Zurich, Switzerland: Kraft Foods opened its European Biscuit Research and Development Centre in Saclay, France, a suburb of Paris. This facility will support product development for many of Europe’s biscuit brands, including LU, belVita, Oreo, Mikado, Prince, Saiwa and TUC. Kraft Foods Chairman and CEO Irene Rosenfeld was on hand for yesterday’s ribbon cutting, which represents the culmination of a two-year-project, with a total investment of E15 million (US$21 million). “France is an important market for biscuits in Europe and for Kraft Foods’ snacking business globally. This investment makes good business sense, supporting us in our efforts to drive future biscuit innovation and growth,” said Timothy P Cofer, president, Kraft Foods Europe. The investment demonstrates the company’s commitment to snacking, and to snacking-related

innovations in the areas of nutrition & wellness and indulgence. In addition, the center will support the company’s focus on sustainability, building upon the success of the ‘LU Harmony’ program in France. _____________________________________________ Enquiry No: 0801

086-11 AD s4s sanw APFI 11/10/11

sub4salt

®

for tasty low sodium products Jungbunzlauer announces sub4salt® – an ingredient used to reduce sodium without compromising product quality.

Jungbunzlauer’s way to reduce sodium

similar usage level to NaCl comparable salty taste characteristics 30-50% sodium reduction in processed food no metallic off-flavor easy handling applicable in wet and dry food systems different granulations for optimized application

www.jungbunzlauer.com HealthyChoices@Jungbunzlauer.com 2937

• • • • • • •

Enquiry Number

Patent pending in EU and the USA (US 2009-0169701 A1), Trademark sub4salt® registered (EU, CH, JP)

Advantages of sub4salt® compared to other common salt reduction systems:


BUSINESS NEWS

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2011

14

INDUSTRY & MARKET

DD Williamson With New Image Kentucky, US: DD Williamson launches a new brand image to reflect its expanded expertise in colour solutions for customers. In the logo, ‘DDW’ replaces ‘DD Williamson’ for a concise, contemporary image. ‘The Colour House’ tagline expresses a place where creativity blends with advanced technical capability to bring colour ideas to life. Like leading, global flavour houses, it provides collaborative science, solutions, and service for product developers. “The new identity helps demonstrate DDW’s ability to deliver creative colour solutions for customers across a wide range of application sectors,” said Campbell Barnum, VP, branding & market development. _____________________________________________________ Enquiry No: 0802

FrieslandCampina Invests To Meet Asia Demand Amersfoort, The Netherlands: FrieslandCampina Domo will invest a total of E130 million (US$182.1 million) to expand its production plants in Beilen and Bedum, the Netherlands, over the coming years. These investments will enable the company to double its production capacity for total infant formulas and the required ingredients during the coming years. The plant in Beilen will receive E100 million to expand its mixing capacity and install a new dryer and packaging line for infant nutrition. These investments will enable FrieslandCampina Domo to respond more effectively to the growing demand for ingredients for infant nutrition and for the production of total infant formulas. The company is also taking these measures in anticipation of future quality requirements which will be imposed by its clients and by law. The expansion activities will also allow the company to continue producing a wide range of infant nutrition products in the future. In Bedum, E30 million will be invested in scaling up the processing capacity for demineralised whey ingredients. Herman Ermens, MD, said: “These investments will allow us to help our customers achieve long-term growth in infant nutrition”. Infant nutrition is one of the spearheads of the company’s route2020 strategy. The projected growth will be based partly on increasing demand for high-quality infant nutrition, primarily in Asia. The investments are scheduled for completion in 2013. _____________________________________________________ Enquiry No: 0803

ISO Standard For Fish Products’ Traceability Geneva, Switzerland: The use of an ISO standard on the traceability of finfish products will help improve food safety by supplying stakeholders throughout the supply chain with accurate information about the origin and nature of these products. The standard titled ISO 12875:2011, Traceability of finfish products – Specification On The Information To Be Recorded In Captured Finfish Distribution Chains, specifies the information to be recorded in marine-captured finfish supply chains in order to establish traceability. It specifies how traded fishery products are to be identified, and the information to be generated and held on those products by each of the food businesses that physically trade them through the distribution chains. The standard deals with the distribution for human consumption of marine-captured finfish and their products, from catch through to retailers or caterers. Potential users of the standard include: • Fishing vessels • Vessel-landing businesses and auction markets • Processors • Transporters and storers • Traders and wholesalers • Retailers and caterers. __________________________ Enquiry No: 0804


BUSINESS NEWS

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2011 ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY

15

INDUSTRY & MARKET

_____________________________________________ Enquiry No: 0805

Trust The Experts Ashworth invented the first spiral more than 40 years ago. For over four decades, we’ve pioneered belt advancements that maximize throughput while minimizing life-cycle costs, and have been granted more patents than any other spiral belt manufacturer. Today, Ashworth continues to innovate the future and remains the world’s leading manufacturer of spiral belts. Put your confidence in Ashworth!

The Right Belt Ashworth is the world’s only company that manufactures both metal and plastic conveyor belts for lotension spiral systems to provide the right belt for your specific requirements. Increase capacity and maximize efficiency Contact Ashworth today!

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Cargill Helps Enhance Food Safety

training the 200 member food banks on best practices and working with a third party organisation to audit the network for food safety excellence. In 2007, the company provided initial funding to create its national food safety program. With its most recent grant, the company will continue to provide expertise on food safety. Another US$500,000 will support increasing the capacity and efficiency of Feeding America’s food sourcing program, which secured more than one billion pounds of food from food manufacturers, retailers and wholesalers last year. In addition to supporting food safety and sourcing enhancements, US$1 million of Cargill’s grant will support Hunger-Free Minnesota. The initiative is a state wide collaboration in the company’s headquarters community for corporate and community organisations to work together to close Minnesota’s gap of 100 million meals, annually and sustainably, by the end of 2014. It is the goal of Feeding America that Hunger-Free Minnesota will serve as a pilot for other states to replicate.

Enquiry Number

Chicago, US: With one in six Americans lacking enough money to obtain adequate nutrition, demand remains strong for the services provided by Feeding America, a hunger relief organisations. In an effort to provide the safest food possible to the 37 million people it serves annually, the organisation is partnering with Cargill to further enhance its food safety practices. “The people we serve deserve safe, high quality food. All of our food banks adhere to the same stringent standards as grocers, food manufacturers and restaurants, but we strive to be best-in-class,” said Vicki Escarra, president and CEO of the organisation. Cargill recently donated US$3 million to the organisation, half of which will go toward implementing rigorous food safety enhancements. This includes


BUSINESS NEWS

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2011

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QUICK BITES

INDUSTRY & MARKET

Investments Boost Production Of Ingredients Denmark: Construction work has begun on a new spraydrying tower at Arla Foods Ingredients’ whey processing plant in Denmark to accommodate rising global sales of high-value nutritional ingredients. The investment will enable an expansion of alphalactalbumin and caseinoglycomacropeptide (CGMP) production. Both these whey-based ingredients offer documented nutritional benefits that are increasingly sought-after by food manufacturers. Additional supplies of raw whey protein will start arriving at the plant from the end of 2012 – delivered by the E35 million whey processing facility at the heart of a joint venture agreement between Arla Foods Ingredients and the German dairy company DMK. _____________________________________________ Enquiry No: 0806

Jean Scheijen, Limburg, Netherlands

Kalsec Partners OmniActive Health Technologies Michigan, US: Kalsec, producer of spice and herb extracts, natural colours and antioxidants for the food, beverage and pharmaceutical industries, has formed an exclusive agreement with OmniActive Health Technologies to produce, market and distribute its natural zeaxanthin from paprika globally. Zeaxanthin (zee-uhZAN-thin) is a carotenoid pigment that scientific evidence indicates is important in reducing the risk of cataract formation and age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the two most prevalent chronic eye diseases. Under this agreement, OmniActive will educate consumers and increase awareness of the health benefits of zeaxanthin, while developing delivery forms and distributing them to the marketplace. _________ Enquiry No: 0807

ABB & ITE Sign Skills Development Singapore: ABB, the power and automation company, has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Institute of Technical Education (ITE), with an aim to focus on the training and development of green technology and increasing productivity in various engineering fields. Under the five-year partnership, both parties endeavour to jointly set up technology and training centres, provide equipment, train ITE staff and students, as well as develop curricula for ITE courses. The latest MOU will extend across all three ITE colleges namely ITE College Central, ITE College East and ITE College West. The company will develop both ITE staff and students on technological developments such as robotics, building automation technologies, intelligent switchgear, and process control.

Elfab Renews Chinese Export Licence UK: Elfab, a pressure relief specialist, has been granted a new manufacturer’s licence for China. The British firm has received a Manufacturing Licence of Special Equipment for the People’s Republic of China, issued by AQSIQ (the General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine).

Ecolab Receives 2011 Green Excellence Partnership Award Minnesota, US: Ecolab was recognised for its commitment to the environment by The Coalition for Government Procurement, which presented the company with the 2011 Green Excellence in Partnership Award. The award, given annually to government contractors that demonstrate exceptional commitment to the environment, was presented on October 26 this year at a ceremony in Washington DC, US. The Excellence in Partnership Awards were developed to promote partnership between industry and government, and to honour the individuals and organisations that have made significant contributions to the success of the procurement system while providing best-value to the taxpayer. The Green Excellence in Partnership Award, recognises government contractors that utilise environmentally friendly products and services or manufacturing and operating procedures.


NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2011 ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY

ArtMast, Poland

INDUSTRY & MARKET

Restaurant Consumers Drinking More Tap Water

_____________________________________ Enquiry No: 0808

DAIRY PRODUCTS THAT EVEN THE LACTOSE INTOLERANT CAN ENJOY? LET’S MILK THE BENEFITS! With 70%of the world's population suffering from a degree of lactose intolerance, a solution that breaks down lactose and enables almost everyone to enjoy milk-based products is naturally a smart one. Novozymes Lactozym® Pure expands your potential customer base by cost-effectively and naturally eliminating lactose. Its premium purity offers superior low-lactose products and significantly reduces the risk of off-flavor development, while improving process flexibility and filterability. Nature's know-how coupled with Novozymes' experience and proven track record within dairy and food enzymes for decades ensures innovative solutions that you can rely on.

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customers’ business and the use of our planet’s resources.

Enquiry Number

chicago, uS: Tap water is one of the fastest growing beverages ordered at US restaurants whereas revenue-generating beverages have been declining over the past five years, according to foodservice market research conducted by The NPD Group. Tap water servings currently represent 10 percent of the 50 billion beverage servings ordered at restaurants. Over the past five years, while restaurant traffic is down one percent, there has been a six percent drop in total beverage servings excluding tap water at restaurants, a decline of 2.7 billion servings, according to the recently released report, ‘Beverages at Foodservice: Satisfying Our Thirst for Beverages’. The report, which includes a custom survey of 5,500 adults, 18 years and older, finds that the decline in beverage orders at restaurants is driven by the largest categories — carbonated soft drinks and brewed coffee — which represent 49 percent of all beverage servings. Although iced tea is growing, other growth categories tend to be newer drinks like smoothies, iced/frozen/slushy drinks, and specialty coffee drinks. Bonnie Riggs, restaurant industry analyst and author of the report, said: “A key learning from this report is that much of the declines in beverage servings are tied to the price/value relationship the consumer perceives.” He adds: “Not all beverages are on the decline. New flavours, addressing taste interests, preparing fresh/freshly made, and creating new versions of existing beverages are factors in the beverages that are growing.”


BUSINESS NEWS

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2011

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INDUSTRY & MARKET

QUICK BITES ohIo lABEl REgUlATIon on oRgAnICS WaSHingTon, US: The State of ohio has agreed that it will no longer pursue regulations limiting labelling on organic dairy products. ohio had attempted to prohibit statements on labels which informed consumers that organic dairy products are produced without antibiotics, pesticides or synthetic hormones. after the organic Trade association (oTa) sued the State of ohio, the Sixth Circuit Court of appeals sided with consumers’ right to know. The state has agreed to abandon the rule rather than trying to revive it, recognising that the First amendment allows organic dairy products to state that they are produced in accordance with the organic standards, without the use of synthetic growth hormones, pesticides, or antibiotics.

Milling Symposium On Future Of Flour hamBurg, germany: The international milling industry is faced with major challenges. The opportunities and perspectives of the changing industry were the subject of a technical symposium at the beginning of September 2011, to which Mühlenchemie had issued an invitation under the motto ‘Future of Flour – economic, functional and nutritional aspects’. Three hundred and ten visitors from 60 countries discussed the pressing demands of flour production today and tomorrow. A total of 28 specialist papers held by research scientists, economists, experienced millers and representatives of public institutions gave the participants valuable information and stimulus. The latest research results and examples of applications were presented under the headings ‘The Future of Wheat’, ‘Emerging Asian Wheat Producers’, ‘Milling’, ‘Flour Fortification’, ‘Science & Technology’, ‘Baking’ and ‘Ingredients’.

_________________________________________ Enquiry No: 0809

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APPOINTMENTS lYCoRED mAkES kEY AppoInTmEnTS Lycored, israel, appoints ilan ron as Vp global marketing & sales for its international and domestic markets. The company is also pleased to announce that Doug Lynch has joined as Vp business development and new Mr Ilan Ron product marketing for the eastern USa market. ron previously worked for seven years with Unilever israel as Vp sales and customer development director, and Ceo of Beigel & Beigel Unilever israel where he brought sales Mr Doug Lynch growth and business development to the company. prior to those experiences, he held leading positions at international companies as Sodexho Catering, el-Chef airline Catering and Sbarro israel. Doug Lynch brings to the company nearly two decades of sales, marketing and business development experience in nutraceuticals, cosmeceuticals and functional foods. prior to joining the company, Lynch led global sales, marketing and business development for the B2B ingredient division for Cott Beverages. He has also directed sales and marketing of the natural product development company Unigen as global Vp of sales and marketing, and was director of sales and marketing at naturally Scientific.


BUSINESS NEWS

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2011 ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY

19

SCIENCE & NUTRITION

Nitrogen Efficiency Technology To Increase Productivity enables the development of highyielding sugarcane that could require about half the amount of nitrogen fertiliser as conventional sugarcane,

offering economic benefits to growers and a measurable positive impact on the environment.

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mount edgecomBe, South africa: Arcadia Biosciences, an agricultural technology company focused on developing technologies and products that benefit the environment and human health, and the South African Sugarcane Research Institute (SASRI), an agricultural research institute that services South African sugarcane growers and millers, have signed an agreement to develop Nitrogen Use Efficient (NUE) sugarcane. Under the terms of the agreement, SASRI receives exclusive research rights to the use of Arcadia’s NUE technology in sugarcane in Africa. The technology enables crops to maintain high yields while requiring significantly reduced levels of nitrogen fertiliser. The combination of this technology and genetic resources

Enquiry Number

Ivana De Battisti, Minas Gerais, Brazil

____________________ Enquiry No: 0810 Innophos APFI island Red Sod HIREZ EmersonDesignStudio


BUSINESS NEWS

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2011

20

CHINA FOCUS

Ball Completes Acquisition of Partners’ Interests In Qingdao

Vitasoy Doubles Production Capacity With Foshan Plant Hong Kong: Vitasoy International, a Hong Kong-based manufacturer, marketer and distributor of non-carbonated beverages and food, has opened its seventh plant globally at Foshan in Guangdong, China. Winston Lo, executive chairman of the Group, said: “The China market has been a significant growth engine for us and the inauguration of Vitasoy Foshan plant is another major milestone and the start of a new chapter in Vitasoy’s business development in the Mainland. It also demonstrates our strong dedication in developing the market.” The group is investing about HK$500 million (US$64.3 million) in its Foshan plant, which is around 80,000 sq m in area for the site as a whole. The automated production facilities include a packaging line that can process 24,000 units per hour. The plant also has its own product development and quality assurance departments. The plant is designed with care of environment, in keeping with the Chinese government’s call to protect the environment. For instance, the plant has put fibre reinforced plastic in the ceilings to let in more natural light, insulating glass windows to enhance heat insulation, and used recyclable structural steel to build the plant. The boundary wall and some furniture such as tables and chairs are made of recycled packaging paper. The plant uses gas-fired boilers to convert natural gas into heat with low emissions of waste gas. Heat energy will be recovered from production equipment. It also has a waste-water treatment plant. ______________________________________________________________ Enquiry No: 0811

Qingdao, China: Ball has acquired its partners’ 60 percent interests in a former joint venture metal beverage can plant in Qingdao, China, and is building a new, expanded plant in Qingdao to meet customer demand. The company has owned 40 percent of the joint venture plant since 1993. The equipment from the existing facility will be relocated to another Ball location in China. Construction on the Qingdao plant is underway. “Our volumes in China in the first half of 2011 experienced strong growth compared to the same period last year due to increased market demand and the acquisition o f o u r F o s h a n j o i n t v e n t u re beverage can plant in June 2010,” said Raymond J Seabrook, executive VP and COO, global packaging. “The relocation of the existing Qingdao plant offers an opportunity for us to build a larger, high-speed plant to supply our customers’ growing demand for beverage cans in northeastern China.” Ball expects to report an after tax gain of approximately US$6 million in the third quarter of 2011 on its previous ownership interest in the joint venture, subject to the appraisal of the business. The plant will supply both 330 ml and 500 ml cans, an increasingly popular size for beer. It is on schedule to start up by the end of 2011. ____________________ Enquiry No: 0812


BUSINESS NEWS

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2011 ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY

21

CHINA FOCUS

China Food Company Signs Regional Distributors Shenyang City, China: During the recent China Food Fair in Shenyang City, Liaoning Province, China Food Company signed 34 regional distributors and is on target to sign a further 26 regional distributors for its ‘Xaka’ soya sauce. These are all first tier distributors with at least RMB30 million annual turnover and complement the existing network of distributors that is already carrying the group’s products. Management anticipates increased sales as all China Food’s products are rolled out through the new distributors. In addition to the above, the company remains in discussion with many other distributors who have shown interest in the company’s product range and the board will update the market on the resultant

impact on sales in due course. The company also confirms that negotiations are continuing over the future of the feed business,

and the management is now in detailed discussions with a number of parties.

____________________ Enquiry No: 0813

__________________ Enquiry No: 0814

Enquiry Number

Beijing, China: The country’s first national standard for food nutrition labelling will take effect from January 1, 2013 onwards, said China’s Ministry of Health. According to Xinhua, the standard requires food labels to specify the nutritional content of the product, such as protein, fat, sodium and carbohydrate. It stresses that the information should be accurate and objective. In order to encourage food companies to adapt to the rule as soon as possible, the ministry stated that after the implementation of the rule, products without the information labels will be banned.

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First National Standard For Nutrition Labelling


PRODUCT HIGHLIGHTS Ingredients / Equipment & Services Byron Solomon, Florida, US

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ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2011

TIC Gums: Guar Gum Alternative For Bakery TIC Gums has developed a texture and stabilisation formula that will replace guar in bakery products. The Ticaloid GR 5420 is a blend of gums that completely replace guar in bakery products like cake, bread, bagels, and muffins. Containing no guar gum, this blend will deliver the same texture benefits that guar gum alone does. The blend was compared to products that contained no gums, guar gum only, and the new texture blend. The bakery goods tested were: white bread, plain muffins, yellow cake and bagels. During the bakery product shelf life, key attributes like moisture retention and crumb structure remain without the use of guar. It is also said to provide equivalent batter viscosity and dough texture. _______________________________ Enquiry No: P820

Vitiva: Natural Shelf Life For Fish Applications Vitiva, Slovenia, has produced VFish, a product line of natural solutions for increasing shelf life and yield management of processed fresh fish. VFish is a combination of natural, mineral-rich sea salt plus the company’s plant extract formulations. This ready-to-use formula provides full antirancidity, yield increase and supports antimicrobial stability for prepared fish and fish products. Fish producers are able to choose among different customised formulations applicable to both mainstream and organic-certified products. The new line is available as a dry mix complete solution customised to different batch sizes, various technological needs and processing operations. _______________________________ Enquiry No: P821

Cama: Total Productive Maintenance

The MP series electronic sleeving machine from Cama recently supplied to a yoghurt factory in China, is one of the recent technical development achieved by the company to meet customer demands in terms of Total Productive Maintenance (TPM). The machines are designed not only to ensure maximum efficiency, but also to improve all the issues related to the daily production, such as quick changeover (without tools or completely automatic), reduced maintenance and easy troubleshooting so that all possible machine down-times can be solved efficiently, quickly and safely. This line can handle up to 50,000 cups per hour. Based on the company’s technology, it can rapidly switch from a single to a double layer format: the complete process is undertaken without the need of tools and it is assisted by automatic size recognition systems that maximise the line efficiency. _______________________________ Enquiry No: P822

Krones: Contiform 3 Ready For Market The Contiform 3 is the latest generation of Krones’ stretch blow-moulding machine series. It is available on the market as of now in a redesigned version of the individual process steps involved. The field-proven linear oven of the Contiform S/H series has been design-enhanced and principally optimised in regard to its energy consumption. The machine has been developed in sizes ranging from eight to 36 blow-moulding stations, enabling record outputs to be achieved of up to 81,000 containers an hour. The machine can also be directly monobloc-synchronised with a filler, or in the ErgoBloc L with both a labeller and a filler. As from mid-2012, heatset and small-cavity versions will additionally be available, as will the integration of ProShape for producing oval containers, or Contipure for preform decontamination. _______________________________ Enquiry No: P823


Enquiry Number

2859


PRODUCT HIGHLIGHTS 24

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2011

Equipment & Services

Eagle: Fat Analysis Tool Eagle (formerly Smiths Detection Product Inspection) showcases its fat analysis system, the FA 720 PRO, for meat producers. This tool provides a non-invasive and an inline method of fat analysis with inspection. Based on dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) technology, the system accurately produces chemical lean (CL) values within +/- 1CL. The accuracy of the measurement combined with its inspection capabilities provides meat producers with a cost-effective, efficient tool to prevent product giveaway and eliminate claims on fat content, helping to reduce costs. In order to determine fat levels, the machine uses two energy spectrums to discriminate between high and low channel x-rays. By evaluating the ratio of energy absorbed at a high spectrum to the level of energy absorbed at a lower spectrum, the technology infers the average atomic numbers of the product scanned to provide a CL value.

Purac: Calculator For Formulators Purac has come up with an online calculating tool, the Purac Beverage Fortification Calculator. This tool has been developed to assist R&D teams in formulating stable calcium fortified beverages, saving time and resources. The beverage industry’s speed-to-market of new products is of high importance to maintain or increase market share. This poses a significant challenge to product developers, as formulating and testing for product stability are time-consuming and expensive. One of the increasingly popular options for product differentiation is calcium fortification of beverages. When developing calcium fortified beverages, preventing precipitation is one of the main concerns. Precipitation occurs when the dissolved calcium reacts with, for example, citric acid, forming insoluble calcium citrate. It results in an undesired quality defects (such as sandy mouthfeel) of the beverage, and can occur throughout the entire product shelf life. _______________________________ Enquiry No: P826

_______________________________ Enquiry No: P824

Cognex: Vision System Test Feature Cognex has installed an added feature for its In-Sight vision systems that allows manufacturers to test the vision system and verify that it is functioning correctly. This functionality, called TestRun, gives users increased confidence in the validity of their vision inspection results. Now, users can confirm program changes by quickly checking against the ‘baseline’ configuration. It also enables system integrators and OEMs to demonstrate that the vision system meets the acceptance criteria when the system is installed at the end user’s facility. And, machine operators can minimise bad results by checking that the vision hardware is performing properly. In addition to testing system functionality, it assists quality managers to identify ‘borderline’ inspections and to refine pass/fail criteria. _______________________________ Enquiry No: P825

Hoogenkamp: Vegetable Protein Marketing Henk Hoogenkamp, continues to prove with his latest book why he is world’s most quoted and referenced writer discussing vegetable protein solutions. The book ‘Vegetable Protein Marketing’ is an authorative overview covering a selection of seemingly unrelated topics that influence food security, health, sustainability, affordability and dietary enjoyment. On a worldwide basis, more than 50 percent of all vegetable protein sources available for human consumption, will be used in formulated and or enhanced meat products. Extruded vegetable protein ingredients that simulated meat texture will allow further growth of this segment. Using premium quality vegetable protein sources to augment or simulate traditional dairy foods and beverages will generate the same growth curves. Combined in a 700-page book, marketing executives, food technologists and business strategists need to stay ahead of the curve and read about the dynamics of vegetable protein. _______________________________ Enquiry No: P827


TRACK & TRACE EVERY ITEM AT EVERY STEP OF THE WAY WITH ZEBRA® RANGE OF HIGH PERFORMING PRINTERS, YOU CAN TRACK EVERY PRODUCT MOVEMENT THROUGHOUT YOUR ENTIRE SUPPLY CHAIN – ANYTIME, ANYWHERE. From suppliers and manufacturers, to distributors and operators, Zebra ® innovative barcode printers and solutions are designed to help you optimize productivity by enhancing efficiencies across every single part of the supply chain. With Zebra® suite of specialty printers, every single pallet, case and item tells its story and you can now track product movement throughout your entire supply chain – anywhere, anytime. · Meet buyer and industry compliance requirements quickly and cost-effectively · Controlled access to distribution, quality, and food safety information anytime, anywhere · Improve your operations with direct quality feedback from customers With this information, your buyers are confident that your product is safe, fresh, and of the highest quality, helping you grow revenues and market share. To find out more, visit www.zebra.com/printerfamily/FI For further enquiries, please email SGMarcom@zebra.com.

©2011 ZIH Corp. All rights reserved.

Enquiry Number

2941


ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2011

from the packaging or label. In other cases, while the correct codes/information may have been printed, the quality of the mark could have been degraded to an extent that it cannot be properly read by vision systems further down the product line and supply chain.

Coding & Labelling:

BRAND Protection adopting the right practices to enable effective supply chain management, while preventing mistakes that could lead to product recalls and a loss of public goodwill. By didier Lacroix, senior VP, international sales & services, Cognex

IN the F&B industry, packaged containers that move through labelling and coding systems can sometimes be affected by production errors. These include information (such as manufacturing and expiry dates, lot and date codes) being incorrectly printed or completely omitted

Point-to-Point intEgrity Ensuring that the information is correct and present on the packaging is crucial for product tracking throughout the supply chain. In the event of product recalls, a massive logistics effort is required to pull the product from the distribution system. Products that have clearly marked codes and labels will be able to facilitate this process better, enabling greater supply chain safety. For the consumer, the expiry date is of primary concern as the latter determines if the product is still fit for safe consumption. Incorrectly printed or missing dates could potentially result in end-users consuming product that is no longer fit for use, and may result in expensive litigation and a tarnished brand image. In other instances, the labels themselves could be missing from the packaging or may be crooked or misaligned. Furthermore, certain facilities in Asia may serve as contract manufacturers that produce similar products for competing well-established brand names. Although rare, there are instances where the wrong label is applied to the packaging, ie: packaging from Brand A is labelled Brand B and vice versa. Left unchecked and undetected, such production errors could result in embarrassment for the manufacturer and a loss of reputation for the brand owners.


PACKAGING & PROCESSING

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Certain manufacturing facilities may also produce different versions of a particular type of product, such as a variety of milk powders for different target markets. In such an environment, label mix-ups could result in the incorrect nutritional and usage information being represented on the product packaging. In the best-case scenario, users may not notice the difference while in serious cases, this could lead to health issues and eventual complaints and lawsuits. Manual Quality Assurance (QA) / Quality Control (QC) methods unfortunately, are unable to provide a thorough means of detecting such errors. A typical manual QA system typically involves deploying operators along the production line to pick out products that have missing information. However, this method does not guarantee a full proof system as it is prone to human error. This is especially true if the operator is tired or is temporary distracted. Furthermore, it is nearly impossible for operators to verify if the printed information is correct, or to read barcodes. To further exacerbate the problem, production facilities may increase production speed and capacity over time to meet growing demand in local and overseas markets. With higher speeds, the human eye may find it increasingly challenging to keep up, resulting in a lower detection rate for identifying defective product. In addition, raising production output could mean that additional operators need to be hired to ‘catch’ mistakes, thereby incurring higher running costs for the facility owner. Ensuring Consistency Some manufacturers may also print Recommended Retail Prices

(RRP) codes on the packaging to ensure that prices are controlled within a particular market. There can sometimes be wide variations in the positions of the RRP codes on the packaging, depending on the printers that are printing the codes. Fortunately, Pat-Max geometric pattern matching technology helps vision systems to read codes and printed information, regardless of their positions. I n t h e c a s e o f re a d i n g information on cans and tins, the challenge comes from the curved surface of such packaging, which

may pose reading difficulties to certain readers on the market. Geometric pattern matching technology can also be applied in such instances for effective reads. Furthermore, cans that are presented to the camera at various angles or even upsidedown can still be read quickly and effectively. Vision systems can be designed to halt the production line when errors are detected – to allow operators to troubleshoot and fix the problem. In other setups, they can be linked to an automated


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Vietnam Brewery Limited (VBL) A Vietnam-based beer bottler adopts machine vision to safeguard its reputation and to ensure error-free production.

V

ietnam Brewery Limited (VBL) produces a number of international premium beers, including popular brands such as Tiger and Heineken. At one of its production facilities that manufactures these beer brands, QC checks to ensure that the correct caps were used to seal the right bottle, depended solely on the human eye. Although rare, there have been occasional incidences where a Tiger cap was mistakenly put on a Heineken bottle and vice versa. Left undetected, such errors can potentially make a dent in the reputations of the beer brands and also that of VBL.

Human Weakness While a manual ‘human vision’ inspection could work to a certain extent, this method was not foolproof. Furthermore, management plans to incrementally ramp up production speed and volume would make it more challenging for operators to identify incorrect labelling. It also meant that more operators would have to be hired, further raising the operational costs for the production line. With the installation of a smart camera solution, the facility is now able to eliminate any incidence of product recalls due to beer brand mismatches between the bottles and caps. Bottles that have been identified as rejects are removed from the production line and sent to a rejection bin for collection after each work shift. The number of operators has been reduced from four to just one – whose role is simply to collect rejected bottles that have been identified and set apart by the system. This translates into higher production quality and better deployment of labour resources. The machine vision system is able to generate reports on the number of errors that have been detected during each shift, thereby providing managers with the necessary information to fine-tune and improve their production processes. The machine vision system saves images of each bottle that has been checked and stores this data for future retrieval if required. These images are important in determining which bottles have the right caps on and which do not. In the event of any investigations or allegations of production error, this data can serve as important evidence.

rejection system, which extracts sub-standard products from the production line and sends them to a separate location for collection later on. This prevents mix-ups from occurring and also frees the operator to focus on monitoring tasks. On occasions where a manufacturing facility receives potential or existing customers for plant visits, an effective vision system can help to build the latter’s confidence in the manufacturing operations, thereby helping to boost the former’s reputation in the industry. Question Of Choice While many manufacturers are beginning to understand the benefits that an automated QC vision system can provide for their labelling and coding operations, a question they then need to ask is, “which brand/ technology should I adopt?” It is important to note that not all 2D vision solutions are equal. In the quest to find the solution that best suits their needs, facility owners need to run parallel tests with technology from dif ferent vendors to determine read speeds and accuracy. Tests should also be conducted by presenting barcodes and information at various orientations and angles, and the results compared sideby-side. Besides performance criteria, the complexity of the system in terms of ease-of-setup is another important consideration that needs to be put to thought. Given that many implementation tasks can only be carried out when the manufacturing line is halted, setting up a complicated vision system could stretch for months and disrupt production. Finding a vendor who is able to work around production schedules


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sEEing thE Light Vendors also need to have the expertise and knowledge to provide advice on the lighting of the facility. At times, it could m e a n p e r f o rm i n g t e s t s t o determine the optimum lighting requirements for the automated QC system. Third-party lighting suppliers would then have to be called in to provide the customised light sets. In other situations, bright lights at the production area can pose certain difficulties where the external glare degrades the quality of the images that are taken by the camera. Such a scenario may call for tinted screens to be put up to create a protective enclosure that filters off the excess glare. The benefits of machine vision go beyond merely achieving operational savings. Product recalls, expensive litigation and reputation loss due to human negligence is an un-quantifiable cost that every business needs to avoid.

Enquiry Number

is important for ensuring that manufacturing capacity is not affected during this period. Scalability is another feature that facility owners need to factor in. As demand for higher output increases over time, the QC vision system needs to be able to keep up with faster production flows and higher volumes. A scalable vision system should allow the manufacturer to add additional cameras to the production line, without having to carry out major overhauls or perform complex reprogramming to the existing system. Often left as an afterthought, ease-of-use of the vision system is an area that facility managers need to determine from the onset. Ideally, the system should be able to be sufficiently simple to be controlled and operated by staff with basic training. These days, it is relatively easy to locate various technology vendors via the Internet. However, facility owners in Asia need to find out if a vendor has a presence in the former’s country. More importantly, the vendor must be able to provide close aftersales technical support and quick response times.


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Hot Looks

For Food in the food industry, it is essential to carefully control the temperature of perishable goods throughout production, transportation, storage, and sales. thermal imaging cameras can aid this process. contributed by Denise cheng, marketing manager asia pacific, Flir systems

T H E main elements doing non-contact temperature measurements in the food processing industr y are a thermal imaging camera and the associated software. They act as ‘smart’ non-contact sensors to perform inspections, measuring the temperature of equipment, refrigerated products, and cooked foods as they exit the cooking process. Thermal imaging cameras are easy to use, small, and can be positioned almost anywhere as needed. They can also be used to inspect package sealing, and improve efficiency in other food processing operations. The use of thermal imaging cameras in food processing is

growing for applications such as: • Oven baked goods • Microwave cooked meats • Microwave drying of parboiled rice and other grains • Inspecting ovens for proper temperature • Proper filling of frozen meal package compartments • Checking integrity of cellophane seals over microwave meals • Inspecting box flap glue of overwrap cartons • Monitoring refrigerator and freezer compartments quaLitY & saFEtY WitH tHErmograpHY Thermal imaging is first and foremost a Quality Assurance


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(QA) tool. Controlling the quality and safety of cooked meat products is an excellent use of this technology. A permanently mounted thermal imaging camera can record the temperature of, for example, chicken tenders as they exit a continuous conveyor oven. The objective is to make sure they are done enough but not over-cooked and dried out. Reduced moisture content also represents yield loss on a weight basis. Thermal imaging cameras can also be used for inspection on microwave precooking lines. Besides improving product quality and safety, overall throughput can be increased. An additional benefit is reduced energy costs. Equipment Monitoring In addition to cooked food inspections, thermal imaging cameras can monitor conveyor ovens. They can even be part of a feedback loop to help control oven temperature. Another use of thermal imaging cameras for conveyor ovens is monitoring temperature uniformity across the width of the conveyor oven cooking belt. If a heating element inside an electric oven fails, or you get uneven heating across an air impingement oven, one side of the product stream may be cooler. This can be quickly discovered with thermal imaging cameras. Quality inspections of this sort are much more difficult with conventional contact type temperature sensors. As such, thermal imaging cameras can help correct variability and improve quality before a lot of product is scrapped. Packaging Inspections Software is available that allows

A permanently mounted thermal imaging camera can record the temperature of, for example, chicken tenders as they exit a continuous conveyor oven.

thermal imaging cameras to locate objects and patterns in the images. One application for pattern matching is in the production of frozen meals. Thermal machine vision can use pattern recognition software to check for proper filling of food tray compartments. A related application is automated 100 percent inspection of the heat-sealed cellophane cover over finished microwave meals. A thermal imaging camera can see heat radiating from the lip of the container where the cellophane heat-seal is formed. T h e t e m p e r a t u re a l o n g the entire perimeter of the package can be checked by using the thermal image with

machine vision software. This type of program matches the geometric pattern in the image and its temperatures against the temperatures in a pattern stored in a computer memory. An added function in such a system could be laser marking of a poorly sealed package so it can be removed at the inspection station. An issue affecting product safety indirectly is the integrity of cartons that overwrap and protect food containers. One of the most cost-effective ways of sealing overwrap cartons is to use heated glue spots on the carton flaps. In the past, the integrity of the spot gluing was determined by periodically doing destructive testing on


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several samples. This was timeconsuming and costly. Because the glue is heated, a thermal imaging camera can ‘see’ through the cardboard to check the pattern and size of the applied glue spots. The camera can be set up to look at predefined areas of the flaps where glue should be applied, and verify spot sizes and their temperatures. The digital data collected is used for a pass/fail decision on each box, so bad boxes can be immediately removed from the production line. The data is automatically logged into the QA system for trend analysis, so a warning can be generated if an excessive number of boxes begin to fail. Yet another application for thermal imaging cameras is monitoring container filling operations. Although this is seldom a product safety issue, it does affect yield and compliance with regulations. Different areas on the bottle can be defined and used to trigger an alarm and remove bottles that are over-or under-filled. Thermal imaging cameras are a better alternative to visible light cameras when a bottle or jar is made of dark coloured glass or plastic. Automating Measurements Application software currently available for thermal imaging cameras includes a wide variety of functions that support automated food processing applications. This software complements and works in conjunction with firmware built into thermal imaging cameras. The imaging tools and libraries in these packages are hardware and language-independent, making it easy for food processing engineers to quickly implement thermal monitoring and control systems.

1 Computer or PLC 2 CAT-6 Ethernet cable with RJ45 connectors 3 Industrial Ethernet switches with fiber optic ports 4 Fiber optic cable 5 FLIR A310 6 Food process to be monitored, eg, items on a conveyor belt

Typical Go/No-Go inspection system using thermal imaging cameras

Thermal imaging cameras themselves provide the user with different operating modes that support correct temperature measurements under various conditions. Two functions commonly found in these cameras are a spotmeter and area measurements. The spotmeter finds the temperature at a particular point. The area function isolates a selected area of an object or scene and usually provides the maximum, minimum, and average temperatures inside that area. The temperature measurement range typically is selectable by the user. As an adjunct to the temperature range selection, most cameras allow a user to set up a colour scale or gray scale to optimise the camera image. In conveyor oven applications, the area function is typically used because pieces of cooked product are often randomly located on the conveyor. The camera can be programmed to find and measure the minimum and maximum temperatures within the defined

area. If one of those setpoint temperatures were to fall outside the user-defined limits, an application program running on a PC or PLC would instantly trigger an alarm, alerting the operator to check the thermal image on a video monitor or PC to find and remove the bad product, and/or adjust the cooking temperature. In the case of local monitoring, an IR camera’s digital I/O can be used to directly trigger an alarm device without additional software. However, food processing often benefits from higher level analytics that are available in third-party software that runs on a PC. These out-of-the-box solutions do not require the writing of application source code. By adhering to commonly used machine vision interface standards such as GigE Vision and GenICam, a wide range of functionality is supported by this software. For more information, ENTER No: 0841


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THE need for food traceability is real and food manufacturers and distributors are looking at supply chain visibility technologies to improve food safety and consumer confidence. Facing growing consumer concern about food safety, businesses are looking at leveraging today’s technology to enhance and build efficient track-and-trace solutions. Play By The Rules Unfortunately, traceability in the US food supply chain is moving at a slow pace. Health & Human Services reports that 59 percent

of the North American food facilities sur veyed did not meet the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) requirements to maintain records about their sources, recipients, and transporters. This lack of compliance places more burden on an a l re a d y s t re t c h e d F D A t o track down the origins of food borne illnesses. Moving Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) and bar code labelling and scanning deeper in food grower, shipping and packaging chains enables easier tracing throughout the product cycle.

Seeing Is Believing Full food supply chain visibility provides an extra layer of protection when a food borne illness occurs, such as the 2010 salmonella outbreak. Visibility allows growers and distributors to determine if the contamination occurred at the grower, or was introduced within the distribution process, and who might else be affected. Adding this level of visibility can save lives in the case of a severe food-borne illness outbreak as well as save a business time, money and reputation. Consider the following case

example. A customer in the baking industry reduced its inventory and distribution costs by US$3 million in the first year

after installing an automated pallet labelling and identification system. The company, which operates six warehouses throughout the US and previously was not able to measure and balance inventory throughout its operations, began printing and applying bar code labels to all its cases and pallets and then scanning the bar codes to capture quantity, location and product identification numbers, including lot codes. The system enabled the company to gain an accurate, timely view of inventory and to increase the average number of pallets per shipment

The Future Of

Traceability The future of food traceability will require business decisionmakers to adapt their current strategies to comply with government mandates while utilising today’s technology to efficiently track what is most important in their day-to-day commerce. By Andrew Tay, president, Zebra Technologies, Asia Pacific


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from 47 to 61, a 30 percent improvement. By increasing load yields, the company significantly reduced the need for expensive less-than-truckload (LTL) shipments to customers to fulfil orders which contributed greatly to cost savings. Shortly after implementing the system, the company recalled some products because it received a bad batch of ingredients from a supplier. Using the lot number information captured from bar code scanning, the company traced its shipments and conducted a highly targeted recall by contacting only those customers who had received the affected products. The recall completed quickly, with minimised cost, and without having to pull unaffected products from store shelves. Increased Traceability The bar code traceability system described above is typical, and relies on standard, commonly used linear bar code formats for cases and pallets. Increased traceability and other applications are possible using more advanced, standardised identification technologies such as GE1 DataBar (RSS) bar codes and RFID. RSS targets produce, loose items, and other difficult to identify products. There are high data capacity versions of RSS that enable coding of lot codes or other traceability information. In contrast to a Universal Product Code (UPC)/ European Article Number (EAN) digit that identifies the product type and manufacturer, the Electronic and Product Code (EPC) RFID system creates a unique serial number for each item, which is very helpful for traceability applications. Rewritable RFID tags that have extra memory sufficient for

lot codes and other information support EPC. Encoders can update RFID tags with time stamps and transaction records to create electronic pedigrees. Smart tags (battery powered RFID) can record temperatures and other environmental data critical for the fresh produce industry. Methods to rapidly and effectively track foods to quickly identify the source of a food-borne illness breakout can be more efficiently managed and reduced through real-time information. Solutions and products must not

Full food supply chain visibility provides an extra layer of protection when a food borne illness occurs.

only give businesses the ability to ‘see’ their entire operations — through bar-coding and RFID technologies – but also enable businesses to give a ‘voice’ to physical assets through the digital enterprise. Technologies that allow grocers, food processors and the FDA to track contaminated products back to the source are a reality these days. Looking Ahead In the near future, the same technology may evolve to take traceability a step further. There is the potential to deliver technology solutions that not only identify what and where something is, but also identify

its condition and initiate an automatic action based on that condition. For example: • Produce that is on the path to becoming too ripe could send an automatic signal for strategic rerouting to a closer location, preventing rotten produce, bacteria growth and potential food-borne illness. • A package of contaminated products could automatically alert grocers to its exact location on the shelf, potentially saving lives and placing an end to recent largescale recalls. • Consumers who bought contaminated products may receive an alert on their cell phone letting them know that their purchases should not be eaten, spurring consumers to get rid of the contaminated food or see a doctor if they have consumed it. Moving for ward, any organisation involved in the transportation, production, storage and sale of food will need to comply with future potential traceability requirements, currently being discussed in congress. Implementing viable tracking systems will be of increased importance with an emphasis on seamlessly linking missioncritical operations to company information systems, creating a highly responsive supply chain. The future of food traceability will require business decision-makers to adapt their current strategies to comply with government mandates while utilising today’s technology to efficiently track what is most important in their day-to-day commerce. For more information, ENTER No: 0842


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Word Of

M

uth

Improving Mouthfeel What exactly does improving mouthfeel entail? Firstly, it should be understood that mouthfeel is a characteristic that differs from one food or drink to the other. What works for a certain type of food may not necessarily apply to another. For example, a stick of celery should feel crunchy with the appropriate amount of moisture. A biscuit however, should have the right level of ‘dryness’. Nevertheless, there are some desired mouthfeel characteristics, which can generally be applied across the range of food and beverage products. For

instance, food or drink should be easily swallowed without being overly slimy or slippery on one’s tongue. Also, ingredients added to improve mouthfeel should be able to mask any ‘off’ flavours, without dampening the required taste of the product. The use of flavour enhancers and taste modifiers in artificially sweetened drinks is such an example. Typically, the use of artificial sweeteners results in a bitter, metallic aftertaste. As such, there exists a need to mix

Gary Tamin, Jakarta, Indonesia

Pa r t o f the pleasure associated with the act of eating is being able to appreciate the physical and chemical sensations that arise when the food is in one’s mouth. The crunchiness of a potato chip, the smoothness of a spoonful of yoghurt, and the sponginess of a breakfast muffin are all examples that indicate how rich and varied the world of foods is, specifically with regards to mouthfeel and texture. To the layman, how good a food is may be a simple matter of its taste. However, consumer perceptions are much more complex. The mouthfeel sensations that are evoked during eating can make a difference between a good and bad culinary experience. Everything from the initial palate sensation and first bite to chewing, swallowing and the final aftertaste can leave a lasting impression. It should therefore come as no surprise that the business of enhancing mouthfeel and texture has grown considerably over the years.

Martin Walls, Kent, UK

A product’s mouthfeel and texture can make the difference between a consumer’s acceptance and rejection. By Shahnawaz Abdul Hamid

A muffin needs to feel spongy for it to be well appreciated.


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Michael Lorenzo, Pasig, Philippines

37

Functional hydrocolloids have been used to give foods better mouthfeel.

such sweeteners with other ingre-dients to produce a more palatable taste experience. Ingredients should also aid in providing a general consistency in the feel and texture of a cer tain food product. For example, par ticulates in a beverage solution should be uniformly dispersed, instead of being clumped together. In BeverAgeS Enhancing mouthfeel and texture is especially crucial in the beverage industry, notably in the production of beers and wines. Part of appreciating such beverages involves understanding the wide range of linguistic descriptors used to define the product’s mouthfeel: lubricity, oiliness, smoothness,

pulpiness, sliminess and chalkiness. Needless to say, these terms are but the tip of the iceberg when describing the mouthfeel and texture of a product. Functional hydrocolloids such as carrageenan, agar agar, xanthan gum, guar gum and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) have been used to compensate for the loss of mouthfeel that occurs from calorie sweeteners or lower juice content. The resulting increased viscosity provides mouthfeel similar to full juice beverages. For the uninitiated, a colloid is formed when one substance is dispersed evenly through another. In hydrocolloids, polysaccharides of vegetable origin are distributed in water, to form gels or sols, depending on

Nature’s best solution for true flavour masking PURAC® FIT Plus, a natural and purified lactic acid, successfully masks off-flavours by regulating the pH and serves as a basis for true flavour innovation. Purac is your proven partner in taste enhancement, developing innovative products while providing technical support for nearly 80 years. For more information, please visit www.purac.com/beverages.

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Consumers want great taste and added health benefits in their beverages. This presents a challenge to beverage producers, especially in low-calorie drinks where artificial sweeteners are used. These sweeteners often produce off-flavours and an unpleasant lingering aftertaste.


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Specialty Starches Adding to this, specialty starches have also been developed in recent years to improve the mouthfeel and texture of beverages. The selection of the correct starch depends on a number of variables, including processing conditions, product application re q u i re m e n t s a n d d e s i re d textural properties. Tapioca-based starches, for instance, are able to withstand harsh processing and storage for long periods of time. Furthermore, their unique ability to remain suspended in lowviscosity solutions makes them ideally suited for beverages. These starches also offer a wide range of textural possibilities and can be used to make anything from films and coatings; light, smooth and pulpy liquids; heavy, creamy textures as well as solid, fat-like gels and pastes. In some instances, they are designed to replace undesirable or expensive ingredients, such as gelatin or egg whites, without compromising on the food structures provided by these ingredients. Making Sense Of The Data Given that minor changes to a

food product’s formulation can considerably alter its mouthfeel and texture, it comes as no surprise that a major challenge facing food developers is to accurately and objectively measure mouthfeel and texture. Being able to collect and work on reliable data related to these attributes will go a long way in helping these developers in modifying the appearance and appeal of their products.

Oh Barcelona, Spain

the amount of water present. Despite being somewhat costly and difficult to use, hydrocolloids such as these are usually capable of creating positive mouthfeel characteristics, either through changing the beverage’s viscosity and density, or creating texture by suspending particles. A scientific study, entitled Mouthfeel & Flavour Of Fermented Whey With Added Hydrocolloids indicates that high-methoxy pectin (HMP) may offer the best potential to enhance the thickness of whey-based lactic beverages.

Manufacturers of processed fruit juices stand to gain from enhancements in mouthfeel technology.

To this end, Texture Profile Analysis (TPA) was developed in the 1960s to study the mechanical properties of foods and their relationship to their texture. The analysis involves compressing food using a machine, and then obtaining parameters from the resulting force-time curve. These parameters include adhesiveness, cohesiveness, chewiness, fracturability, gumminess, hardness and springiness. Such food measurements through the use of sophisticated instruments are becoming fairly

common, and despite the complexity involved are able to provide ‘meaningful’ data: a strong correlation between parameters extracted from instruments and human sensory judgments. Critical to gathering ‘meaningful’ data is the consistent preparation of food samples. Food products undergoing the TPA need to be sliced in a manner that allows for equal sizes of food samples. Generally, edge effects are also avoided. This is because test scores on the interior of cooked samples will tend to be different when compared to the interior. Finally, it is also important to have consistent aging effects on the texture of prepared samples between the time they are prepared and tested. The Future Of Mouthfeel As an increasing number of food products undergo processing, there will be a greater need for ingredients to compensate for the loss of any mouthfeel. Research has shown that mouthfeel and texture are indeed important characteristics that can influence a customer’s opinion, and continued consumption, of a food or drink. Given this, food manufacturers will also need to further improve on their measurements of mouthfeel and texture, tweaking processes such as the TPA to strengthen the correlation between instrument-gathered data and actual sensory perceptions. Ultimately, it would appear future products from the industry will have a better ‘feel’, leading to more satisfied consumers.

For more information, ENTER No: 0850


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Wellbeing is a driving trend in the global food and beverage marketplace. As consumers begin to re-evaluate their dietary choices in processed, shelf-stable, frozen, natural, organic foods and beverages, there is one constant product preference influencer – texture. Not surprisingly, the trend towards healthier foods provides tremendous opportunities for texture and mouthfeel solutions. Staple products can be reformulated as ‘better for you’ just as easily as new products. The reduction of fat, oil or sugar, or addition of calcium or fibre will require novel texture solutions. Mouthfeel in particular, is a vital component of product development as it affects consumer likeability. The organoleptic properties of a food or beverage are factored into the purchase decision; therefore, meeting these expectations during the eating experience is a must. Dairy products must be creamy and luscious, and bakery products must be crunchy and crisp – regardless of what’s been added or substituted to boost nutrition.

Defining Texture The definition of texture varies by audience. The food industry’s texture definition is based on scientific methodologies to include mouthcoating, oral viscosity and meltaway. Consumer definitions, on the other hand, are based on the emotional eating experience, described with terms like ‘creamy’, ‘crunchy’ and ‘chewy’. Manufacturers need to better understand the consumer texture experience, including their likes and dislikes. Food formulators can then translate the consumer experience into scientific methodologies they can measure and characterise to determine textural differences and similarities among products. Using this data and

Translating

Texture

the

Experience

Food formulators can translate consumer experience into scientific methodologies that can be used to measure and characterise textural differences and similarities among products. This data and information can support the development of novel textures and new products. By Tan Ai Tsing, application manager, National Starch


NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2011 ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY

Mouthfeel Matters Texture needs vary by manufacturing specialty; therefore, texture solutions need to be designed to meet the needs of those segments where mouthfeel matters most. These segments include: • Dairy: milk, yoghurt, and cheese • Savour y: soups, sauces, dressings, and gravies • Bakery: breads, cereals, cakes, and snacks • Beverages: juice drinks and dairy beverages Shedding light on how texture solutions differentiate by segment is easiest when actual category challenges are examined. For example, a yoghur t manufacturer wants to make their non-fat yoghurt richer and creamier, while reducing the total calories in each 170 grm cup by 20 percent so they can compete in the light yoghurt category. The solution is developed following a collaboration between manufacturer and supplier, incorporating the following steps: defining business goals, gathering consumer insights, evaluating sensory attributes, understanding the impact of process on texture, and formulating for texture transformation and/ or value optimisation. In the case of the non-fat light yoghurt, a texture solution

Enquiry Number

Duygu Agar, Turkey

2924

information, they can then develop targeted textures to create appealing products. One of the first steps in understanding consumers’ texture experience is gathering consumer insights – the consumer drivers, needs and product claims that will influence purchase and repurchase of products. Focus groups, categor y appraisal, on-site consumer acceptance, and surveys can all help gather these insights. Once the insights have been gathered, sensory expertise is used to home in on these texture experiences. Characterising a specific set of competitive products that represent the texture diversity across an application space helps to create a texture map. From this sensory mapping, key food texture attributes can be identified for that application, revealing how the product compares with the competition and where improvements or textural attributes, such as mouthfeel, can be made. Armed with this information, expert analysts can partner with food scientists to assess ingredient interaction and performance, as well as prototype development. These prototypes are then put into the hands of consumers for preference testing, accelerating time to market.


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can be delivered to achieve the consumer-preferred texture profile for blended yoghurt. ‘Creamy’ is translated to oral viscosity, mouthcoating, meltaway and degree of gel or set, and ‘smooth’ translated as lack of graininess. This texture solution works in tandem with flavour and sweetener system improvements, providing only 80 kcal per 170 grm cup, thereby preserving the rich and creamy yoghurt texture consumers expect, with lower calories for a healthier, equally enjoyable alternative. As a complement to applications expertise, culinologists can also be engaged in formulation to help develop segment specific on-trend food concepts. This combination of expertise expedites the go-tomarket timetable and may significantly improve consumer acceptability.

Asia Pacific Texture Trends In Asia Pacific, food manufacturers have started conducting their own consumer research to understand which texture qualities are most important to their consumers. With this knowledge, manufacturers can tailor product offerings to appeal to consumers. • Packaging Front-of-pack labelling is an increasingly important marketing tool to entice consumers. Texture words specific to different food categories are increasingly prevalent. Baked goods are chewy, moist, soft or fluffy; dairy foods are rich, creamy and smooth; sauces are thick and creamy, or light and smooth. Since 2006, the growth of the descriptive word ‘creamy’ on front-of-pack labelling in the dairy category has grown by more than 10 percent CAGR. In the

bakery category, the descriptive word ‘moist’ on front-of-pack labelling has increased by about 12 percent CAGR. • Varied Preferences Geographic differences across Asia Pacific have intensified challenges to food product developers in understanding consumers’ food preference. For example, in most countries, plain stirred yoghurt typically has a relatively thick and spoonable texture, whereas in China, it is generally more flowable, often consumed through a straw or sipped directly from a cup. Manufacturers need to consider this texture difference when developing stirred fruity yoghurt for the Asian market. Certain textures are also specific to Asia Pacific. For example, ‘mochi’ is a texture word describing a product that is soft, moist, elastic, yet chewy. From this textural concept, manufacturers have developed baked mochi, donuts, chewy puff and other complex ornamental pastries with a chewy texture to entice the consumers. • Matter Of Convenience With an increasing proportion of the population working in major Asia Pacific cities, consumers tend to purchase food products from mega supermarket chains or convenience stores. Consumers are looking for the same softness and moistness in their buns, muffins and cakes and the same lasting crispiness in packaged pastry, as they would find in freshly prepared products. Similarly, ready meals that are stored chilled or frozen for reheating at home must retain their desired texture. Common texture challenges food manufacturers face include lack of softness and moistness of rice-


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• Value For Money In recent months, increasing prices of raw materials, energy and labour have all resulted in lower consumer spending. Affordability is high on the agenda. Since consumers will not sacrifice texture in reformulated f o o d s , m a n u f a c t u re r s a n d suppliers need to work closely together to achieve the desired texture within budget. As consumers become more sophisticated in this region, the quest for healthier foods with less fat, salt and sugar, more functional ingredients such as vitamins, antioxidants, fish oils, and prebiotics/probiotics will accelerate. Similarly, consumers will increasingly seek out products with simpler, more natural ingredients. The key to success when removing or reducing

fat, salt and sugar is to build back texture attributes, such as creaminess in low fat salad dressing or dairy beverages, through ingredient innovation. A Look Into The Future Traditional sensor y panels and evaluation methods are, and will always be, a critical practice to capture the consumer texture experience. However, as technology advances, methods such as the Meaning through Image-based Narrative Discovery

designing new ingredients • Structure function: predicting ingredient, formula and property relations to guide formulation choices • Measurement: developing new methods and techniques Using automated equipment also leads to faster generation of both ingredients and food formulations to help manufacturers bring products to market more quickly. The a u t o m a t e d f o o d rh e o l o g y

Jozsef Szasz-Fabian, Covasna, Romania

based meals, reduction in the elasticity of noodles, syneresis of sauces and gravies, and lack of tenderness and juiciness in meat products. Food manufacturers are increasingly competing for consumer dollars with fast food restaurants and cafes, particularly in fast-growing metropolitan areas of China and South East Asia. Hectic lifestyles and increasing affluence have resulted in the growth of food service sector, with approximately 34 percent of Asians consuming fast food at least once a week. In these Western-style quick service restaurants (QSR), food needs to maintain its texture under heat lamps and during consumption. Another key challenge is ensuring minimal textural changes during home delivery. At full service restaurants (FSR), ingredient suppliers can play a major role ensuring the texture of meals is maintained.

(MIND) – a Zaltman Metaphor Elicitation Technique (ZMET) aimed at understanding the unconscious connection between food texture and emotion – are being used. ZMET employs qualitative methods to elicit the metaphors, constructs and mental models driving customers’ thinking and behaviour, as well as quantitative analyses to provide data for marketing mix decisions and segmentation strategies. Understanding the impact of process on texture is also critical to market success. Texture characterisation science is rapidly advancing in the areas of: • Materials characterisation: mapping the structure and properties of ingredients and

measurements include viscosity, gel strength, gel deformability, and swelling volume. These measurements have been related to oral sensor y mouthfeel attributes such as cohesiveness, meltaway and mouthcoating. Key future opportunities in texture to explore include translation of the consumer texture experience into measureable scientific terms; tapping into advanced consumer insight and rheology technologies to further characterise texture; and partnering with reliable ingredient solution collaborators.

For more information, ENTER No: 0851


HEALTH & NUTRITION

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY november/december 2011

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Indeed, by the time you finish reading this article, assuming it will take you around five minutes, 163 people may have died due to cardiovascular disease (CVD), representing 29 percent of all death during the same time. In fact, CVD is the number one killer globally according to WHO. While the term CVD encompasses a whole group of disorders of the heart and blood vessels, coronary heart disease (CHD) (disease of the blood vessels supplying the heart muscle, including heart attack) and stroke are the main causes of CVD mortality.

Science AtHeart Recent westernisation of Asian diets resulting in increased total and saturated fat consumption, and as a consequence increases in serum cholesterol, may have caused an increase in CHD in Asian countries. By Peter Wisler & Oliver Hasselwander, health & nutrition, Danisco

The key underlying process responsible for the development of CHD is ‘atherosclerosis’, originating from the Greek word ‘athero’ (gruel or paste) and ‘sclerosis’ (hardness). Atherosclerosis is a process which takes place over years, often unnoticed and untreated and refers to the process of progressive thickening and

hardening of medium and large arteries as a result of deposits of fatty substances, cholesterol, cellular waste products, calcium and other substances accumulating on the inner arterial lining. While CHD mortality in Japan and Korea is low and comparable to Mediterranean countries such as France, CHD rates are actually

similar or even higher in many Asian countries compared to Western populations such as the US or the UK. In China, CHD accounted for nine percent of total deaths in urban and four percent in rural populations in 2004. Compared to Western populations, this is still low; however, the CHD burden has been increasing in China as hyperlipidaemia, hypertension, overweight and diabetes become more prevalent. Combat Risk Factors Elevated plasma total and LDL cholesterol is an important modifiable risk factor for CHD and researchers have established the causal relationship between elevated LDL (bad) cholesterol, and CHD supported by large


NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2011 ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY

Phytosterols are naturally occurring and are present in our day-to-day diet, and can be corporated in dairy products.

Nutritional Beverages Premixes Precision Powder & Liquid Blending Tablet Manufacture Sachet Packing Product Design Services Unitech Industries specialise in the custom manufacture of nutritional beverages and premixes for the New Zealand and International food, dairy, beverage, bakery and pharmaceutical industries. Unitech can assist with the provision of a range of services surrounding the supply of your product including; formulation design, product validation trials, regulatory and or label claim compliance, sourcing materials, manufacture, quality assurance and delivery. Contact Unitech to determine the possibilities for improving and developing your quality products to create new market opportunities.

innovation • Precision • trust • commitment •

sales@unitech.co.nz www.unitech.co.nz

2577

Phytoterols For Lower Cholestrol Now that we have decided to change our dieting habits, did our run this morning, we also have the ability of using plantderived phytosterols – one of the most effective functional food ingredients to lower LDL cholesterol. Phytosterols are naturally occurring and are present in our day-to-day diet, albeit in very small quantities of 150-350 mg/day. Structurally, phytosterols are related to cholesterols, but they are metabolised differently and the human body can only minimally absorb phytosterols due to the presence of modified side chains containing extra methyl or ethyl groups. In contrast, dietary cholesterol is absorbed by up to 60 percent from our diet. The main phytosterols found in nature are beta-sitosterol, campesterol and stigmasterol, of which beta-sitosterol is the most abundant accounting for more than 60 percent. Cholesterol-lowering properties of phytosterols were first discovered by Pollak back in 1953, when he established the link between phytosterol consumption and a decrease in blood cholesterol levels. The mode of action relates to the competitive inclusion of phytosterols instead of cholesterol into the micelles

Enquiry Number

epidemiological studies and randomised controlled studies. The relationship of total cholesterol as risk factor for CHD has also been confirmed for Asian populations and total cholesterol is positively related to CHD morbidity and mortality. Causes for raised LDL cholesterol levels are poor diet (high in saturated and trans fats, intake of dietary cholesterol), physical inactivity, obesity, age and genetics. While genetics cannot be influenced, all other causes are in principle ‘modifiable’ factors. Globally, desirable levels of total cholesterol and LDL cholesterols vary slightly, but are somewhat in the range of less than five mmol/L for total cholesterol and less than three mmol/L for LDL cholesterol. However, these desirable cholesterol levels among adults on a population average are only achieved by very few countries, while the majority of countries are above or well above the target of five mmol/L total cholesterol.

UnitecH indUstries


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since statins, by inhibiting the endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver, work differently to phytosterols.

CubeStock

Pine For Heart Health Commercially available phytosterols come from two main sources – soy and pine, with no difference in efficacy. The global market traditionally reser ved the pine derived phytosterols for the European market – being naturally nonGMO and non-allergen – making it very suitable for this sensitive market, while the US was predominately based on soy sterols. However, pine derived sterols are gaining a larger following. Soy is a commodity and regulated by supply and demand. Over time, the demand has become greater than s u p p l y, w h i c h c a n lead to higher prices Exercise helps and tense raw material in maintaining a supplies. On the other healthy heart. hand, manufacturing of pine-derived sterols utilises a by-product of the pulp and paper industries, where phytosterols are recovered from tall oil. The supply is plentiful and to date, only a small percentage of the by-product is utilised for phytosterols p ro d u c t i o n . S t a b l e supply, pricing and high quality with room for growth all play a major role in purchasing decisions and work favourably for pine derived phytosterols. Science To The Rescue Recent westernisation of Asian diets resulting in increased total and

Jason Antony, Vancouver, Canada

and as a consequence effective reduction of both dietary and biliary cholesterol absorption. Since Pollak, over 200 human intervention studies have looked at the cholesterol-lowering properties of this functional ingredient in a variety of different food applications. Recently, a meta-analysis by Demonty concluded that a daily consumption of 2 gr phytosterols, p re f e r a b l y t a k e n i n m o re than one serve, has the ability to lower LDL cholesterol by an a v e r a g e o f n i n e p e rc e n t . Interestingly, there appears to be no significant differences between fat or non-fat based foods enriched with phytosterols. Patients on statins may additionally benefit from the consumption of phytosterols,

saturated fat consumption, and as a consequence increases in serum cholesterol, may have caused an increase in CHD in Asian countries. Together with addressing other modifiable risk factors, science can help t o m a n a g e t h e i n c re a s i n g CHD burden. Pine derived phytosterols offer a highly functional ingredient to lower cholesterol, and depending on local regulatory environments, foods and dietary supplements containing phytosterols could potentially qualify for a cholesterol reduction claim. In Europe, the European Commission has issued Regulations (384/2010, 983/2009 and 376/2010) approving Article 14 health claims that refer to the reduction of blood cholesterol by plant sterols/ stanols in free and esterified form and reduced risk of CHD. Similarly, in the US, the FDA has authorised a health claim with regard to phytosterols and CHD. For more information, ENTER No: 0860


6 grams of protein power

Crave-worthy crunch

Energy that lasts

A natural complement to sweet and savory tastes

A variety of flavour possibilities

3.5 grams of satiating fibre

Enquiry Number

2933


HEALTH & NUTRITION

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY november/december 2011

Sergio Roberto Bichara, Sao Paulo, Brazil

48

A

Hearty Insight Coenzyme Q10 and its active form ubiquinol show promising effects for a healthy heart. By Dr Stefan Siebrecht, consultant for health ingredients, for Kaneka The vitamin-like coenzyme Q10 is essential for a healthy body. It plays important roles in intercellular energy production and in the immune defence system. Young people usually have sufficient concentrations of Q10 and its active form coenzyme QH (also known as ubiquinol) available to meet their needs. However, blood plasma concentrations of Q10 decrease

as people grow older, contract certain diseases or have increased energy requirements. Low blood plasma levels of Q10 are associated with decreased physical and mental performance, fatigue, and a greater risk of cardiovascular diseases. However, various studies have shown that supplementation with Q10 and ubiquinol can benefit people who are suffering from

cardiovascular diseases, such as cardiac insufficiency and angina pectoris. Positive findings such as this have meant that Q10 and ubiquinol have been thrown increasingly into the science spotlight. Since the late 1970s, it has been known that coenzyme Q10 plays an important role in the body’s respiratory chain, an intercellular energy production process that takes place in the mitochondria. Using biochemical processes, the body converts the energy it takes in with food into usable energy called ATP (Adenosintriphosphate) and supplies it to the heart, brain, muscles and everywhere else where energy is needed. The coenzyme and ubiquinol act as important electron transmitters in this process, which produces more than 95 percent


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CoQ10 & Ubiquinol The body uses different sources to make sure that Q10 is available in sufficient amounts. Most of this is synthesised by the body

Rotorhead, Norway

Deficiency Risk When people grow older, the body’s metabolism decreases and Q10 deficiencies can occur. This process continues and the level of Q10 in the body further decreases over the years. Certain diseases, such as diabetes, can also lead to drops in Q10 levels. A diet that is lacking in micronutrients is detrimental to the body’s Q10 levels too – in this case, the body is not supplied with all of the components it requires for Q10 synthesis. As such, population groups at particular risk of Q10 deficiency include the elderly and sick persons, as well as smokers, vegetarians and pregnant women. People who have increased energy requirements, such as top athletes and those who are continuously exposed to negative stress, are also at risk.

Marzena Osuchowicz, Krakow,Poland

of the body’s energy. Being one of its basic components, the amount of Q10 available is directly linked to the speed of the respiratory chain. Q10 is therefore essential for both mental and physical performance. Furthermore, it works as an antioxidant and therefore protects cell membranes from free radical damage. In the walls of the mitochondria, this protection is especially important because reactive oxygen compounds (so-called free radicals) occur here in particularly high numbers. As an important building block of the cell membrane, Q10 also contributes to its elasticity and flexibility and is therefore an important factor in its functionality.

itself, with smaller amounts supplied by the diet. More than 90 percent of the Q10 in the blood is available in its active, reduced form, coenzyme QH or ubiquinol. Used as a supplement, ubiquinol has a more rapid and better effect than Q10 since it does not have to be converted into an active form. Until recently, it was not possible to isolate ubiquinol for use in supplements, as it reacts very quickly and fiercely with oxygen. When exposed to air, the

Blood plasma concentrations of Q10 decrease as people grow older, contract certain diseases or have increased energy requirements.

white powder immediately turns into the orange Q10. However, this oxidative property makes ubiquinol valuable for use in supplements, as it also reacts with oxygen in the body and is therefore a powerful antioxidant. After more than 10 years of research, a stable, bio-identical ubiquinol was developed. As the bio-identical ubiquinol is taken up by the body more quickly and efficiently than Q10, it is effective at lower dosages. It is therefore especially suitable for use in dietary and food supplements. Research shows that in three of the four cases in which Q10 did not show any effect, supplementation with ubiquinol did produce an increase in quality of life.


HEALTH & NUTRITION

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY november/december 2011

Q10 & Heart Health Several studies have shown that Q10 is beneficial for people suffering from cardiovascular diseases. For this very reason, it used to be known as the ‘heart vitamin’. Its significance for the heart becomes obvious upon examination of its mode of action – as previously mentioned, the body loses its ability to synthesise Q10 as it ages. This means that Q10 concentration in the heart decreases, as well as its ability to produce energy. It has been shown that Q10 supplementation can maintain ATP production in the heart and even increase it again. With decreasing Q10 levels, the pump volume of the heart also decreases, the heart becomes weaker and the whole body suffers as a result. If the heart’s performance falls below a critical value, cardiac insufficiency occurs and this has a knock-on effect on other organs as they are undersupplied with blood. The body loses its physical endurance, which has a huge impact on quality of life. It has been recognised that people with heart failure often have low Q10 plasma levels, and that the chances of survival are worse the lower these values. It has also been proven that ubiquinol has significant benefits in raising the concentration, compared to Q10. In one study, an increased blood plasma concentration resulted in a significant enhancement of the heart’s performance and its pump volume. Also with regard to angina pectoris, significant effects have been achieved with Q10 supplementation in older studies: Daily supplementation of 150 to 300 mg Q10 led to increased physical endurance after just two weeks. The performance

Chirnoaga, Romania

50

It has been recognised that people with heart failure often have low Q10 plasma levels

of the patients correlated with the amount of Q10 in the blood plasma – the higher the concentrations, the better their condition. As a higher blood plasma Q10 concentration contributes to a reduction in oxidative stress, supplementation is also beneficial to heart attack and heart surgery patients – for the latter, preventive supplementation prior to surgery has shown convincing results. Dosage & Tolerance For relatively healthy people who want to supplement their daily diet with Q10, an intake of about 30 to 100 mg per day is

ideal. When it comes to certain diseases, the dosage required is much higher. Standard dosages for people with cardiac insufficiency are not available, but studies show that amounts of up to 300 mg ubiquinol result in an increase in the heart’s performance. In studies, this dosage was well tolerated, even over several weeks. Supplementation does not affect the body’s own synthesis of Q10 and there are no known drug interactions. Due to their versatile application fields, Q10 and ubiquinol are suitable for supplements with the most diverse positioning. For example in heart health, special products targeting cardiac insufficiency, angina pectoris or for use following a heart attack are possible. Depending on the specific indication, combinations with other nutrients, such as carnitine, can also be done. Other market sectors could include anti-ageing, skin care, immune strengthening and even sports performance. For more information, ENTER No: 0861


Enquiry Number

2758


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Technological advances in nutrient forms have allowed for better enrichment capabilities and created opportunities to combine nutrients into more effective consumer products. By Fennywaty Sjafeih, regional marketing manager, Asia Pacific, DSM

Fortified Dairy:

The

milky Way

The enrichment of dairy products has evolved from its origins as a vehicle for addressing widespread vitamin deficiency diseases, to addressing the needs of today’s better nourished consumers looking for greater functionality and health benefits in their foods and beverages. Modern consumers are better informed than ever before in the area of health and wellness. Technological advances in nutrient deliver y systems, combined with the hospitable matrix dairy products’ offer for added ingredients, allows dairy manufacturers to address a larger variety of health benefits. These would include heart health (Omega-3), bone health (Calcium and Vitamin D), weight management (satiety) and enhanced vision (carotenoids). Heart Health There is no single label claim considered more desirable than that of being able to tout ‘less fat’ in consumer products. Less fat translates to ‘more healthy’. However, there is one class of


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The key to the successful introduction of Omega-3 into milks and yoghurts is to utilise a form that minimises exposure to potential oxidative factors that contribute towards the creation of offflavours and undesirable tastes in the finished product.

large populations of consumers where dietary sources are low. The key to the successful introduction of Omega-3 into milks and yoghurts is to utilise a form that minimises exposure to potential oxidative factors that contribute towards the creation of off-flavours and undesirable tastes in the finished product. Both oils and powders have limiting characteristics (oils and powders can oxidise too quickly, and powders have a tendency to settle to the bottom of the milk over time).

Bone Health In 2010, bone health ranked with consumers globally in the top five health concerns and the number with concerns in this area has increased by six percent in the last two years. Today’s busier lifestyle makes it more difficult for old and young to meet their nutritional requirements using traditional foods and drinks alone. Interest in functional foods and drinks results from demands for convenience as well as health. At least in the area

The solution to these limitations is to utilise an emulsified form that is protected form oxidative elements and can be added directly to the balance tank of closed systems or can be aseptically dosed at the very end of the production process. A high shear emulsion creating small particle size (<1Îź) is embraced by the dairy matrix quite readily and fully disperses in finished products without settling. In Europe, shelf-stable milks with added Omega-3 boast ambient shelf life of six months. In the US, milks utilising UHT processing achieve > 60 days of refrigerated shelf life.

of bone health, functional dairy has the opportunity to dominate the market; because dairy by its nature is so closely associated with calcium, and calcium in turn with bone health. Around the world, consumers associate both calcium and vitamin D with bone health. Calcium has to be supplied by and absorbed from the diet, and dairy is accepted as a major important source; vitamin D is primarily synthesised in the skin as a result of exposure to sunlight, but may also be supplied in the diet. Recent research evidence shows that vitamin D prevents falls via its positive effect on

Matthew Bowden, Kent, UK

fats that are clearly indicated to improve cardiovascular health when daily intake is increased: Omega-3 fats. Specifically, Omega-3 LongChain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (LC-PUFAs) are recommended to prevent cardiovascular disease, having been shown to reduce the incidence of sudden cardiovascular death and to provide significant benefits for cardiovascular health (CVH). Although there are several types of Omega-3 compounds, the two identified as key to improving CVH are EPA and DHA. Studies in some urban populations have indicated that red blood cell levels of EPA/DHA are only half of desirable levels. Dairy products provide an ideal medium to introduce Omega-3 to


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Rachel James, Netherlands

muscle function and strength that reduces loss of balance. Fewer falls equates to fewer fractures and benefits can be measured in a few weeks. Evidence such as this has resulted in recommendations by numerous health authorities to increase the recommended intake to more than double its current level. The bone remodelling process occurs continuously, with the removal of older bone (resorption, carried out by specialised cells called osteoclasts) needing to be balanced in equal quantity by the formation of new bone (carried out by different cells called osteoblasts). Nutrition research indicates that other nutrients in addition to calcium and vitamin D have impor tant roles to play in balancing this process. For example, vitamin K also plays a role in binding calcium into bone, and vitamin C and vitamin B6 are needed for collagen synthesis. Collagen forms the organic matrix that holds bone together. Minerals like magnesium and zinc are also important in addition to calcium, and there is also a role for omega-3 fatty acids due

Eye health ingredients for fortification of dairy products, label claims per serving and percent of recommended daily allowance (RDA)

Table 1 Ingredients

Label Claim Per Serving

% Of RDA (EU)

Ă&#x;-Carotene

0.72 mg

15%

Lutein

2.0 mg

20%

Zeaxanthin

0.4 mg

20% of daily dose

DHA+EPA

37.5 mg

15% of daily dose

Vitamin C

12 mg

15%

Vitamin E

1.8 mg

15%

Vitamin B6

0.21 mg

15%

Vitamin B12

0.375 ug

15%

30 ug

15%

Selenium

8.25 ug

15%

Zinc

1.5 mg

1.5 mg

Folate

to an anti-inflammatory action that helps reduce the process of bone resorption. Eye Health Solutions Healthy vision is among the main concerns of adults in connection with aging. A global study with over ten thousand consumers found it to be in the top five health issues by which consumers are affected, and the top health concern for which consumers buy nutritional supplements. The projected number of people with age-related blindness in developed countries is also expected to increase as populations age, fuelling the market for eye-health products.

We tend to take our vision for granted because most of the action takes place behind the scenes. In fact, we actually see with our brain; it is where the information received from the eye is translated. At the centre of the retina lies the macula, a highly sensitive yellow spot responsible for detailed central vision. Its yellow colour comes from two plant pigments â&#x20AC;&#x201C; lutein and zeaxanthin â&#x20AC;&#x201C; which are only obtained through the diet or supplements, and are selectively transported to this precise position in the eye. Vision cells in the macula allow us to perform detailed visual tasks such as reading. Fortification Levels Fortification of dairy products with eye health micronutrients is very well feasible. All ingredients mentioned in Table 1 can be incorporated into dairy products such as milk, yoghurt drinks and yoghurts. At least 15 percent of the recommended daily allowance (RDA) of each ingredient should


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be used per serving in order to achieve meaningful and health beneficial daily dose. Depending on the product concept, it could also be advisable to include higher levels of the ingredients. For example, small volume yoghurt drinks (100 mL) that are consumed once daily with breakfast can contain up to 50 percent of the RDA. Technical Considerations Lutein and Zeaxanthin are carotenoids that have a characteristic colour. The colour of Lutein and Zeaxanthin is dependant on their formulations and the concentration used and will range between yellow and orange. If Ă&#x;-Carotene is used as a plant based source of provitamin A, it also adds colour. Different product formulations of Ă&#x;-Carotene are available with colours var ying from yellow to orange to pink to strawberry red. Therefore, the colour of the final dairy product can be modified by varying the concentrations and the product formulation of the carotenoids. This can help to match colours associated with fruits in the range from yellow to red. Furthermore, since carotenoids are insoluble and not well soluble in fat, it is crucial to use product formulations that display good dispersion characteristics. This is especially important in low fat or skimmed dairy products. High quality carotenoid product formulations disperse well in dair y matrices and neither settles at the bottom of the container nor accumulates at the surface. These product formulations also ensure high bioavailability of the carotenoids and, therefore, optimal effects on eye health.

As mentioned above, emulsified forms of Omega-3 fatty acids are the material of choice for fortification of dairy products. For optimal stability and shelf life of Omega-3 fatty acids in dairy products such as milk, several precautions can be implemented during production. Due to the high air content, the milk should be de-aerated before standardising. It is strongly recom-mended to add sodium ascorbate (250 mg per litre milk) as antioxi-dants to the milk before heat treatment or as a sterile solution just before filling using an aseptic dosing system. Any incorporation of air into the milk should be avoided and the centrifugal pumps and connections should be checked whether they are tight. Storage and buffer tanks should be filled from the bottom. The Omega-3 fatty acid emulsion can be dosed after pasteurisation and homogenisation in-line into the milk stream if using an aseptic dosing system, or can be streamed directly into the balance tank pre-pasteurisation. As carotenoids and Omega-3 fatty acids are sensitive to oxygen, it is recommended to use packaging material with a low oxygen and transmission rate. Light tide packaging will help to avoid off-flavours and colour shifts. If the package has head space, then nitrogen flushing of head space is recommended. Milking For More The evolution of dairy enrichment has blossomed from

the early stages of addressing chronic vitamin deficiency with a single nutrient in the US to a full spectrum of choices worldwide representing functionalities that are most appealing to modern consumers. Dairy producers today have the option to customise products to better address the consumer desire to improve health through daily diet. Technological advances in nutrient forms have allowed for better enrichment capabilities and created opportunities to combine these nutrients into more effective consumer products. This allows producers to not only better ser ve customer needs, but also the flexibility to effectively differentiate themselves from competitors.

For more information, ENTER No: 0870


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The current, volatile economic situation has had a particularly dramatic effect on the dairy market due to the pinch of additional outlay on feed, energy, raw materials and environmental pressures. However, demand still continues to soar for staple commodities such as milk, yoghurt and cheese. Furthermore, Asia Pacific is a key driver in the dairy market worldwide and according to a recent report, India is currently the world’s largest producer and consumer of dairy products.

With such products showing no sign of decline, the market is flooded with choice, from the inexpensive supermarket and discount brands to the premium labels with added nutritional functionalities and niche health claims. But, wherever on this sliding scale consumers wish to invest, they will only continue to buy a product if they can be confident that they know what they are getting, time after time. Be it taste, texture, functionality, or any number of aesthetic factors, consistency is key.

Testing What Varies In

Dominic Morel, Western Cape, South Africa

Dairy

Aside from monetary implications, texture analysis in this sector is a significant step in managing the often changeable and unpredictable subject matter as much as is possible. By Jo Smewing, applications manager, Stable Micro Systems

Quantifiable texture analysis of dairy foods is an evolving area of quality assurance that is yet to reach its full potential. Such a measure, employed across a range of dairy products and packaging, can provide manufacturers with the peace of mind that their dairy products consistently meet consumer expectations. Cream Of The Crop Forecasts for 2012 suggest that the overall worldwide volume of dair y products will have increased by 10 percent from 2008 levels, with fastest growth (16 percent) in the spoonable yoghurt sector. I l l u s t r a t i n g t h i s t re n d , Malaysian cultured dairy market has been growing in double digits over the last couple of years. In addition to yoghurt, crème fraiche, whipped, sour and clotted creams and mousses, as well as savoury dips, all fall under the semi-solid category. Not only are these products already hugely popular, they are continuing to develop and diversify at great speed. Analysing the texture of unsupported structures such as these is important, as it can provide manufacturers with vital information as to a product’s consistency throughout its shelf life, which can vary as the active ingredients begin to ferment – finding yoghurt with an unappealing pool of water on the surface, for example, is not uncommon. In addition, it offers a valuable comparison between different products hoping to achieve the same consistency, for example, full fat and reduced fat mayonnaise. It is notoriously difficult to quantify such structures because they flow if unsupported, poured, pumped, extruded or spread during handling or consumption.


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Viscous Solids: The Vital Statistics For viscous solids such as butter, margarine, dairy spreads and other processed cheeses, their uniform structure is self supporting at low temperatures; melting as the temperature rises and during handling. It is useful for manufacturers to explore the ease with which their products can be spread and applied at a number of temperatures, in order to optimise formulations and ensure that they offer consumers preferable functionality. Here, the spreadability rig uses a 90 deg male cone probe and five precisely matched female Perspex cone shaped product holders to assess spreadability and adhesion potential. The material is set up in the lower cone holders and surface levelled, and either frozen, refrigerated or left ambient before testing. The product is then forced to flow outward at

Ilker, Izmir, Turkey

A measurement of their consistency can, however, be achieved if they are analysed in a vessel or container. The back extrusion rig offers a measure of product consistency. A sample container of the test matter is compressed by a disc plunger attached to the texture analyser, which extrudes the product up and around the edge of the disc. The effort taken to do this is measured using a software and results relate to measurements of viscosity. Achieving the desired texture of semi-solid product is therefore possible, and can be monitored from batch to batch, and throughout the productâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lifespan. 45 deg between the male and female surfaces â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the ease of which indicates spreadability. Melt In The Mouth Molten dairy products are not to be forgotten. The extensibility of cheese is an important textural characteristic in a wide range of food applications â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in particular, pizza. Freezing, shredding, thawing and even cooking cheese can have a significant impact on its textural characteristics. Reduced-fat products also display ver y different characteristics compared to fullfat versions. All of this may result in a texture with undesirable mouthfeel. Previously, one of the most common ways to test the stretchability of cheese was to lift it manually with a fork and estimate the force required to stretch it, as well as the length to

which it stretches. This method is inherently subjective and unreliable. Used in conjunction with a texture analyser, the cheese extensibility rig comprises a microwavable vessel, sample retainer and double-sided fork probe. The cheese is cut into small cubes and microwaved in the vessel until molten. The sample retainer is slotted into the vessel, which is securely fastened to the base of the texture analyser. After the fork probe is attached, the arm of the texture analyser pulls the fork upwards through the molten cheese and the software measures the force required to stretch the cheese and the distance to breakpoint. Typical results show that the longer the distance, the stretchier the cheese. For repeatability and replication of consumer experience, a temperature probe may be used to monitor the temperature of a sample. The test can then be programmed to start when a chosen target temperature is attained.


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Dwayne Madden, Loxton, Australia

Leader Of The Pack Not only are the texture and physical appearance of dairy products crucial for achieving aesthetic appeal and optimal functionality â&#x20AC;&#x201C; other factors concerning their look and feel can dictate their popularity. The packaging of a product can have a profound influence over purchasing decisions. Catchy names and bright colours are part of the attraction, but packaging that performs the essential preservation function and is easy to use is also a key persuasion. Regardless of product density, several texture analysis examinations can aid manufacturers in producing the best packaging to suit the dairy product in question. Available in cartons, packs, tubs, tubes and various other vessels, it is essential that the correct packaging format is chosen in order for consumers to make complete and convenient use of their dairy products. The universal peel rig, attached to the texture analyser, measures the force it takes to peel off the sealed lids of cream, yoghurt and similar dairy product containers. It incorporates a multi-position platform, allowing

containers to be held flat, or at 45 deg and 90 deg angles. As such, manufac-turers can more precisely simulate the action of consumers, or handlers, to accurately assess both ease of use and stability of packaging seals. An adjustable rubber strap encircles the container to hold it in place, while a peel clip connected to the arm of the texture analyser holds the lid. As the arm moves up, the force required to peel open the lid i s re c o rd e d . T h e software measures force against distance, ensuring the efficacy of the peel back lid, and measuring the effort required to open it. For dairy products in tubes, such as processed cheeses and novelty yoghurts, the ability to squeeze the product out effectively is essential. If the substance is too dense, consumers will experience difficulty extracting it; if it is too fluid, the product could leak. A specially designed extrusion rig, comparing force against

For viscous solids such as butter, margarine, dairy spreads and other processed cheeses, their uniform structure is self supporting at low temperatures.

time, can alert manufacturers to a productâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suitability for packaging in this format. Such a test at this stage of production could spell the difference between a successful and appealing product and one that will cause waste and inconvenience. For manufacturers, failure at the last hurdle would bring disappointment and huge material losses. Big Cheese In Texture Analysis An analysis of dairy products from liquid through to solid has shown the profound importance of quantifiable texture analysis. Given the financial pressures stemming from the current economic situation that have drastically affected prices, manufacturers must be diligent in ensuring that the products they provide are consistently functional, practical and appealing. Aside from monetar y implications, texture analysis in this sector is a significant step in managing the often changeable and unpredictable subject matter as much as is possible. From yoghur t separation to cheese crumbliness and even the effectiveness of d a i r y p ro d u c t p a c k a g i n g , changeable raw materials and sensitivity to handling mean more risk of batch to batch variations. With the consumer in mind, these issues must be monitored and measured strictly, so that only the best quality products end up on supermarket shelves. For more information, ENTER No: 0880


2800 Enquiry Number

Kehuaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s equipment: Flat waffle biscuit production line Hollow waffle biscuit production line Soft waffle biscuit production line Waffle cup for ice cream production line

KE HUA FOODSTUFF MACHINERY INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE CO. LTD ADD: 12 Jingde Street, Duanzhou 3 Road, Zhaoqing City, Guangdong, PRC

Tel: + 86-758-2727608 Fax: +86-758-2727608

www.kehuachina.com

E-mail: kehuachina@163.com

Enquiry Number

2528

Other single machine & corollary equipment


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EACH food manufacturing plant is special, differing from the size, types of intermediates, bulk substances, or products made, and as such, in the raw materials used and wastes/ emissions generated. Industrial wastewater treatment techniques are often applied in various combinations of mechanical, physical/chemical and biological treatment steps in order to reach the required effluent discharge standards.

Unlike oil, for which there are multiple energy options, water has no substitute. Over the next three decades, projected population and economic growth levels will, locally, push to the limit the stress on this resource. In turn, limits in water availability could become the world’s main growth limitation factor. By selecting the most appropriate techniques and combining them together in a tailor-made design, it is possible

A

to provide wastewater treatment solutions with specific advantages from both environmental and technical perspectives: treatment efficiency, lower operating costs, carbon emission reductions and optimised water cycle management above other standard treatment techniques. anaeRoBic wastewateR tReateMent More and more emphasis is being placed on low operational costs,

Wastewater Treatment:

GREEN S O L U T I O N

to be smarter in the decision-making processes, there is a need to better understand the specific local nature of water challenges and the specific impacts of activities on freshwater resources. By Michel otten, gM, Biothane asia pacific, and Mathieu le noir, regional sales manager, veolia water solutions & technologies.


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small footprint, energy from waste and low sludge production. Because they excel in these areas, UASB and EGSB technology have dominated the market of anaerobic biological industrial effluent treatment worldwide. Both technologies utilise anaerobic bacteria growing in a granular matrix without use of any carrier materials. The anaerobic process enables removal of COD by converting it into biogas (methane + carbon dioxide) at low operational costs and with a compact plant design. Depending on the type of industry application, it is obvious that significant savings can be made when anaerobic technology can be applied. Murray Goulburn, one of the dairy industries in Australia, operates a production facility in Maffra, Victoria. The factory effluent is treated in a wastewater treatment (WWTP) to ensure that the stringent EPA effluent discharge limits are met. The WWTP compromises of a combination of several proven technologies, which are: a Dissolved Air Flotation (DAF) unit to separate fats, oil and grease (FOG) from the wastewater, a EGSB high rate anaerobic process to remove the ‘bulk’ of the COD at a very low operational costs, and an aerobic post treatment process designed to meet the final effluent discharge limits. The aerobic treatment plant is based on an activated sludge process incorporating Biological N+P Nutrient Removal. In the EGSB process, the bulk of the COD load is converted into biogas. The wastewater enters the anaerobic system through a conditioning tank where the otpimum conditions for the anaerobic process (pH, temperature) are created. The

conditioning tank also serves as an internal mixing tank of the raw influent and treated anaerobic effluent. The anaerobic process is designed to remove 70 percent of the COD load from the wastewater. Results: • Cost efficient COD removal with Biobed EGSB process • Reduced energy cost in aerobic process • Reduced surplus sludge production from aerobic process Wastewater characteristics (after DAF pre-treatment) Flow COD load FOG TSS Temperature

2000 m3/d 4455 kg/d 30 mg/l 80 mg/l 30-35 deg C

System features DAF unit Conditioning tank Biobed EGSB Anoxic tank Aeration tank Biogas flare

84m3/h 39 m3 353 m3 180 m3 960 m3 100 m3/h

PT Sari Husada Tbk is one of Indonesia’s leading dairy industries. The company was originally established in 1954 as cooperation between the government of the Republic of Indonesia and the United Nations. Main offices are located in Yogyakarta, while the new factory is located in Klaten, Central Java. In the Klaten production facilities, a range of baby formula and special nutrition products are produced and packed for local and Asian markets. This factory produces wastewater with a high organic suspended solids and FOG content. The wastewater treatment plant consists of a DAF, wich separates the FOG and solids from the wastewater, a combined Anaerobic biological treatment with an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) and an anaerobic sludge digestion treatment with a Completely Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR). After buffering and solids/ FOG removal, the clear water (overflow of DAF) flows by gravity to the conditioning tank. In this tank, pH is controlled before the wastewater enters the UASB reactor. In this reactor, the biodegradation to biogas takes place. The anaerobic pre-treated effluent flows to the aeration tank for further treatment. After this post treatment the water meets all requirements for discharge into the river. A CSTR (completely stirred tank reactor) process is installed to allow the anaerobic digestion of the float from the DAF and the aerobically produced excess sludge. The CSTR is a low loaded digestion process with a very long retention lime (approximately 20 days), which results in a stable process. Usually, the total solids reduction in the process is 70-80


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percent. Finally, the produced biogas from the UASB reactor and the CSTR will be piped out and burned at the flare. Results: • Extreme low surplus sludge production after digestion of FOG and surplus sludge in the CSTR process • Low operating cost due to combination of UASB process with aerobic process Wastewater characteristics Flow t-COD load FOG TSS Temperature System features Buffer tank DAF unit Biothane UASB Extended Aeration Biobulk CSTR Biogas flare

500 m3/d 5,000 kg/d 2,000 mg/l 2,000 mg/l < 40°C 250 m3 21 m3/h 660 m3 1250 m3 500 m3 75 m3/h

Aerobic Wastewater Treatment Aerobic wastewater treatment converts the organic pollutants (COD, BOD) in wastewater into

A granular biomass bucket

a fair amount of excess sludge, and oxidises the rest with oxygen to carbon dioxide. Furthermore, the priority pollutants nitrogen and phosphorus can be effectively removed. However, the operating costs for aeration, sludge treatment and disposal are high so that, whenever feasible, anaerobic treatment systems are preferred. On the other hand, when certain ( s u r f a c e w a t e r ) d i s c h a rg e standards have to be met, the aerobic process will always be needed as a complementary p o l i s h i n g t re a t m e n t s t e p . Furthermore, the aerobic process step can treat wastewaters for which anaerobic treatment is not suited. Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor The MBBR (Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor) is a biological reactor using attached growth bacteria.

CSTR & Aerobic Process

Using less energy and less water results in lower pollution and less stress on ecosystems and water resources, preserving the balance for future generations. The bacteria grow on carriers free flowing in the aeration tank. Nutrients are added to the reactor to guarantee the right level of nitrogen and phosphorous for bacterial development. Aeration is done using blower and aeration piping. A system of sieves is implemented in the aeration tank to retain the carriers within the biological tank. The technology brings a few advantages compared to the common biological treatment, that is the conventional activated sludge or Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR). Indeed, the MBBR reactor is more compact because the attached bacteria are more active and more concentrated. MBBR is more flexible as the capacity can be easily increased by adding more carriers in the aeration tank. The treatment capacity of the MBBR depends on the filling ratio. The filling with carrier can vary from 10 to 67 percent of the reactor total volume. It is also more resistant to toxic pollution and chemicals, as well as hydraulic and load peaks. Towards A Culture Of Responsibility Industrial wastewater has intrinsic value and it is important t o i m p l e m e n t a p p ro p r i a t e solutions to meet the needs of manufacturers and especially


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for the plant and less impact to the environment. This solution also ensured the optimisation of the water footprint as the amount of ground water pumped has been reduced. Towards Sustainable Manufacturing Carbon and water represent two major areas of impact on the environment that have broad economic and social ramifications. Producing energy and undertaking industrial activity requires fresh water, and energy is needed to produce, move and treat water. This interdependence is often referred to as the ‘water-energy nexus’. Viewing carbon and water together provides a more comprehensive picture of the challenges to sustainability.

Using less energy and less water results in lower pollution and less stress on ecosystems and water resources, preserving the balance for future generations. Also, reduction of energy and chemical consumption can limit wear and tear on assets and equipment, which can save money. To be smarter in the decisionmaking processes, there is a need to better understand the specific local nature of water challenges and the specific impacts of ctivities on freshwater resources. For this, industries need data, smart-planning tools, state of the art technologies and more effective best practices to ensure a successful, sustainable future that takes into account our new realities. For more information, ENTER No: 0881

Vacuum – the best way to convey materials!

6028

Expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor

Advantages of the PIAB Vacuum Conveyor: • Simple to install • Dustless conveying • 316L acid-proof polished SS • Modular system • Minimum maintenance • Low noise level • Low energy consumption • Handle powders and granules • Approvals: USDA, FDA, 3A, ATEX

PIAB Asia Pte Ltd 4008 Ang Mo Kio Ave 10, #03-16 Techplace I, Singapore 569625 Tel: +65 6455 7006, Fax: +65 6455 0081, Email: info-singapore@piab.com

www.piab.com

Enquiry Number

for business to consumers related industries. Faced with the growing scarcity of water and energy resources, operating treatment p ro c e s s e s t o t h e n m e re l y discharge the water back into the environment without giving it a purpose, and therefore value, seems extravagant. In the Philippines, solutions have been put in place to optimise the water recovery and treat efficiently the wastewater for a global leader in food & beverage manufacturing. The rejected water of the reverse osmosis (RO) plant is being restored to the RO reject tank and pumped to an array of membranes at 40 percent recovery. In addition, a new WWTP allows the segregation of the different types of wastewater streams: domestic, coffee and milk waste. The combination of specific technologies (SBR, compact clarifier and MBR respectively) has been put in place to treat each stream efficiently. By putting in place this combination, the target recovery of 85 percent for the RO plant is achieved. The reject water is used as backwash water to the pre-treatment in replacement of raw water that will lead to savings


The

Salt-

Steve Woods, UK

The Growing Awareness According to market analyst Mintel, the growing awareness of the harm resulting from excessive salt intake has led to a noticeable shift away from salt in recent years. For instance, the salt sector in the UK has seen sales fall 13 percent in the first five years of the new millennium, with table and cooking salt the main casualties. In 2006, the World Health Organisation (WHO) held a technical meeting on ‘Reducing Salt Intake In Populations’, drawing par ticipants from the fields of academia, the various ministries of health and medical bodies.

Recent trends indicate that salt consumption is rising, and can lead to chronic diseases if not kept in check. Nevertheless, food manufacturers have been quick to provide healthier alternatives that promise the same mouth-watering taste. By Shahnawaz Abdul Hamid

Elisabetta Grondona, Genoa, Italy

For centuries, people have been adding salt to their cooking, primarily to improve taste but also for the health benefits when taken in moderation. Salt plays an important role in the proper functioning of the human body. It helps in water retention, stimulates muscle contraction and contains nutrients vital to the digestive system. However, scientific research has also shown that excessive salt consumption has been found to cause high blood pressure, which can potentially lead to other chronic ailments such as stroke, heart attack and kidney failure.

Lover’s Saviour

The participants of the meeting agreed on three main points: that there is strong evidence linking excessive salt consumption and several chronic illnesses, that interventions to reduce population-wide salt intake have repeatedly shown to be costeffective and that interaction with food manufacturers is crucial to the success of salt reduction strategies. A technical report from the WHO and the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO) recommended a daily salt intake of less than five grm, approximately one teaspoon. Experts suggest that

reducing salt consumption to this level would prevent 70,000 heart attacks and strokes a year. A cursory glance at the raw data indicates that this limit is often exceeded in many countries. For instance, according to several health surveys, the individual daily salt intake in Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand is 8.3 grm, 6.4 grm and 10.8 grm respectively. Food Manufacturers To The Rescue Fortunately, food manufacturers have been quick to discover and develop alternatives that can be used to reduce the sodium content of their food products. This is pertinent, given that various sources estimate the contribution of processed foods to one’s salt intake to be within 60 to 75 percent. One such salt alternative is potassium chloride, says Wong Mong Hong, president of the Singapore Food Manufacturers’ Association (SFMA), in an inter view with Asia Pacific


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TAcKLinG AsiAn dieTs In Asian diets, sodium can also be found in surimi or ‘yu jiang’, a fish-based food product, pulverised to a thick paste and enhanced with additives such as starch, egg white, salt, vegetable oil, seasonings and monosodium glutamate (MSG). This may explain the relatively high levels of daily mean salt intake in countries such as China and Japan.

Wong Mong Hong, president of the Singapore Food Manufacturers’ Association (SFMA)

Yeowatzup, Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany

Food Industry at the launch of the ‘Finest Food’ programme, an industry-wide initiative to get food companies to get food companies to develop healthier salt. However, he cautions against adding too much potassium chloride, citing its bitterness. Potassium chloride has also been found to have a metallic taste, although this is usually mitigated through the addition of L-lysine, an amino acid, or normal salt. Thaumatin, a flavour modifier, may also be added in small quantities. Generally, most salt alternatives are derivatives of potassium chloride, and are industrially known as potassiumbased salt. Although these substitutes are a relief to sufferers of hypertension, they have varying amounts of potassium and may not be suitable for everyone. Nevertheless, potassium has a higher recommended daily allowance than sodium, and the typical consumer takes in less potassium than sodium a day. Seaweed granules are another popular substitute for salt, able to deliver a strong flavour while keeping sodium levels low. Apart from helping stem the tide of high salt intake, these granules also help consumers feel full, reducing obesity. This is because of the vast array of vital micronutrients they contain.

However, companies like Ha Li Fa, a Singapore-based manufacturer of fishballs and fishcakes, has been innovative in modifying the ingredients of its products to reduce the sodium intake of its customers. Randall Ang, the company’s business development manager, says the use of Japanese lactobacillus technology makes it possible to

manufacture fishballs and fishcakes with low salt and no MSG. “The use of Japanese lactobacillus breaks down the protein in the fish itself to create the MSG effect, or umami,” explains Mr Ang. He adds that the company has already begun selling six fishbased food products which are low in sodium, in conjunction with a programme launched by the Health Promotion Board (HPB) in Singapore to equip SMEs to develop healthier salt and food products. Singapore is not the first country to have such a programme in place. According to a report in the British Medical Journal entitled ‘Policy Options To Reduce Population Salt Intake’, similar salt reduction programmes in Portugal, Finland and Japan have resulted in substantial reductions in blood pressure. The FuTure oF sALT reForMuLATion Ultimately, as awareness on salt excessiveness grows, food manufacturers will have to continue to engage in R&D to produce better salt substitutes that can be more widely consumed. This includes having a better understanding of which food products have the greatest potential for reformulation. In this regard, it is refreshing to know that Australian researchers have created a salt database detailing the sodium contents of hundreds of processed foods. Entitled ‘A Systematic Survey Of The Sodium Contents Of Processed Foods’ and found in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the researchers report that 63 percent of food categories e x c e e d re c o m m e n d e d s a l t intake limits. For more information, ENTER No: 0882


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One of the biggest shifts in the manufacturing industry in recent years is the growing focus on sustainability. What started as a concern among a relatively small group has gathered force to become a key mainstream issue. However, a rise of cynicism around ‘green washing’ within the consumer and business worlds alike means companies can no longer get away with claiming sustainable credentials for token efforts in only one area of their business. Instead, environmental considerations have spread

initiatives can have a positive impact on their bottom line by identifying areas where energy costs and waste can be reduced. The result is that more and more manufacturers are starting to see sustainability as a crucial business driver, and are taking a strategic approach to improving the environmental profile of their operations by developing and implementing their own sustainability policies. Manufacturers will be scrutinising the practices of their suppliers, and looking to Flávio Takemoto, Brazil

AGrip With

Sustainability Helping manufacturers address ‘green’ manufacturing with vacuum technology. By Josef Karbassi, VP marketing and communication, Piab them to provide solutions that reduce waste and achieve energy reductions on their lines. Vacuum technology is one area in the production process that manufacturers can focus on to make a meaningful difference to the environment. Below, three key considerations are explored for manufacturers as they strive for supply chain sustainability. from a focus on consumer-facing products to encompass all aspects of a manufacturer’s operations, requiring them to implement a robust, long-term strategy across their entire supply chain. In addition to vital environmental benefits, companies have also realised that sustainability

Efficiency In Production A reduction in energy usage and CO 2 emissions can help manufacturers achieve both sustainability and economic goals, so it is no wonder that these form the core of most sustainability programs. Va c u u m t e c h n o l o g y i s

continuously advancing. With energy-efficient pumps and ejectors/generators constantly being introduced to the market, manufacturers are presented with various ways to reduce energy use. Ejector technologies that utilise the energy as efficiently as possible can help maximise efficiency. Another technological advance that is improving energy efficiency in the use of vacuum technology is the incorporation of lighter materials into machinery. Exchanging metal for high-tech plastics in the construction of machines and robots, for example, means they can be reduced in size, and require less energy to operate.


NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2011 ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY

Energy Distance from point of suction

Frying Oil Filter

Separate the suspending particles and impurities Reduce the oil acid value and prevent oxidation Extend the life-cycle of frying oil Extend the shelf-time of the fried food WWW.CHINAOILFILTER.COM Sunshine F&P Machinery Co.,Ltd. Tel:+86-20-34528332/34529382 Fax:+86-20-34528982 E-mail:Sales@chinaoilfilter.com

2874

Installing a decentralised system provides an energy efficient alternative for manufacturers as less transporting of vacuum is needed, lowering loss of vacuum through the pipe. Adding to this, smaller pumps and ejectors can be used, requiring less energy consumption and producing significant savings.

pumps to ensure they run at optimal pressure. Manufacturers also have choices when it comes to the set up and design of their vacuum system. Where centralised vacuum technology creates considerable pipe losses and transporting vacuum requires a lot of energy, manufacturers can choose to install a decentralised system as an energy efficient alternative. Less transporting of vacuum is needed, lowering loss of vacuum through the pipe. Adding to this, smaller pumps and ejectors can be used with a decentralised system, requiring less energy consumption and producing significant savings. Manufacturers can also consider the use of cartridge integration systems, which allow integration closer to the point of use and further reduce flow losses. Another way manufacturers can improve the sustainability of their operations is by partnering with suppliers that provide energy audits. A thorough assessment of existing vacuum systems as well as advice on possible improvements will allow manufacturers to gain a competitive advantage in what is an increasingly green business environment. vonGAL, an Alabamabased company producing high-performance palletising solutions, recently experienced the energy savings that vacuum technology can provide when they successfully delivered a 34 percent reduction in energy consumption to a customer. The customer requested a robotic palletising solution that was capable of handling recycled cases of various sizes and weights with a single end-ofarm tool, while adhering to strict compressed air consumption and energy usage guidelines.

Enquiry Number

Although it is relatively small, the suction cup itself can also pack a big punch in terms of energy savings. Suppliers seeking energy-efficient options should opt for cups that offer the highest levels of performance. Enhanced sealing capability, even on nonsmooth surfaces, means less flow capacity is needed from the system to get a strong grip on handled objects. Suction cups built to more easily collapse and return allow smaller pumps to be used to complete the task, contributing to additional energy savings. High-quality cups also provide greater lifting power compared to conventional alternatives, meaning fewer cups are required and less energy is used. In addition to new technologies, energy saving units present another useful tool for further optimising energy consumption in a vacuum system. These optimisers allow the use of atmospheric air instead of compressed air to release a handled object. They also ensure the vacuum pump is only running when needed, and switch it off when the required vacuum level for the application is reached. Energy waste can also be reduced by installing units that monitor


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The company’s answer to this challenge was the installation of a vacuum gripper system, which features a decentralised design that generates vacuum directly at the point of suction. The system is equipped with a cartridge allowing it to be run at very low pressure, and suction cups that lower energy consumption by preventing micro-leakage and allow the use of a smaller vacuum cartridge. The system’s flexible design eliminates the need for multiple end-effectors when handling cases of different shapes and sizes, making changeover quick and easy, reducing downtime and allowing the customer to costeffectively produce shorter runs of products to match consumers’ buying habits. A combination of increased efficiency and energy savings of more than a third compared to the previous system highlights why it is beneficial for suppliers to be aware of the latest technological advances. Why Waste The disposal of waste is a key issue worldwide, and reducing the amount dumped into landfills is becoming more and more important. When it comes to selecting the consumables used in the manufacturing process, it is crucial for manufacturers to consider not only the product’s efficiency but also the impact it has on the environment once it is disposed of at the end of its lifecycle. The most thorough approach t o w a s t e re d u c t i o n i s f o r manufacturers to partner with suppliers that offer a combination of long-life, recyclability, and modular design formats. The ability to recycle equipment and parts can play a large role in reducing production scrap. Therefore, there is a growing

demand for suppliers to provide products that are manufactured from recyclable materials. Suction cups made from ThermoPlastic Elastomers (TPE) can be 100 percent recyclable, depending on the material qualities chosen. Even the scrap created in the production of the cups can be reused, reducing waste from further up the supply chain.

The disposal of waste is a key issue worldwide, and reducing the amount dumped into landfills is becoming more and more important.

Longevity should also be a major consideration for manufacturers. Reducing the frequency by which a piece of equipment or part needs to be replaced ultimately creates less waste. Suctions cups that offer a modular design also provide a key tool for addressing sustainability as they allow partial component replacement. Industr y leaders in vacuum technology are designing suction cups that allow the replacement of just the lip, which tends to suffer wear and tear more quickly, rather than the entire cup, further reducing waste. Leading By Example As manufacturers continue

to focus on sustainability, the demand for ‘green’ suppliers is increasing. Suppliers need to focus internally on their in-house operations and consider their own environmental credentials. They need to make strategic changes within their organisations to align their product development processes with the sustainability goals of their clients. To do this, factors such as CO2 output from transportation and compliance with standards, namely the ISO 14001 certification for environmental management, will become more significant. The energy of component production should also be considered. The materials used play a big role here as the amount of energy required to produce the same components in different materials can vary enormously. For example, suction cups made of TPE require much less energy to be produced than traditional rubber versions, and have lower manufacturing costs. Add to that a better product consistency and greater flexibility of design, and TPE cups become the clear choice from environmental, economic and quality standpoints. Ultimately, successful manufacturers will be those who recognise and embrace the move toward sustainability. They would also be manufacturers who carefully select suppliers that are able to provide solutions that address key manufacturing challenges, such as reducing e n e rg y u s a g e i n i n t e r n a l p ro c e s s e s a n d m i n i m i s i n g waste. Partnering with ‘greener’ suppliers that offer sustainability support on both levels, and are also sustainable themselves can help manufacturers achieve their environmental goals. For more information, ENTER No: 0883


Exhibition Outlook For

2012 W

ith 2011 rolling to a close, and the last exhibitions of the year concluded, it is time to look ahead and plan for the upcoming year of events! APFIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exhibition planner showcases some of the key events to look out for next year, and the calendar of events to give an overview of shows not to miss. Focused on Asia PaciďŹ c, the planner serves as a short write-up on what to expect at each of these events, making it easier to plan on the events to visit, and also its relevance to the business.

EX HIB ITO R


CALENDAR OF EVENTS 2011/12 November 16 – 18: FOOD HOTEL CHINA Shanghai New International Expo Centre Shanghai, China China International Exhibitions E-mail: fhc@chinaallworld.com Web: www.fhcchina.com ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

16 – 19: PROPAK INDONESIA 2011 Jakarta International Expo-Kemayoran Jakarta, Indonesia Pamerindo Indonesia E-mail: info@pamerindo.com Web: www.pamerindo.com ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

16 - 18: ANNAPOORNA – WORLD OF FOOD INDIA Bombay Exhibition Centre Mumbai, India Koelnmesse E-mail: info@koelnmesse.de Web: www.worldoffoodindia.com ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

21 – 23: SIAL MIDDLE EAST Abu Dhabi National Exhibition Centre (ADNEC) Abu Dhabi, UAE Turret Media E-mail: info@sialme.com Web: www.sialme.com ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

27 – 29: VIETBREW Saigon Exhibition & Conference Center Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam AMB Exhibitions Vietnam Beer-Alcohol-Beverage Association E-mail: support@ambexpo.com Web: www.vietbrew.merebo.com ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

29 – DEC 1: FOOD INGREDIENTS EUROPE & NATURAL INGREDIENTS 2011 Paris Nord Villepinte Paris, France UBM E-mail: Fieurope@ubm.com Web: www.ingredientsnetwork.com ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

COOKED FROZEN FOOD FACTORY FOR SALE IN THAILAND FLOOD FREE AT FREE ZONE Well Equipped High Standard Manufacturing Facility Sunmax Fryer & Forming, Irinox Shock Freezer & Spiral Freezer, Complete Pastry Makeup Line With Oven Certificates BRC, DLD, DOF, HACCP, GMP, Halal, Etc

Export License To Eu Chicken, Duck, Vegetables & Seafood

Ready Orders With Large Super Market Chains Uk - Eu

Contact By Mail foodfactorysale@gmail.com Brokers Welcome

December 8 – 10: SHANGHAI INTERNATIONAL FROZEN & REFRIGERATED FOOD EXPOSITION Shanghai Everbright Convention & Exhibition Center Shanghai, China Shanghai Gehua Exhibition Service E-mail: yeeher@yeeher.com Web: www.ffb2b.com ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

February 2012 29 – 2: PROPAK VIETNAM Saigon Exhibition & Convention Center Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam Bangkok Exhibition Services E-mail: punnapa@besallworld.com Web: www.propakvietnam.com ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

27 – 30: ANUGA FOODTEC Koelnmesse Cologne, Germany Koelnmesse Gmbh E-mail: info@koelnmesse.de Web: www.anugafoodtec.com ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

28 – 30: FOOD INGREDIENTS CHINA Shanghai World Expo Exhibition & Convention Center Shanghai, China China Food Additives & Ingredients Association (CFAA) CCPIT Sub-Council of Light Industry E-mail: ccpitsli@public3.bta.net.cn Web: www.chinafoodadditives.com ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

April 2012 17 – 20: FOOD & HOTEL ASIA Singapore Expo Singapore Singapore Exhibition Services E-mail: events@sesallworld.com Web: www.foodnhotelasia.com ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

*All details subject to change without notice. Please check with organisers for updates.


www.worldoffoodasia.com/www.thaitradefair.com

Savor Your Success

23. - 27.05.2012

IMPACT Exhibition Center Bangkok, Thailand A Unique Concept That Has Proven to Work • Meet your desired buyers through our well structured product zones • Network with key regional buyer groups that Thailand’s strong food industry attracts • Benefit from the extensive combined advertising and public relations efforts between organizers

THAIFEX - World of Food ASIA covers • • • •

Food & Beverage featuring HALAL & ORGANIC Food Food Catering & Hospitality Services Food Technology Retail & Franchise

R E T GIS

! W NO

Thai Chamber of Commerce

Enquiry Number

Jointly organized by Koelnmesse Pte Ltd Ms Lynn How Tel: +65 6500 6712 Fax: +65 6294 8403 l.how@koelnmesse.com.sg

2929

RE


EXHIBITION OUTLOOK 2012 Food Ingredients China 2012

Event Focus

Visitors’ Profile

FIC – the largest trade show of its kind in Asia & the most famous international brand show in China! The annual Food Ingredients China (FIC), co-organised by the industry administrative departments - China Food Additives and Ingredients Association and CCPIT Sub-Council of Light Industry, has already been held for 15 sessions till now. FIC is widely recognized as the largest and most authoritative international trade show on food additives and ingredients in Asia. FIC is accepted by most food manufacturers in China food industry today and has become a shortcut for overseas food additive and ingredient manufacturers & traders to enter China market.

Executives from R & D, Purchasing, Production, Marketing & Sales, Quality Assurance and Control, Legislation, Distribution/Logistics and General Management from food manufacturers, ingredient traders/distributors, universities, research institutes & government/trade associations.

Exhibitors’ Profile 22 categories of Food Ingredients such as flavour & aromas etc, 25 categories of Food Additives such as milk products etc and related materials, equipment, instrument & technology

MARCH 28-30, 2012

SHANGHAI WORLD EXPO EXHIBITION & CONVENTION CENTER, SHANGHAI, CHINA CHINA FOOD ADDITIVES & INGREDIENTS ASSOCIATION CCPIT SUB-COUNCIL OF LIGHT INDUSTRY

ENQUIRY NO.

E880

www.ChinaFoodAdditives.com/d_e.htm

HKTDC Food Expo 2012

SIAL China 2012

Event Focus

Event Focus

HoReCa • La Cuisine by SIAL • Asian Young Hope Chef Competition • Hotel Team Contest • Coffee Trends and Competition • Hospitality and Retail Forum Wine World Shanghai • Best Buy China Competition • Wine Inovation Forum • Tasting Room • Wine Business Meetings • Wine Networking Night Gourmet World A professional event to capture exhibitor new clients and exchsively reserved to VIP visitors

MAY 9-11, 2012 SHANGHAI NEW INTERNATIONAL EXPO CENTRE SHANGHAI, CHINA COMEXPOSIUM (SHANGHAI) CO LTD

www.sialchina.com

ENQUIRY NO.

E881

Organised by the HKTDC and held at Hong Kong, the Food Expo showcases a wide variety of food and beverage products from 900 exhibitors. The fair includes a Gourmet Zone to feature the finest food from different countries and regions. The Trade Hall is a dedicated business platform. The Public Hall helps exhibitors build brand awareness and ensures instant feedback for new items. A major highlight of the Public Hall is the Premium Food Zone, which features exhibitors promoting branded food and beverage products. The fair is full of activities to entertain and educate, including cooking demonstrations, discussions with wellknown food columnists, games, lucky draws, and seminars. Register now at www.hktdc.com/ex/hkfoodexpo/01 for FREE admission!

AUGUST 16-20, 2012 HONG KONG CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTRE HONG KONG HONG KONG TRADE DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL

www.hktdc.com/hkfoodexpo

ENQUIRY NO.

E882


Thaifex – World Of Food Asia

Event Focus

World Of Halal

Event Focus

What you can expect in 2012 A spectacular showcase of the latest products, services and technologies from market leaders, THAIFEX addresses the procurement needs of trade buyers and provides an abundance of networking opportunities for Asia’s food and hospitality industries.

World of Halal (WOH) is held annually in conjunction with THAIFEX. With more than 50% of our food & beverage exhibitors supplies Halal certified products, the presence of Halal products within THAIFEX has been growing across various segments of the show. Held alongside WOH, the World of Halal Seminar in its 3rd year running remains a key event at THAIFEX, to address the challenges and key issues of the Halal food industry in this region. • Leverage on Thailand’s Halal resource expertise for businesses to benefit from the Halal market • Execute marketing strategies that works in key Halal markets • Understand legislative requirements in key Halal markets • Tap into emerging opportunities within the Halal industry

MAY 23-27, 2012

MAY 23-27, 2012

THAIFEX – World of Food Asia, the leading food and beverage trade fair in Asia. 2011’s edition brought 23,282 visitors from 118 countries on a five-day culinary journey. With 1,021 exhibiting companies hailing from over 25 countries, THAIFEX successfully served up an international platter of products, technology and innovations from the food and beverage markets around the world.

IMPACT EXHIBITION CENTER, BANGKOK, THAILAND KOELNMESSE PTE LTD / THAI CHAMBER OF COMMERCE DEPARTMENT OF EXPORT PROMOTION

ENQUIRY NO.

E883

www.worldoffoodasia.com

IMPACT EXHIBITION CENTER, BANGKOK, THAILAND KOELNMESSE PTE LTD THAI CHAMBER OF COMMERCE DEPARTMENT OF EXPORT PROMOTION

ENQUIRY NO.

E884

www.worldoffoodasia.com

Interfood Indonesia 2012

The 12th International Food & Beverage Expo

Event Focus Interfood Indonesia 2012 – The 12th International Exhibition on food & beverage products, technology, ingredients, additives, raw materials, services, equipment, and supplies will be held from 21 - 24 November 2012. This event is brought to you by Krista Exhibitions. Food & beverage, bakery & confectionery, food & hospitality, food ingredients, herbal & health food, retail & food service equipment will be featured at this event. The event takes place in conjunction with Allpack, Allplas, Agri indo, Fis, and IPEX. Interfood Indonesia has become the strategic meeting point for Asia’s food and beverage market.

Visitors’ Profile 57.3% of the visitors are sole decision makers within the company, while 18.6% participate in decision making in the company and 65.3% of the visitors are responsible for general management. For Interfood 2011, we had 45,298 amount of visitors.

Exhibitors’ Profile For Interfood 2011, we had a total of 923 foreign and local exhibitors. Some countries that will be exhibiting include Belgium, Taiwan, Malaysia, Singapore, Japan, India, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Korea, Switzerland, USA, UK, Uruguay, Vietnam, Pakistan, Holland, Hong Kong, China, Denmark, and Kazakhstan.

NOVEMBER 21-24, 2012 JAKARTA INTERNATIONAL EXPO JAKARTA, INDONESIA KRISTA EXHIBITIONS INFO@KRISTAMEDIA.COM

www.kristamedia.com

ENQUIRY NO.

E885


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Preview

Anuga Food Tech ANUGA FoodTec, the international trade fair for food and drink technology, will make its return from March 27 to 30, 2012. The event, which takes place every three years will be located in Cologne, Germany. Speaking at a press conference in Hong Kong, Peter Grothues, VP of Koelnmesse GmbH, said that the industry is living on the edge of change in consumer behaviour, and that safe and high-quality food is essential. He notes that while the taste of various foods must satisfy expectations and health requirements, consumers of today are also more environmentally conscious, and expects manufac-

ny sse lnme erma 2 Koe gne, G 30, 201 lo – Co ch 27 Mar

turers to comply with standards that benefit the environment. This includes energy conservation and managing resources. In this vein of demands, the event serves as a platform for integrated and flexible technological concepts, and has a process-oriented and cross sector approach for the food and beverage industry. It will feature the relevant themes of food production, with the three major sections: processing, packaging and food safety. “Through marketing campaigns keyed to individual target groups, we specifically address the respective visitor groups all

over the world. We have two major goals in this regard: opening up new potential for our exhibitors outside their key areas of expertise, and attracting new visitors to the trade fair, for example through the targeted expansion of the theme of food safety in the ‘Analytics in the Lab and in Production’ segment,” said Mr Grothues. SPeCiAL FeAtUreS Other than exhibiting technology developments, visitors to the event can also participate in a programme of forums coordinated by DLG, where research institutes


EXHIBITION & EVENTS

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75

the previous installation in 2009, which saw 1,210 companies from 39 countries. The number of visitors from Southeast Asia is also set to reach 1,500, a significant increase

from 611 in 2009, due to the improved economy. Koelnmesse Cologne, Germany March 27 – 30, 2012 ______________________ Enquiry No: 0896

Enquiry Number

Bigger & Better To date (August 2011), the event has confirmed over 800 participating companies globally, and foresees that overseas participation will reach 50 percent of its total. Among its participants from abroad are exhibitors from China, Taiwan, Singapore, Japan and South Korea. The organisers expect the number of participants to exceed

2934

and associations will address issues of current interest. This is in addition to seminars and workshops conducted by professional organisations and media companies. A feature that visitors to past events have looked forward to is the ‘Robotik-Pack-Line’. The showcase will present a safe, fast and hygienic production, processing and packaging of food in a fully automatic procedure. In order to realise this, about 20 companies have par tnered to develop and implement the feature.


EXHIBITION&REVIEW EXHIBITION EVENTS

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Qu Co een Ba nven Sirikit Se ngko tion Nat 201ptem k, Th Centr ional ber aila e 1 21 nd to 2 3,

Review

FOOD ingredients Asia (FiAsia) 2011 attracted over 9,000 visitors and generated approximately THB 1 billion (US$32.2 million) in business for exhibitors. The event was held on September 21 to 23, at Queen Sirikit National Convention Centre in Bangkok, Thailand. M Gandhi, MD of UBM Asia (Thailand), the event organiser, noted that the exhibition hosted more than 489 companies from over 34 countries. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This was the biggest event since the show began and we are delighted with the results. On behalf of everyone who has helped bring FiAsia the success it enjoys today, we extend our grateful thanks,â&#x20AC;? Mr Gandhi said. The show welcomed 9,057 visitors, an increase of 16.5 percent from 2010 and

Food Ingredients Asia 45.5 percent from 2009. Of the total number, international visitors made up 1,354, up 74.2 percent from 2010 and 92.3 percent from 2009. The event was supported by the Food Science & Technology Association of Thailand, the National Food Institute, the Food Industry Club, the Federation of Thai Industries and the Food Processing & Packaging Association, which had its own special pavilion at the event. The event also featured Food Processing and Packaging Asia (FPP Asia), which is a brand extension of the 15-year old FiAsia


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series, and is part of the internationally acclaimed Fi Europe. FPP Asia approaches long-time trade visitors on their needs for better overall plant operations and technology relating to food processing, food science and packaging that address food safety (hygiene and sanitation), health (fortified food), sustainable packaging, convenience and productivity. Increasingly, the food processing industry will be put under growing pressure to enforce Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) system, Good Hygienic Practices (GHP), Good Agricultural Practices (GAP), and Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP), and so on. Prapat Vanapitaksa, the deputy permanent secretary of Thailand’s ministry of industry, who opened the exhibition, noted that the food industry has played an important role in building the Thai economy. “We have implemented a 20-year plan which will include upgrading industry clusters, expanding manufacturing network opportunities abroad and enhancing support for integrated management in Thailand,” he said. “The plan will also enhance co-operation within the ASEAN community for a sustainable manufacturing system by 2050.” Dr Petch Chinabutr, president of the National Food Institute, who, together with UBM, organised the seminar ‘The Impact of AEC 2015 on the ASEAN Food Industry’,

said that the seminar would help to increase recognition for Thailand’s growing food industry. The seminar featured speakers from Thailand and the region, and was part of a special conference programme that included presentations by the Food Science & Technology Association (FoSTAT) and the Federation of Institutes of Food Science & Technology, (FIFSTA). Fi Asia 2012 will be held in Jakarta, Indonesia on October 3 to 5. The event will return to Bangkok, Thailand on September 11 to 13, 2013. Queen Sirikit National Convention Centre Bangkok, Thailand September 21 to 23, 2011 _____________________________________ Enquiry No: 0897


EXHIBITION&REVIEW EXHIBITION EVENTS

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pur entre um la L ion C , Kuanvent mpur 1 Co ala Lu 201 Ku laysiato 23, Ma p 20 Se

Review Food

FOOD & Hotel Malaysia 2011 (FHM 2011) was held from September 20 to 23 at the Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre, in Malaysiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capital city. The exhibition recorded the biggest ever exhibition space sold so far with seven exhibition halls in total. This growth in space brought in more participating companies that increased by 25 percent from the previous installation. A total number of 17,835 visitors from 65 countries visited the four-day event, which hosted 1,010 participating companies from 43 countries. Five international pavilions from Austria, Korea, Taiwan ROC, Singapore and the US were also present, representing their respective culinary cultures. As with the previous

& Hotel Malaysia 2011

exhibitions, a regional culinary competition was held in conjunction with the event. The objective of Culinaire Malaysia 2011 was to set a higher benchmark on the culinary standards in the Malaysian hospitality

industry, and to recognise and motivate individual chefs who excel in their field of culinary art that match world standards. A seminar was also held alongside FHM 2011 by the Malaysian Expor t Club, on the subject of Malaysian Halal Certification. This seminar was designed for those who are interested in the Malaysian Halal certification, particularly for those who want to sell or export their products and services or be recognised as halal certified by Malaysia. The next edition of the event will take place from September 17 to 20, 2013. Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia September 20 to 23, 2011 _______________________ Enquiry No: 0898


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Review

Interfood Indonesia 2011

THE food and beverages exhibition, Interfood and Allpack Indonesia, was held from September 29 to October 2, 2011, at the Jakarta International Expo, in Jakarta, Indonesia. Featuring 923 exhibitors from more than 32 countries, the event included sectors such as bakery and confectionery, food and hospitality, food ingredients, herbs and health food, pharmaceutical, retail and franchise. Held in conjunction with the exhibitions, was Allpack, which showcased processing and packaging technology for the food & beverage industry. Covering an area of 17,000 sq m, the event was attended by 45,268 local and overseas visitors. They were treated to events such as baking & cake decoration course with Rosemary Scalzi, a cake artist from Perth, Australia. Other activities organised include a seminar on chocolate, as well as a coffee & cooking demonstration. The exhibition was officially opened by the Republic of Indonesiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s minister for fisheries and marine, Fadel Muhammad. Organised by Kristamedia, the event has the support of Indonesiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Ja Ex karta Inte Jakpo rna Sep arta, tion I al Oc tem ndo tob ber ne er 2 29 sia , 20 to 11

ministry of trade, ministry of industry, ministry of health and other related associations. The next installation will take place from November 21 to 24, 2012, at the Jakarta International Expo. Jakarta International Expo Jakarta, Indonesia September 29 to October 2, 2011 _______________________________________________ Enquiry No: 0899


Enquiry Number

2932


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We read your needs Cama have been designing and manufacturing machines and systems for secondary packaging since 1981. The secret of our success after so many years is the continuous research of innovative technologies and solutions to satisfy the most demanding applications for automation of complete packaging lines. www.camagroup.com CAMA ASIA PACIFIC - camaasiapacific@camagroup.com - Tel. +662 207 2364

Enquiry Number

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