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MICA (P) 179/12/2009

| APRIL/MAY 2010

Machine Vision

A Bull’s Eye On

SAFETY The

Oven

Nutricosmetics

Inner Beauty That Shows

Optimised

Tocotrienol

Matters Of The Heart

Beyond Regular Beverage

Formulating For The Elderly


Enquiry Number

2618


Enquiry Number

2616


CONTENTS

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY APRIL/MAY 2010

2

PROCESSING

PACKAGING

FLAVOURS & ADDITIVES

STORAGE & HANDLING

www.apfoodonline.com

volume 22 no. 3

BeVerAGe

PACKAGING & PrOCeSSING 26

48

The Optimised Oven

As the market shifts and evolves, an oven’s flexibility can be a make-or-break feature. By Ramesh Gunawardena, JBT foodtech

30

Beyond Your Regular Beverage Consumers are increasingly looking at packaged beverages to fulfil alternative needs and benefits. By Tan Pok Kiam, Kh Roberts

30

Oven Efficiency Through Mixing Consistent dough from continuous mixers eases the burden of the older oven from having to constantly make corrections. By Jim Warren, Reading Bakery Systems

HeALTH & NUTrITION 44

Inner Beauty That Shows Products that support health and appearance from inside are gaining popularity as consumers begin to understand that what they eat affects how they look. By Tjut Rostina

48

36

40 34 INGreDIeNTS & ADDITIVeS 34

Tocotrienol: Matters Of The Heart

Instead of focusing on treating the symptoms of heart disease, people are seeking strategies to prevent heart disease from developing in the first place. By Dr Tieh Koun Koh, Davos Life Sciences

36

Eating Air When producing aerated sugar confectionery the viscosity (determined by the sugar concentration), the whipping time, and the amount and type of whipping agent are important parameters. By Ton Kunst, Kerry Ingredients & flavours

40

Papaya: The Superfruit Suspect Papaya has recently been featured in a number of packaged foods, beverages, dietary supplements and beauty products, but is it just a passing fad or is it here to stay? By Izaskun Bengoechea, Euromonitor International


Enquiry Number

2348


CONTENTS

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY APRIL/MAY 2010

4

PROCESSING

PACKAGING

FLAVOURS & ADDITIVES

STORAGE & HANDLING

www.apfoodonline.com

volume 22 no. 3

08

Refer to Advertising Index on Pg

for Advertisers’ Enquiry Numbers

DEPARTMENTS 06 08 10 20 78 80A 80B

54

60

66

AUTOMATION & FeatureS 54

Machine Vision: A Bull’s Eye On Safety Virtually every product that is manufactured in high volume, or at high accuracy, or that has to be made at very low cost, can be made better, faster, and cheaper using machine vision. By Didier Lacroix, Cognex

58

Spices: The Hygiene Code The ‘spice process operation’ gives a practical monitoring and control parameter for implementation. By Lawrence Low, Gourmet Food Safety Consultancy

60

Case-Study: Non-Returnables Line For Beverages South African company installs line that offers various options for end-of-the-line packaging, coupled with intelligent process control for high line availability levels. By Norbert Hampl, Krones AG

64

Market Report: Many Areas Of Growth Remain For Food & Beverage In US The US, the biggest food and drink market in the world, sets the trend in many product categories and recent research suggests that it continues to be a highly dynamic marketplace. By Chris Brockman, Leatherhead Food Research

66

Editor’s Note Advertiser’s List Business News Product Highlights Calendar Of Events Reader’s Enquiry Form Subscription Information

Asia Pacific Food Industry is published 8 times a year by Eastern Trade Media Pte Ltd. The Publisher reserves the right to accept or reject all editorial or advertising material, and assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited artwork or manuscripts. All rights reserved. Reproduction of the magazine, in whole or in part, is prohibited without the prior written consent, not unreasonably withheld, of the publisher. Reprints of articles appearing in previous issues of the magazine can be had on request, subject to a minimum quantity. The views expressed in this journal are not necessarily those of the publisher and while every attempt will be made to ensure the accuracy and authenticity of information appearing in the magazine, the publisher accepts no liability for damages caused by misinterpretation of information, expressed or implied, within the pages of the magazine. All correspondence regarding editorial, editorial contributions or editorial contents should be directed to the Editor. The magazine is available at an annual subscription of S$176.00. Please refer to the subscription form or contact the subscription department for further details at FAX NO: (65) 6379 2806 Address changes should be notified, in writing, to our circulation executive: EASTERN TRADE MEDIA PTE LTD 1100 Lower Delta Road EPL Building #04-02 Singapore 169206

Case-Study: A Cut Above For Cinnamon Besides being more efficient than the previous plant, the two-cutter arrangement and blending operation is essentially dust free. By Steve Knauth, Munson Machinery

EXHIBITION & EVENTS 70 72 73 74 76

Review: ProPak Vietnam 2010 Preview: IFFA 2010 Preview: Biofach China 2010 Preview: Vietfish 2010 Preview: ProPak Asia 2010

Cover Picture Courtesy Of Symrise • Printed by Fabulous Printers Pte Ltd

The circulation of this publication is audited by BPA international The Advertisers’ Associations recommend that advertisers should place their advertisements only in audited publications

MICA (P) 179/12/2009 • PPS 1566/8/2010 (028233) ISSN 0218-2734 • Co Reg No: 199908196C


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EDITOR’S PAGE 6 managing director Kenneth Tan assistant editor Tjut Rostina tjutrostina@epl.com.sg editorial assistant Audrey Ang audreyang@epl.com.sg

The Glow Of Inner Beauty

senior art director/studio manager Lawrence Lee lawrencelee@epl.com.sg assistant art director Libby Goh libbygoh@epl.com.sg business development manager Randy Teo randyteo@epl.com.sg

All over the world, the quest for better health and youthful beauty rages on. In fact, the desire to attain these qualities is becoming increasingly evident, as people are increasingly aware that what they eat affects how they look. On top of the traditional prime target group of women aged 30 to 60 years of age, the market now sees growth in two groups that were not target consumers in the past: men and young women. According to a report by Euromonitor, men have started to catch up with the vanity chariot, with a number of launches for hair-thinning supplements in the US market. This is said to signify a milestone in the acceptance of nutricosmetics among the results-driven American consumers. The Western markets have also noted that young women are trying nutricosmetics at an increasingly early age, primarily as a way to hold off signs of aging by women in their 20s and late teens. Providing support for health and appearance from the inside is a trend led by Asia, and although their Western counterparts are still starting out, the region is expected to see a strong market development within the next few years. In an exclusive interview with Dr Isabelle Frappa of DSM, she shares that the beauty supplement market is benefiting from a strong growth rate, which could bring it to a total of US$5.6 billion in 2011. And it does not stop there; the high growth rate is expected to remain, taking the total market value to US$6.5 billion by 2014. (Page 44) She further adds: “While market analysts around the world already identify beauty from within as a key trend in the dietary supplement sector, they also place beauty foods and beverages among the top ten trends for the coming years.” With the convenience of eating and drinking to skin care and health, it looks like the thirst for the fountain of youth may be quenched in the near future.

advertising sales manager Peh Sue Ann sueannpeh@epl.com.sg senior circulation executive Brenda Tan brenda@epl.com.sg contributors Chris Brockman Didier Lacroix Dr Tieh Koun Koh Izaskun Bengoechea Jim Warren Lawrence Low Norbert Hampl Ramesh Gunawardena Steve Knauth Tan Pok Kiam Ton Kunst board of industry consultants Dr Aaron Brody Managing Director Packaging/Brody, Inc Dr Alastair Hicks Agroindustries and Postharvest Specialist UN Food & Agriculture Organisation Professor Alex Büchanan Professional Fellow Victoria University Dr Nik Ismail Nik Daud Head, Food Quality Research Unit Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia/ President Malaysian Institute of Food Technology Kathy Brownlie Global Program Manager Food & Beverage Ingredients Practice Frost & Sullivan Sam S Daniels Consultant World Packaging Organisation

Executive Board chairman Stephen Tay group executive director Kenneth Tan financial controller Robbin Lim

etm Tjut Rostina

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TradeanMedia Pte Ltd Eastern Holdings Ltd company

Head Office & Mailing Address Eastern Trade Media Pte Ltd 1100 Lower Delta Road, EPL Building #04-02, Singapore 169206 Tel: (65) 6379 2888 Fax: (65) 6379 2805 Email: apfood@epl.com.sg


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ADVERTISERS

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ANGEL YEAST CO LTD

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ANGSANA FOOD INDUSTRIES SDN BHD

5

2578

ASCENDAS (ADMIRALTY) PTE LTD

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ASHWORTH BROS INC

23

2637

ASIA FRUIT LOGISTICA

17

2616

BASF

2590

BUHLER AG

2348

CARGILL INTERNATIONAL TRADING PTE LTD – CSS

2620

CERMEX SIDEL GROUP

2622

COGNEX SINGAPORE INC

19

2624

DSM NUTRITIONAL PRODUCTS ASIA PACIFIC PTE LTD

IBC

2630

EXANDAL CORP

43

2626

FI ASIA 2010

75

6011

GUANGZHOU SUNSHINE FOOD & PACKAGING MACHINERY CO LTD 80

2612

HEAT & CONTROL PTY LTD

29

2613

HKTDC FOOD EXPO

53

2619

IDI PTE LTD

2629

INNOPHOS INC

15

2621

ISHIDA CO LTD

51

2614

KALSEC INC

41

2618

KERRY ASIA PACIFIC

IFC

2528

KE HUA FOODSTUFF MACHINERY INDUSTRY & COMMERCE CO LTD 39

2615

LONZA AG

2623

MULTIVAC PTE LTD

21

2627

PROPAK ASIA 2010

69

2628

PROPAK CHINA 2010

71

2617

SOLLICH KG

25

2625

URSCHEL ASIA PACIFIC PTE LTD

33

2599

VIETFISH 2010

63

2541

WOLF VERPACKUNGMACHINEN GMBH

13

80 9

1 11 3 7

8

OBC

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ENQUIRY NO.

This index is provided as an additional service. The publisher does not assume any liability for errors or omissions.

Commercial

Enquiry Number

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY ADVERTISING INDEX

IDI Pte Ltd Singapore 13 Bradell Tech # 05-06 Lorong 8 TOA PAYOH - SINGAPORE 319261 Phone: +65 6352 5245 - Fax: +65 6352 8402 Website: www.idi-ingredients.com E-mail: idi-asiapacific@idi-ingredients.com

Contact: Randy Teo / Peh Sue Ann Tel: 65-6379 2888 Fax: 65-6379 2805 / 6379 2806

MEDIA REPRESENTATIVES CHINA Wan Xin Xian Tel: 86-20-3411 4806 Fax: 86-20-3411 4805

JAPAN Ted Asoshina Tel: 81-3-3263 5065 Fax: 81-3-3234 2064

TAIWAN Tom Lin Tel: 886-22619-2798 Fax: 886-22619-2799

The closing date for placing advertisements is not less than FOUR WEEKS before the date of publication. Please contact our nearest advertising office for more details.


Enquiry Number

2578


BUSINESS NEWS INDUSTRY & MARKET

APRIL/MAY 2010

Increase In Exports For Nestlé P e ta l i n g J aya , M a l ay si a : The group posted a turnover of RM3.7 billion (US$1.1 billion) i n 2 0 0 9 . T h i s i s 3 . 4 p e rc e n t lower than the same period the year before. The domestic full year sales performance was close to flat, favourably impacted by strong sales in the fourth quarter. This was an overall satisfactory performance c o n s i d e r i n g t h e 3 . 8 p e rc e n t contraction of the local economy reported in the first nine months, as well as the Milo and milk products price reductions at the beginning of the year. An easing in key raw material costs affected export selling prices resulting in lower export turnover. Additionally, last year saw a shift in export demand, from milk powders to lower per kilo value products, such as ready-to-drink beverages and coffee creamers. While export sales value receded, volumes increased by 11 percent year on year versus 2008. For the full year under review, the profit before tax of RM440.3 million was on par with the previous year. Profit after tax rose by 3.2 percent to RM351.8 million, resulting from a favourable tax expense trend driven by the Halal tax incentives linked to the year’s capital investments. In the fourth quarter of 2009, the group registered a turnover of RM 950.6 million, 2.3 percent lower than the same period last year. With the economy recovering, domestic sales improved by 4.6 percent, however, the total turnover was affected by the lower value of exports. Despite an increase in volumes, exports saw a reduction in value due to a shift in demand from milk powders to lower

per kilo value products, such as coffee creamers and ready to drink beverages. Peter R Vogt, MD of Nestlé (Malaysia) said: “During the year, despite the challenging economic environment, the group remained focused on its long-term strategy by investing RM 267 million in capital, mainly in new manufacturing lines,

to increase production capacity and provide flexibility for product innovations and renovations. We also continued to invest in building our brands with strong marketing and consumer promotions, which helped stimulate consumer demand. These efforts will allow the group to be well positioned for the economic rebound forecasted for 2010 and help us grow our top line.” ______________________ Enquiry No: 0300

PepsiCo India’s Contract Farming Achieves Growth Of 150 Percent Haraldaspur, India: This year PepsiCo India farmers registered a growth of 150 percent in its potato crop in West Bengal, India. Apart from external factors such as favourable climate and non occurrence of crop spoiling diseases, it was the presence of timely intervention by the company’s team to help make this partnership a success. This growth has resulted in the farmers receiving a profit between Rs. 25,000 (US$562.3) – 40,000 per acre as compared to Rs. 15,000 – 25,000 for last year. The company offered its 6,500 contract farmers the knowledge of the correct geometry, and chemical kit required for optimal harvesting. In addition, the farmers were provided with better quality seeds and ensured timely irrigation by maintaining day to day follow up’s on all relevant agricultural practices. PepsiCo India runs the country’s largest contract farming operation in potato. They work with nearly 15,000 farmers and procure 70,000 to 75,000 tons of potatoes. Through contract farming, the total procurement is about 150,000 tons. The company’s direct seeding initiative saves 30 to 40 percent of water in paddy cultivation by doing away with the traditional method of flooding the fields. In 2009, it incorporated 6,500 acres and saved nearly 5.7 billion ltr of water.

__________________________________________________________ Enquiry No: 0301


BUSINESS NEWS

APRIL/MAY 2010 ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY

11

INDUSTRY & MARKET

ThaiBev’s Profit Up In 2009 purpose of targeting the various consumer profiles. In November 2009, the company extended its footprint in the energy

drinks space with the launch of ‘Power Plus’, specifically for younger consumers who engage in sports. ___________________ Enquiry No: 0302

Innovative extrusion processes without limits. Buhler is the global technology partner for companies producing breakfast cereals, snack foods, or food ingredients on a commercial scale. With its extensive extrusion know-how and its passion for customized solutions, Buhler is always in a position to generate added value and success for any product idea. Buhler offers an integral range of products and services for all process stages – from correct raw material handling, cooking and shaping through extrusion to drying of the extruded products. And this for all market segments – from breakfast cereals and snack foods to modified flours and starches, texturised proteins, or vitaminised rice. In short: extrusion processes without limits.

2590

Bühler AG, Pasta & Extruded Products, CH-9240 Uzwil, Switzerland, T +41 71 955 11 11, F +41 71 955 35 82, extrusion@buhlergroup.com, www.buhlergroup.com/extrusion

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Enquiry Number

B a n g k o k , Th a i l a n d : T h a i Beverage Public Company (ThaiBev), has reported a total sales revenue of 107,969 million Baht (US$3,305.3 million), an increase of 2.4 percent in comparison with the same period last year. Net profit from normal operations in 2009 increased by four percent yearon-year, from 10,238 million Baht to 10,643 million Baht. Thapana Sirivadhanabhakdi, president and CEO of the company, said: “It has been a challenging year for the industry as a whole due to the impact of the economic recession and the excise tax increase, but we are glad to have emerged with a commendable set of results.” In 2009, the Thai beer market suffered the effects of an economic downturn and the rise in excise tax. The economic slump impacted overall sentiment, causing consumers to become more cautious about their spending. As a result, drinks that were consumed mainly on-trade like beer and premium drinks saw a decline in sales. However, the company witnessed growth in the spirits business, contributing to higher revenue and net profit. Consumers who, in good times, would consumer premium imported whisky, traded down to local spirits, causing consumption of brown spirits to rise. ThaiBev also saw its non-alcohol business grow, led by major brand Oishi. New green tea drinks under this brand, and rebranded Amino Plus, its functional drink, were launched last year, with the

26.01.2010 13:43:16


BUSINESS NEWS

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY APRIL/MAY 2010

12

INDUSTRY & MARKET

Eye On Melamine Wellington, New Zealand: A New Zealand Food Safety Authority (NZFSA) toxicologist is working with a group of experts from around the world to set an internationallyaccepted limit for melamine in foods, that will harmonise global efforts to detect any deliberate adulteration in the future. NZFSA principal toxicologist, John Reeve will attend the Codex Committee on Contaminants in Foods in Turkey this April, where he expects the committee will consider a limit that will not only protect the health of consumers all over the world, but also ensure that governments can take action against the deliberate and unnecessary adulteration of products. It will also avoid unnecessary barriers to trade in products that contain trace levels of melamine that are not from adulteration. Many other countries have set their own limits at the same levels, but others who have no set limits take action to prohibit imports of products if any presence of melamine is detected. “Essentially the committee’s job will be to formalise a standard, removing the variations that exist from country to country,” said Mr Reeve. “There has been international backing within Codex for taking action, and New Zealand has had a significant input into setting this internationally-accepted limit.” He adds: “A zero limit for the compound would not be practical and could be used as a technical barrier to trade. Therefore, the committee’s work is focussing on striking a balance between acknowledging the ‘natural’ occurrence of the compound while protecting the health of consumers and making it difficult for those willing to use unethical practices in food production.” Internationally-accepted standards are vital for countries exporting and importing food. About 80 percent of the food New Zealand produces is exported, bringing in more than half of the country’s overseas earnings – more than NZ$20 billion a year. _______________________________________ Enquiry No: 0303

New Ready To Eat Foods Shelf Life Guidance Northamptonshire, UK: A free publication to help food businesses determine the shelf life of ready-to-eat foods has been published by CFA and the British Retail Consortium (BRC). The Shelf life Of Ready To Eat Food In Relation to L. monocytogenes - Guidance For Food Business Operators (the Shelf Life Guidance) is designed to help businesses from small food outlets to major food manufacturers calculate an accurate time period for people to eat food and minimise the risk of illness. It is also designed to help firms meet European Union microbiology rules, in particular Regulation (EC) No 2073/2005. This sets limits on microorganisms, such as listeria, in food. The guidance was developed by a coalition of organisations chaired by the BRC, including the CFA, Chartered Institute of Environmental Health, LACORS, the Health Protection Agency and the Food Standards Agency (FSA). _______________________________ Enquiry No: 0304

Tetra Pak Sales Grow To E8.95 Billion Lausanne, Switzerland: Tetra Pak has achieved net sales of E8.95 billion (US$12.08 billion) in 2009, an increase of 1.2 percent from 2008 in comparable terms. Packaging solutions reached E8 billion in net sales in last year, up by 1.8 percent over 2008, while sales of processing solutions declined 3.8 percent to E917 million during this period. Double-digit growth in South and Southeast Asia, the Middle East and Sub-Sahara Africa drove the rise in packaging solutions’ sales, while East Europe and Central Asia were the most affected by the economic downturn, experiencing a 12.2 percent decline in net packaging sales year-over-year. Sales of processing solutions were impacted by the difficult environment for capital equipment. Overall, group sales strengthened in the fourth quarter of 2009, increasing by 5.7 percent from the year-ago quarter. ___________________________________ Enquiry No: 0305


BUSINESS NEWS

APRIL/MAY 2010 ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY

13

INDUSTRY & MARKET

Health & Nutritional Bars Soar To E1.4 Billion

_____________________ Enquiry No: 0306

WOLF Verpackungsmaschinen GmbH Bettenhäuser Str. 3 D-35423 Lich-Birklar Tel.: +49 (0)6404-9182-0 E-Mail: contact@wolf-pack.de

www.wolf-pack.de

2541

wise. According to Roger Kuhn, fesearch analyst with Euromonitor, the key market trends are ‘back to nature’, ‘adding nutritional value’, and a further category segmentation. Breakfast bars are forecasted to grow to E800 million in 2014, granola bars

to E425 million, while energy and nutritional bars is expected to grow to E125 million. Bars in the UK are in good shape for the future according to the data of the various grocery panels: the demand for bars is increasing in families with young children, and income levels between £30,000 (US$45,630) to £50,000. The recession has not led to an increase in purchases of private label bars. The branded bars category increased by close to nine percent versus eight percent growth in the private label demand, measured 52 with effect of Dec 27, 2009. The total bars market in the UK is estimated at £370 million.

Enquiry Number

Utretch, The Netherlands: The market for healthy & nutritional bars is soaring, despite the economic recession. European snack bars sales have seen strong growth in 2009, with increase rate of five percent to E1.4 billion (US$1.8 billion). Breakfast bars have increased by five percent with more looking for a breakfast replacement for timestrapped consumers. Brands have taken a strong approach towards women, and takes on a weight management positioning. Sales of such bars in the UK have reached E390 million. The breakfast categories in France, Italy and Spain have outgrown the other European countries, size-


BUSINESS NEWS

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY APRIL/MAY 2010

14

INDUSTRY & MARKET

APPOINTMENTS & NOTICES

Mykl Roventine, Minnesota, US

Rabobank Appoints CEO For Singapore

Gum & Mint Sales On The Rise Chicago, US: While the economy continues to negatively influence certain shopping behaviors, one category’s bubble refuses to pop. According to recent research from Mintel, the gum, mints and breath fresheners market has seen sales growing through the recession, increasing over 10 percent since 2007, and is expected to continue growing through 2014. “Although this market is not entirely recession proof; gum, mints and breath fresheners are faring well due to their low price points and the feeling that consumers are getting a small treat,” notes Bill Patterson, the organisation’s senior analyst. “In addition, innovative packaging and unique flavours are aiding in the upward sales momentum.” Marketers normally use packaging to help freshen and develop a brand’s image, but survey respondents think functionality is key in the gum category. Nearly 50 percent of people cited packaging that reseals better or is easier to open as being most important. Meanwhile, 19 percent of people want gum and mints to have packaging that is better for the environment. Innovation is not only coming by way of packaging, but also unique flavour combinations. The research also found that 43 percent say they like to try new brands or flavours because they like the variety and 13 percent try new brands or flavours because they have yet to find one they love. Despite the emphasis on health, breath freshening remains the most important function of gum and mints in the minds of survey respondents. Nearly four times as many respondents cited this compared to a healthy function (43 percent vs 13 percent). ___________________________________________ Enquiry No: 0307

Rabobank International has appointed Soh Hang Kwang as CEO of the Singapore branch and representative markets. Mr Soh will assume overall responsibility for the management, supervision and control of the branch’s operations. He reports to Robert Jan van Zadelhoff, the Singapore-based head of Asia for the organisation. Mr Soh was previously from ABN AMRO, where he held various business management and origination roles, and headed the bank’s corporate coverage and advisory functions. One of his key responsibilities was ensuring the delivery of corporate and investment banking capabilities to its top-tier clients. From 2001 to 2003, Mr Soh was with Citibank as the MD of the corporate and capital markets group, in addition to being the MD for corporate development.

Zenith Appoints Water Resources Manager Peter Keane has been appointed as water resources manager, by food and drink consultancy Zenith International. He joins the water & environment team of technical and hydrogeology experts. Mr Keane has over ten years’ of experience designing and developing water supply boreholes for food and drink producers. He also advises national regulators on legislation and guidance for the bottled water industry. With experience covering the UK, Ireland, Europe and the Arabian Gulf, he will be responsible for advising clients on all aspects of water resource management.

For everything you want to know about the food technology

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BUSINESS NEWS

APRIL/MAY 2010 ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY

15

INDUSTRY & MARKET

Symrise Outperforms Market In 2009 In North America, revenues rose by 14 percent, partly due to the acquisitions made in 2008. The EAME region, which was hit especially hard

___________________ Enquiry No: 0308 Innophos APFI April May Issue HIREZ Emerson Design Studio

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Holzminden, Germany: Symrise AG enjoyed a robust increase in business in 2009 despite the challenging market environment. The company increased sales by 3.2 percent at actual rates, and by 2.7 percent at local currency. The company saw a stronger growth than the flavour and fragrances market, which stagnated in 2009. The EBITDA, adjusted for restructuring expenses, was slightly higher than in 2008. They benefited from an increase in business during the second half of the year, and the positive effects of the restructuring measures implemented over the course of the year. In 2009, Symrise enjoyed a 3.2 percent increase in group sales from E1,319.9 million (US$1,781.8 million) to E1,362 million. Revenues generated in emerging markets grew disproportionately and increased by 4.5 percent at local currency. Their share of the total sales rose from 40 percent in 2008, to 41 percent. The Asia Pacific region contributed significantly to growth with an eight percent increase in sales. Sales in the South American region went up by 12 percent and by 17 percent at local currency.

in the first half of the year by the weak economy and by destocking of customer inventories, returned to growth during the second half of the year. Sales in this region for the entire year, declined by four percent.


BUSINESS NEWS

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY APRIL/MAY 2010

16

INDUSTRY & MARKET

Melbourne, Australia: Sales of hot drink products in Australia surpassed A$1,350 million (US$1.2 billion) in the year 2008 and is expected to be worth A$1,473 million in 2013, with the coffee category accounting for the largest share followed by tea according to Datamonitor’s report Hot drinks in Australia to 2013. The biggest growth in coffee i s c o m i n g f ro m o u t - o f - h o m e consumption with a growing number of consumers adopting the idea of café culture. In the tea category, consumers are showing increasing interest towards specialty tea segments, such as green tea and herbal tea, due to its perceived health & wellness benefits. At-home coffee consumption is witnessing strong demand for high quality roast and ground coffee as consumers are seeking to replicate the quality and taste of cafés’ coffee. According to the market data analytics (MDA) database, retail coffee sales in the country grossed A$752 million and ranked second, only behind

Singapore, in per capita coffee consumption amongst the Asian economies in 2008. Although demand for roast coffee is growing, the at-home coffee category is still dominated by instant coffee, accounting for more than 80 percent of the total Australian coffee sales. Nestle, Cantarella and Sara Lee, together accounts for more than two-thirds of the total coffee sales in volume. The at-home coffee market is forecasted to reach A$798 million by 2013. In contrast, the Australian tea category was valued at A$437 million in 2008, and is forecasted to reach a value of A$473 million in 2013. Currently, tea sales are driven by the at-home segment with per capita consumption at less than 0.8 kg per annum. The per capita consumption for out-of-home tea market stands at less than 0.1 kg per annum. Fruit/herbal tea and green tea segments are leading the growth

Nestlé Completes Acquisition Of Kraft Foods’ Pizza Business Vevey, Switzerland: Nestlé has concluded the acquisition of Kraft Foods’ frozen pizza business on March 1, 2010, after the completion of closing conditions. Consequently, the process of integrating the pizza business into the Nestlé Group will begin today as 3,620 of Kraft’s pizza employees join them. The business complements the company’s existing frozen meals and snacks businesses, while allowing them to optimise its existing direct distribution network to stores across the US. ________________________________ Enquiry No: 0310

Gamal Abdalla, Rhone, France

Coffee Is Australia’s Favourite

in the tea market with around five percent growth over the past decade in comparison to negligible growth in the higher value segment such as black tea. In light of all the current indications, the hot drinks market is predicted to be in the order of A$1.5 billion over the next five years.

____________________ Enquiry No: 0309

Cargill Opens China Facility Amsterdam, Netherlands: Cargill has opened a manufacturing plant in Pinghu, China. Complementing the flavour application laboratory established in Shanghai in 2007, the facility will enable the company to serve customers with comprehensive solutions ranging from flavour creation for beverage, dairy, confectionery and bakery applications, to manufacturing and supply. Together with its production facility in Bangalore, India, plus application centres in Shanghai, Malaysia’s Kuala Lumpur, and Bangalore in India, the Chinese site forms the base from which the company will serve the growing Asian market. The plant has been built on the same site as the existing starches and sweeteners plant, enabling customers to benefit from synergies in development and production. ________________________________ Enquiry No: 0311


BUSINESS NEWS

APRIL/MAY 2010 ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY

17

CHINA FOCUS

China Marine Food Reports Record 2009 Financial Results Shishi, China: China Marine Food, the China-based manufacturer of Mingxiang seafood-based snack foods, marine algae-based beverages and distributor of frozen marine catch, has recorded its financial results for the company’s fourth quarter and fiscal year ended December 31, 2009. The total revenue in the fourth quarter was US$24.9 million, up 85 percent from US$13.5 million in the same period prior to last year. Growth was driven by increased shipments of the company’s snack food products to distributors, and by shipments of frozen marine catch to distributors in the Liaoning province. The processed seafood segment contributed US$14.5 million of revenues and grew 29.7 percent from the fourth quarter of 2008. The marine catch product line contributed US$10.4 million in revenue and increased over three-fold from Q4 of 2008.

Total revenue for fiscal year 2009 was US$69.6 million, up 42.6 percent from US$48.8 million in 2008. In 2009, 74.8 percent of revenue was generated by sales of processed seafood products, and 25.2 percent of revenue was generated by sales of marine catch compared to 90.9 percent and 9.1 percent, respectively in 2008. Domestic sales accounted for 97.4 percent of revenue in 2009, compared to 95.1 percent of revenue in 2008. The company exceeded its top line revenue guidance of US$60.0 million by approximately US$9.6 million, or 16 percent. After acquiring Xianghe, the company increased its fiscal year 2010 guidance to US$100.0 million in revenues and US$21.5 million in net income. These guidance numbers are subject to change and before any non-cash amortisation charges associated with intangible assets generated from the acquisition.

___________________________________________ Enquiry No: 0312

ad01.pdf 1 7/4/2553 12:56:25

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KE HUA FOODSTUFF MACHINERY INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE CO. LTD ADD: 12 Jingde Street, Duanzhou 3 Road, Zhaoqing City, Guangdong, PRC

Tel: + 86-758-2727608 Fax: +86-758-2727608

Enquiry Number

2637

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BUSINESS NEWS

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY APRIL/MAY 2010

18

CHINA FOCUS

Jan Jelinek, Praha, Czech Republic

DSM & Tianjin University Establish Cheese Technology Institute Tianjin, China: DSM Food Specialties and Tianjin University of Technology Science has created the ‘Cheese Technology Institute’, a dedicated online resource for cheese manufacturers in China. Visitors to the site (www. cheeseinstitute.com) can access details of the latest cheese research, manufacturing and application information plus facts about international cheese culture. It also explains the cheese making process via text and video. The company will help the University build and run the website. This site was established to increase cheese production in China. Although it is still less than most Western countries, cheese consumption has grown in China over recent years, with imports increasing year on year. In fact, 90 percent of current cheese consumption depends on imports,” said Thomas Zhao, the company’s dairy area sales manager. It is estimated that from 2008 to 2010, the Chinese cheese market has been in a ‘preparation phase’; from 2010 to 2012, processed cheese will be the most fashionable cheese type; and from 2012 to 2018, authentic cheese will be produced, and China will enter the cheese harvest stage. In addition to the website, a cheese seminar and cheese technology training course is also scheduled for May 2010. This training course will include an introduction into cheese processing technology, on-site production of Cheddar, Mozzarella or Processed Cheese, sensory evaluation plus an appreciation of cheese culture.

______________________________________________________ Enquiry No: 0313

Bright Food Raises Bid For CSR Shanghai, China: Shanghai Bright Food Group has offered A$1.75 billion (US$1.61 billion) for the purchase of Sucrogen, the sugar arm of Australian conglomerate CSR. In a report published by the Shanghai Daily, the offer is an increase of 17 percent compared to the A$1.5 billion proposed in January. The intended purchase of the sugar arm is one of the steps Bright Food is taking as part of its expansion plans. With the new offer, CSR has agreed to start negotiations; however, both companies have yet to decide on the terms for the opening of books to allow Bright Food to look through. According to the Sydney Morning Herald, there is no exclusive agreement, so other bidders can also emerge. ______________________________________________________ Enquiry No: 0314

SCIENCE & INNOVATION

Study Defines Benefits Of Slow Release Carb Singapore: In a research by Holub et al, isomaltulose disaccharide carbohydrate has been shown to offer distinct physiological benefits, following a detailed series of human studies. The study which appeared in the British Journal of Nutrition’s online version, was based around discovering what are the physiological properties slow intestinal release of Palatinose, observed in enzyme kinetic studies, would manifest in the human body.

With this in mind three separate studies were carried out to investigate the following: • Whether it would be fully digestible and available from foods and drinks in humans. Whether its slow release led to complete digestion and absorption and how this would be reflected in its blood glucose response • What the acceptance and tolerance of the ingredient’s consumption would be over a longer period of time in the human metabolism, in comparison with sucrose The series of studies by Holub et al have presented the metabolic benefits of isomaltulose disaccharide carbohydrate. The slow yet complete intestinal release of the ingredient leads to a prolonged delivery of blood glucose. The results suggest that it may even have beneficial effects on longterm carbohydrate metabolism. _____________________________ Enquiry No: 0315


BUSINESS NEWS

APRIL/MAY 2010 ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY

19

SCIENCE & INNOVATION

Substance In Agave May Fight Diseases Ms López said her findings suggest that agave fructans could be used in all of the same foods as chicory fructans.

___________________ Enquiry No: 0316

You Know Cognex Vision

Andrew Jabs, WA, Australia

san FrancIsco, us: The plant that gave the world tequila contains a substance that has health benefits as a source of nutrients, scientists reported at the 239th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society. Foods spiked with ‘fructans’ from the agave plant may help protect against osteoporosis by boosting the body’s absorption of calcium and could have other health benefits, they said.

“We still have a long way to go to determine for which health benefits agave fructans perform better than chicory fructans,” Ms López said. ”However, the early results are encouraging, and we working on it.”

“ F r u c t a n s a re c o n s i d e re d functional food ingredients because they affect body processes in ways that result in better health and reduction in the risk of many diseases,” said Mercedes López, who delivered the report. She is with the National Polytechnic Institute, Guanajuato, Mexico. She adds that experimental studies suggest that fructans may be beneficial in diabetes, obesity, stimulating the immune system of the body, decreasing levels of diseasecausing bacteria in the intestine, relieving constipation, and reducing the risk of colon cancer. Scientific studies have suggested that fructans stimulate the growth of healthful bacteria in the large intestine in a way that increases the body’s absorption of minerals, including the calcium and magnesium important for bone growth.

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PRODUCT HIGHLIGHTS Ingredients

ADM: Isolated Soy Proteins ADM’s line of Pro-Fam isolated soy proteins eliminates many of the off-notes associated with soy proteins, resulting in a clean flavour and smooth mouthfeel. This makes it suitable for use in a variety of functional foods and beverages. The portfolio includes Pro-Fam 825, suited specifically for ready-to-drink nutritional beverages, and Pro-Fam 930 for highprotein nutrition bars. ______________________________ Enquiry No: P0320

Hydrosol: Preservatives For Shelf-Life Extension To prevent meat and fish products from spoilage, Hydrosol has developed various preservative systems that prolong the shelf life of fresh and cooked products. The organic preservative systems that have been produced contain additional plant extracts that reduce pathogenic bacteria like listeria species and salmonella. The systems from the Hydrolon range have been tested with fresh and cooked meat and fish products. With the ‘Fresh’ system, a combination of sodium acetate, citric acid and ascorbic acid, it was possible to extend their shelf-life by 50 percent. With ‘Everfresh’, the improvement was as much as 200 percent. These results were achieved under suitable standards of industrial hygiene and with a continuous cold chain of f our deg C. ______________________________ Enquiry No: P0322

City Food & Foto, Hamburg

Chris Brown Photography

Kemin: Natural Satiety Ingredient Exandal: Tara Gum Tara Gum developed by Exandal provides food processors with advantages in food applications including stabilisation of non-fat and low-fat dairy products, cream, condiments, frozen desserts, baked goods, confectionary products, as well as beverages. The ingredient has positive interaction for viscosity when mixed with xanthan, modified starch and CMC. It also reacts well in gel forming, together with xanthan, carrageenan and agar agar. The product is non-GMO and has kosher certification. ______________________________ Enquiry No: P0321

Slendesta is a safe, natural ingredient that promotes satiety and healthy weight management. The ingredient makes it easier for people to meet their weight management goals by helping them to manage their hunger naturally. It promotes the body’s release of CCK, a signaling peptide that induces feelings of fullness and satisfaction. According to the company, the product works naturally with the body to control hunger without unpleasant side effects such as jitters or bloating. It is available in different forms for different product applications, and is considered GRAS for a number of food and beverage applications. _____________________________ Enquiry No: P0323

Sanja Gjenero, Zagreb, Croatia

20

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY APRIL/MAY 2010


Thermoforming Machines R 555 • R 255 • R 155

FormShrink Machines In perfect shape with FormShrink.

Multivac Pte Ltd 25 International Business Park #01-65/66 German Centre. Singapore 609916 Phone: (65) 6562 9130 Fax: (65) 6562 9131 Email: multivac@sg.multivac.com Website: www.multivac.com

*

Enquiry Number

2623


PRODUCT HIGHLIGHTS Ingredients

Palsgaard: Lecithin Alternative Marinova: Fucoidan Ingredient Fucorich by Marinova is an organic-certified fucoidan ingredient developed specifically for the functional beverage market. It contains naturally extracted fucoidan and mannitol, and is free from harmful chemical residues. Unlike extracts made from seaweeds, the ingredient is made from organic brown seaweeds. The solvent-free method used to produce the ingredient ensures the fucoidan molecule remains unadulterated in chemical structure and free from solvent residues. As a result, the chemical integrity of the molecule is preserved and its bioactivity is nature-equivalent. The known health benefits of fucoidan include supporting the immune system, and controlling blood sugar levels when managing weight loss. In addition, its mannitol component helps to curb glucose rises in the blood and reduce fluid accumulation. ______________________________ Enquiry No: P0324

Jason Lam

22

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY APRIL/MAY 2010

Novozymes: Fresh Keeping For Steamed Bread Novamyl Steam, a product of Novozymes, brings a longer lasting softness and extended shelf life to steamed bread. Its properties raise the quality of the steamed bread, increase production flexibility and reduce stale returns. The ingredient raises the eating quality through extending and maintaining softness, crumb structure and elasticity. It also offers shelf life extension, and achieves quality differentiation. It can contribute to safer, more hygienic steamed bread production. ______________________________ Enquiry No: P0325

Palsgaard’s AMP 4448 is an ammonium phosphatide, that provides a solution for chocolate manufacturers to decrease recipe costs, and avoid the shortage situation of IP soy lecithin. It provides the chocolate manufacturer with viscosity reduction in chocolate production. According to the company, the product does not encounter the well known ‘lecithin problem’ of increased viscosity above 0.4 percent dosage. The ingredient is in liquid form, which makes it easy to dose at any temperature, avoiding heating and excessive energy use. It is odourless and undetectable in chocolates, and contains no allergens. The base material for producing the product is based on non-gmo, non-hydrogenated rape seed oil meaning it is an all vegetable product. ______________________________ Enquiry No: P0326

Purac: Balance Taste & Optimise Flavour The Purac Fit Plus is a natural specialty product based on lactic acid. The product can mask the artificial aftertaste of intensive sweeteners, such as aspartame, sucralose, acesulfame-k, saccharine or stevia/Reb-A. It has a longer lasting sourness compared to other acidulants, like for example, citric acid, used in beverages. The sourness profile of the ingredient balances the sweetness profile of the intensive sweeteners. This effectively masks taste defects attributed from intensive sweeteners in the beverage. The sour taste also helps to extend the flavour perception and increases the intensity of a broad range of beverage flavours. ______________________________ Enquiry No: P0327


PRODUCT HIGHLIGHTS

APRIL/MAY 2010 ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY

Equipment & Services

23

GE Intelligent Platforms: Software & Device Management GE Intelligent Platforms has developed the SmartStart for Proficy Change Management, a packaged software and services solution that is designed to get users started quickly with the company’s asset management software solution. The software combines the fullfeatured software and a rapid engagement model to automate and improve change management processes. The version control ensures that only one person at a time is making changes and archives the versions for reuse. Users can also monitor and control access. Other features include audit trails and reports, automated scheduling, notification and reporting, as well as a configurable interface for project organisation. ______________________________ Enquiry No: P0328

Cama: Tetra Brick Line Cama has developed a ‘compact’ line for packing tetra bricks of fruit juice. The system has a speed of 30,000 bricks per hour, and features an electronic sleeving machine packs the bricks into wrap-around sleeves. The products are then loaded into trays by the monoblock loading unit. This includes a forming machine and a two-axis carbon fibre robot. ______________________________ Enquiry No: P0329

Trust The Experts Ashworth invented the first spiral more than 40 years ago. For over four decades, we’ve pioneered belt advancements that maximize throughput while minimizing life-cycle costs, and have been granted more patents than any other spiral belt manufacturer. Today, Ashworth continues to innovate the future and remains the world’s leading manufacturer of spiral belts. Put your confidence in Ashworth!

The Right Belt Ashworth is the world’s only company that manufactures both metal and plastic spiral belts to insure the right belt for your specific requirements.

Phone: 0086 21 6165 2207 E-mail: apfi@ashworth.com

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Enquiry Number

Asia Pacific Sales & Support Center Shanghai, China

2638

Increase capacity and maximize efficiency contact Ashworth today!


PRODUCT HIGHLIGHTS 24

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY APRIL/MAY 2010

Equipment & Services

Habasit: Cleandrive The hygiene properties of the belts used are crucial and for specific applications in hygiene sensitive areas, Habasit has developed a belt concept: the Cleandrive conveyor and processing belt.

Peichuan: Vacuum Packaging The belt features a smooth conveying surface, combined with a reverse side structure of lateral drive bars, which fit into the sprockets of plastic modular belts. High quality thermoplastic material allows use in aggressive cleaning areas, while the closed surface limits the accumulation of waste and debris on the reverse side. The positive engagement of the belt’s bars allows the use of an energy-saving conveyor design, similar to plastic modular belt conveyors. They are designed to limit the risks due to product waste hidden in the gaps in plastic modular belts. As a result, they are particularly appropriate for use in the food industries such as bakery, cheese production and cereal manufacturing.

Built to suit the different vacuum packing needs, the stainless steel machine from Peichuan, allows easy cleaning and maintenance. The machine comes with a digital control panel, and its memory function can store up to 10 sets of specifications, depending on the different needs. _____________________________ Enquiry No: P0332

_____________________________ Enquiry No: P0330

Lock: High Frequency Detector Lock Inspection Systems of the UK, has developed MET 30+ Universal, a range of metal detectors. The detector remains robust and reliable at peak sensitivities by employing a single high frequency, crystal-controlled oscillator. Designed primarily for dry product applications within the snack food and bakery industries, the unit will inspect foods at a frequency of 875 Khz. The software also eliminates the need to reconfigure the settings for each product, therefore reducing downtime while increasing efficiency and operating speeds. The high frequency detector is available as a conveyorised unit, employed at the end of the line for final screening of dry, poly-wrapped, finished products, and as a vertical inspection system for either space-restricted bagging application lines, or for free-flowing goods such as coffee granules, sugar and cocoa. ______________________________ Enquiry No: P0331

Radio Frequency: Post-Baking Dryers A series of post-baking dryers that can be custom engineered for cookie, cracker, and snack food production operations to increase oven band speed by eliminating the final drying requirement from the last third of an oven line is available from Radio Frequency, based in the US. Macrowave Post-Baking Dryers utilise RF (radio frequency) energy that preferentially heats and dries the moist areas of cookies, crackers, and snack foods to eliminate surface checking and control moisture and colour. Developed for high-volume cookie production, the dryers remove residual moisture trapped within the centre of the product. As such, it permits conventional ovens to run at the maximum speed that a product can be produced with the correct loft, crumb structure, and colour. These RF dryers are available in band widths up to 64 inches (40.64 cm) wide. _____________________________ Enquiry No: P0333


When it comes to quality, we are on the ball

SOLLICH ASIA Pte. Ltd. 10 Ubi Crescent No. 02-02 Lobby A Ubi Techpark · Singapore 408564 · Singapore Telephone ++65 6741 4722 · Fax ++65 6743 5098 E-Mail eddie.ong@sollich.com.sg

SOLLICH KG · Your Chocolate and Candy Specialist D-32102 Bad Salzuflen · Germany Telephone ++49 5222 950-0 · Fax ++49 5222 950-300 E-Mail info@sollich.com · www.sollich.com Enquiry Number

2617


PACKAGING & PROCESSING

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY APRIL/MAY 2010

26

The

Oven

Optimised

as the market shifts and evolves, an oven’s flexibility can be a make-or-break feature. By ramesh gunawardena, manager of technology & process development, JBt Foodtech INTENSIFYING consumer demand for better taste, plus, more choice and greater convenience, is driving the fully cooked market. To sustain and grow profits, processors are under pressure to identify the oven with the best overall cooking environment to deliver the best product yields, throughput, uniform colour and other desired product attributes. The vertical airflow spiral oven offers programmable airflows in the spiral to suit a product and process requirements: up-flow and down-flow with horizontal cross-flow components for a complete product coverage, and oscillating airflow control. Alternating the convection airflow within stack from the top and bottom, essentially turns the product over in the heat by turning the heat over on the product – a virtual burger flip. This process retains moisture and ensures even cooking and initial browning on both sides of the product.

Consistent and repeated trial and production data indicates that only a true, end-of-recipe impingement zone capable of high temperatures and air velocities accelerates heat transfer to the core of the product, while simultaneously developing

exterior texture. A true impingement zone also drives: • Yield improvement of up to two percent on bone-in chicken wings and up to four percent on boneless, skinless chicken breasts (BSCB)

MultiPhase Cooking with the new Stein GYRoCOMPACT II Oven

IMPINGEMENT FORCED CONVECTION

CONDENSATION

UNCOOKED Raw product enters infeed conveyer at 40°F (4°C).

In spiral oven cabinet, steam condenses on product surface below dew point. Latent heat of condensation drives energy to product core.

In spiral oven, heated air + superheated steam with air temperatures up to 450°F (232°C) accelerates the cooking process and preserves product moisture.

Heated air at high velocity enhances product texture and provides even top and bottom color development.


PACKAGING & PROCESSING

APRIL/MAY 2010 ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY

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• Throughput (output per hour) increases of up to 10 percent on bone-in chicken wings and up to 40 percent on boneless, skinless chicken breasts (BSCB) • Preser vation of product moisture, with enhanced, even top and bottom colour development. Ovens that place forced convection zones for product finishing or to enhance cooking earlier in the process within the confines of the spiral stack are not effective, if they do not provide sufficient zone separation or airflow control. This is also because they are being used to ‘finish’ products that are only half cooked. By essentially running products under a broiler midway through the cooking process, dwell times are not shortened, while moisture and yield are sacrificed, and throughput drops. Positive separation between zones prevents temperature infiltration between modules. This is essential as minimally insulated walls and the lack of containment reduce independent control over cook and finish zone environments, and sacrifices the advantages of a true finishing zone: reduced dwell times, preservation of product moisture, higher yields, greater throughput, and enhanced, even top and bottom colour development. Multi-Phase Cooking To reduce dwell times and reduce moisture loss, the oven adds a high-velocity top and bottom impingement module to augment multi-phase cooking. An impingement zone with independent temperature and air velocity control, offers a perfect finish for the logical progression of heat transfer in the spiral stack.

• Condensation When frozen or cold product enters the oven, steam condenses on product surfaces below the dew point. Latent heat of condensation begins to rapidly drive energy to the product core.

Convenience Trend If the breaded, bone-in Swanson chicken TV dinner introduced in 1953 was a defining product in convenience food history, then a walk down the frozen food aisle in today’s grocery store offers a new definition: variety.

Slot On Inner Link Low Pressure Area Mezzanine

High Pressure Area

• Forced Convection As product spirals up the spiral stack, convection cooking by a superheated air/vapour mixture of up to 232 deg C drives energy to the product and raises surface and core temperatures. Improved humidity control and containment along with even temperature distribution within the stack preserves product moisture. As the product cooks, the temperature differential between the product and the heating medium declines – the rate of cooking (energy transfer) slows. • Impingement High temperature air (up to 282 deg) at air velocities up to 4,000 20 m per second accelerates cooking and shortens overall dwell time without adversely affecting product moisture and enhancing colour.

As both available meal preparation time and interest in cooking ever yday meals shrinks, the demand for more variety and convenience in both take-home, heat-and-eat meals and eat-on-the-run meals continues to rise. A 2006 study by the Institute of Food Technologists found that almost half of the food served at home was either fully cooked microwave-and-eat meals or ready-to-eat fare prepared outside the home. Consumers now increasingly purchase meal components or heat-and-eat meals rather than ingredients; and stores are rapidly evolving to keep up with demand. Commercial cooking, too, is also moving increasingly further upstream to fully cooked, value-added products prepared by food processors.


PACKAGING & PROCESSING

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Single Spiral Edge The vertical airflow oven offers more than a smaller footprint compared to an equivalent capacity linear oven system. It is the based on the interlocking, self-stacking system that allows for more controllable, annular (cylindrical) vertical airflow through both the belt mesh and lateral airflow through side links. The conveyor features a variable pitch mesh that compensates for the belt collapse that occurs during turning, to maintain crossbelt air temperatures of less than +/- one deg C.

by the use of a temperature ‘equilibration’ zone, but in the absence of sufficient zone separation, an equilibration zone offers no advantage, especially when fully loaded and deep in a cooking cycle. Essentially, equilibration is imprecise ‘corrective’ cooking that can potentially increase cook times and magnify moisture loss. Contained Cooking The interlocking, self-stacking belt has sides that create a contained and consistent cooking environment in each and every

Product marinated with salt and water only

Top Surface

Bottom Surface

Without Impingement

Meanwhile, spiral ovens with horizontal, unidirectional airflow have to contend with considerably higher crossbelt temperature variations because products nearer the source of the airflow block ‘downwind’ products. Such uneven cooking forces extended dwell times to assure that the core of the least cooked product reaches the minimum target temperature. In turn, product near the source of the convection is overcooked, reducing moisture and yield. Effects of wind shadow in traditional horizontal airflow spiral ovens may be mitigated

With Impingement

tier of the spiral. Additionally, this cooking chamber is separated into a high pressure and low pressure region by means of a mezzanine ‘floor’. This baffle can be externally adjusted to control the airflow in the stack, optimising the cooking process, especially effective in mitigating uneven cooking due to non-uniform belt loading. True Impingement Vs Mid-Recipe The original Swanson Chicken TV dinner required a two-step cooking process – the dinner was first cooked covered with foil (steamed), then the foil covering

the chicken was folded back during the last phase of cooking (conduction baking). This primitive version of impingement finishing did not re-establish a temperature differential or impingement air velocities to speed finishing and retain moisture; yet it does offer an important lesson in proper cooking sequence: true finishing for product colour development is only effective at the end of the cooking process. While the oven offers true endof-recipe impingement finishing, positioning an impingement module for product finishing or cooking enhancement in the middle-of-the-recipe position is the metaphorical equivalent of having a chef brown an omelette or chicken breast under the broiler, only to return it to the oven because it is still just half cooked. High Temperature & Velocity Impingement Finish By properly positioning the impingement module at the end of the cooking cycle, an isolated, controllable cooking environment that combines high-velocity convection is provided. This high temperature in the impingement module offers an opportunity to re-establish a temperature differential of up to 112 deg C between the cooking environments, a differential that can drive the core temperature of the product the final three to six deg C in as little as 30 seconds. Fully cooked chicken wings may be in very high demand today, but tomorrow the market may demand a popular new marinated chicken breast or breaded dark-meat strips. For more information, ENTER No: 0340


Progress through innovation

Cooking & Frying Systems for Prepared Food Products The AirForce® impingement oven, MPO® oven and Spiral oven are designed to deliver the most consistent temperatures across the product conveyor width. Uniform cooking ensures each piece of product reaches the same safe core temperature in the same amount of time and has consistent qualities such as texture and colour.

AirForce® Impingement Oven

The HeatWave® fryer, Mastermatic® fryer and MasterTherm fryer, provide high capacity continuous frying that maintains consistent temperatures throughout the fryer and ensures that only the cleanest of oil comes into contact with the products. Uniform frying ensures high quality, consistency and taste for every piece of product. HeatWave® Fryer

Visit us at booth # N11 Enquiry Number

2612

www.heatandcontrol.com


PACKAGING & PROCESSING

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Continuous mixing technology is used to improve the performance of continuous mesh ovens, which otherwise might be replaced due to age or design. Older ovens may have deteriorated over time, and may not boast today’s technology. However, replacement is not the only solution. Supplying

Another solution is to supply the oven with more consistent dough than batch mixing can provide. By reducing variation in dough moisture – even the cyclical changes in hydration from beginning to end of batch – the oven is no longer required to make rapid adjustments to maintain temperature in a

Oven

Efficiency Consistent dough from continuous mixers eases the burden of the older oven from having to constantly make corrections. By Jim Warren, director of exact mixing, Reading Bakery Systems

Through

Mixing

consistent dough to the system does not place the same demand on the oven, and can extend an oven’s useful life. The Challenge An oven’s ability to maintain consistent temperature and quickly adjust to changes in heat demand can degrade over years of use. In addition, older ovens do not offer the technology of modern ovens, and therefore lack the ability to make rapid adjustments. This can result in colour and texture variation in the finished product. Bakers are often required to make control and burner upgrades, or even replace ovens to meet today’s demands for product quality and consistency.

changing internal environment. The result is more consistent finished product properties, as the oven does not fluctuate in response to the changes in the dough, nor struggle to do so because of its age. The process becomes steady state, so the oven bake becomes steady state. The challenge is to supply more consistent dough to the oven, and then confirm that this results in more stable oven performance. Continuous Mixing Technology Any industrial mixing operation consists of four primary operations. The operations are: 1. Delivery of bulk ingredients

(eg: flour) to the mixing area 2. Measurement of the ingredients for the mixer 3. Mixing of ingredients into dough 4. Handling of the dough as it exits the mixer Each of these operations offers opportunities for process control and consistency. In a batch mixing process, these four operations are often designed and implemented separately. Measurement of the flour is the responsibility of the bulk delivery system. Measurements of other ingredients are often done by employees, or systems that are designed to deliver ingredients quickly. However, these are often inaccurate.


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Dough is discharged from the mixer as a continuous stream rather than one large chunk every 10 to 25 minutes. It is this integration of key operations that allows continuous mixing to supply a more constant stream of dough to the oven. But the question remains, will this more consistent dough allow the oven to perform better?

Grongar

The Oven/Mixer Relationship The consistency of dough and the quality of baking are integrally linked. A consistent product with constant moisture can be baked on many ovens, while a product with varying moisture content can be difficult to manufacture on even the best oven. During production, the oven attempts to maintain a constant

Batch mixers tend to be inflexible with mix time as the only opportunity to adjust the process. Furthermore, the dough exits the mixer as a large batch, which takes extended time to process, during which changes occur. Continuous mixers, on the other hand, integrate all four operations into a single process and present several opportunities to control the process. Bulk delivery, metering, mixing and dough handling become a cohesive, uninterrupted process. Metering systems are designed for accuracies of Âą 0.25 percent or better. As the process is continuous, variations from flow start and flow stop are eliminated.

Continuous mixing technology is used to improve the performance of continuous mesh ovens, which otherwise might be replaced due to age or design.


PACKAGING & PROCESSING

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32

temperature. Removal of moisture is the primary driver of energy required. Due to its cycle time, batch mixing delivers varying moisture levels to the oven system, so the oven is in a perpetual state of reaction. The less the oven is asked to react, the more constant the product moisture, colour and texture will be. In order to determine how continuously mixed dough affects oven performance, a site was identified where the same oven could be supplied with either continuous or batch mixed dough. Each mixing system needed to have the ability to produce dough at the same rates, and at a period of time that would allow the oven parameters to stabilise. It was agreed that runs of at least three hours without interruption to the process would meet these goals for the test. Such a site was located during a recent continuous mixing installation. Due to increased production requirements, a new continuous mixing system was being installed. During commissioning, the batch mixers that had supplied the line in the past were still available. This allowed the commissioning team to alternate between batch and continuously mixed dough as needed for this study. The oven to be studied was a 1950’s vintage oven that was one metre wide and 90 metres long. The product was a sheeted snack product produced at a rate above 2,200 kg/hr. The method of comparing the alternate dough mixing methods was to record gas consumption during periods when the oven temperature had stabilised using either type of dough. The gas totalised flow would be read once every 10 minutes, and gas

flow during the last 10 minutes would be calculated and converted to an hourly rate. A stable gas flow would indicate the process was under control with minimal intervention by the oven controls, while a fluctuating gas flow would indicate that the batch mixing process was causing a variation in energy input from the oven. All other factors such as production rate, bakery conditions, sheeting equipment and plant operators remained constant. The following tables show the results of four hours of trials.

when continuously mixed dough was supplied to the oven. RounDing up A baked process in-control will include an oven that can maintain a constant energy input with little adjustment to gas flow. When the product supplied to the oven is inconsistent, modern ovens can sometimes make rapid, automated, adjustments to the gas flow to correct dough inconsistencies. Older ovens do not have the ability to make these adjustments, and sometimes add to

Gas Flow in Oven over 4 hours (scf/hr) 10,500

10,000

9,500

9,000

8,500

8,000 –––– Continuous

–––– Batch

Fig 1: A gas flow meter was used to measure the gas demand on an oven baking crackers. Four hours of data were recorded while the oven was being supplied with batch dough (red) is super imposed over four hours of continuously mixed dough data supplied to the same oven.

It is easy to conclude that the gas draw by the oven was much more consistent when continuously mixed dough was supplied to the oven. The oven was not asked to make rapid adjustments to provide constant temperature. While product quality was not a part of the reported study, it was obser ved that product texture, moisture and colour were also visibly more consistent

the problem by making adjustments in a strictly reactionary manner. The process is no longer in-control. However, consistent dough from continuous mixers eases the burden of the older oven from having to constantly make corrections. This allows older ovens to make more consistent product. For more information, ENTER No: 0341


SIMPLICITY AND EFFICIENCY 1959: Model CC 1963: Comitrol® Processor

1998: TranSlicer 2000® Cutter

Today Urschel manufactures more than 40 precision-engineered size reduction machines, including a wide range of slicers and dicers for hundreds of processing applications worldwide. Our latest addition, the DiversaCut Sprint incorporates flexibility and efficiency in a rugged, compact dicer, and is designed for high performance small scale production.

Urschel Asia Pacific Pte Ltd Tel : +65 6254 7757 Fax : +65 6254 6676 Email : asia@urschel.com

www.urschel.com

2625

2007: DiversaCut Sprint® Dicer

Enquiry Number

1910: Gooseberry Snipper

The rationale that our founder William Urschel had when he invented the Gooseberry Snipper in 1910 was simple: to find a better and more efficient way to remove the stems and ends from gooseberries. These key principles have since been the driving force and vision in Urschel’s quest for groundbreaking designs and technologies that have help our customers the world over to improve their productivity and enhance the value of their end products in some outstanding way.


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Cienpies Design, Uruguay

One of the most obvious criteria of design for heart wellness beverage is the product’s efficacy based on solid science. In this way, the product launched will be successful and can be enjoyed by as many people as possible. Every year, an estimated 16.7 million people succumb to heart disease, which now accounts for 29.2 percent of total global deaths. Many who survive continue to suffer painful symptoms or disabilities, in addition to reduced life expectancy. Medical science has made much progress in reducing heart

disease globally. However, other than the sound advice of ‘eat right and exercise’, many people obtain little information from their doctors on ways to prevent heart disease. Therefore, it is not surprising why many are now making an effort to learn how to ward off heart disease by monitoring new breakthroughs in medicine and natural remedies. Instead of focusing on treating the symptoms of heart disease, people are seeking strategies to prevent heart disease from developing in the first place. Natural Solution Tocotrienol and tocopherol are members of the vitamin E family

commonly accepted as powerful fat-soluble antioxidants. In the last decade, the ingredient has become increasingly recognised as a natural compound that plays a number of roles in supporting a healthy cardiovascular system. This reduces the likelihood of heart disease and maintains healthy cholesterol levels. The basis of these beneficial properties is thought to be via tocotrienol’s down-regulation of the enzyme 3-Hydroxy-3-

methylglutar yl Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, which in turn limits cholesterol synthesis in the liver. Recent research indicates that isomeric tocotrienol displays a more varied tissue distribution and response pattern compared to tocopherol. Further studies show that alpha-tocopherol present in mixed vitamin E preparations may actually compete with tocotrienol for binding sites on the alpha-T transfer protein, a

Tocotrienol:

Matters Of The

Heart

Instead of focusing on treating the symptoms of heart disease, people are seeking strategies to prevent heart disease from developing in the first place. By Dr Tieh Koun Koh, director of sales & marketing, Davos Life Sciences.

protein that transports vitamin E around the human body. As a result, alpha-tocopherol may interfere with, and reduce the bioavailability of tocotrienol by limiting the distribution of tocotrienol to the body’s tissues. As such, its ability to help support healthy cholesterol is compromised. It is important to recognise that tocotrienol preparations that are high in alpha-tocopherol (>30 percent) and low in gamma

and delta-tocotrienol, such as those derived from rice bran, may be inferior in maintaining healthy cholesterol levels. This is in comparison with preparations derived from palm oil that are naturally low in alphatocopherol, while containing higher amounts of both gamma and delta-tocotrienol. Cardiovascular Disease Management Studies through oral admini-


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strong evidence of the benefits that tocotrienol can bring to the human cardiovascular system. In one study, after supplementation of 100 mg per day, trial subjects’ saw their total cholesterol drop by up to 22 percent together, as well as a 20 percent reduction in their LDL cholesterol levels. Furthermore, another study found a significant improvement in arterial compliance, a factor that may have promising implications on reducing arterial hardening

Typofi, Finland

stration of tocotrienol have shown an impact on cholesterol levels, with total cholesterol levels falling by over 30 percent, and a reduction in LDL cholesterol of almost 70 percent. In contrast, standard vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) has little or no effect on cholesterol levels. In one study, HDL/LDL cholesterol ratios improved by up to 150 percent following administration of tocotrienol. Numerous clinical studies

Other than the sound advice of ‘eat right and exercise’, many people obtain little information from their doctors on ways to prevent heart disease.

Walter Groesel, Vienna, Austria

high blood sugar levels react with proteins, resulting in a cross-linking process linked to premature aging, tissue stiffness and decreased cellular function.

on the oral administration of tocotrienol have shown effect on known cardiovascular disease factors, including reduction of cholesterol levels, cardiovascular inflammation, arterial hardening and triglyceride levels. However, the most commonly used vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) has through various clinical studies been shown to have little or no beneficial effect towards reducing cardiovascular disease. Clinical studies have generated

and hypertension. Triglyceride levels, which are also strongly associated with heart disease, have also been shown to fall by almost 20 percent. There is additional evidence that the ingredient may assist in reducing premature aging associated with advanced glycosylation end-products (AGEs) as well as support healthy blood pressure levels, and blood sugar regulation. A G E s a re f o r m e d w h e n

Delta & Gamma Compared to tocopherol and alpha-tocotrienol isomers, deltatocotrienol has shown a strong inhibitory effect on monocyte cell adherence. This is due to its ability to inhibit vascular cell adhesion molecules (VCAM-1) that play a key role in helping monocytes bind to artery walls, and causing inflammation and arterial hardening. The ingredient’s impact on hypertension has also been confirmed in human clinical studies, where tocotrienol-rich vitamin E resulted in reductions of aortic systolic blood pressure, and an improvement in total antioxidant status of almost 10 percent. For more information, ENTER No: 0350


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Patryk Specjal, Warsaw, Poland

The amount of air can be expressed in a number of ways, such as overrun or whip density. From a more scientific point of view, however, phase volume (ml air/ml product) is most convenient. Air bubbles have a spherical shape, but when the amount of air increases, air bubbles will get deformed and take a polyhedral (honeycomb like) shape. This deformation starts when the phase volume gets above about 0.65. The films that separate the air bubbles become thinner and are easily disrupted. For the liquid phase of aerated sugar confectionery, rheological properties such as viscosity, elasticity and yield value (the stress required before a liquid starts to flow) are important. The type and concentration of the

Air

Eating When producing aerated sugar confectionery the viscosity (determined by the sugar concentration), the whipping time, and the amount and type of whipping agent are important parameters. by ton Kunst, r&d director for proteins, Kerry ingredients & flavours

sugars, the amount of graining and the use of stabilisers and/or gelling agents affect these. Table 1 gives a general overview of the aerated products and some key properties. When producing any of these products, one has to consider how to get the air in, how to keep it in, and how to stabilise the liquid phase during the shelf life of the product. aeratiOn Of Sugar COnfeCtiOnery Making foam requires gas (air), water (sugar syrup), energy and a surfactant (protein or hydrolysed protein). Energy is required to incorporate air bubbles in the liquid phase, and to break them up in many small bubbles.

A Urbaniak, A Coruna, Spain

MANY of today’s food products are aerated, and although this can be seen as selling air for money, the primary intent is to improve the texture of the product. Bread, beer, cake, champagne, whipped dairy cream, nougat, marshmallows, ice cream and chocolate mousse are examples of products that would lose all of their characteristic aspects, if no air was present. Sugar confectionery can be grouped in grained and nongrained, gummy, aerated and non-aerated products. Quite often, the sugar confectionery mass is coated with chocolate. Aerated sugar confectionery products are foams, which in general terms, can be described as air bubbles in a liquid matrix. The air phase can be characterised by: • amount of air • form of the air bubbles and their interconnections • bubble size distribution


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Surfactant is required for a rapid decrease in the surface tension; this prevents immediate coalescence (merging) of the newly formed bubbles and facilitates the breakup of bubbles into smaller ones. The surfactant that is used in aerated sugar confectionery products is nearly always protein based, and is either an intact protein (in general egg albumin) or a hydrolysed protein. Hydrolysed proteins are obtained by splitting proteins into smaller fragments, generally called peptides. As the reduction of the surface tension is related to the number of molecules that absorb to the air-water interface, it will be clear that smaller molecules in general give more reduction of the surface tension than bigger molecules. Figure 2a shows that hydrolysed protein gives a much lower surface tension (35 mN/m) than an intact protein (45 mN/m). After absorption at the interface, globular proteins also have to unroll before the maximum reduction in surface tension is achieved. Unrolled protein molecules can interact

Table 1: Some properties of aerated sugar confectionery products Type

Solids (%)

Density grm/ml

ml Air/ ml Product

Structure

Graining

Angel Kiss

72

0.25

0.81

Interconnected

No

Marshmellows, Long

77

0.40

0.70

Interconnected

No

Marshmellows, Short

78

0.45

0.67

Interconnected

Yes

Nougat, Short

90

0.85

0.37

Interconnected

Yes

Nougat, Long

92

0.85

0.37

Closed

Partly

Fruit Chews

90

0.90

0.33

Closed

No

>95

0.92

0.32

Closed

No

Halwa

to form a protein film at the interface with elastic properties, which contribute to the stability of the foam. Hydrolysed proteins do not show this behaviour (see Figure 2b). The effect of the amount of sur factant is shown in Figure 3. Upon increasing the concentration, there is first a strong increase in foam volume until a maximum is reached. With the increase in foam volume, the viscosity of the foam increases, and this makes it difficult to incorporate more air. In addition, the films between the air cells become thinner and are easier to disrupt, leading to air

cell coalescence and loss of air. Consequently, equilibrium is reached between air that is whipped in and air that gets lost. Upon increasing the surfactant concentration, the size of the air bubbles decreases, allowing the creation of extra interfacial surface, hence, smaller bubbles. This gives a further increase in the relative viscosity of the foam. effeCt Of WhiPPing agent COnCentratiOn A much lower amount of hydrolysed protein is required to reach the maximum foam volume than with intact protein.

Figure 2: Surface properties of intact protein (egg albumin) and hydrolysed protein (Hyfoama) 150 Surface Elasticity (mN/m)

Surface Tension (mN/m)

80 70 60 50 40 30 20

125 100 75 50 25 0

0

5

10

Concentration (%) Hyfoama

Egg Albumin

15

0

5

10

Concentration (%) Hyfoama

Egg Albumin

15


INGREDIENTS & ADDITIVES

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Stability Of Aerated Sugar Confectionery Getting air in a sugar mass is one thing, keeping it in is a totally different challenge as foams are thermodynamically unstable. The main destabilising processes in aerated sugar confectionery products are disproportioning and drainage. • Disproportioning Disproportioning (also called Ostwald ripening) is the growth

Figure 3: Effects of whipping agent concentration on whipping performance 1.0 0.8 Phase Volume

0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 0

2

4

6

8

10

12

Amount of Whipping Agent (mg/ml) 0% sugar, Hyfoama

40% sugar, Hyfoama

0% sugar, Egg Albumin

40% sugar, Egg Albumin

Yomi Yomi, Kyoto, Japan / C Chidsey, Wiltshire, UK

At higher sugar levels, the phase volume for a given amount of hydrolised protein is slightly reduced, and is related to the increased viscosity. It can be seen that the performance of egg albumin is much more affected by the increased sugar concentration. This is related to the protecting effect of sugar against (surface) denaturation. Reducing the amount of surfactant first will result in an increase in bubble size, and in softer foams. Only at very low concentrations will the foam volume be reduced. As mentioned earlier, globular proteins such as egg albumin unroll at the air-water interface and will interact to form a film that contributes to the foam stability. Upon increase of the whipping time, however, more protein will interact, and in time insoluble aggregates that have no surfacea c t i v e p ro p e r t i e s w i l l b e formed. Due to this irreversible aggregation process, the foam volume is reduced: the foam is overwhipped. Another important parameter is the viscosity of the liquid phase. Viscosity increases when the amount of sugar is increased and/or when sugar syrup with a lower DE is used.

of larger bubbles at the cost of smaller bubbles. It is the result of the fact that the pressure in a smaller bubble is higher than in a larger bubble, gas will therefore diffuse from the smaller to the bigger bubble causing the smaller bubbles to disappear. This process can be stopped or retarded by increasing the surface elasticity, by giving the liquid phase a yield value, or by

solidifying the liquid phase. As shown in Figure 2, the use of egg albumin results in an increased surface elasticity. In addition, the egg albumin gel that is formed upon heating (when using boiling sugar syrups), has a yield value. As such, egg albumin is an important ingredient for the stability of the aerated sugar confectionery product. To solidify the liquid phase, the sugar level can be increased.


INGREDIENTS & ADDITIVES

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39

In order to obtain good stability without using gelling agents, it is recommended that the solids level is 90 percent or higher. • Drainage Drainage is the flow of liquid out of the foam due to gravity. The rate of drainage is lower when the liquid has a higher viscosity, or when the average bubble size is smaller. It will stop when the liquid has a sufficient yield value, which can be realised by using a protein based gelling agent such as egg albumin, gelatine, or a hydrocolloid based gelling agent. Increasing the amount of sugar not only increases the viscosity, but the foaming properties of intact proteins are also negatively

affected (see Figure 3). It is well known that with increasing sugar concentration, the denaturation temperature of proteins increases; this affects the surface denaturation and the unrolling at the interface. This will result with a reduced foaming power. The Bottomline When producing aerated sugar confectionery the viscosity (determined by the sugar concentration), the whipping time, and the amount and type of whipping agent are important parameters. The main whipping agents are protein based: hydrolysed protein or egg albumin (intact protein). When comparing these two products, it can be seen that: • Hydrolysed protein has gives a higher volume, and smaller

bubbles at lower dose rates, for whipping • Egg albumin gives stability to an aerated sugar mass Increasing the sugar levels has two effects: • Due to the increased viscosity it is more difficult to aerate, but the stability of the aerated product increases • The whipping performance of egg albumin is reduced As such, for products with a high level of solids, hydrolysed protein is the preferred whipping agent, and for lower solid products, egg albumin is the more suitable choice. For more information, ENTER No: 0351

Kehua’s equipment: Flat waffle biscuit production line Hollow waffle biscuit production line Soft waffle biscuit production line Waffle cup for ice cream production line

KE HUA FOODSTUFF MACHINERY INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE CO. LTD ADD: 12 Jingde Street, Duanzhou 3 Road, Zhaoqing City, Guangdong, PRC

Tel: + 86-758-2727608 Fax: +86-758-2727608

www.kehuachina.com

E-mail: kehuachina@163.com

Enquiry Number

2528

Other single machine & corollary equipment


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Haroldo Sena, Belo Horizonte, Brazil/ Florin Florea, Cluj Napoca, Romania

Papaya has recently been featured in a number of packaged foods, beverages, dietary supplements and beauty products, but is it just a passing fad or is it here to stay? By Izaskun Bengoechea, departmental research analyst, Euromonitor International

Papaya:

The

Superfruit Suspect Papaya, and more importantly the enzymes that are extracted from it, called papain, has been making an entrance in various products in recent years. Papain is claimed to have several health benefits, especially in the field of digestive health. Currently, Israel is the most developed market for papaya. It has been one of the fastest growing vitamins and dietary supplements, posting double-digit growth every year since 2003. Papaya and its extracts have also been found in packaged foods, drinks and beauty supplements.


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Indonesia PT. CONNELL BERSAUDARA CHEMINDO (62-21) 5794 1900

2614

Let our experienced team help you find the natural solution to your next liquid Asian Blend need.


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Packaged Foods & NonAlcoholic Drinks In packaged foods, papaya has been mostly seen in functional gum. Wrigley, for example, launched Orbit Balance in 2007, containing aloe vera and papaya as core ingredients to aid digestion. However, one of papain’s first appearances in Europe was in the Chicles Delgatín gum brand in June 2007, in Spain. Positioned as a slimming gum, the product claimed that thanks to papaya, consumers feel fuller and therefore avoid snacking when trying to diet. The product is still widely available through health food stores and is said to be a success, as it was previously in Israel and the US. In drinks, papaya is not yet being promoted on the basis of its medicinal properties, but as a way of tapping into consumer demand for more exotic tastes. In the UK, the Tropicana juice brand has recently launched a new range of flavour blends, including a variety with mango, peach and papaya. Cosmetics & Toiletries In cosmetics and toiletries, papain is also making an appearance in many skincare products such as

Elemis Papaya Enzyme Peel, which claims to brighten and polish skin. It also won a ‘Cosmopolitan Beauty Award’ in the ‘Ultimate Polisher’ category in 2005, while The Body Shop offers papaya body butter. Although Elemis appeals to consumers through the fruit’s ability to help brighten the skin, the latter product is part of a more widespread trend for exotic fruit-based scents. Not Everything Is Peachy… However, the ascendancy of papaya is not without difficulty. In 2008, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) banned all topically applied drugs containing papain. Although the types of drugs that usually contain papain were used for specific skin ulcers and to treat wounds, side effects included hypersensitivity, which has led to cases of low blood pressure and rapid heart rate, as well as allergic reactions. Furthermore, the effectiveness of papain has not yet been scientifically proven. With many countries looking to clamp down on health claims that have not been medically substantiated, this poses a potential problem for papaya where it is expressly marketed as a health aid. Superfruit Or Not At the height of the superfruit trend, fruits appeared on a regular basis, making extraordinary medicinal claims. As a result of this overload, consumers are now less receptive to new products and ingredients. In Singapore, mangosteen is

the latest superfruit, featuring in a range of functional juices and dietary supplements, which claim to have a high concentration of a natural antioxidant called xanthone. However, its success appears to be limited to the country. Although health is still a priority for consumers, given the economic situation of many countries, superfruits are now being sidelined by other

gt@gtamin, Jakarta, Indonesia

Vitamin & Dietary Supplement Israel is currently the most developed market for papaya extract, thanks to companies such as Ambrosia Solgar and Iltex Biotech, which have marketed it as a digestive aid. Overall sales of the extract in 2008 reached NIS1 million (US$268,383.61). However, there are several other manufacturers which sell papaya extract online in many countries, including Vitabase, Nature’s Plus and brand Immun’Age Fermented Papaya extract is widely available.

priorities, such as naturally healthy food. If papaya is to be the next big supplement, it will need a clear health claim that responds to either of the key concerns of today’s consumers – ageing and age-related illness and obesity. However, the key selling proposition of papaya is more related to digestive health, which may not convince consumers who do not have, or want to spend as much money as they would have a year ago.

For more information, ENTER No: 0352


Enquiry Number

2630


HEALTH & NUTRITION

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY APRIL/MAY 2010

Kelly Cline

CubeStock

Simon Cataudo, Newcastle, UK

44

Inner Beauty That S

Deniz Ongar, Istanbul, Turkey

Products that support health and appearance from inside are gaining popularity as consumers begin to understand that what they eat affects how they look. By Tjut Rostina

F O R a beautiful, youthful appearance, a healthy lifestyle, including balanced diet, physical exercise and limited stress is essential. In addition to the use of care cosmetics, the regular consumption of oily fish, lots of brightly coloured vegetables and several cups of green tea are recommended to nourish and protect our beauty – food habits many busy people living today’s fast paced culture lack. Consumers tend to choose products that combine convenience, health and beauty in form of dietary supplements, functional foods or beverages. In an exclusive interview with Asia Pacific Food Industry, Dr Isabelle Frappa, global business manager of DSM Nutritional Products, shares more on the drivers and trends that will propel the nutricosmetics industry. APFI: How would you define nutricosmetics, and how is it different from cosmeceuticals? IF: The terms cosmeceuticals and nutricosmetics can bring some

Dr Isabelle Frappa, global business manager, DSM Nutritional Products

confusion. Within the industry, the word nutricosmetics is now widely used by market analysts and consumers, to talk about beauty supplements, as well as foods and beverages. Cosmeceuticals, on the other hand, are generally recognised as cosmetics containing active ingredients. APFI: What is the major factor that is driving the nutricosmetics market? IF: Today’s consumers are more


health and image-conscious than ever before; everyone wants to look healthy. At the same time, the public awareness about the link between nutrition, health and beauty has never been so high. Surveys reveal that consumers know about the role of proper nutrition to maintain or improve skin health and general appearance.

CubeStock

Shows of value-added products generating high profits. APFI: How do the tr ends compare between Asia and other regions? IF: Products that support health and appearance from inside are gaining popularity as consumers begin to understand that what they eat affects how they look. A

While market analysts around the world already identify beauty from within as a key trend in the dietary supplement sector, they also place beauty foods and beverages among the top ten trends for the coming years. While market analysts around the world already identify beauty from within as a key trend in the dietary supplement sector, they also place beauty foods and beverages among the top ten trends for the coming years. For food and beverage companies, supplement producers and manufacturers of personal care products, it is an opportunity to develop in a growing market

trend that started off in Asia, the region takes the lead in the industry. In Japan, beauty foods and supplements emerged in the early mid-1990s, where they developed very quickly. Today, most supplement, food but also cosmetic companies have their own nutricosmetic brand on the market, sold in specialty shops and dedicated department store counters.

Nutricosmetics are still in their beginning in the Western countries, but strong market development is expected in Europe and the US within the next few years. In Europe, France is the main player, but Italy and Spain are also becoming key players in the beauty food and supplement markets. APFI: What is the current size of this market worldwide? IF: Total beauty food market value was evaluated at about US$6 billion in 2008 with a strong growth rate of 8.4 percent globally, leading to US$7.6 billion in 2011. The growth rate is expected to


HEALTH & NUTRITION

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY APRIL/MAY 2010

46

Ayhan Yildiz, Turkey

needed to defend profitability. We see smaller, more agile companies were first to embrace beauty foods, while multinationals play the waiting game to review the different product approaches. Large manufacturers are just beginning to enter the market.

stay high over the period 2011 to 2014, with 6.8 percent in Europe and 5.9 percent globally. This leads up to a total market value of US$9.1 billion in 2014, with European contribution at US$2.8 billion. As you can see, the majority of nutricosmetics market is actually outside of Europe; it is in Asia. The beauty supplement market is currently also benefiting from a strong growth rate. Total beauty supplement market value was evaluated at US$4.5 billion in 2008, with a strong growth rate that could bring it to a total of US$5.6 billion in 2011. Growth rate is expected to stay high over the period 2011 to 2014, with a total market value of US$6.5 billion by 2014. We do not see the possible flagging of the market in the coming years because of the increasing awareness of the link between nutrition and beauty. The

APFI: Nutricosmetics are generally perceived as costing mor e than cosmetics and normal foods. As such, what are the factors that would drive consumption? IF: Again, today’s consumers are more health and image-conscious than ever before; and they are more informed. Surveys reveal that consumers know about the role of proper nutrition to maintain or improve skin health and general appearance. In the West, and I think is true everywhere, a large degree of

The recent development of the beauty food and supplement market finds its origin in consumers’ growing recognition of the importance of good diet for inner and outside health and beauty. recent development of the beauty food and supplement market finds its origin in consumers’ growing recognition of the importance of good diet for inner and outside health and beauty. APFI: What are the challenges that manufacturers would face? IF: The food market is mature and sale of ‘A-list’ brands are being challenged by private labels. Manufacturers need to differentiate with sophisticated formulations to justify premium positioning, and drive value growth and profitability. A new point of difference, such as beauty or skin, is always

importance is put on physical attractiveness. People, especially middle-aged female consumers, want products that will actively maximise their attractiveness. Consumer trust in oral beauty products is key for success in the Western world, whereas Asian consumers are looking for innovation and are open to try a variety of new functional products. We see this as a challenge for the industr y because those new functional products may not have been as properly studied as those that are already established. In order to convince consumers to obtain premium


HEALTH & NUTRITION

APRIL/MAY 2010 ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY

47

APFI: Is there new scientific evidence in nutricosmetics that you can share? IF: The new generation of nutricosmetics supported by our research team offers a wide range of beauty benefits. They combine the efficacy of a large variety of ingredients in five beauty from within platforms: 1. Skin Fundamentals: the basic nutrients for skin health 2. S k i n D e f e n s e : f o r s k i n protection again oxidative damage and stress 3. Sun Protection: to shield the skin against UVA and UVB damage 4. Optimal Hydration: to proper moisturie the skin 5. Hair & Nails: to supply nutrients for shiny hair and strong nails. A number of literature has shown that EGCG from green tea contributes to the integrity of the skin by reducing UVinduced photo-damage, favouring proliferation and differentiation of normal skin cells and

promoting death of aberrant cells. Other research indicates that CoQ10 may delay skin aging by protecting the mitochondria integrity against oxidative damage. This is important to maintain skin energy metabolism responsible for new skin cells generation. Carotenoids are necessary to protect the skin from UVrelated aging processes. Mixed carotenoids of beta-carotene,

and E. and some minerals. Newer ingredients such as resveratrol from wine and hydroxytyrosol from olives have been shown to have antioxidant properties that are beneficial for the skin as well. APFI: What are the emerging trends that can be expected from the industry? IF: Combining beauty from inside and outside is one of the emerging

Lauren Lank, Arizona, US / Adyna, Brasov, Romania

products, perceived benefits must be clear and convincing. Product efficacy claims must be rigorously backed by science, and supported by professional partnerships and well-known manufacturers, in order to gain credibility. A balance between convenience and the cost of it should also be considered. Consumers should understand that the efficacy of the functional ingredients in beauty foods requires regular consumption to maintain optimum levels in the body, rather than achieving a tangible benefit with just one shot. This is the main d i f f e re n c e b e t w e e n n u t r i cosmetics and topically-applied cosmetics products.

lycopene, and lutein have been shown to be an ‘internal’ sunfilter and can work in addition to the sunscreen lotion you have applied. DSM’s own proprietary study shows that the combination of lycopene and EGCG may reduce the breakdown of collagen in the skin. To maintain a good hydration and elasticity, the skin should be sufficiently supplied with omega-6 fatty acids. For beautiful hair and nails, nourish yourself with plenty of biotin, vitamins C

trends in Western countries, following Asia’s lead, where cosmetic companies have had their own nutricosmetic brands for a number of years.

For more information, ENTER No: 0360


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your Regular

Beverage

Marrying the benefits of functional ingredients and flavours catered for the elderly will continue to be a focus. By Tan Pok Kiam, group business manager, KH Roberts I n c r e a s i n g ly, p a c k a g e d b e v e r a g e s a re n o l o n g e r expected to just quench thirst, and consumers look beyond this basic functionality to fulfil alternative needs and benefits. Ready-To-Drink (RTD) juices, teas, soy beverages, drinkable dairy products, and even water, can be specifically formulated t o d e l i v e r d e s i re d h e a l t h benefits; from maintaining health and beauty to boosting immunity system and energy. All this through the inclusion of functional and nutraceutical ingredients.

For instance, in developed markets, basic mineral and vitamin fortified beverages are already considered mainstream by consumers and are expected for, in certain product categories – rehydration functionality in isotonic beverages. Greying & Growing The greying of the world’s population in many developed markets has been stunning, contributed by the post-war baby-boomers, who form a large demographic and potential new consumer market, especially in

Tinpalace, Cananda

Beyond

developed Asian cities and the US – with a population of 78 million alone. This specific segment of consumers is educated and leads active lifestyles, and many of them have high relative purchasing power. Baby-boomers, having gone through the industrial revolution, understand the advancement of sciences and are more receptive to value-added functional food and beverages. While supplements and nutraceuticals in the forms of pills and capsules may fulfil the health benefits and needs of these aging consumers, regular pill popping may not be everyone’s cup of tea. Flavourenhanced fortified beverages, developed specifically to deliver


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health benefits whilst catering to the sensory preferences of the aging and elderly, have thus become viable and relevant for manufacturers to take on. Functional Beverages For years, packaged beverages are the preferred delivery platform for functional benefits as fortified beverages can be taken as part of the daily diet and requirement of water intake for consumers. The elderly also welcomes consumption of beverages, which do not require chewing, as they are often affected by the loss of teeth, which may otherwise cause food avoidance. When designed with a convenient on-the-go packaging

substances may be impaired due to various factors, such as drugs, or natural deterioration of the body’s metabolism. The Flavour Challenge While making sure the fortified drinks deliver their promised benefits, it is pertinent that the product must taste good to the consumers, or cannot deter too much from its original aroma and taste which consumers are familiar with. Ingredient interaction with the nutraceutical components in the functional beverage may affect the appearance or flavour of the product, or prevent the active substances from performing upon intake into the

body. Such challenges require significant alterations to the beverage formulation to deliver a satisfactory beverage flavour, mouthfeel and/or appearance that the consumers can easily accept. This is especially critical when formulating a functional beverage for the elderly, as not only do their taste and smell sensitivities decrease with age, but their preferences alter with time as well. Collagen Peptide Basics Collagen peptide, a hydrolysate derived from mammalian origins, such as porcine, bovine or fish, is formed by enzymatic hydrolysis of gelatin, which in turn is the

The greying of the world’s population in many developed markets has been stunning, contributed by the post-war baby-

format, the incidence of functional beverage consumption can also be easily encouraged. In terms of safety, supplements, nutraceuticals and vitamins put into packaged beverages pose fewer risks to consumers’ health because of their relatively low dosage per unit volume, as compared to health supplements, pills and concentrates. However, manufacturers face a number of challenges in meeting the market’s expectations, while pushing limits in the fortification of beverages. In order to achieve the desired benefits for consumers, a suitable and stable concentration of enhancers must be bio available to the consumers. This is especially so in the case of the elderly, as absorption and body utilisation of the active

CubeStock

boomers, who form a large demographic and potential new consumer market...


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Collagen Benefits Collagen protein has become i n c re a s i n g l y p o p u l a r a s a functional ingredient in the past 10 years, though not often picked up by manufacturers till recently. As more clinical studies and experimental findings document its beauty, health and medical benefits, the ingredient is consequently gaining the support of medical communities and consumer confidence. Collagen accounts for up to 30 percent of a human body’s proteins, and is distributed predominantly in skin, bone, cartilage and blood. Natural production of collagen in the body keeps the skin firm and smooth, and reduces damage to joints, keeping them supported and flexible. However, with age, the body loses its ability to make collagen, resulting in sagging skin, wrinkles, thin and dull hair, and stiffer joints. Apart from ageing, the imbalance of catabolic and anabolic

processes in the body may also result in degradation of collagen. Dermis and cartilage may not be able to regenerate sufficiently, if their metabolism imbalances lead to tissue degradation. As such, collagen supplements are intended at replenishing the depleting supply of collagen to various parts of the body, maintaining or improving skin tautness, wound healing, and reducing joints pain and swelling.

Recent findings compiled by Nitta Gelatin show that upon oral ingestion of collagen peptides, human venous blood contains high levels of prolyl-hydroxyproline (Pro-Hyp), a dipeptide of the collagen repeating unit glycinePro-Hyp (Gly-Pro-Hyp). Utilisation of Pro-Hyp in the body has been observed to maintain and promote joint health, by widening the spaces between joints, building bone

Collagen Fortification For Elderly An imbalanced diet and absorption problems may result in poor mineral and vitamin intakes for the elderly. In particular, a decline in calcium absorption and vitamin D intake affects bone mass, and eventually lead to osteoporosis and bone fractures. This is especially if the aged have little physical activity. Osteoarthritis is a disease that causes pain in joints owing to meniscus damage or bone fracture, as a result of agingrelated abrasion of cartilage, a cushion of joints, or inflammation or deformation of joints induced by deterioration of muscular power. Hence, the process of absorption and utilisation of the collagen peptides upon ingestion by the elderly are of significant interest.

tissue layers, and preserving the thickness of joint cartilage layers to support the joints.

Ulrik De Wachter, Landskouter, Belgium

product of partial and irreversible hydrolysis of collagen. To produce highly purified collagen peptides, gelatin undergoes two purifications. High quality gelatin is first formed in the initial purification, which is then put through an enzymatic treatment to yield gelatin hydrolysates, otherwise known as collagen peptides. This is followed by a second high-level purification process, which also de-odourises, decolours and sterilises the collagen peptides to yield a high quality product, ready for use in various applications. The collagen peptides can also be stored at ambient temperature, do not form gel when mixed in water, and can be easily absorbed and digested in the body to aid the production of collagen.

Flavours To Entice By incorporating convenient packaging design, collagenfortified beverage manufacturers would have achieved two of the three key pillars of desirable food and beverage product design – flavour, health and convenience. The eventual success of the beverage hinges very much on the overall acceptance by consumers, and beverage flavours serve several functions in beverages fortified with various additives. The flavours may be used to maintain the original beverage taste and aroma that the aging have grown accustomed to, alter or mask unpleasant or incompatible odours, or simply to impart a new, improved and


Enquiry Number

2621


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desirable aromatic profile. Some flavours may, in addition to flavouring the drink, also impart a suitable or preferred physical appearance to the product, such as colour and cloudiness. Application of flavours to beverages is dictated by the nature of the beverage as consumed, and the inclusion of colours can further enhance the positive perceived flavour of the end product. In application,

and flavour houses have to work closely to achieve the perfect composition balance between the active substance and flavour of the fortified drink. Decrease in the enjoyment of food by the elderly has been attributed to a decrease in chemosensory sensitivity. This is sometimes made worse by the various drugs that the elderly may be taking. For instance, humidity changes in the mouth

a peach flavoured drink fortified with collagen, will add to a positive and pleasurable sensory experience for the elderly. Furthermore, to compensate for the lower than usual concentration of sugars typically used in products for the elderly, m o d i f i c a t i o n o f p e rc e i v e d sweetness can be achieved through the use of fruit flavours, which increase palatability of the beverages.

To compensate for the lower than usual concentration of sugars typically used in products for the elderly, modification of perceived

Nitta Gelatin

sweetness can be achieved through the use of fruit flavours, which increase palatability of the beverages.

the added flavours and colours must also be stable to heat, light, acids, preservatives, and most importantly, the active substances, like collagen peptides in this case. A longer chain, higher molecular weight collagen peptides, or a high concentration of low molecular weight collagen peptides, may interact with compounds present in beverage flavours. This can result in an undesirable appearance, such as precipitation or colour alterations. In other cases, interaction with peptide molecules may also change or eliminate the aroma profile of the flavour added, as physical adsorption or chemical reactions of peptides with volatile compounds will disrupt the headspace composition of the beverage. Therefore, collagenfortified beverage manufacturers

due to certain drugs, may modify the flavour of food and drinks. As a result, higher intensity flavours may be required as people age. Flavour enhancement has also been found to be able to compensate for the chemosensory loss in the elderly more so in beverages than in foods. This allows functional beverage manufacturers to make use of this advantage to intensify the flavours in their products according to preferences of the elderly. Apart from flavour enhancement, studies have shown that the elderly have increased hedonics ratings for food and beverages enriched with flavours that are not an inherent part of the original product. For instance, the addition of a new flavour, such as mango, to

Silver Lining In The Greying Market Extensive research and development have yielded flavours that will transform the product and consumer experience. This provides the elderly with a product that not only benefits them in health, but also a complete sensory encounter that will give them more reasons to come back for more. Marrying the benefits of functional ingredients and flavours catered for the elderly will continue to be a focus. Despite the growth of many emerging markets, the increasing size of the greying segments in many cities and its potential to be sustained, is certainly a market that will not be overlooked by manufacturers. For more information, ENTER No: 0370


Enquiry Number

2613


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Machine Vision:

A Bull’s Eye On

Safety

Virtually every product that is manufactured in high volume, or at high accuracy, or that has to be made at very low cost, can be made better, faster, and cheaper using machine vision. By Didier Lacroix, senior VP, international sales & services, Cognex

In recent years, food safety, compliance, product recalls and brand reputation, has forced many organisations in the food and beverage industry to question their ability in providing enterprise-wide traceability. These manufacturers are reexamining the success of their traceability initiatives in a bid to ensure food safety across their entire supply chains, from the field to the fork. Soon, every manufacturer will need to have complete supplier, manufacturing and delivery data for every product at their fingertips, and in real time. Incomplete, inaccurate or untimely data will no longer be acceptable. Taking this into account, more Asian F&B companies have been taking measures by examining various ways to improve the safety and quality of their products. One such measure that is gaining popularity is the implementation of machine vision systems.

Vision Functionality Machine vision systems are used to detect defects and other problems in manufactured items, packages, or assemblies. They do so using a combination of microprocessor technology and image analysis software to

interpret images and generate information about them. Machine vision can be used in four ways: • Gauging: To measure an item or examine its critical dimensions • Inspection: To indicate if an item is good or bad, based on


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its physical characteristics • Guidance: To accurately locate or place items • Identification: To determine whether the right item is present by inspecting its physical characteristics, reading characters, or a marked code

GAUGING INSPECTI N

Traceability, compliance, costcontrol and quality management are important issues in the F&B manufacturing industry and machine vision helps to resolve the following issues. Traceability Fast becoming the most important word in the automated manufacturing environment, traceability lets food and beverage processors and packagers know where all ingredients have come from and where all products are shipped to at any given point in time, and is essential for optimising efficiency which allows large cost savings. One way to do this is by implementing two dimensional barcodes and image-based ID readers, which enables manufacturers to better track inventory and work-in-process. Tr a c e a b i l i t y a l s o h e l p s packagers confirm that labels and products match to lower the risk of recalls due to mislabelling. They also help track lots, batches, and individual items through the supply chain to reduce the cost of recalls due to product contamination. The better and more precise the tracing system, the faster a producer can identify and resolve product safety or quality problems. For example, a manufacturer may uniquely code each lot or batch to identify time and location of production, in order to make recalls more efficient and less costly.


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This can be a huge benefit for manufacturers competing in an intensely competitive retail structure with narrow profit margins, such as the food industry, where reducing these costs can be the difference between successful and failed firms. Compliance Due to the surge in food safety initiatives and mandates, more manufacturers have responded by putting regulatory compliance at the top of their agenda. Increasingly, manufacturers, packagers and their equipment and materials suppliers, point to vision systems as a key technology helping them achieve compliance in an increasingly regulatory environment. Many of these firms implement vision systems, two dimensional barcodes, image-based ID readers, and verifiers to comply with food and beverage safety initiatives. The result of compliance with these new mandates is improved F&B safety, product integrity and supply chain security. However, compliance aside, manufacturers have discovered value in being able to prevent parallel trade through unauthorised channels, stop counterfeiting, and achieve greater visibility into how products are made, distributed and used. Cost Control With increasingly fierce competition and low profit margins constantly on the minds of food and beverage manufacturers, cost control is absolutely critical for success. Using vision systems for gauging, inspection, guidance, and identification helps F&B manufacturers to reduce costs in their processing and packaging operations.

GUIDANCE By minimising waste and detecting process errors early, manufacturers can isolate the source and extent of safety or quality control problems to minimise production and distribution of unsafe or poorquality products that will have to be recalled. This reduces the cost of recalls, potential cost of any related liability, and the cost of bad publicity, which can damage brand reputation. Quality Management In business-to-business relationships, buyers have come to expect higher quality products from their suppliers than they did in the past. As such, it is understandable that firms, which cannot document that they satisfy specific quality criteria, have little chance of winning contracts from large buyers. While inspection at the end-ofthe-line is great for final product

checking, waiting until after a product has undergone numerous value-added stages of production often results in costly waste and time-consuming rework. In addition, defects not caught at the source generate little information about the cause. That is why many manufacturers deploy modular, stand alone vision systems at multiple points along their production lines where significant value is added. By deploying vision systems at key process points where there is significant value added, manufacturers can achieve tighter process control to errorproof production. Machine vision provides production information that can be used for continuous process control to optimise productivity, and overall equipment utilisation. This is important for continuous process optimisation, which is vital for firms to maximise output and profits. systEM suitaBiLity In an F&B packaging plant, package and container materials, labelling equipment, printing methods, and ambient lighting conditions can vary considerably over time. When evaluating a vision system, be sure to test it on a large sample of good, marginal, and poor quality labels to see how the system performs under variable real-world conditions. As character positions can shift from label to label, it is also a good idea to enlarge the region of interest around the character string. This will help you determine the reliability of the vision system’s reading and verification tools in operating within a larger search region. When reading verifying date and lot code information on medicine bottles or packages, there are several capabilities to look


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for when evaluating character reading and verification tools. statistiCaL Font tRaininG This capability builds a font by learning models of characters that appear in a series of images. The images should include multiple instances of each character, and span the full range of quality likely to occur in production. The resulting font will be highly tolerant of normal variations in print quality, whether due to poor contrast, variable locations, degradations, or variations in stroke widths. Unless there is advance knowledge that every code will be marked with the same quality seen in the reference images used to learn the character models, statistical font training can be crucial to the success of a reading or verification application. iMaGE PRE-PRoCEssinG tooLs These tools optimise a trained model by sharpening the edge contrast of characters and filtering out extraneous background in the image. Optimised models maximise the reliability and repeatability of the vision system. instant iMaGE RECaLL This capability enables line operators and technicians to quickly and easily view failed images on a display. Whether the failure is caused by a camera jarred out of position, or a missing or damaged label, it is important to know immediately why the failure occurred so corrective action may be taken. F & B e n v i ro n m e n t s a l s o demand a vision system that can read 2D data matrix codes that are degraded, poorly marked, or vary in position from part to part. The vision system should perform well regardless of the part material (such as metal,

IDENTIFICATI N glass, ceramic, and plastic), and the type of part marking method employed. Beyond these criteria, there are several specific code reading features worth inquiring about: • Code Quality Verification Look for products that can verify code quality to established standards. This can provide valuable information about how well the marking process is working. • Reading Speed Depending on the production line speed and throughput requirements, the manufacturer may need a very high speed reader. The fastest vision systems available today can read more than 7,200 codes per minute. EVaLuation Points To evaluate industrial code reading tools, start by measuring the vision system’s reading speed.

To do this, present a well-marked code to the vision system and have it read the code hundreds of times under pristine conditions to determine the number of reads per minute. Make sure that the read rate under these optimised conditions is 100 percent, or problems may be faced later when conditions might be less than ideal. For example, at a production line speed of 2,000 parts per hour, a read rate of 99.7 percent would fail to read the ID codes on 48 parts in just one eight-hour shift. After establishing the system’s reading speed, a more challenging read rate test should be carried out to determine the impact of factors such as line vibration, variable lighting conditions, and extremely high line speeds on the vision system’s reading performance in your application. To do this, present a large sample of varying qualities to the vision system. At the same time, simulate vibration and motion blur by shaking the part and sliding it back and forth beneath the camera as it acquires an image. This test will provide a good initial assessment of how well the vision system’s read rate will hold up under real-world production conditions. Virtually every product that is manufactured in high volume, or at high accuracy, or that has to be made at very low cost, can be made better, faster, and cheaper using machine vision. As such, investments in greater automation and the implementation of vision systems and ID readers in processing and packaging operations would be beneficial to Asia’s F&B manufacturing sector. For more information, ENTER No: 0380


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Spices: The

Hygiene C de

The ‘spice process operation’ gives a practical monitoring and control parameter for implementation. By Lawrence Low, food safety specialist, Gourmet Food Safety Consultancy

Fran GambÌn, Murcia, Spain / Zsuzsanna Kilian, Budapest, Hungary

There has been an increasing awareness of the ISO 22000 food safety management system in Asia. ISO 22000:2005 specifies requirements for a food safety management system, where an organisation in the food chain needs to demonstrate its ability to control food safety hazards from farm to fork. Although the standard is applicable to all organisations, its system implementation varies based on different set ups. This includes equipments used, operation flow, control parameters, quality of infrastructure, as well as the knowledge of food

safety implementation by the food specialist or owner. One of the most commonly implemented system is the ‘spice process operation’, which is done with reference to the technical guidelines in ISO 22004, and the specific industry relevant codex Pre-requisite programme & Industrial requirement (eg: ADOGA for spice). This system

gives a practical monitoring and control parameter for implementation. Spice Operation Within the spice operation, the team will choose to implement CAC/RCP 42 – 1995, Code of Hygiene Practice for Spices & Aromatic Plants as a guide of good operation practices. The practices not only cover spices under whole, broken, grounded and blended conditions, but also include products from its harvest state till storage as a processed product. It is also considered as part of the ISO 22000 clause 7.2. Within the ISO 22000, the control plays an important role under clause 7.3.3.1, raw


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Lighting Conditions Under this guide, one part that would be challenging during implementation would be the light intensity between inspections, operation to general work area, where 540, 220 and 110 lux intensity lights are to be implemented respectively. For this, preparation can be done with higher intensity light, an increase in the number of lighting, or the light source can be lowered down to meet the requirements. Contamination & Infestation With reference to Section (VII) of the hygienic processing requirement, the raw material acceptance criteria should focus on the any growth of mould. This is where high chances for mycotoxin contamination and insect infestation can occur, as different parts of the imported raw material could give rise to pests that could infest the operation area. Through experience, sulphur content should also be tested to avoid any contamination with additional sulphur dioxide during processing. This gives a bleaching effect on the product colour and lower bacteria level; however, it will cause allergen issues for sensitive consumers. Irradiation Analysis Another area of concern would be implementing the analysis of irradiation residue presence in the spice related product. This is due to the preference of some manufacturers to reduce any germination of the spice in raw form during storage.

Details of meeting the irradiation requirement are in the ‘Code of Good Irradiation’ practices for the control of pathogen in spice. Further hazard analysis could lead to an OPRP, where the quantities, presence or absence of the irradiation residue is being evaluated. During processing, with reference to clause 7.2 and 7.4 of the standard, under normal circumstances, a set of general hygiene practice would be sufficient. This does not include products that require blending, where physical contamination could potentially happen.

and in most circumstances, the sealing is considered CCP upon applying the hazard analysis. Therefore, a 100 percent sealing integrity is normally used as the critical limit (7.6.3) for the derived Hazard Plan (7.6). In the labelling and storage p ro c e s s , t h e p ro d u c t w i l l be labelled with the proper product labelling requirement of the local country. According to clause 7.3.3.2 & 7.3.4, the storage humidity would be best at 55 to 60 percent, otherwise, the maximum would be at 65 percent, or maintained at around 20 deg C.

Detection Of Foreign Objects In smaller factories, the team would use magnets to reduce metal contamination. As for large and medium scale operations, some manufacturers would install metal detectors to eliminate this form of contamination. Another CCP (Critical Control Point) that can be derived for a higher investment will be an X-ray machine, to detect other foreign objects that the metal detector cannot.

The most preferred transportation storage condition would be for the product to be in an ambient condition (eg: 30 deg C), before exposing to external conditions. Overall, the process commonly known as the ‘spice process operation’ with the appropriate control parameters guided by the CAC/RCP 42-1995, ISO 22000 FSMS & Industrial guideline (ADOGA), allows a more robust implementation on the food safety system.

Adam Davis, Birmingham, UK

material characteristic, and 7.4, hazard analysis, where this stage could be place under OPRP (Operational Pre-requisite Program).

Packed & Sealed In the packaging stage, the condition of sealing is critical

For more information, ENTER No: 0381


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NonCase-Study:

Returnables

ine FOR

Beverages Alcohol-based mixed drinks are proving to be more popular in South Africa. For bottling these drinks, also referred to as flavoured alcoholic beverages (FABs), the South African Breweries (SAB) commissioned a non-returnables line to handle these drinks. For this purpose, it offers various options for end-ofthe-line packaging, coupled with intelligent process control for high line availability levels. Fierce Competition While the South African beer market was still exhibiting strong growth as recently as the 1990s, growth rates have slowly declined over the past decade, with 2009 even seeing beer consumption

South African company installs line that offers various options for endof-the-line packaging, coupled with intelligent process control for high line availability levels. By Norbert Hampl, Krones AG

fall for the first time, due to the global economic crisis. That is why the company has diversified its product portfolio to include mixed drinks with alcohol content. As far as beer is concerned, South Africa still retains a preference for returnables, which here make up more than two thirds of the total. At Chamdor Brewery, specifically, things look somewhat different. Here, returnables are in the minority, accounting for 45 percent of the volume, and being filled on just one returnables line rated at 40,000, 750 ml bottles an hour. The focus on non-returnables is rooted primarily in the product mix. This is because in the group matrix, Chamdor is essentially responsible for making a variety of FABs (flavoured alcoholic beverages).

The most recent step in the refurbishment project was the construction of a bottling hall with a footprint of 4,000 sq m for what is called ‘Line 7’. This is currently used for filling FABs into 275 ml, 330 ml and 340 ml non-returnable bottles. Demand in the high doublefigure range Ever since these brands were launched in 2004, demand growth has been in the high doublefigure range, reaching 1.3 million hectolitres in the 2008/2009 business year. “These demand levels were behind the decision to buy a new non-returnables line,” explains senior project manager Wally Tollemache. “At the same time, we’ve created more capacity for beer-filling on the other non-returnables line.” The Brutal Fruit variants are


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filled in individually designed, 275-millilitre ACL bottles, so that the line has to handle eight different bottles overall. There are several options for putting the drinks into sales packages: 6-bottle wrap-around cartons on a 24-bottle full-depth tray, 6-bottle shrink-packs on a 24-bottle full-depth tray or in wrap-around cartons, or 24 loose bottles on a tray. Intelligent Solutions For these tasks, the line has been equipped firstly with three different packers to handle the end-of-the-line packaging variants, and secondly with intelligent IT solutions for optimum capacity utilisation, and for smart line control at product changeovers in particular. In view of the multiplicity of different products being filled, this is of the utmost importance. What has been installed for this purpose is an LDS (line documentation system) for data acquisition, and an LMS (line management system) for order handling. The LDS records all the relevant

machine data and consumption figures, and outputs these in combined reports. The LMS, by contrast, provides support for the operators and line managers in handling the orders involved, and in making the necessary adjustments at the machines. This provides appropriately coordinated procedures, as well as concomitant notes and specifications at the machine touch-screen. Bulk glass is passed into the line by a sweep-off depalletiser in robot design. And it is here that intelligent line control with the LMS starts to come into play, due to the number of pallets holding non-returnable bottles fed in at the depalletiser, it should in fact reflect the availability of product at the filler. In other words, when there is not much product left, the bulk-glass supply should be decelerated down to a stop under coordinated control, so that the end of filling can be matched to the number of bottles still required. The LMS knows the order quantities in relation to the size of bottle being filled.

The final station is the Robobox with palletisers, which have been installed in the palletising zone that is shared by all filling lines and connects up to the warehouse.

By continuously checking the order and the filler’s buffer tanks, it is able to compute the number of bottles still required as the smallest unit accurately down to one bottle layer, and to then stop the layer sweep-off function appropriately. Pause Of Pasteurising Zones Once depalletised, after an accutable buffer, the containers are passed via a bottle spacing unit to the rinser and the filler. After they have been inspected for the proper fill level, they travel along a buffering section that takes them to the pasteuriser. Depending on the pasteurisation unit stipulated, it can take up to 1.5 hours for the product to pass through this machine. This means, the pasteuriser may ‘harbour’ a production quantity equivalent


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to 90 minutes’ worth of filler output. All the downstream processes can, as such, continue to work with these bottles after a corresponding time-delay. To prevent the necessity of running the pasteuriser completely empty when a new order is started, to avoid any intermingling, a procedure between the LMS and the pasteuriser has been developed, which requires a pause of only two pasteuriser zones. This corresponds to roughly ten minutes for reliably separating any two orders and for permitting the pasteuriser to run individualised temperature profiles. At the discharge, the LMS, in conjunction with the pasteuriser’s control system, makes sure that the order leaving the machine coincides with the order at the downstream machine, or, if it does not, interrupts product discharge. Smooth Transition A lengthy section of conveyor follows the pasteuriser, which likewise serves as a buffer and leads to two labellers, each with four stations for pressuresensitive labels and two stations for cold-glue neck-around labels. The fact that there are two labellers means that these can be run either in parallel or separately, depending on the order concerned. How they are going to be used for any specific order is dynamically determined by the LMS, both when the order is started, and while it is being processed. On their way from the pasteuriser to the labellers, the bottles pass through a distribution gate, which enables any conceivable combination of labeller to be utilised. One of the possible variants, for example, is to finish a particular order with only one labeller, while

simultaneously changing the other one over to the next order, so as to achieve a maximally smooth transition without any standstills between one order and the next. This is supported by the LMS, which dynamically connects or disconnects a machine in the current route plan, on the basis of appropriate plausibility checks. If, for example, a particular order has come to its end in the pasteuriser, separated from the next by the two zones as explained above, the pasteuriser will send an appropriate signal to the labellers. This in turn will display the message ‘set guide rail’ for the operator, who then inserts the guide rail manually, concludes production at the labeller no longer active, and can change the label reel here, while the second labeller is handling final completion of this nearly finished order. As soon as the next order after the time-delay of two separating zones leaves the pasteuriser, the first labeller is ready for duty again. Three Different Packers After having been inspected for correct label position, the bottles are passed to the end-

of-the-line packaging zone. For this, installed are a packer for six-pack cartons, and two nonreturnables packer. Distribution gates enable these packers to be run either all three together in a series configuration, or only with a concatenated non-returnables packer, one behind the other, or just with one of it directly. The decision as to which operating mode is appropriate is derived from the material list for the goods to be produced, and monitored appropriately by the LMS. A spiral conveyor takes the packs up to a height of around six metres. For construction-related reasons, this is followed by a pack conveyor section roughly 250 m long, leading to the palletiser. Here, like everywhere else in the entire line, SAB Chamdor uses energy-economical motors featuring the eco-gear-unit. Moreover, both the pack and the container conveyors have been equipped with a sleep control feature, meaning they switch off automatically when there are no more containers or packs to be transported. For more information, ENTER No: 0382


2599 Enquiry Number

VIETNAM INTERNATIONAL INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES FISHERIES EXHIBITION EXHIBITION -- VIETFISH VIETFISH VIETNAM

12, 13, 13, 14 14 June June 2010 2010 12,

SAIGONEXHIBITION EXHIBITION& &CONVENTION CONVENTIONCENTER CENTER(SECC) (SECC) SAIGON

799 NGUYEN VAN LINH AVE., DISTRICT 7, HO CHI MINH CITY, VIETNAM 799 NGUYEN VAN LINH AVE., DISTRICT 7, HO CHI MINH CITY, VIETNAM

Organizer: Organizer: VIETNAM ASSOCIATION ASSOCIATION OF OF SEAFOOD SEAFOOD EXPORTERS EXPORTERS AND AND PRODUCERS PRODUCERS -- VASEP VASEP VIETNAM

218, No.6 Street, Lot A, An Phu - An Khanh New Urban Area, An Phu Ward, District 2, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam 218, No.6 Street, Lot A, An Phu - An Khanh New Urban Area, An Phu Ward, District 2, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam Tel: +84-08-628 10 442- Fax: +84-08-628 10 450 - Website: http://www.vietfish.com.vn Tel: +84-08-628 10 442- Fax: +84-08-628 10 450 - Website: http://www.vietfish.com.vn


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Market Report:

Many Areas Of Growth Remain For Food & Beverage In US

M Kobayashi-Hillary, London, UK

Comfort At Home A squeeze on disposable incomes due to the recession has assisted sales of some product categories such as meals being consumed in the home. This includes soups, a category which grew 4.1 percent in 2008 to achieve retail sales of US$5.3 billion. The relatively mature ready meals and pizza segments also both registered two percent growth in 2008.

The US, the biggest food and drink market in the world, sets the trend in many product categories and recent research suggests that it continues to be a highly dynamic marketplace. By Chris Brockman, market research manager, Leatherhead Food Research Many areas of growth remain, although retail sales growth in most food categories in the US has slowed during the current recession. Alot of the most successful new products over the last few years have focussed on offering some type of health benefit or fortification. This is particularly prevalent in a category such as yoghurt and chilled desserts, worth US$6.9 billion in 2008, up 4.4 percent on 2007. The trend toward natural ingredients has also gathered pace and is now the key driver in many categories.

Asian Invasion Consumption in many categories has been influenced by the continued penetration of ethnic cuisines, for example, those based on Mediterranean, Mexican and other Latin American cuisines. Asian cuisines (such as Thai, Malay and Indian) have also become more popular in the restaurant sector, which has filtered down into packaged foods. In frozen ready meals for example, Asian meals now account for a 23 percent share (Italian leads with 60 percent).

Savoury Snacks The US savoury snacks market remains by far the largest in the world. In 2008, value sales exceeded US$26 billion, up four percent on the preceding year. Despite the fact that many of the products sold are long established, the rate of new product development remains high in this category. However in recent years, the industry has shifted its focus towards addressing health and obesity concerns (especially among children’s products), as opposed to the development of flavours. Flavours With regard to flavours, innovation has been evident across a number of sectors especially fruit juice, carbonated drinks and soups. However, despite an ever-widening array of flavours to choose from, most consumers remain relatively conservative in terms of taste. In ice cream, for example, vanilla remains the market’s


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most popular flavour, accounting for 32 percent of sales, ahead of chocolate with 21 percent, nut/ caramel with seven percent and strawberry with five percent. Confectionery Meanwhile, the trend towards m o re e x p e n s i v e f o r m s o f chocolate confectionery (dark, specific varietals and functional versions) is sustaining growth in that categor y. Chocolate sales grew 3.1 percent to US$16.9 billion in 2008. The merger of Mars and Wrigley has created a more dominant force in confectionery: combined 28 percent share in sugar confectionery for example (with Hershey at 14 percent), Mars holding a 32 percent share in chocolate (Hershey leading at 41 percent), and Wrigley dominating chewing gum (62 percent share). Prices Push Upwards Rising commodity prices dramatically pushed up prices, and also value sales in a number of basic food categories such as pasta and edible oils. An escalation in milk prices and other production costs also pushed cheese sales up 7.6 percent to US$14.1 billion in 2008. Growth in the market has also been driven by increasing consumption of cheese as a snack, as well as growing interest in quality cheeses as witnessed by the success of many imported lines. Packaged Grocery Nestlé, PepsiCo and Kraft remain the key players across the packaged grocery sector. Nestlé, for example, takes major shares of the chocolate drinks market

(38 percent in 2008), ice cream (37 percent), frozen ready meals (31 percent), and bottled water (30 percent) categories as well as smaller shares in a number of other product sectors.

cooking oils (30 percent share in 2008), breakfast cereal (10 percent), chilled fruit juice and drinks (10 percent), bottled water (nine percent) and dried/ ambient soups (nine percent) as

Forecast Top 10 Food & Non-alcoholic Drink Growth Categories in the US, 2009-2012

Pet Foods

9.4

Yoghurts & Chilled Desserts

9.3

RTD Tea

9.3 8.3

Chewing gum

7.9

Soups

7.9

Savoury Snacks 7.3

Coffee Cooking Oils

7.2

Pasta

7.1 6.7

Bakery Products 0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

% Total growth in value 2009–2012 Source: Leatherhead Food Research, Global Food Markets database

Future growth among the established product sectors is forecast to be highest in pet foods, yoghurts and chilled desserts, and RTD tea (all achieving growth of above nine percent in value between 2009 and 2012). PepsiCo dominates savoury snacks (46 percent) and has a 31 percent share in carbonated drinks, a 29 percent share in chilled fruit juice and drinks, and 20 percent share in bottled water. Kraft leads in cookies/crackers (46 percent), coffee (39 percent), frozen pizza (35 percent) and cheese (15 percent), and has smaller shares across a number of other categories. Growth Of Private Labels Private label has been growing its share in the recession. This includes categories such as

consumers seek to downgrade from premium brands. Trends Ahead F u t u re g ro w t h a m o n g t h e established product sectors is forecast to be highest in pet foods, yoghurts and chilled desserts, and RTD tea (all achieving growth of above nine percent in value between 2009 and 2012). Kitchen cupboard essentials such as soups, coffee, cooking oils and pasta will also see value growth. For more information, ENTER No: 0383


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Case-Study:

Starting up a process plant can be tricky business for any company, but when it is the first plant the company has ever built and the location is halfway around the world from equipment suppliers, the project can be daunting. So it was with ForesTrade, when it set about building

A Cut Above For

Cinnamon

Jozsef Szoke, Hungary

Besides being more efficient than the previous plant, the two-cutter arrangement and blending operation is essentially dust free. By Steve Knauth, general sales manager, Munson Machinery

I n d o n e s i a ’s f i r s t o rg a n i c cinnamon-processing plant, and an associated essential oils plant in Padang, West Sumatra. The Bumilindo Project, as it is called, was beset by a variety of problems, including delays in obtaining permits, hitches in the supply of equipment, and bad weather. The two plants were officially opened in March 2007, about a year behind schedule, but the spice plant, for cinnamon and cloves, did not become fully operational until March of 2008.

Problems Afoot One of the biggest problems was the procurement of equipment, particularly a cutter and blender, which are key items in the cinnamon-processing plant. The company worked with two equipment suppliers, but both deals fell through for various reasons, according to Mar y Porter, formerly manager for the project and now manager of the company’s Indonesian operations. They finally received assistance with the plant design from a large local spice processor that is not a direct competitor of the Bumilindo project, because it does not work with organically grown products. Based on their advice, the company then obtained a highspeed screen classifying cutter that cuts the cinnamon sticks to the desired length, and a rotary continuous mixer that blends various grades of material to customer specifications. In The Beginning… Prior to opening the Indonesian plants, the company had contracts with various Indonesian companies to process most of its products. It started up its own spice plant for cinnamon


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and cloves in 2001, but since there was limited resources and know-how, it was a rudimentary operation. An old rice-hulling machine broke up cinnamon bark, and the resultant chips were separated into piles, based on their volatile oil content. Chips were selected from the piles and blended by hand to meet customer requirements for volatile oil content. Then, in 2004, it obtained a E1 million (US$1.2 million) grant to build the plants from the Dutch Government’s Agency for International Business and Cooperation (EVD). To carry out the project, the company formed a joint venture with Mitra Ayu Adi Perkasa, an Indonesian processor of essential oils. Extraction Processes Cinnamon processing is by far the major activity in the plant, as the cinnamon, the inner bark of laurel trees, has to be cut into the appropriate lengths, dried, and blended to obtain the desired volatile oil content in accordance with customer specifications. Cloves, on the other hand, are simply sorted and packaged by hand. Off-specification material is sent to the adjacent essential oils plant, where the cloves are crushed and ground, and oil is extracted by supercritical carbon dioxide or by distillation. The plant also extracts oil from nutmeg and vanilla. The oils are shipped to customers, who further refine them for use as flavours and fragrances. The plant replaced an existing plant that extracted oils by distillation. The new plant still uses distillation for lower-cost products, but supercritical CO2 is employed for higher-purity oils. Sizing & Drying Of Cinnamon Padang might well be called the

cinnamon capital of the world, located as it is in the middle of a major production area for cinnamon and other spices. The popular type of cinnamon in the region is cassia vera, which has a hot and sweet flavour. Bark from the trunk of the tree has the highest volatile oil content, which gives it a spicy flavour. The

manually emptied onto a belt conveyor, along which workers remove stones, and arrange the quills inline for the cutting operation. Soil and any other extraneous material are removed by a vibratory separator, and a magnet extracts ferrous metals. From the conveyor line, the quills are discharged into a rotary

[Above] The screen classifying cutter cuts the cinnamon quills into five cm lengths. [Left] A view of the interior of the rotary continuous mixer.

branches have less volatile oil. Cinnamon is received at the spice plant in bags as rolled sticks, known as quills that range in length from 7.5 cm to 1 m. Samples of bark from each incoming bag are checked by distillation, and by a water-activity metre to determine the content of water and volatile oil. The bags are then

knife cutter and rough-cut to a maximum length of 15 cm. The quills are then fed via a pneumatic conveyor into a high-speed, screen classifying cutter. The unit’s horizontal rotor contains dozens of cutter blades, attached to a helical array of staggered holders called ‘interconnected parallelograms’. The blades are chisel-shaped, with replaceable carbon tips. Driven by a 15 kilowatt motor, the blades rotate at 2,200 rpm and continuously shear the quills against twin, stationary bed knives, cutting them into five cm


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lengths. Despite the high rotation speed, there is little to no heat generation and minimum fines. Also, the original carbide tips have not needed replacing, even though cinnamon is abrasive. The cutter contributes to quality by producing moreuniform pieces and by making a cleaner cut, with less waste than under the old system. Ms Porter points out that having a clean, uniform cut is not only important for meeting size specifications, but makes for consistency in drying. Chopped quills fall from the screen classifying cutter into sacks that are rolled by dolly to one of two solar dryers, polycarbonate-enclosed structures located outside the plant. There, cinnamon is segregated in piles according to volatile oil content. Fans continuously move moist air out of the structures, reducing the cinnamon’s typical moisture content of 12–14 percent to the desired 10–11 percent, normally within three days. Material is then selected from various piles to meet the specifications for the next shipment, and is manually loaded into a bucket elevator that feeds the mixing operation.

Workers arrange the quills inline as the conveyor takes the quills into the first cutter.

Blending Without Breakage Bumilindo’s rotary continuous mixer consists of a horizontal cylinder that is 183 cm long by 61 cm in diameter. It is supported at both ends by large trunion rings that ride on heavy-duty roller assemblies. A 0.746 kilowatt motor rotates the drum continuously, while material is added through a stationary inlet at one end, flows through the mixer, and cascades over a stationary weir (dam) at the discharge end of the drum. Thorough blending is promoted

by proprietary mixing flights on the cylinder wall that tumble, turn, cut and fold the material as the drum rotates. The company operates the mixer at a speed designed to process 2 cu m per hour, or one metric tonne per hour of cinnamon. The mixer has a gentle action that provides two basic advantages. It does not break the brittle product and the abrasive cinnamon does not damage the cylinder wall, which is made of stainless steel.

The discharge weir is set at 25 percent of the cylinder’s fill level, which provides ample dwell time for thorough mixing. At the end of a product run, any residual material in the mixer is discharged by reversing the drum’s rotation. Blended cinnamon discharges into a two-stage vibrator y screener that separates the material into two size classifications. Discharged material is loaded into shipping sacks through pipe magnets that remove any ferrous metal. Throughout the operation, there is a system of aspirators and blowers to remove dust and light trash. The plant has a capacity of 18 metric tonne for a five-day work week, with one eight-hour shift per day. This substantially outpaces the original plant. Dust Away Besides being more efficient than the previous plant, the system has reduced dust, which had been a serious problem. The main sources of dust were the old rice hulling machine that was used to break up bark and the rudimentar y blending method, in which the broken cinnamon was piled on the floor and mixed by rakes. The two-cutter arrangement, plus the installation of a pneumatic dust control system, has practically eliminated airborne dust from the cutting operation. The blending operation is essentially dust free, since the product is completely contained in the mixer. Today, the plant is considered a model for cassia processing and has received praise from visitors, many of them customers, for its efficiency and cleanliness. For more information, ENTER No: 0384


Enquiry Number

2627


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Review

2010

Propak Vietnam PROPAK Vietnam 2010, the country’s trade fair for processing and packaging technology, took place from March 18 – 20, at Saigon Exhibition & Convention Center (SECC), in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. In all, there were 7,464 visitors at the event, the highest number of visitors in its history. There was an increase of 15 percent in the number of trade visitors from throughout the country and other parts of the world. Visitors had the opportunity to gain an overview of processing and packaging innovations, as well as trends presented by more than 173 exhibiting companies from 20 countries. David Aitken, MD, Bangkok Exhibition said: “As the Vietnamese consumer market is growing at a fast pace, packaging plays a vital role in the manufacture and marketing of products because it serves as a storage and transport container, protects goods and gives them a distinctive look, and for some it is even the key deciding factor when it comes to purchasing a product.” He adds that demands are increasing for high-quality packaging shapes and materials. Easy-to-open solutions and modern packaging design are also gaining the momentum. Domestic and international producers are

also investing in expansions and upgrades to existing plants, as well as in packaging materials. Covering an area of 3,960 sq m, the event featured a range of technologies and solutions. It also featured industrial conferences and special events to meet the needs of those from food and beverage processing manufacturers, laboratories, canners, frozen food manufacturers, quality controllers, preserved food manufacturers, dairies, seafood processing manufacturers,

t o b re w i n g , b o t t l i n g a n d agricultural supplies. Wi t h s u p p o r t f ro m t h e Vietnamese government and relevant private sectors, the perception of the event as an important manufacturing growth measure has expanded considerably. The next show will be held from March 23 – 25, 2011 at SECC. Saigon Exhibition & Convention Center Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam March 18 – 20, 2011 _____________________ Enquiry No: 0390


Enquiry Number

2628


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Preview

IFFA

2010

IFFA 2010, the event for technology in the meats business, will open its doors in Germany, at Frankfurt am Main, from May 8 – 13. The exhibition is expected to showcase around 900 companies presenting their latest products and services, on more than 100,000 sq m of exhibition space. Messe Frankfurt, the organiser, also expects to receive some 60,000 trade visitors from more than 100 countries. Trade visitors can look forward to seeing products for the whole process chain, from slaughtering and dismembering, via processing and packaging, to cooling, storing and selling. The exhibitors come from a total of 48 countries. Organised every three years, numerous exhibitors use the fair to present new products to an international audience of experts for the first time. In addition to traditional, manufacturing countries, such as Italy, Spain, The Netherlands and France, more and more suppliers from the growing meat-processing markets, such as East Europe, Russia and Asia, are making presentations at the fair. The proportion of exhibitors from Germany amounts to almost 50 percent (around 440 companies). The packaging segment is one of the fastest-growing product groups at the event. This growth reflects the trend among consumers to greater convenience and the demand for smaller portions. The variety of packaged meat and sausage products is also to be seen here in the growing range of different types of packaging. Important topics in this segment include hygiene, maximum production and packaging flexibility, as well as optimum CO2 emissions during the packaging production. In addition to the range of products and services on show, the complementary programme gives visitors the chance to gather information and hold discussions with experts from the sector. The Meat Vision Conference that takes place on May 10 and 11, is aimed primarily at the international industry. On the first day, experts from the world’s foremost meat markets will talk about the current situation while, on the second day, the focus will be on new manufacturing processes for meat and sausage products and the legal framework. Frankfurt am Main Frankfurt, Germany May 8-13, 2010 ____________________________________________________________________ Enquiry No: 0391


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Preview

2010

BioFach China International representatives from the organic sector meet again at BioFach China in the International Exhibition Centre INTEX, Shanghai, from May 27–29. This is the fourth instalment of the international trade fair for organic food and natural products. The organiser, NürnbergMesse China, expects the number of exhibitors to grow to some 300. Besides a broad spectrum of organic products, trade visitors can look forward to a variety of networking opportunities and congress highlights. China is a powerful country for organic raw materials, but the domestic market is also developing positively. As such, this is an ideal time for manufacturers to gain a foothold there. There is a particularly strong demand

for baby food and international products of an exotic character for Chinese habits, for example, Mediterranean food and even organic wine. One particularly important future project in China, is to make organic farming more professional and boost the credibility and image of the products, according to the result of the EU study Organic Agriculture in China. The of ficial Organic Food Development Center (OFDC) estimates domestic sales of organic products at approximately US$500 million. Organic certification organisations estimate that production will increase by 30 to 50 percent in the coming years, and that exports of organic products could rise to a volume of five percent of total food exports by 2020. The

experiences of business people show that China offers a variety of opportunities, but establishing trade relationships needs time, continuity and the mutual trust of the partners. Exhibitors and visitors can also benefit from the seminar programmes arranged at the event. One highlight is the China Organic Market Development Forum on May 27–28, which deals with the international organic market, marketing and sale of organic products, natural cosmetics and technologies in organic production. Some 30 participants meet for the first time at the premiere of the IFOAM Workshop in China on May 28–29. Another new feature at BioFach China is the Lohas Area, where activities such as workshops and organic cookery courses take place to give visitors an idea of the organic and sustainable lifestyle. International Exhibition Centre INTEX Shanghai, China May 27 – 29, 2010 _____________________ Enquiry No: 0392


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Preview

2010

Vietfish

The annual Vietnam Fisheries International Exhibition (VIETFISH) will be held from June 12 – 14, in Vietnam’s Ho Chi Minh City at Saigon Exhibition & Convention Center (SECC). Organised by the Vietnam Association Of Seafood Exporters And Producers (VASEP), the event has played a role in broadcasting Vietnam fisheries to the rest of the world with the participation of enterprises, seafood export and processing plants, as well as entities that are related to the industry. It

is aslo a platform for business networking, and gaining information on trends, products and technology. This year, the event will feature about 165 exhibitors from Vietnam, and overseas, including the UK, US, Taiwan, Singapore, China, Germany and Thailand. With 9,000 sq m of exhibition space, the event is expected to see about 30,000 visitors from regions around the world such as the US, Europe, Middle East, and Asia. Other than the variety of fresh, frozen and convenient seafood products, attractions to look out for this year are ideas for value-added products, and

a ‘farm-to-fork’ presentation of the Pangasius. Visitors to the exhibition can also look forward to seminars organised for the industry such as ‘Packaging Technology of Seafood for EC and US Market’, and the ‘US Food and Drug Administration Regulations’. Other highlights at the event include ‘Vietnam High Quality Seafood Products Contest’, and the ‘Seafood Festival’, where participants can enjoy seafood dishes. Saigon Exhibition & Convention Center Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam June 12 – 14, 2010 _____________________ Enquiry No: 0393


Enquiry Number

2626


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Preview

2010

ProPak Asia

The 18th edition of the international processing, filling and packaging technology event for Asia, or ProPak Asia 2010, is set to take place from June 16 – 19. The event will be located at BITEC, in Bangkok, Thailand. This year’s four-day event will attract over 850 exhibitors from all over the world, presenting technology, products and solutions in the food and beverage industry. It is expected to draw up to 30,000 trade professionals, with 48 countries already registered. Last year’s installment had 843 exhibitors from 39 countries, featuring technological innovations designed to reduce cost

and increase energy efficiency. It attracted 29,600 trade visitors from 63 countries, including major Asian buyers from Malaysia, Singapore, Japan, Vietnam, India, Myanmar, China, Indonesia and the Philippines. The event generated estimated sales of US$3,500 million with post-event trade up to more than US$10,000 million. Groups of high-potential investors from China, France, Japan, Vietnam Korea, Singapore, Taiwan, the US and the UK also visited the show. This year expects to see a greater interest from international trade visitors as the


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Asian economies show positive signs of recovery. There are growth opportunities for international manufacturers and suppliers of machinery, technology and materials in the fields of packing, filling, processing, quality assurance, test and measurement and their related fields of automation, transportation, storage, re f r i g e r a t i o n , i n g re d i e n t s , labelling and pollution control. Currently, there are approximately 9,000 food processing companies in Thailand alone,

which produce annual earnings that total up to US$25 billion. T h i s y e a r ’s e v e n t w i l l continue to focus on its primary development on brewing and beverage technology (DrinkTech Asia), pharmaceutical techno-

logy (Pharma Tech), plastic materials, moulding and processing equipment (PlasTech Asia) and laboratory and test equipment (Lab & Test Asia). Among the highlights are lectures by industry experts, seminars and workshops, which will be held by the business sector in cooperation with government organisations and educational institutes. New for 2010 will be the Watermex seminar or Water technology and purification process. The event is organised by Bangkok Exhibition Services Co Ltd (BES) and supported by government and private organisations. BITEC Bangkok, Thailand June 16 – 19, 2010 _____________________ Enquiry No: 0394


78

April 18 – 20: Guangzhou Bakery 2010 Guangzhou Jinhan Exhibition Centre Guangzhou, China Hong Kong Goodwill Exhibition & Promotion E-mail: goodwill@goodwill-exh.com.hk Web: www.goodwill-exh.com.hk ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

18 – 20: Food Pro & Pak Central China Zhengzhou International Exhibition Centre Henan, China Tarsus-Hope Exhibition Company E-mail: clei@tarsus.co.uk Web: www.fppcc.com ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

20 – 23: Food & Hotel Asia 2010 Singapore Expo Singapore Singapore Exhibition Services E-mail: events@sesallworld.com Web: www.foodnhotelasia.com ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

21 – 23: RFID World Asia 2010 Suntec Singapore International Convention And Exhibition Centre Singapore Terrapinn E-mail: sylwin.ang@terrapinn.com Web: www.terrapinn.com/2010/rfid ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

May 8 – 13: IFFA 2010 Messe Frankfurt Frankfurt, Germany Messe Frankfurt E-mail: iffa@messefrankfurt.com Web: www.iffa.messefrankfurt.com ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

12 – 16: THAIFEX WORLD OF FOOD ASIA 2010 Impact, Muang Thong Thani Bangkok, Thailand Koelnmesse E-mail: l.how@koelnmesse.com.sg Web: www.worldoffoodasia.com ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

27 – 29: BioFach China 2010 INTEX Shanghai Shanghai, China

FHA2010, which takes place from April 20 – 23, will offer opportunities for food and hospitality professionals to preview the latest products, equipment and technologies available in the global market, and harness trade opportunities.

Nürnberg Global Fairs GmbH Web: www.biofach-china.com ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

June

16 – 17: 2010 AIP National Conference Melbourne Cricket Ground Melbourne, Australia Australian Institute of Packaging E-mail: mark@aipack.com.au Web: www.aipack.com.au ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

31 – 3: 7th International Food & Technology Exhibition Karachi Expo Center Karachi, Pakistan Pegasus Consultancy E-mail: info@foodtech.com.pk Web: www.pegasus.com.pk

16 – 19: ProPak Asia 2010 BITEC Bangkok, Thailand Bangkok Exhibition Services E-mail: cassandra@iemallworld.com Web: www.besallworld.com/ppka/2010/

❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

2 – 4: Fi Asia China 2010 Shanghai New International Expo Centre Shanghai, China UBM Asia E-mail: info@cmpasia.com Web: www.fia-china.com ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

12 – 14: Vietfish 2010 Saigon Exhibition & Convention Center Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam Vietnam Association Of Seafood Exporters & Producers (VASEP) Web:www.vietfish.com.vn ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

*All details subject to change without notice. Please check with organisers for updates.

23 – 26: Foodtec & Pharmatech Taipei 2010 Nangang Exhibition Hall Taipei, Taiwan Taiwan External Trade Development Council E-mail: foodtech@taitra.org.tw Web: www.foodtech.com.tw ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

July 8 –10: Indo Livestock Expo & Forum Jakarta Convention Centre Jakarta, Indonesia


CALENDAR OF EVENTS 2010 ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

14 – 16: ProPak China 2010 SNIEC Shanghai, China Putra World Trade Centre E-mail: Propak@chinaallworld.com Web: www.propakchina.com ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

22 – 24: malaysia international Food & BeveraGe trade Fair Putra World Trade Centre Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Expomal International E-mail: info@expomal.com Web: www.mifb.com.my ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

August 12 – 16: hktdC Food eXPo 2010 Hong Kong Convention And Exhibition Centre Hong Kong, SAR China Hong Kong Trade Development Council Web: http://hkfoodexpo.hktdc.com/ ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

September 8 – 10: asia Fruit loGistiCa Hong Kong Convention And Exhibition Centre Hong Kong, SAR China Global Produce Events Web: www.asiafruitlogistica.com ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

29 – 1: Food inGredients asia 2010 Jakarta, Indonesia UBM International E-mail: info@cmpasia.com Web: fiasia.ingredientsnetwork.com ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

October 13 – 16 Biomin World nutrition Forum Salzburg, Austria Biomin E-mail: florian.zehner@biomin.net Web: www.worldnutritionforum.info ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

ASIA PACIFIC FOOD INDUSTRY

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PT Napindo Media Ashatama E-mail: info@indolivestock.com Web: www.indolivestock.com

79

23 – 24: Food inGredients india 2010 Bombay Exhibition Centre Mumbai, India UBM International E-mail: bipins@ubmindia.com Web: fiindia.ingredientsnetwork.com ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

November 16 – 19 eurotier International DLG Exhibition for Animal Husbandry & Management Hanover Exhibition Grounds Hannover, Germany DLG E-mail: expo@dlg.org Web: www.eurotier.de ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

22 – 25: emBallaGe 2010 – World PaCkaGinG eXhiBition Paris Nord Villepinte Exhibition Centre Paris, France Comexposium E-mail: emballage@comexposium.com Web: en.emballageweb.com ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General Enquiry

December 1 – 4: ProPak indonesia Jakarta International Expo, Kemayoran Jakarta, Indonesia Pamerindo Indonesia Web: www.propakindonesia.com ❑ To Exhibit ❑ To Visit ❑ General

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APFI April May 2010  

Asia Pacific Food Industry

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