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AgriNews May pg 02_AgriNews February pg 02 12-05-04 8:31 AM Page 1

Page 2 The AgriNews May, 2012

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The Canadian Youth Advocacy group at Phase Two of the Youth Dairy Leadership Institute in New Mexico. From left Christina Crowley, Ed Rusenstrom, Courtney Conners, Rob Larmer and Amanda Cowan. Submitted photo

Young advocates get dairy word out Darren Matte AgriNews Staff Writer ANKLEEK HILL— THERE

V

ARE STILL MANY MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT THE DAIRY INDUSTRY FROM PEOPLE OUTSIDE THE RURAL COMMUNITY. AMANDA (ALLEN) COWAN, WHO GREW UP ON A DAIRY FARM JUST OUTSIDE OF VANKLEEK HILL, WAS AWARE OF THIS, BUT IT WAS NOT UNTIL SHE WAS A PARTICIPANT AT THE YOUTH DAIRY LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE (YDLI) IN MARCH OF 2011 THAT SHE SAW HOW SERIOUS THE PROBLEM IS.

The YDLI program is a three-phased program that brings youths, ages 22-25, involved in the dairy industry to Albuquerque, New Mexico where they begin the program. The first phase is a week long session that focuses on individual leadership, growth and development. It was in this phase where Cowan really recognized the issue. “One of the first things we did was take a question sheet to the University of New Mexico and just asked students on the campus about our industry. I was so surprised with how little people outside the industry actually knew.” Cowan originally had read about the YDLI program and since she is Canadian, she, like the other members of the soon to be formed group, had to be nominated to go to the YDLI. Cowan works for Select Sires and her manager there had attended the YDLI the year before and told her about the opportunity. It was through this encounter that several Canadians, who were attending the program came up with their plan to tackle phase two. Phase two is all

about on site training and a project that the participants commit to with the goal of returning to New Mexico in a year to deliver a report. Cowan, along with Hawkesbury’s Courtney Conners, Hastings’ Christina Crowley, Blackstock’s Robert Larmer and Bristol, Quebec’s Edward Ruenstrom, decided to form the Canadian Dairy Advocacy Group (CDAG) to become advocators for the Canadian dairy industry. “What we do is raise awareness to non consumers through our blog and through presentations. We have done a few in our local areas and one big one in Ed’s county on the importance of advocacy for the industry.” So far the group says they have received positive feedback from their presentations and on their website, http://canadiandairyadvocacygroup.blogspot.ca/. The group returned in late February, early March of 2012 to present their findings to the YDLI. The experience has really been special for Cowan and the rest of the group. “I loved the YDLI experience. It was such an eye opener. It has been rewarding to tell people what we regularly do. Overall promoting advocacy is important. It is a worse problem in the United States, but it is coming here.” For now, the group continues to plan presentations. They have one planned for the fall in Glengarry County and are looking to organize more during the summer months. The group continues to spread their message about advocacy and to encourage more open door policies within the industry so that people can see what the industry is really like.

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AgriNews May pg 03_AgriNews February pg 03 12-05-04 8:41 AM Page 1

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The AgriNews May, 2012 Page 3

Custtomerr A Appreecciaat atiion Day a !

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Floyd Dingwall and his wife, Muriel, holding the engraved Lifetime Achievement Award paddle he received from South Nation Conservation at the annual Tri-Valley Conservation Awards. Zandbergen photo

Former Jersey breeder receives conservation Lifetime Award By Nelson Zandbergen AgriNews Staff Writer ERWICK — AS A

B

TEENAGE FARMHAND WORKING AT HIS

MATERNAL GRANDFATHER’S PLACE JUST NORTH OF THIS HAMLET,

FLOYD DINGWALL

PICKED UP A LOT OF WISDOM FROM HIS ELDERS BUT STILL HAD A LIFETIME OF LEARNING AHEAD OF HIM.

Dingwall, 78, credits the local watershed authority — South Nation Conservation —for helping to further his education, years after formal schooling concluded with Grade 9 for the oldest of 14 siblings. Eighteen years as a member of the SNC board were an opportunity to both serve and to learn, as were lengthy stints with municipal council, the Jersey Canada board, and his local Soil and Crop Improvement Association, according to Dingwall, recipient of SNC’s first Lifetime

Achievement Award. “All of these organizations educated me,” says the former Finch Township reeve and SNC chair. “I went there to learn something, and I always listened to the person at the top and saw how they worked,” he says, reminiscing in the living room of the Berwick home shared with his wife of nearly 54 years, Muriel. The Tri-Valley ceremony brings together honours individually bestowed by three Eastern Ontario watershed authorities covering the South Nation, Rideau and Mississippi river valleys. The Rideau Valley Conservation Authority hosted this year’s event April 18 in Manotick. Clutching a specially engraved canoe paddle that came with the honour, Dingwall commends the annual initiative recognizing individuals and organi Continued on page 7

Dave Rousseau & Josée Charron BROWN HEAVEN, Verchères, Québec Herd Classification: 6 EX, 9 VG, 4 GP Production Avg: 9460 kg 4,3% F 3,6% PB 2011 SCC: 50,000. Current month: 28,000 SCC Dave Rousseau and Josée Charron pictured with Nutmeg Acres Jetway Tidbit EX-92 2E 93MS at Brown Heaven. “Tidbit” was first 3 yr old & Reserve Champion at Expo Quebec in 2009. She was Reserve All-Canadian 2010 (4 yr old) and 2011 (5 yr old).

“We have used Udder Comfort™ for 6 years at Brown Heaven. We use it on show cows, and we use one whole tube for each cow calving, to get the udder ready,” said Dave Rousseau during an interview at the 2011 World Dairy Expo in Madison, Wisconsin. Dave Rousseau and Josée Charron have purebred Brown Swiss cattle at Brown Heaven. They like having quality udders, and are known to produce high quality milk, with very low somatic cell counts. They were third in Quebec last year for low counts of 50,000 in 2011. “We like using Udder Comfort on every fresh cow to soften the udders for that nice texture.

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Page 04_Layout 1 12-05-02 1:23 PM Page 1

Page 4 The AgriNews May, 2012

The Editorial Page

Editorial A salute to Smurf and Blitz A big, very big tip of the tractor cap has got to go out to Embrun’s Ferme Gillette which has been piling up the most prestigious dairying awards. Not sooner did the Patenaude family farm place one of its cows in the Guinness Book of World Records as top global milk producer than it posted the country’s Cow of the Year as determined by Holstein Canada. The most recent award was picked up by the Patenaudes at the Holstein Canada annual conference held in Brandon, Manitoba, April 19-20. Ferme Gillette’s 10-year-old Blitz 2nd Wind, mother of five impressive sires, was chosen from four finalists by the nation’s Holstein breeders. The last time the farm won the honour was in 2000 with Blackstar Christiane, the only cow which survived a devastating barn fire in 1994. In an even more impressive achievement, Gillette E Smurf has been registered in the Guinness Book, the first time the category has been included. By late 2011, Smurf had produced a staggering 216,000 kilograms of milk over 10 lactations, besting former top producer at the time, a Japanese cow which had taken the lead from Tacoma Mark My-Word of Michigan. According to Holstein International, that makes Smurf the current holder of the top achievement in world milk production award. Closing in on 16 years of age, Smurf is showing no signs of slowing down. By late March, she had upped her lifetime total to close to 218,000 kilograms; she’s had 11 lactations and is expecting her 10th calf May 8. “She could live another five years and keep producing at a good rate,” says Louis Patenaude, explaining that longevity is in her lineage. And why Smurf? It was the nickname of a youngster who lived along the same Russell Township road as the Patenaudes and who, at one point, invested in the line of cows which eventually produced the record-breaker. To recognize his participation, the nickname was transferred to the calf creating all the buzz all these years later. The Patenaudes aren’t matter-of-fact about world recognition. They liken Smurf’s accomplishment to winning the Stanley Cup. “There’s only one world champion,” Louis says. “It’s the goal of every breeder and milk producer.” Life is good for Smurf these days. Her heroic output has earned her an oversized stall of her own with lots of room to move around. A small plastic crown has been placed at the entrance to denote her celebrity status. Louis… get out there and buy that cow a real crown!

Rah-rah 4-H As expressed recently by its chief executive officer, 4-H Canada hopes to shore up its rural relevance and actually gain some ground among urban youth. Is that possible? CEO Mike Nowosad thinks so and stated as much during the recent 4-H Ontario annual meeting in Kitchener-Waterloo. With its 100th anniversary next year, Nowosad told delegates 4-H Canada is looking to “embrace the future” and double its current membership to 52,000 by 2021. Even that new number would be a far cry from the organization’s peak of 70,000 members across Canada. While 4-H Canada recruits a large number of members, leaders and clubs, it’s been losing them faster than it’s been gaining them. As the rural population has declined since the 1970s, so, too, has 4-H membership. In fact, says Nowosad, the organization has been losing two per cent of members a year with an average tenure of three to four years. A number of critical factors for success have been determined, including that aggressive growth will require aggressive strategies. The unique role of 4-H in farm communities must be respected; the 4-H brand and experience must be repositioned to be nationally consistent, accessible and relevant; and the organization needs to reintroduce itself to convey its true value, particularly to markets outside the farm core. How will that be done? The “Embrace the Future” steering committee comprising members of provincial councils, the national council, 4H Canada staff, and the youth advisory committee have been developing a plan and finding common ground. Here at The AgriNews, we’ve heard this rah-rah before, this talk of taking 4-H uptown, of intriguing city kids with clubs devoted to crafts and beekeeping. In fact, we understand that a little ground has been gained in that very direction.But there’s a major modern hurdle to jump. We wish the latest campaign well and hope the steering committee comes up with the magic formula for making 4-H cool.

Free internet farm classifieds at www.agrinews.ca

AgriGab Basking in the glow Over the past four years, the annual Tri-Valley Conservation Awards Gala has steadily gained in stature partly by not leaving any sector out of the equation, including agriculture. In fact, the awards program operated by the South Nation, Mississippi Valley and Rideau Valley conservation authorities has been very good for Eastern Ontario agriculture, reminding those paying attention that farmers and farm-related businesses and organizations were environmental stewards way before the term became trendy. Not only does the program list agriculture as a separate category, but representatives of the farm sector often turn up as winners or runners-up in other classes. The latest edition of the Tri-Valley Gala was held April 18 in Manotick’s dramatic Rideau Valley Conservation Centre. Some 120 guests enjoyed the elegant festivities, applauding the finalists for, as Rideau Valley Foundation chairman Jason Kelly put it, “making huge voluntary contributions to the betterment of our lives through environmental conservation.” Winning projects ranged from tree planting to exemplary farm practices, to municipalities and businesses taking visionary steps. There was a new category this year, Lifetime Conservation Achievement; collectively, the three winners representing each of the watersheds have put in almost a century of dedication to comservation. Front and centre for South Nation Conservation – along with non-farmers Hans von Rosen and Irv Dardick for Mississippi and Rideau respectively – was semi-retired Berwick dairy farmer Floyd Dingwall, recognized for working for both the betterment of agriculture and of the environment, becoming aware early on of the interconnection between the two. Floyd has been involved with SNC for close to 20 years, serving on the board of directors – including as chairman - and on various committees. A past warden of the United Counties of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry, the icing on his environmental career was creation of McIntosh Memorial Park in Berwick, a project which he instigated and for which he continues raising funds. It’s both a natural gathering spot and memorial to the founding families of the area. First place in the actual agricultural category was Lawrenceholme Farms of Spencerville which has embraced water quality protection and other environmentally friendly best management practices. When the farm was challenged with runoff from its solid manure pile and untreated milkhouse wastewater – which is high in phosphorus - the Lawrences

The AgriNews is dedicated to covering and promoting agriculture, one of Eastern Ontario’s most important economic sectors.

by Tom VanDusen found solutions in covered storage and a subsurface constructed wetland. While wetlands have been used for decades to treat wastewater, milkhouse wastewater is a relatively new application. The system was designed by the Ontario Rural Wastewater Centre at Alfred Campus of the University of Guelph which continues to gather data and feedback at what has become a demonstration site, showcasing relevant technology. Coming in second in the category was sometimes acerbic Williamsburg farmer Gordon Garlough who served in many capacities with the Dundas County Federation of Agriculture. He was a longtime member of South Nation’s Clean Water Committee which assists farmers and other landowners with grants to improve water quality. Speaking of Alfred Campus, it placed second in the college and university category with an innovative Enviro-Agriculture Camp where young people learn about the interface of farming and environmental protection. Participants learn hands-on about windbreaks, pesticides, organic farming, alternative energy, and eating locally… among other topics. And there was another big agricultural winner at the fourth annual Tri-Valley Awards, in the business category. It was Parmalat, the Winchester milk processor which has a long-standing concern for watershed health, becoming involved in South Nation’s Total Phosphorous Management Program back in 1998 and working to upgrade its on-site wastewater treatment facility. Seeing beyond its immediate needs, Parmalat decided to support others in reducing phosphorous in area streams and rivers, donating $50,000 over three years to SNC’s Clean Water Program. The company has continued with its financial commitment for a total of $280,000 donated to the program, helping to fund 100 projects resulting in an estimated annual phosphorus reduction of 1,935 kg/year over 12 years. South Nation chairman Lawrence Levere summed it up for the agricultural winners, all of whom were from his watershed: “We’re proud of those nominated no matter where they come from in Eastern Ontario. Of course, the fact that a good many come from South Nation just increases our pleasure and lets us bask in the glow of their accomplishments.” No false modesty there and none expected.

The AgriNews is Published by Etcetera Publications (Chesterville) Inc. on the first Monday of each month.

Editor & Publisher: Robin R. Morris Staff Writers: Tom VanDusen, Lois Ann Baker, Darren Matte, Nelson Zandbergen Advertising Manager: Julie Lascelle, agrinewsads@gmail.com Advertising Representatives: Muriel Hurst, Jeff Moore, Taunya Grohn P.O. Box 368, Chesterville, Ont. K0C 1H0 Telephone: 613-448-2321 Fax: 613-448-3260 www.agrinews.ca e-mail: rm@agrinews.ca

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AgriNews May pg 05_AgriNews February pg 05 12-05-04 8:43 AM Page 1

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The AgriNews May, 2012 Page 5

Reader questions Carp Fair’s commitment to agriculture OurReadersWrite The Editor: We are about to lose a local institution and its custodians are oblivious. Faced with serious issues, time and again the Directors of the Carp Agricultural Society (hosts of the Annual Carp Fair) fail to fulfill their provincially-mandated responsibility to the community. The Exhibit Hall, the unique octagonal red building, is the focal point in the community. This City of Ottawa “Heritage Designated” building, erected in 1897, is now in ill repair. In 2013, the year the fair will celebrate its milestone 150th Anniversary, Heritage Canada funding could assist in it’s restoration, a necessity if it is to be preserved for future generations. Using federal government money to assist with the preservation of this building (home of the extremely popular Carp Farmer’s Market) would be a sound fiscal decision. Sadly, however, the board passed a motion to defer the planning of any capital projects for the 150th celebration until 2013, knowing full well

that it will be too late to apply for the necessary funding. In December 2011, the C.A.S. was approached by a reporter from CBC and asked to contribute to a story about the Exhibit Hall, its importance and future in the community. The C.A.S. declined the interview. In an age when family farming and the traditional rural lifestyle are on the decline, and largely misunderstood, the decision to arbitrarily refuse publicity for their work to promote agriculture is highly disturbing. BUT THAT IS NOT ALL. In November 2011, the Agriculture Division passed a motion that cancelled the Carleton-Russell Holstein Show. This event provides an opportunity for Holstein breeders to showcase their prize-winning herds. I would consider it a vital educational component of the annual fair. Yet, strangely, the very people who have been entrusted by

the Province of Ontario to promote agriculture have arrogantly chosen to ignore its importance. And they have done so without regard for the needs or desires of the community they serve. Recently, members of the Holstein Club met with the Fair Board to discuss the show. In a surprising move, a Director of the Carp Agricultural Society advised the Holstein Club that members of a local family would not be welcome to attend the meeting. Shame! This Carp family (Holstein Canada Premier Breeder) has been exhibiting livestock at their local fair for four generations. Several members of the family have served as Directors/Presidents of the Carp Agricultural Society for close to 100 years. Faithfully, year after year, the entire family have tirelessly prepared their livestock for competitions, sharing their knowledge and love of rural living with

the community. The majority of the current directors have none or limited agricultural background. Wouldn’t the sharing of this exhibitor’s long time experience be considered beneficial to building a more vigorous organization? What is happening here? Remember the good old days when city folk eagerly awaited the arrival of the “EX” in late summer? That too was once a highly revered fall agricultural fair. But slowly agriculture was removed and it became simply an annual amusement park, until one day it was gone. My fear is that power and arrogance and a true lack of foresight will cause the ever popular Agricultural Exhibition in Carp Village to suffer the same fate. Who is holding the Carp Agricultural Society accountable for its questionable decisions? In lieu of property taxes, Agricultural Societies in Ontario have a legal responsibility to “return” to

the community. Shouldn’t restoring a significant heritage building be considered “returning to the community”? Indeed, as mandated custodians of this slice of Canadian culture, shouldn’t it be a decisive priority? Similarly, the mandate of Agricultural Societies in Ontario is to promote agriculture. It seems obvious; but shouldn’t hosting Holstein Shows at the County Level be considered

promoting agriculture? The Ministry of Agriculture and the taxpayers of Ontario must start asking questions. If not forthwith, yet another symbol of our rich local culture and heritage will be lost forever! Now is the time for the directors to act honourably to restore honour to a society that was once considered honourable. Charlene Johnston, Carp

‘Clear cut for a soy bean plot’ The Editor: My origin is Middlesex County, where Lake Huron pipeline water replaces dry wells and a low water table. One cause of low water table is clear-cutting of wood lots and bush areas. In Middlesex, tree removal is by permit only and woodlot management is practiced. Pipeline water involves millions of dollars of expenditure by taxpayers. Plus landowners pay for access and metered water increases in price to finance repair and maintenance. There can be leaks requiring days of no water for pipeline repair. As a result, livestock is endangered and personal health threatened. SD&G should establish regulations to maintain and replace woodlots which act as reservoirs for underground water. To paraphrase the song: “You don’t know what you’ve got ’til it’s gone. Clear cut for a soy bean plot.” Eileen Webb South Mountain


AgriNews May pg 06_AgriNews February pg 06 12-05-04 8:45 AM Page 1

Page 6 The AgriNews May, 2012

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Charles Bennett heads EastGen

C

HARLES BENNETT, RIDEAUSIDE FARM INC., KEMPTVILLE, ONT., WAS ELECTED 2012 EASTGEN PRESIDENT AT A BOARD MEETING HELD IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING EASTGEN’S ANNUAL MEETING ON APRIL 4 IN CAMBRIDGE, ONT. REPRESENTING FRONTENAC, GRENVILLE, LANARK, LEEDS AND RENFREW COUNTIES, BENNETT JOINED THE EASTGEN BOARD AS INTERIM PRESIDENT IN 2011 AFTER SERVING AS AN EASTERN BREEDERS INC. (EBI) BOARD DIRECTOR SINCE 2001.

Brian Betts, Bristal Holsteins, Flesherton, Ont., was elected vice president to the EastGen Board of Director’s Executive Committee. As a Board member, Betts represents Bruce, Dufferin and Grey counties with nine years of service to Gencor/EastGen. Alan Brown, Brownlands Farm, Enterprise, Ont., was elected to the EastGen Board of Directors’ Executive Committee. Brown represents Hastings, Lennox & Addington, Northumberland and Prince Edward counties with experience as an EBI Board Director since 2004. Norm McNaughton, Comrie Farms Ltd., London, Ont., was also elected to the EastGen Board of Directors Executive Committee. He represents Elgin, EssexKent, Huron, Lambton, and Middlesex counties with eight years of experience with Gencor/EastGen. EastGen directors Warren MacIntosh, Glengarry Stock Farms Inc., Apple Hill, Ont., representing Glengarry, Prescott and Russell counties, and Robert Wright, Wrico Holsteins, Midhurst, Ont., representing Northern Ontario and Simcoe County; were elected as directors of the Semex Alliance Board for a oneyear term. EastGen director Gerrit Wensink, Hoenhorst Farms Ltd., Innerkip, Ont.; and McNaughton; were elected as directors of the Semex Alliance Board for a two-year term. New to the EastGen Board of Directors is Doug Johnston, Maplevue Farms, Listowel, Ont., who represents Perth County; and Wensink who represents Brant, Haldimand, Niagara, Norfolk, Oxford, and

Wentworth counties. Rounding out the EastGen 2012 Board of Directors is Wayne Dickieson, Birkentree Holsteins, Hunter River, P.E.I., representing New Brunswick, NewfoundlandLabrador, and Prince Edward Island; Joe Krol, Krolane Holsteins, Berwick, Ont., representing City of Ottawa, Dundas, and Stormont counties; David Larmer, Vintage Holsteins, Blackstock, Ont., representing Durham (A&B), Halton, Kawartha Lakes, Peel, Peterborough, and York regions; and Dennis Wagler, Claynook Farms Ltd., New Hamburg, Ont., representing Waterloo and Wellington counties. EastGen officially began operation as a company on July 1, 2011, following the amalgamation of artifical insemination companies Gencor of Guelph, Ont., and Eastern Breeders Inc. of Kemptville, Ont.

Customer appreciation at Weagant Weagant Farm Supply, just west of Winchester, held their annual Customer Appreciation Day on April 11. This annual event has been running for over 20 years and usually sees between 450-600 customers come in for special deals, the chance to talk with factory representatives and for the door prizes and food. Here, the staff gathers around the front desk. Front row, from left, Mark St. Pierre, Beth Winters, Stacey Weagant, Sandra Weagant, Emma Dangerfield, Dale Somerville, Lorie Havekes, David Black Clinton Cronk, back row, Brentley Summers, Kristal McHugh, Becky Hoogeveen, Bob Weagant, David Van Moorsel, Mike Gordon, Mike Roosendall and Ault Van Bokhorst. Matte photo

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AgriNews May pg 07_AgriNews February pg 07 12-05-04 8:50 AM Page 1

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Tri-Valley Conservation Awards Continued from page 3 zations for their work in the three watersheds. “It’s a good program,” he observes in a distinctive, husky voice well known in this part of North Stormont Township. “Another award for little old me,” he is reported to have quipped to the gala audience of 120 during gracious acceptance remarks, a copy of which was provided to this publication. Dingwall’s tenure on the SNC board concluded in 2011 and included two years as chair (2002-2004) followed by six years as past chair. He continues to sit as a member of the Communications and Forestry committees. Municipal politics overlapped much of the recipient’s SNC tenure, and his career in that regard took off in 1980, the start of several consecutive terms on Finch Township council, two of them as reeve. In 1995, he served as United Counties of SD&G Warden, and three years later, became the first deputy mayor of the newly amalgamated North Stormont, a merger that places him as history’s final reeve of the precursor township. But it was his spearheading of McIntosh Memorial Park in Berwick that drew special attention from North Stormont Councillor Tammy McRae. In her letter of nomination, McRae describes the 3.6-acre project as “perhaps the crown jewel of Floyd’s accomplishments.” Early in his SNC chairmanship, Dingwall recounts, he watched SNC employees taking walks to and from the agency’s office — then in Berwick — kitty-corner across from the gas station and post office operated by his daughter,

Brenda. Seeing them hike up and down County Rd. 9, sometimes returning via the old nearby railway bed – “not the smoothest place in the world to walk” — got him thinking about the parcel of land just south of the old school house, behind SNC’s former longtime headquarters. “I thought it would make a good little park with a trail in it and a picnic table.” A year after inquiring about the property, Dingwall says he had occasion to talk with the owner and explained his vision for the property. Not long after that gas-station chat, Ray and Marilyn MacLeod donated the County Rd. 12 site to SNC, which agreed to name the new park after her late father, Beryl “BC” McIntosh, previous longtime owner of the nearby feed mill now occupied by Homestead Organics. Officially opening in June 2007, the park is now home to a gazebo and 48 memorial trees and plaques commemorating members of the community. The venue hosts a popular family day event each summer. “I had no idea it was going to be that beautiful, and that big, you know,” Dingwall says. The couple’s retirement home is carved from a chunk of Spruce Vine Jersey Farm, where they and brother Harold Dingwall milked a herd of the renowned brown cattle for 39 years. Young animals from grandfather Angus McDermid’s – “probably the best teacher I ever had,” says Floyd Dingwall — helped stock the farm when the couple struck out on their own and established Spruce Vine. Today, their house contains no shortage

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of trophies and hardware for past efforts as purebred breeders, including mementos and photos from the World Jersey Conference hosted by Jersey Canada in 1982, when Dingwall was the organization’s president. They also met the Queen and had the opportunity to tour Her Majesty’s impressive Jersey dairy barns during a trip to England, where Dingwall served as a judge at a cattle show. “She was very knowledgeable” about her Jersey cows, he says of the Queen. The couple later hosted the Queen’s herdsman on several occasions in Berwick, and then the man’s wife after the herdsman passed away. “I’ve had a good life. Everything has gone well,” says Dingwall. “We’ve had a decent living and I’ve met a lot of people.” Other Lifetime recipients Also conferred with the Lifeteam Achievement Awards by their respective watershed authorities were retired Ministry of Natural Resources employee Hans von Rosen (Mississippi) and academic Irv Dardick (Rideau). Business Parmalat Winchester won the business category, coming out ahead of finalist

The AgriNews May, 2012 Page 7 McGarry Family Chapels. The multinational food company’s Winchester operation was cited for its 1998 involvement in SNC’s Total Phosphorous Management Program and its continued donations to SNC’s Clean Water Program — now totalling $280,000. As seed money, the cash has leveraged more than $1.3-million in investment on 100 projects within the agricultural community, to address things like manure storage, milkhouse wastewater runoff and erosion control. Agriculture Lawrenceholme Farms of Spencerville won the Agriculture category, ahead of finalist Gordon Garlough of Williamsburg. High School St. Thomas Aquinas High School took the High School category for its embrace of “exceptional environmental stewardship efforts,” its gold certification through the Ecoschools program, and other environmentally friendly initiatives like its annual Living Locally Fair. Churchill Alternative School in Ottawa captured the Primary School award, while Dr. Cooke of Carleton University won the College/University category. The Municipal category went to Tay Valley Township, with the Friends of the Tay Valley Watershed topping the community group category. Jim McCready of Carleton Place came first in the Individual category.


AgriNews May pg 08_AgriNews February pg 08 12-05-04 9:17 AM Page 1

Page 8 The AgriNews May, 2012

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TOOK WAS A SPLIT SECOND TO TURN A ROUTINE DAY INTO A FARMERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NIGHTMARE.

On February 18, Tony Baas was working behind his dairy barn, pumping manure into the lagoon, when he ventured a little too close to the power take off (PTO) connecting the pump to his tractor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I remember a small tug on my coat, and the next thing I was on the ground without a coat or shirt on. I got up, and I thought, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;This is probably not a good thingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;,â&#x20AC;? said Baas, at his Russell home last month. His coat got caught in the PTO and was ripped right off his back. When Baas tried to get into the tractor to turn it off, he noticed his right arm didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t respond as usual. Looking down, the farmer saw the limb unnaturally swinging side to side. But he managed to shut the tractor down, then walked back to the house where he instructed his nine-year-old daughter, Rebecca, to call 911. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Swelling only came after we got to the hospital. When I walked in the house, I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel my broken arm,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was after I talked to the guys at 911 and things started to settle down [that the pain came].â&#x20AC;? Baasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right arm was badly fractured midway between his shoulder and elbow from the force of the clothing being torn off of him. The trauma also produced serious swelling in his left arm. He admitted there should have been a guard on the PTO. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For the last seven or eight years I never needed one because it never caught

Wilma and Tony Baas have found a new way of looking at things after Tonyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coat got caught in the PTO. Lucky for Tony he only suffered a swollen left arm and a broken right arm and is well on his way to a full recovery. Baker photo me,â&#x20AC;? he candidly remarked. have time to react,â&#x20AC;? said Baas was also thankful â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve stood beside that Baas. his daughter was home at PTO, 50 or 60 times while Although a lesson the time of the accident, in it was turning and never learned for Baas, the acciitself a happy coincidence. had anything happen.â&#x20AC;? dent hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t profoundly Wilma had taken their other Things could have gone altered his thoughts on children and the neigheither way for Baas, who farming. bourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s children to 4-H and happened to be wearing an â&#x20AC;&#x153;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t change everydidnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have room in the older coat when the thing I do. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m probably vehicle for Rebecca, so she whirring PTO snatched the more careful now, but how chose to stay home. garment. long is that going to last? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I appreciate that the fire â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what saved my The thing is, my whole life department in Russell saw life, was the old coat, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve lived on a farm and my daughter as a hero,â&#x20AC;? he because it ripped easily,â&#x20AC;? been comfortable around said, referring to the first said Baas. He surmised a machinery. When you get emergency responders who newer coat would have too comfortable around arrived after the girlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 911 been more resilient and machinery, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when call. In an article in the pulled him bodily into the things happen.â&#x20AC;? Russell Villager, a sister PTO, making the accident a However, his wife said it publication of The fatal one. His wife, Wilma, has changed their perspecAgriNews, the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pointed out that a newer tive on life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The way fire chief referred to coat might not have gotten things have changed is the Rebecca as the hero of the caught at all. way of looking at things,â&#x20AC;? affair because of the coolâ&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone says farming she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you want to do ness she displayed in makis very dangerous. Yeah, something, you better do it ing the 911 call and in there are dangers involved, because otherwise you directing the responders to but so is there with many might not get to do it.â&#x20AC;? the farm. other jobs,â&#x20AC;? said Baas, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Before the accident we â&#x20AC;&#x153;My wife and I, we can when you let your guard were thinking about and see her as a heroâ&#x20AC;Ś. She down and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t continuous- talking about going to can say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I did do somely watch out that accidents Newfoundland. After the thing specialâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;.â&#x20AC;? happen.â&#x20AC;? accident â&#x20AC;&#x201D; weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going,â&#x20AC;? Baas also appreciated â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m very fortunate to Baas said definitively. the family and friends that come out with the minor Luckily, for Baas he is pitched in to help out. injuries I did.â&#x20AC;? making a full recovery and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everybody stepped up He said the accident is regaining full use of his to the plate and kept things happened so fast that he arm. running.â&#x20AC;? didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have time to react. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still weak but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m Now with this accident The PTO rotates 540 turns using it more and more,â&#x20AC;? behind him, life on the per minute or 10 times each said Baas, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m thankful I Baas farm is slowly getting second. His clothes were got 10 fingers and both back to normal. wrapped around it eight arms.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;You have to live and do times, in the blink of an As for the missing guard what you enjoy doing,â&#x20AC;? he eye. on the PTO, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I ordered it offered, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and start making â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even if I had a kill when he was still in the smart choices on how you switch in my hand, I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hospital,â&#x20AC;? said Wilma. do things.â&#x20AC;?

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AgriNews May pg 09_AgriNews February pg 09 12-05-07 3:15 PM Page 1

Searchable archive at www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews May, 2012 Page 9

Rodeo organizer rides into Rideau Lakes Township By Nelson Zandbergen AgriNews Staff Writer HESTERVILLE — LEAVING THE PAST IN THE DUST, THE 2012 UPPER CANADA RODEO AND ITS CHESTERVILLE-BASED

C

ORGANIZER ARE CHARGING AHEAD IN RIDEAU LAKES TOWNSHIP.

Since last year’s decision to pull out of North Dundas and relocate to the Lombardy fairgrounds, Upper Canada Rodeo Group Foundation president Kevin Pennock has lassoed 30 sponsors in support of the June 23-24 event. He predicts an attendance of at least 8,000 over the two days. That’s based on Pennocks’s judgment of advance ticket sales to date and his general sense of momentum arising from the Foundation’s acceptance by sponsors, “phenomenal” hit numbers on its slick website and related online buzz in the social media, and cross-promotional activities now under way with sponsors Rideau Carleton Raceway and Capital Hoedown 2012. He also points to the event’s recent inclusion in Tourism Ontario’s latest pamphlet as

further evidence of the charitable event’s legitimacy and expresses optimism about a Trillium grant application submitted by the UCRGF. “I could never come back here; it’s too small,” he says of Chesterville, site of the original “Upper Canada Rodeo” in 2010 and 2011, though operated by a different individual who ran the event as a personal endeavour. Those first two editions, which respectively took place at the Chesterville Fairgrounds and the back yard of the Papa Gus Bar & Grill property, were well attended but became embroiled in local controversy over unpaid bills. Pennock, a retired businessman, initially hoped to resurrect the rodeo in Chesterville, using the same name but placing the operation under the new charitable Foundation. He has narrowed down the recipients of funds generated, saying Lanark County Interval House, a battered women’s shelter, will benefit. “I’m still looking at an underprivileged children’s group; I just haven’t found one yet.”

He estimates the value of the event at $80,000 to $100,000. “If it wasn’t for the sponsors I have, this rodeo wouldn’t be feasible. But because of people wanting it in their area, they’re willing to support it.” The event will “at the worst” break even, he says. “This has been planned very neatly and tidily. It’s taken time to do it this way, but as you can see for yourself, those are the results right there,” he asserts pointing to a web page that lists other mainline sponsors like Smith’s Equipment, Campbell’s Trucking Ltd. and Ritchie’s Feed and Seed Inc. He says he’s worked five days a week, as an upaid volunteer, since December, hitting the road to secure sponsorship. Pennock concedes he has been motivated by what he feels was “mistreatment” at the hands of North Dundas Council — after it refused his request to endorse having the rodeo in Chesterville this year — and a desire to show the event as a “viable” one that could have worked here. “In the meantime, I should thank Mayor Eric Duncan for not wanting me

here because I’ve gone way beyond the Township of North Dundas. So maybe I should send him a thankyou letter in the end,” he quips. He has run into no opposition in the Lombardy area and has secured various indications of support from both Rideau Lakes Township and the Towns of Smiths Falls, including cross links on those municipality’s websites and free use of a municipal campground for the incoming Rawhide Rodeo cowboys. Rideau Lakes has also declared it a community festival, he adds. The smiling Chesterville resident suggests the Upper Canada Rodeo has become his primary concern in life. But, he adds, his newfound status as an event promoter has turned into “a lot of fun.” Tickets to the Rodeo are available online at uppercanadarodeofoundation.com . In addition to the spectacles of bull- and bronco-riding bravery, the event will also feature musical acts Sarah McClurg, Ambush, The Nelson Colt Band and The Gallagher Family’s Cowboy Church.

Putting the equine in Eastern Ontario, Upper Canada Rodeo organizer Kevin Pennock.

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AgriNews May pg 10_AgriNews February pg 10 12-05-07 12:34 PM Page 1

Page 10 The AgriNews May, 2012

Agri-business directory at www.agrinews.ca

Early cropping jump evaporates by Nelson Zandbergen AgriNews Staff Writer ASTERN ONTARIO â&#x20AC;&#x201D;AN

E

EARLY JUMP TO THE

CROPPING SEASON EVAPORATED AS APRIL TURNED TO

MAY. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not late, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve slipped right back to schedule on most things,â&#x20AC;? said Gilles Quesnel, field crops specialist and integrated pest management program lead with Ontarioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ministry of Agriculture Food and Rural Affairs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;From a field crops standpoint, we were ahead, but the cold weather has brought us back close to normal. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not behind,â&#x20AC;? he said of the regional pic-

ture in Eastern Ontario. The scant winter snow load disappeared early this year, causing river and creek levels to plummet while record high temperatures took hold through a dry March. The cultivators were out in full force that month and into April, visible dust clouds left in their wake. Dry and mild conditions persisted until the middle of last month, when the weather suddenly turned much cooler with variable precipitation, ending the head start. And it got downright cold, as parts of Eastern Ontario received a blanket of spring snow on April 23. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been so cool ever

since that the drying [process] has been slow,â&#x20AC;? explained Quesnel on May 3. Despite the resulting delay, Aprilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rain and snow was â&#x20AC;&#x153;welcomeâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;more of a benefitâ&#x20AC;? overall, he said. The top two inches of soil had begun to dry out too much in some instances, according to the OMAFRA staffer, particularly where cultivation had gone a little deep. Consequently, spring wheat and other cereal plantings that went into the ground in plenty of good time this year experienced â&#x20AC;&#x153;a bit of unevennessâ&#x20AC;? in emergence, though they still looked good overall. Continued on next page

Cold wet weather at the end of April and beginning of May dashed hopes for an earlier than usual start to the 2012 crop year.

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AgriNews May pg 11_AgriNews February pg 11 12-05-05 4:26 PM Page 1

Agricultural links at www.agrinews.ca Continued from page 10 â&#x20AC;&#x153;And this moisture weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had will help bring it on,â&#x20AC;? he added, noting that spring wheat fields have reached the two- and threeleaf stage. From mid-March to midApril, the region accumulated 6 mm of precipitation, about half the annual average during that time frame, he said. And that late-April snow didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hurt emerging wheat and new alfalfa seedings, he pointed out, as the ground retained heat and generally kept the little plants above freezing. But temperatures have prevented those alfalfa seedlings from growing very quickly, and combined with substantial winterkill observed in the region, there have been concerns about a tight hay supply, according to Quesnel. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But things are picking up.â&#x20AC;? Though it varies by county, he estimated that 35 per cent of the Eastern Ontario corn crop had been planted to date, pretty much on target for the beginning of May. From mid-April to the end of that month, the region received roughly 60 corn heat units, he said,

about one-third the amount needed to pop the crop up after planting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s there and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s starting to develop a bit of a root. As soon as we get a bit of sunshine, it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take too much to warm up that dark coloured soil. In Prince Edward County, cash-cropper and Pioneer Lloyd Crowe estimated that growers in his area had managed to plant only 10 per cent of the corn crop. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Two weeks ago, it was good going. Most spots were dry,â&#x20AC;? said Crowe of the situation at Reynolds Brothers Farms, where heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a partner. The Picton-area operation had about half its corn planted. On his cell phone while wrenching on the farmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s corn planter May 3, Crowe commented: â&#x20AC;&#x153;We started off planting all our low areas, saving all our high sandyloam areas for last, so that turned out to be a good move. But we havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been able to do much in the past week to 10 days.â&#x20AC;? The cooler weather conditions have also delayed weed-spraying activities in their 700 acres of winter wheat, he added. While he would have

The AgriNews May, 2012 Page 11 preferred to have all of his corn and soybeans in the ground, Crowe acknowledged that almost no soybeans had been planted anywhere in Eastern Ontario by that point on the calendar. He explained that he breaks a bit with conventional wisdom on that crop and prefers to see beans planted as early in May as possible. He gauges a noticeable loss in yield when soybeans are planted any later than mid-May. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do everything,â&#x20AC;? he said, noting that

this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s schedule still remains well ahead of last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very wet spring. Yet the 2011 harvest still wound up producing the â&#x20AC;&#x153;best everâ&#x20AC;? year for the farm, he said, thanks to extended summer weather at the end of the growing season. But the wet fall that concluded 2011 reduced the number of winter wheat acres now sprouting in the spring of 2012. Crowe said they managed to plant only half the winter wheat acreage they initially aimed

to achieve at Reynolds Brothers. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not alone, he said, suggesting the market for straw looks to be tighter as a result. Quesnel said heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s noticed an uptick in the number of spring-wheat acres planted this year, likely driven in part by the need to create additional straw. The drier conditions that prevailed earlier in the spring also allowed farmers to draw out their manure in good time, in stark contrast to the challenges experi-

enced a year ago. So the landâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prepared and fertilized, Quesnel noted. Farmers have already â&#x20AC;&#x153;had a chance to put some crops in. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve tried out the equipment. Everybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ready, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just waiting to go.â&#x20AC;? Quesnel didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have stats on total acres likely to be planted in Eastern Ontario, but he agreed the quantity is rising as farmers take out fence rows, tile-drain secondary fields, put old pastures into production and cut down scrub and bush.

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AgriNews May pg 12_AgriNews February pg 12 12-05-07 11:16 AM Page 1

Page 12 The AgriNews May, 2012

Over 2,000 stories archived at www.agrinews.ca

MacLaren still helping to push OSPCA changes By Nelson Zandbergen AgriNews Staff Writer HESTERVILLE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; WHEN IT COMES TO

C

TAMING THE

RURALLY UNPOPULAR

OSPCA, AN EASTERN ONTARIO MPP REMAINS HOPEFUL FOR ANOTHER KICK AT THE CAT

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

THIS

TIME BY WORKING WITH HIS

LIBERAL OPPONENTS

ACROSS THE AISLE.

Carleton-Mississippi Mills MPP Jack MacLaren says heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lobbying two McGuinty government cabinet ministers for reforms to the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, following the failure of his private memberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bill 47 to pass second reading March 29. Conceding his bill â&#x20AC;&#x153;didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get very good supportâ&#x20AC;? from farm organizations, the Conservative MPP asserted those groups are now â&#x20AC;&#x153;working on the Liberal government to try to make changes to the OSPCA Act, to effectively do what we tried to do.â&#x20AC;? MacLaren said heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

attempting to assist the latest effort. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gone to the Minister of Agriculture [Ted McMeekin] and the Minister of Correctional Services [Madeleine Meilleur] and said that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be happy to help out. I had all kinds of good people help me put in place these good ideas and draft up this legislation .... â&#x20AC;&#x153;So all those people are there and willing to help the Liberals make this change,â&#x20AC;? he said May 3, adding the Ontario Federatio of Agriculture also wants to meet with him on the subject later this month. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be happy to do that. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care who fixes the problem as long as we get it fixed, you know? â&#x20AC;&#x153;So Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d say the doorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not closed. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s open. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just that somebody else is carrying the ball. And I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just great.â&#x20AC;? But Meilleur, the minister responsible for the OSPCA, â&#x20AC;&#x153;is not particularly receptive,â&#x20AC;? he warned. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s urban, she doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s any problem at

Carleton-Mississippi MPP Jack MacLaren all. She thinks itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a bunch of whining farmers, that kind of thing.â&#x20AC;? He said the minister generally touts agreements the OSPCA has signed with various commodity groups, such as the Dairy Farmers of Ontario, as evidence of

no problem. On the other hand, McMeekin â&#x20AC;&#x153;is quite receptiveâ&#x20AC;? and has promised to do â&#x20AC;&#x153;something to fix it,â&#x20AC;? according to MacLaren. Failed Bill 47 was intended to be a more OFAfriendly follow-up to

MacLarenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recent predecessor Bill 37. Both bills similarly stripped the OSPCA of farm oversight, but Bill 47 took further steps by placing livestock welfare investigations under Ontarioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs. MacLaren said that â&#x20AC;&#x153;oversight and accountabilityâ&#x20AC;? of OSPCA enforcement personnel was the aim of the proposed legislation, in keeping with a recommendation of the 2010 LeSageMeek report into the private, charitable agency thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s currently empowered to police all animal welfare matters. The proposal would have also added new checks and balances to the process of investigating animal abuse allegations; a veterinarian would have to sign off on compliance orders, a police officer on any charges, and a justice of the peace on the removal animals from a property. The OSPCA also would have lost the ability to bill

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owners for the care of seized animals, eliminating what the MPP says is a conflict of interest with the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fundraising function. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were successful, I would say, in that we raised the profile of the problem,â&#x20AC;? he said, describing the OSPCA as an organization â&#x20AC;&#x153;out of controlâ&#x20AC;? under current law. MacLaren is a former president of the Ontario Landownersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Association that has made a cause celebre of opposing bureaucratic intrusions in rural Ontario. In the end, neither the OFA nor the Farm Animal Council supported Bill 47, he acknowledged, bluntly remarking, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think some of these groups sometimes get a little too carried away with maybe being supportive of Liberals, instead of just doing the right thing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;However, now theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to have to deal with Madeleine Meilleur, and sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not listening. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be a tough one.â&#x20AC;?

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AgriNews May pg 13_AgriNews February pg 13 12-05-04 12:19 PM Page 1

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Seed Growers donate partial proceeds from 2012 show $7,000 to 4-H, $5,000 each to Kemptville, CHEO

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OTTAWA VALLEY SEED GROWERS ASSOCIATION CONDUCTHE

ED A REGULAR SPRING RITUAL

DURING A RECENT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, GIVING AWAY THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS TO WORTHWHILE AGRICULTURAL CAUSES ACROSS

EASTERN ONTARIO AND

BEYOND.

“Much of the revenue from our annual Ottawa Valley Farm Show is returned to the community to support important organizations such as 4-H,” said Seed Growers president Bruce Hudson of Kinburn, a long-time 4-H volunteer. While the final tally isn’t in, the 85th anniversary farm show held last month at the new CE Centre turned a profit despite increased expenses over 2011 of about $40,000, the last time the show was held at Lansdowne Park. Added costs were offset through a $1 increase in the square footage rental fee and a hike in the admission price for adults to $10. Beneficiaries of the latest round of OVSGA donations include Kemptville Campus of the University of Guelph where researchers are getting $5,000 for each of four projects including: Evaluation

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of New Fungicides in Spring Cereals; Smart Spring Cereals; Soybean Monitoring for Rust and Alphids; and Red Clover Under-seeded in Spring Wheat. Also benefitting are 4-H programs including the annual regional show in Metcalfe, a fundraising golf tournament, each of 11 counties in Eastern Ontario, and several field crop clubs, for a total of about $7,000. The Seed Growers also donate about $2,000 worth of space and booth accessories for the 4-H display and activities at the farm show. For the first time, directors decided to support the Royal Winter Fair-based Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame with $500; the Seed Growers are already major supporters of the Milton-based Ontario Agricultural Hall of Fame, including sponsoring a “mini hall” of Eastern Ontario inductees on the Kemptville campus. Finally, directors rounded off proceeds from the annual farm show auction to $5,000 to be given once again to the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario In other business, OVFS manager Tom Van Dusen reported on his recent participation in the Farm Show Council annual meeting in Spokane, Washington. The FSC groups 23 agricultural expositions across North America - with one in New Zealand - to exchange ideas and suggestions with the objective of improving the experience both for exhibitors and visitors alike.

The AgriNews May, 2012 Page 13




AgriNews May pg 14_AgriNews February pg 14 12-05-04 11:06 AM Page 1

Page 14 The AgriNews May, 2012

YOUR FEEDBACK : Do you have any comments or feedback on the format and or the information contained in the OMAFRA Connects Update? If so, we would appreciate hearing from you. Feedback and comments can be left at the following link: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/VQQCLMW.

Technical Updates

Grain Storage - Problems to Avoid By: Helmut Spieser Engineer, Field Crop Conditioning & Environment - OMAFRA

"

Maintaining grain in good condition in storage doesn't just happen, but requires careful, routine inspection and good storage practices." This is crucial to successful storage of grain for extended periods of time. Good storage practices are not just about putting good quality grain into a weather-proof container. Keeping good quality grain over for a long time requires good management. The quality of the grain loaded into storage is as good as it will ever be. Over time, the quality of this grain will only decrease, and seldom (if ever) improve. The best you can hope for, is to maintain grain quality at the same level as when the grain went into the bin. If you have grain stored on your farm you should be monitoring these bins on a routine schedule. Sometimes it's easy to forget to check the bins because of other jobs which require your attention. Blowing snow, renewing your grower pesticide certificate, getting ready for the sap run and other things may distract you from the monthly bin check. Consider telling your farming partner to remind you to check the bin. After all, when you move that grain out, it's worth dollars. Monthly Bin Check Ups 1. Turn on your aeration fan. 2. Climb up and look inside the bin. Look for signs of moisture on the underside of the roof. If water droplets or ice are present, you need to aerate your bin. Moisture from the grain has been carried into the attic space and condensed on the roof metal. 3. Sometimes snow can be driven into the top of a storage bin. If there is a light dusting, don't worry. When you run the aeration fan this snow will sublimate and be discharged as harmless water vapour. When much greater amounts of snow are found, shoveling may be required to remove it from the bin. 4. Take a big sniff. Do you notice any off-odours? Your nose will pick up strange odours at very low concentrations. The air should smell like clean grain. 5. Look at the grain surface. Does it look the same as the last time? If it looks dull or off-colour, investigate further. 6. Check the static pressure, or the working pressure of the fan, in the plenum under the aeration floor. Has this pressure changed from last month? If it has gone down, there is no cause for concern. If the static pressure has gone up, something has increased the resistance of the air as it moves through the grain mass. Investigate deeper into the grain mass. 7. Record your notes in a monitoring log book. Next month you can see how things have changed in the various bins. Aeration of stored grains is done to keep the whole grain mass at a uniform temperature, as well as maintain the grain mass temperature within 5oC of the average outside air temperature. In this way convective air movement is not possible. As bin surfaces are warmed by the sun or mild air, air currents start to move in the grain mass. Moisture from the grain is carried up and condenses on colder surfaces. Spoilage can occur if this convective air movement is not arrested. Routine aeration of the bin contents will prevent convective air movement.

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Basics of Aeration 1. Bring the whole grain mass to the same temperature. 2. Operate the fan only when relative humidity levels will not add moisture to the grain. 3. Operate the fan for sufficient time to totally change the whole grain mass temperature. 4. Changing the whole mass temperature may require a number of days. 5. Relative humidity levels of night-time air can add moisture to small grains and beans. 6. The aeration time required to completely change the mass temperature is as follows: hours of aeration = 20/CFM per bushel. Winter 2012 So far this winter, we have seen temperature fluctuations that we don't typically see in December, January and February. Outside temperatures have drifted above and below freezing for extended periods of time, so things may be a little out of the norm in the bins as well. The key to preventing uncontrolled air movement in your bins is to keep all the grain within 5°C of the average outside air (ambient) temperatures. With fluctuating ambient temperatures, this temperature differential could exceed that. Aerate your grain on cold evenings to get it down to your normal mid-February temperature.

ishing pans as soon as possible after the season is complete. Where sugary sap residue, syrup residue and residue from defoaming agent is allowed to dry out, it will be far more difficult to clean the equipment. To minimize the amount of work in cleaning, wash up the equipment as soon as possible. Use scrub brushes on equipment and rinse with warm or hot potable water. Where cleaning and sanitizing chemicals are used, producers should ensure that cleaning chemicals are listed by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency as acceptable for this purpose and are available from maple equipment dealers. In the sugar bush, it is also important to remove spiles from maple trees before trees begin spring growth. Spiles should be removed as dormant buds begin to grow and new leaves expand. Most new wood growth and healing over of tap holes in maple trees will occur in spring and early summer. Leaving spiles in the trees during the growth of new wood will prevent proper healing of tap holes. Re-useable spiles can also be washed and sanitized soon after the sap collection season is finished, to make proper cleaning easier. Spiles that are disposable should be collected and disposed of properly. Some equipment manufactures and dealers may accept used disposable spiles back from producers for recycling purposes of plastics.

The STRAW Specialist? By Peter Johnson Cereal Specialist - OMAFRA

S

traw has become a huge commodity in the cereal industry. Every year, the questions come around, "Should I sell my straw? What is it worth?" If Johnson EVER quotes a price range, virtually everybody is immediately MAD! Straw has such a local market component that everyone's price differs. What has happened to make straw such a valuable and sought after commodity?

The Past Figure 1 Successful grain storage requires routing inspection and aeration to avoid spoilage If you are feeding grain regularly from a storage bin you are in essence continuously seeing the quality of that grain. Don't forget to check the bins where you are not removing grain on a routine basis. Grain can go out of condition quickly. With careful and diligent monitoring you should see the warning signs of possible spoilage problems and be able to take appropriate action to prevent further quality reductions.

Maple Production Post Season Work By: Todd Leuty Agroforestry Specialist – OMAFRA

M

any syrup producers are now finishing the maple syrup processing season for 2012 and will begin with post-season cleanup. An excellent manual and guide for maple syrup producers on post-season cleaning can be found in the new Best Practices Manual that is available from the Ontario Maple Syrup Producers Association. The manual itemizes a detailed and modern cleaning processes, which is acceptable to food processing industries. Washing, cleaning and sanitizing of all sap and syrup processing equipment should be a priority for all producers as soon as possible. It is best to wash sap tanks, sap tubing collection systems, buckets, evaporator flue pans and fin-

Ratchet back the clock. Let's go back to when I started with OMAFRA in 1985. There was 590,000 acres of mixed grain, 520,000 acres of barley, 280,000 acres of oat, and 30,000 acres of spring wheat, for a total of 1,420,000 acres of spring cereals. Those acreages were already in a downtrend, 200,000 acres less than 1981. There were 505,000 acres of winter wheat. All together, there was almost 2 million acres of straw throughout the 1980's.

Present Compare that to 2011 when there was a whopping 335,000 acres of spring cereals (90,000 mixed grain, 110,000 barley, 55,000 oat, 80,000 spring wheat). OUCH! Can it get any lower? Winter wheat experienced the second largest crop on record, at 1,095,000 acres. Total straw available was 1,330,000 acres.

Future What will happen in 2012? There won't be a big increase in spring cereal acres with corn at $5 per bushel. Winter wheat acres are around 700,000. Add those together for a total of about 1,000,000 acres. This is half of what we had in the 1980's. Is it any wonder that straw is in demand?

Other Factors Dairy farms are feeding more straw, as they need dietary fibre. We are exporting more straw to dairy farms on the US eastern seaboard, as their acres of straw have dropped even more dramatically than ours. If it wasn't for the fact that Ontario livestock numbers have dropped and less people bed with straw, straw prices would be through the roof! It looks like straw prices will continue to be strong, as • Continued on Page 16


AgriNews May pg 15_AgriNews February pg 15 12-05-04 9:35 AM Page 1

Agri-business directory at www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews May, 2012 Page 15

E COST-SHAR FUNDING * AVAILABLE

Workshops Now Available

Start the business planning process by attending this free two-day interactive workshop. You will: • Assess business management practices • Determine priorities and key goals • Develop realistic action plans • Learn about cost-share funding opportunities

County

Day 1

Day 2

Workshop Facilitator

PETERBOROUGH

Thursday, June 14

Thursday, June 21

Paul Reeds

Thursday, August 9

Thursday, August 16

Kara Enright

Thursday, August 30

Thursday, September 6

Paul Reeds

DUNDAS

Tuesday, Sept. 11

Tuesday, Sept. 18

Shelley McPhail

GRENVILLE

Tuesday, Sept. 25

Tuesday, Oct. 2

Shelley McPhail

RENFREW

Thursday, Sept. 27

Thursday, Oct. 4

Shelley McPhail

LANARK

Thursday, Oct. 11

Thursday, Oct 18

Shelley McPhail

HASTINGS, NORTHUMBERLAND

Thursday, Nov. 15

Thursday, Nov. 22

Kara Enright

DURHAM

Thursday, Nov. 1

Thursday, Nov. 8

Paul Reeds

PRESCOTT & RUSSELL

Thursday, Nov. 15

Thursday, Nov. 22

Roxane Legault

LEEDS

Thursday, Nov. 22

Thursday, Nov. 29

Shelley McPhail

RENFREW

Tuesday, Nov. 27

Tuesday, Dec. 4

Shelley McPhail

CARLETON

Thursday, Dec. 6

Thursday, Dec. 13

Shelley McPhail

PRESCOTT & RUSSELL

Thursday, Dec. 6

Thursday, Dec. 13

Roxane Legault

HASTINGS, LENNOX & ADDINGTON, PRINCE EDWARD CITY OF KAWARTHA LAKES

(English Workshop)

(Atelier en francais)

Lunch and refreshments provided. Pre-registration required.

REGISTER ONLINE or Contact Program Representative For More Information Paul Reeds 705-328-2710 preeds@ontariosoilcrop.org Kara Enright 613-478-3404 kenright@ontariosoilcrop.org Paul Reeds 705-328-2710 preeds@ontariosoilcrop.org Shelley McPhail 613-256-4011 smcphail@ontariosoilcrop.org Shelley McPhail 613-256-4011 smcphail@ontariosoilcrop.org Glen Smith 613-628-2987 gsmith@ontariosoilcrop.org Shelley McPhail 613-256-4011 smcphail@ontariosoilcrop.org Kara Enright 613-478-3404 kenright@ontariosoilcrop.org Paul Reeds 705-328-2710 preeds@ontariosoilcrop.org Roxane Legault 613-872-0830 rlegault@ontariosoilcrop.org Rita Vogel 613-275-1753 rvogel@ontariosoilcrop.org Glen Smith 613-628-2987 gsmith@ontariosoilcrop.org Shelley McPhail 613-256-4011 smcphail@ontariosoilcrop.org Roxane Legault 613-872-0830 rlegault@ontariosoilcrop.org

*Cost-share funding available until further notice

Register Online at www.ontariosoilcrop.org/workshops Supported through Growing Forward, a federal-provincial-territorial initiative.


AgriNews May pg 16_AgriNews February pg 16 12-05-04 11:16 AM Page 1

Page 16 The AgriNews May, 2012 • Continued from Page 14 available supply is small. What is it worth? A great question! Lots! Unfortunately, the Provincial Cereal Specialist has done an amazing job of becoming the STRAW SPECIALIST!

Two New Regulations Proposed For The Animal Health Act, 2009

O

n March 9, 2012, two new regulatory proposals under the Animal Health Act, 2009 were posted on the Environmental Registry and the Regulatory Registry for public input. These proposals relate to hazard reporting and compensation. If approved by the Minister of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, the proposed reporting regulation will strengthen our agri-food industry and our agri-food businesses by helping the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) respond more quickly and effectively to reduce the impact of animal disease outbreaks. The regulations will determine the hazards that animal health laboratories and veterinarians will be required to report to the ministry. There are no proposed reporting requirements for individual producers. The proposed reporting regulations will support Ontario’s ongoing relationship with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), which works to help protect animal health in the province. This proposal has been intended to minimize burden for animal health laboratories and veterinarians and minimize overlap with reporting requirements to the CFIA. The compensation regulation proposal, if approved by the Lieutenant Governor in Council, would provide a framework for the Minister, to issue payments in accordance with the act and the regulation for certain losses incurred as a result of action ordered under the act. The compensation under this framework will assist the industry in the event that such losses are incurred. If approved, these will be the first regulations made under the Animal Health Act, 2009, which came into force in 2010. For more details about the proposed regulations, visit this site: http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/food/inspection/ahw/ aha-regs.htm The regulatory proposals will remain on the Registries until April 27, 2012.

Online Courses For Beginning Farmers From Cornell University

Accessible, comprehensive course calendar for beginning farmers: http://nebeginningfarmers.org/online-courses/all-courses/

Programs and Services

Les programmes, les services et les ressources du ministère de l’Agriculture, de l’Alimentation et des Affaires rurales de l’Ontario sont également disponibles en français.

Mapping Information You Can Use Ag Maps Geographic Information Portal By: Adam Hayes Soil Management Specialist - Field Crops - OMAFRA

T

he Ag Maps Geographic Information Portal is a new service launched this past fall by the Geomatics Unit of the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food

and Rural Affairs. This new page on the OMAFRA website www.ontario.ca/agmaps offers a variety of soil map resources. There are four sections that provide a wide range of information. 1. Agricultural Information Atlas The Agricultural Information Atlas is an interactive mapping website. It serves as a tool to acquire agricultural information or to create maps. You can view maps with basic road and municipal information, aerial photography, Canada Land Inventory, hydraulic soil groups, tile drainage information, soil drainage, watersheds and more. It is as easy as clicking on and off the layers you are interested in seeing. You can use the tools to measure length, area and to mark areas on the map. The maps can be printed out as well. These maps can be quite handy when you need a farm or field map. 2. Geospatial Data View and Downloads This part of the website allows the user to view the location on Google Maps of farm markets, OMAFRA offices, equipment dealers and more. The user may also download these files to their computers as a kml or shapefile. 3. Canada Land Inventory (CLI) Mapping The Canada Land Inventory maps, or CLI maps as they are often known, provide information on the soil capability class of land (Class 1 to 7) in Ontario. The map units are in colour and use the current road names. 4. OMAFRA Program Data Sets a. Drainage Mapping The drainage mapping section of the website provides information and links to the agricultural drainage data that OMAFRA maintains. b. Soil Mapping and Reports This section provides links to a page on the Soils Ontario project. The objective is to evolve the current soils data into a digital database that is spatially accurate throughout Ontario, consistent, and easily accessible in digital and paper format. A link is also provided to the Land Information Ontario website, which has significant soils data sets. Another link takes the user to the CANSIS website, which is maintained by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. This website has PDF versions of most of the Ontario soil maps and reports. Just click on the link that says "view the report". The final link takes you to the Service Ontario website where soil maps, reports and other soils related publications can be ordered. c. Land Use Data Sets This section discusses the Agricultural Operations Inventory project, which is complete on a portion of the province. It provides farm and land use information, such as fields, farmsteads, fencerows and ditches. Detailed information includes crop type, row direction, ditch and farmstead locations, livestock raised, irrigation and tillage method used. Also described in this section is the Agricultural Resource Inventory, which was produced in 1983. It provides a map of general land use at that time - urban, woodland, and cropland (corn system, grazing system, hay system, etc). The final link takes you to a page about Specialty Crops and Canada Land Inventory Mapping for the Feed-in Tariff Program. These resources represent a lot of work that has gone into creating useful tools for many types of uses. Some of them are easy for farmers to use and others are targeted more toward planners, consultants and others who have the software to map out the data. A few of the resources are complete, many are being constantly updated and improved, while others are still in development. Check these resources out and see which ones are most useful for your situation.

Searchable archive at www.agrinews.ca GeoSolutions Inc. (AGSI). The PPR is the only official provincial registry for obtaining Ontario Premises Identification Numbers for agri-food businesses. Premises Identification numbers issued before April 1, 2012 are still valid. Obtaining a Premises Identification Number for your agri-food business is an important step towards traceability in Ontario. To register your premises or update your information, please contact AGSI: • Online: www.ontarioppr.ca • By phone: 1-855-697-7743 (MY PPR ID)

New Young Farm Loans For Canada

Y

oung and beginning farmers will find it easier to start and grow their farm

businesses with the help of a new $500 million loan program, introduced by the federal government and FCC yesterday. This new loan offers qualified producers who are under 40 years of age loans of up to $500,000 to purchase or improve farmland and buildings. Producers between the ages of 18 and 39 make up approximately 16% of Canadian producers, according to the 2006 Census. The FCC Young Farmer Loan includes features and options that address this demographic, and support their long-term success. These include: - variable rates at prime plus 0.5% and special fixed rates - no loan processing fees The Young Farmer Loan enhances FCC's suite of existing products and services that support young producers, such as the FCC Transition Loan, FCC Business Planning Award, FCC Learning events and publications, FCC Go Ag! events, and FCC Management Software for both accounting and field management. For more information on the FCC Young Farmer Loan, visit www.fcc.ca/youngfarmerloan

Receive Funding For Planting Trees!

A

number of the grant programs offered through South Nation Conservation cover the majority of the costs associated with planting projects. South Nation staff will help you apply for the grants, and arrange for the tree planting and site preparation by local professionals. Your property might qualify if it has any ONE of the following features: planting area over 2.5 acres; is along a water course; or is within the City of Ottawa. Bareroot trees are also available for smaller projects Would you like to know how to manage your woodlot more sustainably? If so, the Woodlot Advisory Service may be for you. This service is free & voluntary to anyone who owns a minimum of 5 acres or more. For further information, please call Rose-Marie Chrétien at 877-9842948 OR rchretien@nation.on.ca. You may also our website at www.nation.on.ca/en/your-forests/.

Update On How To Register Hay & Straw Buy / Sell Your Agri-Food Premises remises Identification Numbers can be obtained Services

P

from the Provincial Premises Registry (PPR) now operated by approved service provider Angus Continued on page 29

A

reminder of the Ontario Forage Council’s “Ontario Hay Listings” service: www.ontariohaylistings.ca. This is a free listings service for people looking to buy or sell hay and straw. For more information or comments or questions, call 1.877.892.8663 or email info@ontariohaylistings.ca.


AgriNews May pg 17_AgriNews February pg 17 12-05-07 11:44 AM Page 1

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The AgriNews May, 2012 Page 17

Market on the move

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TTAWA— THE FINAL PREPARATIONS WERE FINALIZED AND ON MAY 6 THE OTTAWA FARMERS’ MARKET OFFICIALLY OPENED AT BREWER PARK, ON SLOAN AVE. ACROSS FROM CARLETON UNIVERSITY MARKING, AT LEAST A TEMPORARY BREAK FROM ITS LANSDOWNE PARK LOCATION. Linda Cook, Market Manager, spoke to The Agrinews just days before the opening. She said that while things were very hectic, the market was ready to begin at its new location. “The preparations are getting there. It has been a busy week leading up, but we are ready to go. Not all of the vendors will be there because their products just aren’t ready yet, but by mid-May we hope to be in full swing.” The move to Brewer Park is in response to the long-delayed revitalization of Lansdowne. The group plans to go back to Lansdowne once the renovations are complete in their same spot in front of the Aberdeen pavilion, which will not be affected by the project. “We will be

going back,” said Cook. “We just can’t be there while the redevelopment is going on. So we will be at Brewer for the next couple of years or so.” There was one last market held at the Aberdeen on April 15, something that Cook thought was a good way to go before the move. “We thought it was appropriate to have one more at the Aberdeen because of its history. It was also a good chance to let people know about the move.” The market got what appears to be some positive news in early May as the Friends of Lansdowne, a group that has been against the proposed redevelopment of the site, had their most recent case at the Ontario Court of Appeal unanimously turned down. That means that barring an appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada, the redevelopment by the Ottawa Sports and Entertainment Group can begin. Cook says that the Market had never chosen a side on this debate but is happy that an outcome finally looks like it has been reached. “We have been on the fence on this issue. We are

This was the sight as visitors entered the Aberdeen Pavilion at Lansdowne Park for the final Ottawa Farmers’ Market on April 15. The market relocated to Brewer Park May 6, while Lansdowne under goes redevelopment. The hours will remain the same at the new location, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sundays. not on one side or the other. We understand the concerns of both, we just want to be at Lansdowne and get back there.” As for the new site at Brewer Park, Cook is optimistic about the change. “We will be more visible to the public. It is a nice park and a very nice setting. The only downside is it is not as easy to get to or park at as Lansdowne was.” Still, Cook was excited about the opening and had a message for regular and new customers. “I hope regulars come out and continDavid Phillips stands with his Avonmore Berry Farm booth at the final Ottawa ue to support our local Farmers’ Market at the Aberdeen Pavilion at Lansdowne Park. Phillips is disapfarmers and hope that new pointed with the move because the market has a good following at Lansdowne, customers come check it he believes there will be a few months of growing pains adjusting to the move. out.”

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AgriNews May pg 18_AgriNews February pg 18 12-05-04 1:02 PM Page 1

Page 18 The AgriNews May, 2012

Agricultural links at www.agrinews.ca

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AgriNews May pg 19_AgriNews February pg 19 12-05-04 10:31 AM Page 1

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The AgriNews May, 2012 Page 19

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AgriNews May pg 20_AgriNews February pg 20 12-05-04 8:53 AM Page 1

Page 20 The AgriNews May, 2012

Herd Management Award Nicole Clement from the Royal Bank of Canada , Embrun, presenting award to Ferme A & L Desnoyers. All photos by Wendy Molenaar.

Russell County DHI awards

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Best Herd BCA Award Walter Von Ah, left, presented with the BMO Award.

From left, Chris Nooyen presented with award by Andre Hildbrand, Russell DHI committee

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AgriNews May pg 21_AgriNews February pg 21 12-05-04 9:46 AM Page 1

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Best Calving Interval Julie and Andre Brisson of Ferme Brissfrance with the award. Andre is a Russell County DHI committee member.

The AgriNews May, 2012 Page 19

Lowest SCC Score

Best Composite BCA 5 and over

Ramona Kaelin receivees the Low SCC Award from Bert Molenaar. All photos by Wendy Molenaar

From left, Thomas Meyerhans, Russell County DHI Â Committee, presents the CIBC, Embrun, award to Walter Von Ah.

Russell shows once again itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the little county that could By Wendy Molenaar Special to The AgriNews IMOGES - THE RUSSELL COUNTY DHI BANQUET WAS HELD FRIDAY APRIL 20TH AT THE COMMUNITY CENTRE HERE. THERE WERE 145 PEOPLE ATTENDING THE EVENT. LOCAL ARTIST BARB LACKIE, DID THE TROPHIES THIS YEAR. BARB ALSO DONATED ONE OF HER LIMITED EDITION PRINTS, AS A DOOR PRIZE. Russell County again ranked first in the province

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with an Average Composite BCA of 230. The County also placed second for Herd Management Score with an average of 642 points. Eric Patenaude presented his grandfather Gilles Patenaude of La Ferme Gillette with a Guinness World Record Certificate for their cow Gillette Emperor Smurf EX 91. Smurf set a new world record for most milk produced in a lifetime. She has produced 216,891kg over

15 years on 10 lactations and has another calf due in early May. The Herd Awards were as follows: BEST CALVING INTERVAL was tied at 389 days Ferme Reylene Reynald and Helene Blanchard and Ferme Brissfrance - Andre and Julie Brisson LOWEST HERD SOMATIC CELL COUNT (SCC) AVERAGE at 45,000 - Sunrise Holsteins -

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AgriNews May pg 22_AgriNews February pg 22 12-05-04 10:26 AM Page 1

Page 22 The AgriNews May, 2012

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Smurf is one for the record books By Pamela Pearson AgriNews Staff Writer MBRUN — GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS HAS RECOGNIZED A 15-YEAR-OLD EASTERN ONTARIO HOLSTEIN FOR HIGHEST MILK YIELD IN A LIFETIME, WITH A PRODUCTION OF 21,6891 KG, OR

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ROUGHLY SEVEN TANKER TRUCKLOADS, OF NATURE’S PERFECT FOOD.

GILLETTE EMPEROR SMURF, DAUGHTER OF GILLETTE LINDY MURPHY AND WISCONSIN SIRE ROCKY-VIEW EMPEROR, RESIDES AT EMBRUN’S FERME GILLETTE. PRODUCING MILK SINCE THE AGE OF TWO, SHE SURPASSED THE

CANADIAN LIFETIME PRODUCTION RECORD IN 2011. It was this national achievement that gave Eric, grandson of Gilles and Lorrette Patenaude, the idea of contacting Guinness

World Records. The record book did not have a category of this type, and “the application process took about four months,” says Patenaude. “It was very exciting to be recognized and Smurf has taken the media storm all in stride.” Well known among Holstein breeders nationally and internationally, Ferme Gillette is family farm of 450 head just south of this bustling community. Smurf is rated as an Excellent-91 producer and winner of seven Super 3 and nine Superior Lactation production awards. She is the progeny of a six-generational tree of Very Good or Excellent producers and has herself, calved eight bulls and two heifers. Of the heifers, only one survived to adulthood Gillette Champion Sally, designated an “Excellent” producer in her own right. Smurf will shortly deliver her 11th calf and begin another lactation cycle.

An average cow produces between 12 to 15 litres per day, but Smurf consistently produces approximately 50 litres daily. Most dairy cows also only last between seven and eight years before they are replaced, but Smurf’s ability to still breed healthy calves, mixed with a strong maternal genetic pool of a low somatic cell count, makes her a winner all round. These strong genetics continue to be carried down through generations, such as Smurf’s daughter, Gillette Champion Sally, who is going on her seventh calf and whose embryos are now being flushed and sold to farms in Japan and Australia. Another Gillette dam, Blitz 2nd Wind, rated as Very Good-88 34*, in April was named the 2011 Cow of the Year, a second win in this category for the farm. In 2000, Gillette Blackstar Christiane (VG-88 17*)

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notched the First Cow of the Year Award for the operation; it was a sentimental win, as Christiane survived through the farm’s devastating fire in 1994. PETA cheesed off Recently, the animal right group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) contacted Patenaude by letter recommending he retire the 15year-cow to raise her latest calf in peace at an “an approved farmed-animal sanctuary.” Patenaude states on the missive from the Los Angeles-based organization associated with former Price is Right game-show host Bob Barker, “We are the people best fit to take care of Smurf and her calf.” Patenaude told The AgriNews that his family sends out a “huge thanks for all the positive feedback from the public and to assure that Smurf is well taken care off, your support is appreciated.”

Eric Patenaude of Ferme Gillette, located south of Embrun, presents his grandfather, Gilles Patenaude, with Gillette Emperor Smurf’s (E-91) Guinness World Record certificate, a first for the record book. Smurf was awarded the title of the Highest Milk Yield in a Lifetime. Smurf is a 15 year old cow with lifetime production, so far, of 216,891 kg or seven milk trucks’ worth. Smurf is also expecting her 11th calf in the next couple of weeks. Photo by Wendy Molenaar Front Page photo by Pamela Pearson


AgriNews May pg 23_AgriNews February pg 23 12-05-04 10:18 AM Page 1

Searchable archive at www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews May, 2012 Page 23

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AgriNews May pg 24_AgriNews February pg 24 12-05-07 1:01 PM Page 1

Page 24 The AgriNews May, 2012

Over 2,000 stories archived at www.agrinews.ca

Ontario to see three new plants using Canadian milk By Lois Ann Baker AgriNews Staff Writer

T

HREE NEW MILKPROCESSING PLANTS ARE SCHEDULED TO

ONTARIO VERY SOON, INCLUDING ONE REPRESENTING A RARE MILESTONE IN DAIRY EXPORTS. According to the Dairy Farmers of Ontario, the facilities are planned or under construction this year and include an infant formula plant in Toronto, a new frozen pizza facility in London and a yogurt plant at an as yet undisclosed location. These projects are expected to bring hundreds of jobs to the dairy industry, already the largest sector of Ontario agriculture. In an apparent first, the Toronto plant will make baby formula from Canadian milk for export to China. Tom Kane, President of OPEN UP IN

the Ontario Dairy Council, said to his knowledge, he didn’t know of any other processing plant using Canadian milk in its operation where the end product is exported to another country. “The export of milk is limited to suit World Trade Organization rules,” he said. “Our milk is subsidized and can’t be exported.” Kane was not sure of the details surrounding the formula plant or where they were buying the milk from. “They would have to buy the milk at domestic prices,” he suggested. “Our domestic prices are some of the highest in the world.” “It doesn’t fall within export restrictions because of the category of milk being processed,” explained Graham Lloyd, General Council and Corporate Secretary of the Dairy Farmers of Ontario.

Production at the plant has already started. The Dr. Oetker pizza plant in London is currently under construction. The company’s first plant in North America, the facility will act as a hub for its North American pizza operations. Approximately 50 million frozen pizzas will be produced at the London site each year, employing a workforce of more than 125 people. Agrofarma is setting up the third plant, which will make Chobani yogurt. Its location is not known at this time. “This is exciting news for Ontario dairy farmers,” said Willyan DeJong, Chair of the Dundas Dairy Farmers. “With the disappointing attacks on our supply management, it’s good news that production is coming to Ontario,” said Lloyd.

Turkey fells motorcyclist

H

ECKSTON — AN EASTERN ONTARIO DOCTOR IS BEING TOUTED AS A HERO AFTER HIS

QUICK THINKING HELPED SAVE A MOTOR-

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– ON THE AFTERNOON OF APRIL 12. DR. LAWRENCE SCHNURR OF MORRISBURG WAS DRIVING NEAR HECKSTON WHEN HE CAME ACROSS THE MAN LYING IN A WATERFILLED DITCH, UNABLE TO BREATHE AFTER HIS MOTORCYCLE LEFT THE ROAD BECAUSE OF THE ERRANT GAME BIRD.

After a quick examination of his chest, Schnurr determined the victim had broken many ribs and was having trouble breathing. The doctor thought the man would die

at any minute without help. Using a knife and a pen, the doctor was able to slit the man’s chest and insert emptied ballpoint pen tubes to allow respiration. It worked. Schnurr, an internal medicine specialist, practices out of the Winchester District Memorial Hospital and has his own private practice in Morrisburg. A?South Mountain resident witnessed the bird strike that nearly led to the motorcyclist’s demise, had it not been for the doctor’s arrival on scene and his quick action. Ontario’s 25th annual wild turkey spring hunting season opened April 25. The province reintroduced the previously extirpated species in the early 1980s.

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AgriNews May pg 25_AgriNews February pg 25 12-05-07 12:25 PM Page 1

Searchable archive at www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews May, 2012 Page 25

Modes show Breedersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Cup Grand

V

ANKLEEK HILL â&#x20AC;&#x201C; THE PRESCOTT COUNTY HOLSTEIN

CLUB HELD ITS THIRD ANNUAL BREEDERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CUP, A â&#x20AC;&#x153;BARN SHOWâ&#x20AC;? WHERE CATTLE ARE JUDGED AT HOME AS OPPOSED TO GOING TO A TRADITIONAL SHOW AT A FAIR ON TUES., APRIL 3.

This year saw the addition of a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Progeny of Damâ&#x20AC;? Class - two daughters from the same mother - added to the traditional first, second, third or more lactations, and 60,000kgs or more classes. According to Club Secretary Shawn Wylie, â&#x20AC;&#x153;This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s competition saw 74 entries in the five classes that we offered. Starting at 9:30 a.m., the committee along with Holstein Canada Judge Herb Henderson of Ashton, Ontario, visited 18 farms in the county judging all of the entries.â&#x20AC;? Henderson named Bruce and Susan Modeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s firstplace second lactation winner, Bonnie Brae Stormatic Tegan, Grand Champion and the Modes received the Ken Allen Memorial Award, donated by the club in memory of longtime Holstein breeder and club secretary Ken Allen The results, announced at the Awards Reception that evening, are as follows: First Lactation: First - Mount Elm Samuelo Kolombia, owned by Neil and Bryan Anderson; Second - Redstone Goldwyn Rulina, owned by Stefan and Linda Kunz; Third - Donsher Wish Tone, owned by Wylie Brothers. Second Lactation: First - Bonnie Brae Stormatic Tegan, owned by Bruce and Susan Mode; Second - Bonnie Brae

Jasper Macey, owned by Bruce and Susan Mode; Third - Joel Pella Bolton, owned by Michel and Simon Beaulieu. Three or more Lactations: First - Bonnie Brae Lyster Ella, owned by Bruce and Susan Mode; Second - Overdale Farms Python Jingle, owned by Overdale Farms Ltd; Third - Donsher Rita Free, owned by Wylie Brothers. 60,000 kgs or more: First - Bonnie Brae Astro Dorli, owned by Bruce and Susan Mode; Second - Overdale Farms Igloo, owned by Overdale Farms Ltd; Third - Donsher Lilybet Igniter, owned by Wylie Brothers. Progeny of Dam: First - Bonnie Brae Stormatic Tegan, owned by Bruce and Susan Mode, with Bonnie Brae Stormatic Megan; Second - Overdale Farms Spirte Cash, owned by Overdale Farms Ltd., with Overdale Goldwyn Poppy Third - Mirella Goldwyn Dorothy, owned by Ferme Mirella Inc. (Guy and Carol Levac), with Mirella Goldwyn Darling. At the awards banquet Club President Craig Barton said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would like to thank all the breeders who helped make this event a success as well as the committee for their hard work. I also want to thank Herb for his work judging all these entries. A special thank you also goes out to EastGen for sponsoring the prizes for the competition and to Brunet and Wylie Ltd. for sponsoring the Awards Reception dinner.â&#x20AC;? After organizing what is

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Kelsey, Susan and Bruce Mode of Vankleek Hillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bonnie Brae Farms, shown here during the March 31 Prescott Holstein Club barn tour, had the grand champion, Bonnie Brae Stormatic Tegan, in the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s third annual Breedersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Cup. by far the largest competition of its kind in the province, the committee is

already looking towards the 2013 competition, Barton said.

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AgriNews May pg 26_AgriNews February pg 26 12-05-07 1:38 PM Page 1

Page 26 The AgriNews May, 2012

Barn and House Wall Repairs

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Calhoun dealers gather in Stirling

Calhoun Super Structure dealers from across the continent gathered in Stirling last month to see some of the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest modes unveiled, to acknowledge outstanding sales efforts and to tour the Hastings County Museum with its replicated 1940s era main street. Top photo, Sean Hughes and Mark Hertzler from Central Concrete, Illinois, receive Calhounâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest annual sales growth and million-dollar club awards form Jeremy Calhoun, left. Bottom photo, Jeremy Calhoun presents the dealer of the year award to Lost Cabin Constructors from South Dakota, represented by Rich Quinn, Brenen Brown and Aaron Pozorski. Courtesy photos

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AgriNews May pg 27_AgriNews February pg 27 12-05-07 2:56 PM Page 1

Agri-business directory at www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews May, 2012 Page 27

Parmalat backs SNCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clean Water

RAATS CUSTOM FARMING LTD.

P

CANADA WINCHESTER, LONG-TIME SUPPORTERS OF THE SOUTH NATION CONSERVATION (SNC), HAS ONCE AGAIN CONTRIBUTED $5,000 TO SNCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CLEAN WATER PROGRAM. Parmalat Canada first became involved in the Clean Water Program in 1998, since that time they have donated a total of $285,000 and helped fund over 100 landowner water quality projects. Parmalatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commitment to supporting environmental projects is one of the reasons for their recent win at the Tri-Valley Conservation Awards under the Business Category. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Parmalat Canada is pleased to once again support the South Nation Conservation Clean Water Program. Our commitment to phosphorus source reduction is a long standing objectiveâ&#x20AC;? says Stephen Wilson of Parmalat. ARMALAT

OF

Forage Harvesting â&#x20AC;˘ 32â&#x20AC;&#x2122; self propelled disc mower

MANURE solid spreading â&#x20AC;˘ draglines â&#x20AC;˘ tanks

From left, SNCâ&#x20AC;&#x2C6;Chair Lawrence Levere, Parmalatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Stephen Wilson and SNC Clean Water Committee Chair Denis Perrault. Submitted photo million into the local econapproach to protecting Ronda Boutz, Water omy. The results are signifQuality Coordinator at South Nation water resources through funding icant; each year, approxiSouth Nation Conservation for projects like manure mately 15,000 kilograms of (SNC) commented that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s phosphorus is prevented storages, well decommiswith the support of corpofrom entering local watersioning, fencing along rate donors like Parmalat that SNC has been able to waterways, and streambank courses. Applications for funding work closely with landown- erosion control. To date, the Clean Water under the 2012 Clean Water ers to vastly improve water Program has granted over Program are now being quality for residents of the accepted; contact Val Sylvia watershed. $2.1 million dollars to 699 at 1-877-984-2948 ext. 238, projects; resulting projects In operation since 1993, or vsylvia@nation.on.ca for the Clean Water Program have injected a total estimore information. provides a pro-active mated value of over $10.6

FCC reports rise in Ontario farmland values GUELPH â&#x20AC;&#x201C; According to a new Farm Credit Canada (FCC) Farmland Values Report, the average value of farmland in Ontario increased by 7.2 per cent during the second half of 2011. In the two previous six-month reporting periods, farmland values increased by 6.6 per cent and 2.4 per cent, respectively. Farmland values have been rising since 1993 in this province and reached a peak increase of 8.2 per cent in the last half of 1996. The FCC report provides important information about changes in land values across Canada and is available at www.farmlandvalues.ca. In comparison, the average value

of Canadian farmland increased by 6.9 per cent during the last six months of 2011, following gains of 7.4 per cent and 2.1 per cent in the previous two semi-annual reporting periods. Overall, farmland values increased in nine provinces and remained unchanged in Newfoundland and Labrador. Saskatchewan, which has 40 per cent of Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s arable land, experienced the highest average increase at 10.1 per cent . Saskatchewan results appear to be in line with the pace of price increases in the U.S. where double-digit growth in farmland values has been reported in several corn and soybean states including Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska. Two contributing factors to the value increase in Saskatchewan are the current and anticipated strength of commodity prices, combined with land values that previously

increased at a slower rate than in other areas of the country. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Low interest rates, in relation to inflation, and higher farm income levels have recently led to significant increases in farmland values in some provinces,â&#x20AC;? says Michael Hoffort, FCC Senior Vice-President of Portfolio and Credit Risk. â&#x20AC;&#x153;FCCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s analysis indicates that farmland value trends are sensitive to both interest rates and crop receipt trends. With interest rates expected to remain at historic lows until 2013, it will be especially important to monitor trends in crop and livestock receipts in the coming year. These factors combined with strong demand from expanding farm operations and increasing interest by non-traditional investors have all played a role in the continuing trends toward higher farmland prices.â&#x20AC;?

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AgriNews May pg 28_AgriNews February pg 28 12-05-07 2:10 PM Page 1

Page 28 The AgriNews May, 2012

Searchable archive at www.agrinews.ca

Feds help winery sparkle

H

ILLIER – A PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY WINERY IS EXPANDING ITS CUSTOMER BASE AND POTENTIAL FOR EXPORT SALES THANKS TO A BOOST FROM

CANADA’S ECONOMIC ACTION PLAN. MP DARYL KRAMP (PRINCE EDWARDHASTINGS), ON BEHALF OF AGRICULTURE MINISTER GERRY RITZ, ANNOUNCED AN INVESTMENT OF $42,000 TO HINTERLAND WINE COMPANY LTD. APRIL 17 FOR NEW SPARKLING WINE PROCESSING EQUIPMENT AT

HILLIER, ONT. IN THIS RAPIDLY

ITS FACILITY IN

EXPANDING WINE PRODUCING REGION.

“Our government is helping Canadian winemakers become more competitive by cutting production costs, increasing efficiencies, and expanding export markets,” said MP Kramp. “This investment is expected to increase Hinterland’s domestic sales and result in increased demand for domestically sourced grapes, strengthening our

regional economy.” The new equipment will provide Hinterland, whose wines are produced in a former dairy barn on Closson Road, with greater product quality control, enhanced wine flavour, and shorter production times, helping the company increase its sales and better meet customer demand. This in turn will boost the demand for Canadiansourced grapes, supporting local farmers. “We are thrilled to have received the API investment, enabling us to purchase highly specialized sparkling wine equipment,” said Vicki Samaras, President, Hinterland Wine. “As a small family-run business, this program allows us to focus on growth while continuing to specialize in what we believe to be a world-class product.” This repayable contribution is being delivered by the Agricultural Flexibility Fund (AgriFlexibility) through the AgriProcessing

Initiative, a five-year, up to $50-million initiative designed to enhance the competitiveness of the agriprocessing sector in Canada. It provides support to existing companies for projects that involve the adoption of innovative and new-to-company manufacturing technologies and processes that are essential to sustaining and improving the sector’s position in today’s global marketplace. For more information on this program, visit www.agr.gc.ca/api. Hinterland advertises itself as the only winery in Canada whose production is given over entirely to sparkling wines and its Champagne-style products can be found in some of the most exclusive restaurants in Toronto and Ottawa. The winery’s products have received high praise from wine reviewers in the Toronto Globe and Mail, National Post and from CBC wine commentator Konrad Ejbich. “We have found the soil and climate in Prince

Vicki Samaras (president of Hinterland Wine Company), MP Daryl Kramp (Prince Edward-Hastings) and Jonas Newman (co-owner and wine maker) at the Hinterland Wine Company announcement Edward County produces grapes with the kind of

ripeness suited to making balanced and elegant

sparkling wines,” says Samaras.

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THE CHALLENGES TO MEET hŶĚĞƌƚŚĞƐƵƉĞƌǀŝƐŝŽŶŽĨƚŚĞŐĞŶĞƌĂůĚŝƌĞĐƚŽƌ͕LJŽƵǁŝůůŚĂǀĞƚŚĞĨŽůůŽǁŝŶŐƌĞƐƉŽŶƐŝďŝůŝƟĞƐ͗ ͻWůĂŶ͕ĚŝƌĞĐƚĂŶĚĐŽŶƚƌŽůƚŚĞĂĐƟǀŝƟĞƐůŝŶŬĞĚƚŽƚŚĞƉƌŽŵŽƟŽŶ͕ŵĂƌŬĞƟŶŐ͕ƐĂůĞƐĚĞǀĞůŽƉŵĞŶƚ ĂŶĚŵĂƌŬĞƟŶŐŽĨĐƌŽƉƐĞĐƚŽƌƉƌŽĚƵĐƚƐ͖ ͻ^ƵƉĞƌǀŝƐĞ͕ŵŽŶŝƚŽƌĂŶĚŵĞŶƚŽƌŽĨĂƚĞĂŵŽĨĐŽŶƐƵůƚĂŶƚƐ͖ ͻdžĞƌĐŝƐĞƚŚĞŶĞĐĞƐƐĂƌLJůĞĂĚĞƌƐŚŝƉƚŽŝŶƐƉŝƌĞLJŽƵƌƚĞĂŵƚŽŵĞĞƚĮdžĞĚŽďũĞĐƟǀĞƐ͕ ͻ^ĞĞŬƚŽŝŶĐƌĞĂƐĞƉƌŽĮƚĂďŝůŝƚLJŽĨŽƵƌŵĞŵďĞƌĨĂƌŵĞƌƐĂŶĚƚŚĞŐƌŽƵƉŽĨĐŽŽƉĞƌĂƟǀĞƐ͘zŽƵ ǁŝůůƉƌŽŵŽƚĞŽƵƌƐƚĂďŝůŝƚLJĂŶĚďƵƐŝŶĞƐƐůĞĂĚĞƌƐŚŝƉƚŽŽƵƌĐƵƐƚŽŵĞƌďĂƐĞĂŶĚĂƐƐƵƌĞƚŚĞ ƉŽƐŝƟŽŶŝŶŐŽĨŽƵƌďƌĂŶĚǁŝƚŚĂůůƚŚĞĨĂƌŵĞƌƐŽĨƚŚĞƚĞƌƌŝƚŽƌLJǁĞƌĞƉƌĞƐĞŶƚĂƐǁĞůůĂƐƚŚĞ ĐŽŶƟŶƵŝƚLJŽĨŽƵƌĐŽŶƐƵůƟŶŐƐĞƌǀŝĐĞ͖ ͻdŚŝƐƉŽƐƚƌĞƋƵŝƌĞƐĨƌĞƋƵĞŶƚƚƌĂǀĞůŝŶƚŚĞƌĞƉƉĞĚƚĞƌƌŝƚŽƌLJ͕ƚŚĂƚŝƐ͕ƚŚĞƌĞŐŝŽŶƐŽĨƚŚĞKƵƚĂŽƵĂŝƐ ĂŶĚĂƐƚĞƌŶKŶƚĂƌŝŽ͘

YOU HAVE THE FOLLOWING QUALIFICATIONS ͻzŽƵŚŽůĚĂďĂĐĐĂůĂƵƌĞĂƚĞŝŶĂŐƌŽŶŽŵLJŽƌĂĚŝƉůŽŵĂŽĨĐŽůůĞŐŝĂƚĞƐƚƵĚŝĞƐŝŶĂŐƌŝĐƵůƚƵƌĂů ƚĞĐŚŶŽůŽŐLJŽƌLJŽƵŚĂǀĞĞdžƉĞƌŝĞŶĐĞĚĞĞŵĞĚƚŽďĞĞƋƵŝǀĂůĞŶƚŝŶƚŚĞĮĞůĚŽĨĂŐƌŝĐƵůƚƵƌĞ͖ ͻzŽƵƉŽƐƐĞƐƐĂŶĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚĐĂƉĂĐŝƚLJĨŽƌĐŽŵŵƵŶŝĐĂƟŽŶ͕ĂŶĚLJŽƵƐĞƚLJŽƵƌƐĞůĨĂƉĂƌƚǁŝƚŚLJŽƵƌ ŝŶŶŽǀĂƟǀĞƐƉŝƌŝƚ͕LJŽƵƌĂďŝůŝƚLJƚŽƐƵĐĐĞƐƐĨƵůůLJŵŽƟǀĂƚĞĂŶĚŵŽďŝůŝnjĞĂƚĞĂŵĂƐǁĞůůĂƐďLJLJŽƵƌ ĐŽŶĐĞƌŶĨŽƌĐƵƐƚŽŵĞƌƐĂƟƐĨĂĐƟŽŶ͘ ͻzŽƵŚĂǀĞĂŐƌĞĂƚƉƌŽƉĞŶƐŝƚLJĨŽƌƉůĂŶŶŝŶŐĂŶĚŽƌŐĂŶŝnjĂƟŽŶ͕ŵŽŶŝƚŽƌŝŶŐŽƉĞƌĂƟŽŶƐĂƐǁĞůůĂƐ ĂŶĂůLJnjŝŶŐĂŶĚĐĂƌƌLJŝŶŐŽƵƚŶĞĐĞƐƐĂƌLJŵĞĂƐƵƌĞƐ͘zŽƵŵƵƐƚŚĂǀĞĂĐĐĞƐƐƚŽĂǀĞŚŝĐůĞĨŽƌǁŽƌŬƵƐĞ͖ ͻzŽƵĂƌĞƉĞƌĨĞĐƚůLJďŝůŝŶŐƵĂů;&ƌĞŶĐŚͬŶŐůŝƐŚͿ͕ƐƉŽŬĞŶĂƐǁĞůůĂƐǁƌŝƩĞŶ͘ /ĨLJŽƵĚĞƐŝƌĞƚŽũŽŝŶƚŚĞƌĂŶŬƐŽĨĂŶƵƉͲĂŶĚͲĐŽŵŝŶŐŽƌŐĂŶŝnjĂƟŽŶŽīĞƌŝŶŐŝŶƚĞƌĞƐƟŶŐĐŚĂůůĞŶŐĞƐ͕ ĂƐƟŵƵůĂƟŶŐǁŽƌŬĞŶǀŝƌŽŶŵĞŶƚ͕ĐŽŵƉĞƟƟǀĞĐŽŵƉĞŶƐĂƟŽŶĂƐǁĞůůĂƐĂĐŽŵƉůĞƚĞƌĂŶŐĞŽĨ ƐŽĐŝĂůďĞŶĞĮƚƐ͕ŝŶĐůƵĚŝŶŐƌĞƟƌĞŵĞŶƚ͕join our teamďLJƐĞŶĚŝŶŐƵƐLJŽƵƌĐƵƌƌŝĐƵůƵŵǀŝƚĂĞ͕ĂŶĚ ŵĞŶƟŽŶƚŚĞƉŽƐƟŶŐŶƵŵďĞƌϭϮͲϬϰͲϭϮϴ͕ĂƚŽŶĞŽĨƚŚĞĂĚĚƌĞƐƐĞƐďĞůŽǁ͗ Human ressources sector, La Coop fédérée ϵϬϬϭďŽƵůĞǀĂƌĚ>͛ĐĂĚŝĞ͕Žĸ ĐĞϮϬϬ͕DŽŶƚƌĞĂů;YƵĞďĞĐͿ,ϰEϯ,ϳ ͻLJĨĂdž͗ (514)-850-2579

ͻͲŵĂŝů͗ emploi@lacoop.coop

tĞƚŚĂŶŬĂůůĂƉƉůŝĐĂŶƚƐĨŽƌƚŚĞŝƌŝŶƚĞƌĞƐƚĂŶĚĞīŽƌƚŝŶĂƉƉůLJŝŶŐĨŽƌƚŚĞƉŽƐŝƟŽŶ͖ŚŽǁĞǀĞƌ͕ŽŶůLJĐĂŶĚŝĚĂƚĞƐ ƐĞůĞĐƚĞĚĨŽƌŝŶƚĞƌǀŝĞǁƐǁŝůůďĞĐŽŶƚĂĐƚĞĚ͘dŚĞŽŽƉŐƌŝĚŽƌĂŶĚŐƌŝĞƐƚĂƌĞƋƵĂůKƉƉŽƌƚƵŶŝƚLJŵƉůŽLJĞƌƐ͘


AgriNews May pg 29_AgriNews February pg 29 12-05-04 10:12 AM Page 1

Over 2,000 stories archived at www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews May, 2012 Page 29

OMAFRA Connects Continued from page 16 First Impression Community Exchange (FICE)

F

irst Impression Community Exchange (FICE) is a program designed to help communities learn their strengths and challenges as seen through a visitor’s eyes. A positive impression is important to the local economic health and growth. Each visiting team of 5 – 6 people spend several hours gathering information about their impressions of the Downtown, Tourism or the Community in general and then prepare a report. The exchange community reciprocates with a similar visit and report-back. www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/rural/edr/fice/index.htm l

ready for auditor review. During the hectic production season records often get collected on pieces of paper and forms that can be misplaced and take many hours to locate. Now is the time before the growing season gets started to get organized. Gather all the blank record templates that will be required for the season and put them in one binder or folder and locate it where it is easily accessible as a reminder to complete the data when the practice occurs. Being organized during the growing season will save you valuable hours at the end of the season. For additional information about food safety on your farm, visit our website at www.ontario.ca/goodagpractices or call us at 1877-424-1300. Food Safety Question? Ask us.

New Video Series Resources Delivers Be Proactive Farm Business With Your Planning Record Expertise Keeping n January 4, 2012, the Agricultural System Management By: Don Blakely On Farm Food Safety Specialist OMAFRA

I

f you are participating in a food safety program you know one of the major components of your program is keeping specific records to support the safe production practices on your farm. If you have experienced preparing for a yearly audit you also know the time it takes to gather the records to have them

O

Institute (AMI) launched the Farm Business eTeam Video Series - an online farm business planning resource. Each week for eight weeks, AMI will release a new video featuring insights from farmers and business experts. The virtual team will help farmers review their past performance and plan for the future, including financial management, cost

Tel: 613-932-4413 Fax: 613-932-4467

1440 Tenth Street East, Cornwall, Ontario Mailing Address: P.O. Box 25, Cornwall Ontario, K6H 5R9

of production, marketing, human resources, succession planning, and overall business planning. Farmers can access the Farm Business eTeam Video Series in the comfort of their office at a time that's convenient and at no cost. Visit www.TakeANewApproach. ca for more information and to watch the video series. AMI is part of the Best Practices Suite of programs for Growing Forward, a federal-provincial-territorial government initiative.

Agricultural Market Information System (AMIS)

I

ntroducing the newly released Agricultural Market Information System (AMIS) website. AMIS is a G20 initiative. It is a global agricul-

tural market information system that concerns itself with matters relating to wheat, maize (corn), rice and soybeans. It aims to enhance food market outlook information, by strengthening collaboration and dialogue among main producing, exporting and importing countries, commercial enterprises and international organizations. AMIS aims to: •improve agricultural market information, analyses and forecasts at both national and international levels; • report on abnormal international market conditions, including structural weaknesses, as appropriate and strengthen global early warning capacity on these movements; • collect and analyse policy information, promote dialogue and responses, and international policy coordination; and • build data collection • Continued on Page 30

EARL SHAW INSURANCE BROKERS

Specializing in Farm and Rural Properties

Representing

WESTERN GENERAL ECONOMICAL MUTUAL BAY OF QUINTE MUTUAL ✩ Commercial ✩ Farm ✩ Home ✩ Auto ✩

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Fax:

613-542-5972


AgriNews May pg 30_AgriNews February pg 30 12-05-04 10:18 AM Page 1

Page 30 The AgriNews May, 2012

Agricultural links at www.agrinews.ca

OMAFRA Connects Continued from page 29 capacity in participating countries. Visit the new website and check for updates at: www.amis-outlook.org

PROFIT New-toExporting Seminar

P

ROFIT, a two-day seminar, organized by OMAFRA is a longrunning and highly successful export-focused program which will give you a solid introduction to whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s involved in exporting food and beverage products to the U.S. The seminar, featuring over 15 speakers, is a hands-on orientation covering the basic requirements for food and beverage exporters. Topics include export financing, product labelling, U.S. tax laws, U.S. food brokerage, U.S. food distribution, U.S. Food and Drug regulations, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, and U.S. customs brokerage. Export development services, pro-

vided by Ontario Food Exports will also be presented. Half a day will be spent in Toronto, then participants will travel by motorcoach to Buffalo for the next day-and-a-half. The cost includes the PROFIT GuideBook (containing all presentation materials), round-trip transportation to Buffalo, accommodation in Buffalo and all meals. Please note this seminar is offered only once a year and is restricted to 25 participants. For more information, or to register, call Jennifer Hannam at 519-826-3747 or email jennifer.hannam@ontario.ca. When: June 5-6 Where: Toronto and Buffalo Cost: $350 + HST

Factsheets and Publications

T

he following OMAFRA Publications and Factsheets are now available from www.serviceon-

tario.ca/publications: Guide to Fruit Production, 2012-2013, Publication 360 [new title for Pub 360]; the cost is $20.00; please recycle all former editions of Pub 360 and any supplements. 11-057: Rooftop Solar Installations on Rural Buildings, Agdex 768; New. 12-007: Hazelnuts in Ontario â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Biology and Potential Varieties, Agdex 240; New [first Factsheet in a new series on Hazelnuts] 12-009: Hazelnuts in Ontario â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Pests, Agdex 240; New [second Factsheet in the series] For a complete listing of OMAFRA products, please see our online catalogue at http://www.omafra.gov.o n.ca/english/products/index. html To order OMAFRA publications and factsheets: â&#x20AC;˘ Visit any OMAFRA Resource Centre / Northern Ontario Regional Office or Service Ontario location â&#x20AC;˘ Visit the Service Ontario website at: www.serviceontario.ca/publica-

tions or call 1-800-6689938 â&#x20AC;˘ Visit the OMAFRA website at: www.ontario.ca/omafra or contact the Agricultural Information Contact Centre by calling: 1-877-424-1300

Phone Lines and Websites

â&#x20AC;˘ OMAFRA Website: www.ontario.ca/omafra, Agricultural Information Contact Centre: 1-877424-1300 or e-mail ag.info.omafra@ontario. ca â&#x20AC;˘ Nutrient Management Line: 1-866-242-4460 or e-mail nman.omafra@ontario.ca

â&#x20AC;˘ Growing Forward Information Line: 1-888479-3931 or e-mail growingforward@ontari o.ca â&#x20AC;˘ The Farm Line: 1-888451-2903 - A confidential telephone emotional support and referral â&#x20AC;˘ Continued on Page 31

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AgriNews May pg 31_AgriNews February pg 31 12-05-04 10:29 AM Page 1

Searchable archive at www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews May, 2012 Page 31

OMAFRA Connects Continued from page 30 service provided to farmers and farm families in Ontario

Events SIAL Canada Exhibit Costs Supported By AAFC

T

he Canadian Food Exporters Association (CFEA), in partnership with OMAFRA, is inviting you to exhibit at the SIAL Canada show at the Palais Des Congrès in Montreal from May 9-11, 2012. SIAL Canada is the Salon International de lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Alimentation (International Food Expo). The event is one of the industryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most important meeting places for North American food industry professionals and hosts approximately 700

exhibitors and 13,000 visitors from over 60 countries over the course of three days. Buyers at SIAL Canada are increasingly seeking out products to meet the demands of their diverse and multi-ethnic clientele. Qualified buyers specializing in distribution, retail and foodservice will be in attendance, so the event represents an important opportunity to meet and impress future customers. Advance registration is required. Cost savings and partial reimbursement for this event are also being offered through Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's AgriMarketing Program. For more information, call Susan Powell at CFEA at 416-445-3747 or email susanp@cfea.com. May 27-29 - Canadian Institute of Food Science and Technology (CIFST) National Conference, Scotiabank Conference Centre, Niagara Falls.

CIFSTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2012 conference is all about where â&#x20AC;&#x153;Innovation Meets Commercializationâ&#x20AC;?. Plenary sessions, workshops and technical sessions will explore the journey from innovation to commercialization. What research is happening in Canada and North America? What are the challenges and opportunities, the market and consumer trends? June 19 & 20 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Ontario Pork Congress. Mark your calendar and check for updates at http://www.porkcongress.on .ca/ July 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 25 - World Hereford Conference BC/Alberta/Saskatchewan/ Manitoba/Ontario For more information visit www.hereford.ca September 11 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 13 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Outdoor Farm Show, Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Outdoor Park, Woodstock, ON. Watch for details on the 2012 show at http://www.outdoorfarmshow.com/

County Dateline Quinte & Area

May 10 Prince Edward Federation of Agriculture Meeting O.P.P. Office Boardroom, County Rd. 1, (Schoharie Road), Picton, ON 7:30 pm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; All Welcome! Contact Patti Stacey at

FIFE AGRICULTURAL SERVICES LTD. 14740 County Rd. 43, Finch, Ont. (613)

984-2059 or toll free 1-888-557-FIFE

613-476-3842 / pat.stacey@sympatico.ca May 26 District 8 Ontario Sheep Marketing Association Farm Tour Dana Vader, 786 Kelly Road, Cherry Valley, Prince Edward County 1 pm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; All sheep producers â&#x20AC;˘ Continued on Page 32

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AgriNews May pg 32_AgriNews February pg 32 12-05-04 10:44 AM Page 1

Page 32 The AgriNews May, 2012

Agri-business directory at www.agrinews.ca

County Dateline â&#x20AC;˘ Continued from Page 31 welcome. For more information contact Debi at debistoness@gmail.com June 7 Hastings Federation of Agriculture Monthly Meeting Thurlow Community Centre, 516 Harmony Road, Hastings, ON 8:00 pm - Contact Judy Hagerman 613473-4444 / jlhagerman@sympatico.ca . June 7 Prince Edward Winegrowers Association Executive Meeting Huff Estates Boardroom 6:30 to 8:30 pm. For more information call 613-921-7100 or email info@thecountywines.com

Haliburton & Kawartha Lakes

First Tuesday Monthly â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Kawartha Junior Farmers Meeting Lindsay Fairgrounds at 7 pm Membership is open for anyone aged 1529. For more information visit kawarthajf@gmail.com Third Wednesday Monthly â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Victoria County Sheep Producers Meeting Sunderland Co-op Boardroom, Oakwood location, 7:30 pm. For more information contact Doug Walden 705-324-7478. Lindsay Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market Victoria and Kent St. (Downtown Lindsay) every Saturday 7 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1 pm starting May 5 to Oct. 31 For more information email bryguyc@hotmail.com or call 705-878-1392 June 1-3 Carden Nature Festival Saturday Night Banquet: Speaker: Michael Runtz â&#x20AC;&#x201C;The Untold Story of Plants and Animals. For more information and directions visit www.CardenGuide.com/Festival

Durham & Surrounding Area

May 13 to June 3 Brooklin Spring Fair, Winchester Rd, East of Hwy 12, Brooklin, ON. For more information contact 905-655-7093 /email secretary@brooklinspringfair.com or visit www.brooklinspringfair.com

Peterborough & Surrounding Area

Every Saturday Year Round - Peterborough District Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market, 7 am- 1 pm. Located on the corner of Lansdowne St and Roger Neilson Way at Morrow Park, Peterborough. For more information call 705-932-3166 or visit www.peterboroughfarmersmarket.com. May 30 Best Practice Successful Volunteer Engagement. The Best Western Otonabee Inn, Peterborough. 2012 Spring Workshop, presented by Donna Lockhart, CVRM, The Rethink Group. Cost: $149.00 plus HST $19.37 = $168.37. For more information contact Donna Lockhart 1-705-292-5331 or email donna@rethinkgroup.ca. June 7 to 10 Millbrook Fair, 13 Frederick Street, Millbrook, ON. For more information contact 705-277-9507 / email sheila.rogoski@lhins.on.ca or visit www.millbrookfair.ca

DateLine Ottawa May 24-27 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Gloucester Fair Rideau Carleton Raceway & Slots, 4837 Albion Road, Ottawa, ON For more information contact Patricia Clark 613744-2671 or 613-741-3247 or visit www.gloucesterfair.ca

SD&G 1st Wednesday of the month - Dundas Federation of Agriculture regular monthly meetings Nelson Laprade Centre, Chesterville, ON 8 pm - Please contact Mary Dillabough 13-4482655 or email mary.dillabough@xplornet.com or visit website www.dun-

dasagriculture.com for meeting date confirmation. â&#x20AC;˘ Continued on Page 33

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Bourgon Seeds Ltd. St. Isidore, Ontario 613-524-3102


AgriNews May pg 33_AgriNews February pg 33 12-05-04 10:51 AM Page 1

Searchable archive at www.agrinews.ca

DateLine May 23 & 30 Environmental Farm Plan (EFP) 2 day Workshop Winchester/Chesterville, ON. This workshop will give you an opportunity to asses your farm operation from an environmental view, identify opportunities for actions, and qualify you for cost-share opportunities for on-farm projects. For more details and to register contact Arlene Ross 613821-3900 / arlene.ross@ontariosoilcrop.org or visit http://www.ontariosoilcrop.org/workshops/default. htm.

Frontenac Last Thursday of the month - Frontenac County Federation of Agriculture regular monthly meetings Glenburnie Church Hall, Glenburnie, ON 7:30 pm Please Contact Eileen Sleeth 613-353-2475 or email eilevale@kingston.net for meeting date confirmation.

Leeds 3rd Thursday of the month - Leeds Federation of Agriculture regular monthly meetings Delta Agricultural Fair Society Boardroom, Delta, ON 8 pm - Please contact Eleanor Renaud 613-275-2981 or email erenaud@xplornet.ca

The AgriNews May, 2012 Page 33

â&#x20AC;˘ Continued from Page 32

for meeting date confirmation. 2nd Wednesday of the month - Grenville Federation of Agriculture regular monthly meetings Spencerville Council Chambers, Spencerville, ON 8 pm - Please contact Carol Wynands 613-9262579 or email a.wynands@sympatico.ca for meeting date confirmation. April 28 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Workshop, Regional Integrated Community Sustainability Plan (ICSP) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; North Grenville/Merrickville Wolford North Grenville Municipal Centre, 285 County Road 44, Kemptville, ON Registration 8 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; workshop 8:30 am to 2:30 pm New action plans and longterm sustainability strategies are being developed in the upcoming, interactive Saturday sessions hosted by the United Counties of Leeds and Grenville in partnership with each of its municipalities. For a listing of all ICSP workshop locations, visit www.leedsgrenville.com/icsp. To assist with planning, advanced registration is suggested and can be submitted by emailing icsp@uclg.on.ca or by calling 613-342-3840, ext. 5367.

April 28 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Workshop, Regional Integrated Community Sustainability Plan (ICSP) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Athens/Front of Yonge Joshua Bates Centre, 1 Main Street West, Athens, ON Registration 8 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; workshop 8:30 am to 2:30 pm - New action plans and long-term sustainability strategies are being developed in the upcoming, interactive Saturday sessions hosted by the United Counties of Leeds and Grenville in partnership with each of its municipalities. For a listing of all ICSP workshop locations, visit www.leedsgrenville.com/ics p. To assist with planning, advanced registration is suggested and can be submitted by emailing icsp@uclg.on.ca or by calling 613-342-3840, ext. 5367. May 12 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Workshop, Regional Integrated Community Sustainability Plan (ICSP) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Westport/Rideau Lakes Portland Community Hall, 24 Water Street, Portland, ON Registration 8 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; workshop 8:30 am to 2:30 pm - New action plans and long-term sustainability strategies are being developed in the upcoming, interactive Saturday sessions hosted by the United Counties of Leeds and

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Grenville in partnership with each of its municipalities. For a listing of all ICSP workshop locations, visit www.leedsgrenville.com/ics p. To assist with planning, advanced registration is suggested and can be submitted by emailing icsp@uclg.on.ca or by calling 613-342-3840, ext. 5367. May 12 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Workshop, Regional Integrated Community Sustainability Plan (ICSP) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Gananoque/Leeds & the Thousand Islands Leeds & the Thousand Islands Community Hall, 1 Jessie Street, Landsdowne, ON â&#x20AC;˘ Continued on Page 34

4TH GENERATION FARM ESTATE AUCTION SALE

Farm Machinery, Horse Drawn Farm Machinery, Rare Caboose Sleigh, Show Wagon, Show Harness, Household Antiques, Collectibles, 2006 Dodge Ram and Miscellaneous Articles 2851 Nixon Dr. (Manotick), On â&#x20AC;&#x201C; from Osgoode travel 1 mile North on Nixon Dr. or from Manotick travel 7 miles South of Drummonds Gas Bar on River Rd., turn left at the Swan on the Rideau on Nixon Dr. Watch for Auction Signs.

SATURDAY, JUNE 2 AT 9:00 AM To settle the estate of the late John Ferguson: 2006 Dodge Ram 1500, 2WD w/ matching cap, 89,726 kms, sells safetied and E-tested - very clean; 1994 Yamaha 350 Big Bear, 4x4 ATV; Machinery: JD 3130 w/ 148 loader and cab; IH 504 Utility w/IH 2001 front end loader (gas); IH Farmall M w/ front end loader-not running; IH Farmall H on steel; IH H-not running; Kvneverland 4 furrow semi-mount plow; Kongskilde 2 furrow plow; Vibrashank 12â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, 3pth cultivator; 7 shank cultivator; 7 shank cultivator ripper; flat harrows; 125 bu gravity box; 4 ton TMT wagon; Demco hyd dump trailer â&#x20AC;&#x201C; flat deck; NH 256 rake; NH 489 haybine; Hesston PT10 haybine; NH 717 harvester; various harvesters and heads; 4 wagon running gears; 2 bale thrower wagons; Roulx electric straw chopper; oat roller; Allied mow conveyor; bale spears; hand carts for feed; fence posts; 3 pth scraper blade; lumber; Antique Farm Machinery and Horse Drawn Equip: Very old unique 2 seater sleigh w/ 2 door caboose w/ windows-very good original condition-rare; cutter; buggy-good condition; wooden mill wheel; large selection of neck yokes and whipple trees; Cockshutt 3 pth mower; dump rake; 1 and 2 furrow sulky plows; 2 walking plows; land roller; horse drawn cultivators; sleighs; quantity of implement seats; 2 large wooden wheels; buggy wheels; horse shoes; horse poles; heavy horse trimming stock; Horse Show Equip and Harness: oak rubber tired show wagon; complete set of leather show harness for 4 horse hitch; other assorted harness-Mr. Ferguson showed his beloved Percherons for many years; western parade saddle w/ silver; Misc: 16â&#x20AC;&#x2122; truck box on trailer w/ roll up doors- ideal for storage; homebilt tandem trailer; gates-ideal for sheep; farm gates; very large quantity of scrap steel and old machinery and parts; older cars and trucks for scrap; 3 school buses-not running-storage only; large selection of logging chains; circa 1970 Snowjet snowmobile; dairy cans; scales; Tools: new 2000 watt generator; Lincoln 225 welder; band saw; planer; Makita wood planer; Rockwell radial arm saw; 6â&#x20AC;? jointer; table saw; anvil; hand forge; cement mixer; very large selection of hand tools, saws, drills etc; large collection of antique wrenches, drill press etc; barn jack; lanterns; greases and oils; milk house heaters; electric fencers; Household Furniture and Antiques: antique flat wall cupboard-4 doors w/ 2 drawers; ice box; wooden cupboard; chimney cupboard; antique table w/ drawer; bakerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s table; drop front desk; gramophone; small table; rocking chairs; wooden chairs; beds; sewing machine; deaconâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bench; Mama Bear Fisher wood stove; Findlay stoves; 5 piece Meakin wash set; agate 3 piece chamber set; assorted old glassware and dishes; cups and saucers; straight razors; horse memorabilia; crocks and jugs; gingerbread clock; tin bath tub; old bedroom set; insulators; freezer; brass wringer washer; many other assorted items. Terms of Sale â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Cash or Cheque with Proper ID

Prop: Mrs. Mary Ferguson AUCTIONEERS JAMES AND HILL AUCTION SERVICE LTD. Stewart James Carson Hill (613) 445-3269 (613) 821-2946 This is a very large sale where 2 auction rings will be selling throughout the day. Refreshments available. Owners and Auctioneers not responsible for loss or accidents.


AgriNews May pg 34_AgriNews February pg 34 12-05-04 10:58 AM Page 1

Page 34 The AgriNews May, 2012

DateLine Registration 8 am – workshop 8:30 am to 2:30 pm New action plans and longterm sustainability strategies are being developed in the upcoming, interactive Saturday sessions hosted by the United Counties of Leeds and Grenville in partnership with each of its municipalities. For a listing of all ICSP workshop locations, visit www.leedsgrenville.com/icsp. To assist with planning, advanced registration is suggested and can be submitted by emailing icsp@uclg.on.ca or by calling 613-342-3840, ext. 5367.

Lanark 2nd Thursday of the month - Lanark County Federation of Agriculture regular monthly meetings Beckwith Township Council Chambers, Blacks Corners - 8 pm 3rd Wednesday of the month - The National Farmers Union Lanark, Local 310 For information contact Hilary Moore 613259-5757

Free internet farm classifieds at www.agrinews.ca

• Continued from Page 33

Renfrew 2nd Monday of each month - Arnprior Region Federation of Agriculture Meetings Galetta Community Hall – 8 pm Contact Ernie Smith, President, 613-623-3439. 4th Monday of each month - Renfrew County Federation of Agriculture Meetings Cobden Agricultural Hall, Cobden, ON 7:30 pm - Contact Chris Bucholtz, President 613-735-9164 or Donna Campbell, Sec/Trea 613432-5568 / donnaofa@nrtco.net 3rd Thursday of each month - Renfrew County Cattlemen Association Meetings Cobden Agricultural Hall, Cobden, ON 7:30 pm - Contact David McGonegal 613582-7031 or Donna Campbell 613-432-5568. 3rd Wednesday of each month - Renfrew County Plowmen’s Association Meetings Cobden Agricultural Hall, Cobden, ON 7:30 pm - Contact Donna Campbell 613-432-

5568.

2012 Regional/ Provincial Events May 16 – Broker Certificate Course Kemptville, ON 9 am to 5 pm - This course helps you get familiar with the NMA, Regulation and Protocols and examines how the NMA directly affects broking operations. (Brokers transport, haul or store prescribed materials in the course of their business operations.) This course is a requirement for obtaining a Broker Certificate. A Broker Certificate is mandatory for brokers who deal with farm operations subject to Ontario Regulation 267/03 under the NMA. Note: this course also constitutes day one of the Prescribed Materials Application Business Licence Course.

AUCTION SALE

of Farm Machinery, Horses, Harness, Restored Buggy, Antique Farm Machinery and Collectibles and Miscellaneous Articles 4509 Frank Kenny Rd. – travel East of Navan, Ontario on Colonial Rd. to Frank Kenny Rd., turn South and go 3 kms, or from Carlsbad Springs travel East on Russell Rd. 6.5 kms to Frank Kenny Rd., turn North and travel 2.5 kms. Watch for Auction Signs.

SATURDAY, MAY 26 AT 10:00 AM Due to health reasons the following will be offered: Machinery: AC 170 diesel w/ Leon loader, 4325 hrs, 3 hrs on engine overhaul-good condition; AC WD w/ chains; Delta 5th wheel stock trailer, 16’ – selling “as is”; New Idea snow blower; AC hyd. wheel discs-7’; AC 3 furrow plow; 5 section flat harrows; land roller; Kongskilde 8’ cultivator; small hyd dump trailer; NH 328 manure spreader w/ top beater; 2 farm wagons; AC rake; NH 477 haybine-7’; NH 273 baler; Allied auto stooker; NH 30’ hay elevator; bale loader forks; cedar fence posts; 2 truck caps; farm gates; 2 Surge milkers; vacuum pump; oat roller and motor; upright granary/tank, 5000 gal, 9 ton grain capacity – top fill; 14’ truck box w/ roll up door; Horses, Horse Drawn Equip and Antiques: Reg. black Percheron mare-coming 7-bred for late July – big quiet mare; Reg. Red Percheron stallion – coming 14-quiet and broke single and double – great feet and legs; 1899 restored McLaughlin doctor’s buggy, rubber tired w/ top, shaves-complete; A Must See: restored delivery wagon; complete set of double HD harness w/ britchen – made by Barrett’s; set of collars; 27”, 26” 2-25” and 24” collars; double set of harness – bridles, back pads – no britchen; brass trimmed single harness w/ collars- suitable for light wagon: western and English saddles; horse cart w/ brakes – set up for single or double; McCormick 6’ cut grain binder w/ pole and canvass – top condition; JD 1 furrow sulky plow w/ pole; Fleury walking plow; 1 furrow potato plow; IHC corn planter on steel- working condition; McCormick 13 run seed drill on steel w/ tongue; 2 McCormick No 9 hay mowers – 5’ and 6’- on rubber, extra set of steel wheels; 2 McCormick thrashing mills – 1 ran 2 years ago; set of horse drawn discs w/ pole; IHC No 200 horse drawn manure spreader; horse drawn snow scraper; older seed drill; fanning mill; scrap steel; assorted planks and lumber; forks, shovels, chains, tools etc; 6 oak saw logs; different size drive belts for thrashing machines; many other assorted items. Terms of Sale – Cash or Cheque with Proper ID

Prop: Andre and Ruth Dugas AUCTIONEERS JAMES AND HILL AUCTION SERVICE LTD. Stewart James Carson Hill (613) 445-3269 (613) 821-2946 Great sale for the antique and horse drawn machinery and collectibles enthusiast. Refreshments available. Owners and Auctioneers not responsible for loss or accidents.

Various dates and locations. For more information and/or to register call Ridgetown Campus at 1855-648-1444 or visit http://www.ridgetownc.com /bdt/bdt_training_index.cfm May 16 & 17 Prescribed Materials Application Business Licence -Kemptville, ON9 am to 5 pm - This course helps you become familiar with the NMA, Regulation and Protocols and examines how the NMA directly

affects a custom applicator business. This course is required for obtaining a Prescribed Materials Business Application Licence. Various dates and locations. For more information and/or to register call Ridgetown Campus at 1-855-648-1444 or visit http://www.ridgetownc.com /bdt/bdt_training_index.cfm June 7 - Canadian Association of Farm Advisors (CAFA) Inc. Annual Ontario Conference

- "Current & Connected" Quality Inn & Suites, Woodstock, ON. For more information visit www.cafanet.com, or contact CAFA by email info@cafanet.com

ESTATE AUCTION SALE

Farm Machinery, Restored Tractors, Horse Drawn Farm Machinery, Rare Antique Agricultural Implements and Collectibles, Tools, Vehicles, Hay and Miscellaneous Articles 6024 Cty. Rd. 18, Spencerville, On – 2 kms South of the Village of Roebuck - from Hwy. 401 at Prescott exit No 716, then travel North on Cty. Rd 18. approx 10 kms or from Hwy. 416 exit No 12 (Spencerville) and then West on Cty. Rd. 21 to Roebuck, then South on Cty. Rd. 18 approx 2 kms. Watch for Auction Signs.

SATURDAY, MAY 19 AT 9:30 AM To settle the estate of the late Gary Throop, the following will be offered for sale: MF 275 diesel tractor w/cab; JD 710 w/ loader; NH 479 haybine; MF 120 baler; hay elevator w/ PTO; NH 510 manure spreader; 3 pth snowblower; Bushog hyd disc-10’; 3 pth vertical wood splitter; PTO driven post hole auger; Antiques and Collectibles: 1939 MH Super 101 – restored; 1948 8N Ford-restored; 1930 JD hay press- restored; 1960 JD stationary engine-restored; 1890 Taylor dump rake-restored; 1865 Buckeye hay tedder-restored; 1905 horse drawn grader – restored; MH No 26 drag plow; Deerborn 2 furrow plow; 1923 Commomsense grain separator w/ bag; 1910 MH straw cutter; 1910 MH corn cutter; 1940 Cockshutt root cutter; 1901 Maxwell corn sheller; 1892 Deering reaper; 1899 Deering corn binder; Cockshutt grain binder; 1953 Dion thrashing mill-restored; 1940 Cockshutt stock cutter; 1878 wooden turnip seeder; 1901 bean thrasher; 1930 seed potato cutter; 1850 potato digger-wood beam; Cockshutt No 11 seed drill; 1920 MH cultivator-restored; 1935 Otaco steel wheeled wagon w/ rack-restored; 1925 Tudhope-Anderson wooden manure spreader; miniature sloop sleigh; 1875-1975 collection of hand sleighs; 1908 American seeding machine; 1917 TE Eaton egg incubator; RARE 1940 sulky ice racing sleighrestored; 1890 OE Thompson wheelbarrow seeder; 1910 IH potato seeder – restored; Hit and Miss Engines: 1925 McCormick Deering hit and miss engine; 1945 Fairbanks Morse styled 1 ½ -2 hp engine; 1910 Fairbanks Morse hit and miss 1 ½ -2 hp engine; Antique Plows: 1895 McArthur blacksmith plow; 1912 JD walking plow; 1906 Syracuse chilled sulky plow; 1906 Syracuse hillside plow; 1940 MH No51 walking plow; 1925 TudhopeAnderson walking plow; 1925 Cockshutt No 17 walking plow; 1912 Frost& Woods No 6 walking plow; 1905 JE Fleury & Son walking plow; 1951 McCormick Deering walking plow; 1855 and 1875 wooden beam walking plows; 1896 Yul Cam left hand walking plow; 1880 wooden beam hillside walking plow; 1940 Cockshutt potato hiller; 1925 MH hiller; 3 pth 2 furrow plow; 2 furrow disc plow; horse drawn ditcher; horse drawn snow scoop; snow plow for set of sleighs; Collectibles: dog treadmill – restored; Cockshutt steel wheeled wheelbarrow – No.3; bushel counter; wooden shovels; ice saws; assortment of scales and coffee grinders; grain cradle; barrel churns; milk and cream cans; box of milk test bottles; Daisy butter churn; assorted crocks; glass top butter churn; Renfrew wash tub; Beatty wash stand; collection of wood hay forks; cabbage; cutter; New Idea corn sheller; Pennsylvania wash stand; hand held potato planter and corn planters; 1860 baby carriage; Surge milker pails and straps; collection of hammers and wooden planes; milk cart; Tools and Misc: air powered tools; pressure washer; battery charger; ten ft aluminum brake w/ coil holder and trim table; power cement trowel; cement mixer; assorted other power tools; transit level; Vehicles: 1967 Ford Fairlane-Ranchero style- needs restorationapprox 52,000 mi; mini sprint car – no engine; tandem trailer w/ steel deck; 1988 Suzuki 4 wheeler – 50 cc; 1985 Yamaha 3 wheeler- 60cc; Misc: approx 700 small square bales of hay to be sold as one lot; clipping chute; livestock blower; tack box; many other assorted items. Terms of Sale – Cash or Cheque with Proper ID

Prop: Mrs. Marg Throop AUCTIONEERS JAMES AND HILL AUCTION SERVICE LTD. Stewart James Carson Hill (613) 445-3269 (613) 821-2946 Mr and Mrs Throop have traveled Ontario far and wide to assemble this amazing collection, with many rare pieces in great condition- expect surprises- don’t miss this sale! Canteen by Antique Vehicles in Motion Owner and Auctioneers not responsible for loss or accidents.


AgriNews May pg 35_AgriNews February pg 35 12-05-04 10:04 AM Page 1

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The AgriNews May, 2012 Page 35

CLASSIFIEDS

TRP SERVICES

FOR SALE

FOR SALE

FOR SALE

FOR SALE - NH forage blower. $1,000. Ford blue 500 manure spreader with tail gate. A-1 shape. Cost $900 to get in A-1 shape. $1,250. 613-448-2332. 08tfc FOR SALE Kuhn hay tedder & rake, 2 in 1, 3 pth; 718 New Holland forage Harvester with hay pickup; International 10 grain planter with grass seed box, holds 80 lbs. & fertilizer boxes; double disc drills, heavy truck tires & frames with platform at back; 16â&#x20AC;&#x2122; & 18â&#x20AC;&#x2122; steel & wire farm gates; Allis Chalmers 4 row Plate corn planter with fertilizer boxes, no till. 613774-2777 or 613-448-1512. 05

FRUIT TREES Fruit Trees, Apples $18, local and heirloom varieties, Pear, Plum, Cherry and Flowering Crab trees $19. Strawberry, Raspberry and Asparagus plants. Maple Syrup at Barkleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Call 613543-0491 or email barkhm5@magma.ca 05

FOR SALE - Purebred Limousin Bulls, Double Polled red and black bulls up to 22 month of age. Home grown and ready to work. Call Corad Farms 1-613-624-5405. 05 FOR SALE - Truck and End Dump Trailer ready to go ETested and Safetied in Nov./2011. Fully loaded truck with Detroit 435hp 15 spd front axle 14000 rear 40000 trailer 33ft box on 36ft fram lots of new parts on both too many to list. READY TO GO $24,995.00 OBO. Call 613-925-2481. 05

OUTDOOR WOOD FURNACE Heat your entire home, buildings, water and more with an OUTDOOR WOOD FURNACE from Central Boiler. Call today. Bourgon Seeds Ltd. 613-524-3102 12

)8(/

&KULV*X\ 3UHVLGHQW 'DZOH\'ULYH 32%R[ :LQFKHVWHU2QWDULR .&.

SERVICES HOOF CARE Functional Hoof Care. Dairy Cattle hoof trimming service. Tom Booyink 613-362-6528.

HEAT PUmP SALES AND SERvICE OF GEOTHERmAL HEAT PUmPS denis@travel-net.com www.kingscross.net 613-271-0988 ext. 3 FINANCING AvAILAbLE 01tfc

HELP WANTED Company of Russell area is seeking an honest, hardworking individual. Various duties may include equipment deliveries, assisting with equipment installations and dismanteling, etc. Must have clean driving record and personal transportation to and from shop. Initial salary $16.00/hr. Benefits after probation period. Fax resumĂŠ: 613-445-0212 or email at swingstage@magma.ca.

READY MIX LTD.

Associated with A.L. Blair Construction Ltd.

â&#x20AC;˘ Excavating Contractors â&#x20AC;˘ Equipment Rentals â&#x20AC;˘ Stone Slinger â&#x20AC;˘ All Quarry Products â&#x20AC;˘ Sand & Gravel

MAIN OFFICE MOOSE CREEK ST. ALBERT QUARRY & READY MIX PLANT WINCHESTER QUARRY & READY MIX PLANT

613-538-2271 613-987-5377 613-774-5277

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AgriNews May pg 38_AgriNews February pg 38 12-05-05 3:50 PM Page 1

Page 38 The AgriNews May, 2012

AdWatcher surfs the classifieds for you at www.agrinews.ca

Master Breeder Shield for Penlow

A

LMONTE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ALLAN AND DONNA LOWRY, THEIR SON, BRAD, AND DAUGHTER, LEANNA, OPERATE PENLOW HOLSTEINS IN ALMONTE. They consider it an honour to stand among a fraternity of distinguished Canadian Holstein breeders to accept their first Master Breeder Shield and claim the recognition not only counts them among an elite group of Holstein breeders, but validates their efforts over the years to develop a herd of high quality cattle. The Penlow prefix was created in 1956 when Allanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parents, Bert and Dorothy, purchased and registered their first purebred animals. When Allan and Donna became partners in the operation in 1978, the herd became 100 per cent purebred Holsteins and the farm expanded to its current 650 acres. Allan and Donna have been full owners since 1994 and along with the help of their four children (Christa, Julie, Brad and Leanna), they have successfully grown their operation to include some of the best cattle in Lanark County and beyond. Penlow Holsteins is a head-to-head tie-stall opera-

tion housing a total of 125 cows, 50 of which are milking. The family grows corn, soybeans and wheat on 400 acres and devotes the remaining 250 to hay and pasture. Their herd classifieds with 12 EX, 30 VG and 14 GP cows and their rolling herd average BCA is an impressive 225-226-225. Over the years, the Lowryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s have had nine All Canadian nominations (resulting in two All Canadians), 4 Reserve All Canadians and two Honourable Mentions. Three main cow families in particular have contributed to this shield. Penlow Georgie Dragoon EX 3E 6* was a good brood cow with 5 Excellent daughters. Her ability to transmit show type daughters with phenomenal frames and longevity was remarkable and her genetics were used extensively within the herd, yielding 14 daughters, of which 85 per cent are Good Plus or better. One of her daughters, Georgette Outside, was twice All Canadian and three times Reserve All Canadian. Penlow Cindy Park EX-90-2E 5*was known for her ability to transmit a good balance of type, production and

longevity and produced family members who went on to become excellent brood cows themselves. Penlowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first excellent cow was Candy Fury Lad, a cow with a terrific frame and dairy strength who helped develop the Penlow herd from the ground up. Today, Penlow genetics can be found across Canada, the U.S. and South America. The Lowry family is heavily involved in Lanark Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agricultural landscape. In past years, Allan has been involved in the Lanark Federation of Agriculture, The Lanark Soil and Crop Association, The Lanark Holstein Club and was a 4-H leader in the county as well. Currently, he is a member of the Lanark Milk Producers Committee, a Director with Lanark Mutual Insurance and a volunteer with various church committees. Brad, who has been working on the farm full-time since graduating from OAC Guelph in 2002, is the Past President of the Lanark Holstein Club and is involved with the North Lanark Agricultural Society, the EOWQ Championship Show Committee and the EastGen

Board as a delegate. He was also an Ontario Dairy Youth Award winner in 2011, enjoying an allexpenses paid trip to Madison to take in World Dairy Expo. Outside the dairy industry, the family spends time collecting and restoring vintage snow machines, traveling, hiking and a participating in variety of sports. Eldest daughter, Christa, is a classical musician and Julie works as an elementary teacher. Brad and Leanna both work on the farm, with Leanna taking courses in print media and design at Algonquin College. With the future of the dairy industry looking bright, the Lowrys plan to continue improving their herd and striving for a second shield. Their advice to others is choose good mentors and participate in as many shows as possible. Using proven sires and embryo transfers, they say, will help maximize results.

The Lowrys of Penlow Farms in Almonte were recently recognized April 20 as Master Breeders at Holstein Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Annual Meeting in Brandon, Manitoba. The Master Breeder Shield distinguishes herds that have the best ratio for breeding cows possessing the complete package of high production and outstanding conformation, with high proficiency in reproduction, health and longevity. Twenty-one Master Breeders were announced for the 2011 year, 13 of them from Ontario. In photo: Ontario Holstein Board President Brian Slaughter (left) congratulates Brad Lowry on his familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Master Breeder achievement at the Ontario Holstein Branch Annual General Meeting in March

Courtesy Photo by Jennifer Kyle

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AgriNews May pg 39_AgriNews February pg 39 12-05-04 11:21 AM Page 1

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The AgriNews May, 2012 Page 39

Stormont recognizes farmers, businessman AVONMORE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Stormont Soil and Crop Improvement Association honoured Finch dairy farmers Henry and Kenda tePlate as the 2011 Farmer of Year Couple March 30. The annual banquet at North Stormont Place also

recognized businessman Paul Oosterhof, owner of Finch Feed and Seed, as the Award of Merit Winner. The tePlates, who were unable to attend the occasion, operate a 100head purebred Holstein dairy farm with some help

from Henryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parents. They also manage a cash-crop operation while doing some work for Canada Post as well. Last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recipient, Joseph Speck, who was on hand with his wife, Theres, delivered the award.

Farmers of the Year Kenda (centre) and Henry tePlate Stormontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Farmer of the Year Couple. Local Soil and Crop Improvement Association secretary-treasurer Barbara-Ann Glaude presents on behalf of the actual presenter, Joseph Speck.

Speck cited the couple for activities involving the Stormont Soil and Crop Improvement Association, the Eastern Valley Soil and Crop Association, Stormont Holstein Club, the Stormont Dairy Producersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Committee, the Stormont Peer Review Committee, Finch Recreation and the Stormont Agricultural Society. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They also squeak in time to do canvassing for Canadian Diabetes Society and drive for Meals on Wheels.â&#x20AC;? The tePlates have two grown children in the nursing profession, and a third child in elementary school. Their home has been host for many student exchanges over the years. Paul Oosterhof, a mid1980s graduate from what is now the Kemptville Campus of the University of Guelph, previously worked as a nutritionist and crop advisor before entering business in Finch several years ago. The Award of Merit recognizes the recipient for an outstanding contribution to agriculture in their community.

Stormont Soil & Crop Improvement Award of Merit The public face of Finch Feed and Seed, Paul Oosterhof, owner (left) was bestowed with the Stormont Soil and Crop Improvement Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2011 Award of Merit, at the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s March 30 banquet at North Stormont Place. Past recipient Jim MacIntyre hands the award to Oosterhof.

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AgriNews May 2012  

The AgriNews is dedicated to covering and promoting agriculture, one of Eastern Ontario’s most important economic sectors.

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