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AgriNews January pg 02_AgriNews February pg 02 13-01-11 9:28 AM Page 1

Page 2 The AgriNews January, 2013

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Farming trio among GPR Jubilee recipients By Pamela Pearson AgriNews Staff Writer TTAWA — GlenGArryPrescOTT-russell MeMber Of PArliAMenT And PArliAMenTAry secreTAry TO The MinisTer Of AGriculTure Pierre leMieux PresenTed 27 Queen elizAbeTh ii diAMOnd Jubilee MedAls TO G-P-r residenTs On dec. 7, 2012.  The cereMOny, ATTended by 160,

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service to others. Wyatt McWilliams, from Navan, was the next recipient. McWilliams has been recognized for his work with the Hay West Campaign in 2002, initiating the delivery of over 60,000 large bales of donated hay from Eastern Canada to drought-stricken prairie farmers. In 2005, McWilliams teamed up with a group of like-minded

individuals who want to help farmers and hungry people in the Ottawa area, creating a now annual event Food Aid Day. Lemieux stated in his decoration to McWilliams it was because of his love of farming and commitment to excellence in agriculture with a big heart and unparalleled generosity that these have become two of McWilliams’ crowning

PeOPle WAs held in The cenTre blOck On PArliAMenT hill in And, As leMieux nOTed, PrOvided A diGnified venue, decOrATed in TrAdiTiOnAl sTyle fOr The chrisTMAs seAsOn.

“As the Queen pledged allegiance to our Country at her coronation, so have the recipients among us tonight when they act selflessly in the service of their fellow Canadians. Honouring these outstanding citizens is a privilege,” he continued ,”I am very pleased and proud that we are having our Diamond Jubilee Medal ceremony here at Parliament this evening. There is much noble tradition and history here with this building and it is particularly beautiful as this time of year.” Each recipient received a medal, a silver lapel pin and a personalized certificate signed by the Governor General of Canada, David Johnston. Three GPR residents in particular and with extensive agricultural backgrounds were nominated for the medal by either family or community members in a process that began earlier in 2012.   From North Glengarry area, Noble Villeneuve was one of the first to have his medal pinned on by Lemieux, who gave a brief background of Villeneuve regarding his time in the Ontario legislature in the 80s through to the mid-90s, how he “served the people of Glengarry-PrescottRussell as a highly respected provincial Minister of Agriculture. It is no simple task to win the respect of farmers, but this he did. His firsthand experience as a local farmer made him truly appreciative of the challenges facing Eastern Ontario farmers and he was instrumental in helping them to recover from devastating effects of the great Ice Storm.”  Lemieux went on to state how Villeneuve had  earned the admiration of people throughout the region for his exemplary

achievements. “The story of Hay West has been recorded in a 2004 book by well known author Bob Plamondon entitled Hay West: A Story of Canadians Helping Canadians. Wyatt’s heart for helping people in need does not end with his fellow farmers.” Lemieux continued “He is also the head and the heart behind Ottawa’s extremely successful Food Aid Day

whereby the Ottawa Food Bank purchases and processes local beef from our local farmers to help feed our local families in need. It is a true community undertaking.” The third recipient was Horace Nixon. A gentleman on all accounts, Nixon was honoured because of his lifelong and tireless work in the agricultural sector of the G-P-R riding and

beyond.  Showing his first calf at the age of 10 in 1937, Nixon has gone on to win many grand champions and premier awards for his Burnacres Holsteins and Clydesdales, awards of agricultural merits for community involvement, including many years of volunteer leadership with the 4-H, and his veteran breeder pin from Holstein continued on page 4

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AgriNews January pg 03_AgriNews February pg 03 13-01-10 3:17 PM Page 1

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The AgriNews January, 2013 Page 3

Heritage hog breed introduced to area Hereford hogs brought in from U.S. to Finch By Lois Ann Baker AgriNews Staff Writer INCH — THere’s a New breed IN TowN. IN aN eFForT To reINTroduCe THe HerITage breed baCk To THe area, FINCH area Farmer sCoTT dINgwall Has sTarTed breedINg HereFord pIgs. dINgwall, wHo Farms Near FINCH, Is CurreNTly breedINg sIx dIFFereNT breeds oF HerITage or rare pIgs. The Hereford is a medium-sized hog breed unique to the United States. Developed in Iowa and Nebraska during the 1920s, the breed was created by crossing Duroc, Chester Whites and Poland China bloodlines. The name comes from its striking resemblance to the colouring of Hereford cows. “The Hereford Association was actually started by the Hereford Cattlemen’s Association because the pigs resemble the cows so much,” said Dingwall. “They weren’t recognized as a purebred breed through the Pork Board, so the Cattlemen’s Association founded them and that is what started the breed. Now they are recognized as an actual breed.” The hogs are primarily red with a white face and two or more white feet. The shade of red varies, but the preferred is deep red. Dingwall said one of the advantages of the Hereford is that a 250-pound pig can mature in five to five and a half months as opposed to the commercial breeds now that finish in six to seven. “And that’s being all natural feeds without the hormones and additives we feed them today, you can mature in the same amount of time,” said Dingwall. The Herefords are

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known for their tight marbling meat which is sought after by chefs in the States, and that is one reason Dingwall has decided to breed these unique pigs. That and wanting to bring their numbers back up. “They are just starting to make an appearance. This is my first year, I just got this pair,” said Dingwall. He is expecting his first litter of eight to 10 piglets in about two months. Popularity of the breed began to wane in the 1960s due to the shift in pork producers to hybrids instead of purebreds. It is not quite on the endangered list, but the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy has this breed on their watchlist. There are only about 2,000 pairs of Hereford breeding pigs in all of the United States, and only two breeders in Canada, Dingwall and another farmer located near Pembroke. With limited numbers in the area, Dingwall is expecting to share sows with the Pembroke farmer to avoid in-breeding. “There are three different genetics that are here now; I have one, the man in Pembroke has the other two,” said Dingwall. “Between us we are going to switch females around to keep the new bloodlines in. We will look to bringing in more females.” Herefords are adaptable and are comfortable in both outdoors and confined systems and are used to a variety of climates. They are also known for their docile disposition, making them ideal 4-H projects. With early maturation, Hereford hogs weigh 200 to 250 pounds by five to six months of age. Mature boars can weigh in as much as 800 pounds and mature sows weigh in at about 600 pounds. “They are so new, it’s a learning curve for everyone,” said Dingwall.

At just over a year old, Gulliver, shown here with breeder Scott Dingwall, already weighs in at around 500 pounds. Dingwall has started breeding the unique Hereford breed of pigs in an effort to bring the numbers of this heritage breed back up.

Baker photo

“We really like the effectiveness...” — Ramsey family

PARADISE VALLEY FARMS, LOUISVILLE, OHIO FOUR GENERATIONS OF THE RAMSEY FAMILY 950 Reg. Holsteins — Milking 410 — SCC 221,000 Production: 27,375m 3.8 1015 f 3.0 818 p (3x) 2010 National Dairy Shrine Distinguished Breeder Bill Ramsey is pictured here in his office at Paradise Valley Farms. On the wall behind him are some of the heart and soul of the Paradise-R Bell Sears family, including two top sires from Sears: Cleitus Mathie and Roebuck. Also pictured are 3 generations EX-94 in the herd today from the foundation Bell Sears family: Paradise-R Hi Metro Serenity EX-94, dam Paradise-R Drew Stacy EX-94 and daughter Paradise-R Lewis Stacy EX-94.

For 6 years, the Ramsey family has relied on the soothing qualities of Udder Comfort™ for hard quarters and fresh cows. They milk 410 registered Holsteins. Most of the herd carries the Paradise-R prefix at Paradise Valley Farms, Louisville, Ohio. “We focus on prevention,” says Bill Ramsey. He and his wife Debbie run the dairy with their sons, daughters, son-in-law, and Bill’s parents. They focus on breeding cows to have a long and productive life in the commercial freestall environment. “We like how Udder Comfort works,” says son-in-law Nevin L’Amoreaux. He manages the milk cows and his wife Brenda is the herd veterinarian.

“We’ve stayed with Udder Comfort ever since we switched because we really like the effectiveness of it.” Quality Udders Make Quality Milk

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Available at Select Sires, Norwell Dairy Systems, participating Co-ops, Country Depot, Purina, Shurgain, Dundas Agri Systems, Ritchies Feed and Seed, and Lawrence’s Dairy Supply. For external application to the udder only, after milking, as an essential component of udder management. Always wash and dry teats thoroughly before milking.


AgriNews January pg 04_AgriNews February pg 04 13-01-11 9:38 AM Page 1

Page 4 The AgriNews January, 2013

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In photos from left, Glengarry-Prescott-Russell MP Pierre Lemieux presents Queenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Diamond Jubilee medals to Wyatt McWilliams, Noble Villeneuve and Horace Nixon in a ceremony on Parliament Hill. Pamela Pearson photos

Jubilee medals Continued from page 2 Canada in 2008. He has also had a pair of his Clydes in the record-breaking 50 horse hitch driven through Navan for that fairâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 50th anniversary in 1995, making it into the Guinness Book of World Records.   Nixon has sat on various boards and been an active member of several agricultural associations, including the Prescott County Federation of Agriculture from 1953 to 1986 and the Prescott County Soil and Crop Improvement Association since around the same era.   By his family, Nixon is valued as an â&#x20AC;&#x153;inspiration to his children, grandchildren and community youth, as he encourages them to be the best they can be.â&#x20AC;? Lemieux referred to Nixon as an icon of agriculture in the Vankleek Hill region, giving his whole life to family, community and farming. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Horace has impressive agricultural credentials â&#x20AC;&#x201C; for example, he has been attending and exhibiting his cattle at the Vankleek Hill Agricultural Fair and other fairs and exhibitions for 75 years .â&#x20AC;? According to Lemieux, Nixon has not missed a local fair since attending as a young boy. Lemieux knew he had recently been hospitalized. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Imagine my surprise when I saw him at the Vankleek Fair only shortly after having been released from the hospital â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and then seeing him again at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair in Toronto. Horace is renowned and widely respected for his important example and for his contributions to agriculture â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and for the love of agriculture that he has passed onto his children. Horace is an inspiration to me and to others and for this I congratulate him.â&#x20AC;? The ceremony was followed with many of the recipients, their families and friends, gathering to celebrate, as many were linked through past generations of working to improve their communities in which they lived.


AgriNews January pg 05_AgriNews February pg 05 13-01-11 11:38 AM Page 1

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The AgriNews January, 2013 Page 5

Right wing ‘Christian nutters’ at AgriNews? The Editor: Re: Christmas goodies, page 6, AgriNews, December 2012. Is it really the time of year to be slagging the poor? Have food bank users been competing with your rag for profits?  Are you unaware that most food bank users are children? Of course, they’re just kids who did not have the good sense to have well-heeled folks like you as their parents? Those little food bank freeloaders should pull themselves up by their bootstraps, right? Have you visited inner cities where there are no stores other than your ha-ha-ha “well-stocked-corner-stores”? Don’t know where you’ve been, but inner city corner stores are well stocked with only junk food and cigarettes. EVERYTHING in corner stores is much more expensive than regular grocery stores. The well-stocked corner stores near tony areas like Rosedale and Forest Hill are VERY expensive as well as being far from where the poor people live, of course. Large cities have now made it mandatory for new developments in their inner cities to have banks and full service grocery stores. Banks and grocery stores have been absent from the inner cities for years. And BTW, 15 minutes walking distance

is most likely a minimum. Out here in the country, if you don’t have a car, it’s a good two hours’ walk one way to a full service grocery store. For some it’s even further, of course. Tough being poor in the country. FYI - Ontario farmers are quite happy to sell their excellent produce at farmers’ markets in the cities, but they charge MUCH MUCH more than Ontario produce available in full-service grocery stores. So, poor people cannot avail themselves of that good food. However, some enterprising persons who don’t have it in for the poor, are now bringing fresh vegetables to the inner city food bank users at cost or free. This undoubtedly gets your Scrooge/Grinch dander up. Full disclosure: I live on the family farm (1850). Your paper is an unwelcome addition to my rural mailbox. Having read your editorial, I am sorely disappointed and offended. I will not be reading your rag again. I guess you fall into the category of mean Harper Tory and/or right-wing Christian nutters who really don’t get Jesus’ message. Keep your horrid paper out of my mailbox. F. Walsh RR7 Brighton, ON

Minister supports Hay East, you can too The Editor: As winter approaches, farmers in Western Canada are rallying to help farmers in Central Canada deal with a critical shortage of hay needed to feed animals. Dry summer weather prevented normal hay crops in some areas of Ontario and Quebec. I’d like to encourage industry, agricultural associations and private citizens to support this HayEast 2012 initiative in any way they can. The donations of hay, transportation and funds are coming in but more is needed. The Province of Ontario, together with the federal government, will match every dollar donated, as well as in-kind donations of

transportation services, up to a maximum of $2.5 million. This is in addition to the grant of $500,000 already announced for HayEast on Nov. 3 to transport the donated hay. I’d like to thank all those organizations and individuals who have already supported HayEast. I’d also like to thank the media who have helped get

the word out here and in Western Canada. I made my personal donation at an OFA office. Please visit the Hay East 2012 website at http://www.hayeast2012.co m/ to find out how easily you can help. Kindest regards, Ted McMeekin Minister of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs Tel: 613-932-4413 Fax: 613-932-4467

1440 Tenth Street East, Cornwall, Ontario Mailing Address: P.O. Box 25, Cornwall Ontario, K6H 5R9


AgriNews January pg 06_AgriNews February pg 06 13-01-11 9:37 AM Page 1

The Editorial Page

Page 6 The AgriNews January, 2013

Editorial Ring in the good news It’s time for a belated tip of the battered New Year’s Eve party hat to Farm Credit Canada for its latest project designed to bring positive notice to the agricultural industry. For the past several years, FCC has organized a non-perishable goods and cash drive to replenish the cupboards of food banks across the land as they arrive at their busiest season. In Eastern Ontario, the FCC’s Embrun office coordinates a tour by loaned tractor and wagon to pick up the donated packages at various schools and drop them off at area food banks. Use of farm equipment in the drive is deliberate… FCC organizers want to remind the general populace where their food comes from and that the farming community is proud to pitch in for a worthy cause. It’s a good news story about Canadian agriculture and FCC wants to channel many more such stories into the mainstream. The agency has come up with a new “Ag More Than Ever” project through which it intends to improve the general image of the industry. The idea came out of an inconsistency FCC identified between the “real story” of Canadian agriculture and negative perceptions it gleaned through polling done in 2011. Surprisingly, producers shared the bleak view of the general public, the FCC says. “The responses contrasted sharply with the bright future we see for the industry.” While challenges can’t be ignored, the agency emphasizes that industry members must be encouraged to share positive stories and to celebrate opportunities. “Changing long standing views will require significant effort and long-term commitment.” Noting that it has been on the scene for 50 years and “agriculture is all we do”, FCC intends to act as a catalyst for positive discussions about the business. It’s soliciting partners among industry leaders to sign agreements committing to promote the feel-good messages of Ag More Than Ever. No payment is involved and some 90 partners have already signed on. There’s an AMTE web site (www.agriculturemorethanever.ca) where partners are listed with links to their home sites, and a quarterly newsletter with updates and stories to be shared with members, customers and others. The Ottawa Valley Seed Growers will likely soon climb on board and provide AMTE with free booth space at the 86th Ottawa Valley Farm Show March 12-14 at Ottawa’s Ernst and Young Centre. Materials such as posters, pins, brochures and displays are provided to organizations willing to participate. The AMTE site invites participants to help tell the real story of Canadian agriculture as a “modern, vibrant and diverse industry filled with forward thinking people who love what they do.” There’s even an on-line store where you can shop for reasonablypriced AMTE swag such as shirts, caps and coffee mugs. It all adds up to an appreciated upbeat splash to help ring in the New Year in Canadian farming.

Christmas goodies We don’t know about you, but here at The AgriNews we’ve seen more snow so far this season than we can recall in the same period over the past several years. The imposing load has the city slickers wailing about snowjammed streets, snow banks they can’t see over – although we’re not sure what they want to look at – and tortuous driving. Even the skiers were complaining at first. While they had plenty of snow to exercise their preferred form of recreation, road conditions made it hard to drive to the slopes. Now, we don’t like snow coming in over the tops of our barn boots any more than the next guy but we certainly understand the importance to farming of this high level of frozen precipitation now being stored for later use on the fields. For at least the past two years, it’s been dry times in Eastern Ontario, especially last summer when much of the region was affected by drought conditions necessitating shipping feed from Western Canada to supplement many farmers in a program called Hay East. Conservation authorities across the region imposed Level 2 drought conditions requiring close monitoring of clean water supplies and voluntary cutbacks in use. In a rare situation and despite some rain, the Level 2 alert remained in place well into the fall. The amount of snow we’re currently experiencing leading the way to a substantial spring melt was needed desperately by dried out Eastern Ontario farms… and hallelujah, we got it and wouldn’t say no to another several inches. It’s something most city folk don’t consider: Heavy snow now will make for high moisture in the fields come the 2013 growing season, facilitating bountiful crops to manufacture the food providing consumers with enough strength to shovel and push stuck cars next winter. In other words, it’s beginning to look a lot like spring crop crisis averted.

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AgriGab It’s just food, OK? It’s the same old story with a twist. It happens when urbanites get too close to farming operations. They often start complaining about strange smells, noises, dust, and potential air and water pollution. Without any evidence, they run screaming through the fields (OK, that’s an exaggeration) warning of disease, physical and psychological damage, hellfire and damnation. Usually, the farms were there first and the urbanites move close by to enjoy the benefits of country living, only to discover that manure smells icky and combines can be noisy. The twist this time is that the urbanites were there first and are reacting badly to a proposal from an Ottawa sustainable food group to do some low grade farming among them, including setting up a small facility to burn restaurant kitchen scraps and biowaste, creating methane to generate electricity. This is all happening in Blackburn Hamlet, an east-end Ottawa suburb on the fringe of farm country. Some might think the urbanites would be enthralled by the plan, a demonstration of alternative energy production. But no… they’re running screaming down the street warning of the usual negative consequences just short of hellfire and damnation. Just Food Ottawa is a non-profit grassroots organization creatively trying to expand farming and food production in the city. Its controversial proposal is for a training farm and garden plots on Greenbelt land owned by the federal National Capital Commission. The site is a vacant former tree nursery including several greenhouses. The concept hit the fan just before Christmas when residential neighbours got wind of it and loudly insisted they didn’t want “garbage cooked in my front yard”, as Susan Jewell, who faces the property, expressed it. Just Food reasonably countered there would be no noxious emissions and no smell from waste that would be sealed in containers until burned. Bill Jewell added that the proposal sets a dangerous precedent in that it would open the door for similar projects down the road. He makes it sound like a bad thing but wouldn’t it be good to see similar small-scale installations in suburbia, all of them geared to producing healthy food for local consumption? It would certainly make no difference to the bottom line of big commercial farming. Predictably, City Councillor Rainer Bloess said he stands firmly with the residents (voters) in protecting the land in question as green space. Emphasizing the Just Food project hasn’t been finally approved by the NCC, city or anyone else, Bloess said residents will get a chance to air their grievances at a community meeting being organized for late January.

The AgriNews is dedicated to covering and promoting agriculture, one of Eastern Ontario’s most important economic sectors.

by Tom VanDusen While the NCC originally said the proposal fit in with its vision for the area, it later indicated the power plant was an add-on it hasn’t agreed to put on the table just before Christmas. Just Food needed to apply to the Ontario Power Generation Authority before its Jan. 13 deadline for new projects. Just Food project manager Erin O’Manique explained the concept is for an incubator farm and distribution centre for local food, connecting niche farmers with city restaurants. The Blackburn operation, O’Manique said, would provide access and training for individuals interested in farming and in developing local markets. In some cases, participants might be new Canadians learning about agriculture in a harsher climate. Just Food has an impressive track record. While the organization may have stirred up controversy with the waste-powered incubator farm, it has been successfully promoting a “vibrant, just and sustainable food system” in several other ways. Among its programs is Community Shared Agriculture that has farmers and “eaters” working cooperatively. A given farmer grows food for a predetermined group of customers that enters into a preseason agreement to purchase that food. The farmer gains a guaranteed market while consumers gain high quality fresh food as it becomes available during the season. CSA farms offer weekly delivery of vegetables, meat, fruit, herbs, eggs and even flowers; recipients can strengthen the relationship by providing volunteer labour on their host farm. Another initiative is the Farmer Training Program, a series of workshops for people interested in becoming “test-croppers”… one of 12 in 2013. A test-cropper is someone interested in farming commercially who wishes to access land (one quarter acre), shared equipment and technical support focused on production and marketing. There’s a graduation process with a novice testcropper eligible in year two to become a half-acre start-up farmer and to gain a full acre in year three. An orientation session is being held Jan. 15, with more information and registration at info@justfood.ca. There’s also an explorer course for those interested in running a small farm on more of a hobbyist basis Feb. 5, 12, and 19. Urbanites everywhere these days – including in Blackburn Hamlet – are looking for easier access to local food. That’s what Just Food is all about so why not give the organization a chance to see what it can do… including introducing an enlightened way to put bio-garbage to good use generating electricity.

The AgriNews is Published by Etcetera Publications (Chesterville) Inc. on the first Monday of each month.

Editor & Publisher: Robin R. Morris Staff Writers: Tom VanDusen, Lois Ann Baker, Darren Matte, Nelson Zandbergen Advertising Manager: Julie Lascelle, agrinewsads@gmail.com Advertising Representatives: Muriel Carruthers, Christine Lascelle, Taunya Grohn P.O. Box 368, Chesterville, Ont. K0C 1H0 Telephone: 613-448-2321 Fax: 613-448-3260 www.agrinews.ca e-mail: rm@agrinews.ca Annual Subscription $36.75 (HST Included) within Canada


AgriNews January pg 07_Layout 1 13-01-10 2:27 PM Page 1

The AgriNews January, 2013 Page 7

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January, 2013 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Michelle Voskamp - Carrying Place, Ontario   Raised in a Toronto suburb but always interested in food and farming, Michelle met her husband, Derek, when they were both studying agriculture at the University of Guelph. Today, Michelle is actively involved on the familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Belleville-area chicken farm where the couple is also raising the fourth generation of their farm family (with the latest addition baby Adelaide) and a small flock of sheep. She still enjoys visiting her family in the city but is always happy to return to her farm home. Sponsored by: www.mapleleaffoods.com

2013

Special to The AgriNews UELPH â&#x20AC;&#x201C; THE EiGHTH EdiTion of a PoPULar bLack and wHiTE caL-

May, 2013 - Cindy, Leah and Emma Schillings â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Oshawa, Ontario   The mother/daughter team of Cindy, Leah and Emma are actively involved in their familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s egg farm working alongside Cindyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s husband, son and other family members. The Oshawa-area farm also contains a busy retail store. This store provides them with a great opportunity to answer customersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; questions about food and farming directly. In her free time, Cindy enjoys gardening, cycling and cooking. Leah (in university) and Emma (in high school) are both conscientious students who enjoy playing soccer. Sponsored by: www.eggfarmersontario.ca with Real Heart, is designed to introduce the public to a few of Ontarioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passionate and hardworking farmers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the people who produce food in this province. The calendar is produced by Farm & Food Care Ontario. With this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calendar, the stories of 100 Ontario farm families have now been featured within its pages. All of the calendarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s models are real, working farmers and hail from all parts of the province. As the calendar shows, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

no such thing as a typical farmer. Their farms are as diverse as the individuals. They range in age from 2 to 78 and produce a variety of crops and livestock from lavender to poultry; fish and mink; beef, pork and soybeans, corn and dairy. The artistic, black and white calendar photos, taken by Kitchener photographer Terry Scott White, are as dramatic and appealing, as the stories, which include: continued on page 11

The faces G of farming :ERHIR&SWGL)PIZEXSVW-RG Endar sHowcasinG THE PHoTos and sToriEs of 13 onTario farmErs and farm famiLiEs, incLUdinG foUr oPEraTions in THE EasTErn End of THE ProvincE, is on saLE on-LinE and aT rETaiLErs across onTario.

The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Faces of Farmingâ&#x20AC;? calendar, featuring this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theme of Real Farmers

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AgriNews January pg 08_Layout 1 13-01-10 4:21 PM Page 1

Page 8 The AgriNews January, 2013

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ReCeiveD fROm CORn COmpanies, as Of

nOvemBeR 23, 2012. aLThOuGh The OnTaRiO CORn COmmiTTee BeLieves The infORmaTiOn COnTaineD in This RepORT TO Be aCCuRaTe, GROWeRs aRe sTROnGLy uRGeD TO COnsuLT DeaLeRs Of The RespeCTive hyBRiDs anD pRODuCTs, BefORe makinG puRChasinG OR manaGemenT DeCisiOns.

Notes: Corn Heat Unit ratings for all areas of the province are based on the average heat unit accumulation for the period from May 1 to the date in the fall when the long-term average daily temperature falls below 12°C or an occurrence of -2°C, whichever comes first. Brand or Identification

Country Farm DEKALB Elite Horizon Hyland Maizex Mycogen Seeds NK Brand PICKSEED Pioneer PRIDE Seeds

Company

Country Farm Seeds Ltd. Monsanto Canada Inc. La Coop federee Horizon Seeds Canada Inc. Hyland Seeds Maizex Seeds Inc. Dow AgroSciences Canada Inc. Syngenta Seeds Inc. PICKSEED Pioneer Hi-Bred Limited AgReliant Genetics Inc.

Address of Canadian Sponsor

Telephone

Box 790, Blenheim, ON N0P 1A0 120 Research Lane, Suite 101, Guelph, ON N1G 0B4 9001, Blvd. de L'Acadie, Montreal, QC H4N 3H7 531 Bostwick Rd., Courtland, ON N0J 1E0 P.O. Box 1090, 5 Hyland Dr., Blenheim, ON N0P 1A0 4488 Mint Line, R.R.#2, Tilbury, ON N0P 2L0 73 Avenue, Chatham, ON N7M 5S2 15910 Medway Rd., R.R.#1, Arva, ON N0M 1C0 1 Greenfield Road, Lindsay, ON K9V 4S3 Box 730, 7398 Queens Line, Chatham, ON N7M 5L1 P. O. Box 1088, 6836 Pain Court Line, Chatham, ON N7M 5L6

1-800-449-3990 1-800-667-4944 1-514-384-6450 1-519-842-5538 1-800-265-7403 1-877-682-1720 519-350-3216 1-800-756-SEED 1-800-661-GROW 1-800-265-9435 1-519-354-3210

All hybrids included in this report have been fully approved for food and feed use in Canada and the United States. However, a number have not been approved for use in the European Union. Corn harvested from these non-EU approved hybrids must be delivered to a market that will not ship the grain or its processed products to Europe. For more information, contact your seed supplier. Information regarding the genetic traits carried by all commercially available hybrids and their acceptability for export can also be obtained from the Canadian Seed Trade Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;List of Corn Hybrids Commercially Available in Canada at http://cdnseed.org/list-of-cornhybrids/ Code B D L R W O

Trait Resistant to Corn Borer Resistant to Corn Rootworm Tolerant to Liberty Herbicide Tolerant to glyphosate Resistant to Western Bean Cutworm Available with Refuge Included

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AgriNews January pg 09_Layout 1 13-01-10 4:23 PM Page 1

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The AgriNews January, 2013, Page 9

2012 Hybrid Field Trials Results from Elora, Pakenham, Wingham CHU 2475 2525 2550 2550 2550 2575 2600 2600 2600 2625 2650 2650 2650 2650 2650 2650 2650 2650 2675 2675 2675 2675 2675 2675 2675 2675 2700 2700 2700 2700 2700 2700 2725 2725 2725 2750 2750 2750 2750 2750 2775 2775 2775 2775

Brand and/or Hybrid Pioneer P8210HR Maizex MZ 2333DBR DEKALB DKC34-46 Maizex MZ 211X Pioneer P8651HR DEKALB DKC35-43 DEKALB DKC36-65 Hyland, Mycogen 8180 Pioneer P8622HR PICKSEED 2616VT2P DEKALB DKC37-41 Hyland, Mycogen 8202RA Maizex MZ 266X Maizex MZ 2988DBR NK Brand N20Y-3000GT PICKSEED 2629GT/CB/LL Pioneer P8906AM Pioneer P8906XR DEKALB DKC38-03 DEKALB DKC38-26 Horizon HZ 792BtGT Hyland, Mycogen 8234RA NK Brand N21J-3000GT PICKSEED 2670VT3P PICKSEED 2750RR PRIDE Seeds A5624G3 Hyland, Mycogen 8295RA Maizex MZ 3020CBR PICKSEED 2751GSX PICKSEED 2792VT2P Pioneer 38B14 Pioneer P9329HR DEKALB DKC40-22 Horizon HZ 850 PRIDE Seeds A5909G2 Country Farm CF330 Horizon HZ 872 Maizex MZ 3066DBR Pioneer 38N94AM PRIDE Seeds A5848G8 Country Farm CF372 Country Farm CF393 DEKALB DKC42-72 Hyland HL CVR48

Notes3 WBRL BRO R

2011-2012 averagesš

2012 averages²

average of 5 trials

average of 2 trials

Yield Index

WBRL BDR BRO WBDRL WBRLO BRO WBDRLO WBDRLO BRO BDRL BRL WBRO WBDRL BRO BDR BRL WBDRLO BDRL BDR R BDR WBDRLO BDR WBDRLO BRO WBDRL WBRLO WBDRLO R BRO BRL BRO WBRO WBDRLO BRO BDRL BDR BDR

Test Wt Index

Moist %

Ldg %

97

23.3

3

102

92

23.0

1

105

98

23.8

3

101

100

24.7

0

101

107 98 96

24.4 22.0 23.5

1 4 2

99 103 105

96 95 96 95

24.5 23.5 24.9 23.1

1 3 1 2

103 104 98 103

101 95 98 98 104

24.9 24.7 24.7 25.6 26.3

1 1 0 2 0

100 101 97 102 98

95

24.4

0

99

101 98

25.7 25.8

1 4

101 100

93 100 104 99 100

23.5 24.0 26.2 25.7 25.2

7 5 0 1 0

103 99 98 100 102

106 101 97

26.8 25.3 25.5

7 0 1

99 100 102

Yield Moist Index % 90 23.8 98 24.6 97 24.6 99 25.1 89 25.2 93 24.7 95 24.9 93 26.5 95 24.8 101 24.3 97 26.1 93 28.6 101 26.3 103 25.8 96 23.1 93 25.6 93 26.6 96 25.2 109 26.6 93 26.6 89 25.7 96 25.5 91 24.4 109 26.9 102 26.4 88 27.3 96 25.7 97 27.1 104 27.6 92 103 105 98 102 94 96 105 101 99 102 107 99 93

24.9 27.2 26.5 27.5 27.3 25.0 25.5 26.0 26.6 27.0 26.3 28.7 26.3 28.1

Ldg % 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0

Results of 2012 Performance Trials WINGHAM Test Wt Index 102 101 102 100 106 105 102 97 101 102 101 97 100 100 103 105 99 103 100 102 102 98 103 100 101 102 97 102 99 100 102 102 100 101 103 99 100 101 102 99 98 100 101

Yield Index 93 96 95 98 87 88 97 93 99 98 100 92 101 103 99 90 94 93 112 95 90 91 99 108 104 90 94 97 101 106 87 107 104 97 102 95 101 105 95 101 98 107 100 90

Moist % 22.1 24.0 23.7 24.5 23.5 22.6 23.2 24.7 23.4 23.2 24.5 26.1 24.4 24.1 22.8 23.6 24.6 23.4 24.4 24.5 24.2 24.9 22.5 25.4 24.7 26.0 23.8 24.1 26.2 24.9 23.9 25.1 25.1 26.2 25.0 23.8 23.6 25.2 24.5 25.2 25.3 26.8 24.9 25.5

ELORA Ldg % 0 2 0 2 0 0 4 0 1 0 0 0 1 3 2 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 1 0 0 4 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0

Yield Moist Index % 85 25.4 100 25.3 101 25.5 99 25.7 91 26.9 100 26.8 92 26.6 92 28.3 89 26.2 104 25.5 93 27.8 95 31.1 102 28.2 105 27.6 91 23.3 96 27.5 93 28.5 100 27.0 105 28.9 91 28.7 87 27.1 101 26.1 80 26.3 110 28.5 100 28.1 85 28.5 99 27.7 97 30.2 107 29.0 99 97 106 99 102 92 90 106 108 96 106 107 97 98

Ldg % 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

25.9 29.3 27.9 28.8 29.6 26.2 27.4 26.8 28.8 28.9 27.3 30.6 27.8 30.6

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Ontario Hybrid Corn Trial Performances Conducted by the Ontario Corn Committee

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Ontario Corn Committee The Ontario Corn Committee is made up of representatives of Agriculture and Agri Food Canada, the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, the University of Guelph, the Ontario Soil and Crop Improvement Association, the Grain Farmers of Ontario, the Seed Corn Growers of Ontario and the Canadian Seed Trade Association. Tests are conducted each year by the following cooperating agencies: Ridgetown Campus, University of Guelph, Ridgetown; Plant Agriculture Department, University of Guelph; Kemptville Campus, University of Guelph, Kemptville; and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada at Ottawa. Testing Methods Hybrids entered in the Hybrid Corn Performance Trials are selected by the seed companies. A testing fee is charged per hybrid per replication. A hybrid must be entered in all trials within a table. In each trial, hybrids are replicated in a suitable experimental design. Trials are machine planted with an excess of seed and thinned at an early growth stage to obtain a uniform population. ***Contined next page

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AgriNews January pg 10_Layout 1 13-01-11 9:59 AM Page 1

Page 10 The AgriNews January, 2013

Free internet farm classifieds at www.agrinews.ca

Table Three - Lancaster, Ottawa, Winchester CHU 2650 2650 2650 2650 2675 2675 2675 2675 2700 2700 2700 2700 2700 2700 2725 2725 2750 2750 2775 2775 2775 2800 2800 2800 2800 2800 2800 2800 2800 2800 2800 2800 2825 2825 2825 2825 2825 2825 2825 2825 2850 2850 2850 2850 2850 2850 2850

Brand and/or Hybrid Hyland, Mycogen 8202RA Maizex MZ 2988DBR Pioneer P8906AM Pioneer P8906XR DEKALB DKC38-03 Horizon HZ 792BtGT Hyland, Mycogen 8234RA PICKSEED 2670VT3P Hyland, Mycogen 8295RA Maizex MZ 3020CBR PICKSEED 2751GSX PICKSEED 2792VT2P Pioneer 38B14 Pioneer P9329HR DEKALB DKC40-22 Horizon HZ 850 Maizex MZ 3066DBR Pioneer 38N94AM DEKALB DKC42-72 Maizex MZ 3202SMX PICKSEED 2759 Country Farm CF409 DEKALB DKC43-10 DEKALB DKC43-27 Maizex MZ 3124BR Maizex MZ 312X Mycogen Seeds 2J337 PICKSEED 2843RR Pioneer 38M58 Pioneer P9411HR Pioneer P9519AM PRIDE Seeds A6012G3 Country Farm CF434 DEKALB DKC43-47 Hyland HL CVR54 Hyland, Mycogen 8300RA Maizex MZ 3490SMX NK Brand N29T-3111 PICKSEED 2844VT2P PRIDE Seeds A6060G2 Hyland, Mycogen 8377RA Hyland, Mycogen 8395RA Maizex MZ 3344R NK Brand N33R-3000GT Pioneer 38A57 Pioneer P9623AM Pioneer P9675YXR

3

Notes WBDRLO BRO WBRO WBDRL BRO BRL WBDRLO BDR WBDRLO BDR WBDRLO BRO WBDRL WBRLO WBDRLO R BRO WBRO BDR WBDRLO WBDRLO BRO BDR BRL BDR R WBRL WBRL WBRO BDR BRO WBDRLO BDR WBDRLO WBDRLO WBDRL BRO BRO WBDRLO WBDRLO R BDRL WBRL WBRO WBDRLO

2011-2012 averagesš

2012 averages²

average of 5 trials

average of 2 trials

Yield Index

Moist %

Ldg %

Test Wt Index

94 91

20.2 20.8

3 0

105 99

96 95 98

20.9 20.8 21.9

0 1 1

98 104 100

89

22.6

1

100

96 91 100 97 99

23.3 22.6 22.3 21.6 21.5

0 5 1 1 0

102 102 101 101 100

102 103

22.2 21.2

1 4

97 102

94 108 101 101 102 102

21.5 21.1 21.5 21.0 22.8 22.1

0 6 11 1 2 0

101 99 99 102 97 104

103 99

20.3 22.0

0 1

103 101

103 87 95

22.7 23.5 23.3

0 1 0

97 97 104

104

22.1

0

98

97 96

22.6 24.1

1 0

98 99

98 100

21.6 22.9

0 0

102 104

Yield Index 102 93 90 94 102 89 90 104 96 93 95 100 88 103 99 88 100 94 101 99 98 102 109 100 103 95 101 102 100 96 103 103 100 101 102 89 98 98 100 98 93 96 99 96 98 98 99

Moist % 19.9 19.3 19.6 19.7 19.4 19.2 19.1 19.6 19.7 19.9 19.4 19.4 20.4 20.3 20.7 21.1 19.2 20.5 20.1 19.4 20.5 20.0 20.1 19.9 20.4 20.3 19.5 20.9 20.4 20.2 20.3 19.3 20.2 20.1 20.9 20.3 21.2 19.6 20.3 19.6 21.3 21.6 21.1 20.1 21.2 21.4 21.3

Ldg % 0 3 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 3 2 1 1 4 0 6 2 3 0 3 2 9 1 0 12 21 2 3 0 0 8 1 2 0 0 3 1 7 0 5 3 1 3 1 1 1 4

How tests were carried

Results of 2012 Performance Trials WINCHESTER Test Wt Index 100 99 102 104 102 104 99 99 99 104 101 101 100 103 102 102 101 101 100 101 96 100 99 101 97 98 102 97 104 101 100 102 101 100 100 98 104 98 97 100 98 99 98 101 105 103 101

Yield Index 107 89 88 96 107 87 94 104 97 92 94 99 87 103 102 85 100 92 101 94 95 104 110 102 103 94 102 104 100 96 103 102 100 100 105 89 96 97 99 102 90 97 98 94 102 96 102

Moist % 18.7 18.8 19.4 19.6 19.0 19.0 18.6 19.2 19.2 19.9 19.2 19.0 19.9 19.9 20.2 20.3 18.9 20.2 19.8 19.1 19.7 19.6 19.5 19.5 20.1 19.8 19.1 21.2 20.1 19.5 20.2 19.0 19.4 19.8 20.5 19.4 21.0 19.5 20.0 19.2 20.6 20.9 20.6 20.0 20.6 21.3 20.5

LANCASTER Ldg % 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 8 0 0 0 2 0 5 0 0 2 7 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0

Yield Moist Index % 97 21.2 95 19.8 93 19.9 92 19.9 98 19.8 91 19.5 87 19.6 103 19.9 95 20.3 93 19.9 96 19.5 100 19.8 89 20.9 103 20.8 97 21.2 90 21.9 100 19.5 96 20.8 102 20.4 104 19.8 100 21.2 101 20.3 108 20.8 98 20.3 104 20.8 97 20.8 100 20.0 100 20.5 99 20.6 96 20.8 103 20.5 104 19.7 100 21.0 103 20.4 99 21.3 89 21.3 101 21.4 99 19.7 100 20.6 95 19.9 96 21.9 95 22.3 100 21.5 98 20.2 95 21.7 100 21.6 97 22.1

Ontario Hybrid Corn Trial Performances Conducted by the Ontario Corn Committee

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Ldg % 0 6 1 1 2 3 0 2 1 5 3 2 1 6 0 3 3 5 0 4 4 12 2 1 22 34 4 3 0 0 15 1 3 0 1 4 2 14 0 9 6 1 5 2 2 2 9

Contnued from page 9 A row width of 30 inches is used in all trials. Plots consist of four rows of which the middle two rows are harvested for yield. Fertilizer rates may be higher than those recommended by OMAFRA to compensate for any variability in soil nutrient supply. Most of the hybrids entered in the trials were treated with a seed treatment to control soil insects. Hybrids that were not treated with are not identified in the report. There was no significant damage from soil insects at any of the locations. To determine the percentage of lodged plant, a count is made, immediately before harvest, of all plants broken below the ear and all plants which are leaning such that the ear is in the adjacent row or is otherwise unharvestable. The moisture percentage of the grain is determined at harvest time. The weight of grain harvested from each plot is determined and the yield of shelled corn is calculated at 15% moisture. Test weights are recorded either during harvest, using combine-mounted monitoring equipment, or in the laboratory, using procedures recommended by the Canada Grain Commission.

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AgriNews January pg 11_Layout 1 13-01-10 4:24 PM Page 1

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The AgriNews January, 2013, Page 11

October, 2013 - Justin Dorland – Brighton, Ontario   After graduating from university, Justin worked off farm before returning to live with his wife Jennifer on his family’s eighth generation grain and dairy farm in Northumberland County. Today, he farms in partnership with his parents. His hobbies have long included playing hockey but he now gets his best exercise from keeping up with his two young daughters Lauren and Audrina. Justin is also active in many local farm organizations.  Sponsored by: www.gfo.ca

November, 2013 - Stephanie Campbell – Perth, Ontario   Eighth generation farmer Stephanie is a passionate spokesperson for agriculture and loves to help introduce farmers to their urban neighbours, including producing YouTube videos about her farm. She studied Crop Science at the University of Guelph, and her goal is to eventually take over her family’s Eastern Ontario egg and crop farm, a farm that’s been in her family since 1816. Stephanie is a mentor with the Big Sisters’ organization and enjoys biking, square dancing and road trips. Sponsored by: www.farmersfeedcities.com Sponsored by: www.burnbraefarms.com

Continued from page 7 • A fish farmer who scuba-dives to check on his rainbow trout; • A four-generation family that enjoys riding motorcycles when they’re not caring for turkeys; • A senior citizen dairy farmer who has baked thousands of pies for community events; • A young egg farmer living on a farm that’s been in her family for almost 200 years;

YouTube interviews with each participant. The calendar is sponsored by many Ontario agribusinesses and commodity groups. Again this year, the calendar is being old at all TSC stores across Ontario and is also available through the Farm & Food Care office in Guelph, by using the online order form at www.farmfoodcare.org or by calling 519-837-1326. Farm & Food Care Ontario, launched exactly a year ago, was created from the

• The winners of the 2012 Outstanding Young Farmer competition; • A molecular biology student who farms with her family in between university classes; • A former tobacco turned lavender farmer; New this year, a QR (Quick Recognition) code found on each calendar page allows viewers to scan with their mobile devices to “meet” the farmers. Each of the codes provides a direct link to short

Tel: 613-932-4413 Fax: 613-932-4467

amalgamation of the Ontario Farm Animal Council (OFAC) and Agricultural Groups Concerned about Resources and the Environment (aGCare). Both groups were formed 25 years ago as non-profit, agricultural education coalitions. Today, Farm & Food Care is the first its type in Canada, bringing together livestock, crop and horticulture farmers and related businesses with a mandate to provide credible information on food and farming in Ontario.

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AgriNews January pg 12_AgriNews February pg 12 13-01-11 10:30 AM Page 1

Page 12 The AgriNews January, 2013

Over 2,000 stories archived at www.agrinews.ca

Brent Baird of South Mountain (left), a Sevita International soybean grower, receives a gift basket and discount on next year’s seed purchase — grand door prize at Sevita’s annual grower meeting, Dec. 13 in Inkerman. Zandbergen photo.

Sevita International Corporation Vice-President Bob Hart (centre) and IP Coordinator and PRO Seeds Regional Sales Manager David Guy (left) and Business Manager Michael Staebler, at the company’s annual grower meeting, Dec. 13. Zandbergen photo.

Sevita hosts first postmerger grower meeting Nelson Zandbergen AgriNews Staff Writer NKERMAN — CARRyINg oN A ChRIstMAs tRAdItIoN bEguN by Its loCAl pREdECEssoRs, oNE-yEAR-old sEvItA INtERNAtIoNAl

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INKERMAN CAMpus. The annual grower meeting and turkey dinner took place at the converted public school building that formerly served as the offices of Hendrick Seeds and Hendrick AgriFoods until last January, when those Eastern Ontario firms — founded by David Hendrick — merged with Bob Hart’s PRO Seeds Marketing and Agworks in Woodstock. Hart, vice president of Sevita, gave an update on the status of the firm on the eve of its first anniversary. Hendrick, company president, couldn’t attend Continued on page 13

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Lavoie Farm Eqpt. Inc. Bourget 613-487-2946

Moore Bros. Napanee 613-354-5516

McLaren Systems Cobden 613-646-2062

Len’s Farm Eqpt. Martintown 613-528-4205

Seguin Dairy Farm St. Eugene 613-674-2177

McCann Farm Auto. Ltd. Seeley’s Bay 613-382-7411

R.B. Farm & Dairy Eqpt. Ltd. Alexandria 613-525-3691


AgriNews January pg 13_AgriNews February pg 13 13-01-11 10:49 AM Page 1

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Sevita Continaued from page 12 because snowy whether delayed his return from a business trip in the Ukraine, according to event emcee and business manager Michael Staebler. Introducing the vice president to the group, Staebler quipped that Hart â&#x20AC;&#x153;over the past year has gotten to know the 401 between Woodstock and Inkerman quite well.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Where would we be without our growers? The answer is, we just wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. You guys are absolutely critical to our business,â&#x20AC;? said Hart from the podium. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They help us supply our buyers with the best soybeans in Eastern Ontario and all of Canada.â&#x20AC;? He cast the merger, which officially occurred Jan. 25, 2012, as the logical continuation of a working relationship between the precursor companies, dating back to 2005. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think what makes this whole thing work is that the Hendrick family and Hart family share common values. Number one is honesty and integrity, and always learning and improving and trying to move forward. And most importantly, I think is a genuine desire for growers to win in any transaction.â&#x20AC;? He explained the four originating companies no longer exist as entities. The Atlantic Soy Corporation â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a processing facility in Prince Edward Island that came into the marriage via the Hendrick operation â&#x20AC;&#x201D; continues under its own name but wholly owned by Sevita, he added. The PRO Seeds moniker has also carried forward, but strictly as a Sevita brand name, offering both non-GMO and GMO products. He touted the merger as completing a value chain around the production of soybeans meant for human consumption that are the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bread and butter. From research and development of new varieties, to the production and sale of seed to growers, through to the processing, marketing and exporting of the resulting edible product to end users overseas, the proposition made â&#x20AC;&#x153;a ton of sense,â&#x20AC;? he said. The new company also brought together a workforce of 170, who held a special first-time gathering

Guest speaker Mike Treytiak, a resident of Japan â&#x20AC;&#x201D; originally from the Canadian prairies â&#x20AC;&#x201D; addresses the group. in Inkerman last summer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a tremendous group of people, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all here only because you guys support us,â&#x20AC;? he said. Hart recounted that considerable effort went into developing the Sevita name that combines two root words meaning â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;seedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;way of life.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Canadian company with a Spanish name and global vision,â&#x20AC;? he proudly declared, also describing Sevita as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the centre of excellence of non-GMO soybean production in Canada.â&#x20AC;? The company has set â&#x20AC;&#x153;some pretty aggressive sales targets,â&#x20AC;? he added, forecasting exports of 67,000 to 70,000 tonnes in 2013, with a goal of 125,000 tonnes by 2015. Just eight years ago, in 2004, Hendrick AgriFoods sold 17,000 tonnes, he noted. Buyers of the specialized soybeans are typically located in the Far East, especially Japan, where the crop is a dietary staple and food traceability standards are high. Hart also catalogued a series of capital improvements undertaken at Sevita processing facilities, including the Sandy Row Road plant just down the road from the Inkerman offices. Based on a Dec. 7 market price, Eastern Ontario farmers who grew IP soybeans under contact with Sevita last year would have netted just over $423 per acre, taking all crop inputs into consideration (except land costs), according to

The AgriNews January, 2013 Page 13 figures presented by Cliff Metcalfe of Eastern Ontario Crop Doctor Inc. The figure is substantially better than conventional no-till soybeans at almost $357 per acre, grain corn at $372, or soft red winter wheat at a little more than $401. King of the hill was another Sevita specialty, a type of IP soybean used solely for a Japanese dish known as â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nattoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; soybeans. A natto soybean crop would have clocked in at just over $477 per acre. Guest speaker Michael Treytiak, a Canadian who lives in Japan, described natto as an â&#x20AC;&#x153;acquired taste.â&#x20AC;? But he taught himself to enjoy the sticky, stringy concoction characterized by a strong note of ammonia. Treytiak, who has also learned to speak Japanese, figured it was only right he should like natto, being a partner in KDMI International, a wholesaler of food-grade soybeans and soybean isolate proteins in the Japanese marketplace. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I guess itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re used to, or brought up with,â&#x20AC;? observed Treytiak, who delivered a fascinating overview of market conditions in his adopted country. Times have been fairly tough in the Japanese soybean wholesale market because of an oversupply of the commodity. But that surplus appears to have finally cleared after three years, he told the producers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re finally seeing a more normal supplydemand balance in the last six months.â&#x20AC;? Conditions also prompted 700 tofu makers to go out of business in 2011, and that sector continues to struggle, he said. He placed such challenges amid a broader context of a Japanese economy that has only â&#x20AC;&#x153;muddled throughâ&#x20AC;? over the last 20 years. Japanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s national debt stands at 220 per cent of GDP, he pointed out, outpacing even that of Greece. On an optimistic note, he assured his audience that â&#x20AC;&#x153;soybeans are always going to be a stapleâ&#x20AC;? in Japan. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And Canadian soybeans have a better reputation than American soybeans.â&#x20AC;? Asked about the likelihood of GMO soybeans ever becoming allowable in Japan, he noted strong domestic resistance to that idea. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The housewives and everybody else, they want non-GMO soybeans.â&#x20AC;?

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AgriNews January pg 14_AgriNews February pg 14 13-01-11 9:16 AM Page 1

Page 14 The AgriNews January, 2013

Technical Updates

Preparing The Cow Herd For Winter By: Brian Pogu Beef Program Lead - OMAFRA

W

ith the dry weather throughout the province this summer, managing a beef cowherd has been a challenge this year. Winter is just around the corner. Last year, we had a mild winter which cut down on feed costs but caused problems with winter kill of alfalfa. So what should be done to prepare for this winter?

Dealing with Feed Shortages Most everyone in the province put up less hay than usual, so producers have gone to alternative feeding strategies. For some this has meant the addition of a TMR mixer which then allows them to blend different feeds to come up with a ration for beef cows that was acceptable both from an expense and nutrition perspective. In the long term, the TMR will pay for itself with a ration that is cheaper and better suited to beef cows. Some are using feedstuffs they have not used before such as straw, corn stalks, oatlage, turnips, peas etc. Producers have been checking the internet, visiting with other farmers and/or consultants to learn more about these feeds with respect to nutrition, storage and feeding. There have been some things to learn such as when to bale based on how wet or dry the feed should be. Nitrates have been a concern with stressed corn and are now a concern with oatlage, particularly if cut early and stored wet. Nitrate toxicity causes the blood to lose its oxygen carrying capacity so be on the watch for cattle panting, staggering etc. Time and ensiling will see nitrate levels drop, but it is worthwhile to have the oatlage tested at a credible lab. If the level is high, it should be blended with other feeds. Blending feeds is always a good strategy for rumen health and efficiency. The feeding system strategy has to limit cows to what feed they need without overfeeding and with minimal waste. Spreading feed on frozen ground can be an efficient way to minimize feed waste so long as the cattle are only fed what they need (Figure 1).

Free internet farm classifieds at www.agrinews.ca

calf • Productivity - lbs of calf per cow exposed

Culling After looking at the herd measures, then comes looking at individual cows. In a year with short feed supplies, it becomes more critical to cull any cows who will not work well enough to make money for you next year. • Anyone that is open • Cows with feet and udders bad enough that will affect their production • Late calving cows or cows that are poor performers based on the performance measures above • Cows with attitudes that you can not put up with another year Similarly it is important to look at herd bulls. The nutritional requirements and thus costs for keeping a bull are generally higher than a cow. Consequently serious consideration should be given to culling bulls: • With extra age • Bad feet and temperament • In excess of a ton • Bulls with a lot of daughters in the herd • Whose calves are anything less than outstanding as he can be replaced in the spring with a young bull who is better As always the winter months will be challenging, but a few management decisions can be made which will make it easier and more profitable.

Herd Evaluation Fall is a good time to sit down and do some evaluations on the cowherd by comparing some key performance measures to previous years. • Pregnancy rate - % of cows exposed that are pregnant • Weaning weights - adjusted weaning weight - with poor pastures due to dry weather, these are likely to be down unless creep feed was supplied • Sale weights • Sale weights compared to cow weights • Weaning percentage - % of cows exposed that weaned a

Too little water: Rainfall is often insufficient during the growing season to maintain tree health and to produce adequate yields and quality fruit. Water needs of fruit trees are increased under intense sunlight, and incoming solar radiation has been gradually increasing in recent decades. Dwarfing rootstocks have shallow root systems so are more susceptible to lack of rain.

Potential solutions: • Supplemental irrigation, preferably a permanent trickle system • Use of under-tree mulch to conserve soil moisture • Addition of soil organic matter before planting with cover crops or other organic amendments • Installation of subsurface tile drains which encourage deeper growth of roots, so this helps sustain trees through periods of drought.

Wind: Every year brings severe weather, which often includes strong winds. Wind can cause fruit damage from limb rubs, as well as limb breakage (including the tree leader), or worse, breakage of the graft union. Wind damage can also allow entry of diseases like fire blight. Wind can cause problems with spray coverage and pesticide drift. Tornadoes have caused extensive damage in Ontario apple orchards in the past few years.

Potential solutions:

Managing Weather Risks By: Leslie Huffman Apple Specialist - OMAFRA

W

eather has influence on many aspects of the business of growing tree fruit, as growers are well aware. When warm temperatures were pushing bud development last March, every grower knew there were risks from frost if the buds pushed into flower development. Some growers invested in frost protection strategies, with results ranging from promising to discouraging. Many are now considering future investments into frost protection. However, there are many weather risks in growing tree fruit in Ontario - which is the most critical for your particular orchard location? Consider the risk to your orchards from these weather risks:

Too much water:

Figure 1. Spreading feed on frozen ground

improve soil structure and drainage • Avoidance of imperfectly-drained sites, especially clay soils. • Use of tunnels to reduce cracking in cherries.

Ontario weather patterns usually create this problem in the spring and fall only. However, in 2011 many orchards dealt with excessive water throughout the entire year. Apples, peach and pears do not like "wet feet", although some newer rootstocks are more tolerant of imperfect drainage and subsequent Phytophthora infections. Tree roots standing in water-logged soils during the growing season are at much greater risk than when trees are dormant. Wet soils or potholes also make it challenging for spray or harvest equipment access. Rain close to harvest can cause cracking in sweet cherries.

Potential solutions: • Installation of systematic tile drainage before planting the orchard; • Use of "French drains" to direct surface water down to tile drains • Choice of rootstocks tolerant of Phytophthora • Use of cover crops before and during plantings to

• Location of windbreaks on windward side of orchards; trees will help protect up to 10 times their height away from the windbreak • Orientation of rows along path of prevailing winds • Support the trees (especially leaders) right from plantin • Maximize strength of row trellises, especially the anchors • Prune trees to allow space for apples to hang away from branches • Summer prune to remove branches that may cause limb rubs

Hail: The devastation from a short episode of hail has been felt by most tree fruit growers at some time. Hail can either bruise or cut fruit, starting at calyx until harvest. Hail cuts can also allow fire blight infections in leaves and bark (pears and apples) that can lead to death of trees, or removal of limbs.

Potential solutions: • Hail netting, most useful for high value cultivars • Hail interruption machines, like cannons, including weather monitoring system on a 24-hour basis • Production insurance to cushion the economic impact • Multiple locations of orchards to spread the risk

Intense sunlight: Pear growers in many parts of the world suffer damage from sunlight. UV radiation can cause sunburn on fruit, and sub-lethal injury on leaves. Intense sunlight can cause photosynthesis to slow down or stop, resulting in less manufactured carbohydrates, which can reduce yields and fruit quality.

Potential solutions: • Use of sunscreen materials like kaolin clay • Encouragement of leaf growth over fruit to prevent sunburn • Use of evaporative cooling during the heat of the day (with caution) • Continued on Page 16


AgriNews January pg 15_AgriNews February pg 15 13-01-11 11:40 AM Page 1

Agri-business directory at www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews January, 2013 Page 15

Small cheese producer in permit flap with S. Stormont Nelson Zandbergen AgriNews Staff Writer inCh — FrOThing behinD The sCenes FOr QuiTe sOme Time, An OngOing DispuTe beTWeen A lOCAl sheep-milk prODuCer AnD his lOCAl TOWnship hAs reCenTly splAsheD inTO publiC vieW. From his modest flock of sheep in South Stormont, Josef Regli produces milk and makes popular specialty cheeses sold at farmers’ markets in the Ottawa area. The Swiss immigrant has built a following for his products since setting up shop here in 1995, operating as Canreg Station and Pasture Dairy. He’s also built a new structure — without the necessary township permit, his municipality alleges. Regli was not available to speak with The AgriNews, but his plight was featured in a report by an Ottawa televison station. In the broadcast, he’s said

“We postponed it [the court case], to allow him another opportunity to understand … the code he has to follow,” said Mayor Bryan McGillis last month. “We’re there to promote business and work the best we can for our farming sector. And I think we have to try and do what we can … but it’s a two-way street. We have to follow … due process as well,” said

F

McGillis. “This has been going on since 2010,” noted South Stormont Deputy Mayor Tammy Hart, who also indicated her intent to help businesses stay in the township. South Stormont still needs information from the owner regarding the floorplan, septic system, plumbing details, and the dimensions of the area enclosed

by the building, according to the deputy mayor. Hart added the township needs this information to assist Regli in having the new building slotted into a less onerous “live-work” designation limited to structures less than 200 square meters in size. “Nothing’s been determined yet, but we’re doing our best to try and work with him so it can fit into

that one criteria.” The alternative is to treat the building as Group F, Division 3 industrial building, in the township’s apparent view. Hart said that the Dave Smith appearing in the elevision piece speaking for Regli is a hobby farmer from Lanark. The deputy mayor herself also went before the camera in the broadcast.

Josef regli to acknowledge erecting a small building beside his house without a building permit. The matter was headed to an initial court hearing on Tues., Nov. 27. but township officials delayed proceeding with that route after an hour and a half of negotiations with Regli — then on a hunger strike. The farmer resumed eating after four days.

Nominations now open for Dairy Farm Sustainability Award

WESTEEL WIDE-CORR Make it your choice

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O

TTAWA – DAiry FArmers OF CAnADA (DFC)

inviTes FArmers TO pArTiCipATe AgAin TO The DAiry FArm susTAinAbiliTy AWArD. nOminATiOns Are nOW Open. FOr The seCOnD yeAr in A rOW, The AWArD Aims TO reCOgnize ACTiOns TAken by DAiry FArmers ACrOss CAnADA WhO prODuCe milk in A highly susTAinAble WAy.

“Last year, we were proud to recognize four exceptional dairy farm families,” said Wally Smith, President of Dairy Farmers of Canada. “Their efforts and contributions to sustainable dairy farming are innovative and go beyond industry standards. We hope to see more outstanding submissions this year that show how farmers work to reduce their environmental footprint!” The Dairy Farm Sustainability Award recognizes Canadian dairy farmers that have adopted practices that are environmentally sustainable and financially viable. The practices must also bring social benefits to Canadians and must be easily replicated on other farms. Candidates must demonstrate respect for the environment overall, and can showcase projects that show wise management of natural resources, conservation practices, efficient use of energy and or reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. DFC invites dairy farmers to submit their own candidacy, or that of a fellow dairy farmer, on or before March 1, 2013. To be eligible, nominees must have an up-todate environmental farm plan (developed under provincial programs) and hold dairy quota. There will be four finalists, and one Laureate will be selected among these four. The Laureate will receive a prize of $2,000, a trophy and a trip to receive the Award in person at Dairy Farmers of Canada’s 2013 annual general meeting in Toronto. The three other finalists will each receive a prize of $1,000. Rules, information on the judging and nomination forms are available on dairyfarmers.ca

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AgriNews January pg 16_AgriNews February pg 16 13-01-11 9:25 AM Page 1

Page 16 The AgriNews January, 2013 • Continued from Page 14

Winter injury: Although pears can tolerate colder air temperatures than most tender fruits, they can be damaged by sudden air temperature drops in the fall or very deep cold in the winter. The trunks and limb crotches are the last tissue to harden off in the fall, so may be vulnerable to air temperature changes in November and December. Extreme cold air temperatures, especially after January when trees start to deacclimate, may result in fruit bud damage or dead shoot tips. Infections from powdery mildew also make shoots most vulnerable to cold injury. Peaches and other stone fruits can be very vulnerable to temperature drops.

Potential solutions: • Avoid cold sites • Apply nitrogen only early in the season • Grow sod or cover crops between rows after July to encourage trees to harden off • Do not prune in the fall, or early winter • Use reflective white paint on young tree trunks to avoid southwest injury

Frost: Orchard site and location have a huge influence on the risk from frost. Many orchards are located near the Great Lakes, which tends to slow development in the spring, and delay bloom. Some orchards near Lake Ontario and Lake Erie had full crops in 2012 thanks to this lake effect. However, there were other orchards that were not as lucky. Rolling topography and high elevation are usually beneficial. Location of windbreaks to avoid frost pockets is important as well.

Potential solutions: • Frost machines to either mix warm air from an inversion (eg. tower fans, tractor-mounted moveable units), or move cold air upwards to prevent ice crystal formation (eg. cold air drains); • Burning hay bales to create a smoke layer (smudge effect): • Frost protection with irrigation at low rates; orchard heaters. The frosts of 2012 will only be one of the many weather-related stories for our industry. Be sure to carefully consider all of your weather risks before choosing which mitigation strategy will provide you with the most protection and returns.

Programs and Services

Les programmes, les services et les ressources du ministère de l’Agriculture, de l’Alimentation et des Affaires rurales de l’Ontario sont également disponibles en français.

Premier’s Award For Agri-Food Innovation Excellence: Application Deadline is January 18, 2013 WHAT’S NEW

Applications are now being accepted for the Premier’s Award for Agri-Food Innovation Excellence program. The deadline for submissions is Friday, January 18, 2013. The Premier’s Award for Agri-Food Innovation program has attracted more than 1,000 applications highlighting onfarm innovations since its inception in 2007.

ABOUT THE PROGRAM The Premier’s Award for Agri-Food Innovation Excellence program encourages the development of our rural communities, farms, agri-food processors and agrifood organizations by adding value to existing products, creating jobs and driving economic growth. The program recognizes up to 45 Regional Award recipients across the province who receive a plaque, wordmark and a gate sign, as well as $5,000; a Premier’s Award

($75,000); a Minister’s Award ($50,000); and, three Leaders in Innovation Awards ($25,000).

WHO CAN APPLY? A farmer, primary producer, processor, or agri-food related organization are all eligible for recognition under this initiative. Applicants must be in compliance with all applicable federal, provincial and municipal legislation that apply to the operation of the innovation.

ELIGIBLE INNOVATIONS Examples of innovation areas include, but are not limited to: • improved business practices • response to consumer demands (eg., new product development, value added, marketing, strategic alliances, local food) • environmental stewardship • health and safety • energy and bio-economy • food safety and traceability • education and marketing of the agriculture and food industry to society

DEADLINE This year’s applications must be received by 5:00 p.m. on Friday, January 18, 2013. Eligible applications will be reviewed by two independent panels comprised of a crosssection of Ontario’s agri-food industry. Additional information, guidelines and application forms are available on the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs website or by calling the Agricultural Information Contact Centre at 1-877-424-1300.

Ontario Food Exporter Award 2013

T

he 2013 Ontario Food Exporter Award recognizes an exporter’s successful expansion into new export markets, as well as their creativity and excellence in approaching international markets. The award highlights the importance to Ontario’s agri-food industry of exporting, creating new jobs, new investment and fostering economic growth in communities across the province. To be eligible, an exporter must: • be a client of OMAFRA’s Ontario Food Export program • produce its food or beverage products in Ontario • be a food or beverage processor and/or farming business (trading houses and companies in the service and distribution sector are not eligible) • have operated for at least two years • have exported outside of Canada for at least one year • have entered a new market/trade channel within the past two years • have earned foreign revenue in excess of 15% of gross sales Application Deadline: January 31, 2013. To apply for the award or for more information visit OMAFRA’s website.

Fresh New Look To OMAFRA Regional Economic Development Branch e-Bulletins

I

n January 2013 the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture Food and Rural Affairs’ (OMAFRA) Regional Economic Development Branch (REDB) is releasing a fresh new look to our monthly e-bulletins. The regionally based OMAFRA Connects / Connexion products that have been in existence since 2009 will be replaced with two products: a) OMAFRA Connects / Connexion MAAARO – a provincially developed and distributed e-bulletin that provides information on programs and resources of interest to Continued on page 26

Searchable archive at www.agrinews.ca producers, processors, rural business, municipalities, and agriculture and rural economic development organizations b) OMAFRA Dateline / Calendrier MAAARO – a regionally based calendar of events, meetings and workshops that will be accessible from the ministry’s website The web based OMAFRA Dateline / Calendrier MAAARO will provide you with immediate information on events that are being held in your region / across the province. The calendars will be available for download or printing from the ministry’s website. Current subscribers will receive a single copy of OMAFRA Connects / Connexion MAAARO on a monthly basis (second Friday). Information will be available as “text within the email” as well as a pdf attachment. Individuals and organizations that do not currently receive OMAFRA Connects / Connexion MAAARO can subscribe by sending an email to OMAFRA.Connects@ontario.ca or by calling your nearest OMAFRA office. The web link for OMAFRA Dateline / Calendrier MAAARO will be included in OMAFRA Connects / Connexion MAAARO beginning January 2013 and in the email signature block of the REDB Advisor that you work with. Events and meeting dates that you would like considered for inclusion in OMAFRA Dateline / Calendrier MAAARO can be sent to OMAFRA.Connects@ontario.ca

How To Register Your Agri-Food Premises

P

remises Identification Numbers can be obtained from the Provincial Premises Registry (PPR) now operated by approved service provider Angus GeoSolutions Inc. (AGSI). The PPR is the only official provincial registry for obtaining Ontario Premises Identification Numbers for agri-food businesses. Premises Identification numbers issued before April 1, 2012 are still valid. Obtaining a Premises Identification Number for your agri-food business is an important step towards traceability in Ontario. To register your premises or update your information, please contact AGSI: • Online: www.ontarioppr.ca • By phone: 1-855-697-7743 (MY PPR ID)

Eastern Ontario Development Fund (EODF)

T

he Eastern Ontario Development Fund supports regional economic development by creating jobs, attracting private sector investment and promoting innovation, collaboration and cluster development in Eastern Ontario. For the purposes of the EODF program, “Eastern Ontario” is defined as the area comprising the following 14 geographic areas under the Territorial Division Act, 2002: Frontenac; Haliburton; Hastings; Kawartha Lakes; Lanark; leeds and Grenville; Lennox and Addington; Northumberland; Ottawa; Peterborough; Prescott and Russell; Prince Edward; Renfrew and Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry. The fund is a discretionary, non-entitlement program with limited funding. There are two funding streams, one for established businesses and a regional stream for economic development organization including municipalities. Under the business stream, the fund may provide up to 15% of eligible project costs to a maximum grant of $1.5 million. For project investment of $10+ million that create 50+ jobs, funding may be available in for form of a secured repayable loan, to a maximum of $5 million in provincial support. Under the regional stream, the fund may provide up to 50% of eligible project costs to a maximum grant of $1.5 million. Stacking with other provincial programs is not permitted under either funding streams. For more information about the Eastern Ontario Development Fund including criteria, eligibility,


AgriNews January pg 17_Layout 1 13-01-10 2:52 PM Page 1

Searchable archive at www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews January, 2013, Page 17

2012 soybean trials

Ontario Soybean Relative Maturity Map OO O I II

-

2300 2500 2700 2900

-

2500 2800 2900 3300

HU HU HU HU

Interpretation of Tables & Results Interpretation of Table 1 Notes: Varieties with resistance genes for races of the Phytophthora root rot organism in Ontario: Herbicide Reaction RR: Roundup Readyâ&#x201E;˘ (Trademark of Monsanto Company) RR2Y: Roundup Ready 2 Yieldâ&#x201E;˘ (Trademark of Monsanto Company) LL: Liberty Linkâ&#x201E;˘ (Trademark of Bayer CropScience AG) Varieties have not been evaluated for metribuzin tolerance by OOPSCC. For further information contact seed distributor. The following varieties have been reported to OOPSCC as being metribuzin sensitive: 90B73, DH405-2. Relative Maturity Ranking of maturities has been initiated to provide producers with a rating system that is similar to the USA soybean industry standards. Rankings are not assigned by OOPSCC. See attached Relative Maturity map Hilum Colour Each soybean seed has a hilum which is the point where it was attached to the pod. Varieties differ in hilum colour and can be either Yellow (Y), Imperfect Yellow (IY), Gray (GR), Buff (BF), Brown (BR), Black (BL), or Imperfect Black (IBL). Hilum colour may also be Light (L). Continued on page 19

WEAGANT FARM SUPPLIES LTD. WINTER 2013 YELLOW TAG Stock # Location Item

Regular Yellow Tag Price Sale Price

BALE GRABBER 1 OF 2 63198 B Couture RND ......................................$1,500 BALE SPEAR 1 OF 7 68109 B Horst ......................................................$325 BALE THROWER 1 OF 2 58733 W New Holland 75 Hyd Drive, Kicker ......$750 BALE WRAPPER 1 OF 4 63835 W Kvernland 7655 Trail Type...............$24,900 ROUND BALER 3 OF 14 45268 B CIH 8455 - 4â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x6.5â&#x20AC;?, Round baler .......$5,900 68023 B Case IH 3450 ..................................... $2,900 66743 W New Holland BR740A ......................$16,900 BLADE 1 OF 9 60799 W A&B 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; ....................................................$495 CAB 1 OF 5 60383 T Curtis B7500 Soft Side ......................$1,900 CHISEL PLOW 1 OF 3 67601 W White 435 11 Shank ...........................$8,875 COMBINE 1 OF 6 67891 W Case IH 1440 - 4x4, 820 Head .........$23,900 CULTIVATOR 3 OF 12 63432 W Case IH TM 14FT 50â&#x20AC;&#x2122; With Harrow ... $31,900 66120 W Case IH 4500 18â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Dbl. Rolling Basket....$4,950 65932 W Kongskild 20â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 3PTH, Hyd Wings .......$1,875 CUTV 1 OF 3 68251 W John Deere AMT600 5 Wheel ............$2,500 DISC HARROW 2 OF 8 67756 W Bush Hog 12â&#x20AC;&#x2122; ......................................$1,500 66685 W Massey Ferguson 820 22â&#x20AC;&#x2122; .................$5,900 ELEVATOR 1 OF 6 64209 T Little Giant 34â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Electric Drive ............$1,100 EXCAVATOR 1 OF 2 66956 T Kubota KX41 ....................................$13,500

$995 $250 $250 $19,500 $2,900 $1,900 $12,900 $375 $900 $7,400 $17,900 $19,900 $2900 $1,200 $1,650 $975 $4,500 $800 $11,900

Terms of Sale: Â&#x2021;$OOLWHPVVDOHDUHÂłDVLVZKHUHLV´ Â&#x2021;7UXFNLQJFDQEHDUUDQJHGDWUHDVRQDEOHUDWHV Â&#x2021;3ULFHVLQHIIHFWXQWLO)HEUXDU\ Â&#x2021;3ULFHVVXEMHFWWRFKDQJHXSRQUHFRQGLWLRQLQJ : :LQFKHVWHU% %URFNYLOOH7 7RSOLQH7UDLOHUV

Stock # Location Item

SALE ON USED EQUIPMENT Regular Yellow Tag Price Sale Price

FORAGE BOX 3 OF 21 63728 B 16â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Wood Sides ..................................$3,995 64853 W Dion 1016SE 3BTR 12Ton Wagon ....$2,400 63440 W Gehl 970 PTO Driven .........................$4,900 FORAGE HARVESTER 2 OF 11 53382 W Gehl 1065 Pull Type, 2R Corn Head...$6,950 65876 W New Holland 790 Single Axel ............$6,500 GRAIN AUGER 2 OF 8 66178 W Farmking 8X51 With Hopper .............$1,850  : :HVWĂ&#x20AC;HOG0. ..............................$2950 GRAIN BUGGY 1 OF 1 67622 W 400Bu ..................................................$5,900 HAYBINE / DISCBINE 3 OF 12 66077 W John Deere 1209 540 PTOâ&#x20AC;? ...............$2,700 66562 W Kvernland 337 ....................................$6,800 63547 W New Holland 1442 1000RPM, Flail ...$12,900 LOADER 2 OF 6 67874 W Allied 590 Valve & 72â&#x20AC;? Material Bucket ...$2,250 67741 W Case IH 2250 with 84â&#x20AC;? Snow Bucket ...$2,150 LOADER BUCKET 1 OF 7 67139 W Dundas 84â&#x20AC;? Sawdust Slinger Bucket ...$2,900 MANURE SPREADER 1 OF 7 64516 W NH 520 Single Axel, End Gate ..........$2,075 MOWER 3 OF 14 55578 W Alamo Falcon 15â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Rough Cut ............$7,900 63386 W JF 3PTH ..............................................$2,350 61358 W Lely 240 Disc Mower 3PTH ...............$4,500 PLOW 1 OF 5 65054 W Kongskilde 4F with Auto Reset ........$6,750 RACK 1 OF 8 67133 W 16â&#x20AC;&#x2122; All Steel on 5 Ton Wagon ...............$800 SEEDER 2 OF 10 65902 W Great Plains 1300 13â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Drill ...............$12,700 66912 B Case IHG 10 16 Run Grass Drill .......$1,450

$1,000 $1,900 $3,000 $5,900 $3,900 $1,100 $1,900 $3,900 $1,900 $2,900 $7,900 $1,600 $1,600 $2,100 $1,800 $1,875 $1,500 $2,500 $3,950 $500 $7,900 $1,050

Stock # Location Item

Regular Yellow Tag Price Sale Price

RAKE 5 OF 25 61302 B Allis 7â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Side Delivery.............................$900 67423 W Claas 1550 Gyro Rake 540 PTO ......$16,400 66669 B M&W Trail Type Rotary Rake ...............$925 61625 W Miller Pro 1150 ...................................$3,950 63702 W New Holland 254 Rake/Tedder ..........$2,950 SNOW BLOWERS 3 OF 31 61616 W Mckee 720 7â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Wide 2 Auger ...............$1,650 67347 W New Idea 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Rear Mount .......................$674 61181 W Roberge 421-74â&#x20AC;? Inverted 74â&#x20AC;? ..........$2,900 SPRAYER 1 OF 5 58384 W Flexicoil 55 80â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Boom, Controls .......$5,900 TMR MIXERS 2 OF 8 62485 W Jaylor 3650 Twin Screw, 2 Scale Hds ...$29,00 50307 W Oswalt 575 4 Auger Haysaw, Scales ... $4,900 TRACTOR 10 OF 89 67924 W Case IH 5130 2WD, Cab ...................$23,900 66067 W Ford TW10 2WD, Cab ........................$7,900 67130 B Ford 3910 2WD, New Tires As Is ......$8,975 67831 W Ford 7710 4WD, Cab ..........................$9,800 66285 T JD 3130 2WD, Loader, Cab .............$14,500 59975 B Kubota R400.......................................$9,500 64874 W MF 1085 2WD, Cab .............................$7,700 66969 W MF 1105 2WD, Cab, Air ........................ $12,900 65579 B MF 165 Cab, Loader ...........................$6,950 58711 B White 2-50 4WD, Cab, Loader ...........$9,800 64023 T White 2-60 4WD, Loader .................. $11,900 TRACTOR (COMPACT) 1 OF 13 64812 T Kubota B8200HSD 4WD, Cab, Hydro ...$7,900

$500 $12,800 $450 $2,000 $1,700 $900 $400 $2,200 $3,900 $19,500 $2,900 $18,000 $4,500 $7,000 $7,500 $9,900 $6,900 $4,900 $9,400 $4,200 $8,900 $8,900 $5,900

CONTACT US AT: WINCHESTER: 877-302-6276 BROCKVILLE: 800-260-2031 TOPLINE TRAILERS: 888-701-6185

&KHFNRXWRXUFRPSOHWHOLQHXSRIXVHGHTXLSPHQWZLWKSKRWRVDW

www.weagantfarm.com 6HH(DVWHUQ2QWDULRÂśVODUJHVWLQYHQWRU\RIXVHGWUDFWRUVDQGPDFKLQHU\RQOLQH


AgriNews January pg 18_Layout 1 13-01-10 2:55 PM Page 1

Page 18 The AgriNews January, 2013

Searchable archive at www.agrinews.ca

TABLE 2.1 AGRONOMIC DATA AT MATURITY GROUP 00 (2300-2500 HU) AREAS , RR TEST AVERAGE DUNDALK ELORA LISTOWEL Yield Index Yield Index Yield Index Yield Index 1 year 2 year 3 year 1 year 2 year 2 year 3 year 2 year 3 year

Days to Mature

Variety

Pekko R2 Chadburn R2 Vito R2 Sampsa R2 004R21 24-10RY HS 006RYS24 PRO 2525R2 PS 0083 R2 90Y01 25-10RY S01-K8 LS 008R21 900Y81 NSC Jaden RR2Y PRO 2535R2 S00-B7 PS 0074 R2 Astro R2 Kipo R2 Theo R2 Murano R2 Average yield (T/ha) (bu/ac)

101 103 105 105 105 106 107 108 109 109 110 110 111 111 111 113 DTM (1yr) 108 111 111 112 113 116

OTTAWA Yield Index 1 year

RENFREW Yield Index 1 year 2 year

WINCHESTER Yield Index 1 year

Plant Height (cm)

87 86 92 100 93 90 101 99 91 99 107 99 109 93 110 109

97 90 90 102 94 98 102 101 95 104 105 101 111 96 107 108

----------100 -104 94 101 --

134 80 76 113 90 106 101 103 98 126 81 94 111 84 90 114

----------100 -104 93 103 --

92 90 94 94 80 94 99 102 102 107 110 102 117 88 113 116

----------103 -106 88 103 --

95 90 90 103 99 99 99 100 91 103 108 104 103 105 107 104

----------100 -99 99 102 --

80 80 85 130 84 85 113 94 85 101 103 98 118 94 106 115

104 103 89 95 103 103 107 93 101 97 97 97 111 107 98 95

----------97 -107 103 94 --

88 92 90 92 104 96 98 102 88 92 104 94 110 92 104 101

89 107 110 104 107 116 3.07 45.6

------2.83 42.0

------3.18 47.2

------1.90 28.2

------2.48 36.8

------2.92 43.3

------3.20 47.5

------3.81 56.5

------4.14 61.4

94 118 99 102 102 114 1.88 27.9

------1.77 26.2

------2.66 39.4

93 103 114 110 112 120 3.81 56.5

-------

Plant Height (cm)

Lodging 1=standing 5=flat

67 66 76 65 67 64 74 77 73 74 74 67 75 69 80 84

1.3 1.2 1.5 1.5 1.1 1.5 1.6 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.2 1.4 1.6

LICENSED GRAIN ELEVATOR Corn and Soybean Dealer

-------

TABLE 3.2 AGRONOMIC DATA AT MATURITY GROUP 0 (2500-2800 HU) AREAS , CONV/FOOD TEST Days to Mature

Variety

Bloomfield Chikala Misty Jari Opus Toma 900M91 Savanna Krios 90M30 OAC Madoc S03-W4 Kassidy DH618 OAC Lakeview Narita S05-T6 Naya HDC 2701 S07-D2 Etna Kyoto OAC Wellington OAC Champion Saska Heather OAC Belgrave Furio PRO 275 S07-M8 Madison OAC Blythe OAC Wallace OAC Nation Dares OAC Sunny HS 09C02 SR PICOR

F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F

ANSER DH863 F Aquita ADV Windfall Kofu HDC Winthrop F OAC Drayton Average yield (T/ha) (bu/ac)

104 105 105 105 106 106 107 108 109 109 109 109 109 110 110 110 111 111 111 111 111 111 111 111 111 112 113 113 114 114 114 114 114 114 115 115 115 116 DTM (1yr) 103 104 104 108 109 111 113

1 year

AVERAGE Yield Index 2 year

3 year

BRUSSELS Yield Index 1 year 2 year

ELORA Yield Index 2 year 3 year

LISTOWEL Yield Index 1 year

OTTAWA Yield Index 2 year 3 year

WINCHESTER Yield Index 2 year 3 year

Lodging 1=standing 5=flat

77 83 93 91 84 92 96 98 105 99 101 102 100 106 106 99 111 99 93 104 103 102 103 104 102 94 114 103 113 114 111 109 115 107 105 102 108 105

78 84 95 91 87 91 97 96 96 98 101 102 97 104 105 98 109 99 92 103 101 102 99 101 102 94 109 104 109 109 110 104 112 107 103 103 107 99

-82 -----98 94 99 101 100 96 103 102 98 107 100 90 100 99 104 96 100 102 90 106 101 107 -108 101 110 103 99 102 105 99

84 90 97 90 93 88 101 96 88 95 97 103 102 97 103 95 112 99 94 101 98 97 95 101 105 93 107 102 109 105 115 106 112 105 104 110 106 103

-87 -----98 89 96 100 101 98 99 103 98 107 100 94 97 97 100 94 101 106 88 104 98 108 -111 101 109 102 100 107 105 101

73 82 93 96 89 86 100 92 108 102 98 105 95 98 103 100 112 95 102 105 96 99 102 102 96 99 103 105 111 113 110 100 110 106 110 104 103 96

-80 -----93 101 100 100 101 96 100 102 101 108 96 98 103 95 103 104 104 100 93 103 101 106 -106 99 106 101 104 100 101 95

88 93 95 89 72 92 95 102 109 98 108 95 98 113 99 91 112 104 93 101 103 103 103 87 104 84 115 87 114 101 109 120 111 111 106 101 112 103

77 72 96 85 89 96 94 97 95 97 101 97 97 105 109 103 108 107 84 102 101 104 100 105 104 93 112 102 109 109 112 105 120 104 100 101 110 96

-77 -----98 92 98 102 99 99 103 103 98 107 110 81 97 103 104 92 98 100 90 109 101 109 -112 100 116 100 98 102 107 97

77 86 97 94 87 91 96 97 87 99 103 105 94 107 109 98 106 94 88 106 105 106 98 102 104 96 111 111 106 111 106 99 109 109 98 103 107 100

-81 -----102 89 102 101 103 94 104 101 99 106 97 86 103 101 109 92 101 104 91 106 106 104 -104 101 109 105 91 101 104 101

71 73 74 77 76 67 72 72 80 71 71 78 79 76 76 75 81 64 77 81 71 70 83 84 72 68 82 80 74 77 77 78 81 84 87 80 73 76

1.7 1.3 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.0 1.5 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.0 1.3 1.0 1.5 1.1 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.0 1.0 1.9 1.3 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.0 1.1 1.0 1.6 1.7 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.0 1.3 1.1

73 84 72 101 100 105 114 3.06 45.5

-------3.47 51.5

-------3.70 54.8

-------4.13 61.2

-------4.19 62.2

-------3.46 51.3

-------3.52 52.2

80 97 72 102 104 103 120 3.20 47.4

-------2.96 44.0

-------3.32 49.3

-------3.80 56.4

-------4.05 60.1

--------

--------

Plant Height (cm)

We Offer: â&#x20AC;¢ Forward Contracts â&#x20AC;¢ Drying â&#x20AC;¢ Trucking â&#x20AC;¢ Storage

We Buy: â&#x20AC;¢ Corn â&#x20AC;¢ Soybeans â&#x20AC;¢ Barley

18408 Conc. 15, Maxville, Ont. marc@bourdon.ca Tel.: 613-527-2859 Fax: 613-527-3468

1-888-342-5795

TABLE 3.2 AGRONOMIC DATA AT MATURITY GROUP 0 (2500-2800 HU) AREAS , CONV/FOOD TEST Days to Mature

Variety

Bloomfield Chikala Misty Jari Opus Toma 900M91 Savanna Krios 90M30 OAC Madoc S03-W4 Kassidy DH618 OAC Lakeview Narita S05-T6 Naya HDC 2701 S07-D2 Etna Kyoto OAC Wellington OAC Champion Saska Heather OAC Belgrave Furio PRO 275 S07-M8 Madison OAC Blythe OAC Wallace OAC Nation Dares OAC Sunny HS 09C02 SR PICOR

F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F

ANSER DH863 F Aquita ADV Windfall Kofu HDC Winthrop F OAC Drayton Average yield (T/ha) (bu/ac)

104 105 105 105 106 106 107 108 109 109 109 109 109 110 110 110 111 111 111 111 111 111 111 111 111 112 113 113 114 114 114 114 114 114 115 115 115 116 DTM (1yr) 103 104 104 108 109 111 113

3 year

BRUSSELS Yield Index 1 year 2 year

ELORA Yield Index 2 year 3 year

LISTOWEL Yield Index 1 year

OTTAWA Yield Index 2 year 3 year

WINCHESTER Yield Index 2 year 3 year

77 83 93 91 84 92 96 98 105 99 101 102 100 106 106 99 111 99 93 104 103 102 103 104 102 94 114 103 113 114 111 109 115 107 105 102 108 105

78 84 95 91 87 91 97 96 96 98 101 102 97 104 105 98 109 99 92 103 101 102 99 101 102 94 109 104 109 109 110 104 112 107 103 103 107 99

-82 -----98 94 99 101 100 96 103 102 98 107 100 90 100 99 104 96 100 102 90 106 101 107 -108 101 110 103 99 102 105 99

84 90 97 90 93 88 101 96 88 95 97 103 102 97 103 95 112 99 94 101 98 97 95 101 105 93 107 102 109 105 115 106 112 105 104 110 106 103

-87 -----98 89 96 100 101 98 99 103 98 107 100 94 97 97 100 94 101 106 88 104 98 108 -111 101 109 102 100 107 105 101

73 82 93 96 89 86 100 92 108 102 98 105 95 98 103 100 112 95 102 105 96 99 102 102 96 99 103 105 111 113 110 100 110 106 110 104 103 96

-80 -----93 101 100 100 101 96 100 102 101 108 96 98 103 95 103 104 104 100 93 103 101 106 -106 99 106 101 104 100 101 95

88 93 95 89 72 92 95 102 109 98 108 95 98 113 99 91 112 104 93 101 103 103 103 87 104 84 115 87 114 101 109 120 111 111 106 101 112 103

77 72 96 85 89 96 94 97 95 97 101 97 97 105 109 103 108 107 84 102 101 104 100 105 104 93 112 102 109 109 112 105 120 104 100 101 110 96

-77 -----98 92 98 102 99 99 103 103 98 107 110 81 97 103 104 92 98 100 90 109 101 109 -112 100 116 100 98 102 107 97

77 86 97 94 87 91 96 97 87 99 103 105 94 107 109 98 106 94 88 106 105 106 98 102 104 96 111 111 106 111 106 99 109 109 98 103 107 100

-81 -----102 89 102 101 103 94 104 101 99 106 97 86 103 101 109 92 101 104 91 106 106 104 -104 101 109 105 91 101 104 101

71 73 74 77 76 67 72 72 80 71 71 78 79 76 76 75 81 64 77 81 71 70 83 84 72 68 82 80 74 77 77 78 81 84 87 80 73 76

1.7 1.3 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.0 1.5 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.0 1.3 1.0 1.5 1.1 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.0 1.0 1.9 1.3 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.0 1.1 1.0 1.6 1.7 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.0 1.3 1.1

73 84 72 101 100 105 114 3.06 45.5

-------3.47 51.5

-------3.70 54.8

-------4.13 61.2

-------4.19 62.2

-------3.46 51.3

-------3.52 52.2

80 97 72 102 104 103 120 3.20 47.4

-------2.96 44.0

-------3.32 49.3

-------3.80 56.4

-------4.05 60.1

--------

--------

1 year

AVERAGE Yield Index 2 year

Lodging 1=standing 5=flat

TABLE 4.1 AGRONOMIC DATA AT MATURITY GROUP 1 (2700-2900 HU) AREAS , RR TEST

Variety

91M01 Mirada RR CF12GR Medea R2 28-12RY R2T0980 S10-G7 27-60RY Endurance R2 91Y01 RR2 Platinum 91Y41 NSC0913R2 HS 14RYS02 Valiant RR Absolute RR S12-L5 R2T1449 PS 1162 R2 RR2 Cobalt PRO 2935R2C Maxo R2 CF30GR 28-60RY PS 1563 R2 PRO 2835R2 CF31GR 29-11RY PS 1670 NR2 HS 11RY07 Soido R2 91Y61 R2T1741 91Y81 RR2 Titanium 5A130RR2 29-60RY S14-M4 S15-B4 HS 09RYS12 5091RR2Y 5A090RR2 5A145RR2 Average yield (T/ha) (bu/ac)

Days to Mature

114 114 115 115 116 116 116 116 116 116 117 117 117 117 117 117 117 117 117 117 118 118 118 119 119 119 120 120 120 120 120 120 121 121 121 121 123 123 124 DTM (1yr) 119 119 120 122

1 year

AVERAGE Yield Index 2 year

3 year

EXETER Yield Index 2 year 3 year

98 98 101 102 94 97 97 102 100 100 100 96 98 99 98 100 108 98 99 90 104 111 98 101 105 95 99 102 103 104 95 94 104 99 104 99 107 100 103

94 98 99 98 99 93 95 100 100 99 97 95 97 101 101 102 104 100 100 93 103 107 96 99 101 97 102 102 105 104 99 97 103 101 104 99 107 103 103

92 -99 ---95 99 99 --95 -101 -102 -101 99 -100 108 97 100 -98 103 -103 105 99 99 --105 101 -100 101

93 104 98 101 95 97 97 95 101 99 98 96 96 97 101 103 100 101 101 100 106 105 98 96 100 100 98 101 101 103 109 100 102 101 103 97 103 105 101

99 101 100 97 4.31 63.9

----4.42 65.6

----4.51 66.8

----4.26 63.2

91 -97 ---99 94 102 --94 -100 -103 -100 101 -101 107 100 99 -99 97 -99 104 107 101 --104 97 -102 100 ----4.17 61.9

ST. PAULS Yield Index 2 year 3 year

WINCHESTER Yield Index 2 year 3 year

WOODSTOCK Yield Index 2 year 3 year

Plant Height (cm)

Lodging 1=standing 5=flat

101 99 100 98 98 96 93 103 101 102 105 97 99 107 103 99 103 97 99 92 98 109 98 98 101 93 100 99 108 99 96 90 104 99 103 94 110 100 107

98 -99 ---95 100 98 --97 -106 -101 -101 97 -100 109 95 100 -94 104 -106 102 97 93 --104 99 -99 106

91 92 101 94 100 86 94 102 99 90 95 97 95 100 101 105 106 102 99 93 105 112 94 108 96 96 103 104 106 109 93 100 102 105 102 104 112 108 98

87 -102 ---93 100 95 --97 -98 -103 -102 102 -99 109 94 104 -98 105 -101 106 95 101 --106 105 -103 96

92 100 98 98 103 94 96 101 100 106 87 91 97 99 97 101 107 100 100 85 104 102 96 95 107 99 106 104 105 106 98 101 106 101 106 103 102 99 108

92 -98 ---94 101 101 --93 -102 -102 -99 97 -99 106 98 97 -100 106 -105 109 96 102 --105 102 -95 103

78 73 84 81 77 86 80 85 83 77 83 82 80 78 77 80 82 81 82 74 84 80 82 92 77 80 83 76 85 82 77 78 84 85 79 82 84 83 83

1.3 1.0 1.4 1.3 1.0 1.3 1.5 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.3 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.0 1.3 1.1 1.4 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.0 1.3 1.3

----4.65 68.9

----4.62 68.6

----4.62 68.6

----4.91 72.8

----4.17 61.8

----4.32 64.1

-----

-----

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AgriNews January pg 19_Layout 1 13-01-10 3:00 PM Page 1

Searchable archive at www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews January, 2013, Page 19

TABLE 4.2 AGRONOMIC DATA AT MATURITY GROUP 1 (2700-2900 HU) AREAS , CONV/FOOD TEST Days to Mature

Variety

HDC Winthrop S09-L6 Destiny Colby DH405-2 91M10 S14-L9 Black Pearl EIDER HS 13C38 Acora DH4173 DH5170 S15-C2 S12-A5 Stargazer DH530 Bakara HDC Goshen DH748 OAC Ginty DH410SCN S18-R6 HDC 1600T Kanata OAC Huron OAC Calypso OAC Perth HDC Blake OAC Avatar Thames

F F F F F F F

F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F

ADV Windfall OAC Drayton Proxy LL HAVANE ADV Cadet F DH4202 F Average yield (T/ha) (bu/ac)

1 year

112 115 117 117 117 117 117 118 118 118 119 119 119 120 120 120 121 122 122 122 123 123 123 123 124 124 125 125 125 126 126 DTM (1yr) 113 117 117 120 121 121

AVERAGE Yield Index 2 year

EXETER Yield Index 2 year

3 year

ST. PAULS Yield Index 2 year 3 year

WINCHESTER Yield Index 2 year 3 year

WOODSTOCK Yield Index 2 year 3 year

Plant Height (cm)

Lodging 1=standing 5=flat

92 86 95 101 99 96 104 95 91 96 107 101 107 104 102 95 106 98 102 105 96 101 106 110 103 97 113 103 101 113 105

93 85 95 98 96 97 104 93 94 96 105 100 102 104 101 91 105 101 100 107 97 100 106 105 101 97 112 102 102 111 99

94 84 94 96 97 96 --97 97 103 100 -104 103 94 105 100 101 107 98 98 106 102 100 96 111 105 101 110 --

88 87 100 93 97 101 105 94 93 97 106 103 108 109 103 95 108 98 96 103 102 97 104 111 96 95 108 106 95 105 98

89 87 91 103 95 97 104 92 91 91 102 101 104 104 96 89 104 104 101 108 100 104 107 105 104 99 109 99 107 115 97

94 88 91 99 97 94 --97 96 99 103 -103 101 91 105 106 103 107 101 98 105 99 102 100 105 103 103 112 --

99 87 94 93 100 94 104 88 96 95 103 100 101 104 105 90 102 100 106 111 91 100 106 98 102 95 116 101 104 108 106

99 84 93 89 101 98 --101 97 105 99 -110 106 92 100 96 106 108 93 100 112 98 99 90 111 105 103 104 --

94 81 95 103 91 97 100 97 96 100 107 94 96 98 99 93 108 102 97 106 96 99 105 108 101 100 117 104 103 117 96

93 79 94 102 93 93 --96 99 103 96 -96 101 97 108 100 98 111 97 97 103 104 101 100 117 107 99 116 --

78 87 82 77 79 77 74 86 84 81 92 78 88 84 77 83 87 86 94 86 82 86 84 79 81 83 90 82 90 87 85

1.3 1.6 1.1 1.8 1.2 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.5 1.3 1.2 1.8 1.4 1.2 1.4 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.7 1.9 1.5 1.7 1.6

79 96 98 101 92 106 4.24 62.9

------4.30 63.8

------4.34 64.3

------4.29 63.6

------4.23 62.7

------4.34 64.3

------4.69 69.6

------4.64 68.8

------3.99 59.2

------4.07 60.4

-------

-------

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TABLE 5.1 AGRONOMIC DATA AT EARLY MATURITY GROUP 2 (2900-3300 HU) AREAS , RR TEST

Variety

PRO 2935R2C 29-11RY Valiant RR RR2 Gold HS 18RYS13 HS 18RY09 30-11RY 29-60RY PRO 3025R2C HS 19RYS14 5201RR2Y CF40GR Aspen RR 30-61RY HS 22RYS03 PS 2082 NR2 S20-Z9 92Y12 PS 2393 NR2 CF41GR 31-10RY CF52GR 92Y22 RR2 Impact 92Y32 31-11RY 92Y30 92Y55 92Y53 Dart RR Charger RR PRO 3215R2C RR2 Gravity 31-60RY HS 24RYS01 S25-W4 HS 26RYS16 Thesan R2 5A255RR2 32-11RY R2C 2861 R2C 2351 Average yield (T/ha) (bu/ac)

Days to Mature

111 111 111 114 115 115 116 116 117 118 118 118 118 119 119 119 119 120 121 121 121 121 122 122 122 123 123 123 124 124 124 125 125 126 126 127 127 128 128 128 132 DTM (1yr) 127

CLAY AVG Yield Index 1 year 2 year

INWOOD Yield Index 2 year 3 year

PALMYRA Yield Index 2 year 3 year

LOAM AVG Yield Index 1 year 2 year

RIDGETOWN Yield Index 2 year 3 year

TALBOTVILLE Yield Index 2 year 3 year

Plant Height (cm)

Lodging 1=standing 5=flat

95 94 77 99 103 95 94 92 104 104 97 88 96 94 104 105 94 97 109 101 98 108 108 105 94 103 100 104 112 107 99 96 97 99 101 100 104 108 109 101 100

95 94 83 97 101 94 96 91 106 106 98 92 95 97 104 105 96 94 106 102 97 106 105 105 95 102 102 105 108 109 99 101 97 100 101 103 103 106 105 101 99

95 97 83 105 100 101 96 100 105 105 95 85 94 100 110 103 95 101 108 99 101 107 109 105 95 103 96 99 106 110 97 107 93 101 100 101 101 98 100 102 92

95 -86 103 100 102 99 100 104 100 99 92 --108 102 95 97 -98 104 ----103 95 -101 107 98 104 -100 103 101 103 -----

95 92 82 90 103 89 96 85 107 108 100 96 96 95 100 107 97 90 105 104 93 105 102 105 95 101 105 110 110 108 101 97 99 99 102 104 104 111 108 101 105

91 -87 97 101 93 97 90 107 107 101 96 --100 106 96 91 -103 98 ----103 106 -109 108 100 99 -103 100 105 106 -----

89 86 85 101 97 101 94 102 102 100 94 99 99 103 103 100 101 105 104 102 101 104 104 107 104 103 99 107 102 103 104 99 104 97 98 99 104 106 101 92 96

92 89 89 100 98 101 96 101 104 103 95 100 100 103 102 102 101 103 103 101 101 103 102 108 98 104 98 103 101 101 103 102 101 98 100 99 101 105 100 94 97

97 92 89 103 98 103 99 102 106 103 95 100 101 108 102 103 103 106 106 98 104 105 102 108 97 102 94 100 100 99 102 99 100 95 98 98 99 105 98 91 92

96 -89 100 99 101 101 103 106 101 96 101 --102 101 101 104 -100 103 ----102 93 -102 101 101 99 -96 100 100 102 -----

86 86 89 96 98 98 93 100 101 102 95 99 99 98 103 101 98 100 100 104 98 101 101 108 100 105 103 105 102 103 104 105 101 102 103 101 103 105 102 97 102

87 -91 97 101 98 95 103 102 101 97 100 --106 104 95 100 -103 98 ----104 102 -105 103 104 103 -99 101 100 100 -----

85 79 85 87 87 84 90 88 87 88 94 87 89 91 86 94 93 88 95 92 91 93 87 93 91 94 92 93 91 91 93 88 91 94 98 93 99 96 95 91 99

1.5 1.0 1.2 1.6 1.2 1.3 1.5 1.3 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.5 1.7 1.6 1.2 1.8 1.7 1.4 1.7 1.6 1.8 1.7 1.1 1.6 1.3 1.4 1.1 1.5 1.4 1.4 1.7 1.6 1.7 1.9 2.0 1.8 1.9 1.7 1.7 1.8 1.8

106 4.07 60.4

-3.89 57.6

-3.30 49.0

-3.50 51.9

-4.47 66.3

-4.26 63.2

99 4.91 72.9

-5.03 74.7

-5.41 80.3

-5.87 87.0

-4.65 69.0

-4.59 68.0

--

--

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TABLE 5.2 AGRONOMIC DATA AT EARLY MATURITY GROUP 2 (2900-3300 HU) AREAS , CONV/FOOD TEST

Variety

HDC Goshen F DH4202 F S18-R6 F HDC 1600T F DH410SCN F DH715L F Thames F HDC Blake F OAC Marvel F OAC Calypso F S20-G7 F OAC Kent F Mersea F OAC Heritage F S21-C3 F HS 25S89 X790P F SG 2311 S23-T5 F 92M10 OAC Thamesville F PS 2295 LL DF 155 F Average yield (T/ha) (bu/ac)

Days to Mature

112 112 113 113 114 116 116 117 117 118 118 118 119 119 119 119 119 119 120 120 122 123 126

CLAY AVG Yield Index 1 year 2 year

106 100 105 96 103 97 113 101 99 98 102 96 98 96 106 95 87 100 99 113 101 90 99 4.01 59.5

102 101 106 92 100 97 109 96 103 99 96 95 101 92 110 101 82 101 108 108 101 100 100 3.78 56.0

INWOOD Yield Index 2 year 3 year

98 108 101 101 102 96 104 97 94 101 102 99 106 94 101 92 90 105 98 108 106 98 99 3.42 50.8

97 107 97 98 100 98 105 100 96 -100 99 105 95 -92 91 103 100 106 107 101 104 3.40 50.5

PALMYRA Yield Index 2 year 3 year

105 95 110 85 99 97 113 95 110 97 90 92 97 90 118 109 76 98 115 109 96 102 100 4.13 61.3

103 101 109 91 98 99 110 99 110 -94 95 98 95 -105 79 100 109 105 102 99 100 4.13 61.2

Continued from page 17 Yellow hilum soybeans are usually the only type accepted for the export market. In certain years discolouration of the hilum of IY varieties can occur and as a result the soybeans may not be acceptable for export markets. Seeds per Kilogram This is an estimate of the relative number of seeds of a particular variety in a kilogram of seed based on a 1-2 years of data from all locations where a variety was tested. Since seed size can vary from year to year and from seed lot to seed lot these figures should be used as a rough guide only. Actual seed size reported on each seed lot should be used to calculate seeding rate. Phytophthora Root Rot % Plant Loss Based on three year average in a field heavily infested with Phytophthora. Not all races of Phytophthora root rot are found at these sites. The relative ranking of varieties for plant loss may differ in fields that have other races present. Disease Testing Information Phytophthora root rot testing is carried out on clay soils infested with common races of Phytophthora at Woodslee. White Mold variety ratings will be listed on the

LOAM AVG Yield Index 1 year 2 year

97 96 99 100 97 97 96 101 96 101 106 96 106 89 113 102 84 100 118 109 100 89 107 4.62 68.5

95 99 100 102 95 99 96 98 97 105 101 97 105 97 113 100 81 102 112 105 101 95 106 4.78 70.9

RIDGETOWN Yield Index 2 year 3 year

95 102 101 103 95 100 98 97 98 107 101 97 106 96 114 100 78 101 115 101 98 93 103 5.18 76.8

96 102 103 102 96 100 100 98 98 -100 98 106 97 -103 81 104 112 102 99 99 106 5.57 82.7

TALBOTVILLE Yield Index 2 year 3 year

94 94 100 101 96 99 93 99 95 102 102 98 104 98 112 100 84 103 109 109 104 97 109 4.38 65.0

95 101 103 104 96 101 97 98 95 -98 97 107 93 -102 80 103 111 107 103 100 108 4.39 65.1

Plant Height (cm)

94 84 92 78 90 75 89 94 96 95 95 92 91 101 94 89 89 94 90 97 94 92 92

Lodging 1=standing 5=flat

1.5 1.6 1.1 1.3 1.7 1.2 1.6 1.6 1.7 1.6 1.4 1.7 1.5 1.9 1.5 1.4 1.9 1.5 1.3 1.5 1.4 1.8 1.7

web at www.Gosoy.ca as they become available. SCN tests are done in collaboration with variety sponsors and the SCN Resistant Variety Development project. For further information, contact soyinfo@oopscc.org. Protein & Oil Index Protein Index (%) and Oil (%) are found on the web at www.Gosoy.ca. Interpretation of Results (Tables 2 to 6) Days from Planting to Maturity Maturity is affected by planting date and the area where a variety is being grown. Varieties are rated as being mature when 95% of the pods on the plants are ripe. Normally, 3-10 additional drying days are needed before the crop is dry enough for combining. A 2-year average is shown. Yield Index Varieties can only be compared within each test area. Yield index of a variety indicates its performance as a percentage of the average yield of all varieties grown in a test area. Small index differences may not be meaningful. In Tables 2-4, the yield index for each location and for the average of all locations is based on 2-3 years of testing. Continued on page 20

Justin Dorland Brighton, Ontario

74.35 bu/ac Congratulations Justin Dorland! Winner of Zone 1 in the 2012 GFO Soybean Yield Challenge. Justin’s soybean of choice is Maizex RR2 Titanium which proved to be the highest yielding in the Non-IP Division CHU 2750-3000.

Call 1-877-682-1720 or visit maizex.com MAIZEX® is a registered trademark of Maizex Seeds Inc.


AgriNews January pg 20_Layout 1 13-01-10 3:02 PM Page 1

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Free internet farm classifieds at www.agrinews.ca

TABLE 7. RESISTANT VARIETY PERFORMANCE IN SCN INFESTED FIELDS Round-up Ready Varieties*

Variety PRO 2825R2C HS 14RYS02 PRO 2935R2C 91Y41 PS 1670 NR2 29-11RY PRO 2925R2C 91Y81 HS 18RYS13 S14-M4 30-11RY 30-61RY 5201RR2Y HS 19RYS14 PRO 3025R2C S20-Z9 PS 2393 NR2 HS 22RYS03 PS 2082 NR2 92Y22 92Y32 92Y53 92Y55 31-11RY 92Y30 PRO 3215R2C PS 2797 NR2 S25-W4 31-60RY HS 24RYS01 S30-E9 HS 26RYS16 32-11RY 32-61RY 92Y83 HS 28RYS28 Thesan R2 S31-L7 Hino R2 93Y22 93Y05

Average of 6 Tests (2010-2012) Days to Yield Index Maturity (%) --102 121 103 123 --104 120 --106 124 --107 137 --108 134 --111 137 111 142 111 134 112 130 --113 141 112 136 ----116 143 --116 148 116 134 118 136 119 137 119 139 120 144 120 152 --121 146 --121 142 ------122 150 --125 142 125 147

** Susceptible Yield Index is: Susceptible Yield (RR):

Average of 4 Tests (2011-2012) Days to Yield Index Maturity (%) 104 108 105 120 105 119 105 117 107 117 108 140 108 126 110 128 110 131 110 141 112 136 114 134 114 141 114 147 115 138 115 128 115 140 116 141 116 132 118 132 119 138 120 147 120 131 120 151 121 136 122 140 123 140 123 144 123 147 123 152 123 138 124 148 124 146 124 146 124 140 124 141 124 150 125 151 127 147 127 141 128 144

100% 2.77 T/ha 41.1 bu/ac

100% 2.67 T/ha 39.6 bu/ac

Average of 6 Tests (2010-2012) Days to Yield Index Maturity (%) Variety HDC Goshen 105 126 S18-R6 105 130 DH410SCN 106 108 OAC Marvel 111 131 Thames 112 140 S23-T5 111 140 PS 2295 LL 114 145 ** Susceptible Yield Index is: 100% Susceptible Yield (Conv): 2.75 T/ha 40.7 bu/ac

Average of 4 Tests (2011-2012) Days to Yield Index Maturity (%) 107 125 107 125 108 101 113 132 114 141 114 146 116 144 100% 2.62 T/ha 38.9 bu/ac

Source of Resistance PI88788 PI 88788 PI88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 Peking PI88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 Peking PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 Other PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 Peking PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 PI88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788

(DVWHUQ2QWDULR&URS &RQIHUHQFH Days to Maturity 105 105 106 111 112 111 114

Yield Index Days to Yield Index (%) Maturity (%) HDC Goshen 126 107 125 PI 88788 S18-R6 130 107 125 PI 88788 DH410SCN 108 108 101 PI 88788 OAC Marvel 131 113 132 PI 88788 Thames 140 114 141 PI 88788 S23-T5 140 114 146 PI 88788 PS 2295 LL 145 116 144 PI 88788 100% 100% 2.75 T/ha 2.62 T/ha 7KH(DVWHUQ2QWDULR&URS&RQIHUHQFHLVGHVLJQHGWRJLYH\RXWKHRSSRUWXQLW\ 40.7 bu/ac 38.9 bu/ac

:%*HRUJH&HQWUH.HPSWYLOOH&ROOHJH 8QLYHUVLW\RI*XHOSK 7KXUVGD\)HEUXDU\ DPWRSP

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* ** Susceptible Yield Index is based on three high yielding susceptible varieties. Test locations had moderate to high SCN infestations of 3,000 to 6,000 eggs/100g soil. F

;EUDFLQJLQ3XUOLQVIRUPRUHVWUHQJWK

Conventional Varieties Source of Resistance

PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788 PI 88788

2012 soybean trials Coninuued from page 19 In Table 5, the Clay and Loam Averages are based on 3 years of testing. Yield index averaged over locations and years will be a more reliable indicator of yield potential than performance from one single location or single year. Plant Height An indicator of the amount of plant growth, it is measured at maturity as the length of the stem from the base of the plant at soil level to its tip. A 2-year average is shown. Lodging A visual estimate at maturity of the standability of the crop. A value of 1 is equivalent to a crop standing completely upright, while a 5 represents a crop entirely flat. Within a test area, varieties with lower values are less prone to lodging. A 2-year

average is shown. Testing Methods In each trial, varieties were replicated in a suitable experimental design and received equal fertility, weed control and management. All trials were planted and harvested by machine. Tests were separated into conventional herbicide and glyphosate herbicide treated plots. Prior to harvest, plant height and lodging scores were obtained. The grain harvested from each plot was weighed and the yield of soybeans was calculated in tonnes/hectare at 13% moisture. Food Soybean Varieties (F) The Conventional and Food soybean variety trials were combined for the first time in 2006. All conventional and food varieties were grown in the same test sites in all three years for which data is presented.

0DGHLQ &DQDGD

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AgriNews January pg 21_Layout 1 13-01-10 3:10 PM Page 1

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The AgriNews January, 2013, Page 21

Soybean Variety Distributors Distributor

Address

AGRIS Co-operative Ltd.

835 Park Ave. W, Chatham, ON N7M 5J6

Telephone

519-380-2384 519-354-7058 www.agris.coop

Fax

Internet

Bramhill Seeds

5220 Hwy 23, RR #2 Palmerston, ON N0G 2P0

519-343-3630 519-343-2037

Country Farm Seeds Ltd.

P.O. Box 790, 18814 Communication Road, Blenheim, ON N0P 1A0

1-800-449-3990 519-676-9633 www.countryfarmseeds.com

DEKALB

120 Research Lane, Unit 101, Guelph, ON N1G 0B4

1-800-667-4944 519-823-9733 www.monsanto.ca/products/dekalb

Elite Seeds

19 235 Avenue St-Louis, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC J2T 5J4

450-799-2326 450-773-3381 www.eliteseeds.ca

Hensall District Co-op Inc

Box 219, 1 Davidson Drive, Hensall, ON N0M 1X0

519-262-3002 519-262-3412 www.hdc.on.ca

Huron Commodities Inc.

79 Wellington St., Clinton, ON N0M 1L0

519-482-8400 519-482-8383 www.huron.com

Hyland Seeds

P.O. Box 1090, 2 Hyland Dr., Blenheim ON N0P 1A0

519-676-8146 519-676-6800 www.hylandseeds.com

Land O'Lakes, Inc.

7 Willi St, Chepstow, ON N0G 1K0

519-889-0402

Maizex Seeds Inc.

4488 Mint Line, RR #2, Tilbury ON N0P 2L0

877-682-1720 519-682-2144 www.maizex.com

Mike Snobelen Farms Ltd.

Box 29, 323 Havelock St., Lucknow, ON NOG 2HO

1-800-582-5669 519-528-3542 www.snobelengroup.com

Mycogen Canada

P.O. Box 1060, St. Mary's, ON N4X 1B7

1-800-668-4939 519-349-2688 www.dowagro.com/ca

Pioneer Hi-Bred Ltd.

Box 730, 7398 Queen's Line, Chatham, ON N7M 5L1

1-800-265-9435 519-380-2014 www.Pioneer.com/Canada

PRIDE Seeds

P.O. Box 1088, Chatham ON N7M 5L6

1-800-265-5280 519-354-8155 www.prideseed.com

Email: csmith@landolakes.com

PRO Seeds

595570 County Road 59, Woodstock ON N4S 7W1

1-888-537-5157 519-533-0773 www.proseeds.ca

Prograin

145 Bas Rivière Nord, St-CÊsaire, QC J0L 1T0

1-800-817-3732 450-469-4547 www.semencesprograin.com

SeCan

400-300 Terry Fox Drive, Kanata, ON K2K 0E3

866-797-7874 613-592-9497 www.secan.com

Semican Inc.

1290 Route 116 Ouest, Princeville, QC G6L 4K7

819-364-2001 819-364-2500 www.semican.ca

Sevita International

11451 Cameron Road, Inkerman, ON K0E 1J0

613-989-5400 613-989-2200 www.sevita.ca

SG Ceresco, Inc.

166, chemin de la Grande-Ligne,, Saint-Urbain-Premier, QC J0S 1Y0

450-427-3831 450-427-2067 www.sgceresco.com

Southwest Seeds

R.R. # 1, 19686 Scane Rd., Ridgetown, ON N0P 2C0

519-674-0054 519-674-0388 Southwest Seeds

Synagri

5175 Boul. Laurier Est, St-Hyacinthe, QC

450-799-3226 450-799-3229 www.synagri.ca

Syngenta Canada, Inc. Woodrill Ltd.

15910 Medway Road, RR #1, Arva, ON N0M 1C0 7861 Hwy 7 East, RR # 2, Guelph, ON N1H 6H8

800-756-7333 888-717-7122 www.nkcanada.com 519-821-1018 519-821-5198 www.woodrill.com

Test Locations and Soil Types - 2012 Trials Relative Maturity Soil Type

Row Width Seeding Rate (cm) (plant/ac) Co-operator

Location

Table

Elora

2&3

0.6

silt loam

35

200,000

OAC

OAC, U of Guelph

Listowel

2&3

0.7

loam

35

200,000

Paul Dewar

ECORC, AAFC, Ottawa

Ottawa

2&3

0.6

clay loam

40

200,000

Research Centre, AAFC, Ottawa

Research Centre, AAFC, Ottawa

2, 3 & 4

1.0

clay loam

35

200,000

Kemptville Campus, U of Guelph

Kemptville Campus, U of Guelph

Woodstock

4

1.8

clay loam

35

200,000

Bob Hart

OAC, U of Guelph

Exeter

4

1.7

clay loam

38

200,000

Bill Essery

Ridgetown Campus, U of Guelph

St. Paul's

4

1.5

clay loam

35

200,000

Pat Murray

OAC, U of Guelph

Talbotville

5

2.3

clay loam

35

200,000

Tom Oegema

Ridgetown Campus, U of Guelph

Palmyra

5

2.7

clay

43

200,000

Chris Quinton

Ridgetown Campus, U of Guelph

Inwood

5

2.4

clay

43

200,000

Jeff Lassaline

Ridgetown Campus, U of Guelph

Ridgetown

5

2.8

clay loam

43

160,000

Ridgetown Campus, U of Guelph

Ridgetown Campus, U of Guelph

Chatham

6

2.9

clay loam

43

160,000

Wonnacott Farms Ltd.

Ridgetown Campus, U of Guelph

Merlin

6

3.1

clay

43

200,000

Grant Guy

Ridgetown Campus, U of Guelph

Woodslee Malden

6 6

3.3 3.5

clay clay loam

46 46

200,000 185,000

Research Centre, AAFC, Harrow Research Centre, AAFC, Harrow

Research Centre, AAFC, Harrow Research Centre, AAFC, Harrow

Winchester

Pure Bred or Grade Holsteins Top Quality Fresh Heifers and Springers

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Will Trade Fresh Heifers for Open Heifers or Cull Cows.â&#x20AC;?

MANGAN TEAM FARMS LIMITED 613-561-2521 Ed

Seeleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bay, ON 613-382-2911

613-561-2881 Tom

Trial Co-ordinator

',%1&)67 )<'%:%8-2+ Â&#x2C6;)\GEZEXMSRÂ&#x2C6;0ERH'PIEVMRK Â&#x2C6;(VEMREKIÂ&#x2C6;&EGOLSI7IVZMGIW

'LIWXIVZMPPI32  'EPP&VEHJSVQSVIMRJSVQEXMSR

4-H Ontario gets new home

G

UELPH â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4-H Ontario announced on Dec. 19 that its headquarters will soon be relocating to Rockwood, Ontario from the current location in Guelph. The search for a new space to house 4-H Ontario began in the interest of providing fully accessible services, specifically in meeting requirements of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA). However, the opportunities resulting from the move extend even further. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This move presents an incredible opportunity for us, not only in terms of serving our volunteers, members, stakeholders and the public with dignity, but also, with the opportunity to create a permanent home, a hub for 4-H Ontario, and a showcase for our history,â&#x20AC;? said John den Haan, President of the Ontario 4-H Council, the elected governance body for 4-H Ontario. An exhaustive search of properties for lease and sale in Wellington County led 4-H Ontario to the village of Rockwood, a central location in the County, where property values were affordable. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Ontario 4-H Council is confident that purchasing property represents a strong investment for the organization,â&#x20AC;? states den Haan. 4-H Ontario took possession of a commerciallyzoned century home located at 111 Main Street, Rockwood, approximately 22kms from the current location in Guelph, in early December. A move-in date is still to be determined, but is forecast for late Winter or early Spring 2013. For over a decade, 4-H Ontario has been a tenant of EastGen at their facility on Highway 6 North, outside of Guelph. 4-H Ontario Executive Director Wraychel Horne says â&#x20AC;&#x153;the strong partnership and support of EastGen is to credit for much of the strengthening of 4H Ontario in the past 12 years.â&#x20AC;? 4-H Ontario will be celebrating its 100th anniversary in 2015, and Horne states â&#x20AC;&#x153;weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re very excited to have this property as a showcase for our storied history in time for that momentous occasion.â&#x20AC;?


AgriNews January pg 22_AgriNews February pg 22 13-01-10 3:11 PM Page 1

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Page 24 The AgriNews January, 2013

Over 2,000 stories archived at www.agrinews.ca

Speaker connects â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;dirty electricityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; to wind power By Nelson Zandbergen AgriNews Staff Writer OUTH MOUNTAIN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; DAIry fArMerS Are fAMIlIAr wITH THe NegATIve HeAlTH effeCTS Of wAywArD eleCTrICAl eNergy: STrAy vOlTAge CAN be THe bANe Of keepINg MIlk COwS AS prODUCTIve AND HeAlTHy AS pOSSIble. Armed with this understanding, a retired dairy farmer now working as a stray-voltage dairy consultant â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who once leased some of his own land to a wind-power developer several years ago â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is drawing attention to another kind of unwanted electrical interference he attributes to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;cheapâ&#x20AC;? DC-to-AC power inverters employed by wind- and solar-farm installations. David Colling maintains that developersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; reliance on such equipment to process their final output of alternating current (AC) feeds a problematic high frequency into the power grid and the internal wiring of nearby homes and buildings. This â&#x20AC;&#x153;dirty electricityâ&#x20AC;? can sicken people and disturb animals, he suggested in a late-November address to local wind-power opponents gathered at South Mountainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agricultural hall. Instead of the smoothsided â&#x20AC;&#x153;sine waveâ&#x20AC;? expected of a clean AC source, the contaminated current shows a jaggedness when measured on an oscilloscope, according to Colling, who says he turned against the wind industry after a developer in his Ripley, Ontario, area, briefly hired him to measure the phenomenon, then refused to acknowledge a problem when he became an advocate for five affected families. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is imperative that both wind turbines and solar installations generate as close to a pure 60Hz sine wave as possible to minimize adverse effects of transient harmonics to both equipment and human health,â&#x20AC;? said the guest speaker, citing research by an associate professor of Environmental & Resource Studies at Trent University, Dr. Magna Havas. Carried into buildings through the neutral wire, the unwanted frequency then radiates from the wiring inside the structure, according to Colling. He relayed anecdotes about several families in his area

youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re dealing with are just PR people....â&#x20AC;? According to Colling, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only one type of expensive inverter, made by Siemens, that ought to be used to create the AC outputted by wind and solar farms. But project developers choose less costly options, he said.

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One family in his area spent the summer sleeping in a fifth-wheel trailer beside their house because they couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t rest inside the building. Colling helped them install a system to filter the incoming hydro supply, but they still â&#x20AC;&#x153;have to kill the power at the house at night. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the only way

they can sleep.â&#x20AC;? The family sold the place in September to an Amish buyer who took down the incoming hydro lines entirely. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got another family up there, the only way they can sleep at night is to cut the power into the bedroom,â&#x20AC;? he said. He argued that dairy cat-

tle receive better health care on this issue than do humans, as health authorities discount peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s complaints as unproven by default. He claimed to have spoken with insiders at Ontario Hydro, and the Ministry of the Environment, and even Contiinued on page 25

David Colling whose health symptoms â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including migraines and ear aches â&#x20AC;&#x201D; suddenly disappeared after the wind company disconnected them from the grid and supplied power with on-site generators. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They tried to prove me wrong, and it backfired.â&#x20AC;? The company finally bought out the homeowners, he said, assuring the audience that no other Ontario wind developer would ever follow that precedent again. The Township of North Dundas has seen an antiwind movement spring up in response to proposed turbine projects that have yet to be built. The local debate has tended to revolve around the usual alleged health effects of low-frequency noise and light flicker, as well as concerns about esthetics and impact on property values. Collingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s late-November visitâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; spearheaded by wind-power opponents led by Chestervilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Theresa Bergeron â&#x20AC;&#x201D; was the first local event to highlight the dirty-electricity angle from a health perspective. He told the group about finding a direct link between the spinning of turbine blades and the frequency level on the wiring of several homes in his area where individuals reported feeling sick because of nearby windmills. The telltale jagged â&#x20AC;&#x153;inverter waveformâ&#x20AC;? appeared whenever the turbines were running, he said, showing a PowerPoint slide. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very clear.â&#x20AC;? He used a provincial website to confirm when local turbines were putting power into the grid. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It directly correlates. So when they tell you, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Oh we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cause any stray voltage,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re lying,â&#x20AC;? he said of project proponents. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You must understand the people

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AgriNews January pg 25_AgriNews February pg 25 13-01-11 12:22 PM Page 1

Searchable archive at www.agrinews.ca Continued from page 24 the wind industry itself, who applaud the message he has delivered in over 30 talks across the province. Dirty electricity has also captured the attention of the Ontario Federation of Agriculture, which held a well-attended seminar on that subject and stray voltage last month in Listowel. Advice to farmers Colling also acknowledged that yearly per-turbine lease payments have now risen into the $50,000 range for participating landowners. But he contrasted that with the $500,000 he said the turbine owners annually net on their 20-year power contracts. And he warned farmers of the pitfalls of signing on the dotted line, starting with the construction process. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I can tell you horror stories about how they cut drainage tiles and never hooked them up again. Because often, in some of the areas I come from, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s absentee ownership. And no one cares, right? And the subcontractorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in there just to bury [power] lines,â&#x20AC;? said

Colling, who has since sold his land that was involved in a turbine land lease. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So I tell people â&#x20AC;Ś any construction they do on that farm, make sure somebodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s standing with them there all the time. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care if you have to hire somebody because if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t, and you try to fix that tile after, good luck.â&#x20AC;? His 2004 land lease was only four pages long, he said, adding that newer documents run into the dozens of pages. The leases now explicitly state that the landowner knows the potential for nuisance from turbines hosted on their property and waives their right to complain about it, he added. A member of the audience piped up to argue this could expose farmers to lawsuits, and Colling â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a lawyer â&#x20AC;&#x201D; replied he wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be surprised if that became more common. Anyone looking at leasing land to a renewable energy developer should hire a specialized corporate lawyer to go over the agreement, he cautioned.

The AgriNews January, 2013 Page 25

Robinson proceedings stayed Lois Ann Baker Record Staff ORNWALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; WHILE A JUSTICE OF THE ONTARIO COURTS SIDED WITH THEM AND STAYED THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST DAVID AND MARILYN ROBINSON, THE NIGHTMARE IS STILL NOT OVER FOR THE COUPLE. THE ROBINSONS HAD BEEN CHARGED WITH CRUELTY TO ANIMALS AFTER O.S.P.C.A. OFFICIALS QUESTIONED THE CONDITIONS OF THEIR CATTLE. Court proceedings do take time, however, lawyer Kurtis Andrews claimed that due to motions filed by the Crown and a delay in setting a court date, the charges should be stayed due to an abuse of process from the prosecution. In her ruling, Justice of the Peace Claire Winchester said she felt the Robinsonsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; case had gone on far longer than it should have as it was not a complex case. Winchester said under the Charter of Rights, the right to a speedy trial is

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there to minimize the stigma and stress attached to defendants as they await trial. When deciding on her ruling, she said it was a judicial determination, not a mathematical one based on number of days alone. However, since 19 months had already passed and it would be over 25 months before their scheduled court date, she did take the numbers into consideration as well. Winchester said she felt there could have been an earlier court date set, but the Crown brought forward a motion to have Andrews removed as counsel. The motion had been previously denied by Justice Louise Rozon, and Winchester felt the motion brought irreparable harm to the attorney-client relationship as it put Andrews under suspicion he had done something wrong, and was an unnecessary delay in the proceedings. Winchester found the Robinsons suffered prejudice due to the crownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s delays and said they not only have been hurt financially, but the proceedings had taken a toll on them. She said both exhibited signs of stress, and the longer the proceedings went on, the greater the stress. The

Robinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reputation as farmers has also been questioned and this added to the stress. The Abuse of Process motion by the defence is based on two principles, societal interest and individual interest, and Winchester said the crown exaggerated by suggesting the motion should be denied because of societal interest. She said there was no direct societal interest to be preserved. In other words, the Robinsons were not charged with an offence that would put society in harmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s way. Winchester also said the Robinsons suffered more in the past 19 months than what the courts could do to them. She added that although the proceedings have been stayed, they have not been exonerated and questions will remain as to whether they were in fact guilty of cruelty to animals. David Robinson was certain the Justice would rule the way she did, but was actually hoping for the motion to be denied as he wanted his day in court to prove his innocence and to have the O.S.P.C.A. answer to what he considered â&#x20AC;&#x153;bullying.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are going to go after them in civil court,â&#x20AC;? he said.

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AgriNews January pg 26_AgriNews February pg 26 13-01-10 4:00 PM Page 1

Page 26 The AgriNews January, 2013

Free internet farm classifieds at www.agrinews.ca

OMAFRA Connects Continued from page 16 application forms and program contacts, please contact: Ministry of Economic Development and Innovation Regional Economic Development and Co-ordination Branch Email: eodf@ontario.ca / Toll Free (866)909.9951 Mail: 366 King Street East, Suite 340 Kingston, Ontario K7K 6Y3

Farm Management Canada â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Excellence Award For Agricultural Students

T

he Farm Management Canada (FMC) Excellence Award for Agricultural Students is a scholarship competition that is designed to help students develop their communication skills by having the opportunity to voice their opinion on a subject related

to farm business management. Submissions are collected from students across Canada and three winners are awarded a $1,000 cash prize to help further their education in agriculture. The award is a great way of connecting with the next generation of farm managers while challenging them to reflect on the important issues facing the industry. Students are asked to submit videos, responding to the following question: Why is innovation an important aspect of a farmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s success? How can farm business management be innovative? Please provide examples. Farm Management Canada must receive the completed online application form no later than February 28th, 2013. The names of the winners will be announced in March 2013. Visit www.fmcgac.com

New Young Farm Loans For Canada

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oung and beginning farmers will find it easier to start and grow their farm businesses with the help of a new $500 million loan program, introduced by the federal government and FCC yesterday. This new loan offers qualified producers who are under 40 years of age loans of up to $500,000 to purchase or improve farmland and buildings. Producers between the ages of 18 and 39 make up approximately 16% of Canadian producers, according to the 2006 Census. The FCC Young Farmer Loan includes features and options that address this demographic, and support their long-term success. These include: - variable rates at prime plus 0.5% and special fixed rates - no loan processing fees The Young Farmer Loan enhances FCC's suite of existing products and services that support young producers, such as the FCC Transition Loan, FCC Business Planning Award, FCC Learning events and

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publications, FCC Go Ag! events, and FCC Management Software for both accounting and field management. For more information on the FCC Young Farmer Loan, visit www.fcc.ca/youngfarmerloan

Risk Management - Agricorp

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nterim payment applications available for AgriStability AgriStability participants who are experiencing financial pressure can ask Agricorp to place their 2011 or 2012 final payment application in priority sequence. Producers who have completed at least six months of their 2012 or 2013 fiscal year can also apply for an interim payment, which will provide a portion of their estimated final AgriStability benefit before the end of the tax year. To apply for an interim payment, download an application from

agricorp.com or contact Agricorp at 1 888 2474999. SDRM: Edible Horticulture plan now available for 2012 Funds are now available for eligible Ontario producers to sign up for the SDRM: Edible Horticulture plan for 2012. SDRM funds can help producers offset losses and manage risks associated with running a farm business. To receive funding, eligible producers simply fill out the deposit request included in packages mailed earlier this month. Producers should send their deposit to Agricorp by February 1, 2013. To withdraw funds this year, both deposit and withdrawal requests should be received by October 31, 2012. The self-directed risk management plan for edible horticulture is part of Ontarioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Risk Management Program to help producers manage risks beyond their control. To be eligible, producers must have a minimum of $5,000 in allowable net sales, grow an eligible commodity, participate in AgriStability, and

provide a valid premises ID. Rainfall data posted for forage rainfall plan Rainfall data for the forage rainfall plan is now available on agricorp.com. Producers who are enrolled in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;insufficient rainfallâ&#x20AC;? option of the forage rainfall plan may be eligible for a claim if the measured rainfall at their chosen rainfall station is less than 80 per cent of the long-term average for their area. The forage rainfall plan is based on the concept that rainfall influences production. The plan uses rainfall as an indicator of quantity and quality of forage. Agricorp contracts a professional weather service to provide rainfall data from a network of 350 rainfall collection stations across Ontario. The rainfall stations have built-in backup systems to provide accurate information. Rainfall samples are collected twice a month then compared to Environment Canada records and surrounding stations to verify accuracy â&#x20AC;˘ Continued on Page 27

ECO Farm Day PRESENTED BY:

Saturday, February 23, 2013 9 A.M. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Keynote Presentation & 12 Workshops 6 P.M. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Organic Gala Dinner

Sunday, February 24, 2013 8 A.M. to 1:30 P.M. Two Workshops on Farm Business Management with Breakfast & Lunch

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Water Management in Organic Agricultureâ&#x20AC;? Conference with 12 Workshops & Trade Show with over 30 Exhibitors Â&#x2DC;#4-'6 #4&'0+0) Â&#x2DC; +'.&4125 Â&#x2DC;+8'561%Â&#x2DC; '0'4#. 06'4'56

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: Maude Barlow Council of Canadians Ralph C. Martin B.A., M.Sc. and Ph.D. Richard Wiswall Farmer & Author of The Organic Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Business Handbook

1%#6+10U*'#/#&# 00XLNI411-&#.'8'TX1409#..X E*174(41/66#9#XETI*1745(41/1064'#.XF*1745(41/+0)5610

Register on-line at www.ecofarmday.ca


AgriNews January pg 27_AgriNews February pg 27 13-01-10 4:00 PM Page 1

Agri-business directory at www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews January, 2013 Page 27

OMAFRA Connects Continued from page 26 before the data is sent to Agricorp. At the end of the rainfall collection period, customers receive a report that shows the rainfall collected at their chosen rainfall station. Payments are mailed automatically to producers who qualify for a claim.

Hay & Straw Buy / Sell Services

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reminder of the Ontario Forage Council’s “Ontario Hay Listings” service: www.ontariohaylistings.ca. This is a free listings service for people looking to buy or sell hay and straw. For more information or comments or questions, call 1.877.892.8663 or email info@ontariohaylistings.ca.

Recources

durable enough to use in and around your farm. The posters provide visual instructions for best practices on a variety of topics, including: • Hand Washing • Proper use of hand sanitizers • Food Handling • Proper toilet use • Food storage and packaging • Transportation • Proper use of animal health products Food safety practices contribute to competitive, productive and sustainable agri-food business. For more information and to see our posters, visit the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture Food and Rural Affairs website at www.ontario.ca/goodagpractices or call us to order your posters, 1-877-4241300.

Workshops

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n January 25, OMAFRA is offering a full-day workshop on GMP: PERSONNEL, HANDLING, RECEIVING & SHIPPING. This interactive session focuses on the significant impact people can make on minimizing food safety contamination and identifies ways to strength-

en the role staff play in daily operations. Topics covered include: personal hygiene, storage and handling of utensils, injuries and illness, access and traffic patterns, handling, storage, control of suspect items, allergen and chemical control, waste management, receiving and shipping procedures and inspections.

When: January 25 from 9:00 am – 4:00 pm Where: 93 Stone Road West in Guelph, ON Cost: $45 + HST Who Should Attend: HACCP Coordinators, QA or QC staff, Owners and Food Handlers interested in learning about food safety best practices for processing facilities.

Other Upcoming Workshops: • GMP: Sanitation & Pest Control – February 19 in Brampton, ON • Food Safety Culture – February 26 in Brampton, ON • Developing Your HACCP Plan – March in London, ON • Continued on Page 28

On Farm Food Safety Food Snippets Safety: Your Receiving Inputs Business hen inputs arrive on the farm, it is Advantage always a good

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food safety practice to check that items are not damaged or showing signs of tampering, and that the received items match your order. Mistakes can happen during shipping and using the wrong product or a damaged product can lead to a food safety risk. After you have confirmed your order, sign and date the invoices, bill of lading or packing slips and keep them on file for future reference or a potential food safety audit. Food safety practices contribute to competitive, productive and sustainable agri-food business. For more information, visit the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture Food and Rural Affairs website at www.ontario.ca/goodagpractices or call us at 1877-424-1300.

Instructional Posters for OnFarm Food Safety Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs’ (OMAFRA) has developed a series of Good Agriculture Practices posters that are available free of charge to producers. The posters are 8 ½ x 11" in size and available in English/Spanish or French/Spanish versions. They are rip and weather resistant making them

Storage of Potentially Hazardous Products

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learly label and store potentially hazardous products according to the instructions on the label. This is especially important if you have diluted or mixed pest control or cleaning products not in the original container. Products that do not have legible labels may be used accidentally or incorrectly. This could cause damage to equipment or leave residues on food and/or food contact surfaces. Remember to keep hazardous products in a designated storage location separate from non-hazardous products to reduce food safety risks. Food safety practices contribute to competitive, productive and sustainable agri-food business. For more information, visit the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture Food and Rural Affairs website at www.ontario.ca/goodagpractices or call us at 1877-424-1300

OMAFRA’s 2013 Good Manufacturing Practices

Canada-Ontario Environmental Farm Plan (EFP)

Workshops Now Available Producers are invited to attend free EFP (Third Edition) Workshops to learn more about best management practices, develop an action plan for their farm and get details on cost share programs that may be available. County

Town

Day 1

Day 2

Contact

Tues., Jan. 15 - 10am to 3pm

Tues., Jan. 22 - 10am to 3pm

Micheline Bégin - 613-679-8867 prescott@ontariosoilcrop.org

Tues., Feb. 5 - 10am to 3pm

Tues., Feb. 12 - 10am to 3pm

Barbara-Ann Glaude - 613-984-2398 stormont@ontariosoilcrop.org

Prescott, Russell

TBD

Stormont

TBD

Ottawa/Carleton, Dundas Grenville

Chesterville/Winchester

Tues., Jan. 22 - 10am to 3pm

Tues., Jan. 29 - 10am to 3pm

Kemptville

Thurs., Feb. 21 - 10am to 3pm

Thurs., Feb. 28 - 10am to 3pm

Richmond/North Gower

Wed., Mar. 20 - 10am to 3pm

Wed., Mar. 27 - 10am to 3pm

Leeds, Frontenac

Elginburg

Tues., Jan. 15 - 10am to 3pm

Tues., Jan. 22 - 10am to 3pm

Rita Vogel - 613-275-1753 rita.vogel@ontariosoilcrop.org

Lanark

TBD

Fri., Jan. 18 - 10am to 3pm

Fri., Jan. 25 - 10am to 3pm

Shirley Munro - 613-267-6362 lanark@ontariosoilcrop.org

Kawartha Lakes, Durham

Peterborough Prince Edward

Lindsay

Tues., Jan. 15 - 10am to 3pm

Tues., Jan. 22 - 10am to 3pm

Lindsay

Thurs., Jan. 17 - 10am to 3pm

Thurs., Jan. 24 - 10am to 3pm

Sunderland

Thurs., Feb. 7 - 10am to 3pm

Thurs., Feb. 14 - 10am to 3pm

Sunderland

Fri., Feb. 8 - 10am to 3pm

Fri., Feb. 15 - 10am to 3pm

Nestleton

Mon., Mar. 18 - 10am to 3pm

Mon., March 25 - 10am to 3pm

Nestleton

Tues., Mar. 19 - 10am to 3pm

Tues., March 26 - 10am to 3pm

Douro

Tues., Feb. 19 - 10am to 3pm

Tues., Feb. 26 - 10am to 3pm

Douro

Thurs., Mar. 7 - 10am to 3pm

Thurs., Mar. 14 - 10am to 3pm

Picton

Wed., Feb. 13 - 10am to 3pm

Wed., Feb. 27 - 10am to 3pm

Arlene Ross - 613-821-3900 arlene.ross@ontariosoilcrop.org

Robin Brown - 705-374-4975 robin.brown@ontariosoilcrop.org

Pat Learmonth - 705-295-1590 peterborough@ontariosoilcrop.org Rick Terpstra - 613-476-8250 rick.terpstra@ontariosoilcrop.org

Growing Forward, a federal-provincial-territorial initiative.


AgriNews January pg 28_AgriNews February pg 28 13-01-10 3:49 PM Page 1

Page 28 The AgriNews January, 2013

Searchable archive at www.agrinews.ca

OMAFRA Connects Continued from page 27 â&#x20AC;˘ GMP: Recall & Water â&#x20AC;&#x201C; March 27 in Mississauga, ON To register or call: 1877-424-1300.

Grants Ontario

G

rants Ontario, launched in January 2012, is an online tool that allows access to grant information in the Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration and the Ministry of Tourism Culture and Sport. Individuals can locate and submit grant applications, check their application status and manage reports. http://www.citizenship.gov. on.ca/english/grantsandfunding/GO.shtml

WEB PORTAL HELPS BUSINESSES SAVE TIME Ontario is making it faster and easier for new and small businesses to get the services and information they need to start, operate and grow. To date, more than 10,000 businesses have registered for the Province's ONe-Source for Business service. The online portal provides quick and easy access to over 5,000 services and information from all levels of government, allowing small business owners to focus on creating jobs and competing in the global economy. ONe-Source for Business helps business owners: â&#x20AC;˘ find information about funding and grant programs â&#x20AC;˘ create a virtual briefcase to securely access saved information at later date â&#x20AC;˘ complete and submit forms online, eliminating the need to mail them in â&#x20AC;˘ find customized information about the permits and licences they need. Making it easier for businesses to succeed with faster, more streamlined services is part of the McGuinty government's plan to create a vibrant economy. A strong economy creates jobs for Ontarians and protects the services that matter most to Ontarians - health and education.

Factsheets and

Publications

The following OMAFRA Publications and Factsheets are now available from www.serviceontario.ca/publications: Guide de protection des lĂŠgumes de serre 20122013, Publication 835F; cost is $15.00; please recycle all former editions. Guide de la floriculture en serre, Publication 370F (on CD, no printed book); cost is $10.00 (vs. $20.00 for the former book); please recycle all former editions. Note: An accessible (tagged PDF) will also be available on the OMAFRA website. Please contact Laurie Butter if you have any questions. Best Management Practices for Phosphorus â&#x20AC;&#x201C; new colour brochure (produced in partnership with our federal counterpart and the OFA); any questions, please contact Arlene Robertson. 12-053: Soil Erosion â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Causes and Effects, Agdex 572/751; replaces 87-040, which should be recycled. 12-054: Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ĂŠrosion du sol â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Causes et effets, Agdex 572/751; replaces 89-064, which should be recycled. 12-047: Quality Concrete on the Farm, Agdex 715; replaces 06023, which should be recycled. 12-049: Programs and Services for Ontario Farmers, Agdex 871; replaces 11-041, which should be recycled. For the first time, the following publication has been produced on CD (no printed book) and was released at the greenhouse conference this week; copies will be shipped to ServiceOntario on Oct. 9 and should be available from www.serviceontario.ca/publications by Oct. 12: Guide to Greenhouse Floriculture Production, Publication 370; cost for CD is $10.00 (vs. $20.00 for the former book); please recycle all former editions. SELLING FOOD TO ONTARIO - THROUGH RESTAURANTS, INSTITUTIONS, GROCERY RETAILERS, PROCESSORS AND MORE Farmers and commercial buyers share buyer expectations and tips for establishing and maintain successful buyer/seller relationships. The Selling Food To Ontario video series is ideal for farmers and small

scale processors who wish to sell through these various market channels. Videos are available on the OMAFRA website http://www.omafra.gov.on.c a/english/busdev/facts/sellingfood.htm .

Foodland Ontario

F

oodland Ontario offers a wide assortment of Point of Sale materials to suit your promotional and merchandising needs; is no cost associated with these items. If you direct market Ontario food products, visit http://www.foodland.gov.on .ca/english/industry.html for more information on the Foodland Ontario branded products.

Have a Drainage Question? We can help. Visit our Drainage eReference Tool at: www.ontario.ca/drainage

NEW! Value Chain Development Business Iinformation Bundle Interested in value chains? Want to know more? OMAFRAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest resource to help you and your business can be found here: www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/food/valuechains.html â&#x20AC;˘ Continued on Page 29

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DROP DECK TRAILER SERVICE Ontario & Quebec

For more information call: Elevator situated at 12650 Ormond Rd., Winchester (Marionville) Â&#x2021;(OHYDWRUÂ&#x2021;+RPHÂ&#x2021;$QGUH


AgriNews January pg 29_AgriNews February pg 29 13-01-10 4:14 PM Page 1

Over 2,000 stories archived at www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews January, 2013 Page 29

OMAFRA Connects Continued from page 28 BOOK NOW For a complete listing of OMAFRA products, please see our online catalogue at http://www.omafra.gov.o n.ca/english/products/index. html To order OMAFRA publications and factsheets: â&#x20AC;˘ Visit any OMAFRA Resource Centre / Northern Ontario Regional Office or Service Ontario location â&#x20AC;˘ Visit the Service Ontario website at: www.serviceontario.ca/publications or call 1-800-6689938 â&#x20AC;˘ Visit the OMAFRA website at: www.ontario.ca/omafra or contact the Agricultural Information

Contact Centre by calling: 1-877-424-1300

Phone Lines and Websites â&#x20AC;˘ OMAFRA Website: www.ontario.ca/omafra, Agricultural Information Contact Centre: 1-877424-1300 or e-mail ag.info.omafra@ontario. ca â&#x20AC;˘ Nutrient Management Line: 1-866-242-4460 or e-mail nman.omafra@ontario.ca â&#x20AC;˘ Growing Forward Information Line: 1-888479-3931 or e-mail growingforward@ontari o.ca â&#x20AC;˘ The Farm Line: 1-888451-2903 - A confiden-

tial telephone emotional support and referral service provided to farmers and farm families in Ontario

Events

January 29 - Savour Ottawa Networking Event, the Canadian Room, 2-5pm at the Fairmont Chateau Laurier. More information to follow at www.savourottawa.ca. January 31 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; February 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 32nd Annual Guelph Organic Conference, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Organics â&#x20AC;Ś Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The Buzz?, at the University of Guelph. For further information, please visit the website at: www.guelphorganicconf.ca.

County Dateline Quinte & Area January 15 Grain Farmers of Ontario, District 12 Meeting (Durham, Northumberland, Kawartha, Peterborough, Hastings) For more information visit http://www.gfo.ca/ January 16 Grain Farmers of Ontario, District 13 Meeting (Prince Edward, Lennox, Addington, Frontenac, Lanark, Leeds, Grenville, Renfrew, Ottawa Elgin Lions Club, 19 Pineview Drive, Elgin, ON 10 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; For more information visit http://www.gfo.ca/ January 17 Hastings/Lennox & Addington Soil Improvement Association Annual Meeting Hart Acre Farms (Herb Hart 613-3540404), 461 Woodcock St., Napanee, ON 10 am to 2 pm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; For more information contact Shane Smith, TCO, Napanee, 613-3544424 January 30 Codrington Tie Stall Housing 2013 - Dairy Housing Design Seminars Community Centre, 2992 County Road 30, Codrington, ON 9:30 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Cost is $107.35 ($95 +13% HST). For more information, view agenda and to register, contact the Agricultural Information Contact Centre at 1-877-4241300 or visit http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/livestock/dairy/facts/info_freetiestall.htm

Haliburton & Kawartha Lakes First Tuesday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Monthly Kawartha Junior Farmers Meeting Lindsay Fairgrounds at 7:30pm Membership is open for anyone aged 15-29. For more information visit kawarthajf@gmail.com Third Wednesday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Monthly Victoria County Sheep Producers Meeting

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Miss Out on ADVERTISING in our Ottawa Valley Farm Show issue coming out in March.

Sunderland Co-op Boardroom, Oakwood location, 7:30pm. For more information contact Doug Walden 705-324-7478. Haliburton County Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market Carnarvon, Friday afternoons 1:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:00pm There is a year- round phone to contact the Market 705-457-0991 or visit http://haliburtoncountyfarmersmarket.word press.com January 15 & 22 Environmental Farm Plan Workshops OMAFRA, 322 Kent Street West, Lindsay, ON 10 am to 3 pm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; For more information or to register, contact Robin Brown 705374-4975, Email for details January 17 & 24 Environmental Farm Plan Workshops OMAFRA, 322 Kent Street West, Lindsay, ON 10 am to 3 pm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; For more information or to register, contact Robin Brown 705374-4975, Email for details

Peterborough & Surrounding Area Every Saturday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Year Round Peterborough District Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market, 7am- 1pm. Located on the corner of Lansdowne St and Roger Neilson Way at Morrow Park, Peterborough. For more information call 705-932-3166 or visit www.peterboroughfarmersmarket.com.

Buy, Sell, Trade, Help Wanted, Work Wanted

FREE Internet Farm Classifieds at

www.agrinews.ca

On the web or delivered to your electronic mailbox.

The Eastern Ontario AgriNews ... serving the farm community

86TH ANNUAL

OTTAWA VALLEY FARM SHOW

MARCH 12, 13 AND 14, 2013 For more info please contact Julie Lascelle Phone: 613-448-2321 | Toll Free: 1-866-307-3541 | Fax: 613-448-3260 Email: agrinewsads@gmail.com or visit us on our website at www.agrinews.ca

Ontario Forage Council presents...

Profitable Pastures 2013

CEU Accredited

Conference & Trade Show

Monday March 4, 2013-Napanee Tuesday March 5, 2013-Drumbo Key Speaker: Dr. Darrell Emmick USDA-NRCS Grazing Land Management Specialist in New York State $XWKRURI³0DQDJLQJ3DVWXUHVDVD&URS´ Jack Kyle, Grazier Specialist-OMAFRA To register phone 1-877-892-8663 by February 25. Conference registration is $40 & includes a hot roast beef dinner. Pre-registration is necessary to ensure dinner. For more info visit www.ontarioforagecouncil.com

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AgriNews January pg 30_AgriNews February pg 30 13-01-10 4:27 PM Page 1

Page 30 The AgriNews January, 2013

Agricultural links at www.agrinews.ca

DateLine Ottawa January 16 - Grain Farmers of Ontario, District 13 Meeting (Prince Edward, Lennox, Addington, Frontenac, Lanark, Leeds, Grenville, Renfrew, Ottawa Elgin Lions Club, 19 Pineview Drive, Elgin, ON 10 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; For more information visit http://www.gfo.ca/

Stormont, Dundas & Glengarry 1st Wednesday of the month - Dundas Federation of Agriculture regular monthly meetings Nelson Laprade Centre, Chesterville, ON 8 pm Please contact Mary Dillabough 13-448-2655 or email mary.dillabough@xplornet.com or visit website www.dundasagriculture.co m for meeting date confirmation. January 17 - Grain Farmers of Ontario, District 14 Meeting (Prescott, Russell, Stormont, Dundas, Glengarry) North Stormont Place, 16299 Fairview Dr., Avonmore, ON 10 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; For more information visit http://www.gfo.ca/ January 22 & 29 Environmental Farm Plan (EFP) 2 day Workshop Dundas County, Winchester/Chesterville area 10 am to 3 pm - This workshop will give you an

opportunity to asses your farm operation from an environmental view, identify opportunities for actions, and qualify you for costshare opportunities for onfarm projects. For more details and to register contact Arlene Ross 613-8213900 / arlene.ross@ontariosoilcrop.org or visit http://www.ontariosoilcrop.org/workshops/default. htm.

Frontenac Last Thursday of the month - Frontenac County Federation of Agriculture regular monthly meetings Glenburnie Church Hall, Glenburnie, ON 7:30 pm Please Contact Eileen Sleeth 613-353-2475 or email eilevale@kingston.net for meeting date confirmation. 1st and 3rd Saturday of the month (January to April) - Sharbot Lake Farmers Winter Market OSO Community Hall, 1107 Garrett Street, Sharbot Lake, ON 9:30 am to 11:30 am - Parking Available. For more information visit www.slfm.handsonharvest.c a January 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sharbot Lake Farmers Winter Market Workshop - Winter Seed Sowing OSO Community Hall, 1107 Garrett Street, Sharbot Lake, ON 10 to 11 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Cost $10 payable at the workshop (cash only). Presenter: Peggy Green. For more information visit http://slfm.handsonharvest.c a/market-events/

January 15 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Frontenac Cattlemen's Association will be holding their Annual General Meeting at 7:30 p.m. on 15 January 2013 at the Community Room at the Sydenham Public Library in Sydenham. For more information contact Mike Voith at 613-353-6380. January 15 & 22 Environmental Farm Plan (EFP) 2 day Workshop Elginburg Trinity United Church Hall, 2170 Unity Road, Elginburg, ON 10 am to 3 pm - This workshop will give you an opportunity to asses your farm operation from an environmental view, identify opportunities for actions, and qualify you for cost-share opportunities for on-farm projects. For more details and to register contact Rita Vogel 613-2751753 / rita.vogel@ontariosoilcrop.org or visit http://www.ontariosoilcrop.org/workshops/default. htm January 16 - Grain Farmers of Ontario, District 13 Meeting (Prince Edward, Lennox, Addington, Frontenac, Lanark, Leeds, Grenville, Renfrew, Ottaw Elgin Lions Club, 19 Pineview Drive, Elgin, ON 10 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; For more information visit http://www.gfo.ca/ January 19 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sharbot Lake Farmers Winter Market Workshop â&#x20AC;&#x201C; At Ease with your Cheese OSO Community Hall, 1107 Garrett Street, Sharbot Lake, ON 10 to 11 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Cost $10 payable at the

workshop (cash only). Presenter: Pat FurlongBrownlee, Elphin Gold Organic Farm. For more information visit http://slfm.handsonharvest.c a/market-events/

Leeds 3rd Thursday of the month - Leeds Federation of Agriculture regular monthly meetings Delta Agricultural Fair Society Boardroom, Delta, ON 8 pm - Please contact Eleanor Renaud 613-275-2981 or email erenaud@xplornet.ca for meeting date confirmation. 2nd Wednesday of the month - Grenville Federation of Agriculture regular monthly meetings Spencerville Council Chambers, Spencerville, ON 8 pm - Please contact Carol Wynands 613-9262579 or email a.wynands@sympatico.ca for meeting date confirmation. January 16 - Grain Farmers of Ontario, District 13 Meeting (Prince Edward, Lennox, Addington, Frontenac, Lanark, Leeds, Grenville, Renfrew, Ottawa Elgin Lions Club, 19 Pineview Drive, Elgin, ON 10 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; For more information visit http://www.gfo.ca/ January 22 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Kemptville Calf Housing 2013 - Dairy Housing Design Seminars Royal Canadian Legion, 100 Reuben Crescent, Kemptville, ON 9:30 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Topics include Calf Behaviour, Housing

TD Canada Trust

Meet our Agriculture Services Team   Sylvain Racine Eastern and Northern Ontario and Quebec 514-465-7401

Kelly Fawcett-Mathers Frontenac, Grenville, Dundas, Stormont and Glengarry 613-668-2782

Paula Cornish Peterborough, Northumberland, Hastings and Prince Edward Counties 705-653-4573

Jessica Schouten Carleton, Lanark, Leeds, Grenville and Renfrew Counties 613-790-2196

Considerations, Economics, Housing Options and Discussion Topics. Cost is $107.35 ($95 +13% HST). For more information, view agenda and to register, contact the Agricultural Information Contact Centre at 1-877-424-1300 or visit http://www.omafra.gov.on.c a/english/livestock/dairy/fac ts/info_freetiestall.htm January 23 & 24 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Kemptville Free Stall Housing 2013 - Dairy Housing Design Seminars Royal Canadian Legion, 100 Reuben Crescent, Kemptville, ON 9:30 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Cost is $214.70 ($190 +13% HST). For more information, view agenda and to register, contact the Agricultural Information Contact Centre at 1-877424-1300 or visit http://www.omafra.gov.on.c a/english/livestock/dairy/fac ts/info_freetiestall.htm Jan. 29 & Feb. 5 Growing Your Farm Profits (GYFP) 2 day Workshop Athens Christian Reformed Hall, 14-16 Wellington St. (at the corner of Henry St.), Athens, ON This two-day workshop will give you the tools to assess where you are now and where you could be in the future and enable you and your man-

agement team to start the journey towards managing and planning your farm business success. For more details and to register contact Rita Vogel 613-2751753 / rita.vogel@ontariosoilcrop.org or visit http://www.ontariosoilcrop.o rg/workshops/default.htm

Lanark 2nd Thursday of the month - Lanark County Federation of Agriculture regular monthly meetings Beckwith Township Council Chambers, Blacks Corners - 8 pm 3rd Wednesday of the month - The National Farmers Union Lanark, Local 310 For information contact Hilary Moore 613259-5757 January 16 - Grain Farmers of Ontario, District 13 Meeting (Prince Edward, Lennox, Addington, Frontenac, Lanark, Leeds, Grenville, Renfrew, Ottawa Elgin Lions Club, 19 Pineview Drive, Elgin, ON 10 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; For more information visit http://www.gfo.ca/ January 18 & 25 Environmental Farm Plan (EFP) 2 day Workshop Lanark County 10 am to 3 â&#x20AC;˘ Continued on Page 31

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AgriNews January pg 31_AgriNews February pg 31 13-01-10 4:36 PM Page 1

Searchable archive at www.agrinews.ca

DateLine pm - This workshop will give you an opportunity to asses your farm operation from an environmental view, identify opportunities for actions, and qualify you for cost-share opportunities for on-farm projects. For more details and to register contact Shirley Munro 613267-6362 / shirley.munro@ontariosoilcrop.org or visit http://www.ontariosoilcrop.org/workshops/default. htm January 19 – "State of the Sheep Industry" – Producer Information Day hosted by Ontario Sheep Marketing Agency District 9 Perth Civitan Club, 6787 County Road 43, Perth, ON 10 am to 3 pm – Speakers on the current state of the sheep industry. There will be a charge. Lunch provided. For more information and to pre-register, contact Allan Burn by email cairnfarm@hotmail.com or call 613-812-8407.

Prescott January 15 & 22 Environmental Farm Plan (EFP) 2 day Workshop Prescott and Russell County 10 am to 3 pm This workshop will give you an opportunity to asses your farm operation from an environmental view, identify opportunities for actions, and qualify you for cost-share opportunities for on-farm projects. For more details and to register contact Micheline Bégin 613679-8867 / Micheline.Begin@ontariosoilcrop.org or visit http://www.ontariosoilcrop.org/workshops/default. htm January 17 - Grain Farmers of Ontario, District 14 Meeting (Prescott, Russell, Stormont, Dundas, Glengarry) North Stormont Place, 16299 Fairview Dr.,

The AgriNews January, 2013 Page 31

• Continued from Page 30

Avonmore, ON 10 am – For more information visit http://www.gfo.ca/ January 31 & February 7 - Growing Your Farm Profits (GYFP) 2 day Workshop - FRENCH Comtés de Prescott et Russell – endroit à être déterminé This two-day workshop will give you the tools to assess where you are now and where you could be in the future and enable you and your management team to start the journey towards managing and planning your farm business success. For more details and to register contact Roxane Legault 613-872-0830 / roxane.legault@ontariosoilcrop.org or visit http://www.ontariosoilcrop.org/workshops/default. htm

Renfrew 2nd Monday of each month - Arnprior Region Federation of Agriculture Meetings Galetta Community Hall 8 pm Contact Rick Cummings, 613-832-3588. 4th Monday of each month - Renfrew County Federation of Agriculture Meetings Opeongo High School 7:30 pm - Contact Chris Bucholtz, President 613-735-9164 or Donna Campbell, Sec/Trea 613432-5568 / donnaofa@nrtco.net 3rd Wednesday of each month - Renfrew County Plowmen’s Association Meetings Cobden Agricultural Hall, Cobden, ON 7:30 pm - Contact Penny Rochon 613-6467737 or Myles England 613-582-3470. New members always welcome! 3rd Thursday of each month - Renfrew County Cattlemen Association Meetings Cobden Agricultural Hall, Cobden,

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ON 7:30 pm - Contact Larry Schroeder 613-5823222 or Donna Campbell 613-432-5568. Every Saturday – Renfrew Farmer’s Market Renfrew Fairgrounds - 7 am to 12 pm Every Friday – Eganville Farmer’s Market Curling Club/Rotary Club Grounds – 3 to 7 pm January 16 - Grain Farmers of Ontario, District 13 Meeting (Prince Edward, Lennox, Addington, Frontenac, Lanark, Leeds, Grenville, Renfrew, Ottawa Elgin Lions Club, 19 Pineview Drive, Elgin, ON 10 am – For more information visit http://www.gfo.ca/ Jan. 31 & Feb. 6 Growing Your Farm Profits (GYFP) 2 day Workshop Pembroke, ON This twoday workshop will give you the tools to assess where you are now and where you could be in the future and enable you and your management team to start the journey towards managing and planning your farm business success. For more details and to register contact Shelley McPhail 613256-4011 / shelley.mcphail@ontariosoilcrop.org or visit http://www.ontariosoilcrop.org/workshops/default. htm

2013 Regional/ Provincial Events January 18 - FarmSmart Special Preview Workshop: "CornSmart" with Ken Ferrie Puslinch Community Centre, 23 Brock Road, Guelph (Aberfoyle), ON Complete program details available at

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www.oscia.cloverpad.org. Two easy ways to register: Online at www.oscia.cloverpad.org or call 1-877-424-1300. For more information visit www.uoguelph.ca/farmsmart or follow on Twitter @FarmSmart1 January 19 – FarmSmart Conference University of Guelph For more information visit www.uoguelph.ca/farmsmart/

January 19 - Beef Symposium - In Conjunction with the Farm$mart Conference. For more details, visit http://www.uoguelph.ca/far msmart/conference/program.html January 22 - Advantage On-Farm Food Safety Webinar - Getting Started in Food Safety 12:00 pm (noon) to 12:45 pm - Learn how to identify the role food safety plays in farming

operations; analyze the associated risks and what good agricultural practices are and how they apply. This module will also explain the resources OMAFRA has to offer to help reduce your risks. Reduce your risk of food contamination and expand your customer base by putting in place an on farm • Continued on Page 32

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AgriNews January pg 32_AgriNews February pg 32 13-01-10 4:44 PM Page 1

Page 32 The AgriNews January, 2013

DateLine food safety program. OMAFRA is here to help you keep up to date on the latest food safety practices! Join us for these online workshops from the comfort of your home or business. All you need is an internet and phone connection. Register today online at http://www.omafra.gov.on.c a/english/food/foodsafety/pr oducers/webinars.htm. Registration closes the day before each workshop. A confirmation email will be sent following registration with the workshop teleconference details. January 22 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Kemptville Calf Housing 2013 - Dairy Housing Design Seminars Royal Canadian Legion, 100 Reuben Crescent, Kemptville, ON 9:30 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Topics include Calf Behaviour, Housing Considerations, Economics, Housing Options and Discussion Topics. Cost is $107.35 ($95 +13% HST). For more information, view

Agri-business directory at www.agrinews.ca

â&#x20AC;˘ Continued from Page 31

agenda and to register, contact the Agricultural Information Contact Centre at 1-877-424-1300 or visit http://www.omafra.gov.on.c a/english/livestock/dairy/fac ts/info_freetiestall.htm January 23&24 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Kemptville Free Stall Housing 2013 - Dairy Housing Design Seminars Royal Canadian Legion, 100 Reuben Crescent, Kemptville, ON 9:30 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Cost is $214.70 ($190 +13% HST). For more information, view agenda and to register, contact the Agricultural Information Contact Centre at 1-877424-1300 or visit http://www.omafra.gov.on.c a/english/livestock/dairy/fac ts/info_freetiestall.htm January 24 - Ontario Canola Growers Association Annual Meeting, Nottawasaga Inn 9:30 am to 3:30 pm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Guest Speaker, Moe Agostino January 30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Codrington Tie Stall Housing 2013 Dairy Housing Design

Seminars Community Centre, 2992 County Road 30, Codrington, ON 9:30 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Cost is $107.35 ($95 +13% HST). For more information, view agenda and to register, contact the Agricultural Information Contact Centre at 1-877424-1300 or visit http://www.omafra.gov.on.c a/english/livestock/dairy/fac ts/info_freetiestall.htm January 31 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Milverton Tie Stall Housing 2013 Dairy Housing Design Seminars East Perth Recreation Complex, 40 Temperance Street, Milverton, ON 9:30 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

Cost is $107.35 ($95 +13% HST). For more information, view agenda and to register, contact the Agricultural Information Contact Centre at 1-877424-1300 or visit http://www.omafra.gov.on.c a/english/livestock/dairy/fac ts/info_freetiestall.htm Jan 31 to Feb 3 - Guelph Organic Conference & Expo Guelph University Centre, Guelph, ON Expo Only - February 2 & 3, For more info visit http://www.guelphorganicconf.ca/

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AgriNews January pg 36_AgriNews February pg 36 13-01-11 11:01 AM Page 1

Page 36 The AgriNews January, 2013

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CALL TODAY AND BOOK YOUR ADVERTISING SPACE IN OUR SPECIAL UPCOMING EDITION

FARM CONSTRUCTION MONTH FEBRUARY IS OUR ANNUAL FARM CONSTRUCTION MONTH. Tell your own story about your products, services, history, etc. — up to 250 words — and each story [YfZ]Y[[gehYfa]\Zqqgmj[gehYfqkdg_g& For more info please contact Julie Lascelle Phone: 613-448-2321 Toll Free: 1-866-307-3541 Fax: 613-448-3260 Email: Y_jaf]okY\k8_eYad&[ge or visit us on our website at ooo&Y_jaf]ok&[Y

3063 Forward Rd. S. CHESTERVILLE, ONT. K0C 1H0 CANADA

PHONE: 613-448-2522 FAX: 613-448-1025 EMAIL: pderks@ripnet.com EMAIL: martyderks@gmail.ca

Elias Meyerhans (left) receives the Russell County 4-H 2012 Outstanding Agricultural Member Nov. 24 from Cam Crogie, 4-H Ontario Coordinator for Volunteer Support Region 2. The award was sponsored by the Ontario Plowmen's Association. PJ Pearson photo

Russell County 4-H marks the achievements of 2012

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County started with their first meeting at Drentex Farms, in Russell, and relocated to surrounding farms such as Marvellane Farms Ltd., and La Ferme Gillette Inc. for each meeting. Calf Club awards presented included: Outstanding Record Book and Top Overall MemberTamara Hamilton; Outstanding Poster Project: Shelley Nyentap; Leadership Award - Sara Akkermans; Most Deserving 1st year Member - Celina Hildbrand and Most Improved Member Maria Maloney. Calf members who exhibiting throughout the season also received gifts, such as the coveted 4-H belt buckles sponsored by the St. Lawrence Valley Jersey Club that Marin Pearson and Eric Ross received. The Dairy Calf Club Top Showman went to Vicki Brisson; Most Points to Caroline Savage and new members to the French club included Phoebe Robinson, Samantha Bray, Tanya Regimbald and Karine Perreault. Other clubs included Home For the Holidays, Woodworking, and Milk Makes It. Sponsored by the La Coopérative Agricole d’Embrun - presented by Andre Brisson, Judging Night Results included Continued on page 38

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By Pamela Pearson AgriNews Staff Writer ussell — The Russell CounTy 4-h CelebRaTed ITs aCComplIshmenTs on nov. 24 aT The lImoges CommunITy CenTRe. membeRs, leadeRs and FamIlIes enjoyed a Well laId ouT poTluCk dInneR, a slIde shoW oF 2012 evenTs, dooR pRIzes and membeR aWaRds. The 2012 executive included President Bert Molenaar, Past President Herman Akkermans, VicePresident Arlene Ross and Secretary/Treasurer Natalie Baumgarter. Presentations were made to 12 new members with a plaque and Seal, as well as a gift card for the movies. Members also received a Seal for number of projects completed from six to 12. Caroline Savage received her Graduating Seal and volunteers DeeDee Bekker, Judith Hildbrand, Jenna James received a Volunteer Seal for one year and Julie Brisson received a Seal for 10 years of volunteering. Over the summer, Calf Club leaders Jenna James, Joanne Nyentap and Arlene Ross had 26 youth involved. Calves included a variety from Holstein to Jersey and Brown Swiss. This section of Russell

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AgriNews January pg 37_AgriNews February pg 37 13-01-11 11:32 AM Page 1

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The AgriNews January, 2013 Page 37

Calf-tastic!

Amelia Patenaude was awarded Grand Champion Calf for her intermediate Holstein Gillette Sid Mystery Day (La Ferme Gillette Inc.) at the Russell County 4-H awards night held on Nov. 24 at the Limoges Community Centre. Patenaude's 2012 awards include Grand Champion Holstein and Grand Champion 4-H Calf - Russell 4-H Achievement Day; Best Bred and Owned 4-H Calf - Russell 4-H Achievement Day; 1st Intermediate Holstein; Member of first prize Group of Three 4-H heifers - Metcalfe 4-H Regional Championship Show and Member of 4th prize Group of Three 4-H heifers (of 60) at the TD Canadian 4-H Dairy Classic, Toronto.

Russell 4-H’s Top Overall Member

Tamara Hamilton (left) receives the Top Overall Member Award for Russell County 4-H from leader Jenna James at the group’s closing banquet, held Nov. 24 at the Limoges Community Centre. Hamilton's other 4-H awards include Outstanding Record Book, 1st place Intermediate Judging, 4-H Achievement Day, Honourable Mention Showmanship and the Spirit of 4-H Award. PJ Pearson photos

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AgriNews January pg 38_AgriNews February pg 38 13-01-11 11:57 AM Page 1

Page 38 The AgriNews January, 2013

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Russell 4H Awards Continued from page 36 second and third places for Novice, Junior, Intermediate and Senior. Novice: 1st - Caroline Pasquier, 2nd - Closine Baumgarter, 3rd - Tanya Regimbald; Junior: 1st William Baumgartner, 2nd - Vicki Brisson, 3rd - Mark Nyentap; Intermediate: 1st - Tamara Hamilton, 2nd Shelley Nyentap, 3rd Rachel Bekkers; and Senior: 1st - Caroline Savage, 2nd - Maria Maloney and 3rd - Trevor Perrault. The evening also recognized members from the 4H Achievement Day held at the Russell Fair in September. Trevor Perrault received both Top Showmanship Russell 4-H Calf Club and Grand Champion Showman; Paul

Patenaude received Reserve Grand Champion Showman and Tamara Hamilton earned Reserve Grand Champion. Grand Champion Holstein, Grand Champion 4-H Heifer of the Day and Best Bred and Owned 4-H Heifer was awarded to Amelia Patenaude with Gillette Sid Mystery Day; Grand Champion Jersey to Eric Ross with Glenholme Regan Callie and Grand Champion Brown Swiss to Sara Akkermans with Eastwind Galaxy Magic. Reserve Grand Champion 4-H Heifer of the Day was awarded to Alex Chabot with Belfasst Goldwyn LaSenza, with Honourable Mention going to Eric Ross for Glenholme Regan Callie. The Spirit of 4-H Award

was presented to Tamara Hamilton; the new Jack James Memorial Leadership Award was presented to Vicki Brisson; Enthusiasm Award was presented to Angela Maloney and Outstanding 4-H Agricultural Member to Elias Meyerhans. The evening ended with Alex Chabot and Sarah Akkermans speaking about their experiences at different events, including the 2012 Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, where Chabot received Reserve Champion Holstein with her Summer Yearling. Russell County 4-H members participated in the Eastgen Showcase and Holstein Junior Dairy Show, the Avonmore 4-H Rally, the 4-H Adventure Camp, the Regionals at the Metcalfe Fair and in the TD Canadian 4-H Classic Dairy Show RAWF in Toronto.

Hunkered down for a winter in the sticks

The Embrun farmstead of Stewart and Muriel Carruthers is playing host to a fox this winter. Too bad for the sly critter, but the rustic shed in the background is not a henhouse. M. Dunn photo

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AgriNews January pg 39_AgriNews February pg 39 13-01-11 9:57 AM Page 1

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DSCIAâ&#x20AC;&#x2C6;Awardsâ&#x20AC;&#x2C6;

At the Dundas County Soil and Crop Improvement Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual meeting Dec. 4 in Chesterville, (above) winner of the High Corn Yield award, Cedar Lodge Farmsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Arden Schneckenburger and son Warren Schneckburger; (top lleft) Jackie Pemberton accepts the Award of Merit from Mark Tibben; (top right) Warren Schneckenburger (right) presents the Innovative Farmer Award to Tibben Farms (Mark Tibben accepting); and (bottom photo) John Devries accepts the Farmer of the year award from Jackie Pemberton.

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