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Top bidder gets her art

Phyllis MacMaster (right) again proved top bidder for the high-profile art entry in the annual Prestigious Pedigreed Seed Sale auction, March 15 at the 85th annual Ottawa Valley Farm Show. MacMaster, a fixture in local farm circles as an OMAFRA staffer and Holstein show announcer, has snagged the featured artwork entry at nearly every auction since a painting was first put on the block at the event about a decade ago. She paid $850 this year to win â&#x20AC;&#x153;Crisp Winter Sceneâ&#x20AC;? by Heather Metcalfe-Griffith of Smiths Falls (left). Martin Harry (centre, left) Eastern Marketing Manager for SeCan, which sponsored the painting, and Ottawa Valley Seed Growers Association President Bruce Hudson also appear in the photo. A fundraiser for the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital of Eastern Ontario since its 1992 debut, the auction this year generated $4,600 for the cause, bringing the 21-year tally to just over $95,000. Zandbergen photo

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AgriNews April pg 02_AgriNews February pg 02 12-03-30 2:43 PM Page 1

Page 2 The AgriNews April, 2012

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Future IPM site Jeff Waldroff (second from right), president of the Stormont County Plowmen’s Association and a key Ontario Plowmen’s Association plowman organizer of the upcoming 2015 Plowing Match and Rural Expo — Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry — stands with some of the involved landowners in the vicinity of North Stormont Concession 34, just outside Finch. In the background is the planned site of the tent city. From left are Marcel Leduc, Dale Dingwall, Monica and Armin Kagi (owners of the actual city site), Waldroff and Stephen O’Donohue. Zandbergen photo

Getting ready for 2015 By Nelson Zandbergen AgriNews Staff Writer INCH — A TRIEDAND-TRUE TRACTOR

F

WE BRING AGRICUL AGRICULTURE CUL LTURE TURE

FULL FU ULL CIRCLE CIR RCLE Richardson is involved in all aspects of the agriculture product cycle: growing, merchandising, handling, value-added processing and the development of new opportunities.

MODEL HAULED THE

WAGON THAT OFFICIALLY

PARADED PRIME MINISTER JOHN DIEFENBAKER INTO THE LAST INTERNATIONAL PLOWING MATCH HELD IN NORTH STORMONT MORE THAN 50 YEARS AGO. Today, preparations for the 2015 IPM have just started chugging ahead for a handful of eager farmers all connected to the coming attraction as landowners. And in a couple of cases, they’re also linked to the past 1958 edition as owners of ancestral iron. “We still have the Cockshutt 30 at home that they used to bring in the prime minister [and MPP Peter Manley],” recounted a smiling Stephen O’Donohue, during a group interview March 23 around the kitchen table of dairy farmers Armin and Monica Kagi, proprietors of Redlodge Farms Inc. and owners of the planned 92acre “tent city” site on the north side of Concession 34, just outside Finch. Stephen O’Donohue and his brother, Leonard, cash croppers at Finchside Farms, are supplying 75 acres of trailer parking immediately north of tent city, an area of expansive Continued on page 11

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AgriNews April pg 03_AgriNews February pg 03 12-03-30 11:45 AM Page 1

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The AgriNews April, 2012 Page 3

Above, Sunnylodge Reality Megan, All-Canadian Red & White Heifer. Right, Greenlane Destry Laurel, All-American Red & White Fall Calf.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Redâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; success for Sunnylodge animals at World Dairy Expo By Nelson Zandbergen AgriNews Staff Writer HESTERVILLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A PAIR OF REDAND-WHITE-HAIRED BEAUTIES FROM EASTERN ONTARIO FARMS WOWED

C

JUDGES AS THE BEST OF

CANADA AND U.S. LAST SEASON. Based on her performance in multiple show rings in 2011, the Holstein Journal in March recognized Sunnylodge Reality Megan â&#x20AC;&#x201D; born and bred at Chestervilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sunnylodge Holsteins â&#x20AC;&#x201D; as AllCanadian Red & White Heifer Calf. Sunnylodge also bred another heifer named AllAmerican Red & White Fall Calf by the Red & White Dairy Cattle

THEIR KIND IN THE

Association south of the border. That animal, Greenlane Destry Laurel, was born the autumn of 2010 at Russellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Greenlane Farms, which jointly owned her with Sunnylodge. Both of the successful bovines have since been sold to other interests. Sunnlodge co-owner Mark Smith spoke proudly of the All-Canadian, born a year ago at the Chesterville operation this past March. Reality Megan â&#x20AC;&#x153;beat a lot of black and whitesâ&#x20AC;? to win the Maxville and Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry TriCounty Holstein shows where the he showed her last summer. Continued on page 12

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Page 4 The AgriNews April, 2012

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Calf sale at College Royal From left, first year student Ronald Werry and calf Tomalynn Damion Dorthy of Tomalynn Farms; second year student Jess Wales; while first year student Martin Chamberlain poses with Gillette Jordan Fally of Ferme Gillette of Embrun. Wales organized this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s consignment calf sale at the annual University of Guelphâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kemptville Campus College Royal in March. The 2012 sale grossed $27,950, with the Gillette calf fetching the top price, $3,800. Werry himself jointly bought the Tomalynn calf with another buyer for $2,400. Fifteen animals went on the block, along with one embryo lot and three doses of Stanley Cup semen donated by EastGen, which went for $50 each. The number two animal, Hendercroft Alexander Lil Kim, sold for $2,900. Ten per cent of the auction proceeds went back to the school as a fundraiser and will be used to purchase a road sign to promote the campusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dairy herd. Zandbergen photo.

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AgriEst sees its sales soar St-ISIDORE â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Co-op AgriEst held its 11th Annual General Meeting on March 20 and presented the cooperativeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s financial results to its members for the fiscal period ending October 31, 2011. It was with great pride that the executive declared the cooperativeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s financial situation to have clearly improved over the previous year, and that the cost effectiveness of The Co-op AgriEst is responsible for its remarkable growth. The cooperativeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s consolidated activities generated sales totalling $39,323,000, compared with $23,418,000 for the previous year. This represents an increase of more than 40 per cent, which can be attributed mainly to the combination of the rise in the number of tons of traded grain, feed and fertilizer. Gross margin also experienced an increase, going from $2,507,000 to $2,806,000 for this year, while the surplus at the end of the period, October 31,

2011, increased by 27 per cent, from $535,000 to $737,000. Over the past year only, sales transactions with its members rose from 26.9 to 29.2 per ent, which is a testimony to the vitality of Co-op AgriEstâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s membership. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our cooperative is more active and conscientious than ever,â&#x20AC;? stated president Francine Cayouette. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sales have significantly increased while operating expenses remained the same. We have every reason to be proud!â&#x20AC;? Furthermore, a strategic blitz was undertaken last year with the objective of rendering Co-op AgriEst operations as profitable as possible to meet the expectations of its members. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being part of The Co-op fĂŠdĂŠrĂŠeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s network, our sales team can depend on their expertise and a quality product and service offering,â&#x20AC;? said Cayouette. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our members are the primary reason for our success and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s critically

important that we satisfy them.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We owe it to ourselves to mention all of the hard work of The Co-op AgriEst employees, without which our cooperative would never have experienced such success. The cooperative also wishes to thank all of its collaborators, including the Co-op Agrodor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I must emphasize the excellent collaboration on the part the Co-op Agrodor with which we share several employees. The sharing of our resources allows both of our cooperatives to benefit from the many synergies and to improve the skill levels of our employees,â&#x20AC;? Co-op GM Patrick Therrien stated in a press release issued in late March. Founded in 2001, AgriEst is a major player in several divisions of the retail market, from grain trading, crop production, animal production to hardware and materials. Its sales exceed $39-million and it employs 23 people.

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AgriNews April pg 05_AgriNews February pg 05 12-03-30 11:55 AM Page 1

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OMAFRA’s $100K Club now stands at 101 T HE RATE OF

INCREASE IN THE MEMBERSHIP OF

MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND RURAL AFFAIRS’ $100,000 CLUB SLOWED LAST YEAR, GROWING FROM 94 TO 101 MEMBERS. THIS IS HALF THE INCREASE FROM 2009 TO 2010 WHEN 13 NEW THE

MEMBERS JOINED THE LIST, ACCORDING TO FIGURES RELEASED UNDER THE PROVINCE’S ANNUAL DISCLOSURE OF PUBLIC EMPLOYEE SALARIES, INCLUDING THE PROVINCIAL PUBLIC SERVICE, PROVINCIAL AGENCIES, MUNICIPAL-

boards. OMAFRA’s increase in 2011 was 7.4 per cent, below the provincial average of a 10 per cent growth in $100K club membership. In total, 78,901 provincial, municipal and provincial agency employees earned $100,000 in 2011, according to the figures released in late March. Heading OMAFRA’s list once again is Deputy ITIES AND SCHOOL

Minister John Burke, whose salary in 2011 was $237,352.58, a 5.2 per cent increase over the amount he received in 2010. The ministry’s four Assistant Deputy Ministers all topped $170,000 last year, according to the list. They are David Hope, Food Safety and Environment, $177,528.24, David Antle Policy, $177,046.11, Aren Chank, Research and Corporate Service, $171,545.11, and Bonnie Winchester, Economic Development, $171,936.73. The following is the full list of the 101 OMAFRA members of the $100K club: ADAIR, JANE, Lead Project Analyst, $101,318.30, $149.32. ALBRIGHT, KENDALL, Projects Director, $138,148.47, $195.96. ALDER, BEVERLEY, Manager, Legislative Policy, $110,757.33,

$156.57. ALLAN, ANGELA, Manager, Finance & Rural Investments, $106,133.58, $156.57. ALLES-DE VOS, MARIA, Manager, Strategic Analysis & Planning, $108,655.83, $156.57. ALVES, DAVID, Manager, Veterinary Science & Policy, $108,654.76, $156.57. ANDERSON, ANNETTE, Manager, Business Management, $108,654.76, $156.57. ANDERSON, NEIL, Lead Veterinarian, Disease Prevention, Ruminant, $102,076.07, $147.69. ANTLE, DAVID, Assistant Deputy Minister, Policy, $177,046.11, $249.87. ATCHISON, KAREN, Manager, Dairy Food Safety Program, $108,654.76, $156.57. BAKER, THOMAS,

Director, Animal Health & Welfare and Office of the Chief Veterinarian, $144,909.05, $55.38. BERGES, HUGH, Manager, Horticulture Technology, $110,756.24, $156.57. BLACKWELL, TIMOTHY, Lead Veterinarian Disease Prevention, Swine, $102,076.07, $367.00. BOHL, MARTIN, Director, Rural Community Development, $131,445.34, $189.17. BOROVILOS, GEORGE, Director, Business Development, $136,360.75, $3,608.35. BRADLEY, CECIL, Manager, Agriculture Development Policy, $106,018.57, $153.12. BROX, ERIC, Manager, Planning & Analysis, $108,202.91, $157.08 BURKE, JOHN, Deputy Minister, $237,352.58, $2,521.03 CARLOW, DAN,

Manager, Innovation Engineering Program West, $108,654.76, $156.57 CHANK, AREN, Assistant Deputy Minister, Research & Corporate Services, $171,545.11, $2,107.24 COOPER, DAVID, Manager, Environment & Land Use Policy, $108,655.83, $156.57 CRAWLEY, ALAN, Manager, Export Development, $110,756.24, $156.57 DALLAIRE, TRACY, Director, Farm Finance, $116,117.64, $171.74 DESIR, FINBAR, Farm Implements Coordinator, $112,981.53, $169.11 DOWNING, GAVIN, Manager, Food Safety Science, $114,111.32, $166.67 DUFF, SCOTT, Manager, Rural Development Policy, $108,655.82, $156.57 DUFF, STEPHEN,

Senior Economist, $102,076.07, $147.69 FELDMANN, HANS, Senior Policy Advisor, $101,425.98, $140.46 FELKER, JIM, Director, Strategic Human Resources Business, $110,160.81, $195.96, FERGUSON-MEREK, LEANNE, Manager, Multi Media Services, $104,412.84, $156.57 FITZGERALD-HUBBLE, COLLEEN, Executive Assistant, $109,014.36, $156.88 FLAMING, DENNIS, Manager, Human Resources Solutions, $104,750.73, $156.57 FLEMING, GRAHAM, Manager, Policy Coordination & Cabinet Liaison, $100,823.45, $147.46 FORREST, ROBERT, Manager, Horticulture Crops, $108,654.76, $156.57 Continued on page 10


AgriNews April pg 06_AgriNews February pg 06 12-03-30 10:14 AM Page 1

Page 6 The AgriNews April, 2012

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The Editorial Page

Editorial Unaccountable Here’s one for the record books. At the March 23-25 annual 4-H conference in Waterloo, delegates got a chance to vote on two resolutions promoting a more transparent and inclusive process involving the governing council. In our jaded minds here at The AgriNews, that’s kind of like voting for motherhood. Who wouldn’t want more accountability from the ruling body, right? WRONG! At least where 4-H is concerned! Both resolutions were defeated by narrow margins. The first one received the most discussion. Put forward by Elgin County, it called upon the council to forego making important changes without a vote at the annual meeting. Existing bylaws now permit the council to take action it sees fit without going to the membership. Elgin president Henry Helder explained the motion pertained directly to a decision by the council to drop the minimum 4-H membership age last year from 10 to 9 years old, placing sudden pressure on regional associations who received little forewarning of the influx of new youngsters. The current situation, the resolution explained, potentially causes a “sense of alienation” between the council and volunteer leaders. “If the leaders are unable to participate in decisions that change the overall structure and direction of 4-H, then those volunteers that are currently passionate for the program may lose their sense of ownership and become discouraged, seeking other venues to use their gifts of knowledge.” The second resolution, this one from Renfrew County, was similar. It called on the council to present possible programming changes at the annual conference in order for district representatives to hear “the rationale, discuss and vote on these plans so that any changes are truly understood by all levels of the organization.” “Vital, happy local volunteer 4-H associations are essential to carry out the mandate of the Ontario council and the development of successful programs.” Both motions seemed straightforward and logical. They were basically stating that volunteers devoting time and effort to the 4-H cause should have a say in how the outfit is administered and, particularly, on changes which impact them directly and substantially. Yet, in two decisions which were almost tied, delegates voted down what would amount to a minor reduction in the council’s power. Meanwhile, there was lots of talk at the conference about moving forward, and making 4-H more relevant, and broadening the reach into urban areas. However, a successful new deal in this venerable organization should start with a transfer of at least some of the decision-making authority from on high down to the grassroots level.

Welcome aboard Can you ever have too many farm organizations in what is a crowded and competitive field? It’s like anything else. If there’s even a sliver of an opening, something will eventually appear to fill it. Scheduled to hold its inaugural meeting March 31 (after press deadline for this edition of The AgriNews) at Trent University, Practical Farmers of Ontario sees a niche between general farm lobbyists and the commodity groups. With support from the Ontario Landowners Association, it intends to fill that niche. Practical Farmers will respond to a “rapidly growing movement of independent family farmers” stretching across the province, its promoters trumpet. These farmers are involved in direct production and marketing of food to consumers and want to have a strong voice. PFO intends to be an “open, supportive and diverse organization advancing agriculture that’s profitable for producers, sound for the environment, healthy for consumers, and supportive of communities.” According to organizers, none of the traditional general farm organizations offer their membership adequate advocacy on important issues such as land owner rights and direct access to consumers. Practical Farmers vows to help its members “take back their rights” for the good of agriculture and consumers. If it all sounds familiar, it’s because it’s the OLA mantra with more of an agricultural flavour to it. Most of the guest speakers lined up for the inaugural meeting were prominent OLA supporters such as raw milk advocate Michael Schmidt, rebel egg producer Shawn Carmichael, and farmer and journalist Ian Cumming who relocated his dairy operation to New York State. There’s nothing wrong with that. The OLA has always championed the rights of independent-minded farmers and this new group confirms that connection, possibly opening the door to new farmer-members who didn’t feel at home among the Landowners.

AgriGab

The AgriNews is dedicated to covering and promoting agriculture, one of Eastern Ontario’s most important economic sectors.

by Tom VanDusen

exclaim in a public forum exactly what they think of the way The Ontario organization dedicated to rural youth the Shannon/Corkey affair has been manwhose inner machinations sometimes make kids aged. No such recrimigames look sophisticated is in need of an overhaul nations were uttered in and maybe, just maybe, new beginnings were Waterloo... at least not launched March 23-25 at the 4-H annual conference publicly. in Waterloo. There were two At the invitation of 4-H executive director developments in Wraychel Horne, I attended the conference for the Waterloo which made first time and it was a strange experience indeed, my me think the 4-H counfriends! cil may soon get itself Among other things, I was ejected from a 4-H in order and begin govregional chit-chat session out of fear I might report erning as it’s supposed on something hush-hush that might have been said, even after I’d paid my full $260 registration fee. But to do without constantthat’s a story unto itself, one which can be read in an ly conceding to paid chief administrator Horne on the dismissal issue and who knows what else. AgriNews sister publication The Villager. One development was that Shonna Ward was sucEven though the conference was sponsored by 4ceeded as council president by down-to-earth farmer H’s Region 2 - Eastern Ontario – with welcome pamJon den Haan. It was Ward who loudly declared at phlets and products from eastern municipalities and the conference that the 15-member council stands businesses, and a tote bag provided by the Ottawa Valley Seed Growers Association, the meeting was in behind Horne all the way as she continues to dig her Waterloo, obviously in the west end of the province. heels in on the dismissals. While it’s true that den Haan was vice-president Is it just me… or does that seem bizarre? to Ward and didn’t break from council allegiance to Apparently, that’s the way it is no matter which take his own stand on the dismissal file, I have a feelregion is sponsoring, and it didn’t take long to dising he’ll behave differently now that he’s in comcover why. At one point, it was suggested from the mand. floor the governing council might consider rotating After all, he’s a practical and innovative dairyman the event; departing president Shonna Ward of from Simcoe County who’s about to open his own Oxford replied that a survey of several facilities had on-farm store selling pasteurized unhomogenized determined that there’s no eastern location offering milk and yogurt to meet a niche market. all the services of the Waterloo Inn and Conference He has chalked up 25 years volunteering with 4-H Centre. and he’s a past church elder and trustee. He’s a man Predictably enough, the decision was taken to who must sympathize with the simple request from hold the 2013 conference right back in the Waterloo Shannon and Corkey that they be given a clear explacomfort zone, not too far from 4-H headquarters in nation as to why they were run out of the organizaGuelph and close to home for a majority of council tion they love so much. members. The other positive development is the acclamation Can you imagine! There’s no venue suitable in the to the governing council of firebrand Tammy east! Nothing in Belleville! Nothing in Kingston or Oswick-Kearney – Tammy OK to her friends – of Cornwall! Nothing in Ottawa! Come on! Vankleek Hill along with four other new members. There’s a problem right there: 4-H is obviously OK was a 4-H staff member doing communication Western Ontario-centric and doesn’t want to venture work out of her home for six years before the posiinto the eastern badlands where folks aren’t always tion was suddenly relocated last year to headquarters as docile and as prepared to toe the line. It would be unfair to link 4-H’s preference to stay in Guelph. To this day, she doesn’t know why; to this day, she’s peeved by the loss of her job. west of the GTA with the ongoing flap over the disShe served for years as a Prescott County 4-H volmissal several months ago of two Frontenac County unteer; she’s a past member of the 4-H Canada counvolunteers. The timing is off; Waterloo was decreed cil; she chaired the 2011 International Plowing and promised many years before that clumsily hanMatch Queen of the Furrow committee; she’s been dled event. However, the episode which Horne and the coun- part of a local amateur theatre group for 30 years. In other words, she’s no pushover. OK says she cil have so far refused to resolve by telling volunteers Ruth Shannon and Harriet Corkey exactly what they wanted to be a council director to help maintain the did to warrant such draconian action, probably does- values of 4-H while “implementing necessary change n’t encourage 4-H to take the conference east, say to to remain relevant in a fast paced society.” With the introduction of den Haan as president Kingston, any time in the foreseeable future. After all, back on their home turf, those occasion- and several new directors, I’m betting that Shannon ally ornery easterners might just drop the niceties and and Corkey will soon be OK.

It might turn out OK

The AgriNews is Published by Etcetera Publications (Chesterville) Inc. on the first Monday of each month.

Editor & Publisher: Robin R. Morris Staff Writers: Tom VanDusen, Lois Ann Baker, Darren Matte, Nelson Zandbergen Advertising Manager: Julie Lascelle, agrinewsads@gmail.com Advertising Representatives: Muriel Hurst, Jeff Moore, Taunya Grohn P.O. Box 368, Chesterville, Ont. K0C 1H0 Telephone: 613-448-2321 Fax: 613-448-3260 www.agrinews.ca e-mail: rm@agrinews.ca

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The AgriNews April, 2012 Page 7

OFA didn’t want to politicize wind power: Wales Conservative opposition on wind power and the Green Energy Act. “There were two extreme positions, fundamentally, between the two parties that could end up running the province,” he observed. Wales asserted that even before the OFA’s moratorium call, the organization “had been saying for a long time that there’s a whole lot of issues that need to be addressed” in the province’s renewable energy policies. He noted as examples the OFA’s successful lobby for an increase in the minimum mandated setback distance from wind turbines, to 550 metres, and the reversal of a solar-rate cut for some rural applicants. The OFA remains a “strong supporter” of wind energy, “but we’ve got to get it right,” he emphasized. The province’s review of the Feed-In Tariff program — which began Oct. 31 and should wrap up with a report released at the end of March — is the “perfect time” to solve the windpower concerns highlighted

But was keeping quiet during provincial campaign equally as political? By Nelson Zandbergen AgriNews Staff Writer HESTERVILLE — THE ONTARIO FEDERATION OF AGRICULTURE CONSCIOUS-

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LY CHOSE NOT TO SPEAK OUT ON WIND POWER DURING LAST FALL’S PROVINCIAL ELECTION, SAYS THE PRESIDENT OF THE ORGANIZATION THAT CALLED FOR A FREEZE ON NEW WIND FARMS AT THE BEGINNING OF THIS YEAR.

Mark Wales, keynote speaker at the Dundas Federation of Agriculture’s Feb. 29 annual general meeting, acknowledged the OFA “heard a lot of members through the fall” on the issue. However, he told The AgriNews, “We didn’t want to make this an election issue. If we had done this [demand a moratorium] back in the summer or early

fall, then it would have politicized the election, and we would’ve got screwed 12 ways to Sunday.” Wales and the OFA instead made headlines by urging Dalton McGuinty’s newly re-instated government to “suspend the invasion of rural Ontario with industrial wind turbines,” on Jan. 20. “We couldn’t leave it really any longer,” Wales explained, as the bustling group of local farmers packed up tables and chairs inside Chesterville’s Nelson LaPrade Centre. “And a lot of members were saying, ‘We’re backing you,’ but we’re not hearing it loud enough.’ So we finally had to say [to the government], ‘Don’t issue any more contracts until you’ve got this right’.” Asked if staying silent about those concerns during

OFA President Mark Wales, speaking at the Dundas Federation of Agriculture annual general meeting, Feb. 29. Wales was elected OFA president last November. Zandbergen photo the 2011 campaign was noting the polarization really any less political than between the governing speaking up, he began by Liberals and the

by the OFA, according to the president. This includes, he said, the Ontario auditor’s December revelation that surplus electricity generated in Ontario at night – including wind power — is exported for almost nothing. As a solution to that particular problem, he suggested the province should promote energy storage systems that collect the nocturnal power from wind turbines until needed during the day. The technology does exist, he insisted. “Batteries are the easy way to go. It’s not cheap, but you give a little incentive and you can make it happen.” He also pointed to concerns about negative health impacts around turbines as another matter still unresolved. It’s not enough for the province to have only conducted a review of existing literature, he said. “Sooner or later, they’re going to have to debunk what’s false or deal with the stuff that’s true. Continued on page 9

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AgriNews April pg 08_AgriNews February pg 08 12-03-30 12:00 PM Page 1

Page 8 The AgriNews April, 2012

AdWatcher surfs the classifieds for Toronto, he acknowledged. Red tape Helpfully for farmers, the report also targeted the Yet farm programs are expense of having “jurisnot “support programs,” he dictional overlap” in the declared. “It’s about makpublic sector. ing sure that when we get Wales cited the example these bumps in the road, be of the Ministry of the they weather, be they disEnvironment, which has ease, be they crop prices in recently attempted to exerthe market, we need to be able to survive to next year, cise influence over tile drainage because one piece so that we can then innoof legislation “sadly” refers vate and increase our productivity, and ideally, create to them as “sewage works.” The Ministry of Food, more jobs in the long term. “That’s the focus of farm Agriculture and Rural Affairs otherwise oversees programs. They’re not a gift. They’re not really enti- tile drainage through the tlements. Many of them are Drainage Act. MOE has also classified programs that we jointly rainwater running off a fund with premiums.” greenhouse roof as “indusHorse racing trial sewage,” he scoffed, The report’s recommen“and they want an environdation to claw back slotmental certificate of machine funds from the approval for greenhouses to horse-racing industry, say how they’re going to embraced by the McGuinty deal with this water.” government, would put a The greenhouse industry “$350-million hole” in Ontario’s rural economy, he is consequently pushing to fall under the Nutrient said. Many OFA members Management Act, “rather grow oats, hay and straw than be legislated by the for the industry, and treatMOE,” he reported. ing horses also helps the Troublesome legislation bottom line of the remainTaking aim at the ing cadre of large animal Species At Risk Act, he veterinarians in Ontario. noted an “unaccountable The issue has become committee” of scientists confused by the fact that recently added the barn one racetrack handles 80 swallow, eastern meadper cent of the money, owlark and bobolink to the Woodbine in downtown

Drummond Report challenges farmers By Nelson Zandbergen AgriNews Staff Writer HESTERVILLE — Economist Don Drummond’s headline-making report has seeded the ground with potential challenges for the province’s farming sector, according to Ontario Federation of Agriculture president Mark Wales who delivered a keynote address here Feb. 29. Speaking at the Dundas Federation of Agriculture’s annual general meeting, the Elgin County vegetable farmer made the backhanded observation that Drummond — chair of the Commission on the Reform of Ontario’s Public Services — was “only out by 50 per cent” in his cost estimate of the province’s new Risk Management Program (RMP). Actual “money out the door” from provincial coffers during the RMP’s debut was $100-million — $50-million less than the amount budgeted by the province — asserted Wales, who added that Drummond got it wrong by placing last year’s RMP expenditure at $145-million.

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“That’s not bad for an economist. He was only out by 50 per cent, so $145million doesn’t relate to any part of reality,” said Wales, concluding with a hint of sarcasm, “So he’s close, and that’s about as close as any economist will typically get.” More important, the report has surmised the RMP poses a “potential risk” of $300-million to the provincial treasury in the event that commodity prices suddenly drop 20 to 30 per cent, Wales said. He speculated that government budget-makers may now move to “cap” the province’s own monetary risk from the RMP. That led him to suggest having the program funded by producer premiums kept entirely separate from the “black hole” of the province’s general revenue account, similar to crop insurance. A brief survey of the room at the Nelson LaPrade Centre seemed to indicate general support for the idea. Increasing value for public money spent, while reining in the province’s $16billion deficit, is the broader context of the Drummond Report, he

noted. “It’s very, very clear you’re not going to make the deficit go away any time soon or without any degree of pain somewhere along the line, so that’s going to be one of the challenges as we move forward.” He told his audience of local farmers that, “keeping the programs we have is going to be critical.” As it turned out Wales need not have been overly concerned as provnvial treasurer Dwight Duncan threw the Drummond baby out with the bathwater when he tabled his budget in the Legislagure March 28. Ony a few of Drummond’s recommendations were included in the McGuinty government’s cost-cutting measures as it tackles its $16-billion deficit. ‘Farm support’ a misnomer The report also “lumps us in with business support programs” and seems to suggest that different sectors should compete for dollars coming from one pot, he said. “So agriculture would have to compete against automotive, or against this or against that.”

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you at www.agrinews.ca list of at-risk species. Protecting the latter two birds could have future implications for cutting hay — though Wales suggested plenty of habitat could be created if residents of Toronto were banned from mowing their lawns instead. It was particularly strange for Ontario to protect the bobolink, he said, when they are plentiful enough elsewhere to be eaten as a barbecued treat in the Caribbean. OSPCA And while the OFA wants to eliminate the warrantless entry provisions in the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, the organization couldn’t support a private members’ bill that aims to hand investigative authority to the Ontario Provincial Police, under the Criminal Code. Such a move would “put our members at risk” and place additional OPP costs on municipal taxpayers, he said. Wales favours the Nova Scotia model, where he said the agriculture ministry handles animal cruelty investigations on farms. Carleton-Mississippi Mills MPP Jack MacLaren has since amended his bill to do precisely that.

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The AgriNews April, 2012 Page 9

Community catches wind of developerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s land-leasing attempts By Nelson Zandbergen AgriNews Staff Writer HESTERVILLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A LARGE-SCALE

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WIND TURBINE

DEVELOPER IS QUIETLY SOLICITING LAND LEASES FROM FARMERS BETWEEN

CHESTERVILLE AND MOREWOOD, AND ELSEWHERE IN THIS EASTERN ONTARIO AREA. The canvassing effort

came to light when a resident caught wind of it and wrote a letter to her local newspaper urging farmers to be â&#x20AC;&#x153;neighbourly neighboursâ&#x20AC;? by refusing to sign with EDP Renewables. Elexco â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a London based consulting firm specializing in land services â&#x20AC;&#x201D; has been approaching landowners on behalf of the developer. Theresa Bergeronâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is no local newspaper ad saying, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;LAND WANTED TO BUILD WIND GENERATORS.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; March 28 letter to the editor of The Chesterville

Answers are blowinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in the wind Continued from page 7 â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you have a problem, solve it, and then tell people youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve solved it. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pretend it never happened in the first place. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been saying, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Solve these things,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; [and] they havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been.â&#x20AC;? The OFA contends that the 550-metre minimum turbine setback distance â&#x20AC;&#x201D; considered safe for residential neighbours â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ought to equally apply to the homes of farmers hosting the towering windmills on their land. Again, the province has yet to deal with this discrepancy, the president said. The OFA also wants assurances that a farmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proximity to wind turbines wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t encumber future barn construction projects â&#x20AC;&#x201D; potentially jeopardizing farm familiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; succession plans â&#x20AC;&#x201D; under minimum distance separation rules for agricultural

buildings that would end up protecting unmanned windmills from livestock odours in this case. The litany of unaddressed concerns, according to the OFAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jan. 20 statements, has left rural Ontario seriously divided over wind power. Things have â&#x20AC;&#x153;gotten out of control,â&#x20AC;? Wales said Feb. 29, adding that farmers are now involved in lawsuits because theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve signed a lease with a renewable energy company or have a turbine on their property. Resentment, he conceded, has also played a role in a riven rural Ontario. As alternative energy developers have fanned through rural Ontario, not every farmer has had the good fortune to be approached with a land-optioning offer.

Record appeared the same day that proponents hosted a special dinner event for landowner lease contenders at a local establishment â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the latest by-invitation-only meal schmoozer as EDP attempts to secure a â&#x20AC;&#x153;ballpark estimateâ&#x20AC;? of 10,000 acres in the area, confirmed the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s senior project manager, Ryan Brown. While the electrical output of the envisioned project is still undetermined, Brown said by telephone, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We generally target 100 megawatts.â&#x20AC;? Depending on model, individual windmills are typically rated between one or two megawatts each. EDP currently has no operational Ontario projects but is the third-largest wind-farm operator on a global scale, according to

Brown. The firm began its search for project land in 2011, and a swath north of Chesterville is one of â&#x20AC;&#x153;a coupleâ&#x20AC;? potential areas being explored, he said, declining to name the other one. Some land has already been optioned, though he wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t reveal how close the company is to reaching its acreage goal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still working on it. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re talking to a lot of folks at the moment.â&#x20AC;? Leasing landowners are paid even before a project breaks ground, he confirmed. The owners are able to crop their land as usual in the meantime, and the lease and its obligations carry forward in the event the farmer sells the property to someone else, he said. Asked how many farmers in the province are today being paid as landlords to hold their property in abeyance for proposed energy projects potentially years away from being built, Brown could offer no figure. He conceded that available grid capacity in the area is among the issues

still to be sorted out. Two major solar farms are already on the drawing board on properties north of Chesterville. Getting a wind project off the ground could take four to eight years, he suggested. Theresa Bergeron said she was informed by one of the solicited farmers that several landowners in the vicinity of her North Dundas Township residence were approached the developer. But Bergeron, who produces a line of socks made from the mohair fleece of Angora goats, said she wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t one of them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is no local newspaper ad saying, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;LAND WANTED TO BUILD WIND GENERATORS,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? observed the Crump Road resident in her published missive, alleging the process was being conducted â&#x20AC;&#x153;hush, hush, behind the scenes to avoid public dissent.â&#x20AC;? She concluded, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We will now see how neighbourly our neighbours truly are. Keep those generators away from settled areas.â&#x20AC;?

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AgriNews April pg 10_AgriNews February pg 10 12-03-30 12:02 PM Page 1

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OMAFRA Sunshine List Continued fromm page 5 GIBSON, SHELLEY, Director, Business Services, $138,148.47, $195.96 GILLESPIE, SUSAN, Senior Policy Advisor, $102,350.35, $147.39 GIMPELJ, GAIL, Senior Policy Advisor, $101,980.77, $147.69 GRAHOVAC, VESELJKA, Senior Policy Advisor, $101,317.09, $145.40 GUMBS, DIANE, Director, Communications, $136,360.75, $195.96 HAGERTY, THOMAS, Director, Economic Development Policy, $136,360.75, $195.96 HARRISON, HEATHER, Corporate Controller, $108,654.76, $156.57 HAVERSON, CLARENCE, Director, Environmental Management, $118,617.04, $171.82 HOPE, DAVID, Assistant Deputy Minister, Food Safety & Environment, $177,528.24, $249.87 HUBERS, RENA, Director, Food Inspection, $136,360.92, $195.96 ILNYCKY, JANNA, Manager, Business Development Policy, $108,655.83, $156.57 INNES, PAUL, Lead Veterinarian Provincial Biosecurity, $105,891.38, $147.69 JENNER, SHERI, Manager, Rural Economic Development, $104,364.39, $150.06 JENNER, TROY, Manager, Training, Education & Communications, $102,441.73, $145.10 KEEGAN, MICHAEL, Chief of Staff and Special Advisor to the Minister, $108,544.27, $159.48 KENNEDY, BRENT, Director, Client Services, $131,917.49, $191.43 KOMLJANEC, MARIJA, Manager, Training, Education & Communications, $100,456.36, $156.57 KOZA, JOSEPH, General Manager, Meat Inspection, $109,241.68, $837.53 KUEPFER, CHRISTINE, Director, Farm Finance, $132,515.71, $192.18 LAIDLEY, KEVIN, Manager, Client Programs & Service, $108,654.76, $156.57 MACHAN, ARVA, Manager, Regulated Marketing, $108,655.83, $156.57 MACNEIL, AILEEN, Director, Agriculture Development, $136,360.75, $195.96 MAITERTH, KARLHEINZ, Manager, Strategic Communications, $110,756.24, $156.57 MALCOLMSON, PHILIP, Secretary to the Commission, $132,654.56, $190.20 MARK, DERMOD, Manager, Traceability Programs, $108,654.76, $156.57 MARTEL, LOUIS, Regional Manager, Meat Inspection East, $100,976.07, $147.62 MARTELL, AMI, Lead Project Analyst, $104,517.02, $147.69 MARTIN, ANDREA, Manager, Policy Development, $108,655.83, $156.57 MCASLAN, KELLY, Manager, Strategic Planning & Client Management, $110,259.22, $156.57 MCBRIDE, GWEN, Director, Food Safety & Traceability Programs, $136,360.75, $195.96 MCCAW, GEORGE, Director, Strategic Policy, $136,360.75, $195.96 MCCLUNG, ELIZABETH, Senior Issues Management Team Leader, $102,076.07, $147.69 MCGEE, WILLIAM, Manager, Statistics, $102,076.07, $147.69 MCLEAN, JASON, Executive Assistant, $108,519.98, $156.62

MCNAB, BRUCE, Lead Veterinarian Preparation & Planning $104,517.02, $147.69 MCTAVISH, GARFIELD, Regional Manager, East Region, $108,015.17, $1,621.25 MILLER, DOROTHY, Senior Policy Advisor, $100,928.42, $147.69 NORKOOLI, RICHARD, Manager, Beef, Sheep & Goats, $104,714.48, $156.57 NORRY CAR, MARY ELLEN, Regional Manager, North Region, $108,654.76, $475.38 PATE, DAWN, Manager, Field Crops, $108,654.76, $156.57 PAYNE, JELENA, Manager, Community Economic Development, $104,797.62, $156.57 PEKARIC-FALAK, IVANA, Senior Policy Advisor, $102,745.27, $146.76 PHILIPPI, MARIANNE, Senior Policy Advisor, $102,076.07, $147.69 RADOCCHIA, DINO, Manager, Rural Investments, $110,323.09, $158.58 RANKINE, ANDY, Manager, Strategic Management Solutions, $109,415.66, $158.93 RELF, MICHAEL, Coordinator, Special Projects, $104,714.48, $156.57 RICHARDSON, JAMES, Director, Animal Health & Welfare and Office of the Chief Veterinarian, $136,886.99, $195.96 ROSENBERG, ALEXANDER, Senior Policy Advisor, $104,517.02, $147.69 SCHIECK, ALLAN, Manager, Finance, Infrastructure & Administration, $103,962.48, $152.87 SEEBER, BOBBY, Senior Policy Advisor, $104,483.17, $147.69 SENYSHYN, LEONARD, Manager, Approvals, Certification & Licencing, $108,654.76, $156.57 SINCLAIR, BARRY, Manager, Property Tax & Farm Finance, $110,757.33, $156.57 SVETIK, HELENE, Project Coordinator Livestock, Environment & Energy, $114,412.29, $0.00 TONDEVOLD, TAMMY, Senior Policy Advisor, $104,950.51, $147.69 TOOMBS, MICHAEL, Director, Research & Innovation, $138,148.47, $195.96 ULIANA, KARLA, Senior Policy Advisor, $102,106.34, $147.69 VANDER VEEN, SID, Drainage Coordinator, $112,981.53, $169.11 VANDERWOUDE, ROBERT, Manager, Veterinary Services, $108,654.76, $156.57 WALDIE-LAWSON, LILLIAN, Team Lead, $101,227.97, $146.68 WALKER, LEE-ANN, Director, Business Planning & Financial Management, $115,748.05, $164.70 WILSON PINKNEY, CATHERINE, Manager, Business Support Services, $105,037.71, $151.02 WINCHESTER, BONNIE, Assistant Deputy Minister, Economic Development, $171,936.73, $249.87 WOOD, NIGEL, Manager, Program Coordination, Research and Partnerships, $107,190.96, $156.57 WOODCOCK, LESLIE, Manager, Veterinary Inspection & Audit, $105,030.57, $156.57 WYNNE, MELODIE, Food Safety Information Management, $103,032.11, $147.69 YOUNG, PAMELA, Manager, Foods of Plant Origin, $108,654.76, $156.57 ZACHARIAH, OSWALD, Manager, Innovation & Knowledge Management, $104,502.85, $150.22

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AgriNews April pg 11_AgriNews February pg 11 12-03-30 12:06 PM Page 1

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Stormont wastes no time in readying for 2015 Continued from page 2 farm fields currently characterized by endless rows of corn stubble. “It’s a great honour, and I’m looking forward to it, actually,” said Armin Kagi of the big event slated to arrive at his farm in a little more than three years’ time. Neighbouring cash croppers Dale and Wendy Dingwall — she’s the proprietor of Wendy’s Diner in Moose Creek, and he’s a wintertime employee of North Stormont Township as well – have agreed to provide some adjoining land from their Finchdale Farms operation. Dale Dingwall highlighted how his father drove a tractor that hauled wagonloads of visitors into the 1958 IPM, outside Crysler; just like the O’Donohues, that antique Cockshutt remains in the family. He described the opportunity to be involved with the 2015 version as a “once in a lifetime thing.” Not a moneymaker for landowners

The AgriNews April, 2012 Page 11 While there is some compensation for farmers who lease their land for an IPM, Dingwall asserted: “You could make a lot more money putting it into crops.” The involved property owners are “only doing it to support the excitement of doing it” and to benefit their community, he said, adding, “Maybe when I’m 80 years old, I can look at the pictures on the wall and have some fond memories.” “It’s not a money-maker,” agreed Monica Kagi, commenting on the dollars involved. “The landowners are all people involved in this community, and they know what volunteer work is,” said Jeff Waldroff, president of the Stormont County Plowmen’s Association, which formally landed the successful IPM bid in early March. Arnie and Marion Hakvoort, and Marcel and Linda Leduc are also on board to provide some land, according to Waldroff, who’s still working to secure yet more property from additional owners in the vicinity. Aside from the acreages provided by the Kagis and O’Donohues, it’s still too early in the process to know exactly how much might be requested from any of the others, he said. The right spot “We knew we kind of wanted to be in this area,” Waldroff said of the Kagis’ neighbourhood, noting the presence of three-phase power lines, hookup to Finch’s town water supply only 500 feet away, road accessibility on two sides, and close proximity to Cornwall. He said the Ontario Plowmen’s Association encouraged the Stormont

organization to submit a bid on behalf of the local United Counties –as reflected in the official name of the event to be known as the 2015 International Plowing Match and Rural Expo — Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry. It’s scheduled to run September 22-26 that year. “In all truthfulness, no one else was bidding,” he said of their success at the OPA’s March 2 convention. Key officials from the OPA – including the organization’s electrician — made an exploratory visit to the proposed Finch site last fall, he revealed. They could have applied for the 2014 slot, but Waldroff said he wanted the extra year to prepare. Having occasion to speak with many farmers in the region at the recent Ottawa Valley Farm Show, he reported an “enormous amount of positive attitude” about the 2015 IPM. Not just Stormont Now in the process of forming a committee to organize the event, he emphasized the IPM will be an SD&G affair, not just a Stormont one. “Just because we’re in Stormont County doesn’t mean we don’t expect help from Dundas and Glengarry,” he said of the potential volunteer base. He pointed out that all SD&G taxpayers are contributing to a $100,000 loan through their United Counties government. He anticipates that not all of that money will be required, however, and that any draw on the loan will be paid back by an event he foresees running in the black through adequate gate receipts. “Enough to pay the

bills and have lots left over,” was as far as Waldroff would go, when asked for a prediction on turnout. Any excess funds will be split 50-50 between the committee and the OPA, he added. Sponsors In addition to SD&G, he identified the event sponsors to date as the Ontario Mutual Insurance Association (approximately $100,000), Hydro One ($350,000 in in-kind services), and the Bank of Montreal ($75,000 for the event, plus $25,000 distributed to local plowmen associations across the province.) The 2015 IPM also received its first actual cash donation this month, when the Finch North Stars Snowmobile Club handed organizers $1,000 in an apparent final act before closing down for good. The OPA also provides eight shipping containers filled with hydro poles and other infrastructure moved from IPM to IPM each year, he said. It’s a major production, one that can take its toll on land. But the OPA will monitor and fix tile-drainage damage at the venue, for up to two years after the IPM is over, according to Waldroff, a Newington dairy farmer who is a past president of the provincial organization. Incidentally, the group around the Kagi table also traded stories of at least one other local tractor that was on the ground at the predecessor IPM of ’58. But before the throngs of rumbling machines return in 2015, the event still has to go ahead this fall in Waterloo Region (Roseville), followed by Perth County (Mitchell) and Simcoe County (Ivy) in 2013 and 2014, respectively.

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AgriNews April pg 12_AgriNews February pg 12 12-03-30 12:12 PM Page 1

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Animal care advisor and overseer Gerald Rollins (left) is the Ontario Cattlemen’s Assocation reprentative on Farm & Food Care – a new entity established in January of this year through the amalgamation of the Ontario Farm Animal Council (OFAC) and Agricultural Groups Concerned about Resources and the Environment (AGCare) — that offers advice to farmers about animal care issues before the Ontario Society of Prevention Cruelty to Animals becomes involved. He appears with Larry Wilkinson, OSPCA senior inspector. Both men made presentations at the Ontario Sheep Marketing Agency District 10 meeting in Spencerville last month. Zandbergen photo

Sunnylodge Conntinued from page 3 “She was that good,” Smith said. The heifer went on to take top spot in the red-and-white show at the Royal Winter Fair in Toronto, after being sold to Milk Source Dairy in Wisconsin. Meanwhile, the original partnering owners of Greenlane Destry Laurel sold her off last spring, before she proceeded to make her mark at shows on behalf of Westcoast Holsteins in B.C. That included capturing the

“blue” ribbon last October at the World Dairy Expo Red & White show in Madison, Wisconsin, where she was Junior Champion. Smith said that red-andwhite Holsteins, as show animals, are gradually making gains, though the ubiquitous black-and-white remains superior. “Fifteen years ago, we didn’t have the modern style” in red-and-whites, he explained, adding that’s no longer the case. “The feet and legs are catching up.” He considers it a rewarding challenge to foster such improvements

while retaining the minority colouration that some farmers prefer and “really like,” he said. “If you want to stay red, you’re limiting the genetics you can work with,” he observed. Holstein aficionados with a penchant for the crimson hue should check out an upcoming sale at La Ferme Gillette Inc., in Embrun, where Smith says a sister of All-American Greenlane Destry Laurel will be going on the auction block. Mark Sept. 21 on your calendar for that event.

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AgriNews April pg 13_AgriNews February pg 13 12-03-30 12:16 PM Page 1

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The AgriNews April, 2012 Page 13

Coming source water plans to open new bureaucracy spigot New â&#x20AC;&#x153;risk management officersâ&#x20AC;? to oversee some landowners

By Nelson Zandbergen AgriNews Staff Writer INCHESTER â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A DOZEN YEARS AFTER THE WALKERTON TRAGEDY, NEW REGULATIONS

W

ARE DRAWING EVER CLOSER TO REALITY FOR RURAL EASTERN ONTARIO LANDOWNERS LOCATED INSIDE THE MOST VULNERABLE PORTIONS OF PROPOSED NEW MUNICIPAL WELLHEAD AND WATER INTAKE PROTECTION AREAS.

Affected residential property owners would see mandated septic-system inspections every five years, while small farming operations â&#x20AC;&#x201D; those exempt from provincial nutrient management legislation â&#x20AC;&#x201D; would for the first time face environmental oversight similar to their larger brethren, under a new â&#x20AC;&#x153;risk management planâ&#x20AC;? option imposed by a local risk management officer (RMO). The RMO would be hired or contracted by the local municipality, as part of an obligation to a region-wide sourcewater protection planning process begun several years ago, under the provincial Clean Water Act, and now nearing ratification. Having the legal status of provincial offences officer, the RMO would also oversee local businesses that store chemicals and fuel within specified zones deemed most vulnerable based on the amount of time a ground spill would take to travel through the soil and eventually contaminate a municipal well. Location within a zone of two years or less â&#x20AC;&#x201D; denoted in red on scientifically drawn maps released Feb. 29 by

the Raisin-South Nation Source Protection Region â&#x20AC;&#x201D; would trigger the new bureaucratic attention, according to information presented by local watershed and source protection officials to Township of North Dundas Council last month. Plenty of comments and concerns were voiced at the March 13 meeting â&#x20AC;&#x201D; from members around the council table, as well as a hog farmer in the audience whose operation happens to fall inside the red zone at the Maple Ridge well emplacement feeding Chesterville and Winchester. Eric Breteler expressed concern about the potential impact on his farm propertyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s potential resale value as well as the possible reaction from his banker and insurer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my bank going to say? Raise interest rates,â&#x20AC;? declared Breteler. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my insurance company going to say when they see all these nice maps? Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll want to raise my insurance cost.â&#x20AC;? Assuming he can even buy insurance, who will cover this extra expense? he asked later. South Nation Conservation environmental planning technician Allison McDonald emphasized that farmers like Breteler who have a nutrient management plan would already comply with the proposed new rules, although the RMO would still ask Ontarioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ministry of Agriculture, Food

and Rural Affairs to review and vouch for the effectiveness of these existing plans. The intent of the source protection committee, she said, was â&#x20AC;&#x153;not to bring down any more restrictions or costsâ&#x20AC;? but to â&#x20AC;&#x153;keep it business as usualâ&#x20AC;? for property owners. â&#x20AC;&#x153;By ensuring youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing the best management practices on your property, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re actually keeping the value high,â&#x20AC;? McDonald added, speaking to Breteler, â&#x20AC;&#x153;because youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re showing that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing everything to the highest standard possible.â&#x20AC;? Admitting the farmer had good questions, Raisin-South Nation Source Protection Region project manager Richard Pilon pointed out that the province, which the initiated source-protection planning process, wants to know the concerns of landowners and municipalities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want properties to go down [in value],â&#x20AC;? Pilon added. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be some shortfalls along the way,â&#x20AC;? conceded Raisin-South Nation Source Protection Region chair Claude Cousineau of Morewood. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s face it,â&#x20AC;? Cousineau assured, â&#x20AC;&#x153;farmers have been good land stewards for 150 years. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not concerned about farmers at all.â&#x20AC;? He said there was talk of some provincial funding to assist with costs, in partnership with municipalities and landowners.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Money they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have,â&#x20AC;? he quipped, referring to all of the parties in that equation. Small farms under the microscope Smaller farms lacking nutrient management plans that fall inside the vulnerable protection zone â&#x20AC;&#x201D;officially described as a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;wellhead protection area Bâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x201D; would have the option of creating an OMAFRA-style nutrient management plan or a new â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;risk management planâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; directly through the RMO. Even tiny hobby farms are seemingly captured by the proposed requirement, especially where the grazing of animals is concerned. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allow these activities to go unmanaged,â&#x20AC;? said McDonald, â&#x20AC;&#x153;so the municipality has to be confident these are being operated correctly.â&#x20AC;? Undertaking a risk management plan would be an â&#x20AC;&#x153;easy optionâ&#x20AC;? for these smaller operators, she said, adding as an example: â&#x20AC;&#x153;You know, if they have a couple of geese and they keep them fenced off from the riverâ&#x20AC;Ś. Someone comes in [and asks],â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Are you doing everything you can to protect drinking water?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your plan, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re good to go.â&#x20AC;? McDonald explained later that tweaking such a plan would be as simple as calling the official. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Say they wrote the plan for 10 grazing sheep, and [now] they want 15 sheep, they would phone up the RMO.â&#x20AC;? Well, well, well In North Dundas, the new wellhead protection zones would make a regulatory Continued on page 14

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AgriNews April pg 14_AgriNews February pg 14 12-03-30 12:23 PM Page 1

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Continued from page 13 imprint on the rural landscape just east of Maple Ridge, and at four additional well sites supplying Winchester — one south of Morewood, one within Winchester itself, and two others just west of Winchester, off County Rd. 31 and Spruit Rd. A rural area north of Morewood also falls within the allimportant red zone related to the Embrun/Marionville wellhead in Russell Township. The respective red zones for these wells are all differently shaped and based on the underground flow of water to each site, as determined by an earlier consultant’s study that considered the hydrology and geology affecting each one. They appear to be hundreds of acres in size. A large swath of Winchester village’s south side is situated in such a zone. The intent “of this whole program is to protect municipal drinking water, to prevent it from becoming

contaminated in the first place,” said Phil Barnes, water resources engineer at the Raisin Region Conservation Authority. Twenty-six municipal drinking water systems in the jurisdictional area of the South Nation and Raisin Region watershed authorities were assessed for vulnerability to 21 activities identified as threats to drinking water sources by the MOE. The spreading of manure — described as the “application of agricultural source material (ASM) to land” — and pesticide application are documented as the top “presumed” threats to both the Winchester and Chesterville wells. Use of biosolids or “application of non-agricultural source material (NASM)” also makes the list in Winchester’s case. Fuel storage is also identified as a risk factor for those wells – though it ranks higher for Winchester. Storage of certain chemicals — those of

the “dense non aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL)” variety, along with organic solvents and commercial fertilizers – also rank on the respective risk listings for North Dundas’s wells. “Risk management officials will go to each business [in a red wellhead protection area], are you using anything on this list,” said McDonald, noting that “volume triggers” come into play for the regulation of some substances. The RMO will have the authority to enter businesses to inspect the storage of chemicals, she said, observing that this power is a new one for municipalities. Some chemicals would be prohibited outright, under the proposed plan, she said, pointing to the example of a dry cleaner wanting to set up shop in a red zone. “If he wants to do business in this really small, specific area … he doesn’t need to use the most harmful chemicals.” Continued on page 15

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AgriNews April pg 15_AgriNews February pg 15 12-03-30 12:24 PM Page 1

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The AgriNews April, 2012 Page 15

Source water Continued from page 14 The new rules would also compel the township to camera-inspect village sewage lines located within the red zone every five years, or 10 years for newly installed pipes. North Dundas planning director Calvin Pol also predicted building-permit delays because of the new rules in vulnerable areas. He foresaw sending those applicants over to the RMO, to complete a risk management plan, before allowing them to apply for a permit from his department. He suggested there could be further problems around the notion of activity on a property versus the traditional idea of land use. “It gets really complicated.” Pol also pointed to potential legal implications for the township if it awards a building permit in the belief a property doesn’t require a risk management plan, then discovers otherwise. “Now what happens? Because a guy’s gone ahead constructing there, and then you find out, oops, he’s in a vulnerable area. There’s a lot of onus on the building official. “Now you’re into a lawsuit. There’s a lot of repurcussions about how this falls out over time.” “I don’t think it’ll be be too onerous,” opined Cousineau in reply. Pol also highlighted a concern over the lack of a third-party appeal mechanism, outside of court, for property owners who find themselves in disagreement with a powerful RMO. “When you have one individual go to the site, sees what has to be done, and drafts the plan for [the landowner], and then gets to be the appeal authority, and can lay tickets if you don’t do it … I’m a little bit nervous how this rolls out in the future. It’s a lot of power for one individual.” Councillor John Thompson suggested the RMO be subject to some external form of accountability. “Not everything will go the way you’re hoping it to go, so there should be some accountability for the inspector, if there is a disagreement in a recommendation.” But Councillor Al

Armstrong seized on a point reiterated by Pilon: the RMO will be working for the municipality, either as a township employee or perhaps subcontracted through South Nation Conservation, which is interested in providing the service. “You want an appeal mechanism but this is going to be one of our employees,” said Armstrong. “So how staunchly do we want to set up a committee than can appeal the guy that works for us, or the woman that works for us?” Mayor Eric Duncan observed that other municipal employees, such as the Chief Building Official, are not subject to an internal appeal process. The proposed RaisinSouth Nation Source Protection Plan is available for viewing online at yourdrinkingwater.ca

The second annual Rubber Boot Challenge took place on March 25 in Avonmore, to crown the best non-commercial maple syrup. This year the contest featured five entrants: Rob Berkvesn, Apple Hill, Donat Levac, Strathmore, Warren & Trudy MacIntosh, Apple Hill, Morris and Donna Dusomos, Newington and Amber & Rene Boer, Avonmore. For the second year in a row, Morris and Donna Dusomos took home the rubber boot as winners. Here, the official serves stand behind the samples given to guests, from left, Nicole Farkas, Sierra DeVries, Amber Johnston and Allison Wert. Matte photo

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AgriNews April pg 16_AgriNews February pg 16 12-03-30 12:51 PM Page 1

Page 16 The AgriNews April, 2012

Technical Updates

Dry cows are susceptible to heat stress too! By: Mario S. Mongeon Livestock Specialist - OMAFRA

T

he dry period in dairy cattle is critical in many ways and optimum conditions during the dry period will influence positively the outcome of the subsequent lactation. During the dry period, the mammary system undergoes many changes. Tissue grows and extensive cell turnover takes place. This process is required to compensate for the cell loss that took place during the previous lactation. The extent of the regeneration process dictates the number of milk producing cells as well as their production capacity. The absence of a dry period is associated with decreased milk production in the subsequent lactation since the mammary gland regeneration process is altered. Environmental factors such as photoperiod and temperature have been demonstrated to affect subsequent lactation as well. For example, cows exposed to short-day photoperiod during the dry period produce more milk and have improved immune function than similar animals dried-off under long-day photoperiod. Temperature is another important environmental factor. Dairy cows prefer cool temperatures. As the temperature gets warmer, especially if the relative humidity is high, signs of heat stress may start to show up: lower dry matter intake and reduced milk production for lactating animals. Dry cows can be negatively affected by warm temperatures as well and this is a less known fact. Furthermore, not only will dry cows exhibit signs of heat stress during the warm spell but the effects may extend well into the following lactation. From May to November of 2009 a study involving dry cows was conducted at the University of Florida in Gainesville. The objective of the project was to evaluate the effect of heat stress on the development of the mammary gland of dairy cows. Cows in late lactation were dried off about 46 days before the expected calving date, separated in 2 groups statistically similar, exposed to a fixed photoperiod of 10 hours of darkness, fed the same ration and housed in the same barn. The only difference between the 2 dry cow groups was exposure to heat stress. The heat stressed group was not provided with means to mitigate the effect of heat whereas the area of the barn housing the other group of dry cow was equipped with fans and sprinklers that would automatically turn on if the ambient temperature exceeded 21.1ºC. The sprinklers, when activated, were on for 1.5 minutes every 6 minutes. Various data were collected during the dry period as well as the following lactation for the first 40 weeks. During the dry period, cows exposed to cooling had a lower body temperature as well as a lower respiration rate compared to cows in heat stress. Furthermore, heat stressed dry cows had a shorter gestation length and consequently shorter dry period. The calves from the cooled dry cows were heavier than those from cows exposed to heat stress. During the first 40 weeks of lactation following the experimental treatment, cows that were exposed to heat stress during the dry period produced on average 5 kg of milk per day less than the cows exposed to cooling. In term of milk yield during the 40 weeks, this represents 1400 liters of milk and more than a thousand dollars at current milk prices in Ontario. The analysis of udder tissues sampled during the study provides evidence that heat stress during the dry period alters cell proliferation in the udder. Fewer secretory cells are produced and this in turn reduces milk yield capacity. This study emphasizes the necessity to take measures to reduce the impact of heat stress on cows. When tempera-

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tures rise above the animal’s comfort zone during the dry period, it could compromise the development of the mammary system, which decreases milk production in the following lactation. During the summer months, several means are available to mitigate the effects of warmer temperatures. Providing plenty of drinking water and making it easily available for the dry cows is an excellent first step. Access to shade, good ventilation and air movement are other simple means to reduce the impact of heat on the herd. Another method that can be used to reduce the effect of heat on the animals is to use water to cool them. Sprinkler or misting systems are fairly common in large herds in New Zealand and in the United States. Most of the time, sprinkler systems are associated with fans. The cooling effect of the water is enhanced by the evaporation induced by the fans. These systems are usually installed where cows congregate or above the animals at the feed bunk.

Effect of heat stress on dry cows: -Decreased milk production in the following lactation -Decreased milk solid yields -Negatively affect liver functions in early lactation -Decreased immune functions during the transition period

feed. • Thin cows will have poor quality and low levels of colostrum, have calves with less vigour and take longer to re breed.

Observe Cattle • Keep an eye on cows and particularly on heifers when calving just in case of twins or some other complication. • If at all possible manage young cows separately from the cow herd as they need additional nutrition to continue growing as well as all of the other things expected of a cow. • Be sure that yearling replacements heifers are growing adequately to reach breeding weights = 65% of their mature weight.

Herd Sires • Check out current bulls for health, condition and feet. Consider a breeding soundness test, particularly on older bulls. • Start looking for a new herdbull. Check out the BIO website for bulls in your area. Consider bulls that have high percentile rankings in the traits that matter most to you.

Keep some records • There are comprehensive record keeping systems available through companies such as BIO. • At a minimum the birthdate and ID of cow and calf should be recorded. Recording the birthweight with a scale or even as small, medium or large and things like the cow's temperament, condition and udder structure will be valuable in determining which cows should be culled and which heifers should be retained as replacements.

Begin pasture improvement by frost seeding established pastures.

Frost Seeding Works By: Barry Potter Agriculture Development Advisor - OMAFRA

(Adapted from Tao et AL,2011.) Reference: S. Tao , J. W. Bubolz , B. C. do Amaral , I. M. Thompson , M. J. Hayen , S. E. Johnson , and G. E. Dahl. Effect of heat stress during the dry period on mammary gland development J. Dairy Sci. 94 :5976–5986

Timely Tips for Beef Cattle By: Brian Pogue Beef Program Lead - OMAFRA

Prepare for the calving season. • Hopefully the cows are calving on grass in a very natural setting and if cows are in good shape and there has been proper genetic selection, there should not be any calving problems. • Have a clean new pasture upon which the cows can calve and a system to handle and move baby calves with their mom away from the main cowherd. Avoid muddy areas as they increase the cattle's nutritional needs, and contaminate udders which may result in scours. Increase the feed after calving as the cow's nutritional needs dramatically. • Be sure supplies are ready - calving book, eartags and facilities in case something must be given special attention.

Evaluate cows for body condition. • This has been an easy winter so cows should be in very good shape but if not then provide supplementary

T

he all terrain vehicle (ATV) roared up and down the field, ripping through the last snow drifts of winter. The passing vehicle slowed, the driver obviously wondering if his neighbouring farmer had finally lost his marbles. But no marbles had been lost. Instead, the spinner on the back of the ATV threw grass seed across the frozen field, to be lost into the slowly thawing soil. This activity would pay off later on, resulting in vigorous new growth in a thickening sward of pasture. Frost seeding is the name given to the process of spreading seed across fields in late winter and early spring. The thawing/freezing action in early spring acts to work the grass seed into the soil. Moisture from melting snow and spring rains helps the seed germinate. The new seedlings grow to thicken stands, providing more grazing for livestock.

Frost seeding can introduce legumes to improve pasture quality • Continued on Page 18


AgriNews April pg 17_AgriNews February pg 17 12-03-30 12:22 PM Page 1

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The AgriNews April, 2012 Page 17

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AgriNews April pg 18_AgriNews February pg 18 12-03-30 1:33 PM Page 1

Page 18 The AgriNews April, 2012 • Continued from Page 16 Recently (2009), at the Agriculture Canada Research Station at Kapuskasing, several fields were determined to have low or non existent legume content. The cows grazed existing grasses in the fall, leaving little residue. Red Clover seed was spread on the fields by ATV in April of 2010, while snow was still on the ground. The seeding rate was 10 lbs per acre. By early June it was evident that red clover now made up 50 % of the forage stand or greater in areas where previously there was no legume. In 2011, red clover was spread in additional fields. This time the rate was cut to 5 lbs per acre, and the grass was not grazed off in the fall. Evaluation in the summer demonstrated that the red clover per cent increased only marginally (less than 15 %.) Frost seeding is a concept that has been around for quite a while. The process imitates the natural process of seed heads shedding mature seed from plants onto the ground in the fall. While forage seed can be spread at any time, typical frost seeding now occurs in late winter/early spring. Farmers are afraid that seed spread in the late fall could germinate in a winter thaw, or be washed away in a spring melt. So usually the seed will be spread on the last melting snows of winter, or the frozen ground of an early spring day. The subsequent morning freezing and afternoon thawing works to lower the seed into the soil, ready to germinate in a sustainable environment as the soil temperature warms. Frost seeding is especially beneficial in areas where the pasture or hay field has "run out" of legumes. Legumes provide extra yield, and quality in the field, as well as taking nitrogen from the air, and making it available in the soil for grass roots to use. Clovers, trefoil and alfalfa are the legumes most used in frost seeding. The down side of alfalfa is a built in autotoxicity that allows existing alfalfa plants to kill any new germinating alfalfa seed. If there is existing alfalfa in a field, putting more alfalfa seed into the ground is counter productive. Red clover and white clover stands can be effectively rejuvenated with frost seeding. In the Kapuskasing trial, the application of 10 lbs per acre provided a dramatic increase in legume content. However, bear in mind that clovers can cause bloat. Managing pastures with thick clover stands can be a challenge. An option would be to include 5 lbs of clover and 3 lbs of trefoil. Trefoil does not cause bloat, and provides the same nitrogen fixing capability as clover. However, It can be harder to establish than the clovers. The experience at Kapuskasing, and research at Wisconsin demonstrates that having the cows graze off the pasture in late fall allows the seed better soil contact and more light to power the newly germinated plants. Frost seeding can work to rejuvenate old stands. Frost seeding of legumes also adds their nitrogen fixing capabilities to the sod, thus reducing the need to purchase as much commercial nitrogen fertilizer. While frost seeding is not as effective a strategy to rejuvenate a pasture as ploughing and working up the land, it is a much cheaper alternative than plowing with conventional seeding. Its also a great the way to improve fields that are too rough or hilly to be worked by conventional tillage.

Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference: View Sessions Online

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n December 1, the first bilingual Eastern Ontario Local Food Conference was held in Kemptville. Some of the sessions are now available online for archived viewing. The available sessions are: • Forging a Healthy Food System: Vermont’s New Path – Tom Stearns, High Mowing Seeds • Panel of Eastern Ontario Local Food Initiatives • Measuring Economic Success • The Local Food Consumer: An Update from Foodland Ontario • Accessing the Retail Market To view the sessions of your choice, visit www.agriwebinar.com. You will need to create a FREE account using your e-mail address. Then visit “Past Webinars”.

Agricultural links at www.agrinews.ca

Growing Strawberries Organically

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rowing Strawberries Organically is the newest handbook published by Canadian Organic Growers (COG) in its Practical Skills series of technical manuals for organic agriculture. The book and the series continue COG’s commitment and success in educating organic and transitioning growers. The Practical Skills series and other handbooks are available from Canadian Organic Growers on the web at www.cog.ca or by phone at 1-888-375-7383 (Canada) or 1-613-216-0741. The cost is $22.00. Online Courses For Beginning Farmers From Cornell University Accessible, comprehensive course calendar for beginning farmers: http://nebeginningfarmers.org/online-courses/all-courses/

New Video Series Delivers Farm Business Planning Expertise

O

n January 4, 2012, the Agricultural Management Institute (AMI) launched the Farm Business eTeam Video Series - an online farm business planning resource. Each week for eight weeks, AMI will release a new video featuring insights from farmers and business experts. The virtual team will help farmers review their past performance and plan for the future, including financial management, cost of production, marketing, human resources, succession planning, and overall business planning. Farmers can access the Farm Business eTeam Video Series in the comfort of their office at a time that's convenient and at no cost Visit www.TakeANewApproach.ca for more informa-

tion and to watch the video series. AMI is part of the Best Practices Suite of programs for Growing Forward, a federal-provincial-territorial government initiative.

Receive Funding For Planting Trees!

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number of the grant programs offered through South Nation Conservation cover the majority of the costs associated with planting projects. South Nation staff will help you apply for the grants, and arrange for the tree planting and site preparation by local professionals. Your property might qualify if it has any ONE of the following features: planting area over 2.5 acres; is along a water course; or is within the City of Ottawa. Bareroot trees are also available for smaller projects Would you like to know how to manage your woodlot more sustainably? If so, the Woodlot Advisory Service may be for you. This service is free & voluntary to anyone who owns a minimum of 5 acres or more. For further information, please call Rose-Marie Chrétien at 877-9842948 OR rchretien@nation.on.ca. You may also our website at www.nation.on.ca/en/your-forests/.

Rural Summer Jobs Applications Coming Soon

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he 2012 Ontario Rural Summer Jobs Service is now accepting applications from eligible employers who plan to create summer jobs for rural youth. Eligible businesses and community organizations in rural Ontario can apply for a hiring incentive of $2 per hour to create student employment. Online application forms are available for eligible employers. • The online application form takes less than 10 minutes to complete and ensures that your information is uploaded quickly and accurately. • After completing the form simply type your name in the signature field. This is considered an electronic signature for the purpose of the contract. • Click submit and you’re done! There is no need to print the application and send it in. • You will receive a confirmation email after hitting the submit button. Should you have trouble submitting your online application please contact us at 1-888-588-4111. Completed application forms must be submitted by April 16, 2012. Please note: • If your business or organization is located in a town, small city or rural township with a population of 100,000 or less, you are eligible to apply to this program. • The program will provide each eligible applicant a minimum of one (1) student placement. The maximum hours that can be claimed per eligible student placement are 560 hours (35 hours/week x 16 weeks) for a maximum amount of $1120 (560 hours x $2/hour) per full time position awarded. • Additional student placements may be approved depending on available funding. • Submission of an application is not a guarantee that all positions will be approved. • Eligible student placements may begin effective April 1, 2012 and will end on or before September 30, 2012. • Application approvals will be confirmed with employers by the end of May 2012. Should you have any questions regarding the Rural Summer Jobs Service program, please do not hesitate to contact us at 1-888-588-4111 or email rsjs.omafra@ontario.ca. Hard copy application forms are

available upon request.

Ontario Vineyard Improvement Program

I

ntake 2 of the Ontario Vineyard Improvement Program (OVIP) is now open. Applications are being accepted on a first come, first served basis and can be submitted in person at the Ridgetown, Brighton, Vineland, Simcoe and Guelph offices, by mail, fax or by email. The Intake will remain open until March 31, 2012 or until funding is fully allocated. For contact information or further information about the program requirements and documents please visit the website at www.ontario.ca/improvingvineyards.

Resources

Programs and Services

Les programmes, les services et les ressources du ministère de l’Agriculture, de l’Alimentation et des Affaires rurales de l’Ontario sont également disponibles en français. Continued on page 32

Agricultural Market Information System (AMIS)

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ntroducing the newly released Agricultural Market Information System (AMIS) website.

AMIS is a G20 initiative. It is a global agricultural market information system that concerns itself with matters relating to wheat, maize (corn), rice and soybeans. It aims to enhance food market outlook information, by strengthening collaboration and dialogue among main producing, exporting and importing countries, commercial enterprises and international organizations. AMIS aims to:


AgriNews April pg 19_AgriNews February pg 19 12-03-30 2:40 PM Page 1

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The AgriNews April, 2012 Page 19

Hemp - an ancient plant with a new future in Ontario Catherine Thompson AgriNews Contributor EMPTVILLE THERE ARE SOME EXCITING OPPORTUNITIES FOR CROP PRODUCERS IN ONTARIO,

K

BECAUSE A NEW COMPANY IS DEVELOPING INDUSTRIAL HEMP, BUCKWHEAT FOR EXPORT MARKET AND GLUTEN FREE OATS, ALONG WITH OTHER CROPS.

ValleyBio has conducted nitrogen yield optimization trials with the Ontario Soil and Crop Improvement Association. It also has done planting date fertility growth regulator trials at Kemptville Campus, University of Guelph. At a seminar at the Eastern Ontario Crop Conference here on Feb. 23, ValleyBio president Reuben Stone outlined their work on pedigreed hemp seed and its genetics right up to the final stage of food processing, performed out west. According to a company profile, ValleyBio Ltd. in Cobden is “eastern Canada’s largest contractor of food grade hemp, a product which lets growers put four times as many dollars in a grain bin over corn, 2.5

times as many dollars shipped on a B-train truck over IP Soys. Put the combine back to work between cereal and soy harvest with no timing conflict.” Stone told listeners that hemp is Cannabis Sativa, the same plant as marijuana, but it has the THC bred out of it. “It’s the puppy dog variety,” he says. The plant is bred for its food quality and high protein levels, similar to those found in dairy milk and it is rich in Omega fatty acids, amounting to as much as 200 liters of pure fatty acids from an acre of crop. “We’re breeding below .03 per cent actually in the plant - that’s in the flower. In the food product there’s less than 10 ppm. There is more arsenic in a bottle of wine and more mercury in your town water,” he states. Canada is currently the world leader in hemp production and if anything happened to the main crop out west, the industry would be in trouble, Stone says. For this reason Manitoba Harvest, the company that takes ValleyBio products for processing has a strategy of diversifying

over into Ontario. Research by ValleyBio shows hemp has a long illustrious history, starting with the development of agriculture 10,000 years ago. It was one of the first crops Europeans brought to North America. It was also once legal tender for taxes in the U.S.A and helped the Allies win both World Wars, with 300,000 acres grown in 1943. The Canadian hemp industry was renewed in 1998, when it was permitted under conditions of the

Controlled Substances Act. Production is growing about 50 per cent annually and it is forecast to reach over 100,000 acres by 2014. It is a very large part of Stone’s own crop and he hopes to have 10,000 acres contracted for hemp by 2014. Stone says when hemp came to Ontario 14-15 years ago, it was intended to be a fiber crop, but they “missed the step that the food value is very high. They caught on to that out

west first and now they’re trying to bring it to Ontario.” The germ plasm for hemp came from the old Soviet countries of Romania and the U.S.S.R. where they were never “on probation” as in Canada, Stone states. “They continued to use hemp as their fiber stock through all those years.” Stone’s varieties include Anka, a dual-purpose grain fiber which was first developed in Ontario for Ontario and has a long season. It is

now exempt from THC testing in the field. This year, ValleyBio will introduce a new variety, Jutta which is suitable for Ontario and Quebec, with a little better yield than Anka. It is slightly shorter in the field and more uniform. Allysa is similar to Anka but has a shorter season, thus is suited to Northern Ontario. Stone says it is one of the varieties that the industry was built on out west. Continued on page 27

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Eastern Ontario Crops Day speaker Reuben Stone of ValleyBio in Cobden. Thompson photo

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AgriNews April pg 20_AgriNews February pg 20 12-03-30 1:48 PM Page 1

Page 20 The AgriNews April, 2012

AdWatcher surfs the classifieds for you at www.agrinews.ca

The people who bring you the Ottwa Valley Farm Show Directors of the Ottawa Valley Seed Growers Association and staff members of the Ottawa Valley Farm Show gathered for a group photo at the conclusion of the Prestigiouzs Pedigreed Seed Sale on Thurs., March 15 as the 85th annual OVFS at Ottawa’s new Capital Exhibition Centre started to draw to a close.Front from left, Don Cochran, Ivor Williams, Walter Foster, presidentBruce Hudson, John Posthumus, Keith Matthie and Lynda McCuaig. Centre row from left, Mary Joynt, manager Tom Van Dusen, Barry Dean, Keith Lackey, Jim Arbuckle, RobertDessaint, Graham Hudson, Jeff Waldroff, Kathy Hardy, Brian Hudson and BobDick. Back row from left, Graham Hardy, Burt Grundy, Roy Carver, Cecil Cass, John Joynt, David Blair and Don Giff. Zandbergen photo

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AgriNews April pg 21_AgriNews February pg 21 12-03-30 12:36 PM Page 1

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The AgriNews April, 2012 Page 21

85th annual OVFS Pedigreed Seed Show

WILMARVALE ELEVATORS LTD. The Barclay Dick Challenge Trophy for the best exhibit of Red Clover was won by Bruce and Brian Hudson, Carleton County. Bruce Hudson accepts the trophy from Chris Armstrong.

The Bishops Farms Seeds Plaque Exhibitor for the Championship in the Barley Class was won by: Gary Gordon, Frontenac County, left, who accepted the trophy from Matt Taylor.

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The Ed Wallace & Issac Wallace Challenge Trophy for the Championship Hay Exhibit was won by Lindsay Gordon, Frontenac County, and was presented by Keith Lackey

More photos on page 25 Nelson Zandbergen Photos

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AgriNews April pg 22_AgriNews February pg 22 12-03-30 12:39 PM Page 1

Page 22 The AgriNews April, 2012

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Check out Wilkin today. The yield leader will help you maximize profits. All C&M Seeds varieties come treated with Cruiser Maxx Cereals and Proseed. Call Us today to see how much it will help your field! 1-888-733-9432 www.redwheat.com

Carleton Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 4-H Judging team placed third and received their awards from (front left) Barb Keith and (back) Barb Vance and Barry Dean. In the photo are team members are Maggie Flewellyn, Devon Dean and Kathryn Stanton.

Barb Keith and Barry Dean presented the first-place 4-H team judging award to a member of the winning foursome, from Pontiac County, QC.


AgriNews April pg 23_AgriNews February pg 23 12-03-30 12:43 PM Page 1

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The AgriNews April, 2012 Page 23

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OVFS 4-H judging awards

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Frontenac Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 4-H Judging Team member Lindsay Gordon accepts the second-place team award from Barry Dean and Barb Keith.

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1964,=´7 The Lanark Mutual Insurance Company award for the winner of the 4-H Judging Competition was presented to Trent Ziebarth by Reg Campbell. Ziebarth also accepted an award from the OVSGA presented by Barry Dean. Laura StephensDagg placed second.

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Jeanette Straathof accepts the third-place individual judging award for Matthew Straathof. It was presented by Barb Keith.

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AgriNews April pg 24_AgriNews February pg 24 12-03-30 1:24 PM Page 1

Page 24 The AgriNews April, 2012

Over 2,000 stories archived at www.agrinews.ca

Falling Star Farms looks forward Port of Prescott By Nelson Zandbergen AgriNews Staff Writer ST-EUGENE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Falling Star Farms is taking a step up. A new free-stall dairy barn sits at the peak of the natural rise punctuated by the tidy farmstead visible from County Rd. 10. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a good time. Interest rates were low, and my old barn was done,â&#x20AC;? says Jeffrey MacLeod of the milking herdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s original tie-stall home, an early 20th century hip-roofed barn situated a stoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s throw from its 18,000-square-foot replacement. As workmen busily put the finishing touches inside the airy and spacious structure â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including a doubleeight herringbone milking parlour at the heart of the place â&#x20AC;&#x201D; MacLeod and his spouse, Melissa MacPhee, led The AgriNews on a tour mere days before those 46 Holsteins would move into their new digs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was either build or quit,â&#x20AC;? says MacLeod, a welderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s arc busily crackling in the background amid 108 empty stalls. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no fun working in the other barn, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not milking enough cows,â&#x20AC;? adds the 43year-old, explaining that too much labour is currently required for the amount of milk produced at Falling Star, where the herd now averages about 36 litres daily per cow. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s animal welfare, too,â&#x20AC;? he thoughtfully adds, citing another factor that played into the decision to eschew the old tie-stall environment. MacLeod admits to being a bit of a contrarian by building a new and expanded barn today, when quota is not available in significant quantity to quickly accommodate his envisioned herd expansion to more than 100 head. But it was actually good time to

Farm family

Melissa MacPhee, Jeff MacLeod and sons Logan, 2, and Cody, 5, stand inside the new free-stall barn at Falling Star Farms. The family dairy operation hosted an open house event to showcase the improvements on March 31.

proceed, he asserts, pointing to the availability of barn-building contractors and low interest rates. And heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s buying quota in the small amounts that do become available; the last purchase netted about .4 kg. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to sit around and wait.â&#x20AC;? He and MacPhee went on a number of barn tours before settling on the chosen design. They began talking to an engineer just over a year ago, with project groundbreaking occurring early last fall. Sylvain Cheff Construction of Bourget was selected as general contractor. The frame of the structure is a mixture of steel uprights and wooden trusses above to form the expansive roof. A combination of bright, white metal and glossy puckboard clads the interior, which is bathed in natural light streaming through translucent inflatable turkey curtains on the main walls. Typical of the modern free-stall, those glass windows that do exist are of the large residential variety, situated at the main entrance in front of the par-

lour and alongside an adjoining area of offices, utility and control rooms and milkhouse. The parlour is also well lit thanks to a large, glass-panelled, garage-type door off the main entrance. MacLeod says they chose the four-row, centrealley configuration, which offers a little more space per animal compared to a six-row barn. As tradesmen methodically installed the final ceramic tiles lining the feed manger on either side of that alley, he says the cows will only benefit from the extra square footage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They have everything they need to be happy. The air quality is so much better.â&#x20AC;? During the twice-daily milkings, those bovines will make their way to the crowding area and a double-eight, automated herringbone parlour, and on their way out, amble through a foot bath and an impressive three-way GEA Westfalia sorting gate â&#x20AC;&#x201C; systems sold and installed by Lawrenceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dairy Supply of Moose Creek. Mike Johnsen, one of

the firmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s owners, says that parallel parlours are somewhat more popular than the herringbone configuration these days but notes the latter design has its advantages. Continued on page 40

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AgriNews April pg 25_AgriNews February pg 25 12-03-30 12:45 PM Page 1

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The Hal Botham Memorial Trophy, awarded annually to the Champion Exhibitor of Forage Seeds, was won this year by Brian and Bruce Hudson, Carleton County. It was prresented by Kathy Botham.

The OVSGA Challenge for the Champion Exhibit of Haylage was won by Gary Gordon, Frontenac County, left, and was presented by Bruce Hudson.

The Embrun Agricultural Co-Op Trophy for the Champion Shelled Corn was won by Laurier Bruyere, Russell County, who accepted it from David Blair.

The C & M Trophy for the Champion Wheat in the open classes was won by Francis Henderson, Dundas County. It was presented by Rob McLaughlan and accepted by Tracey Porteous.

More photos on page 41

The AgriNews April, 2012 Page 25

The E.H.Wallace Memorial Trophy for the Champion exhibit of Soybeans won by John and Jeannette Devries and was presented by Willis McCormick to John Devries.

The Nation Valley Potato Growersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Trophy for the Championship Exhibitor of Potatoes was won by Kathryn Stanton. Presenting the trophy is Jim Arbuckle


AgriNews April pg 26_AgriNews February pg 26 12-03-30 1:13 PM Page 1

Page 26 The AgriNews April, 2012

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Congratulations

FALLING STAR FARMS

to Melissa MacPhee & Jeff MacLeod with sons Cody & Logan on their

NEW BARN

CONGRATULAT IONS JEFF, MELISSA, CODY AND LOGAN!

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AgriNews April pg 27_AgriNews February pg 27 12-03-30 12:51 PM Page 1

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The AgriNews April, 2012 Page 27

An ancient crop with a new future Continued from page 19 Stone uses â&#x20AC;&#x153;hermaphroditeâ&#x20AC;? plants, because of the uniformity of ripening and because there are fewer issues with equipment than with the male plant. Dual-purpose varieties Fiber type plants will grow up to 12 feet high and are too tall for most combines while the grain types grow to three to six feet tall and are not good quality fiber. So ValleyBio focuses on growing dual-purpose varieties that average seven to eight feet. In this way, they can take advantage of the current demand for hemp as a food source. If in future, a market develops for fiber, the company will be ready for it. He says ValleyBio didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get a license from Health Canada to plant until June 1 and â&#x20AC;&#x153;we still got a very respectable crop.â&#x20AC;? Stone recommends holding off on planting too soon and early nitrogen application, say May 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;or it will fuel everything right off the get go. Hemp doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t put any effort into producing seed until it hits the summer solstice and then it will start to flower and it cuts off energy to the top growth and starts producing grain. So if we plant May 1, we just get taller plants.â&#x20AC;? On one plot with a clay loam soil, as much as 200 lb. of nitrogen per acre made hemp grow a foot

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still trying to figure out the basics for hemp and the top yield was nine tonnes an acre at 150 lb. (of nitrogen)â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

Reuben Stone

taller and much greener. With this trial the fertility was just nitrogen, with no effort yet to figure out micronutrients. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still trying to figure out the basics for hemp and the top yield was nine tonnes an acre at 150 lb.â&#x20AC;? While ValleyBio looks for lighter soils, hemp has been grown on heavy soils with good success. In seed production, heavy soils limit the root development and the crop stays shorter and easier to manage, Stone says. He adds weed control should be done preplanting with Round Up burn down ahead of time. Right now there is no registered product for weed control in hemp. Assure is registered for grass control on fiber hemp and trials have been done with Pardner for broad leaf control. Stone says Lance is undergoing trials in southern Ontario at one of the research centers for fungicide control. But right now fungicide is not an issue. Plant density is about 80

to 110 plants per sq. meter but that number is coming down. Also ValleyBio is getting varieties that are more â&#x20AC;&#x153;monofolialâ&#x20AC;?, meaning a single stem comes up with no branching. This is easier on the combine because the head of the plant goes in flat. All in all, â&#x20AC;&#x153;hemp is a low maintenance crop that is not subject to insect or wildlife damage. It is rare to require herbicide and pesticide products, with a good start and adequate fertility it manages weeds on its own. It is a good break crop to disturb life cycles of pathogens and pests in the soil.â&#x20AC;? Also, it has lower nutrient requirements and better drought tolerance than corn. With a grain only harvest hemp removes little nutrient from soil and retains large amounts of residue. A good stand will leave a field clean and ready for fall seeded cereal or cover crop. ValleyBio ValleyBioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production contract is for commercial grain production and the

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company is also interested in pedigreed seed growers for multiplication of seed. Growers must fill out applications to Health Canada with basic information about identities, locations and destinations of the crop. Fields should be marked and if land is rented, permission obtained from landowners along with a criminal record check. Stone â&#x20AC;&#x153;highly recommends growers mark their own field and for our growers we call it into the police station anyway.â&#x20AC;? ValleyBio plans another field day with a combine clinic in August featuring a price giveaway to attendees. Growers who commited to a production contract of 25 acres before the Ottawa Valley Farm Show ended March 15 were eligible for two tickets to the March 24 game between the Senators and Pittsburgh Penguins.

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AgriNews April pg 28_AgriNews February pg 28 12-03-30 2:23 PM Page 1

Page 28 The AgriNews April, 2012

Searchable archive at www.agrinews.ca

Prescott producers open their doors One of the most eastern stops on the Prescott County Barn Tour, March 24, was in St. Eugene at Redstone Holsteins. The farm, operated by Stefan and Linda Kunz along with their daughters, from left Mackenzie and Michaela, invited guest to see their four-row freestall barn with double10 swing parlour. Matte photos

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s TRUE There is still time to plant

BUCKWHEAT You can plant it up to July 15th: â&#x20AC;˘ It conditions the soil â&#x20AC;˘ Put those idle acres to profit. â&#x20AC;˘ It requires no inputs. â&#x20AC;˘ Follow pasture, hay or green chop. â&#x20AC;˘ It pays quickly at â&#x20AC;˘ Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to manage. harvest time. â&#x20AC;˘ It suppresses weeds. We are now contracting 2008 Crop Buckwheat; you need to buy new seed from us.

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Delay. Contact us now to order seed and reserve your contract.

1-877-984-0480 Berwick, Ontario K0C 1G0 www.homesteadorganics.ca

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AgriNews April pg 29_AgriNews February pg 29 12-03-30 12:53 PM Page 1

Over 2,000 stories archived at www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews April, 2012 Page 29

NEW SERVICE: HAYBUSTER TUBE GRINDER Grinds big round & square bales of hay and straw

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GRINDING OF GRAINS: GU\DQGKLJKPRLVWXUHFRUQ

A la mode

CALL THOMAS AT 613-524-9959 OR 613-316-2320

One of the stops on the Prescott County Barn Tour, on March 24, was Bonnie Brae Farms just east of Vankleek Hill. The farm is operated by, from left, Kelsey, Susan and Bruce Mode and is home to the Jr. Champ of the EOWQ Show â&#x20AC;&#x2122;10 and â&#x20AC;&#x2122;11. Here the family poses with some of their awards just outside the entrance to their barn.

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One of the stops on the Prescott County Barn Tour, on March 24, was Bonnie Brae Farms just east of Vankleek Hill. The farm is operated by, from left, Bruce, Susan and Kelsey Mode and is home to the Jr. Champ of the EOWQ Show â&#x20AC;&#x2122;10 and â&#x20AC;&#x2122;11. Here the family poses in their barn.

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AgriNews April pg 30_AgriNews February pg 30 12-03-30 12:57 PM Page 1

Page 30 The AgriNews April, 2012

Agricultural links at www.agrinews.ca

Barn and House Wall Repairs

613-561-1802

Email: robsangers@me.com www.sangersilo.com Emerald Ash Borer a continuing concern Tammy Watson, Ministry of Natural Resources Management Technician (Kemptville District) and Lincoln Rowlinson, MNR Forest Health Technical Specialist (Sault Ste. Marie District) presented information on the ongoing Emerald Ash Borer infestation in Eastern Ontario, Feb. 22 at the Winter Woodlot Conference in Kemptville.

Taking the cake The steering committee behind Februaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 25th annual Kemptville Winter Woodlot Conference had a special cake made up for the occasion.

Forest certification promoted Chestervilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s David Whetter, president of the Stormont, Dundas & Glengarry Certified Woodlot Owners Inc. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; an entity set up with support from the United Counties of SD&G and the Resource Stewardship Council of SD&G â&#x20AC;&#x201C; was on hand to promote forest certification at the Kemptville Winter Woodlot Conference, Feb. 22. There are over 50 certified woodlots in SD&G, according to Whetter. The participating owners pay a $50 annual fee and receive a number of benefits, including expert advice and a designation for their forest products internationally recognized by large retailers.

KIRCHMEIER FARMS Custom Work  (TXLSSHGZLWKELJĂ&#x20AC;RWDWLRQWLUHV  6SUHDGLQJZLGWKXSWRÂś  6DQGORDGHGPDQXUH  ([FHOOHQWIRUIHUWLOL]LQJJUDVVÂżHOGV OLPHDQGFRPSRVWDSSOLFDWLRQ

INTERESTED IN COMPOST? ORDER IT THROUGH US FOR 2011.

SOLID MANURE SPREADING WITH TEBBE SPREADER

CALL THOMAS AT 613-524-9959 OR 613-316-2320

LICENSED GRAIN ELEVATOR Corn and Soybean Dealer

Special edition for a special anniversary Maple Ridge Farm proprietor Gary Ivens shows off one of the special 25th anniversary Kemptville Winter Woodlot Conference bottles of maple syrup produced by his Apple Hill operation. The Apple Hill producer made his first appearance at the conferenceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trade fair. He was looking forward to making the first maple syrup of the 2012 season later that weekend, a record early start, he said, providing the mild weather held (but, as it turns out, temperatures plummeted, delaying the sap to a more typical start in March.)

We Offer: Trees Ontario Wade Knight, field advisor for Trees Ontario, delivered a Feb. 22 presentation about the provincial program that aims to plant 50 million trees by 2020. For landowners to be eligible for funding, the potential planting area must be open land at least 2.5 acres in size. While the spring 2012 planting schedule is already filled up, organizers are still accepting applications for inspections to occur this summer, for plantings in 2013.

â&#x20AC;˘ Forward Contracts â&#x20AC;˘ Drying â&#x20AC;˘ Trucking â&#x20AC;˘ Storage

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18408 Conc. 15, Maxville, Ont. marc@bourdon.ca Tel.: 613-527-2859 Fax: 613-527-3468

1-888-342-5795


AgriNews April pg 31_AgriNews February pg 31 12-03-30 2:28 PM Page 1

Searchable archive at www.agrinews.ca

Feds invests in green research F INCH â&#x20AC;&#x201C; CANADIAN

USE AND MITIGATE GREEN-

FARMERS WILL HAVE

HOUSE GAS EMISSIONS.

THE OPPORTUNITY TO

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our Governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top priority remains the economy, and Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agriculture industry plays a vital role in keeping our economy strong,â&#x20AC;? said Mr. Lauzon. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This unique research will provide science-based technologies to maximize the efficiency of water usage, leading to reduced costs and larger profits for our farmers while lessening the impact on our environment.â&#x20AC;? The South Nation Conservation Authority will use the funding to study

INCREASE THEIR PROFITS WHILE IMPROVING THE ENVIRONMENT WITH THE SUPPORT OF THE

GOVERNMENT OF CANADA. MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT GUY LAUZON (STORMONTDUNDAS-GLENGARRY), ON BEHALF OF AGRICULTURE MINISTER GERRY RITZ, ON MARCH 21 ANNOUNCED AN INVESTMENT OF OVER

$600,000 TO THE SOUTH NATION CONSERVATION AUTHORITY TO STUDY NEW DRAINAGE PRACTICES THAT WOULD IMPROVE WATER

how controlled tile drainageâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a beneficial management practice that allows producers to manage water using a simple, inexpensive modification to their existing field drainage systemsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;can potentially mitigate greenhouse gas emissions caused by cropping activities while simultaneously improving water quality and crop yields. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are pleased to partner with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada on the Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Program,â&#x20AC;? said Dennis Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Grady, General Manager-

Secretary/Treasurer of the conservation authority. â&#x20AC;&#x153;South Nation Conservation sees this as an excellent opportunity to provide local farmers with the science and technology to manage greenhouse gases from crop production, which will have benefits for farms across Canada.â&#x20AC;? This investment is pro-

The AgriNews April, 2012 Page 31 vided through the tion to the Global Research Agricultural Greenhouse Alliance on Agricultural Gases Program (AGGP), a Greenhouse Gases, an interfive-year, $27-million ininational network of more tiative that focuses on the than 30 member countries development of on-farm that will coordinate and greenhouse gas mitigation increase agricultural technologies. The AGGP research on greenhouse gas will provide funding to var- mitigation and make new ious partners across Canada mitigation technologies and to investigate innovative beneficial management mechanisms, tools and practices available to farmapproaches that provide real ers. solutions for the agriculture For more information on sector. the Alliance, visit The AGGP represents http://www.globalreCanadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s initial contribusearchalliance.org/

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Stormont-Dundas-South Glengarry MP Guy Lauzon and SNC Board Chair Lawrence Levere are pictured with a controlled tile drainage unit. Funding from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada announced March 21st  will be used to study how controlled tile drainage can improve water quality and crop yields while reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

PUMPELLER New

Choose the length or any option needed and turbine (540 or 1,000)

High volume pressure gun goes through the thickest layer. The sharp edges cut the solids into pieces.

High volume propeller sucks in solid and liquid manure.

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AgriNews April pg 32_AgriNews February pg 32 12-03-30 12:52 PM Page 1

Page 32 The AgriNews April, 2012

Agri-business directory at www.agrinews.ca

OMAFRA Connects Continued from page 18 â&#x20AC;˘ improve agricultural market information, analyses and forecasts at both national and international levels; â&#x20AC;˘ report on abnormal international market conditions, including structural weaknesses, as appropriate and strengthen global early warning capacity on these movements; â&#x20AC;˘ collect and analyse policy information, promote dialogue and responses, and international policy coordination; and â&#x20AC;˘ build data collection capacity in participating countries. Visit the new website and check for updates at: www.amis-outlook.org

PROFIT New-toExporting Seminar

P

ROFIT, a two-day seminar, organized by OMAFRA is a longrunning and highly successful export-focused program which will give you a solid introduction to whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s involved in exporting food and beverage products to the U.S. The seminar, featuring over 15 speakers, is a hands-on orientation covering the basic requirements for food and beverage exporters. Topics include export financing, product labelling, U.S. tax laws, U.S. food brokerage, U.S. food distribution, U.S. Food and Drug regulations,

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U.S. Customs and Border Protection, and U.S. customs brokerage. Export development services, provided by Ontario Food Exports will also be presented. Half a day will be spent in Toronto, then participants will travel by motorcoach to Buffalo for the next day-and-a-half. The cost includes the PROFIT GuideBook (containing all presentation materials), round-trip transportation to Buffalo, accommodation in Buffalo and all meals. Please note this seminar is offered only once a year and is restricted to 25 participants. For more information, or to register, call Jennifer Hannam at 519-826-3747 or email jennifer.hannam@ontario.ca. When: June 5-6 Where: Toronto and Buffalo Cost: $350 + HST

Hay & Straw Buy / Sell Services

A

reminder of the Ontario Forage Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ontario Hay Listingsâ&#x20AC;? service: www.ontariohaylistings.ca. This is a free listings service for people looking to buy or sell hay and straw. For more information or comments or questions, call 1.877.892.8663 or email info@ontariohaylistings.ca.

Factsheets

and Publications

T

he following OMAFRA Publications and Factsheets are now available from www.serviceontario.ca/publications: Guide to Weed Control, 2012-2013, Publication 75 (over 400 pages). Cost is $15.00; please recycle former editions. 2012 Field Crop Budgets, Publication 60 and Budgets de grandes cultures 2012, Publication 60F. Free; please recycle former editions. Field Pocket Guide, Publication 820 and Carnet de notes sur les cultures, Publication 820F (recently reprinted and now back in stock) 11-049: Hydrogen Sulphide in Agricultural Biogas Systems, Agdex 769; New. 11-050: Sulfure dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;hydrogène dans les systèmes de production de biogas de source agricole, Agdex 769; New. 11-053: Harmonized Sales Tax (HST), Agdex 837; replaces 10-017, which should be recycled. 11-054: Application de la taxe de vente harmonisĂŠe (TVH) aux ventes et transferts de terres agricoles, Agdex 837; replaces 10-018, which should be recycled. 11-055: The Cost of â&#x20AC;˘ Continued on Page 33

D.T. MOBILE WASH Â&#x2021;)UHHVWDOO%DUQ:DVKLQJ Â&#x2021;3RXOWU\%DUQ:DVKLQJ Â&#x2021;+RW:DWHU8QLWV Call Dave Tremblay 613-652-1690 613-227-8084 TILE DRAINAGE CONTRACTORS

Â&#x2021;2YHU\HDUVH[SHULHQFH Â&#x2021;4XDOLW\ZRUNPDQVKLS Â&#x2021;&RPSHWLWLYHSULFHV Â&#x2021;6RLOHURVLRQFRQWUROGHVLJQV Â&#x2021;2SHQGUDLQH[FDYDWLQJ Â&#x2021;6LWHSUHSDUDWLRQV ODJRRQV Â&#x2021;)HQFHOLQH ODQGFOHDULQJ Â&#x2021;6HSWLFSURGXFWV LQVWDOODWLRQV Â&#x2021;&DOOIRUIUHHHVWLPDWHV

Las-er-plane & GPS Mapping

613-774-3320 Albert Zandbergen (Res.) 613-652-4435

Milo Seeds Inc. Supplier of Canadian Pearl Millet and Sorghum Hybrids

CONVENTIONAL & NO TILL SEEDING Â&#x2021;&&66HHG'ULOO Â&#x2021;-RKQ'HHUH'ULOO ZLWKVFDOHÂ&#x2021;UHVHHGLQJ Â&#x2021;QHZVHHGLQJÂ&#x2021;VPDOO JUDLQVÂ&#x2021;VR\DEHDQV ROUND BALING Â&#x2021;ZLWKPD[LFXW Â&#x2021;ZUDSRUWZLQH BALE WRAPPING Â&#x2021;FRQWLQXRXVZUDSSLQJ Â&#x2021;URXQGEDOHV Â&#x2021;VTXDUHEDOHV COMBINING Â&#x2021;676 Â&#x2021;FRUQÂ&#x2021;VR\DEHDQV Â&#x2021;VPDOOJUDLQV VERTICAL TILLAGE DISCING -2( 72063(&. .HPPDWWHQ)DUPV 0RRVH&UHHN

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Try one of our Forage hybrids: Safe for feeding (no toxicity under cold and drought stress) highly palatable Sudan grass CFSH-30 - multi-cut/ grazing Sweet stem sorghum CSSH-45 - single cut Sweet stem pearl millet CSSPMH-7 - single and multi-cut/ nematode control Forage pearl millet CFPM-101 - multi-cut/green manure and nematode control Sorghum and grain pearl millet hybrid also available

Milo Seeds Inc.

Please contact us for more information.

1-877-857-6456 (MILO) www.belanger-agro.com

FIFE AGRICULTURAL SERVICES LTD. 14740 County Rd. 43, Finch, Ont. (613)

984-2059 or toll free 1-888-557-FIFE


AgriNews April pg 33_AgriNews February pg 33 12-03-30 1:02 PM Page 1

Searchable archive at www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews April, 2012 Page 33

OMAFRA Connects Continued from page 32 Raising Replacement Dairy Heifers, Agdex 412; replaces 09-063, which should be recycled. For a complete listing of OMAFRA products, please see our online catalogue at http://www.omafra.gov.o n.ca/english/products/index. html To order OMAFRA publications and factsheets: â&#x20AC;˘ Visit any OMAFRA Resource Centre / Northern Ontario Regional Office or Service Ontario location â&#x20AC;˘ Visit the Service Ontario website at: www.serviceontario.ca/publications or call 1-800-6689938 â&#x20AC;˘ Visit the OMAFRA website at: www.ontario.ca/omafra or contact the Agricultural Information Contact Centre by calling: 1-877-424-1300

Phone Lines and Websites â&#x20AC;˘ OMAFRA Website: www.ontario.ca/omafra, Agricultural Information Contact Centre: 1-877-4241300 or e-mail ag.info.omafra@ontario.ca â&#x20AC;˘ Nutrient Management Line: 1-866-242-4460 or email nman.omafra@ontario.ca â&#x20AC;˘ Growing Forward Information Line: 1-888479-3931 or e-mail growingforward@ontario.ca â&#x20AC;˘ The Farm Line: 1-888451-2903 - A confidential telephone emotional support and referral service provided to farmers and farm families in Ontario

Wednesday, May 2nd Kerns Hall, New Liskeard (279279 Milberta Rd) Registrations are accepted by phone, or mail. To register by phone call the Agricultural Information Contact Centre at 1-877-424-1300. To register by mail, send the registration information to: SR Parasite Seminar, OMAFRA, AICC, 1 Stone Rd. W., 4th Fl., Guelph, ON N1G 4Y2. (Registrations will NOT be accepted at the door). Cost: (includes 13% HST, lunch and proceedings) Before April 23rd for New Liskeard $39.55 After April 23rd for New Liskeard) $56.50 Payments by credit card or cheque. Make cheques payable to: Ontario Sheep Marketing Agency. For more information Toll Free: 1-877-424-1300 Local: (519) 826-4047 E-mail:

ag.info.omafra@ontario.ca

SIAL Canada Exhibit Costs Supported By AAFC

T

he Canadian Food Exporters Association (CFEA), in partnership with OMAFRA, is inviting you to exhibit at the SIAL Canada show at the Palais Des Congrès in Montreal from May 9-11, 2012. SIAL Canada is the Salon International de lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Alimentation (International Food Expo). The event is one of the industryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most important meeting places for North American food industry professionals and hosts approximately 700 exhibitors and 13,000 visitors from over 60 countries over the course of three days. Buyers at SIAL Canada are increasingly

Events

O

ntario Small Ruminant Internal Parasite Seminars A one day interactive meeting for sheep producers, goat producers and veterinarians to help them control gastrointestinal parasites in their livestock. Topics addressed include: â&#x20AC;˘ The "Who, What, Where, When and How" of Gastrointestinal Parasites â&#x20AC;˘ Diagnosing Gastrointestinal Parasitism â&#x20AC;˘ Anthelmintics (Dewormers) for Sheep and Goats â&#x20AC;˘ Reasons for Treatment Failure â&#x20AC;˘ Anthelmintic Resistance â&#x20AC;˘ Sustainable Parasite Control - Ontario 5 Point Program - "Worm Starâ&#x20AC;? Program runs from 8:30 am to 4:20 pm, and is offered at the following location:

seeking out products to meet the demands of their diverse and multi-ethnic clientele. Qualified buyers specializing in distribution, retail and foodservice will be in attendance, so the event represents an important opportunity to meet and impress future cus-

tomers. Advance registration is required. Cost savings and partial reimbursement for this event are also being offered through Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada's AgriMarketing Program. For more information, call Susan Powell at CFEA at 416-445-3747

or email susanp@cfea.com. May 27-29 - Canadian Institute of Food Science and Technology (CIFST) National Conference, Scotiabank Conference Centre, Niagara Falls. CIFSTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2012 conference is all about where â&#x20AC;&#x153;Innovation â&#x20AC;˘ Continued on Page 34

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AgriNews April pg 34_AgriNews February pg 34 12-03-30 1:02 PM Page 1

Page 34 The AgriNews April, 2012

OMAFRA Connects Continued from page 33

Meets Commercializationâ&#x20AC;?. Plenary sessions, workshops and technical sessions will explore the journey from innovation to commercialization. What research is happening in Canada and North America? What are the challenges and opportunities, the market and consumer trends? June 19 & 20 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Ontario Pork Congress. Mark your calendar and check for updates at http://www.porkcongress.on.ca/ July 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 25 - World Hereford Conference BC/Alberta/Saskatchewan/ Manitoba/Ontario For more information visit www.hereford.ca September 11 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 13 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Outdoor Farm Show, Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Outdoor Park, Woodstock, ON. Watch for details on the 2012 show at http://www.outdoorfarmshow.com/ September 18 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 22 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2012 International Plowing Match, Waterloo Region, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cultivate Country Celebrate Communityâ&#x20AC;?. Check for regular updates at http://www.ipm2012.ca/

Free internet farm classifieds at www.agrinews.ca

County Dateline Quinte & Area

April 5 Hastings Federation of Agriculture Monthly Meeting Thurlow Community Centre, 516 Harmony Road, Hastings, ON 8:00 pm - Contact Judy Hagerman 613-473-4444 / jlhagerman@sympatico.ca . April 12 Prince Edward Federation of Agriculture Meeting O.P.P. Office Boardroom, County Rd. 1, (Schoharie Road), Picton, ON 7:30 pm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; All Welcome! Contact Patti Stacey at 613476-3842 / pat.stacey@sympatico.ca

Haliburton & Kawartha Lakes

First Tuesday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Monthly Kawartha Junior Farmers Meeting Lindsay Fairgrounds at 7 pm Membership is open for anyone aged 15-29. For

more information visit kawarthajf@gmail.com Third Wednesday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Monthly Victoria County Sheep Producers Meeting Sunderland Co-op Boardroom, Oakwood location, 7:30 pm. For more information contact Doug Walden 705-324-7478. April 11 Community Leadership â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Mastering Minutes Lindsay Gallery, 190 Kent Street West, Lindsay, 6:30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8:30 pm Provided by United Way for CKL Leadership Development Services. What are the roles and responsibilities of a minute taker? This is a practical and essential course on how to make an organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s minutes clear, concise and accurate. Cost is $25 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; contact United Way for the City of Kawartha Lakes at 705-878-5081, email office@ckl.unitedway.ca. For more information visit www.ckl-unitedway.ca. April 14 Kawartha Lakes Dairy Producers Annual Dinner and Banquet Woodville Legion, Woodville For ticket information contact Jennifer English 705-328-0989

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& Surrounding Area

April 4 Durham Farm Connections Open House Luther Vipond Memorial Arena (67 Winchester Road East), Brooklin Ontario 4:308:30pm Learn first- hand where your food comes from, ongoing Cheese Making,

meet your local 4-H members and Junior Farmers and so much more. Free admission (donation of canned goods will be gratefully accepted on behalf of the local food bank) For more information visit www.durhamfarmconnections.ca. or call 905-668-7711 ext. 2615 or 905-436-2528.

Surrounding Area

Every Saturday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Year Round - Peterborough District Farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market, 7 am- 1 pm. Located on the corner of Lansdowne St and Roger Neilson Way at Morrow Park, Peterborough. For more information call 705-932-3166 or visit www.peterboroughfarmersmarket.com

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AgriNews April pg 35_AgriNews February pg 35 12-03-30 1:03 PM Page 1

Searchable archive at www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews April, 2012 Page 35

DateLine Stormont, Dundas & Glengarry 1st Wednesday of the month - Dundas Federation of Agriculture regular monthly meetings Nelson Laprade Centre, Chesterville, ON 8 pm Please contact Mary Dillabough 13-448-2655 or email mary.dillabough@xplornet.com or visit website www.dundasagriculture.co m for meeting date confirmation. April 14 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Grower Pesticide Safety Course for Farmers Chesterville, ON 9:00 am Full course â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3:00 pm Separate Exam. To register call Ontario Pesticide Education Program 1-800652-8573

Frontenac Last Thursday of the month - Frontenac County Federation of Agriculture regular monthly meetings Glenburnie Church Hall, Glenburnie, ON 7:30 pm Please Contact Eileen Sleeth 613-353-2475 or email eilevale@kingston.net for meeting date confirmation.

Leeds 3rd Thursday of the

month - Leeds Federation of Agriculture regular monthly meetings Delta Agricultural Fair Society Boardroom, Delta, ON 8 pm - Please contact Eleanor Renaud 613-275-2981 or email erenaud@xplornet.ca for meeting date confirmation. 2nd Wednesday of the month - Grenville Federation of Agriculture regular monthly meetings Spencerville Council Chambers, Spencerville, ON 8 pm - Please contact Carol Wynands 613-9262579 or email a.wynands@sympatico.ca for meeting date confirmation.

Lanark 2nd Thursday of the month - Lanark County Federation of Agriculture regular monthly meetings Beckwith Township Council Chambers, Blacks Corners - 8 pm 3rd Wednesday of the month - The National Farmers Union Lanark, Local 310 For information contact Hilary Moore 613259-5757 April 14 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Grower Pesticide Safety Course for Farmers Pakenham, ON 8:45 am Course â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3:00 pm Separate Exam. To register call Ontario Pesticide Education Program 1-800652-8573

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Prescott April 3 & 10 Environmental Farm Plan (EFP) 2 day Workshop ENGLISH Prescott County - Location to be determined 10 am to 3 pm - This workshop will give you an opportunity to asses your farm operation from an environmental view, identify opportunities for actions, and qualify you for costshare opportunities for onfarm projects. Program details available at http://www.ontariosoilcrop.org. To register contact Micheline Begin 613-6798867 / Micheline.Begin@ontariosoilcrop.org

Renfrew 2nd Monday of each month - Arnprior Region Federation of Agriculture Meetings Galetta Community Hall â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8 pm Contact Ernie Smith,

President, 613-623-3439. 4th Monday of each month - Renfrew County Federation of Agriculture Meetings Cobden Agricultural Hall, Cobden, ON 7:30 pm - Contact Chris Bucholtz, President 613-735-9164 or Donna Campbell, Sec/Trea 613-432-5568 / donnaofa@nrtco.net 3rd Thursday of each month - Renfrew County Cattlemen Association Meetings Cobden Agricultural Hall, Cobden, ON 7:30 pm - Contact David McGonegal 613582-7031 or Donna Campbell 613-432-5568. 3rd Wednesday of each month - Renfrew County Plowmenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Association Meetings Cobden Agricultural Hall, Cobden, ON 7:30 pm - Contact Allan Lance 613-633-8276. â&#x20AC;˘ Continued on Page 36

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AgriNews April pg 36_AgriNews February pg 36 12-03-30 2:10 PM Page 1

Page 36 The AgriNews April, 2012

DateLine 2012 Regional/ Provincial Events April 4 & 5 - Prescribed Materials Application Business Licence Kemptville, ON 9 am to 5 pm - This course helps you become familiar with the NMA, Regulation and Protocols and examines how the NMA directly affects a custom applicator business. This course is required for obtaining a Prescribed Materials Business Application Licence. Various dates and locations. For more information and/or to register call Ridgetown Campus at 1-855-648-1444 or visit http://www.ridgetownc.com /bdt/bdt_training_index.cfm

Free internet farm classifieds at www.agrinews.ca

â&#x20AC;¢ Continued from Page 35

April 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Eastern Ontario Berry Growers Association â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Berry Information Day Purvis Hall (below the library), U of G â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Kemptville Campus 8:30 am to 3:30 pm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Cost $30 members, $60 non members, includes lunch. For more information contact Kevin Schooley 613-2584587 / kevinschooley@bell.net April 11 & 12 Regulation and Protocols Course Kemptville, ON 9 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5 pm Note: Also available as an online course. This 2 day course is designed for farmers and consultants. It helps you understand your obligation under the Nutrient Management Act, Regulation and Protocols and how they relate to a Nutrient Management Strategy and a Nutrient Management Plan. Various

dates and locations. For more information and/or to register call Ridgetown Campus at 1-855-648-1444

or visit http://www.ridgetownc.com /bdt/bdt_training_index.cfm

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Notable families include: Red Rose, Frantisco, Debutante Rae & Promis Sired by Sid, Fever, Windbrook & Duplex

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Contact: Smygwaty Holsteins

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Russell, Ontario | 613-445-8616 | smygwatyholsteins@hotmail.com

TRP READY MIX LTD.

Associated with A.L. Blair Construction Ltd.

â&#x20AC;¢ Excavating Contractors â&#x20AC;¢ Equipment Rentals â&#x20AC;¢ Stone Slinger â&#x20AC;¢ All Quarry Products â&#x20AC;¢ Sand & Gravel

MAIN OFFICE MOOSE CREEK ST. ALBERT QUARRY & READY MIX PLANT WINCHESTER QUARRY & READY MIX PLANT

3URSHUW\7REHVROGDWQRRQ :HVWRI)LQFK2QWDULRPLFLYLFRQ &W\5GFRQWREHVROGDVLV DFUHV 7HQWKRXVDQGGRZQGD\RIVDOHFHUWL¿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AgriNews April pg 37_AgriNews February pg 37 12-03-30 1:04 PM Page 1

Over 2,000 stories archived at www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews April, 2011 Page 37

CLASSIFIEDS FOR SALE

FOR SALE

FOR SALE

FOR SALE

SERVICES

FOR SALE - NH forage blower. $1,000. Ford blue 500 manure spreader with tail gate. A-1 shape. Cost $900 to get in A-1 shape. $1,250. 613-448-2332. 08tfc FOR SALE Purebred Limousin Bulls, Double Polled red and black bulls up to 22 month of age. Home grown and ready to work. Call Corad Farms 1613-624-5405. 05 FOR SALE Black yearling Limousine Bull. Also red and black 4H yearling heifer and 3 in 1 pairs. AI sired - shown successfully, proven dams. Thomas McLennan 613623-2291.

FOR SALE 150 acres, older home, out buildings, tiled acres, another 55 acres could be cultivated. South of Finch. 613-880-9772 04 FRUIT TREES Fruit Trees, Apples $18, local and heirloom varieties, Pear, Plum, Cherry and Flowering Crab trees $19. Strawberry, Raspberry and Asparagus plants. Maple Syrup at Barkleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Call 613543-0491 or email barkhm5@magma.ca 05 FOR SALE Valmetal Agri Mixer Model 2000 for sale. 5 yrs. old, good condition. Call 613987-2144

OUTDOOR WOOD FURNACE Heat your entire home, buildings, water and more with an OUTDOOR WOOD FURNACE from Central Boiler. Call today. Bourgon Seeds Ltd. 613-524-3102 12

FOR SALE 300 acres, 105 workable Dairy Farm on Cape Breton Island, includes top purebred herd, 36 kilo quota, freestall barn, full line machinery, 2 tower silos, 5 bdrm farm house in scenic farming community. $1,400,000. Reason for selling, due to retirement. 1902-631-2213. 04 HEIFERS FOR SALE 4 registered Jersey heifers. Due to calve late April until mid May, out of AI sired cows. Herd avg. 7,100 ltr. @ 5%BF by feeding 70% forage ration. $1,650 per head. 613-928-2614 04

HOOF CARE Functional Hoof Care. Dairy Cattle hoof trimming service. Tom Booyink 613-362-6528. 12

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FOR SALE New Holland Baler 316 with a 70 thrower; New Holland 489 Haybine with subguards; Triple K cultivator, 10â&#x20AC;&#x2122; with rolling harrow; used iron posts (approx. 80); 20â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Patz ringdriver silo unloader. Call 613-448-3083 for info. 04

LEEDS COmmUNITy PASTURE, ATHENS, ON. Spring is upon us, time to think about heifers/calves grazing. Leeds community pasture is here to assist you. Applications for the 2012 Pasture Season are now being accepted. (Grain Season 2012 starting May to October) For more information call Kim Sytsma 1-613924-9241 or Larry Reeden 1-613-372-2503. 04

SERVICES HEAT PUmP SALES AND SERvICE OF GEOTHERmAL HEAT PUmPS denis@travel-net.com www.kingscross.net 613-271-0988 ext. 3 FINANCING AvAILAbLE 01tfc

HELP WANTED Full- or Part-time for 100 cow dairy farm. 613-9875332. Fax 613-987-1085. 04

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Page 38 The AgriNews April, 2012

AdWatcher surfs the classifieds for you at www.agrinews.ca

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AgriNews April pg 40_AgriNews February pg 40 12-03-30 1:00 PM Page 1

Page 40 The AgriNews April, 2012

AdWatcher surfs the classifieds for you at www.agrinews.ca

Falling Star barn Continued from page 20 “I think the biggest advantage is the hose positioning. You can get an arm in there and adjust the

A three-way sorting gate directs cattle on their way out of the milking parlour, sending them into one of two groups, or a special needs area.

milker. With parallel, it’s hard to do that,” says Johnsen. Of his company’s last several parlour installations, “three or four would be parallel and a couple would be herringbone,” he estimates. The parlour, which features computerized meters that will provide the farmer with an array of information, is built above a basement-style crawlspace, accessible through a large utility room that holds most of the body of the bulk cooler tank. Below the room also sits a pair 1,400gallon tanks to hold water recycled from the cooling and wash-water systems. In the case of the cooling water, once it has absorbed the milk’s warmth, it will be piped off to the cattle for drinking. On the feeding side of the operation, MacLeod has purchased a tow-behind TMR mixer, but intends to continue using his existing upright silos, augmented by feed stored in Ag-Bag plastic. On the waste side, the new barn features automated

Installers with general contractor Sylvain Cheff Construction of Bourget lay ceramic tile in the feed manger at the new Falling Star Farms barn. Zandbergen photos

Sylvain Cheff works inside the almost complete milkhouse, near the 2,000 gallon bulk tank, several days before the new dairy barn was set to go into operation.

alley scrapers by Houle. A new concrete-lined storage lagoon also went in, replacing the existing earthen pit. MacLeod says these types of barn projects cost

depending on the wishes of their children. Sons Logan and Cody are two and five years old, respectively. MacLeod himself has lived on the spread since

in the $15,000 per stall range, an investment that will see this family farm through its next 20 years of operation, according to the owners — and beyond

the 1980s, when his veterinarian father Dr. Donald MacLeod bought the place. The younger man took over 20 years ago. “I love farming,” he says.

RAATS CUSTOM FARMING LTD.

Forage Harvesting • 32’ self propelled disc mower

MANURE solid spreading • draglines • tanks

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Meet our Agriculture Services Team

613-821-2264 ¤

OUTDOOR WOOD FURNACES Four Models 4,000 to 30,000 sq. ft. rating.

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Sylvain Racine Eastern and Northern Ontario and Quebec 514-465-7401

Paula Cornish Peterborough, Northumberland, Hastings and Prince Edward Counties 705-653-4573

Kelly Fawcett-Mathers Frontenac, Grenville, Dundas, Stormont and Glengarry 613-668-2782

Jessica Schouten Carleton, Lanark, Leeds, Grenville and Renfrew Counties 613-790-2196

We’ll take the time necessary to understand your unique needs. Together we can meet today’s challenges and anticipate tomorrow’s opportunities.

2508, Highland Rd. South, Maxville ON

613-527-2834 - 1-888-371-0336

®/ The TD logo and other trade-marks are the property of The Toronto-Dominion Bank or a wholly-owned subsidiary, in Canada and/or other countries.


AgriNews April pg 41_AgriNews February pg 41 12-03-30 12:59 PM Page 1

Free internet farm classifieds at www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews April, 2012 Page 41

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The synAgri Trophy for Championship Open and 4-H Ear of Corn was won by Tibben Farms, Dundas County. It was presented by Maxime Begin and accepted by Mark Tibben.

The Bennie Vance Memorial Trophy for the Champion Grain Sheaf in the 4-H Section was won by Kerin Hudson, Carleton County. It was presented by Barb Vance to Bruce Hudson

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The Mack and Lois James Award for the most points in the 4-H section field crop classes won by Ben Gordon, Frontenac County, and presented by Sheila James.

The John Posthumus Award for the most points in the 4-H section Life Skills classes was won by Robyn Rochon-Kaiser, Carleton County, who accepted the award from John Posthumus.

P^ZbfmhZ\ab^o^Zeeh_hnk\nlmhf^klg^^]l 2XUFRPSDQ\LVSURXGWRRIIHUDGHVLJQWKDW DOORZVLWVFXVWRPHUVWKHÃ&#x20AC;H[LELOLW\RIFKRLFHIRU WKHLUYLVLRQ :HRIIHUHQJLQHHULQJWRPHHW\RXUORFDOEXLOGLQJ UHTXLUHPHQWVZKLOHVDWLVI\LQJ\RXUH[SHFWDWLRQV LQWKHEXLOGLQJSURFHVVWRWKHHQGUHVXOWLQ GHOLYHULQJWR\RXDORQJODVWLQJVWUXFWXUH 2XUEXLOGLQJVL]HVDUHDYDLODEOHIURP¶WR¶ FOHDUVSDQDQGWRXQOLPLWHGOHQJWKLQVXODWHGRU QRQLQVXODWHGIRUDJULFXOWXUDODQGLQGXVWULDOXVHV &RQWDFWXVWRGD\WREHJLQGHVLJQLQJ The Hay Quality Competition (Class 50) was won by Gary Gordon, Frontenac County, right, who accepted the award from Graham Hudson, centre. The Hay Quality Competition Reserve was won by Jim Tims, Lanark County, left,

The Special Export Hay Class(Class 51 first cut) award, sponsored by Ed Duncan of JED Express, South Mountain, won by Nandale Farm, Lanark County. It was presented by Cecil Cass and accepted by John Nanne.

L@=HGKKA:ADALA=K9J==F<D=KK$L@=GHLAGFK9J=QGMJK& JJ)KAE;G=$GFL9JAG$;9F9<9)%000%/0.%,/.1KL==DOGG<LJMKK&;9


AgriNews April pg 42_AgriNews February pg 42 12-03-30 1:01 PM Page 1

Page 42 The AgriNews April, 2012

At the annual Kemptville College Royal Danielle Bisselle of Casselman peruses plants at the greenhouse with student Colin Piper

Rob Clement, food, nutrition and risk-management student, with some cranberry confections.

AdWatcher surfs the classifieds for you at www.agrinews.ca

Ryan Garner and Amber Archibald, king and queen of the 2012 Kemptville College Royal.

Harrison De Groot (left) and Niels Kieftenburg show off an elaborate popsicle and toothpick freestall barn model produced for Prof. Tim Rennie.

In the welding facilities, from left, visitor Stefan Usyk, instructor Paul Beckinsale, student Alex Usyk, and Sharon Usyk.

The Royal treatment From left, helping out at the pancake breakfast inside the Agroforestry Education Centre, during the College Royal March 10, Kemptville College Foundation director John Fraser, Foundation president Dave Morrow, and Pat Remillard, manager of non-core activities on the campus.

Milking contest competitor Dr. Claude Naud, campus director.

DRUMMOND PTO Driven Generators

ck In Sto Now k 60 w s 40 & tor enera PTO G

Used 55 Kl. Winco Generator, Single Phase, Trailer & PTO

Now Available Portable Generators 2.5 to 12kW

STANDARD FEATURES: Heavy-duty brushless dual-bearing generator Solid state voltage regulator Breaker protection Integral gear box Frequency meter Full load capacity outlet

All Sizes of

Pole Top Switches Available

Kohler Single & 3 phase Commercial & Domestic Gen-Set all sizes

N. BEEHLER ELECTRIC LTD. Electric Contractor 17 Beaver St., Berwick, Ont.

Tel. 613-984-2877

Fax: 613-984-2965


AgriNews April pg 43_AgriNews February pg 43 12-03-30 12:56 PM Page 1

Free internet farm classifieds at www.agrinews.ca

The AgriNews April, 2012 Page 43

At GreenField, we make corn marketing easy. Decades of agri-business expertise

• Tailor made contracts •

Fast, simple deliveries

At GreenField we have local agri-business experts to help you navigate your corn marketing. Our buy-direct program is designed to maximize your opportunities and we have tailor-made contracts to meet your needs. Corn deliveries to GreenField’s Johnstown, Chatham and Tiverton plants are friendly and efficient.

Contact your local GreenField agri-business expert. Chatham / Tiverton 1 888 471 3661 Ken Robertshaw k.robertshaw@greenfieldethanol.com Melody Hambleton m.hambleton@greenfieldethanol.com Rich Daly r.daly@greenfieldethanol.com

Johnstown 1 866 972 6866 Daniel deMoissac d.demoissac@greenfieldethanol.com Joanne van Moorsel j.vanmoorsel@greenfieldethanol.com

Check out our new website for GreenField’s latest corn prices and a direct feed from the Chicago Board of Trade

Your corn is fueling our future.

www.greenfieldethanol.com


AgriNews April pg 44_AgriNews February pg 44 12-03-30 12:57 PM Page 1

Page 44 The AgriNews April, 2012

AdWatcher surfs the classifieds for you at www.agrinews.ca

AgriNews April 2012  

The AgriNews is dedicated to covering and promoting agriculture, one of Eastern Ontario’s most important economic sectors.

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