__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

Co operator THE

Volume 29 : Issue 3 • May & June 2018

-

FREE!

A GUIDE TO THEMED GARDENING Page 4

PLATED BY POLLINATORS Page 8

GROWING FARMERS Page 14


STORE NEWS Board of Directors

Eddy Jones, President Patrick McHale, Vice President William Warnock, Treasurer Emily Deferrari Malcolm Ferguson Alicia Hall Katy Nevinsky Sarah Trafican O.E. Zelmanovich The board meets the third Monday of each month.

Management Team

Human Resources: Jen Girty Finance: Shawn McCullough Marketing & Member Services: Kate Safin IT: Erin Myers Grocery: Maura Holliday Café: Amber Pertz Front End: eric cressley Produce: Evan Diamond

The Co-operator

Editor: Kate Safin Contributors: Erica Peiffer Design: Molly Palmer Masood Printer: Banksville Express Printed with vegetable-based inks on recycled paper. The Co-operator is a bi-monthly publication of East End Food Co-op. Copies are available in the lobby of the store and online at www.eastendfood.coop.

Interested in Advertising? Please contact: editor@eastendfood.coop or call 412.242.3598 ext. 142. Opinions expressed are the writers’ own and do not necessarily reflect Co-op policy. The East End Food Co-op does not endorse the views or products of the advertisers in this newsletter.

• The East End Food Co-op and UE Local 667 successfully completed contract negotiations. The union ratified a 3-year contract with the Co-op on March 12, 2018. • What happened to the reverse osmosis (RO) water and when will it return? Last year, the Allegheny County Health Department ordered the Co-op to shut down our RO machine. There was nothing wrong with the water we were dispensing, but we did not have the correct permit to vend RO water in our store. Ultimately, this was an issue with our vendor and the Co-op had to take on buying new equipment and applying for a water vending permit. The PA Department of Environmental Protection has strict requirements for producers of filtered water and the application and permitting process has been long. We are awaiting approval of our permit application, and then will need an additional 30-60 days before we can install our equipment. Our new water machine will be able to fill two water bottles simultaneously and include a powerful sterilizing UV lamp. We appreciate everyone’s patience throughout the process and assure you a new-and-improved water system is on the horizon!

BOARD REPORT The Board of Directors would like to thank all of the members who attended the Annual Meeting on February 24th. We enjoyed engaging with you in meaningful and constructive dialogue about the future of our Co-op. One of the topics discussed was the re-introduction of various committees, including a committee that would help in planning the next annual meeting, as well as a committee tasked with strengthening our approaches to member engagement. Serving on a committee is a great way to get more involved in our Co-op. Commitment is typically a few hours per month. These volunteer positions are open to both experienced and new members. Please send an email to boardofdirectors@eastendfood.coop to notify the board of your interest to serve on a committee. 2 - The Co-operator


CUSTOMER COMMENTS Instead of recycling hundreds of cardboard boxes, why don’t we make them available to customers to carry their groceries? Aldi and Costco both do this, we should do no less. Thanks so much for the suggestion, we would love for this to be possible. Unfortunately, due to our limited space we do not have a safe way to store these boxes so they do not pose a tripping hazard to our customers and staff. Perhaps in a larger location we can provide this convenience. - Maura, Grocery

It’s great that organic produce is a top priority at the Co-op. Local is even better. So you should clearly print on the label/price tag that our mushrooms are PENNSYLVANIA LOCAL! Thank you for writing to let us know about our signage. You are absolutely correct and they have been updated to reflect the local and organic distinction. The produce team as a whole is responsible for ensuring accurate signage, so I will bring your observations to the crew at our weekly meeting to get this back on everyone’s radar. - Evan D., Produce

Please make the bulk turmeric sunrise available at all times. The AquaVita Tumeric Sunrise is a popular flavor. As long as this flavor is “in-stock” from our distributor, the Tumeric Sunrise will be a standard feature in the Bulk department. Thank you! - Jim, Bulk

Please consider carrying the gluten free version of Bob’s Red Milll polenta instead of the one not labelled GF (they’re both JUST CORN as the ingredient) Thank you! Consider it done. We should have this item on our shelves in the next week or so. Thanks for your suggestion. - Ian, Grocery

Please consider ordering vegan artichoke burgers from Five Star Foodies. Best burgers EVER! We can get it and I’m going to bring it in on your recommendation. Thanks for the tip! - Evan, Perishable Do you carry wheat germ oil? Yes, wheat germ oil is available in the supplement cooler in aisle 5. - Jackson, Supplements Please consider carrying A2 milk. Thank you. We carry A2 Whole Milk! It came in about a week ago and just was out of stock for a few days. Look for it by the half gallons. - Evan, Perishable

Have a thought that you’d like to share?

Fill out and submit a comment card online or at customer service during your next visit!

Member Celebration Day - Sunday, June 3rd 10 AM to 4 PM ~ free drinks and snacks ~ gift bags ~ raffle

Staff Celebrations Send us your recipes! Congratulations to the following staff members, who were elected by their peers as Employees of the Month.

MArch

Drew Cox (Grocery)

April

The Christine Co-operator - 3Beatty

We’d love to include your recipes in The Co-operator. If we print yours, we’ll give you one of our insulated tote bags free as a thank you! Send your recipes to

(Front End)

editor@eastendfood.coop.


A guide to

Themed Gardening

Plant Name

Days to maturity

No. of Plants

Spacing

Chi-Chien Spicy Hot Pepper

75

3

1 sq. ft.

Golden Acres Cabbage

65

6

1 sq. ft.

Scallions

100 days for bulb

3 -4 doz. sets

3 sq. in.

Carrots

65

48

3 sq. in.

Daikon Radish

55

24

6 sq. in., staggered

By Katy Lydon, Garden Dreams Urban Farm & Nursery The most important thing to remember when starting a themed garden is to have fun with it! A themed garden may be centered around any number of things—from your favorite color or childhood story, to your favorite thing to eat. Once you have decided on a theme, choose plants that you are familiar with to set yourself up for success. Make sure the plants you select are compatible, regionally and seasonally appropriate, and with similar growing requirements (i.e. full sun vs. shade, soil type, etc.). Next, you will need to choose a spot in your garden to make your dream a reality. When planning the layout of your themed garden, don’t forget to put the tallest plants on the north end of the bed to ensure the other plants are getting enough sunlight! The plants in these guides are listed from tallest to shortest to help you plan your themed garden. Remember to have fun and use your imagination when planning your garden—the themes below are just suggestions! Happy growing! Katy Lydon has been farming for the better part of a decade, all across the country on both rural and urban operations, growing vegetables and raising a number of different animals. Katy is a recent transplant to Pittsburgh and is the new Sales and Outreach Manager at Garden Dreams Urban Farm & Nursery. She is looking forward to becoming a part of the growing urban agriculture movement! Join Garden Dreams for “Gardening for Beneficial Insects” hosted at the East End Food Co-op on Wednesday, June 20th and a family-friendly “Bug Hotel & Hunt” hosted at Garden Dreams Urban Farm & Nursery in Wilkinsburg on Saturday, June 23rd. More info about these events are on the back page.

(3’ x 6’ plot)

Plant Name

Days to No. of maturity Plants

Spacing

Blue Vervain

75, 5-6 ft. tall

4

1 sq. ft.

Motherwort

100, 4 ft. tall

2

2 sq. ft.

Feverfew

90, 2-3 ft. tall

2

10 sq. in.

Anise Hyssop

60, 2 ft. tall

2

15 sq. in.

Holy Kapoor Basil

70, 2 ft. tall

2

1 sq. ft.

Helen Mount Viola

60, 15 in. tall

4

6 sq. in.

(4’ x 4’ plot)


Plant Name

Days to maturity

No. of Plants

Spacing

Plant Name

Amish Paste Tomato

85

2

16-18 sq. in., staggered

Snow White Cherry Tomato

75

1

1 sq. ft., staggered

Principe Borghese Paste Tomato

75

1

1 sq. ft., staggered

Arctic Rose Dwarf Tomato

60

1

1 sq. ft., staggered

Hinkelhatz Spicy Hot Pepper

88

2

1 sq. ft., staggered

Lemon Ice Dwarf Tomato

58

1

1 sq. ft., staggered

2

1 sq. ft., staggered

PinkBerkeleyTie DyeDwarf Tomato

75

1

1 sq. ft., staggered

67

1

1 sq. ft., staggered

Days to No. of maturity Plants

Spacing

Petite Marseillais

70

Genovese Basil

75

4

6 sq. in.

Pink Passion Dwarf Tomato

Italian Flat Leaf Parsley

75

2

6 sq. in.

Purple Heart Dwarf Tomato

67

1

1 sq. ft., staggered

65-100

2-3 doz. sets

3 sq. in.

Scarlet Heart Dwarf Tomato

65

1

1 sq. ft., staggered

2

6 sq. in.

Uluru Ochre Dwarf Tomato

67

1

1 sq. ft., staggered

Scallions or Green Onions Greek Oregano (4’ x 4’ plot)

The Co-operator - 5

40

(4’ x 4’ plot)


How to Take a

Soil TesT by Allegheny County Conservation District

*Wear gloves when taking a soil sample to protect against potential contamination.

Step 1: Identify one area of interest at a time (yard, garden bed, playground, etc.).

This area should not exceed 100 square feet (10’ by 10’). If it is larger, split it into separate areas.

Step 2: Use shovel to collect 3-5 small scoops from different spots in that area. If

the soil is wet, lay it on a piece of paper in the sun to dry out.

Step 3: Mix those 3-5 scoops together in a bucket. Step 4: Remove any large debris like large rocks, leaves, grasses, or trash. Step 5: Transfer 1 cup of the mixed soil into a clear plastic bag that is labeled so you know where it came from.

Step 6: Repeat steps 2-5 with other areas of interest for soil sampling like a

different garden bed or area of the yard.

Step 7: Bring sample(s) to the Allegheny County Conservation District’s free soil

screening events (like Plant Something Day on May 19th!). Our event schedule can be found by calling (412) 291-8017 or visiting: www.facebook.com/pg/accdpa/events/

Flatboat Fair Traders

It’s kit-tea time! A handcrafted mug to delight cat enthusiasts and looseleaf connoisseurs. Steeped in tradition, ceramics provide sustainable livelihoods for makers in Nepal.

5820 Forbes Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15217 Mon, Wed, Fri-Sat: 10 AM - 6 PM Tue, Thur: 10 AM - 8 PM Offer valid at participating stores until 6/22/18. Not valid with other offers or discounts, purchase of gift cards, Oriental rugs, Traveler’s Finds or consumables. One coupon per store per customer.

Use this logo for reductions only, do not print magenta. Do not reduce this logo more than 35%. Magenta indicates the clear area, nothing should print in this space.

5901 Bryant St. Pittsburgh, PA 15206

flatboatfairtraders.com

6 - The Co-operator


The Co-operator - 7


a n t i l o l r o s P

y b d e t a l P

A bountiful plate with fresh fruits and vegetables is only possible because of pollinators. In fact, we depend on pollinators for 1/3 of all of our food and beverages. Crops that rely heavily on pollination include almonds, blueberries, apples, squash, and melons. Chocolate, coffee, tea, spices, sugar, berries, tomatoes, and many other plants also need pollinators. June 18-24 is National Pollinator Week, an international celebration of the valuable services provided by bees, birds, butterflies, bats, and beetles. It’s a time to reflect on the mighty power of small pollinating insects and consider ways to support them. If you enjoy any of these pollinator-friendly recipes, take a moment to reflect on the amazing process that brought these foods to your plate and thank a pollinator.

Want to learn more ways to support pollinators? Check out our National Pollinator Week events: Gardening for Beneficial Insects on June 20th and kid-friendly Bug Hotel & Hunt on June 23rd. More details are on the back page! 8 - The Co-operator


Apple & Almond Butter Breakfast Quinoa

Grilled Honey Lime Chicken

Tomato Cucumber Avocado Salad

Berry Chocolate Cake


Ingredients

and then remove off the heat. • 8 chicken thighs and legs 2. Clean and oil your grill (with the skin) grates. Heat the grill to • Vegetable oil medium high heat 3. In a small bowl, blend For the sauce: the rub ingredients in a • 1 lime, zested and juiced small bowl and sprinkle • 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar generously all over the • 1 Tbsp. orange juice chicken. • 1 cup honey 4. Place the chicken on the • 1 Tbsp. sriracha grill and allow to cook 5-7 minutes or when skin For the rub: begins to char before • 2 tsps. chili powder flipping. Once turned, • 2 tsps. cumin baste with half of the • 1/2 tsp. ground coriander sauce mixture. allow • 1 tsp. onion powder to cook for another 5-7 • 1 tsp. granulated garlic minutes. Flip the chicken • 1/4 tsp. freshly ground black and baste the other pepper side with the sauce right • 1 tsp. kosher salt before removing from the grill, and allow to • Chopped fresh cilantro, for cook for another minute. garnish Remove the meat from the grill and let rest for at least ten minutes before serving. Baste the chicken 1. In a small saucepan, cook again with the sauce all the ingredients for before serving. the sauce together over medium heat until they Foodista.com - The Cooking just come together. Bring Encyclopedia Everyone Can Edit. the sauce to a simmer

Ingredients

Ingredients

Ingredients

Preparation

with a mixer until light and fluffy. Beat in eggs • 2 ½ cups all-purpose flour one at a time. Add vanilla. • ½ cup Equal Exchange Organic Reduce mixer speed Baking Cocoa to low, then alternate between adding the flour • 1 tsp. baking soda mixture and milk mixture. • ¾ tsp. salt 3. Spoon batter into a pan. • ½ cup whole milk Bake until toothpick • ½ cup sour cream comes out clean, about • 2 sticks unsalted butter 55-60 minutes. Let cool in • 1 ½ cups sugar pan on a wire rack, then • 4 large eggs invert cake. • 1 tsp. pure vanilla extract 4. To make the glaze, place • 2 cups of blueberries and chopped chocolate in a sliced strawberries (or any bowl. In a small saucepan, berries you prefer) heat the cream to a simmer. Pour over the Glaze: chocolate and let stand • 3 oz. Equal Exchange Organic for 2 minutes. Add butter and mix until smooth. Panama Extra Dark Chocolate Let stand, stirring • ½ cup heavy cream occasionally, until slightly • 2 Tbsp. unsalted butter thickened. Pour glaze over cooled cake. 5. Top the cake with a handful of berries and fill 1. Preheat oven to 325 the center with the rest. degrees. Grease a 14Serve sliced with berries cup Bundt pan. Whisk on the side. together flour, baking cocoa, baking soda and Yields 14 servings salt in a large bowl. Combine milk and sour Adapted from Martha Stewart. cream in a separate bowl. Reprinted by permission from 2. Cream butter and sugar www.equalexchange.coop.

Preparation

3. Stir in the quinoa, then • 2 cups water turn the heat • 1 cup quinoa • ¼ cup coconut down to low. milk (or almond) Cover and • 1 Tbsp. almond simmer until butter all the liquid is • 1 apple, sliced absorbed, about 15 minutes. Optional: 4. Use a fork to fluff • 1 Tbsp. vegan chocolate chips and separate the • 1 tsp. chia seeds grains. • 2 Tbsp. flaked 5. Mix 1 cup of coconut cooked quinoa in a bowl and Preparation add coconut milk 1. Rinse the quinoa to your desired under cold consistency. running water to remove its bitter 6. Add apple and additional flavor. toppings and 2. Bring the 2 cups of water to a boil. enjoy.

• 1 tsp. lemon juice • 1 avocado • 1 yellow pepper • 4 cups cherry tomatoes, halved • 1-2 cucumbers, peeled and chopped • 1/4 cup red onion , chopped • 4 oz. feta cheese crumbles • 1 Tbsp. red wine vinegar • 2 Tbsp. olive oil • salt and pepper to taste • 1/4 cup fresh parsley, choppped

Preparation 1. Drizzle lemon juice over chopped avocado. 2. Place avocado, tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, onion and feta cheese in a large bowl. 3. Whisk together red wine vinegar, olive oil and salt and pepper. Pour over salad. 4. Top with freshly chopped parsley.


THE

MEET Owner Where do you live and how often do you visit our store? Stanely (S): Monroeville, and we’re here about two times a week.

What was your motivation for coming to and/or joining the Co-op? S: I honestly can’t remember… I used to shop at the co-op in Oakland, and then started shopping here once this location opened. We’ve been coming here forever.

What is your favorite thing you get from the Co-op? S: Organic produce, absolutely! I like that I can shop freely and not have to worry about accidentally buying anything conventional. What do you LOVE and hope will never change about the Co-op? S: I really like the Café, it’s one of my favorite restaurants. Elisa (E): Yes, we love all the plant-based meal options and want more – thank you! What makes shopping at the Co-op different than other stores? S: It’s a good size, not too big. How would you describe your lifestyle, and how does the Co-op fit in? S: I like to hike and spend time with my family. My wife and I are vegan. The money we save on not buying meat or dairy allows us to afford top quality organic foods. It’s nice that the Co-op prioritizes vegan options for us.

Stanley & Elisa B., Members Since 1991

The Co-operator - 11


Nutritional Support for the Childbearing Years by Natalie Watson and Karen Crow, Steel City Midwives Many believe prenatal vitamins are the endall of nutritional support for the childbearing years. Yes, a whole-food based vitamin with folate should be started even before pregnancy, if possible. However, vitamins are not the foundation of a pregnancy diet. The true building block of the perinatal year is protein—meat, fish, eggs, dairy, beans and seeds. Not only is protein essential to helping grow a healthy baby, it can also help maintain steady blood sugar, lower the chances of gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia, and strengthen muscles, like the uterus.

more tired and thirsty. Included in your fluid intake can be nourishing herbal teas, like red raspberry leaf, dandelion, nettle, and alfalfa. The East End Food Co-op has a wonderful selection on hand. To learn more about healthy eating, lifestyle changes, pregnancy supplements supporting the newborn microbiome, physiological birth and more, join Steel City Midwives at the Coop on Wednesday, May 2nd at 7 PM for a free Wellness Wednesday class. Details are on the back page.

Round out your diet with whole, natural foods. Shop with your eyes. Look for brightly colored foods—dark leafy greens, bright yellow peppers, purple cabbage, red strawberries, etc. Select whole grain carbohydrates like oatmeal, quinoa, and whole wheat bread. Avoid boxed and prepackaged foods as much as possible. Fermented foods are the cornerstone of healthy gut flora. Include yogurt (low sugar), sauerkraut, water kefir, and kombucha in your diet. Maternal gut health research is showing promising results in cutting down infections, such as Group Beta Streptococcus (GBS), and the need for antibiotics in newborns when probiotics and fermented foods are consumed in pregnancy. These positive changes can greatly impact the newborn microbiome and future health of your baby. Hydration is essential. It can reduce blood pressure, headaches, edema, UTI’s, and even preterm labor. Aim to drink a minimum of 64 ounces of water a day, and resist the temptation to grab sweet beverages that will wreak havoc on your blood sugar, leaving you

Natalie Watson and Karen Crow are traditional midwives and NARM CPM certification candidates. They are Waterbirth International, CPR, and Neonatal Resuscitation certified. They pursue seminars, workshops, conferences and other trainings on midwifery, birth, maternity care, and breastfeeding. Natalie and Karen feel it is essential to keep up to date with current trends in labor and birth through evidence based medical journals and literature. They also participate in peer review and in groups beneficial to the homebirth community. Steel City Midwives wishes to thank Midwife Michele Parham, of Amethyst Midwitchery for their contributions this article. 12 - The Co-operator


register

Round

To support these organizations, tell your cashier to Round Up your total at the register!

May - Landforce Landforce’s mission is to support people and restore land. Landforce hires and trains people who are struggling to find and keep employment. Crew Members work on a variety of ecological and community restoration projects throughout the region before moving into the market job economy. Register Round Up funds will support the Landforce training curriculum.

www.landforcepgh.org

June - DREAMS OF HOPE Through the power of the arts, Dreams of Hope provides the region’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, asexual, and allied (LGBTQA+) youth a welcoming environment to grow in confidence, express themselves, develop as leaders, and learn to make positive changes in their communities. Register Round Up funds will support youth programing.

www.dreamsofhope.org

Spare Change Makes a Big Difference! Register Round Up Funds raised to date: $117,200.05

(April 2013-March 2018)


Growing

Farmers by Kate Safin, Marketing & Member Services

The Hilltop Urban Farm in Pittsburgh’s South Side is ready to start putting down some roots, literally. A project of the Hilltop Alliance several years in the making, the site of the former St. Clair Village Housing Project is now ready to cultivate and will feature a Youth Farm, Farmer Incubation Program, and CSA. It is a place that will teach self-sustaining life skills while addressing food gaps that exist in the City of Pittsburgh. The South Pittsburgh Hilltop community where the farm is located consists of eleven City of Pittsburgh neighborhoods and Mt. Oliver Borough. It has high levels of poverty and unemployment, an aging population, and low access to food. In fact, nine of the eleven neighborhoods in the Hilltop are considered food deserts, and the other two have food gaps (access to only one grocery store). There is a need in the community for revitalization and a growing interest in local food production and urban agriculture. When the St. Clair Village Housing Project was demolished in 2010, there was opportunity for neighborhood development. In 2013, the community engaged in a four-month visioning process with Grow Pittsburgh and Penn State Extension to determine the feasibility of a future farm site. “The desire for the project came from the community. Everyone has been very excited about it and we definitely have the full support of the community,” explains Sarah Ashley Baxendell, Project Manager, Greenspace Asset Development. At 107 acres, it is the largest urban farm in the country. Included in the space are 23 farmable acres and 67 acres of preserved forest on unbuildable hillsides. (Just for the sake of context, the next largest urban farm in America is a 7-acre farm in Detroit.) The first phase of the farm is a single-acre Youth Farm, which will include raised beds, shipping containers, and lots of fruit trees. Students from Arlington Elementary School and Lighthouse Church after-school programs will learn about growing and selling food with a curriculum developed by Grow Pittsburgh, Penn State Extension, and Allegheny Land Trust Education Department. The Co-operator - 14


“The partnership with the elementary school provides an opportunity for [the students] to come across the street and participate in the most engaging youth experiences we can provide. A child in Pre-K can really grow up through this site and gain the skills to someday manage their own farm,” says Baxendell. The Youth Farm, set to officially open in April 2019, will have a mini farmers market and much of the food will be sent home with the children, providing immediate access to healthy fruits and vegetables. Getting the food into the school is another goal, though not one Pittsburgh’s school system is quite ready to manage yet. Baxendell is hopeful that with the help of the Pittsburgh Food Policy Council, a farm to fork program in the school will be a reality someday. The second phase of the farm is the Farmer Incubation Program, which is set to launch in August 2018 and aims to create between 9 and 16 new farm businesses on-site. Penn State Extension will offer training to help farmers develop a variety of ecosystems from edible forests to apiaries. Farmers can apply for a ¼ acre plot to grow food certified to USDA organic standards that support on-site and mobile farmers markets. At least 75% of the food grown on the Hilltop Urban Farm will remain in City limits. To make the food accessible beyond the farm location, food trucks will be used as mobile markets in all 11 Hilltop neighborhoods. Eventually, there will be the ability to accept SNAP and other food vouchers. Baxendell believes without this project, the St. Clair site would be “a field surrounded by a fence.” Instead, it is a community space that will feed a neighborhood while offering jobs and skills training from Pre-K to adulthood. As she describes it, “We are growing farmers. Some are short, and some are potentially taller.” If you’d like to get involved in the Hilltop Urban Farm, visit their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ HillTopUrbanFarmPGH for updates on volunteer work days. The Co-operator - 15


Event Calendar MAY & JUNE

NUTRITIONAL SUPPORT FOR THE CHILDBEARING YEARS Wednesday, May 2, 7 PM – 8 PM Steel City Midwives Café Seating Area FREE

Wondering about nutritional lifestyle changes that support moms before, during, and after pregnancy? Join this lively discussion about healthy eating, pregnancy supplements, physiological birth, and the newborn microbiome!

CONTAINER GARDENING

Saturday, May 19, 2 PM – 4 PM Robert Grey, Grow Pittsburgh POWER/EEFC Conference Room $10 Co-op & Grow Pgh Members/ $15 Non-Members Don’t have space for a full garden? Learn the basics of growing vegetables in pots.Participants will create one small self-watering container!

CO-OP ORIENTATION

Sunday, June 3, 11 AM – 12 PM Erica Peiffer, Member Services POWER/EEFC Conference Room FREE Members and non-members are welcome to ask questions, meet other members and staff, review member benefits, and learn more about the cooperative business model.

GET AHEAD OF LEAD

Wednesday, June 6, 7 PM - 8 PM Allegheny County Health Department POWER/EEFC Conference Room FREE Learn about the health hazards of lead, the importance of getting kids tested, and what resources are available to help.

10%* off wellness AND body care The first Wednesday of every month

GARDENING FOR BENEFICIAL INSECTS Wednesday, June 20, 6:30 PM – 8 PM Garden Dreams Urban Farm & Nursery POWER/EEFC Conference Room $10 Co-op Members / $15 Non-Members

Take your growing skills to the next level by learning how to garden for beneficial insects. Participants will take home an organic seedling!

BUG HOTEL & HUNT

Saturday, June 23, 10 AM – Noon Garden Dreams Urban Farm & Nursery 806 Holland Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15221 $10 Co-op Members / $15 Non-Members / Kids 12 and under Free! Explore the wonderful world of beneficial insects as a family. Activities include a scavenger hunt, story and snack time, and we’ll work together to build a bug hotel!

RSVP at: eastendfoodcoop.eventbrite.com

WELLNESS Wednesday

*No additional discounts or sales may be stacked with this offer

Senior Discount Days (5% courtesy discount for 62+) Every Tues. & Thurs.

quarterly discount

Members, be sure to use your 10% quarterly discount by June 30th!

Open to everyone, every day from 8 AM - 9 PM 7516 Meade Street . Pittsburgh, PA 15208 412-242-3598 . www.eastendfood.coop

Profile for The East End Food Co-op

The Co-operator - May & June 2018  

The Co-operator - May & June 2018  

Advertisement