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College of Human Ecology Annual Report and Directory of Supporters A publication for alumni and friends near and far who support human ecology fields

2009–2010


In This Issue 4 Dean’s Perspective 5 New Leadership for Social Work and Criminal Justice

College of Human Ecology Academic Units

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The Department of Child Development and Family Relations

Alumni Spotlights

9 Partners in Education

Dr. Cynthia Johnson, Chair 252-328-4273 The Department of Criminal Justice

10 Investing in Cultural Proficiency

Dr. James Anderson, Chair

1 1 In the Classroom

Dr. Robert O’Halloran, Interim Chair 252-328-4192

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The Department of Hospitality Management

Study Abroad

13 Providing National and International Leadership

Dr. Robert O’Halloran, Chair 252-328-1604

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The Department of Interior Design and Merchandising

Social Work Helps Hmong Tell Story

16 Faculty Newsmakers

Dr. Katherine Swank, Chair 252-328-6929

18 Demystifying Dyslexia

The Department of Nutrition and Dietetics

19 Faculty Publications 23

Student Discovery Products

27

Advisory Boards

Dr. William Forsythe III, Chair 252-328-4274 The School of Social Work Dr. Shelia G. Bunch, Director 252-328-5650

29 Giving to the College 30 Honor Roll of Donors

The College of Human Ecology Annual Report and Directory of Supporters is a publication for supporters and practitioners of human ecology fields near and far. It is produced by East Carolina University Publications in collaboration with the College of Human Ecology. Editor: Peggy Novotny Writers: Peggy Novotny, Spaine Stephens Photos by: Peggy Novotny, Cliff Hollis, and Forrest Croce

College of Human Ecology

Nutrition students (lr) Lynette Spencer, Justin Johnson, and Angelica May were among the many College of Human Ecology students who traveled abroad in 2009–2010.

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Dean’s Perspective

Our faculty collectively completed 246 service activities for professional organizations, 608 service activities for the college and university, and 131 service activities for the broader community.

The past academic year brought many challenges. A significant amount of time and effort was consumed addressing the budget situation at the college and university. We successfully budgeted $606,611 to help offset the state’s structural deficit within our operating budget. This significant reduction was not without worrisome consequences and necessitated some internal financial restructuring, but no additional job losses. New faculty positions were limited, but we were able to hire seven faculty replacements and two new faculty, as well as add two advisors to the CHE Student Services Center. Enrollments outpaced our ability to increase the number of faculty. This combination of factors meant burgeoning class sizes for many of our already overworked faculty. Overall, the faculty produced 51,342 student credit hours. Despite the heavy teaching load, the faculty continued to produce research and other creative activities at a high level. Over the last academic year, collectively, the faculty published 141 journal articles, 13 books, 18 creative activities, numerous book chapters and conference papers, and made 193 presentations. In 2010, faculty grants yielded approximately $1.75 million in funds to support faculty research and program efforts, with the Department of Nutrition and Dietetics leading the way, followed closely by the Department of Child Development and Family Relations. Eighteen of the faculty won major university, UNC system, and/ or professional awards. Six faculty members undertook major leadership roles in professional organizations, including one with 70,000 members. Faculty also worked with graduate and undergraduate researchers to produce 17 journal articles, 19 manuscripts under review, and 92 presentations, as well as book chapters and conference proceedings. These efforts resulted in seven awards. Through the hard work of the faculty, the college continued to improve the depth and breadth of our students’ educational experience. Our curriculum continued to grow and improve as a result of a revised undergraduate curriculum in the Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, an integrated care model for medical family therapy students and medical students, and the incorporation of Second Life technologies into social work, hospitality management, and interior design and merchandising courses, and updates to many course offerings across the college. Student access to education was facilitated by statewide articulation agreements with community colleges for early childhood education, birth through kindergarten education, as well as a new online MAEd program in family and consumer sciences. Student cultural boundaries were expanded through three CHE study-abroad opportunities to the countries of Italy, France, the Commonwealth of Dominica, and China. International connections were also forged with Bhutan, Bahrain, Peru, Kenya, Ecuador, Turkey, and Portugal, as well as other countries. True to the college motto of “enriching lives, enhancing communities,” the faculty stepped forward to aid those in eastern North Carolina and beyond. Our faculty collectively completed 246 service activities for professional organizations, 608 service activities for the college and university, and 131 service activities for the broader community. Marginalized populations that benefitted from this service included, among others, the west Greenville community, Hmong people, Latinos, North Carolina Native American tribes, and Dominicans. As we enter academic year 2010–2011, the College of Human Ecology will face the ongoing challenge of increasing our competitive advantage in teaching, research/creative activities, and service in the face of even greater pressure on our operating budget. We must continue to find ways to do more with less. At the same time, we must continue to improve the quality of our faculty and student experience. Our success in the coming year will be measured by our ability to • heighten awareness of our programs and further enhance the image of the college through teaching, research and service, • continue to be proactive in finding ways to increase the diversity and cultural knowledge of our faculty and students, and • continue to seek new gifts and commitments through fundraising efforts focused on student and faculty support, as well as improvements to the Rivers Building to enhance the working and learning environment. Accolades are owed to the talented CHE faculty and staff who have produced so many accomplishments over the last year and who have endeavored to improve our students’ experiences in difficult financial times. Best wishes,

Judy Siguaw, Professor and Dean 4

2009–2010 Annual Report

College of Human Ecology


Feature Stories Social Work and Criminal Justice Take on New Leadership Shelia Grant Bunch

William P. Bloss

Dr. Shelia Grant Bunch became director of the School of Social Work in July 2010. She has been an integral part of the social-work faculty for 24 years, serving on many community, school, and university committees. She earned a PhD in sociology from North Carolina State University and an MSW from the University of North Carolina– Chapel Hill. She had been serving as interim director of the school since 2008, and she is the former coordinator of the baccalaureate social work degree program. Bunch has published in the areas of grandparenting and kinship, intimate partner violence, and rural social work. One priority for Bunch, a Bertie County native, is for the School of Social Work to maintain its dedication to student and faculty service within the community. “There are lots of opportunities for students to provide service in the community as they are learning how to practice social work in those settings,” she says. Social work students complete internships across North Carolina, in settings including schools, hospitals, outpatient medical clinics, substance-abuse treatment centers, and prisons, among many others. Faculty members work in the field as well, completing research and staying current with the changing face of the community’s needs. For Bunch, it is vital that she stay immersed in community service, “primarily because one can become lost in administrative duties and be removed from real people and real problems and situations,” she says. “It keeps me connected to the things I’m interested in. I always knew I was a natural helper.” She also stays focused on serving in leadership roles. In addition to serving as the principal investigator for the ECU Child Welfare Education Collaborative, Bunch has been principal investigator and co-principal investigator on the following grants: Addressing Violence During and Around the Time of Pregnancy; Pregnancy and Depression: Pilot Study of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention in Pregnancy for Low-Income Women with Depressive Symptoms; and Insight-Plus: A Cognitive Behavioral Intervention Pilot Study for Pregnancy African-American and Caucasian Low-Income Women with Depressive Symptoms. Bunch wants to use her breadth of experience to help shape graduates of ECU’s School of Social Work. She foresees the challenges in an ever-changing field, including changing demographics, and stereotypes and misconceptions about the social-work profession. She plans to build on the infrastructure of a successful, growing program, expanding its reach through alumni networking and study-abroad opportunities. “We live in a global society now,” she says. “Studyabroad experiences would really enhance learning and growth.” Bunch also plans to work with faculty to produce well-rounded, well-prepared graduates who can make a difference in the lives that make up that global society, using empathy, problem-solving skills, and therapeutic alliances with client systems while “looking at the big picture,” Bunch says. “We teach them to be in tune with themselves and to increase their self-awareness.”

William “Bill” Bloss assumed duties as chair of the Department of Criminal Justice in June 2010. Bloss held former appointments as professor of criminal justice and director of the international criminal justice studies program at The Citadel. He earned a PhD in criminal justice and MA in criminology from Sam Houston State University. Bloss has served as a regional police academy director, police training coordinator, and law enforcement officer. His research focuses on transnational crime, international terrorism, comparative crime and criminal justice, police practice, surveillance, and privacy rights in criminal justice. In addition to being nationally recognized as an educator and scholar, Bloss is a fellow of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences and has been named to Who’s Who in America and Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers. Part of Bloss’s agenda at the helm of the criminal justice department is to “further develop an already robust and effective program,” he says. “The sky’s the limit.” One area Bloss champions is the strong engagement of faculty members as teacher-scholars, a concept he wants to broaden through the visibility of their research that includes crime control, criminal-justice procedures, improving public safety and citizens’ quality of life, and the challenges that face these professionals in a post-September 11 world. “We face new challenges,” he says,” but we have new opportunities to contribute to public safety and homeland security.” Bloss’s expertise and interests extend beyond the United States. He has conducted research in close to 40 countries on topics including international crime and terrorism, and drug and human trafficking. He is a respected contributor to panels and councils worldwide. He has served as a grant-proposal peer reviewer for the United Kingdom’s Economic and Social Research Council since 2009 and was appointed in July 2010 to an international crime conference in Slovenia, among many other achievements and affiliations. Bloss plans to expand that global reach in the department and build off of current research initiatives. Bloss also wants to work with faculty to produce highly skilled criminal-justice professionals from the department. “We want to fill students’ toolboxes with the tools they’ll need to enhance their understanding of criminal-justice processes,” he says, “but also the ability to be better critical thinkers and problem solvers in an increasingly complex world.” Similarly, he believes it is his responsibility to lead the department in making a global impact through faculty contributions as well. “We need to tell the world about what we’re doing,” Bloss says. “We’re doing good things, and we have a bright future.” Even with his wealth of experience, Bloss looks to his new role as a learning opportunity as well. Part of his professional success has stemmed from being open to new perspectives and ideas. For him, it’s about “lifelong learning,” he says. “I’m excited to constantly be engaged in intellectual growth, and to continue to learn about the world around us.”

College of Human Ecology

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Alumni Spotlights Dana McQueen ’92 “I wake up each day looking forward to work.” Dana (pronounced Dan-a) McQueen decided to become an interior designer at the tender age of five. As she was growing up, her dad, Danny McQueen, owner of the landmark McQueen’s Interiors (www. mcqueensinteriors.com) in Morehead City, North Carolina, tried unsuccessfully to interest her in less demanding occupations. “Dad knew that interior designers put in very long hours, and he wanted me to have it a little easier,” said Dana. But as an ECU interior design alumna and second-generation owner of McQueen’s Interiors, Dana has no regrets. “Dad was right. My business is demanding, but I love it. I wake up each day looking forward to work, and I feel very fortunate for that,” she says. Though Dana might have worked part-time for her parents in college, she refrained. “I knew even then that a good interior designer must be committed to clients,” she says. “This business is about building relationships, and that requires a time commitment.” After graduating from ECU, Dana worked as a design assistant for another ECU grad, Joni Vanderslice, owner of J. Banks Design Group in Hilton Head, South Carolina. She began working for McQueen’s Interiors in 1993. The combination of work experience and the

bachelor’s degree gave Dana the knowledge and confidence to buy the business from her parents in 2009. “It’s great to have Dad as a consultant,” says Dana, “but I make all the major decisions for the store now and feel comfortable with that responsibility.” McQueen’s Interiors, a full service interior design store, opened its doors in 1973 on the causeway in Atlantic Beach, North Carolina. For the past 25 years, the 12,500-square-foot showroom has been located in the Pelletier Shops in Morehead City. This wonderful showroom is filled with dreamy, colorful, beachy furniture, fabrics, and accessories. When asked how her industry has changed during her career, Dana says, “The greatest changes I have seen have been within the furniture industry. I hand select furniture from the Atlanta, High Point, Dallas, and New York markets, and furniture is not made the way it used to be made. Even with what’s called high-end furniture today, it is hard to find real craftsmanship. Most furniture today is shipped from overseas and comes in several boxes. Assembly is definitely required.” As far as advice for students, Dana says, “I would tell students that success comes from being serious about the profession. Be prepared to stay with a job for a few years. It takes time to build product knowledge and become confident with your designing ability. Be prepared to be as devoted to the profession as you are to your classes at ECU. Instant gratification is rare in this or any other field, but if you love it, it’s worth the effort.”

Carolyn Mansfield ’76, ’77 “I feel very rewarded when I help solve a nutrition problem.” Every day, Carolyn Mansfield tries to make a difference. Mansfield, a clinical dietician at Nash General Hospital in Rocky Mount, earned a BS in foods, nutrition, and institutional management in ’76 and an MS in home economics with a college teaching option in ’77. With her mother (and now her sister as well) in the same field, the Goldsboro native knew early on where her education would lead her. “I knew from the time I was a child,” she says. “I’ve always been pretty serious about what I wanted to do.” Her daily duties include managing diets of high-risk patients, solving problems presented by diets, creating tube feedings, and screening patients for their respective dietary needs. Those patients can include diabetics, those suffering from congestive heart failure, and oncology patients. To meet their needs, it may mean beginning from scratch and finding solutions to loss of appetite. “I’ll go and get them something that I think they can eat,” Mansfield says. “When I come back and they’ve eaten half a sandwich and they’re smiling, that makes my day. I feel good doing what I can.” Her ECU education helped her become capable of doing so much for the patients she serves. The combination of clinical, 6

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management, and food-service experience she received through her major equipped her to be an expert in every area of her field. The teamwork the curriculum offered her through projects and studying made a difference as well, she says, helping her consider every option when finding the best nutritional solutions for patients. She is a patient educator, prepared to consider each patient’s case and present nutritional information on a level that he or she can understand and in turn take care of him- or herself. Because she has worked in a clinical setting since graduate school, Mansfield believes new dieticians should take time to work in such a setting for at least a year to build a strong professional foundation. From there, they will be ready to take on the nutritional and dietary needs in other settings in a community. Mansfield led the way in beginning dietetic internship opportunities at Nash General for college students, including ECU students. “I knew we had a lot to offer,” she says. “I owe it to the next generation to do whatever I can to help them succeed.” In fact, Mansfield is not finished learning, either. She regularly attends workshops to stay current on the latest dietetics information, and is a certified diabetes educator. As she continues to pursue education, she is appreciative of ECU and the departments where her education began and led to a successful career in a field she’s passionate about. “I stay in it for the love of it,” Mansfield says. “I feel very rewarded when I help solve a nutrition problem.” College of Human Ecology


Debbie Roe-Dixon ’75 “There’s never a dull moment in the hotel industry.” Debbie Roe-Dixon is confident that she found her professional niche, thanks to thorough guidance and mentorship from the college’s faculty and staff. Roe-Dixon ’75 is director of catering at Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza, a position in which she uses her degree in institution management and nutrition to help produce top-quality events for guests and the public. The fast-paced world of management and catering attracted the Weldon, North Carolina, native after a careful examination of all her career options. “There were professors who were willing to take some extra time to talk to me about what direction I wanted to go in,” says Roe-Dixon. The array of possibilities in the nutrition field won her over. After a stint working for Chi Omega sorority, of which she became a member during college, she served as catering manager for Stouffer Hotels and eventually became the executive director of the Cincinnati International Wine Festival before accepting her current position. At ECU, Roe-Dixon studied a well-rounded variety of courses based on College of Human Ecology majors. She took child-development

and home economics courses, as well as others not directly focused on her major, which helped her understand what other students in her college were interested in. “We all learned to appreciate what each of us was interested in,” she says. “When I started out in the hotel industry, very few people I worked with had that background.” Those courses also helped her learn skills that benefit her own career, such as creating menus and preparing meals. Roe-Dixon, who holds a certified meeting professional credential, manages a group of catering managers and administrative staff. She works with clients every day to plan events, find solutions to challenges in planning those meetings, weddings, or galas, and ensures that every aspect of an event—set-up, menu, audiovisual, etc.—goes smoothly in the end. “There’s never a dull moment in the hotel industry,” she says. Familiar with every aspect of the way the 561-room hotel runs, Roe-Dixon is able to produce creative, personalized ideas for each client, focusing on details from reservations and lodging arrangements to transportation. In a field where every detail matters, she has found success—and happy clients. Some of Roe-Dixon’s success comes from her continued learning from colleagues and her relationships with competitors. “I learn from people, too,” she says. “The more I’ve learned, the more I’ve realized this is just where I wanted to be. This is my niche, but it’s not that I’ve stopped growing.”

Robert Desoto “Do it because you care about making a difference.” Robert “Bob” Desoto ’75, ’81 every day delves into the multiple layers of social work and its impact on a community. Desoto is a managing partner and licensed practical social worker at Eastern Psychiatric & Behavioral Specialists PLLC in Greenville and teaches in the human services program at Pitt Community College. Using his bachelor’s degree in social work and his master’s degrees in rehabilitation counseling and social work, he not only helps clients make decisions that will improve their lives, but also influences future social-work professionals. “It’s a real privilege working with people who share their stories with you,” Desoto says. “I’ve always felt that’s an honor and a privilege. Helping people make choices that are best for their lives, that’s kind of driven me.” Eastern Psychiatric is one of the largest private outpatient practices of its kind in the region, and has grown to include more than 19 practitioners. Desoto hopes the practices reaches as many clients in need as possible. It all started when Desoto went to Walter Reed Army Medical Center to visit his father, who had been wounded in Vietnam. Something about the way the hospital’s social worker related to his family touched Desoto, and he became College of Human Ecology

interested in the field. He took an introduction to social work class at ECU, and he was hooked. “I was so impressed with the professors’ knowledge base and how flexible you could be in social work,” he says. “There are so many areas of helping.” The professionals at Eastern Psychiatric are touching many of those areas. As Desoto helps educate future social-work professionals, his colleagues continue to help him evolve in the field. “I am blessed to work with professionals who teach me,” he says. “I learn from others. He also has high hopes for the School of Social Work, which he says excels at preparing students for real-world situations. Desoto would like to see a large, strong alumni association that finds innovative funding sources for the school. Those alumni could also share professional knowledge with new graduates and even help place them in internships or permanent positions. In addition to serving on the ECU School of Social Work Advisory Board, Desoto sits on the State Employees Credit Union Advisory Board. In 2004, he was awarded the President’s Award from the Southern Organization of Human Services Education for his active involvement in helping students continue their education and become engaged in the community. His advice to social-work students shows his strong stance on social work and service. “Be passionate about what you do,” he says. “Don’t worry about making a living in social work—that will come. Do it because you care about making a difference, and good things will follow.” 2009–2010 Annual Report

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Alumni Spotlights Art Beeler Jr. ’75 “Criminal justice is a people business.” Arthur “Art” F. Beeler Jr. ’75, felt an inclination toward criminal justice from the start and built a notable and celebrated career in the field. Beeler, who is originally from Edenton and earned his bachelor of science professional degree in social work and correctional administration, began his career as a correctional officer at the Federal Reformatory in Petersburg, Virginia, in 1975, and retired in 2009 as the complex warden at the Federal Correctional Complex in Butner, North Carolina. With his commanding presence, Beeler managed five institutions at Butner, including low, medium, and close security facilities and a federal medical center. “A successful day was if everyone (employees) went home safely,” he says, “and if nobody got out.” Between his first professional position and his retirement, Beeler served as warden, superintendent, and official for correctional facilities all over the country, ensuring inmates were cared for and that security was top-notch. Several keys to his success in serving as the CEO of the Butner facilities that he describes as “a city for people who do not want to be there” are values and practices he learned from professors and mentors at East Carolina, including Gus Moeller, then a professor in the Department of Social Work. Criminal justice is a “people business,” Beeler says, and success can come from learning to speak “with” others rather than “to” or “at” them. Beeler came to know countless correction employees within the

walls of the facilities he oversaw. “Lots of people work inside these institutions trying to protect the public,” he says, “and also trying to give others the opportunities to better themselves. They don’t get a lot of attention, but they are unsung heroes.” Beeler emphasizes oral and written communication, data analysis, and sustaining professional relationships—skills that were nurtured early on at ECU—as the basis for his professional success. During his tenure as warden at Butner, he opened the federal medical center to ECU undergraduates so they could see those values important to a criminal-justice professional in action and also see firsthand how the facility serves inmates. During his career, Beeler has served as a contract health-services program specialist for the North Carolina Division of Prisons, as a lecturer and presenter on criminal justice and correctional administration and as an author of scholarly articles about related topics. He has served as an expert witness for the Massachusetts Department of Correction and for the Prison Rape Elimination Commission. He has received numerous awards, including the H. G. “Gus” Moeller Award for Correctional Excellence from the North Carolina Correctional Association, a distinction special to Beeler because of its namesake. He also was awarded the Distinguished Service Award from the Bureau of Prisons, the Compassion in Action Award from the Dalai Lama Foundation, and the US Surgeon General’s Medallion. Interestingly, Beeler will act as a consultant in Afghanistan in the year ahead to help transition prisoners from military rule to civilian charge. So, there will be much more to come from this special alumnus.

Nelda Howell ’59 “I had a really well-balanced education.” Nelda Howell’s hands-on experiences in college led to a lifelong career in the field she always loved—family and consumer sciences. Howell ’59 began studying what was then known as home economics and took advantage of every opportunity her East Carolina College education offered. “I had a really well balanced education,” she says. Howell has served as a home economics extension agent for the Agricultural Extension Services of NC State University, a vocational home economics teacher in Richlands, North Carolina, a home economics extension agent in Craven County, and director of extension services in Clemson, South Carolina. She has served on numerous community boards, including the Jacksonville Regional Branch of the American Association of University Women and the Land Use and Development Committee of Onslow County. She also serves on the ECU Family and Consumer Sciences Advisory Board, which gives her the opportunity to advocate for an area of study she says is vital to families and communities. “Family and consumer science is a very diverse, wonderful career,” she says. “I would choose to study home economics again.” 8

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The summer after she graduated, she joined the National Home Economics Association. “I really think I got a lot of that involvement from East Carolina,” she says. “I learned to be very dedicated to my college and my profession.” The experiences she had during college— from bonding with and learning from popular professors to learning more about her profession in ECC’s home management house—also helped encourage her to stay involved in the university’s progress. “I feel like you need to continue to give back to the organization that helped get you where you are,” Howell says. Her close ties to the school and the community helped her build a reputation for civic responsibility and professional expertise. She is often tapped to serve on boards, councils, and committees statewide, a duty she feels began with her college studies and her experience helping run her family’s Moss Hill, North Carolina, farm. “That gave me a feeling that you have to be independent and do things,” she says. Howell, who recently attended her 50th class reunion at ECU, is happy that the university is on the long list of her affiliations. She wants to be a voice for the College of Human Ecology, encouraging new students to examine its breadth of majors, including family and consumer sciences. The college has many impressive amenities, Howell says, such as the Golden Corral Culinary Center and other hands-on teaching tools. She also wants to help recruit students to ECU, because of her own fond memories. “I really enjoyed my time here,” she says. College of Human Ecology


Partners in Education Thanks to These Partners in Education Wolfgang Puck Worldwide Inc. Although great cookware doesn’t ensure great cooking, it certainly helps! Working with state-of-the-art facilities and cookware creates a professional atmosphere for hospitality management and nutrition students. This year, Wolfgang Puck Worldwide (www.wolfgangpuck. com) contributed to that atmosphere by donating nearly 300 pieces of its professional grade cookware to the Department of Hospitality Management. The assortment of pots, pans, and utensils are used in the college’s new Golden Corral Culinary Center to enhance the culinary experience. Dr. Robert O’Halloran, chair of the Department of Hospitality Management, said, “The cookware will help blend the business of hospitality with knowledge of food preparation and presentation.” Jacqui De Chabert-Rios, visiting assistant professor of hospitality management, who oversees several of the food laboratory courses said, “Wolfgang Puck has had a long commitment to the hospitality industry as both a restaurateur and culinarian. He has created three highly successful business enterprises within the industry. Mr. Joe Essa, managing partner and president of Wolfgang Puck Worldwide Inc. and advisory board member in our department, was the catalyst for this gift. We’re grateful to Joe and WPW for their donation. Having the best tools for our students will provide an even higher quality educational experience.” James Chandler, associate professor of hospitality management, who facilitated the gift with WPW, added, “WPW has been an advocate of higher education for hospitality industry professional business managers, and this gift is further evidence of that commitment. The Department of Hospitality Management is honored to share the vision of Wolfgang Puck Worldwide, and we accept the challenge to change our world, one community at a time, through education and economic development. Tomorrow starts here.”

James Chandler, associate professor of hospitality management, helped facilitate the gift from Wolfgang Puck Worldwide.

Alfred Williams & Company of Raleigh The Department of Interior Design and Merchandising found the perfect location and the perfect company to help students network with our many alumni in the Raleigh area. In March, Alfred Williams & Company of Raleigh (www.alfredwilliams.com) hosted Wine and Design, an evening of food and drink providing a marvelous venue for interior design and merchandising students to display their concept boards and discuss employment and internship opportunities with alumni and friends. A special thanks goes out to Matt Dorsey, Herman Miller representative and CHE Interior Design Advisory Board member and John McKinney, president of marketing, Alfred Williams & Company, Raleigh. Thanks also to the North Raleigh Hilton for donating hors d’oeuvres that evening and to Tina Williford for the generous donation of wines and for educating guests on wines during the evening. It was a great event! College of Human Ecology

In March, Alfred Williams & Company hosted Wine and Design, a networking event for interior design and merchandising students. 2009–2010 Annual Report

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Feature Stories Invested in Cultural Proficiency Our world is transforming before our eyes. As the Internet has come to ignore geographic boundaries, so too have people, products and services, cuisine, entertainment, tourism, travel, fashion, art and design, customs, cultures, and crime. Educators now must think in global terms about their industries and strive to prepare students to work with a broad spectrum of people from varying countries and cultures. In higher education today, we hear the terms global competence, cultural proficiency, internationalization, and globalization used interchangeably. It could be that these concepts have similar meanings at their core—the ability to interact effectively with people of different races, cultures, and customs. Whatever term one chooses, cultural proficiency is an essential element of a good education today. The College of Human Ecology is heavily invested in ECU’s strategic goal to “prepare students for citizenship in an increasingly global, culturally diverse, and rapidly changing society.” Since its formation in 2003, the college’s International Education Committee (IEC) has led the charge to prepare students to compete and work in a global and multicultural society by promoting cultural competence across the curriculum and fostering a culture of internationalism within the college and university. The IEC includes faculty whose countries of origin include China, Jamaica, India, Iran, Japan, Poland, Turkey, Ukraine, and the United States. This year, the IEC presented forums on the cultures and customs of Turkey and India for students, faculty, and staff. They also sponsored a presentation by the college’s international and exchange students from Australia, Turkey, United Kingdom, Japan, and Spain, and they promoted the college’s summer study abroad programs to Italy and France. The IEC also encourages all faculty members to look for areas within the curriculum to infuse cultural sensitivity. Priti Desai, assistant professor of child development and family relations, is a member of the IEC and of the ECU Chancellor’s Diversity Leadership Council. She knows that her students in CDFR 4303: Families and Cultural Diversity, whether they remain in North Carolina or move far away, will be called upon to serve diverse families, but she says that teaching diversity is not easy. “Negative stereotyping and prejudice contribute to barriers toward engaging impartially and in meaningful ways with individuals and communities different than oneself. Prejudice arises out of ignorance, feeling threatened, possible reaction to prior mistreatment, and lack of exposure to others. It is sometimes taught early and could be deep- Priti Desai rooted. It is the role of the university to enable each student to identify and break free of any existing biased thought and behavior,” says Desai. “Those who teach diversity courses must be very thoughtful in planning the exercises and experiences to enable students to reflect on their attitudes toward individuals from other cultures. I plan activities and assignments which engage the students to examine the sources and consequences of stereotyping and prejudice. We move beyond this to think of steps to overcome prejudice so that all individuals and families will be served equally with respect and dignity.” Desai stresses with her students 10

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The International Education Committee

that cultural sensitivity and proficiency are essential at all levels of providing service: individual, program or agency, and policy. Desai believes the path to cultural proficiency is a continuum, and the first step in the continuum is to clarify one’s own cultural heritage, values, beliefs, and behaviors. The second step is to learn more about the cultural characteristics, customs, and courtesies of the people with whom one will be working. The third step is to learn practical skills to put the knowledge into practice. Desai acknowledges that each instructor who teaches diversity-related courses brings to the classroom their own unique perspectives based on life experiences and world view. Hailing from India with its pluralistic, multilingual, and multiethnic society, she learned as a child to embrace and celebrate diversity. She urges her students to “keep an open mind, avoiding stereotypical thinking, and show respect for all individuals.” Desai has also developed a relationship with Ms. Mariella Olivos of the Universidad ESAN in Lima, Peru, and facilitates classroom exchanges via the global classroom between her students and Ms. Olivos’s to improve cultural understanding for students in both countries. As Desai’s diversity course nears the end each semester, she finds herself hoping that all of the exercises, activities, interactions, and thoughtful discussions will add up to much more than credit hours and a final grade for students. She hopes the course will make a lasting impression. “But one diversity focused course alone is not enough for developing cultural proficiency,” says Desai. “We have to figure out ways to entice students in meaningful out of classroom interactions with diverse people and communities. Students should be constantly transforming through their interactions with peers, faculty, staff, and the larger community. This is why I’m pleased to serve on the Chancellor’s Diversity Leadership Council. The Council is charged with examining the complex issues of diversity, inclusion, and cultural proficiency on the campus, and we feel a sense of urgency for the ECU community to understand, communicate with, and effectively interact with people across cultures.” College of Human Ecology


In the Classroom

Dr. Hamid Kusha teaches courses in comparative criminal justice and terrorism.

Every department and school in the College of Human Ecology has a strategic plan to help students, faculty, and staff move along the cultural proficiency continuum. Here are some examples of opportunities offered within the college in 2009–2010. CHE 4500: Leadership in a Global World offers students a chance to meet other students from around the globe via the Internet and learn skills for leading a culturally diverse, international team. CHE 1002: Military Leadership, Culture and Protocol for Civilian Careers offers students a chance to become more familiar with the unique culture of the military services in preparation for civilian employment with the military. HMGT 1500: Multicultural Hospitality Management examines the influence of culture on hospitality organizations and management styles. Dr. Cynthia Deale and Dr. David Rivera teach this class. Dr. Tracy Carpenter-Aeby and social work students

worked collaboratively with Hmong families in Hickory, N.C., to promote public awareness and sensitivity for the Hmong culture, assist Hmong students on their path to higher education, and preserve the Hmong culture in the United States. Dr. Tracy Carpenter-Aeby and social work students have worked to reduce cultural and language barriers among students, teachers, and social workers at Wellcome Middle School Wildcat Leadership and Life Skills Academy for dropout prevention. MRCH 2239: Apparel and Human Behavior examines how values and beliefs held within a culture influence people’s apparel choices and behavior. International guest speakers share expertise on dress and fashion outside the United States, and students conduct interviews with people of wide-ranging cultures to develop a global perspective on apparel. Student design teams in IDSN 4500: Interior Design IV– Universal Design developed conceptual designs for assisted living College of Human Ecology

facilities in the U.S. that addressed the cultural needs of residents originating from other countries. Considerations for differences in body measurement for ethnic groups from Brazil, China, Japan, India, Mexico, South Korea, Sweden, and Turkey were factored into the development of prototypes for seating. Dr. Yaprak Savut and Mr. W. Hunt McKinnon teach Universal Design. NUTR 1010: Cultural Foods explores the traditional foods and food habits of many different cultures. Students learn about the overall history and environment of differing cultures, get to know people from different cultures, and experience foods from around the world. NUTR 6032: Practicum in Community Dietetics helps dietetic interns become more familiar with the cultures of their clients. Interns explore many different cultures and prepare foods from wide ranging cultures. They also learn about counseling individuals and families from many cultures. Dr. Hamid Kusha teaches courses in comparative criminal justice and terrorism, specializing in global terrorism, and Islamic crime, law, and justice issues in the U.S. and abroad. Among his culture-focused scholarly activities is authorship of the books The Sacred Law of Islam and Islam in American Prisons. Dr. Patrice Morris teaches both undergraduate and graduate courses in diversity in criminal justice. These classes examine U.S. criminal justice system functions in relation to cultural diversity dimensions in the community. As a criminologist, Dr. Morris has been nationally recognized for her groundbreaking research on homicide in Jamaica and is currently leading a research study investigating criminality and imprisonment among Caribbean immigrants to the United States. Dr. William Bloss, chair of the Department of Criminal Justice, is an international and comparative criminal justice specialist whose teaching and research interests focus on a range of global crime and justice issues. He teaches courses in comparative criminal justice, international crime, and international terrorism. 2009–2010 Annual Report

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Study Abroad

Nutrition and hospitality students toured France and Italy.

Child development and family relations students studied in the progressive early childhood centers in Pistoia, Italy, under the direction of Dr. Sandra Triebenbacher, Ms. Barbara Brehm, and graduate student, Nicole Mitchell. Merchandising students traveled to China to broaden their understanding of the apparel and textile industry of that country under the leadership of Dr. Runying Chen and Dr. Liuying Shen. Students presented research based on the experience at the National Council for Undergraduate Research 2010 National Conference in Montana. A “wearable art” apparel collection inspired by the China trip was débuted at a fashion show produced by apparel and interiors merchandising students. Ms. Nancy Harris and Dr. Marcia Taylor led nutrition and hospitality management students on a trip to France and Italy to broaden students’ understanding of nutrition, health, cuisine, and the hospitality industry in those countries. Dr. Beth Wall-Bassett, Ms. Nancy Harris, and five nutrition students continued their work with governmental ministries in the Commonwealth of Dominica, addressing health and nutrition-related issues across that country. Cultural Connections The ECU Latino Initiative and the Association of Mexicans in North Carolina presented the Second ECU Conference on Latino Issues. The conference planning committee included Dr. John Pierpont and social work students Karen Kuemerle-Pinillos, Katie Lassiter, Christian Adams, Louise Hudak, Anna Holloman, and Jalisa Lewis. Professor Rebecca Sweet and her interior design students collaborated with Pitt Community College instructor Bill Hofler and his architectural technology students on conceptual designs for a spa and retreat center that addresses a 21st-century vision of Woodland Indian culture. Dreamweaver of the Haliwa-Saponi tribe led the students through a journey of discovery in Native American culture. 12

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The School of Social Work hosted a presentation on opportunities and challenges facing Mexicans in North Carolina by Carlos Flores Vizcarra, Mexican consul general to the Carolinas. Dr. Angela Lamson and Dr. Jennifer Hodgson secured a grant to provide medical family therapy to Hispanic families and migrant farm workers in Pitt and Greene counties in North Carolina. Medical family therapists are providing in-home family therapy and integrated care alongside Greene County health-care outreach workers, specifically focusing on biopsychosocial-spiritual care for individuals, couples, and families. Dr. Nancie Mangels raises awareness about cultural diversity in the criminal justice profession, university, and community. She is a member of the Affirmative Action Committee of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences and has led many of efforts to appreciate multiculturalism in the Department of Criminal Justice. Dr. Mangels is a member of the Chancellor’s Diversity Leadership Committee and is on the Speaker’s Bureau of the Office of Institutional Diversity. Dr. Robert O’Halloran travelled to Bhutan, Bahrain, and Portugal and hosted representatives from Kenya to forge educational partnerships and international exchanges for hospitality management students and faculty. The interior design program entered into a student exchange agreement with Bilkent University in Ankara, Turkey, and hosted a student from the Department of Interior Architecture and Environmental Design at Bilkent. Additionally, an interior design student participated in the Nordic Design program in the Department of Architecture at the University of Oulu in Finland. Dr. Yaprak Savut initiated these exchanges. Dr. Roman Pawlak led nutrition seminars with Polish-Americans in Chicago. Polsat 2, a global Polish media network, captured the story about Dr. Pawlak and aired it on the news program “Oblicza Ameryki” (Faces of America). College of Human Ecology


Feature Stories CHE Provides National and International Leadership Sylvia Escott-Stump, dietetic program

director for the Department of Nutrition and Dietetics at East Carolina University, has been voted president-elect of the American Dietetic Association (ADA), the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. With more than 70,000 members, the ADA works to improve the nation’s health and advance the profession of dietetics through research, education, and advocacy. As president-elect, Escott-Stump will shadow the current president during 2010, serving as a media spokesperson for the ADA and using her special expertise in cultural competency, elderly nutrition, functional foods and phytochemicals, nutritional assessment, nutrition, and genetics. She will become the ADA’s 85th president for a year beginning June 2011, joining the ADA Board of Directors, with responsibility for strategic planning, policy development, and fiscal management for the Association. Escott-Stump has presented hundreds of lectures and workshops for national and international audiences, including Saudi Arabia, Mexico, Scotland, China, and Japan. She has authored articles in many peer-reviewed journals, six editions of Nutrition and DiagnosisRelated Care and four editions of Krause’s Food and Nutrition Therapy, a staple text for many college nutrition programs. She is a past chair of ADA’s Nominating Committee and Speaker of the House of Delegates. She chaired a task force for the Nutrition Care Process for the dietetics profession from 2002 to 2005, establishing standardized nutrition language to be used internationally. As a mentor and inspiration to entry-level professionals, she became the first recipient of ADA’s Margene Wagstaff Fellowship for Innovation in Dietetics Education in 2007. Escott-Stump has received many other awards, including ADA’s Medallion Award, Member of the Year for North Carolina Dietetic Association, and Distinguished Dietitian of Pennsylvania. She maintains accreditation status of the dietetics programs at ECU and conducts applied research in the areas of professionalism, nutrition in health care, management, career coaching and education. She is a graduate of Indiana University of Pennsylvania, where she also earned a master’s degree in adult/community education and received the Distinguished Alumni Award. Cynthia Deale, associate professor of

hospitality management, was voted to serve a three-year term as vice president (2009–2010), president (2010–2011), and immediate past president (2011–2012) for the International Council on Hotel, Restaurants and Institutional Education (ICHRIE). ICHRIE is the global advocate of hospitality and tourism education for schools, colleges, and universities offering programs in hotel and restaurant management, foodservice management and culinary arts. ICHRIE’s annual summer conference includes 400–500 attendees from around the globe who are educators or administrators in hospitality and tourism-management programs in two-year and four-year post-secondary schools, colleges, and universities. ICHRIE hosts regional conferences throughout the year in six College of Human Ecology

federations: the European Federation, the Asia-Pacific Federation, and four federations within the USA and the Americas. ICHRIE also sponsors two refereed journals, the Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Research and the Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Education, as well as a non-refereed publication called the Hosteur. Dr. Deale has a diverse background in hospitality, tourism, and education and has worked for the National Park Service and the USDA Forest Service. She directed recreation and activities planning within a city park system, and managed and worked with the housing and food service department of a major university planning special events and overseeing daily operations. Dr. Deale is also an instructor and evaluator for the Certified Hospitality Educator program offered by the Educational Institute of the American Hotel and Lodging Association and a certified instructor for the ServSafe food-safety program offered by the Educational Foundation of the National Restaurant Association. Dr. Deale is an invited member of the Eta Sigma Delta, Phi Delta Kappa, and Phi Kappa Phi international honor societies and was Phi Delta Kappa’s recipient of their Dissertation of the Year Award in 1994. She also received the John Wiley Innovation in Teaching Award from ICHRIE in 2005. As an academic, Dr. Deale has used her background to focus on food and beverage issues, including sustainability and wine marketing, as well as sustainable tourism, and hospitality education. She has published more than 30 refereed articles, many with coauthors, and is also co-author of the book, Mise en Place for Teaching: A Handbook for Hospitality & Tourism Educators and Trainers, published by the Educational Institute of the AH & LA. Ginger Woodard, CHE associate dean,

will serve a three-year term as vice president of scholarship for the International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) beginning in September 2010. ITAA comprises scholars, educators, and students in the textile, apparel, and merchandising disciplines in higher education for the pursuit of knowledge, interchange of ideas, and dissemination of knowledge through meetings, special events, and publications. As vice president of scholarship, Dr. Woodard will oversee the submission process for scholarly research, innovative teaching papers, and design exhibitions for the association’s annual meeting. Prior to being associate dean, Woodard served as the merchandising program coordinator in the Department of Interior Design and Merchandising where she provided leadership for faculty, program development, and assessment. She was also instrumental in developing a merchandising advisory board made up of business professionals. She has developed and taught merchandising courses on global economics, consumer affairs, international trade, and professional development, some of which has been included in the merchandising concentration within ECU’s School of Business MBA program. The textbook she co-authored, Merchandising Math: A Managerial Approach, is sold in 32 states and in Brazil, Hong Kong, Japan, India, Mexico, Singapore, Spain, and the United Kingdom. Woodard received a PhD and master’s degree from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and a bachelor of science from Meredith College. 2009–2010 Annual Report

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Feature Stories Social work team helps Hmong-Americans tell their story How can Americans of the Judeo-Christian tradition begin to understand and communicate in a meaningful way with a people from Southeast Asia steeped in ancient Far-Eastern religions and customs? This is the question that Tracy Carpenter-Aeby, associate professor of social work, struggled with when she was contacted in the summer of 2009 by a group of Hmong students attending the Bill Gates’s funded Challenger Early College High School in Hickory, North Carolina. The Challenger students had heard of Dr. Carpenter-Aeby’s work with an alternative high school in Georgia, and they believed she was the person to help them and their families in their search for acceptance, assimilation, and education among a population of Americans who do not share their language, beliefs, or traditions. Who are the Hmong people? The Hmong have lived in southern China for at least 2,000 years. In the 18th century, many Hmong fled to Southeast Asia to escape Chinese oppression. During the Vietnam War, the United States Central Intelligence Agency recruited Laotian Hmong in the fight against Communist forces. In 1975, when the U.S. retreated from Laos, the Hmong were persecuted and tortured. Many fled to the mountains of Laos or to Thailand. In the 1990s, large numbers of Hmong were forcibly relocated from Thailand to Laos with support from the United Nations and the U.S. The repatriated Hmong suffered renewed persecution, and many were relocated to safer countries, including the United States. In the U.S., the largest concentrations of Hmong are in California, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and North Carolina. “I told the Challenger students that my work in Georgia had been in drop-out prevention at an alternative high school,” said CarpenterAeby. “My task there was to create programs to help at risk kids finish school. Challenger is also a non-traditional school, but most of the kids who go there are motivated and serious about getting into college. The students insisted, however, that they wanted my help.” Carpenter-Aeby took on the challenge armed with a $4,000 ECU Community Engagement Scholar stipend and a $16,000 grant from the ECU Engagement and Outreach Scholars Academy (EOSA). She decided to approach the project in two research phases, calling the first phase “Transforming Rural Culture Through Higher Education: Preserving Hmong Culture and Oral Histories.” The second phase she calls “Transforming Rural Culture Through Higher Education: Developing Protective Assets for Early College and High School Hmong Students Transitioning to ECU.” For the past year, Carpenter-Aeby and her research team, including ECU Student Community Engagement Scholars Shauna Daniels and Jacqueline Coleman-Carmon, have been getting to know Hmong families in Hickory. They first attended Hmong New Year festivities in November 2009, where they dressed in traditional Hmong costumes and joined nearly 5,000 Hmong families from several states for an outdoor celebration of Hmong heritage with traditional foods, music, lectures, pageants, dance, and films. It was at this gathering that Carpenter-Aeby and her team conducted their first 14

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interview with a Hmong family. “The first family we interviewed was the family of Doaw Xiong, an ECU student of Hmong descent from Hickory,” said CarpenterAeby. “Ironically, Doaw had worked in my office through the federal work-study program before I was ever contacted by the Challenger students. Doaw’s family told us their story of living in an internment camp in Laos for ten years before being re-settled in California. From California, the family moved to Minnesota where they had relatives, but climate and food proved problematic for the family. So they moved back to California. That move did not work out well either, so they decided to try North Carolina after hearing about the Hmong community around Hickory and the climate, which is similar to Laotian climate. The family has taken root here. Doaw’s parents grow the family’s food and maintain a very specialized diet of all-natural, traditional foods.” The researchers have continued to interview Hmong families in College of Human Ecology


Community engagement scholar Shauna Daniels interviewed Hmong families in Hickory, North Carolina.

Hickory and record their stories of survival and resilience. Hmong parents often ask: How do we preserve Hmong culture and traditions now that our children are marrying Americans and melting into the American fabric? Doaw’s father poignantly remarked, “I am HmongAmerican and my children are more American-Hmong. I want to find a way to blend the old and the new families together here in America.” “The interviews have also made it clear that education is a priority for Hmong families,” said Carpenter-Aeby. “Progressive Hmong fathers think college is especially important for their daughters, but they worry about placing their girls in harm’s way on campuses. ECU already has 35 to 40 Hmong students, and some of the parents have found ingenious ways to safeguard their daughters while here.” This is where the second phase of Carpenter-Aeby’s project with the Hmong comes in. ECU has already formed a partnership with Catawba Community College, home of the Challenger School, to College of Human Ecology

help Hmong students complete two years of high school and then transition to ECU. Many Hmong families would now like ECU and Catawba to work together to foster what Carpenter-Aeby calls “protective assets” for their sons and daughters when they transition to ECU, including a caring support network with strong value, physical safety, opportunities for spiritual development, and an emphasis on scholastic achievement. As Carpenter-Aeby and her team tackle the second phase of the project, they plan to seek large community engagement grants. For the present, the research team is building the body of knowledge regarding the Hmong population in North Carolina. “To a great extent we are listening to the Hmong families and letting them tell us what they need,” said Carpenter-Aeby. “Many have said they feel misunderstood by the larger population and would like people to know more about them. So, our immediate task is to gather and process the stories. Telling the stories will come next.” 2009–2010 Annual Report

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Faculty Newsmakers Paige Averett and Blace Nalavany, assistant professors of social work, received international attention from the press for their study titled “An Evaluation of Gay/Lesbian and Homosexual Adoption.” The story went global after appearing in Reuters online news service. Sharon Ballard, associate professor of child development and family relations and Hunt McKinnon, teaching assistant professor, were nominated for the ECU 2010 Centennial Award for Excellence in the area of Service. Barbara Brehm, visiting instructor in child development and family relations, was nominated for the 2010 Max Ray Joyner Award for Excellence through Continuing Education. The award honors faculty members who show outstanding commitment and enthusiasm in teaching and mentoring off-campus students. Melani Duffrin, associate professor of nutrition, received the 2009–2010 East Carolina University Provost and Senior Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs Scholar-Teacher Award. Duffrin was also awarded $198,000 in ARRA funding to supplement a parent award of $504,000 from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Center for Research Resources (NCRR) Science Education Partnership Award (SPEA) to conduct educational research on the impact of the FoodMASTER initiative teaching approach in grade 3–5 learning environments. Sylvia Escott-Stump, dietetic program director and presidentelect of the American Dietetic Association, received the Movers and Shakers Award from the North Carolina Dietetic Association for her many accomplishments in the field of nutrition/dietetics at the state, national, and international levels. George Fenich, professor of hospitality management, was selected by Meeting Professional International to serve on the organization’s Global Volunteer Leadership Team for 2009–2010. Fenich, whose expertise is in meetings, expositions, events, and conventions, is chair of MPI’s Faculty Task Force. MPI is the industry’s largest and most vibrant global community, made up of more than 24,000 members in 71 chapters worldwide. William Forsythe III, professor and chair of the Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, joined more than 80 educators from the United States and around the world to participate in the National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements course, “Dietary Supplement Research Practicum 2009,” in Bethesda, Maryland. Jennifer Hodgson, associate professor of child development and family relations, received the ECU 2010 Centennial Award for Excellence in the category of Ambition. Cynthia Johnson, professor and chair of the Department of Child Development and Family Relations, received the Excellence in Collaboration Award 2010 by the faculty of ECU’s family therapy program for her support of the medical family therapy and marriage and family therapy programs. 16

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Paige Averett and Blace Nalavany, assistant professors of social work, received international attention from the press for their study titled “An Evaluation of Gay/Lesbian and Homosexual Adoption.” John J. Kerbs, assistant professor of criminal justice, received a 2009–2010 Research and Creative Activity Summer Stipend from East Carolina University for his research on “A Multi-Level Analysis of Age-Related Differences in Health Outcomes as Reported by Federal and State Prisoners.” Susan Martin Meggs, assistant professor of interior design, was the recipient of the poster award for her session entitled “Converging Art & Health: An Evidence-Based Approach to Innovation in Learning” at the Lilly Greensboro 2010 Conference on Teaching and Learning. Meggs co-presented with Annette Greer, PhD, MSN, RN, Department of Bioethics and Interdisciplinary Studies. Hunt McKinnon, teaching assistant professor, was nominated for the 2010 Board of Governors Distinguished Professor for Teaching Award. The award recognizes and supports excellent teaching at each of the seventeen constituent universities in the UNC system. College of Human Ecology


Bob O’Halloran (center, top row) presented a workshop for hotel managers in Bhutan.

Bob O’Halloran, professor and chair of the Department Hospitality Management, traveled to Thimphu, the capital of the Kingdom of Bhutan, to deliver a workshop for the Bhutan Middle Management Program sponsored by the Jacobs Foundation of Switzerland and the Kingdom of Bhutan. The students are employees of hotels throughout Bhutan and are nominated for the program by their employers. Roman Pawlak, associate professor of nutrition and dietetics, conducted a study on the health benefits of peanuts and tree nuts among low-income consumers. The study, published in Nutrition Research and Practice, was reported on in Today’s Dietitian, a popular health-related magazine with 110,000 readers. Also, Pawlak’s nutrition seminars with Polish-Americans in Chicago was covered by the Polish media network, Polsat 2, and aired worldwide on the news program Oblicza Ameryki. John Pierpont, associate professor of social work, was inducted into the ECU Servire Society. Professors Margie Gallagher (associate dean), Nancy Harris (nutrition), Angela Lamson (family therapy), and Roman Pawlak (nutrition) were honored for multiple years in the Society. Servire honors ECU students, faculty, and staff who have demonstrated 100 or more hours of volunteer service to the community in the past year. College of Human Ecology

Damon Rappleyea, assistant professor of marriage and family therapy, was invited by the National Healthy Marriage Resource Center to submit a brief discussing the differences between therapy and marital education. The brief is featured on the federally supported National Healthy Marriage Resource Web site. N. Yaprak Savut, assistant professor of interior design, was appointed to the Educator’s Evaluator Verification Team by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA). The role requires team members to assess collegelevel interior design programs seeking NKBA accreditation. Elizabeth Wall-Bassett, assistant professor of nutrition and dietetics, received the “Recognized Young Dietitian of the Year Award” from the North Carolina Dietetic Association. Michael Wheeler, associate professor of nutrition and dietetics, was awarded $215,250 from the National Institutes of Health to conduct research on hepatic lymphocytes and fatty liver disease. Carmel White, associate professor of child development and family relations, and N. Yaprak Savut, assistant professor of interior design, were nominated for the 2010 Robert L. Jones and ECU Alumni Association Award for Outstanding Teaching. 2009–2010 Annual Report

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Feature Stories

Dr. Blace Nalavany and Dr. Lena Carawan display examples of concept mapping created by participants in their study of adults with dyslexia.

Demystifying Dyslexia Two professors in the School of Social Work are using innovative research techniques to help adults with dyslexia find a way to convey what they experience on a daily basis. Dr. Blace Nalavany and Dr. Lena Carawan joined forces in 2007 based on similar backgrounds, research interests, and personal ties to dyslexia, a specific neurobiological learning disability characterized by difficulties with accurate and/or fluent word recognition and poor spelling and decoding abilities. The two are examining the views of adults with dyslexia from a psychosocial standpoint. “There’s very, very little research and understanding on how adults deal with learning differences,” Nalavany says. “We’re using a very innovative methodology to understand what the impact is.” It seeks to uncover how dyslexia affects their daily lives and decisions. The goals of the research include making a “difference through legislation and services” for those living with dyslexia, says Carawan. Professionals working in different agencies within the social-work field will better understand how dyslexia affects every aspect of life for this population. “We want to demystify this experience,” she says. The methodology of this ongoing research project is new to the field of learning-disability research. Phase I of this study used concept mapping, an innovative mixed-methods approach, to produce a visual map of the social and emotional experiences of adults with dyslexia. Photography and art were used as a unique method to capitalize on the strengths of this population. Through these mediums, adults with dyslexia were better able to convey their everyday life experience with dyslexia than through the use of more traditional methods. Through those media, the adults with dyslexia were able to convey experiences and generate statements such as how much energy it takes to study for a test or even complete routine tasks, and the difficulty involved in trying to decide whether to disclose their dyslexia to others. These statements were used in the next phase of concept mapping which involved participants sorting individual statement into groups that 18

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made sense given their own experiences. Additional, participants rated each statement to the degree that it captured their personal experiences. Through statistical analysis nine themes emerged. For example, the importance of having a good support system like family and peers, developing good coping strategies such as recognizing their learning differences, and the emotional toll of living with dyslexia were some of the major themes the adults with dyslexia grappled with every day. Nalavany and Carawan have published three papers on their dyslexia research, one of which explored their methodology alone. Findings from the concept-mapping phase led to the present phase of their research, a nationally based online survey. The survey is one of the largest sample sizes in such research endeavors. Nalavany and Carawan had to work hard to find participants from a population that is often hidden. Along with a survey Web site, they used YouTube, Facebook, LinkedIn, and news releases to find participants, and even gained endorsement from the first school ever to focus on students with dyslexia. The survey was quite detailed and took participants a long time to fill out. Interestingly, by the time the survey closed, there were more than 200 responses, with an almost 90-percent completion rate. “That speaks to their passion,” Nalavany says, “and to their wanting to make a difference.” The survey, and the overall research, helps the participants understand that someone is paying attention to what it’s like to have dyslexia. The open-ended comments section of the survey reflects their eagerness to share their experiences. “We didn’t think we would have the degree of depth we had in the comments,” Carawan says. The next steps in the research process will be steered by the participants themselves, depending on the survey’s findings. The ongoing, groundbreaking research of Nalavany and Carawan is delving deeper into the heart of dyslexia and giving hope to the many faces of the learning disability that they can be understood, receive the services they need, and ultimately lead successful lives. College of Human Ecology


Faculty Publications Recent Books Anderson, James F., and Mangels, Nancie J. (criminal justice), and Dyson, L. Significant Prisoner Rights Cases. Colby, Sarah (nutrition and dietetics). Food Behavior: Why We Eat What We Eat. Duffrin, Melani (nutrition and dietetics), Phillips, S., Hovland, J., Rivera, David, and Carraway-Stage, V. FoodMASTER Grade 3-5. Escott-Stump, Sylvia A. (nutrition and dietetics). Nutrition and Diagnosis-Related Care, 7th edition. Pawlak, Roman M. (nutrition and dietetics). I am the LORD that Heals You: A Biblical Guide to Healthy Eating. Recent Book Chapters Anderson, James F., and Mangels, Nancie J. (criminal justice). “Critical Needs for Effective Criminal Justice and Public Health Responses in Preventing Elderly Sexual Abuse” in Sexual Assault: The Victims, the Perpetrators, and the Criminal Justice System, edited by Fran P. Reddington and Betsy Kreisel. Carawan, Lena, Bunch, Sheila J., and Parker, A. Virginia. (social work). “Capturing the Leadership Experiences of African American Women in a Rural Southern University” in Dilemmas of Black Faculty at U.S. Predominantly White Institutions: Issues in the Post-Multicultural Era, edited by S. Moore, R. Alexander and A. Lemella. Edgell Sr., David L. (hospitality management). “Cambio Climatico y Turismo: El Momento de Reaccionar” in Cambio Climatico y Turismo: Realidad y Ficcion. Johnson, Matthew (criminal justice). “Series Victimizations” in The Praeger Handbook of Victimology, edited by Janet Wilson. Department of Child Development and Family Relations Ballard, S. M. “Network: The newsletter for certified family life educators of the National Council on Family Relations.” Review of The Sexually Confident Wife, 2009. Ballard, S. M., and Elmore, B. “Labor of Love: Constructing a Service Learning Syllabus. The Journal of Effective Teaching 9, 3 (2009): 67–75.  Blanchard, A., Hodgson, J., Gunn, W., Jesse, E., and White, M. “Understanding Social Support and the Couple’s Relationship Among Women with Depressive Symptoms in Pregnancy.” Issues in Mental Health Nursing 30 (2009): 764-776. Blanchard, A., Hodgson, J., Lamson, A. L., and Dosser, D. A. “Lived Experiences of Adult Children Who Have a Parent Diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease.” The Qualitative Report 14 (2009): 61-80. Gross, K. H., Robinson, L., and Ballard, S. M. “Maternal Depression and Early Childhood Behaviors: The Role of the MotherDaughter Relationship.” Family Science Review 15, 1 (2009): 64-76. Hill, E. W. “Confronting Anxiety in Couple and Family Therapy Supervision: A Developmental Supervisory Model Based on Attachment Theory.” Australian and New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy 30, 1 (2009): 1-14. Hill, E. W. “Stretched Thin by Chronic Pain: Struggling for Meaning.” Journeys: Essays from the Heart of Pastoral Counseling 11, 2 (2009): 20-21. Meadors, P., Lamson, A., and Sira, N. “Development of an Educational Module on Provider Self-Care.” American Journal of Nurses and Staff Development (2009). Meadors, P., Lamson, A., White, M., Sira, N., and Swanson, M. “Secondary Traumatization and Healthcare Providers: A Literature Review.” Journal of Trauma and Dissociation (2009). Meadors, P., Lamson, A., Swanson, M., White, M., and Sira, N. “Secondary Traumatization in Pediatric Healthcare Providers: Compassion Fatigue, Burnout, and Secondary Traumatic Stress.” Omega: The Journal of Death and Dying 60, 2 (2009): 103-128.   College of Human Ecology

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Faculty Publications Phelps, K., Hodgson, J., McCammon, S., and Lamson, A. “Caring for an Individual with Autism Disorder: A Qualitative Analysis.” Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability 34 (2009): 27-35. Phelps, K., Howell, C., Hill, S., Seemann, T., Lamson, A., Hodgson, J., and Smith, D. “A Collaborative Care Model for Patients with Type-2 Diabetes.” Families, Systems and Health 27 (2009): 131-140. Pratt, K., Lamson, A., Collier, D., Crawford, Y., Harris, N., Gross, K., Ballard, S., Sarvey, S., and Saporito, M. “Camp Golden Treasures: A Multidisciplinary Weight-Loss and Healthy Lifestyle Camp for Adolescent Girls.” Family, Systems, and Health 21, 1 (2009): 116-124. Pratt, K., and Lamson, A. “Consumer Update Medical Series: Childhood Obesity.” Family Therapy Magazine (2009): 1-4. Pratt, K., and Lamson, A. “Clinical Update Medical Series: Childhood Obesity.” Family Therapy Magazine (2009): 37-48. Sira, N., and Ballard, S. M. “An Ecological Approach to Examining Body Satisfaction in Caucasian and African American Female College Students.” Family and Consumer Science Research Journal 38, 2 (2009): 252-270. Sira, N., and Ballard, S. M. “An Ecological Approach to Examining Body Satisfaction in Caucasian and African American Female College Students.” Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal 38, 2 (2009): 208-226. Sira, N., and White, C. P. “Individual and Familial Correlates of Body Satisfaction in Male and Female College Students.” Journal of American College Health 58 (2009): 507-514. Sira, N., and Pawlak, R. “Prevalence of Overweight, Obesity and Dieting among Caucasian and African American College Students in Eastern North Carolina; a Cross-Sectional Survey.” Journal of Nutritional Research and Practice 4, 1 (2009): 36-42. Sira, N., and Ballard, S. M. “An Ecological Approach to Examining Body Satisfaction in Caucasian and African American Female College Students.” Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal 38, 2: 208-226. White, C. P., Mendoza, J., White, M. B., and Bond, C. “Chronicallyill Mothers Experiencing Pain: Relational Coping Strategies Used While Parenting Young Children.” Chronic Illness 5 (2009): 3-45. White, C. P., White, M. B., and Fox, M. A. “Maternal Fatigue and Its Relationship to the Care Giving Environment.” Families, Systems, and Health 27 (2009): 325-345. White, C. P., “What Do College Students Consider ‘Busy Work’?” Family Science Review 14. White, M. B., White, C. P., and Martin, J. K. “Autoimmune Disease in Women (Clinical Update).” Family Therapy Magazine 8, 5 (2009): 34-44. White, M. B., White, C. P., and Fox, M. A. “The Aftermath of the Diagnostic Lag: Working with Women Recently Diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis.” Women and Multiple Sclerosis (2009): 24-42. Department of Criminal Justice Anderson, J. F., Mangels, N. J., and Dyson, L. Significant Prisoner Rights Cases. Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press, 2009. Anderson, J. F., and Mangels, N. J. “Critical Needs for Effective Criminal Justice and Public Health Responses in Preventing Elderly Sexual Abuse” in Sexual Assault: The Victims, the Perpetrators, and the Criminal Justice System, edited by Fran P. Reddington and Betsy Kreisel. Durham: Carolina Academic Press, 2009. Anderson, J. F., Mangels, N.J., and Dyson, L. Significant Prisoner Rights Cases. Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press, 2010.   Anderson, J. F., Mangels, N. J., and Langsam, A. H. “The Challenges of Teaching Criminological Theory: Can Academia Deliver What the Media Promises?” Criminal Justice Studies 22, 2 (2009): 223-236.   Anderson, J. F., and Mangels, N. J. “Critical Need for Effective Criminal Justice and Public Health Responses in Preventing Elderly Sexual Abuse” in Sexual Assault: The Victims, the Perpetrators, and the Criminal Justice System, edited by F. P. Reddington and B. W. Kreisel. Durham: Carolina Academic Press, 2009.   Johnson, M. “Series Victimizations” in The Praeger Handbook of Victimology, edited by Janet Wilson, 246-247. Santa Barbara, California: Praeger, 2009.   Johnson, M. “Reporting Rates” in The Praeger Handbook of Victimology, edited by Janet Wilson, 224-226. Santa Barbara, California: Praeger, 2009.   Johnson, M. “Lifestyle Theory” in The Praeger Handbook of Victimology, edited 20

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by Janet Wilson, 158-159. Santa Barbara, California: Praeger, 2009.   Jones, G. M. “A General Theory of Crime: Using the Pre-Sentence Investigation to Examine Organized Crime Offenders.” Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, San Diego, California, 2009. Jones, G. M. “Current Issues in Teaching Criminal Justice Ethics.” Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, San Diego, California, 2010. Jolley, J. M., and Kerbs, J. J. “Risk, Need, and Responsivity: Unrealized Potential for the International Delivery of Substance Abuse Treatment in Prison.” International Criminal Justice Review 20, 3 (2010).   Kerbs, J. J., Jones, G. M., and Jolley, J. “Discretionary Decision Making by Probation and Parole Officers: The Role of Extralegal Variables as Predictors of Responses to Technical Violations.” Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice 25, 4 (2009): 424-441. Kerbs, J. J., and Jolley, J. “A Commentary on Age Segregation for Older Prisoners: Philosophical and Pragmatic Considerations for Correctional Systems.” Criminal Justice Review 34, 1 (2009): 119-139. Kerbs, J. J., and Jolley, J. “Perceived Risk of Victimization Among Older Male Prisoners.” Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, San Diego, California, 2010. Kusha, H., and Jones, G. M. “Legal Terrorism in the Name of Islamic Justice: The Case of Iran,” initial submission to International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice. Kusha, H. R. “Anti-Criminogenic Impacts of Culture on Female Gang Formation: The Case of Islam.” Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment 19, 3 (2009): 242-257.   Kusha, H. R. Islam in American Prisons: Black Muslim’s Challenge to American Penology. Darthmouth, England: Ashegate Publishers, 2009.  Morris, R. G., Johnson, M., and Higgins, G. E. “The Role of Gender in Predicting the Willingness to Engage in Digital Piracy among College Students.” Criminal Justice Studies 22, 4 (2009): 393-404.  Morris, P., and Charles, C. “An Analysis of the Neighborhood-Homicide Relationship in Urban Jamaica.” Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, San Diego, California. 2010. Pacheco, V., and Morris, P. “Locked into Debt: Child Support Arrears and Prisoner Reentry.” Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, San Diego, California, 2010. Department of Hospitality Management Barber, N., Taylor, C., and Deale, C. “Environmental Attitudes Toward Wine Tourism.” International Journal of Wine Research 2 (2010).  Barber, N., Taylor, C., and Deale, C. “Wine Tourism, Environmental Concerns and Purchase Intention.” Journal of Travel and Tourism Marketing (2009).  Chandler, J. A., and Faiola, N. “Attitudes and Opinions of Hospitality Management Educators and Students Regarding the Importance of Industry Experience: A Pilot Study.” The Consortium Journal of Hospitality and Tourism 13 (2009): 41-47.  Crawford, A., Hubbard, S. S., Gaillard, N., and Waln, M. “Strategies for On-Campus Recruitment: A Decade Later.” The Consortium Journal of Hospitality and Tourism 13, 2 (2009), 5-13.  Crawford, A., Hubbard, S., O’Neill, M., and Guarino, A. “Mediating Effects: A Study of the Work Environment and Personality in the QuickService Restaurant Setting.” Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management 16, 1 (2009): 24-31.  Deale, C., “A Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Case Study of a Food Safety Class.” Journal of Culinary Science and Technology (2009).  Deale, C., “Collaboration is the Key to Community Engagement on a Festival: A Case Study of a Sustainable Tourism Project in Southern Appalachia.”  Journal of Community Engagement and Scholarship 2, 1 (2009): 61-67.  Deale, C., Elders, E., and Jacques, P. “The Appalachian Growers’ Fair: An Authentic Learning, Community Engagement, Sustainable Tourism Project.” Journal of Teaching in Travel and Tourism (2010).  Deale, C., Nichols, J., and Jacques, P. “A Descriptive Study of Sustainability Education in the Hospitality Curriculum.” Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Education 21, 4 (2009): 34-42. Deale, C. and O’Halloran, R., Jacques, P., and Garger, J. “An Examination of Current Hospitality and Tourism Teaching Methods.” Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Education (2009). Duffrin, M., Hovland, J., Carraway-Stage, V., McLeod, S., Duffrin, C., Phillips, S., Rivera Jr., D., Saum, D., Johanson, G., Lee, T., Bosse, M., and College of Human Ecology


Berryman, D. “Using Food as a Tool to Teach Science to 3rd Grade Students in Appalachian Ohio.” Journal of Food Science 00 (2010): 1-7. Edgell Sr., D. L. “Cambio Climatico y Turismo: El Momento de Reaccionar” in Cambio Climatico y Turismo: Realidad y Ficcion. Tourism Analysis, 2010. Edgell Sr., D. L. “Sustaining Ecotourism: The Condor Lodge Conservatory Project.” In International Travel and Tourism Research Association. San Antonio, Texas, 2010. Fenich, G. G. “Preferences of Courses of Study of Hospitality Management Majors.” Convene (2010). Fenich, G. G., Chacho, H., and Taylor, M. H. “Hotel/Meeting Planner Contracts.” International Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Administration (2009). Hashimoto, K. F., and Fenich, G. G. “Development of Casinos in South Africa: An Instrument for Social Change.” CHRIE Annual Conference, 2010. Jacques, P., Garger, J., Brown, C., and Deale, C. “The Roles of Personality Traits, Technology Anxiety, and Trust as Predictors of Perceptions of Virtual Reality Teams.” Journal of Business and Management 15, 2 (2009): 143-157.  O’Halloran, R., and Deale, C. “Designing a Game Based on Monopoly as a Learning Tool for Lodging Development.” Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Education, accepted in press, (2010). Pawlak, R., Malinauskas, B., and Rivera Jr., D. “Predicting Intentions to Eat a Healthy Diet By College Baseball Players; Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior.” Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior 41, 5 (2009): 334339. Rivera Jr., D. “A Pilot Study of Students Perceptions and Attitudes Towards Multicultural Concepts: A Pre and Post Course Analysis.” Journal of Teaching in Travel and Tourism 10, 1 (2010): 1-17, 2010. Rivera Jr., D., Adams, C. R., and Burley, H. “A Cluster Analysis of Young Adult College Students Using the Constructs of a Proposed Modified Model of Planned Behavior.” Journal of Food Products Marketing 16, 1 (2010): 19-38. Rivera Jr., D., Chandler, J., and Winslow, H. “Developing a Profile of Visitors at a North Carolina Wine Festival: Pilot Test, Spring 2009.” The Consortium Journal of Hospitality and Tourism 14, 2 (2009): 5-17.   Rivera Jr., D., Duffrin, M., and Phillips, S. “Improving Elementary School Students Learning Outcomes Using Food Based Mentorship Programs.” Journal of Teaching in Travel and Tourism 9, 3-4 (2009): 144-158. Taylor, M. H., and Finley, D. A. “Acculturation, Assimilation, and Retention of International Workers in Resorts.” International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management (2009). Weber, M. R., Chandler, J. A., and Finley, D. A. “Assessing Teaching Effectiveness in a Basic Food Laboratory Setting: Phases 2 and 3, Educator and Student Responses.” Journal of Teaching in Travel and Tourism 10, 1 (2010): 59-74. Weber, M. R., Crawford, A. A., Rivera Jr., D., and Finley, D. A. “Using Delphi Panels to Assess Soft Skill Competencies in Entry Level Managers.” Journal of Tourism Insights (2010). Weber, M. R., Finley, D. A., Crawford, A., and Rivera Jr., D. “An Exploratory Study Identifying Soft Skill Competencies in Entry-level Managers.” Tourism and Hospitality Research 9, 4 (2009): 353-361. White, B., Brown, J., Deale, C., and Hardin, A. “Collaboration Using Cloud Computing and Traditional Systems.” Issues in Information Systems 10, 2: 27-32.     Department of Interior Design and Merchandising Articles and Proceedings Allen, R., Oxenham, W., and Hodge, G. L. “Performance Measurement of Textile and Apparel Supply Chains in Developing Countries: Phase.” Conference of the International Foundation of Fashion Technology Institutes (2009).  Ballard, S. M., Jenkins, C., Savut, N. Y., McKinnon, W. H., and Carroll, K. E. “Innovative and Complementary Approaches to Enhancing Elders’ Ability to Age in Place.” Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences (2009).  Daniels, B. L., Parrish, E. D., Cassill, N. L., Oxenham, W., and O’Neal, G. R. “DR-CAFTA: Opportunities for the US Textile Industry.” ITAA Proceedings (2009).  Gustina, C. F., Sweet, R. J., and Swank, K. “Making Design Out of Thin Air: Music as Design Inspiration.” National Conference of the Beginning Design College of Human Ecology

Student (2010).  Gustina, C. and Sweet, R. J. “Music as Design Inspiration: A CrossDisciplinary Exercise Exploring Music and Design.” Interior Design Educators Conference (2009).  Meggs, S. M. “A Second Look at Second Life: Relevance for Interior Design Pedagogy.” IDEC International Conference (2010).  Meggs, S. M. “Addressing Societal Injustices Toward the Aging and Dying: The Intersection of Art and Healthcare.” Art and Design for Social Justice Symposium (2010).  Meggs, S. M. “Virtual Learning Environments for the New Millenium.” 2009 IDEC South Regional Conference, 2009.  Parrish, E. D. “Retailers’ Use of Niche Marketing in Product Development.” Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management (2009).  Savut, N. Y., and Carroll, K. E. “Study Abroad as a Field Trip for an Interdisciplinary Service Learning Project.” IDEC Southeast Regional Conference, 2009.  Sweet, R. J. “From Interiors to Apparel: Nature as Teacher.” 4th International Conference on Design Principles and Practices, 2010.  Sweet, R. J. “No Text, No Tweets, No iPods: Millennials ‘Get’ Community Service--How YOU Can Get CIDA and Research Credit!” IDEC South Regional Conference, Raleigh, North Carolina, 32-38, 2010.  Sweet, R. J. “America’s First People: Another Way of Knowing through the Design Process.” 2010 Art and Design for Social Justice, Florida State University, 25-27, 2010.  Sweet, R. J. “Interior Environmental Poetics: Developing Observation and Drawing Skills that Define a Sense of Place.” National Conference of the Beginning Design Student, Charlotte, North Carolina, 2010.  Interior Design Exhibits Gustina, C. F. “Folia (Series).” Photography, IDEC International Conference, Atlanta, Georgia, 2010.  Meggs, S. M. “Local City Hall Artist Association Exhibit,” City Hall Exhibition, Greenville, North Carolina, 2009. Meggs, S. M. “Creation of Spatial Disparities in the Perception of Architectural Structures,” IDEC South Regional Conference, Raleigh, North Carolina, 2009. Meggs, S. M. “Fall Regional Exhibition.” Greenville Museum of Art Annual Juried Competition, Greenville, North Carolina, 2009.  Department of Nutrition and Dietetics Al-Numair, K., Heidal, K., and Al-Assaf, A. “Vitamin B-6 Intake and B-6 Vitamin Concentrations and Excretion in Blood and Urine of Cigarette Smokers, Water-pike Smokers and Non-smokers.” J. Saudi Soc. for Food and Nutrition 4, 2 (2009): 15-24. Ballard, S. M., Jenkins, C., Savut, N. Y., McKinnon, W. H., Carroll, K. E., and Escott-Stump, Sylvia. “Innovative and Complementary Approaches to Enhancing Older Adults’ Ability to Age in Place.” Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences 101, 3 (2009).  Check, J., Byrd, C., Menio, J., Rippe, R., Hines, Ian, and Wheeler, Michael D. “Src Kinase Participates in LPS-Induced Activation of NADPH Oxidase.” Molecular Immunology 47, 4 (2010): 756-62.  Colby, S., and Johnson, L. “Macronutrient Intakes and Waist Circumference.” Topics in Clinical Nutrition 25, 1 (2010): 9-19.  Colby, S., Johnson, L., Scheet, A., and Hoverson, B. “Nutrition Marketing on Food Labels.” Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior 42, 2 (2010) 92-98.  Colby, S., Paulson, M., Johnson, L., and Wall-Bassett, E. “Reaching North Dakota’s Food Insecure.” Journal of Hunger and Environmental Nutrition 5, 1 (2010): 129-135.  Colby, S., Johnson, L., Cutrell, S., and Haldeman, L. “Portion Size Estimation Error Among Newly Arrived Latino Immigrants.” Topics in Clinical Nutrition 24, 2 (2009): 139-144.  Colby, S. “Food Behavior: Why We Eat What We Eat.” (2010).  Colby, S., Johnson, L., Eickhoff, A. and Johnson, A. “Promoting Community Health Resources: Preferred Communication Strategies.” Health Promotion Practice (2009).  2009–2010 Annual Report

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Faculty Publications Condrasky, M., Parisi, M., Kirby, E., Michaud, P., Graham, K., WallBassett, E. D. and Clifford, A. “Application of the Process Evaluation Model to the Cooking-with-a-CHEF Program.” Topics in Clinical Nutrition 24, 2 (2009): 152-160.  Duffrin, M., Hovland, J., Carraway-Stage, V., McLeod, S., Duffrin, C., Phillips, S., Rivera, D., Saum, D., Johanson, G., Lee, T., and Bosse, M. “Using Food as a Tool to Teach Science to 3rd Grade Students in Appalachia Ohio.” Journal of Food Science Education (2010).  Duffrin, M., Phillips, S., Hovland, J., Rivera, D. and Carraway, V. “FoodMASTER Grade 3-5.” FoodMASTER Printing (2009).  Escott-Stump, S. A. “A Perspective on Systemic Nutrition and Nutritional Genomics.” Topics in Clinical Nutrition 24, 2 (2009): 92-113.  Hovland, J., McLeod, S., Duffrin, M., Johanson, G., and Berryman, D. “School-based Dietary Intake Screening of 3rd Graders in Rural Appalachia Ohio.” Journal of Rural Health (2010).  Harris, N. G. “Educating Your Patient with Diabetes.” Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior (2009).  Kremer, M., Thomas, E., Milton, R., Perry, A., Rooijen, N., Wheeler, M. D., Zacks, S., Fried, M., Rippe, R., and Hines, I. “Macrophage and IL12dependent Loss of NKT Cells in Hepatosteotosis.” Hepatology 51, 1 (2010): 130-41.  Pawlak, R. M. I am the LORD that Heals You: A Biblical Guide to Healthy Eating. American Book Publishing, 2009.  Pawlak, R., and Colby, S. “Benefits, Barriers, Self-Efficacy, and Knowledge Regarding Healthy Foods: Perceptions of African Americans Living in Eastern North Carolina.” Journal of Nutrition Research 3, 1 (2009): 56-63.  Pawlak, R. M. “Benefits, Barriers, Attitude, and Beliefs About Soy Meat Alternatives Among African American Parishioners Living in Eastern North Carolina.” Ethnicity and Disease (2009). Pawlak, R. M. “Taking an Undergraduate Nutrition Course Results in Favorable Attitudes Toward a Healthful Diet and Improved Intake of Several Key Nutrients.” Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal 38, 1 (2009): 3-10.  Pawlak, R. M. “Prevalence of Hypertension Among People Living in or Near Vicabamba, Ecuador.” International Journal of Health Sciences II, 3 (2009): 231-233.  Pawlak, R. and Colby, S. “Beliefs, Benefits, Barriers, Attitudes, Intakes and Knowledge About Peanuts and Tree Nuts Among WIC Participants in Eastern North Carolina.” Nutrition Research and Practice 3, 3 (2009): 220-225.  Pawlak, R. M., and S. Sovyanhadi. “Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity Among Seventh-Day Adventists College Students; A CrossSectional Survey.” Ethnicity and Disease 19, 2 (2009): 111-114.  Pawlak, R. M., Malinauskas, B., and Rivera, D. “Predicting Intentions to Eat a Healthful Diet By College Baseball Players; Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior.” Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior 41 (2009): 334339. Pratt, K. J., Lamson, A. L., Collier, D., Crawford, Y., Harris, N., Gross, K., Ballard, S., Sarvey, S., and Saporito, M. “Camp Golden Treasures: A Multidisciplinary Weight Loss and a Healthy Lifestyle Camp for Adolescent Girls.” Families, Systems, and Health (2009).  Rivera, D., Duffrin, M., and Phillips, S. “Food Inspired Mentoring Fosters Positive Relationships and Improved Learning Outcomes for College and Elementary School Students.” Journal of Teaching in Travel and Tourism 9 (2009): 144-158.  Wall-Bassett, E. D., Gerard, P. D., and Kunkel, M. E. “Food Consumption Patterns of Dominican Children.” Topics in Clinical Nutrition 25, 1 (2010): 60-69.  School of Social Work Arnd-Caddigan, M. “Failure to Mentalize Self and Masochistic Functioning.” Psychoanalytic Social Work (2009).  Arnd-Caddigan, M., and Pozzuto, R. “The Virtuous Social Worker: The Role of Thirdness in Ethical Decision Making.” Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Human Social Services (2009).  Arnd-Caddigan, M. “Evidence-based Practice and the Purpose of 22

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Clinical Social Work.” Smith College School for Social Work (2010).  Averett, P., Strong-Blakeney, A., Nalavany, B. A., and Ryan, S. “Adoptive Parents Attitudes Towards Gay and Lesbian Adoption.” Journal of GLBT Family Studies (2009).  Averett, P. “The Search for Wonder Woman: An Autoethnography of Feminist Identity.” Affilia: Journal of Women and Social Work 24, 4 (2009): 360-368. Averett, P., Nalavany, B. A., and Ryan, S. “An Evaluation of Gay/ Lesbian and Heterosexual Adoption.” Adoption Quarterly 12, 3 (2009): 129151. Averett, P., Strong-Blakeney, A., Nalavany, B. A., and Ryan, S. D. “Adoptive Parents’ Attitudes Toward Lesbian and Gay Adoption.” Journal of GLBT Family Studies (2010).  Averett, P. “Professional Readiness: Service Learning Projects as Preparation for the Field Experience.” In Press. In Quick Hits for Service Learning: Successful Strategies from Award Winning Educators, edited by Coulter-M. Kern and M. Cooksey. FACET, 2009. Carawan, L. W. and Nalavany, B. A. “Using Photography and Art in Research with Adults with Dyslexia.” Disability and Society (2009).  Carawan, L., Knight, S., Nalavany, B. A., and Miller, M. “The Use of Participant-Generated Photographs in Addressing Social Justice Issues Among Research Participants.” Social Justice in Context 4, 1 (2009): 59-68.  Carawan, L., Bunch, S. G., and Parker, A. V. “Capturing the Leadership Experiences of African American Women in a Rural Southern University.” In Dilemmas of Black Faculty at U.S. Predominantly White Institutions: Issues in the Post-Multicultural Era Edwin Mellon Press, edited by S. Moore, R. Alexander and A. Lemella. New York, 2010. Eastman, B. J. and Bunch, S. G. “Variables Associated with Treatment Outcome in a Sample of Female Offenders.” The Open Criminology Journal 2 (2009): 18-23.  Harrison, W. D. “Social Work’s Evolution in the United Kingdom: A Study of Community Care and Social Control.” Families in Society: the Journal of Contemporary Human Social Services 90 (2009): 336-342.  Jesse, D. E., Blanchard, A., Bunch, S. G., Dolbier, C., Hodgson, J., and Swanson, M. S. “A Pilot Study to Reduce Risk for Antepartum Depression Among Women in a Public Health Prenatal Clinic.” Issues in Mental Health Nursing (2010). Louison, Green, L. S., Bunch, S. G., and Scheyett. “The Problems No One Wants To See: Mental Illness and Substance Abuse Among Women of Reproductive Age in North Carolina.” North Carolina Medical Journal 70, 5 (2009): 454-458. Miller, M., and Carawan, L. W. “Developing a Hybrid Research Course for Rural BSW Students.” Contemporary Rural Social Work Electronic Journal. Http://www.ruralsocialwork.org/journals/RSWC_Jour, 2009.  Nalavany, B. A., Glidden, L. M., and Ryan, S. D. “Parental Satisfaction In The Adoption Of Children With Learning Disorders: The Role Of Behavior Problems.” Family Relations 58 (2009): 621-633. Nalavany, B. A., Ryan, S. D., and Hinterlong, J. E. “Externalizing Behavior Among Adopted Boys with Preadoptive Histories of Sexual Abuse.” Journal of Child Sexual Abuse 18 (2009): 553-573.  Sheaffer, B., Golden, J., and Averett, P. “Facial Expression Recognition Deficits and Fault Learning: Implications for Theoretical Models and Clinical Applications.” International Journal of Behavioral Consultation and Therapy 5, 1 (2009): 31-55.  Yong, F. “Income Inequalities in Grandchild-care: A New Division of Labor?” Gerontologist (2010).  Yoon, I., and Chung, I. “Sam Would Be Proud: Wal-Mart’s Nontraditional Banking Business and Its Potential to be a More Responsible Corporate Citizen.” Social Responsibility Journal (2009).  Yoon, I. “Securing Economic Justice and Sustainability from Structural Deviances: Recommendations for Consumer Credit Policy Changes.” Journal of Poverty 13, 1 (2009): 40-54. Yoon, I. “A Mixed-Method Case Study of Princeville’s Rebuilding from the Flood of 1999: Lessons on the Importance of Invisible Community Assets.” Social Work 54, a (2009): 19-28. College of Human Ecology


Student Discovery Products Undergraduate Students Publications: Under Review White, C. P., Cauthen, M. A., Haas, J. R., and White, M. B. (under review). “Differences Between Chronically Ill Women: Do Good Sleepers Function Better Than Poor Sleepers?” Sleep Medicine. Menio, J., Pope, B. A., Gent, R., Ding, J., Bradford, B. U., Hines, I. N. and Wheeler, M. (under review). “Reciprocal Regulation of Hepatic Innate Immunity and Circadian Gene Expression.” Cell Metabolism. Publications In Press or Print Check, J., Byrd, C., Menio, J., Rippe, R. A., Hines, I. N., and Wheeler, M. D. (2010). “SRC Kinase Participates in LPS-induced Activation of NADPH Oxidase.” Molecular Immunology 47(4):756–62. White, C. P., Mendoza, J., White, M. B., and Bond, C. (2009). “Chronically-ill Mothers Experiencing Pain: Relational Coping Strategies Used While Parenting Young Children.” Chronic Illness 5:3–45. Abstracts in National Proceedings Menio, J., Hines, I., and Wheeler, M. D. (2010). “The Role of TNFa in Circadian Rhythmic Responses and the Regulation of Metabolic Regulator SIRT1 in Liver.” Experimental Biology, Abstract 547.11 (Anaheim, CA). Pope, B. A., Menio, J. E., Ding, J., and Wheeler, M. D. (2010). “Circadian Regulator PER2 Plays a Critical Role in Regulating Fat Metabolism and the Development of Fatty Liver Disease.” Experimental Biology, Abstract 926.4 (Anaheim, CA). Romano, E., Menio, J., Threadgill, S. W., and Wheeler, M. D. (2010). “Phenotypic Linkage of Hepatic Fibrogenesis to Circadian Rhythm and Circadian Loci in CxB RI Mice.” Research Society on Alcoholism, Abstract 380 (San Antonio, TX). Presentations: National White, C. P., Cauthen, M., Haas, J., and White, M. B. “Differences Between Good and Poor Sleepers in a Sample of Well Mothers and Mothers with Chronic Illnesses: Health, Quality-of-Life, and Parenting Stress.” Biennial Conference on Human Development, New York City, NY, April, 2010. Mauren, E. R., Taylor, A. C., Fisackerly, B. L., Carnahan, H., Collinson, A. and Holton C. “‘Pass the Potatoes and Tell Me Another Story:’ An Examination of Family Stories and Their Impact on Young Adults.” Accepted presentation for the Annual Conference for the National Council on Family Relations, Minneapolis, MN, November 2010. White, C. P., Bellamy, R., Creech, M., and Wittenauer, A. “Talking About Illness: Do Mothers With Chronic Illnesses Talk about Illness Differently than Healthy Mothers?” Biennial Society for Research in Human Development, San Antonio, TX, March, 2010. Presentations: Regional Anthony, B., Ashley P., and Colby, S. “Development of Creative Video Messages to Promote Health Behaviors.” North Carolina Dietetics Association, Durham, NC, April, 2010. Little, J. “Acceptance of Muscadine Barbeque Sauce Compared to a Plain Barbeque Sauce.” North Carolina Dietetics Association, Durham, NC, April, 2010. Hopkins, J., Spencer, L., and Wall-Bassett, E. “Train the Trainer: Providing Nutrition Education to Paraprofessionals in the Caribbean.” North Carolina Dietetics Association, Durham, NC, April 2010. Presentations: Local Anthony, B. “Development of Creative Video Messages to Promote Healthy Behaviors.” Poster. College of Human Ecology and KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Blackburn, J. and Roome, M. “A Comparative Field Study in Nike’s Merchandising Strategies in China and the USA.” Oral presentation. College of Human Ecology and KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Bunn, J. “Lessons Learned as an Undergraduate Teaching Assistant.” College of Human Ecology

Poster. College of Human Ecology and KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Carnahan, H., Fisackerly, B., Collinson, A., Mauren, E., Holton, C., and Harmon, A. “Grandparental Stories and Their Impact on Young Adult Grandchildren’s Values and Identity Development.” Poster. College of Human Ecology & KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. McCallen, C. and Corman, A. “Apparel Line Development for M. J. Soffe.” Poster. College of Human Ecology and KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Cerillo, N. “Development of Web-based Assessments of Dietitians’ Knowledge and Skills Related to Celiac Disease.” Poster. College of Human Ecology and KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Collinson, A., Fisackerly, B., Carnahan, H., Mauren, E., Holton, C., and Harmon, A. “‘Grandma, Your Story Means a Lot to Me:’ Gender Differences When Assessing the Impact Grandparent Stories Have on Values and Identity Development of Young Adult Grandchildren.” Poster. College of Human Ecology and KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Cox, S. and Zappullar, M. “Comparison of Purchasing Decision Making of Denim Jeans Between Caucasian and African American College Students.” Poster. College of Human Ecology and KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Monica B. Creech, Ashley Wittenauer, and Roberta Bellamy. (April, 2010) Mother’s Talking About Acute Illness: Transmission of Information About Sickness to Young Children. Poster, College of Human Ecology & KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Wendy Dixon. (April, 2010) Consumer Acceptance of Muscadine Grape Ice-cream. Poster, College of Human Ecology and KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Kristin Dodge, Shelley Craven, and Ardriana Byrd. (April, 2010) The Unplugged Office Building. Oral Presentation, College of Human Ecology and KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Anna Duncan, Amanda Tharrington, Kristen Hendricksen, and Lauren Hesser. (April, 2010) The Unplugged Office Building. Oral Presentation, College of Human Ecology and KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Rachel Gent, Jade Menio, Michael Wheeler. (April, 2010) Role of Liver Circadian Rhythm in Hepatic Adaptive Immune Response. Poster, East Carolina University Student Research and Creative Achievement Week. Greenville, NC. Rachel Gent. (April, 2010) Role Of Liver Circadian Rhythm In Adaptive Immune Response. Poster, College Of Human Ecology & KON Research And Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Marc Glidden. (April, 2010) Underage drinking problems among college students in Greenville, North Carolina. Poster, College of Human Ecology & KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Jeanette Leibowitz. (April, 2010) Umami Day Spa. Poster, College of Human Ecology & KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Jenna Little. (April, 2010) Acceptance of Muscadine barbeque sauce compared to a plain barbeque sauce. Oral Presentation, College of Human Ecology & KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Macedo, A., Jones, C. L., Callis, C., and Taylor, L. M. “America’s Neglected Epidemic.” Poster. College of Human Ecology & KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Mauren, E. R., Fisackerly, B. L., Carnahan, H., Collinson, A., Holton, C., and Harmon, A. “‘Pass The Potatoes and Tell Me Another Story’: An Examination Of Family Stories and Their Impact on Young Adult Values, Behaviors, and Identity Development.” East Carolina University Student Research and Creative Achievement Week, Greenville, NC, April, 2010. Menio, J., Pope, B., Ding, J., and Wheeler, M. “Role of Innate Immunity in the Development of Fatty Liver Disease.” Poster. East Carolina University Student Research and Creative Achievement Week, Greenville, NC, April, 2010. 2009–2010 Annual Report

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Student Discovery Products Menio, J., Pope, B., Ding, J., and Wheeler, M. “Role of Innate Immunity in the Development of Fatty Liver Disease.” Oral Presentation. College of Human Ecology & KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Romano, E., Menio, J., Threadgill, D., and Wheeler, M. “Quantitative Trait Analysis of Liver Fibrosis.” East Carolina University Student Research and Creative Achievement Week, Greenville, NC, April, 2010. Romano, E., Menio, J., Threadgill, D., and Wheeler, M. “Quantitative Trait Analysis of Liver Fibrosis.” Poster. College of Human Ecology & KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Rooney, K., Shoulars, K., and May, A. “Photovoice: A Grocery Store Through The Eyes of the Young Child.” Oral Presentation. College of Human Ecology & KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Roseno, A. and Bethea, N. “Correlation Between Eating and Exercise Habits in College Students at ECU.” Poster. College of Human Ecology & KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Sweetser, C., Puckett, K. M., Wharton, M., Gaglianese-Sale, M., and Winbourne, K. “The Unplugged Office Building.” Oral Presentation. College of Human Ecology & KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Wittenauer, A., Creech, M. B. and Bellamy, R. “Talking about Illness: Differences Between Well and Chronically Ill Mothers of Young Children. Poster. College of Human Ecology & KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Xiong, D., and Aeby, V. “Exploring Health Loci of Control Among Hmong College Students.” Poster. College of Human Ecology & KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Xiong, D., and Aeby, V. “Exploring Health Loci of Control Among Hmong College Students.” Oral presentation. East Carolina University Student Research and Creative Achievement Week. Greenville, NC, April 2010. Grants Jade Menio, ECU Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity (URCA) award. Hepatic Innate Immune Cytokine Expression Regulation Controlled by Circadian Rhythm. $850 Eileen Romano, ECU Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity (URCA) award. Phenotypic Characterization of Hepatic Th1/Th2 Cytokines in CxB Lines. $950. Maddy, Ladonna, ECU Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity (UGRA) award. Effects of a High Carbohydrate Diet on Immunosenescence in Older Adults. $800. Awards Jade Menio, First Place Undergraduate Oral Presentation, College of Human Ecology & KON Research and Creative Activities Forum. Greenville, NC. Little, Jenna. (2010) Undergraduate Research Award. North Carolina Dietetics Association, Durham, NC. Spencer, L. and J. Hopkins. (2010) Undergraduate Research Award. North Carolina Dietetics Association, Durham, NC.

Graduate Students Publications: Under Review Adcock, K. and Eastman, B. J. (under review). “Examining How Adolescent Sex Offender Treatment Providers Conceptualize the Goal of Victim Empathy.” Journal of Child Sexual Abuse. Bibb, B., Person, A., and Colby, S. E. (under review). “Frequency and Type of Food Messages Seen on Primetime Television.” American Journal of Public Health. Bulova, J. A., Colby, S. E., Person, A. L., Mammarella, S., and Bibb, B. W. (under review). “Online Versus Face-to-Face: A Course Comparison.” Teaching in Higher Education. Averett, P., Carawan, L. and Dupree, C. (revised and resubmitted). “Getting ‘Tillerized:’ Traits and Outcomes of Students in a Macro Field Placement.” The Journal of Social Work Education. 24

2009–2010 Annual Report

Taylor, A. C. and Fisackerly, B. L. (under review). “Activities.” Journal of Religion, Spirituality and Aging. Taylor, A. C., Fisackerly, B. L., and Mauren, E. R. (under review). “‘Pass the Potatoes and Tell Me Another Story:’ An Examination Of Family Stories And Their Impact on Young Adult Development.” Manuscript submitted to Journal of Family Communication. Rappleyea, D. L., Kaverman, K., and Munk, A. C. (under review). “Control Versus Influence: A Narrative Intervention for Adolescent Emotional Regulation Assurance.” Reclaiming Children and Youth. Person, A. L., Colby, S. E., Bulova, J. A., and Eubanks, J. W. (under review). “Nutritionopoly: Let Healthy Choices ‘Monopolize’ Your Lifestyle.” Journal of Nutrition Education. Person, A. L., Colby, S. E., Johnson, L., Johnson, A., and Betting, L. (under review). “‘Healthy’ versus ‘Non-healthy’ University Employees Wellness Program Preferences.” Health Education Journal. Phelps, K., Hodgson, J., Lamson, A., Swanson, M., and White, M. (under review). “Biopsychosocial Analysis of Underserved Populations with Type 2 Diabetes: A Literature Review.” Journal of Health-Care for the Poor and Underserved. Mammarella, S., Colby, S. E., Rivera, D., Gross, K., and Pawlak, R. (under review). “Food Options with a More Nutrient Favorable Profile in Grocery Stores: Buying Healthier Foods without Paying More.” Journal of Nutrition Education. Pratt, K., Lamson, A., Lazorick, S., Collier, D., White, C., White, M., and Swanson, M. (under review). “Conceptualizing Care for Childhood Obesity through Clinical, Operational, and Financial Procedures.” Journal of Children’s Services. Pratt, K., Lamson, A., Lazorick, S., Swanson, M., Cravens, J., and Collier, D. (under review). “A Biopsychosocial Glance At Childhood Obesity.” Pediatric Psychology. Satkowiak-Cross, J., Bertrand, B., and Colby, S. E. (under review). “Differences in Breastfeeding Perceptions among Lower Versus Higher Income WIC Participants.” Journal of Human Lactation. Hegde, A. V., Mitchell, L. C., and Sugita, C. (under review). “Exploring the Relationship Between Preschool Teachers’ Beliefs and Practices Regarding Developmental Appropriateness and Inclusion.” Early Education and Development. Heidal, K., Tankard, G., Gross, K., Malinauskas, B., and Duffrin, M. (under review). “Cost Analysis of Fast Food Consumption in College Students.” Nutrition Research. Reade, J. W., White, M. and White, C. (under review). “Stress, Perceived Support, and Effects on Coping for Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis.” Families, Systems, and Health. Publications In Press or Print Jesse, E., Blanchard, A., Bunch, S., Dolbier, C., Hodgson, J., and Swanson, M. (in press). “A Pilot Study To Reduce Risk For Antepartum Depression Among Women in a Public Health Prenatal Clinic.” Issues in Mental Health Nursing. Blanchard, A., Hodgson, J., Gunn, W., Jesse, E., and White, M. “Understanding Social Support and the Couple’s Relationship Among Women with Depressive Symptoms in Pregnancy.” Issues in Mental Health Nursing 30 (2009):764–76. Pawlak, R., Malinauskas, B., and Corbett, A. “Benefits, Barriers, Attitudes, and Beliefs About Soy Meat-Alternatives Among African American Parishioners Living in Eastern North Carolina.” Ethnicity and Disease 20 (2010):119–22. White, C. P., White, M. B., and Fox, M. A. “Maternal Fatigue and Its Relationship to the Caregiving Environment.” Families, Systems, and Health 27 (2010):325–45. Marlowe, D., Hodgson, J., and Lamson, A. (in press). “The Heroes’ Journey: A Young Couple’s Experience with Gestational Cancer.” The Qualitative Report. Hovland J., McLeod S., Duffrin M., Johanson G., and Berryman D. “School-based Dietary Intake Screening of 3rd Graders in Rural Appalachia Ohio.” Journal of School Health (2010). Duffrin, M. W., Hovland, J., Carraway-Stage, V., McLeod, S., Duffrin, C., Phillips, S., Rivera, D., Saum, D., Johanson, G., Graham, A., Lee, T., Bosse, College of Human Ecology


M., and Berryman, D. “Using Food as a Tool to Teach Science to 3rd Grade Students in Appalachian Ohio.” Journal of Food Science Education (2010). Mutch, K., Heidal, K., Gross, K., and Malinauskas, B. (in press). “Costanalysis of Nutrition Support in Patients with Severe Acute Pancreatitis.” International Journal of Health-Care Quality (2010). Person, A. L., Colby, S. E., Bulova, J. A., and Eubanks, J. W. (in press). “Wellness Wednesdays: Barriers to Participation in a Worksite Wellness Program.” Nutrition Research and Practice (2010). Phelps, K. “Review of the Book Beliefs and Illness: A Model for Healing.” Families, Systems, and Health, 28 (2010): 70–1. Phelps, K., Howell, C., Hill, S., Seemann, T., Lamson, A., Hodgson, J., and Smith, D. “A Collaborative Care Model for Patients with Type II Diabetes.” Families, Systems, and Health 27 (2009): 131–40. Phelps, K., McCammon, S., Wuensch, K., and Golden, J. “Enrichment, Stress, and Growth from Parenting an Individual with an Autism Spectrum Disorder.” Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities 34 (2009): 133–41. Phelps, K., Hodgson, J., McCammon, S., and Lamson, A. “Caring For an Individual with Autism Disorder: A Qualitative Analysis.” Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities 34 (2009): 27–35. Pratt, K., Lamson, A., Collier, D., Crawford, Y., Harris, N., Gross, K., Ballard, S., Sarvey, S., and Saporito, M. “Camp Golden Treasures: A Multidisciplinary Weight-Loss and Healthy Lifestyle Camp for Adolescent Girls.” Family, Systems, and Health 21,1 (2009): 116–24. White, C. P., Ramirez, R., Smith, J. B., and Plonowoski, L. (in press). “Simultaneous Delivery of a Face-To-Face Course to On-Campus and Remote Off-Campus Students.” To be published in Tech Trends. Abstracts Mammarella, S., Colby, S. E., Gross, K., Rivera, D., and Pawlak, R. “Nutrient Rich Food Options in Grocery Stores: Buying Healthier Foods Without Paying More.” FASEB J 21 (2010): 333.2. Pope, B., Menio, J., Hines, I., Ding, J. and Wheeler, M. D. “Circadian Regulator Per2 In the Occurrence of Fatty Liver Disease.” Abstract 381. Research Society on Alcoholism 2010, San Antonio, TX. Pope, B., Menio, J., Hines, I., Ding, J. and Wheeler, M. D. “Circadian Regulator Per2 Plays A Critical Role In Regulating Fat Metabolism And The Development Of Fatty Liver Disease.” FASEB J 24 (2010): 926.4. Presentations: National Fisackerly, B. L., Taylor, A. C., and Mauren, E. R. “Family Narratives and the Impact on Gender and Identity Development.” Accepted Presentation for the Annual Conference for the National Council on Family Relations, Minneapolis, MN, November, 2010. Whetstone, L., Hames, A., and Morrissey, S. “Evaluation of the NCHWTF Health Disparities Initiative.” Oral Presentation. HWTF HDI Annual Conference, October 25, 2009. Hames, A. “Diabetes and Health Disparities: A Place for Individual Psychology.” Oral Presentation. North American Society of Adlerian Psychology Annual Meeting Tucson, AZ, June 27, 2009. Diaz-Loving, R., Rappleyea, D. L., Harris, S. M., Kaverman, K., Moynihan, J., Wright, V. “Acculturation and Assimilation: Hispanic Views on Marriage.” AAMFT conference-student /faculty presentations, Atlanta, GA. Rappleyea, D. L., Harris, S. M., and Kaverman, K. M. “Community Marriage Initiatives: Developing Capacity and Creating Sustainability.” National Council on Family Relations, Minneapolis, MN, November, 2010. Diaz-Loving, R., Rappleyea, D. L., Harris, S. M., Porter, R., Kaverman, K. M., Moynihan, J., and Wright, V.W. “Acculturation and Assimilation: Hispanic Views on Marriage.” American Association on Marriage and Family Therapy, Atlanta, GA, September, 2010. Mammarella, S., Colby, S. E., Gross, K., Rivera, D., and Pawlak, R. “Nutrient Rich Food Options in Grocery Stores: Buying Healthier Foods without Paying More.” Experimental Biology, Anaheim, CA, April 2010. McLeod S., Duffrin M., Wheeler M., Sullivan S., Forsythe W., Fussel D., and Ange G. “Local Agriculture Engages Student in Classroom-industry Partnership.” Institute for Food Technology Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, September 2010. College of Human Ecology

Hovland, J. A. and McLeod, S. “FoodMASTER: Enhancing Math And Science Education Through Food-Based Activities.” Training workshop for teachers. Minneapolis, MN, 2009. McLeod S., Hovland J., Duffrin M., Johanson G., and Berryman D. “School-based Dietary Intake Screening of 3rd Graders in Rural Appalachia Ohio. American Dietetic Association Food and Nutrition Conference Expo, Denver, CO, 2009. Phelps, K., Hodgson, J., and Lamson, A. “Collaboration: An Essential Component to Diabetes Care for the Underserved.” Collaborative Family Healthcare Association: 11th Annual Conference, San Diego, CA, 2009. Phelps, K. “Data Blitz: Qualitative Experiences of Integrated Care Interns.” Collaborative Family Health-care Association: 11th Annual Conference, San Diego, CA, 2009. Lamson, A., Pratt, K., and Phelps, K. “Social Networking and Implications for Health Care Providers.” Presentation. Collaborative Family Health-care Association: 11th Annual Conference, San Diego, CA, 2009. Rappleyea, D., Phelps, K., Stinson, M., and Young, A. “Autism and Developmental Disabilities: Strategies for Marriage and Family Therapists.” Presentation. The American Association of Marriage and Family Therapists Annual Conference, Sacramento, CA, 2009. Pope, B., Menio, J., Hines, I., Ding, J. and Wheeler, M. D. “Circadian Regulator Per2 in the Occurrence of Fatty Liver Disease.” Abstract 381, Research Society on Alcoholism, San Antonio, TX, April, 2010. Pope, B., Menio, J., Hines, I., Ding, J., and Wheeler, M. D. “Circadian Regulator Per2 Plays A Critical Role in Regulating Fat Metabolism and the Development of Fatty Liver Disease.” Experimental Biology, Anaheim, CA, April, 2010. Pratt, K. “Medical Family Therapy and Childhood Obesity: Qualitative and Quantitative Outcomes.” Oral presentation. Collaborative Family Healthcare Association, San Diego, CA, October 24, 2009. Pratt, K. and Lamson, A. “Integrated Care And Pediatric Obesity: From Primary To Tertiary Care.” Oral presentation. Collaborative Family Healthcare Association, San Diego, CA, October 24, 2009. Pratt, K. and Lamson, A. “Family Therapy Meets Childhood Obesity.” Oral presentation. American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, Sacramento, CA, October 2, 2009. Lamson, A., Pratt, K., and Phelps, K. “Cyber-Ethics and Our Professional Worlds.” Oral presentation. Collaborative Family Healthcare Association, San Diego, CA, October 24, 2009. Presentations : Regional Averett, P., Jenkins, C. and Ascher, S. H. “Old Lesbians’ Sexuality and Relationships: Preliminary Results of Online Data.” Old Lesbians Organizing for Change, Regional Gathering, Columbia, SC, July, 2009. Bibb, B., Person, A., and Colby, S. “Frequency of Food Messages on Primetime Television.” North Carolina Dietetics Association, Durham, NC, April, 2010. Bulova, J., Person, A., Mammarella, A., Bibb, B., and Colby, S. “Online vs. Face-to-Face: A Course Comparison.” Oral and Poster: North Carolina Dietetics Association, Durham, NC, April 2009. Cerillo, N., Colby, S., and Escott-Stump, S. “Development of Web-Based Assessments of Dietitians’ Knowledge of Skills Related to Celiac Disease.” Oral and Poster: North Carolina Dietetics Association, Durham, NC, April, 2010. Hames, A. “Diabetes, Social Embeddedness, and Health Disparities.” Oral Presentation. South Carolina Society of Adlerian Psychology Annual Meeting, Myrtle Beach, SC, September, 2010. Hodgson, J., and Lewis, M. “The Ethical Constraints of Working with Rural Populations.” Workshop, North Carolina Association for Marriage and Family Therapy Annual Conference, Durham, NC, February 2010. Mammarella, S. “Food Options With a More Nutrient Favorable Profile in Grocery Stores: Buying Healthier Foods With Paying More.” Oral and Poster. North Carolina Dietetics Association, Durham, NC, April 2010. Pratt, K., Phelps, K., and Lamson, A. “MySpace or Yours: Cyber-Ethics in a Networking World.” Preconference Workshop. North Carolina Association of Marriage and Family Therapists Conference, Winston-Salem, NC, 2009. 2009–2010 Annual Report

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Student Discovery Products Collier, D., Crawford, Y., Lazorick, S., Grossi, S., Pratt, K., and Henes, S. “ECU’s Pediatric Healthy Weight Research and Treatment Center: A Multidisciplinary Integrated Approach to the Treatment and Prevention of Childhood Obesity in Eastern North Carolina.” Presentation. North Carolina Public Health Association 100th Anniversary Conference, Asheville, NC, October 2009. Person, A. “Wellness Wednesdays: Barriers to Participation in a Worksite Wellness Program.” Oral and Poster. North Carolina Dietetics Association, Durham, NC, April 2010. Price, L., Averett, P., and Jenkins, C. “Mental Health Needs of Older Lesbians: National Survey Results.” Annual Eastern Region Adult Mental Health Conference. Greenville, NC, April 2010. Presentations: Local Bibb, Brittan. “Frequency Of Food Messages On Primetime Television.” Poster. College of Human Ecology and KON Research and Creative Activities Forum. Greenville, NC, April 2010. Bibb, B., Person, A., and Colby, S. “Frequency and Type of Food Messages on Primetime Television.” East Carolina University Student Research and Creative Achievement Week. Greenville, NC, April 2010. Bulova, J. “Online vs. Face-to-Face: A Course Comparison.” Poster. College of Human Ecology and KON Research and Creative Activities Forum. Greenville, NC, April 2010. Bulova, J. “Online vs. Face-to-Face: A Course Comparison.” East Carolina University Student Research and Creative Achievement Week. Greenville, NC, April 2010. Daniels, S., Coleman-Carmon, J., Carpenter-Aeby, T. “Family Stories of Hmong Displacement to North Carolina: One Family’s Journey.” Oral presentation. Student Engagement Outreach Scholars Academy, April 2010. Daniels, S., Coleman-Carmon, J., Carpenter-Aeby, T. “Family Stories of Hmong Displacement to North Carolina: One Family’s Journey.” Oral Presentation. College of Human Ecology and KON Research and Creative Activities Forum. Greenville, NC, April 2010. Daniels, S. “Stories of Hmong Displacement: One Family’s Journey.” East Carolina University Student Research and Creative Achievement Week. Greenville, NC, April 2010. Guelich, J., Bunch, S., Carpenter-Aeby, T. “Compassion Satisfaction, Compassion Fatigue, and Burnout Prevalence among Rural Child Welfare Workers in Eastern North Carolina.” Poster. College of Human Ecology and KON Research and Creative Activities Forum. Greenville, NC, April 2010. Hopkins, J. “Train the Trainer: Providing Education to Paraprofessionals in the Caribbean.” Poster. College of Human Ecology and KON Research and Creative Activities Forum. Greenville, NC, April 2010. Kuemerle-Pinillos, K. “Applying Principles Of Participatory Action Research To Social Work Practice With Latino Immigrants.” Poster, College of Human Ecology and KON Research and Creative Activities Forum. Greenville, NC, April 2010. Mammarella, S. “Food Options With A More Nutrient Favorable Profile In Grocery Stores: Buying Healthier Foods With Paying More.” Oral presentation. College of Human Ecology and KON Research and Creative Activities Forum. Greenville, NC, April 2010. Mammarella, S. “Food Options with a More Nutrient Favorable Profile in Grocery Stores: Buying Healthier Foods with Paying More.” East Carolina University Student Research and Creative Achievement Week. Greenville, NC, April 2010. Person, A. “Wellness Wednesdays: Barriers to Participation in a Worksite Wellness Program.” Poster. College of Human Ecology and KON Research and Creative Activities Forum. Greenville, NC, April 2010. Person, A. “Wellness Wednesdays: Barriers to Participation in a Worksite Wellness Program.” East Carolina University Student Research and Creative Achievement Week. Greenville, NC, April 2010. Phelps, K., Stinson, M., Hodgson, J., and Lamson, A. “Empowering Underserved Patients With Type-2 Diabetes Toward BiopsychosocialSpiritual Change.” Poster Presentation. 4th-Annual Jean Mills Health Symposium, Greenville, NC, 2009. Hodgson, J., Phelps, K., Stinson, M., and Lamson, A. “Application of a Biopsychosocial-Spiritual Approach to Caring for Underserved Patients with 26

2009–2010 Annual Report

Type-2 Diabetes.” Presentation. Family Medicine 3rd-Annual Scholarship Day, Greenville, NC, 2009. Pope, B. A., Menio, J. E., Ding, J., and Wheeler, M. D. “Role of Per2 in the Development of Fatty Liver Disease.” East Carolina University Student Research and Creative Achievement Week, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Pope, B. A., Menio, J. E., Ding, J., and Wheeler, M. D. “Role of Per2 in the Development of Fatty Liver Disease.” Oral Presentation, College of Human Ecology and KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Pratt, K. “Family Systems and Childhood Obesity.” Oral Presentation. Pediatric Healthy Weight Research and Treatment Center Annual Summit, Greenville, NC, March 2010. Pratt, K., Lamson, A., Lazorick, S., Collier, C., and Swanson, M. “Biopsychosocial Changes in Children and Caregivers Participating in an Integrated Pediatric Obesity Treatment Program.” Poster. Pediatric Healthy Weight Research and Treatment Center Annual Summit, Greenville, NC, March 2010. Price, L. “Building a Knowledge Base for School Professionals: Incorporating an Open and Safe Space for Same-Gender Parents.” Poster. College of Human Ecology and KON Research and Creative Activities Forum, Greenville, NC, April 2010. Williams Reade, J. “Stress, Perceived Support, and Effects on Coping for Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis.” Poster. Jean Mills Health Symposium, Greenville, NC, 2010. Williams Reade, J. “Coping with Loss: A Biopsychosocial-Spiritual Experience.” Workshop Presentation to Support Staff of Pitt County Memorial Hospital, Greenville, NC. Robertson, S. “Sexual Behaviors of College Students. Oral Presentation, College of Human Ecology and KON Research and Creative Activities Forum. Greenville, NC. Tyndall, L. “The State of Medical Family Therapy: A Modified Delphi Analysis.” Oral Presentation, CHE Research and Creative Activity Forum, April 2010. Langbehn, J. and Vetter, P. “Utilizing Groundbreaking and Innovative Research Methods to Connect with the Hidden and Hard to Reach Population of Adults with Dyslexia.” East Carolina University Student Research and Creative Achievement Week. Greenville, NC, April 2010. Awards Bibb, B. First Place Graduate Poster. Human Health and Nutrition, ECU Research and Creative Achievement Week. Pope, B. A. First Place Graduate Oral Presentation, CHE Research and Creative Activity Forum. McGinn, J. Foundation Graduate Scholarship, North Carolina Dietetic Association. Tyndall, L. Student Research Award, North Carolina Association for Marriage and Family Therapy. Book Chapters Pratt, K. and Walker, M. “Where Does Weight Fit In?” Chapter for Clinical Activities in Child Therapy: Creative Applications in Therapeutic Practice. Editor: Chang, J. Accepted, pending final review, 2009. White, M. B., White, C. P., and Fox, M. “The Aftermath of the Diagnostic Lag: Working with Women Recently Diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis.” Chapter in Women and Multiple Sclerosis. Editors: O’Mahony, D. and de Burca, A. Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science, 2009. Invited Papers Pratt, K. and Lamson, A. “Clinical Update Medical Series: Childhood Obesity.” Family Therapy Magazine 8 (4, 2009): 36–48. Pratt, K. and Lamson, A. “Consumer Update Medical Series: Childhood Obesity.” Family Therapy Magazine 8 (4, 2009). www.aamft.org. Other Hodgson, J., and Larson, K. “Consumer Update: Parkinson’s Disease.” Brochure (May/June 2009). Hodgson, J., and Larson, K. “Clinical Update: Parkinson’s Disease.” Family Therapy Magazine (May/June 2009). College of Human Ecology


CHE Advisory Boards Birth-Kindergarten Advisory Board Betty W. Blythe ’73, ’78 Pamlico Partnership for Children New Bern, NC Patrick Neil Callahan ’95, ’03 Pamlico Community College Grantsboro, NC Holly Lynn Cartwright ’93 Northside Elementary School Elizabeth City, NC Katherine Yopp Collins ’77, ’79 Pitt Community College Greenville, NC Katherine Burnette Dosser ’92 Belvoir Elementary School Belvoir, NC Dr. Kay B. Gresham Onslow County Schools Jacksonville, NC Juliana Whitehurst Harris ’98 Stocks Elementary School Tarboro, NC Judy Beckert Jones ’69, ’72 Early Childhood Program Greenville, NC Mrs. Emilie Hughes MacDonald ’97 Currituck County Schools Currituck, NC Leigh Taylor Powers ’00 Child Development Services Agency Greenville, NC Dr. Kristi Lee Snuggs ’06 Edgecombe Community College Tarboro, NC Brenda Arthur Stroud ’71 Snow Hill Primary School Snow Hill, NC Shelly Willis WAGES Head Start Goldsboro, NC Family and Consumer Sciences Advisory Board Judith Dennis Barber BSW Home Improvements New Bern, NC Karena Barnes ’08

College of Human Ecology

Nelda Kay Howell, ’59 Melva Lawrence ’82, ’90 Pitt County Schools Ayden, NC Nancy W. Lewis ’58 Luther Lewis and Son, Owner Davis, NC John Alan Meeks Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Raleigh, NC Julia Stokes Rogers ’56 Lifetime Houses, Owner Washington, NC Judith C. Simon Public Schools of North Carolina Raleigh, NC Erica Ashley Smith ’05 Wake County Schools Knightdale, NC Catherine H. Tyndall ’52 Merrywood Antiques, Owner Goldsboro, NC Dr. Bernadette G. Watts ’80 Durham, NC Criminal Justice Advisory Board

District Court Kimberly Swank US District Court Greenville, NC Hospitality Management Advisory Board Tom Abbott The Grove Park Inn Resort & Spa Asheville, NC Jeff Bass ’98 MBM Corporation Rocky Mount, NC Mayo Boddie Jr. Texas Steakhouse and Saloon Rocky Mount, NC Scott Brewton Pinehurst Resort Village of Pinehurst, NC Kevin Caulfield Duplin Hospitality Wallace, NC Jim Davidson Optimance Plano, TX Perry Dunbar ’98 Marriott International, Inc. Washington, DC

Charlotte-Anne T. Alexander Mattox, Davis, Barnhill & Edwards Greenville, NC

Denny Edwards Greater Raleigh Convention and Visitors Bureau Raleigh, NC

Chief William Anderson Greenville Police Department Greenville, NC

Joseph C. Essa Wolfgang Puck Worldwide Inc. Beverly Hills, CA

Clark Everett District Attorney Pitt County Greenville, NC

Don Farrell ’69 Fresh Revenues www.freshrevenues.com/site/

Judge David Leech Pitt County District Court Greenville, NC

Graham P. Felton ’71 Diversified Foodservice Manufacturing Tucker, GA

Sheriff Mac Manning ’81 Pitt County Sheriff Greenville, NC Stanley Melvin ’04 Pitt County Detention Center, Director Greenville, NC Douglas Morgan ’88 US Department of Treasury Beltsville, MD

David Fussell Jr. ’90 Duplin Winery Rose Hill, NC Geoff Gardner, CFBE Biltmore Estate Hospitality Group Asheville, NC Alan Hilton S&D Coffee Inc. Concord, NC

Dan Jones Winterville, NC Mike Kelly ’72 Kelly’s Restaurant Nags Head, NC John LaMarche II ’99 Bettcher Industries Inc. Birmingham, OH Darold Lando Harrah’s Casino, CEO Cherokee, NC Mike Lysaght ARAMARK, Campus Director East Carolina University Eric Mason, SVP ’02, ’05, ’09 RCI International www.rci.com/RCI/ J. L. Nichols III ’75 Nichols Companies Wallace, NC Smokey Norris ’83 U.S. Foodservice Zebulon, NC Tanya Pierson, Sr. VP HVS International Boulder, CO Irwin C. Roberts, FMP ’66 Golden Corral Corporation Raleigh, NC Darrin Stephens ’89 Old South Foods Inc. Wilson, NC John Van Coutren Hilton Greenville Greenville, NC Philip R. S. Waugh Jr. ’82 Second Half, LLC Winston-Salem, NC Greg Weatherford Sysco Raleigh, LLC Selma, NC Interior Design Advisory Board Keri Wilder Ayscue ’05 Phillips Architecture, PA Raleigh, NC Tracie Bailey, ASID ’97 Duke University Durham, NC 2009–2010 Annual Report

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CHE Advisory Boards Charlene Gill ’67, ’68, ’83 Greenville, NC

Laurel W. Wright NC Department of Insurance Raleigh, NC

Walter Perkins III ’88 The Hammock Source Greenville, NC

Merchandising Advisory Board

Traci Stapleton M. J. Soffe Fayetteville, NC

Ashley Kirby, IND IIDA ’93 Design Lines Glen Allen, VA

Miles Barefoot ’64 Albion and Associates High Point, NC

Jennifer Stein ’01 Jones Apparel Group Louisville, KY

Patricia Mansfield Blackbeard View IX Bath, NC

John Coffman Coffman’s at Lynndale Shoppes, Greenville, NC

Karen J. Koch, MSW, LCSW Eastern Area Health Education Center (AHEC) Greenville, NC

School of Social Work Advisory Board

Amy Norris, CBD, CKD ’96 Triangle Design Kitchens Inc. Raleigh, NC

Michael DeMatteis Kopperman New York, NY

Kathy Boyd NC-NASW, Executive Director Raleigh, NC

Joyce Mitchell ’79 WNCT-TV 9 Greenville, NC

Earl R. Print, IESN New Bern, NC

Joseph DiGiulio Jerry’s Artarama Raleigh, NC

Connie Bridgewater Beaufort County Department of Social Services Greenville, NC

Matt Dorsey Herman Miller Inc. Raleigh, NC Anne Bolling Forney, IIDA Arc-Com Greensboro, NC

Ruth Ann Taylor, CBD, CKD ’01 Alta Cabinet Design Raleigh, NC Julie Bledsoe Thomas Historic Hope Plantation Windsor, NC

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2009–2010 Annual Report

Greg Grauel ’79 Reebok Canton, MA Britt Laughinghouse, President Bostic Sugg Furniture Inc. Greenville, NC

Bob Desoto ’75, ’81 Eastern Psychiatric and Behavioral Specialists Greenville, NC

Paula Hale ’70 State Division of Social Services (Ret.) Winterville, NC

Juvencio Rocha Peralta AMEXCAN Simpson, NC George Perry ’77, ’98 Pitt County Department of Social Services Greenville, NC Myra J. Powell ’74, ’89 Vanguard Professional Staffing Wilson, NC

College of Human Ecology


Giving to CHE Investing in the College of Human Ecology “Just as we hope that ECU has made a significant impact on your life, we hope that you will share your legacy with today’s students, who will be tomorrow’s leaders in North Carolina and beyond. My husband and I are both graduates of the university, and we are extremely grateful for our ECU experiences. I ask that you join me as we invest in East Carolina University and our students by making a gift to the College of Human Ecology’s greatest needs or to one of the college’s specific programs or funds. This support will be vital to the success of the college and will be included as participation in ECU’s Second Century Campaign. One of the easiest ways to support our university is to include us in your bequest provisions for a specific amount or for a percentage of the remainder of your estate. This last option provides assurance to potential donors that ECU would not receive a gift should it require all of their assets to take care of them and their family. All alumni and friends who have documented a planned gift for ECU will become members of the Leo Jenkins Society. As members of the ECU family, let’s make sure ECU continues a legacy of excellence for the next 100 years.” —Kathy Davis Brown, College of Human Ecology Major Gifts Officer Ms. Kathy Brown, ’78, ’93, Major Gifts Officer Office of University Development Greenville Centre, Suite 1100 2200 South Charles Boulevard Mail Stop 301 East Carolina University Greenville, NC 27858-4353 252-328-9552 brownka@ecu.edu

When making a gift, please provide this information: Name Address Phone E-mail I would like my gift to be used for:

r College’s Greatest Needs r Specific program or fund, namely r I have included ECU in my will. r Please send information on supporting ECU through my estate plan. All checks should be made payable to the ECU Foundation and may be sent to Ms. Kathy Brown at the address above. For more information on CHE giving opportunities and giving online, please visit https://www.ecu.edu/che/he/giving.html. Thank you! College of Human Ecology

2009–2010 Annual Report

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Annual Honor Roll of Donors Thank you to these supporters for generously assisting the college to enrich lives and enhance communities in 2009–2010. Chancellor’s Society Jarvis Circle ($10,000 and above) ARAMARK Corporation Diversified Foods Inc. Duplin Winery Nash W. Love Jr. and Marilyn Love Van D. Ray and Joyce A. Ray The NC Foundation for Christian Ministries Myrtle Hopkins Westmoreland Wright Circle ($5,000–$9,999) Bettcher Industries Inc. Margie Lee Gallagher Outer Banks Community Foundation W. Leonard Pruitt and Dorothy G. Pruitt Chancellor’s Circle ($1,000–$4,999) Both Management Services Inc. Linwood Owen Brown and Kathy Davis Brown Shelia Grant Bunch Michael L. Bunting Jimmell Racquel Felder William A. Forsythe III and Susan W. Forsythe William H. Freeman Herb and Marcy Hardt International Gold & Silver Plate Society J. Andrew Keel Jr. and Patricia G. Keel J. Bryant Kittrell III and Cynthia Domme Kittrell Edwardl Markowski and Elizabeth J. Markowski Charles Rogers and Julia “Jewelle” Rogers Kevin T. Ferguson and Judy Ann Siguaw David B. Stevens The Winston-Salem Foundation Wolfgang Puck Worldwide Carolyn M. Worden Old Austin Society Founder ($500–$999) Apparel and Interior Merchandising Organization Debra Anne Elmore Kristi Michele Forbes Frank Corydon Gill Jr. and Charlene Sanders Gill Richard Hunter and Sara McKenzie Hunter Kellogg Supply Company Inc Jackson Lawrence and Betsy Hill Owens Renee L. Pearson and Patricia C. White Pilot Club Gordon L. Poulsen and Ramirez Poulsen Irwin C. Roberts ’66 and Lucy E. Roberts H. Donald Scott Katherine L. Swank Rebecca Sweet University Book Exchange Inc. Marie Moses Willer Samuel J. Wornom III and Sandra L. Wornom Partner ($250–$499) Ronald M. Allen Samuel and Nancy Bernstein C. M. Eppes Middle School 30

2009–2010 Annual Report

Thomas David Cafferty and Debra S. Cafferty Joyce M. Davis Robert Lynn Desoto and Hannah DeSoto Edward Drayton III and Linda D. Drayton Warren T. Evans and Rosemarie J. Evans Ann Graham Earl Wayne Hill and Kay W. Hill Kenneth W. Hooper and Diane Grand Hooper Cynthia Elaine Johnson Modern Exterminating Co. Inc. Peggy A. Novotny Edwin H. Patterson and Jean Austin Patterson Mark L. Powell and Lynne Deborah Powell Yaprak Savut Billy Sewell Richard A. Urquhart III Associate ($100–$249) Susan T. Abbott Victor G. Aeby and Tracy C. Aeby A. W. Alexander and Jean D. Alexander Marina Alexander Danny T. Allen and Anne M. Allen Carole S. Anders Dorothy M. Andrews Justin Charles Artz and Keri Pauley Artz June St. Clair Atkinson Teddy Azam Cindy Bagwell Judy Baker Mary B. Baker Mozelle B. Batchelor Thomas M. Bean and Linda Armstrong Bean Arthur Franklin Beeler Jr. and Jo Anna Beeler James Bernard Benson and Patricia Benson Sara Baker Bentzel Bryan Edmonds Berry and Kelly Belton Berry William Glenn Bickett Jr. and Henrietta C. Bickett Rittie Jean Biggs James Black and Doris Black Gerald W. Blake and Mittie Gould Blake Robert W. Boxley JoAn D. Boyette Mary Alice Brinn Angelia Gail Britt Patricia Capehart Brown Sila Brown Jr. and Jewell J. Brown Sandra P. Brown Robert M. Browning Jr. and Susan Dark Browning Daphne Sue Cain Lena Williams Carawan James Cash and Ramona H. Cash Peter James Charland Jr. and Patty Charland Runying Chen Matt Cobb and Carol Proctor Cobb Walter Cooper Jr. and Debra Cooper Bryar Ted Cougle Dale Cowan and Marianne P. Cowan William Henry Cox and Edith Mallard Cox Marcia Lee Coyle Melvin B. Crawford and Susanne S. Crawford J. Bryce Cummings and Jayne W. Cummings Elizabeth Hedgepeth Daly Elizabeth Ann Davenport

Edith Moore Davenport Joshua W. Davis Elma Winborne Davis Christy L. Deardorff John K. Donaldson Rosanne T. Donohoe David A. Dosser and Katherine Burnette Dosser Christopher Duffrin and Melani Duffrin James B. Early III and Nancy L. Early Julee Barnes Efird Alwood B. Ervin Jr. Sylvia Escott-Stump Thomas Edward Evans and Ella Johnson Evans Bill Fender and Jackie G. Fender Harold D. Fletcher and Tennielean H. Fletcher Jeff Floyd and Carolyn S. Floyd Elizabeth M. Foley Phileppe A. Fontenot and Linda D. Fontenot Charles Forbes and Katherine Purvis Forbes Prudence T. Frederick Anthony Wayne Futrell James R. Garrett III and Kellie V. Garrett Paul B. Gay and Jean Gay Wendell German and Vivian P. German Jeff Elwell and Edwina Gower John T. Gresham and Kay B. Gresham James Griffin and Margaret M. Griffin Paula Marie Hale Ossie Shackelford and Lillian M. Hardy Robert L. Harper and Jane Hinton Harper Gary C. Harrison Jr. and Elizabeth R. Harrison Wayland C. Hedgepeth and Betty W. Hedgepeth Bob Henson and Kitty Henson Diego J. Hidalgo and Lois D. Hidalgo Ronald P. Hlozansky and Linda J. Hlozansky Elizabeth Ann Hobbs Jennifer Hodgson William Jefferson Horton Nelda Kay Howell Frances T. Hubbard William E. Irwin Harvey G. Jackson and Mary S. Jackson Elizabeth Mae Jernigan Charles L. Jones Jospeh Howell Jones and Imogene H. Jones Jean Cameron Jones Joseph R. Karns Jr. and Clarinda K. Karns Garry Leland Keech and Carol R. Keech Heather Dawn Kellum John Johnson Kerbs Patrick James Kiley Allan Delon King J. Bryant Kittrell III and Cynthia Domme Kittrell Cheryl Krakower Lacey Lauretta Lewis Elaine A. Lilliston Charles J. Lobel Darryl S. Lovelace and Janice Starr Lovelace Jeffrey Vincent Maglio and Abby Maglio Isabelle S. Mallard Mac Edwin Manning Jr. and Gail Lynch Manning Susan Ward Manning Rebecca M. Martin Ken Martin College of Human Ecology


Easter Maynard William S. McIntosh Lucile McKee Charlie Lee Meeks Jr. and Erin Bradley Meeks Iris E. Mills Laura Helene Mitchell Julia T. Morton Pansy Morton Clifford E. Napolitano Stephen P. Nicholson and Elaine S. Nicholson Robert M. O’Halloran Rhetta C. O’Quinn Fan G. Panton Annie Virginia Parker H. S. Parker Jr. Katherine Suzanne Parker Michael S. Parrish and Erin D. Parrish Linda O. Patch Gary A. Payne and Rebecca B. Payne A. Craig Phillips and Nan Phillips Gerald and Norma Pickler John Pierpont James D. Pierson and Nancy Smith Pierson Charles Poe and Patricia Forbes Poe Karen W. Ponder Russell V. Powell and Myra Johnson Powell John Pruette Alicia Ragsdale Mat C. Raymond Jr. and Elizabeth D. Raymond Sue Rice David G. Roberts Charles Rogers and Julia “Jewelle” Rogers Juanita B. Rummans Delmar L. Scott Jr. and Alice S. Scott Amy Scrinzi Alfred R. Seeley and Janice Seeley Shell Companies Dustin Glenn Shivar Richard M. Shull and Kimberly Lisman Shull Conrad Sloan and Molly Sloan Donald Slota and Anne Lane Slota Mary E. Starling John O. Stevenson and Susan B. Stevenson Blonnie S. Stroud Agnes C. Summerlin Larry I. Tate The Gravely Foundation The Norman & Rose Shamberg Foundation Inc. Brenda Kay Tillotson Tammy M. Tomberlin James Townsend Paulette Trenary Karl Von Gunten and Nancy Jo Von Gunten Jerry M. Wallace and Diane Wallace Harold M. Wallace and Emma B. Wallace June H. Wallace William John Watkins and Elizabeth Watkins Thomas F. Webb and Karen Farless Webb Mel Weber Richard Lee Weires and Bena Treece Weires Robert Craig Welch and Anna Welch Emily R. Wells Philip E. Williams and Brenda L. Williams Edwin Ferebee Williamson College of Human Ecology

Nancy M. Willis Claudia Jo Yeatts Donors (up to $99) Joshua R. Adkins and Emily-Lynn Presley Adkins Dianna H. Aideuis Bradford D. Aikin and Tracy H. Aikin Iris Smith Aldridge Cathie Jean Alexander Julius R. Andrews and Cynthia Bridger Andrews Joseph R. Anthony and Joanne C. Anthony Novella Applewhite Kathryn Baars Janet Pearce Bailey Robert H. Bailey and Delores Tudor Bailey Shannon Pierre Baker Lisa Anne Bartels Bartley Insurance Services Inc. Walter Alan Basnight and Ann C. Basnight Herbert Carlton Batten and Judy Batten Kenneth W. Beaman Sr. and Kathy H. Beaman Violette P. Bell Todd Berger and Tracy Hogue Berger Allen S. Berry Jr. and Karen K. Berry Ira Wayne Berry and Jill Joyner Berry Bob Berry and Bobbie K. Berry Patrick Betrand and Anne O’Donnell Bertrand Earl Fred Bisel Jr. and Louanne Bisel Lionel L. Bishop and Ann Carawan Bishop Jesse Vann Bissette and Jody H. Bissette Gary C. Blanton and Cheryl Murdock Blanton Stephanie Taylor Bond David M. Boyette and Susan Godwin Boyette Jim Bradley and Judith Chappell Bradley Shirley Mae Brandon Geoffrey Clayton Brann Nannette Yvonne Brett Dennecia B. Brown Robert M. Browning Jr. and Susan D. Browning James Floyd Buck and Rebecca Parks Buck Patricia Aileen Burr Sandra Kay Carawan Linda Ann Cataldo Ann Cathcart Alec M. Cathey and Donna Jessup Cathey Anthony Caywood and Lisa O. Caywood Tracy Leigh Chamberlain James A. Chandler Susan Annette Clark Samuel Paul Clifton and Hayley Britt Clifton Peggy Bryan Cochran Sarah Elizabeth Colby Edward Collevecchio and Susan B. Collevecchio William E. Colvin Vera W. Congleton Anne Dunwody Cooper Dawn Rini Cornwell John Christopher Corsbie and Joanne Corsbie Teresa J. Corwin Tammy M. Cozart Phillip A. Crawford and Anne C. Crawford Anne Greenwell Crawford Joseph Alexander Croom Kenneth E. Cummings and Jill H. Cummings

Jonathan C. Curry and Mary Helen Perry-Curry Atha Malissa Cutler Lige Daughtridge and Ann M. Daughtridge Trenton M. Davis and Patricia Brown Davis Joseph B. Dean and Patricia A. Dean Jason Bradley Denscombe Daniel Joseph Di Leo Charles DiSano and Trisha Matteson DiSano Charles T. Dorman and Wendy Hutchins Dorman Janice Wheless Drymon Harriet A. Egertson Erin Paige Emory Sara Asbell Epling Brenda Harper Ernest Tommie R. Everett John T. Everhart and Cynthia Shackelford Everhart Julia Ewing Rainy May Eyrich Gerald R. Feno and Christine Elizabeth Feno Susan Moushey Fike Dori Ann Finley George H. Fleming Food Lion Timothy J. Ford and Susan S. Ford Keith Layne Frazier II and Shannon H. Frazier David Furlough and Elizabeth V. Furlough Michael Allen Galloway and Alison Galloway David Todd Garrison and Elizabeth A. Garrison Laura Brinson Geer Kathleen Erin Geohagan Jack R. Gilgo and Betty Gilgo Evelyn G. Glover Ben F. Glover Jr. and Judith Gleason Glover Richard Goldstein and Patricia Alice Goldstein Tony Y. Gray and Nancy T. Gray Genora H. Greene Philip Davis Greenwood Kevin Elliot Grieve and Shana Albritton Grieve Michael Alan Griffis and Mona Crisp Griffis Amanda L. Grimmett Julius A. Grisette and Hettie Wallace Grisette Ronald W. Hancock and Lois A. Hancock Gregory A. Harbaugh and Audrey Harbaugh George Allen Harden and Nancy Lillian Harden Evelyn Mewborn Hardy Norman Harrell and Elizabeth H. Harrell Edward D. Harris and Elizabeth Ann Harris Lloyd Taylor Harris and Lane A. Harris Ruth Harrison Linda Sue Hart Jewell O. Hatlestad Michael P. Haviland and Kerry M. Haviland Cleveland M. Hawkins and Doris Hawkins Jimmy Beaufort Hayes and Lorraine Hayes Patricia Hearron JoAnn O. Henderson Philip Alan Hight and Melissa Brantley Hight Bobby D. Hilemon and Angela Willis Hilemon Pete Atkisson Hill Jennifer Dawn Fahy Hines Tom Hines and Mary Y. Hines Jody Maria Hite Jon Hockaday and Jamie H. Hockaday Daniel Hoehne and Ruth S. Hoehne 2009–2010 Annual Report

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Annual Honor Roll of Donors Eric Charles Hoffman Jane Holding Willis R. Holland and Frances B. Holland William D. Holmes and Velvet M. Holmes Gretchen L. Homan Dennis Guy Honeycutt and Karen Honeycutt Charles G. House and Phyllis Thomas House Lawrence P. Houston Jr. and Sandra T. Houston Franklin R. Howes and Betty Boyette Howes David Coy Huffman and Rebecca W. Huffman Clarence A. Hustrulid Jr. and Judyth E. Hustrulid Michael C. Jackson Pearlie Lee James and Lucille S. James Brent L. Jensen and Allison Plaster Jensen Leigh Caldwell Johnson Lance C. Johnson III and Kathryn Johnson Joseph H. Johnson III and Karen R. Johnson Gregory W. Johnson and Kristine Johnson Raymond H. Johnson Ralph J. Johnston II and Edythe Cline Johnston Lynn L. Jones Bill Jones and Hilda H. Jones Martha Gaskins Jones Daniel Judd and Tricia Jane Judd Thomas S. Kaplanes and Alison L. Kaplanes George Chris Kares and Marie Jones Kares David C. Kennedy and Danielle C. Kennedy Lillian P. Kimrey Bob Kimzey and Norma A. Kimzey Richard J. Kubiak and Virginia A. Kubiak Lee Catherine Lamb Billie P. Landen James E. Langston and Betty Rice Langston Barry Lash and Deborah Herring Lash Ashley Elizabeth Lawson Patrick Lynn Lenz and Tracy Everette Lenz Michael Anthony Lewis Jr. and Haley R. Lewis William D. Lewis and Patricia A. Lewis Sylvia G. Lewis Thomas H. Little and Mary Catherine Little Ronnie Wayne Long Jr. and Christine W. Long Shirley Myers Long Thomas F. Loving and Julia C. Loving LaToya Este Lowe James William Lumpkins and Mary Ann Lumpkins Carolyn Beth Macala Robert C. MacDuffee and Ann J. MacDuffee Tom Mallison and Frances Mallison Churck Mann and Peggy Rosser Mann Courtney J. Manning Scott E. McCollum and Shannon B. McCollum Randier L. McCullen and Sandra R. McCullen William Phillip McLean Patrick Joseph McMahon Ray Meads and Loretta Wooten Meads Mac Miller and Carol S. Miller Bill Mitchell and Brenda McAuley Mitchell Teresa Gail Mitchell Jimmie Mitchell and Joyce M. Mitchell Michael S. Mooney and Jennifer Joy Mooney Bill Moore and Gail B. Moore Lynda B. Moore W. K. Morgan Sr. and Mary Brabham Morgan 32

2009–2010 Annual Report

Bill Morrison and Bobbie Morrison Christopher Daniel Moss and Sheri Moss Jean Yvonne Mullen Sharon Corbett Mumford Lori Winslow Murray Alyce P. Nadeau Glenn Neal and Hannah W. Neal Chris Newman and Lisa Strickland Newman Mac Newsom and Lindsay Smith Newsom Rudolph Oliver and Edwina H. Oliver Marion A. Ore and Patricia Leggett Ore Stacey Anderson Orr Russell Wayne Palmer Julia Dale Panaro Van Martin Paramore and Donna E. Paramore Jane M. Parker Edward Parkinson and Marilyn Parkinson J. Andrew Peach and Julie Anna Peach Candace Pearce Samuel H. Pepkowitz and Roberta A. Pepkowitz Jill T. Perry Eva Craig Phillips Andrew C. Phillips Jr. Jeffrey H. Pilcher and Jennifer Wilson Pilcher Sylvia R. Potter Jonathan R. Powers and Leigh Taylor Powers Tessie S. Price J. Michael Rabb and Kathryn D. Rabb Frances J. Ratcliff Michael S. Rees Kathryn Bonner Reese Sandra S. Rhodes Russell H. Rhodes Jr. and Melissa Rose Rhodes Daniel W. Rice III and Johnee Rice David E. Richardson and Amanda P. Richardson Sharon Ritchie Ruth Brock Roberts Lillie H. Roberts Sarah G. Roberts Percy E. Rogerson and Lannie Rogerson Ranae Rogerson Jeffrey Scott Ross and Lara Jeanne Ross Susan E. Rumbley Kathleen V. Sabella Bryan J. Salter Sr. and Sondra Rountree Salter Elaine E. Sandman Prentiss Scott and Suzanne R. Scott James Frank Scott and Nancy Gill Scott Jenne Delynn Sevilla David Smith and Carleen H. Smith Dina White Smith Catherine Clark Smith Vernon M. Smith and Peggy T. Smith Sammy B. Smith Jr. and Rhonda C. Smith Michael G. Starling and Cynthia W. Starling Richard D. Steffens and Linda Bennett Steffens Heike Ann Steinle Ray Stevens Christopher B. Stewart and Wendy D. Stewart Marilyn H. Stewart Dellon Brent Stough and Maureen Stough Stephen M. Strickland and Jodi G. Strickland Geraldine M. Styers Ghi Suiter and Susan Arneta Suiter

SunTrust Mid-Atlantic Foundation David W. Swanson and Anna Parrott Swanson Donnell Winders Taylor and Margaret Taylor William Durward Taylor and Betty D. Taylor Loreley Joy Taylor Gary Remus Teachey and Virginia A. Teachey Chad M. Teague and Kali McDonald Teague Harold Tharrington Frank B. Thomas and Rachel Kirby Thomas Arthur S. Thomas and Lovelace Joyce Thomas Philip W. Tierney and Laurel K. Tierney Glen Neal Titus Jr. and Linda Titus Amy Dunn Tolson Hubert Glenn Tolson III and Alice C. Tolson Cynthia Calloway Treadway April A. Turner Judith Quick Uhrick Richard J. Vanek Carol C. Venters James Scott Wagner and Lori Wagner Mindy Ann Walker Billy M. Wall and Jean Byrd Wall Richard D. Ward and Lynn Bennett Ward Wade T. Ward and Norma Ward Richard Curry Ward and Deborah B. Ward Stephen V. Warden and Alene Payne Warden Marijennie B. Warlick Darien R. Waters and Melanie Rublein Waters Marvin T. Waters and Pamela Chaffee Waters Melba R. Webster Guy E. West Jr. William Edward West and Phyllis E. West James R. White and Belle Futrell White Patricia C. White and Renee Latrese Pearson Betty R. White Ray V. Whitehurst and Jama Rhett Whitehurst Christy L. Wilkerson Angela Louise Williams Tim Williams and Barbara Hill Williams Joe Williamson Alice J. Willingham Douglas Wiltshire and Pamela Pugh Wiltshire Dawn Christine Winn-Burdo Abner T. Winslow Jr. and Nancy J. Winslow Edward W. and A. Danielle Belcher Woodall Lou L. Woodard John H. Woodard Jr. and Sandra E. Woodard Jessica Clark Woolard Leslie Worthington III and Elizabeth Worthington Jere William Yost and Barbara Moyer Yost Charles F. Young and Lynn Stevens Young Chelsea B. Younkin Margaret Linda Zealy

The list above includes donors whose gifts were received between July 1, 2009 and June 6, 2010. As with any list of this magnitude, it is very difficult to ensure that there are no errors or omissions. If a name has been incorrectly listed or omitted, please notify us and accept our apology. Thank you. College of Human Ecology


College of Human Ecology

2009–2010 Annual Report

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College of Human Ecology RW-264 Rivers Building Mail Stop 505 East Carolina University Greenville, NC 27858-4353 www.ecu.edu/che

U.P. 10-402


Human Ecology Annual Report