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Tomorrow starts here.

Secretary of Defense Employer Support Freedom Award N O M I N AT I O N PA C K A G E

Public Sector Division


Tomorrow starts here.

Secretary of Defense Employer Support Freedom Award N O M I N AT I O N PA C K A G E

Public Sector Division S UB MIT T ED FEB RUA RY 24 , 2010


PAY P OL I C I ES East Carolina University provides compensation, including differential pay, when National Guard and Reserve employees are away from work performing military service. Based on North Carolina General Statute 127A-116 and the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA), East Carolina University grants leave with pay up to 120 hours each federal fiscal year for employees who serve in the National Guard and Reserve. Employees called for active duty, active duty for training, or inactive duty training are eligible for leave with pay. Employees also have the option of requesting that the work schedule be rearranged.

“With respect to

Leave with pay is also granted for a required physical examination relating to membership in the uniformed services.

the Reserve, I have to say that ECU is the most supportive

When a military obligation is less than 31 days, an employee is authorized eight hours recoup time before and after performance of military duties or training.

employer I have

When ordered to state or federal active duty, members receive up to 30 calendar days of pay based on the employee’s current annual state salary. ever worked for.” This includes special activities of the National Guard. After 30 days, SR. CHIEF PAT FREDE members shall receive differential pay for any period of involuntary service. This pay is the difference between military basic pay and the employee’s annual state salary, if military pay is less. “With respect to the Reserve, I have to say that ECU is the most supportive employer I have ever worked for,” says Pat Frede, director of development and alumni affairs for ECU’s College of Allied Health Sciences and US Navy quartermaster senior chief and reservist, who is currently deployed. “Everyone has been extremely helpful—Payroll, Benefits, the College of Allied Health Sciences, and the Medical & Health Sciences Foundation, to name a few—in assisting me with all the things I needed to do before leaving and since leaving.”

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North Carolina State Personnel Manual Excerpt

STATE PERSONNEL MANUAL

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Leave Section 5, Page 51 July 1, 2009

Military Leave Statutory Authority

This regulation is promulgated pursuant to North Carolina General Statute 127A-116 and the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act of 1994.

Policy

Leave shall be granted to employees of the State for certain periods of service in the uniformed services. No agent or employee of the State shall discriminate against any employee of the State or applicant for State employment because of their membership, application for membership, performance of service, application for service or obligation for service in the Uniformed Services.

Definitions

Following are definitions of terms used in this policy: Term Service in the Uniformed Service

National Guard

Definition The performance of duty on a voluntary or involuntary basis in a uniformed service under competent authority and includes: • active duty (extended active duty; mobilization or call up of reserve components), • active duty for training of reserve components (annual training - usually 2 weeks or special schools), • initial active duty for training (initial enlistment in reserve or National Guard), • inactive duty training (drills - usually on weekends), • full-time National Guard (usually a 3-year contract), and • a period for which a person is absent to determine fitness of the person to perform such duty. • service in or training for the National Disaster Medical System A reserve of the U.S. Armed Forces. The N.C. Army and Air National Guard respond to the Governor as Commander in Chief and serve as the military arm of State government and respond to the President of the U.S. in time of war. Continued on next page

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STATE PERSONNEL MANUAL

Leave Section 5, Page 52 July 1, 2009

Military Leave, Continued Uniformed Services

Armed Forces and the Reserve Components (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, Army and Air National Guard), • Commissioned Corps of the Public Health Services, • National Disaster Medical System intermittent disaster-response appointees, and • any other category of persons designated by the President in time of war or national emergency. •

Also included are the Civil Air Patrol and State Defense Militia in accordance with the Special Provisions outlined at the end of this policy. Covered Employees

Type of Appointment Full-time or part-time Permanent, probationary, trainee, or time-limited Temporary, intermittent

Is Employee Eligible? Yes No x x

Note: Although temps are not eligible for military leave benefits, they are covered under the reinstatement policies. Types of Military Leave

The policy and guidelines that follow are presented in six different sections to differentiate between the benefits applicable to the different types of leave. The sixth section covers reinstatement. Section 1 –Active Duty Training and Inactive Duty Training Section 2 - Physical Examination Section 3 - Reserve Active Duty Section 4 - Extended Active Duty and Other Military Leave Without Pay Section 5 - Civil Air Patrol and State Defense Militia Section 6 - Reinstatement Continued on next page

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STATE PERSONNEL MANUAL

Leave Section 5, Page 53 July 1, 2009

Military Leave, Continued SECTION 1 – ACTIVE DUTY TRAINING AND INACTIVE DUTY TRAINING Leave Options

Leave with pay, up to a maximum of 120 hours each Federal fiscal year (Oct.-Sept.) [pro-rated for part-time employees] shall be granted to members of the uniformed services for: • active duty for training (annual training or special schools, including an authorized training program for the National Disaster Medical System) • inactive duty training (drills - usually on weekends) If the drill is not scheduled on the employee’s off-day, the employee has the option of requesting that the work schedule be rearranged, or the employee may use any unused portion of the 120 hours leave with pay, vacation/bonus leave or leave without pay. Additional military leave needed for training shall be charged to vacation/ bonus leave or leave without pay at the discretion of the employee. Note: When a military obligation is less than 31 days an employee is authorized eight (8) hours recoup time before and after performance of military duties or military training. This time may also be charged to the 120 hours leave with pay, leave without pay or vacation/bonus leave. Example: An employee may be scheduled on a Friday, to take a convoy to a specific site. If significant travel is required, the employee may need to be released early on the day before training in order to accommodate the request for travel and reasonable rest. The employee is to return at the beginning of the next regularly scheduled work period on the first full day after release from service, taking into account safe travel home plus an 8 hour rest period. Advisory Notes for agencies using BEACON HR/Payroll System: (1) If an employee has holiday compensatory time, overtime compensatory time, gap hours compensatory time, on-call compensatory time or travel compensatory time, it shall be taken before vacation/bonus leave. (2) Hours worked in excess of the employee’s established work schedule will be used to offset leave reported in the same overtime period. Leave will be restored to the employee’s balance for later use.

Notification

The employing agency may require the employee to provide notification of upcoming duty and/or schedule changes as soon as known.

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Leave Section 5, Page 54 July 1, 2009

Military Leave, Continued SECTION 2 – PHYSICAL EXAMINATION Leave with pay for physical examination

Leave with pay shall be granted for a required physical examination relating to membership in the uniformed services.

SECTION 3 – RESERVE ACTIVE DUTY Compensation

When ordered to State or Federal active duty, or as an intermittent disasterresponse appointee upon activation of the National Disaster Medical System, the following shall apply for each period of involuntary service: 1) Members shall receive up to thirty (30) calendar days of pay based on the employee’s current annual State salary. Note: This includes special activities of the National Guard, usually not exceeding one day, when so authorized by the Governor or his authorized representative. 2) After the thirty-day period, members shall receive differential pay for any period of involuntary service. This pay shall be the difference between military basic pay and the employee's annual State salary, if military pay is the lesser. Advisory Note: It is assumed that an employee had at least satisfactory performance when placed on military leave; therefore, any cost-of-living adjustment should be included in the differential pay. The addition of career growth adjustments or performance bonuses is determined in the same manner as any employee on leave without pay.

Notification Required for Full Pay or Differential Pay

The employing agency shall require the employee, or an appropriate officer of the uniformed service in which such service is performed, to provide written or verbal notice of any service. For periods eligible for military leave with differential pay, the agency shall require the employee to provide a copy of their Leave and Earnings Statement or similar document covering the period eligible for differential pay.

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BEN EFITS A N D L EAV E P OL I C I ES East Carolina University provides continuation of health care, dental, and other insurance benefits for deployed National Guard and Reserves employees and their families while the employees are away from work performing military service. During the period of Reserve active duty, whether receiving full state pay or differential pay, the employee will not incur any loss of state service. The employee continues to accumulate sick and vacation leave while deployed. If eligible, the employee continues to be paid longevity payments during the period of Reserve active duty. When a service member is on state duty, the state continues to pay for health coverage for members of the National Guard. When he or she is on federal active duty, the state will pay for coverage in the State Health Plan for at least 30 days from the date of active service.

“I feel really secure here.”

East Carolina University holds positions open during military service leave and facilitates transition for the employee back into his or her position upon return to university service.

LT. COL. PAUL J. SCHENARTS

“I feel really secure here,” says Lt. Col. Paul J. Schenarts, trauma and critical care surgeon and professor with the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, and field trauma surgeon with the US Army Medical Corps (Reserve). “I’m not worried about losing my job while I’m gone, which is a really big deal. I’ve seen doctors, particularly dentists, lose their practices when they deploy. That happens to a lot of people in other industries. That has not happened to me or anyone I know of here.”

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North Carolina State Personnel Manual Excerpt

STATE PERSONNEL MANUAL

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Leave Section 5, Page 55 July 1, 2009

Military Leave, Continued Leave Options

Prior to the 30 days of full pay and the differential pay, the employee may choose to have accumulated vacation/bonus leave paid in a lump sum (maximum of 240 hours of vacation leave), exhausted, or retained (part or all) until return. The employee shall retain any unused sick leave. FLSA non-exempt employees may exhaust any compensatory time prior to exhausting leave or it may be paid in a lump sum.

Benefits

Service credit

During the period of reserve active duty, whether receiving full State pay, differential pay, or no pay, the employee shall not incur any loss of total State service.

Longevity

If eligible, the employee shall continue to be paid longevity payments during the period of reserve active duty.

Leave

Retirement

The employee shall continue to accumulate sick and vacation leave. If the employee does not return to State employment, vacation leave earned while on reserve active duty will be paid in accordance with the Vacation Leave Policy. The employee shall receive retirement service credit for periods of service authorized in the Retirement System statute. (See Retirement System Handbook for further details.) Effective July 1, 2009, differential pay meets the statutory definition of "compensation" for retirement purposes. Thus, retirement contributions should be reported to the Retirement System on differential pay.

Health Insurance

When on State duty, the State continues to pay for health coverage for members of the National Guard. When on Federal active duty, the State will pay for coverage in the State Health Plan for at least 30 days from the date of active service pursuant to the orders. Partial premiums are not accepted; therefore, if a full premium is paid to cover a partial month, coverage will also continue to the end of that month. After that, the employee may choose to continue coverage in the State Health Plan by paying the full premium. Advisory Note: If the employee chooses to exhaust vacation leave, the State also pays for coverage while exhausting leave.

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STATE PERSONNEL MANUAL

Leave Section 5, Page 56 July 1, 2009

Military Leave, Continued SECTION 4 – EXTENDED ACTIVE DUTY AND OTHER MILITARY LEAVE WITHOUT PAY Periods Eligible

Military leave without pay shall be granted for all uniformed service duty that is not covered by military leave with pay defined in Sections 1-3. Among the reasons are: 1) Initial active duty for training (voluntary initial enlistment); 2) Extended active duty (voluntary) for a period not to exceed five years plus any additional service imposed by law; (see Advisory Note on next page) 3) Full time National Guard duty (usually a voluntary 3 year contract); 4) While awaiting entry into active duty, such period as may be reasonable to enable the employee to address personal matters prior to such extended active duty; 5) The period immediately following eligible period(s), as defined under “Reinstatement” of this policy, while reinstatement with State government is pending, provided the employee applies for such reinstatement within the time limits defined. (Note: It is the employee’s responsibility to apply for reinstatement within the time limit defined.); 6) Employees hospitalized for, or convalescing from, an injury or illness incurred in, or aggravated during the performance of extended active duty, except that such period shall not exceed two years beyond their release from extended active duty under honorable conditions. Also, the employee shall be entitled to leave without pay for the period from the time of release by the physician until actually reinstated in State employment, provided the employee applies for such reinstatement within the time limits defined; 7) Duties resulting from disciplinary action imposed by military authorities; and 8) Inactive duty training (drills) performed for the convenience of the member, such as equivalent training, split unit assemblies, make-up drills, etc. Agencies are not required to excuse an employee for incidental military activities such as volunteer work at military facilities (not in duty status), unofficial military activities, etc.

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Leave Section 5, Page 57 July 1, 2009

Military Leave, Continued Periods Eligible (continued)

Advisory Note: The following types do not count toward the cumulative 5year limit of military service a person can perform while retaining reemployment rights: 1) Unable (through no fault of the individual) to obtain release from service or service in excess of 5 years to fulfill an initial period of obligated service, 2) Required drills and annual training and other training duty certified by the military to be necessary for professional development or skill training/retraining, or 3) Service performed during time of war or national emergency or for other critical missions/contingencies/military requirements.

Notification

The employing agency shall require the employee, or an appropriate officer of the uniformed service in which such service is performed, to provide written or verbal notice of service.

Leave Options

Prior to going on LWOP, the employee may choose to have accumulated vacation/bonus leave paid in a lump sum (maximum of 240 hours of vacation leave), exhausted, or retained (part or all) until return. The employee shall retain any unused sick leave. FLSA non-exempt employees may exhaust any compensatory time prior to exhausting leave or it may be paid in a lump sum.

Benefits

Service Credit

Longevity

Leave

During periods eligible for military leave without pay, the employee shall continue to earn time toward total State service if reinstated within the time limits outlined in the Reinstatement Section.. If eligible, a longevity payment computed on a prorata basis shall be paid. The balance will be paid when the employee returns and completes a full year. Then, a full payment will be made on the employee’s longevity date that was established before going on leave without pay. The employee shall not accumulate vacation or sick leave. Leave is earned only when the employee is on leave with pay or on reserve active duty. Continued on next page

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STATE PERSONNEL MANUAL

Leave Section 5, Page 58 July 1, 2009

Military Leave, Continued Benefits (cont) Retirement

Health Insurance

The employee shall receive retirement service credit for periods of service authorized in the Retirement System statute. (See Retirement System Handbook for further details.) The State will pay for coverage in the State Health Plan for at least 30 days from the date of active service pursuant to the orders. Partial premiums are not accepted; therefore, if a full premium is paid to cover a partial month, coverage will also continue to the end of that month. After that, the employee may choose to continue coverage in the State Health Plan by paying the full premium. Advisory Note: If the employee chooses to exhaust vacation leave, the State also pays for coverage while exhausting leave.

SECTION 5 – CIVIL AIR PATROL AND STATE DEFENSE MILITIA Civil Air Patrol

While the Civil Air Patrol is not a reserve component, it is an auxiliary to the Air Force. Its members are not subject to obligatory service. When performing missions or encampments, authorized and requested by the U.S. Air Force or emergency missions for the State at the request of the Governor or the Secretary, Department of Crime Control and Public Safety, its members are entitled to military leave with pay not to exceed 120 hours (prorated for part-time employees) in any calendar year. Exceptions may be granted by the Governor. Such service may be verified by the Secretary of the Department of CCPS upon request by the employing agency. Regularly scheduled unit training assemblies, usually occurring on weekends are not acceptable for military leave, however, employing agencies are encouraged to arrange work schedules to allow employees to attend this training. Continued on next page

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Leave Section 5, Page 59 July 1, 2009

Military Leave, Continued State Defense Militia

The State Defense Militia is considered a reserve to the National Guard, but it is not a reserve component of the U. S. Armed Forces. Its members are not subject to obligatory service unless they are assigned to a unit that is ordered or called out by the Governor. Only under the following conditions are State employees entitled to military leave with pay: • infrequent special activities in the interest of the State, usually not

exceeding one day, when so ordered by the Governor or his authorized representative • State duty for missions related to disasters, search and rescue, etc., again, only when ordered by the Governor or his authorized representative. Under these conditions, an employee may be granted military leave not to exceed 120 hours (prorated for part-time employees) during any calendar year. State employees who are members of the State Defense Militia are not entitled to military leave with pay when volunteering for support of functions or events sponsored by civic or social organizations even though such support has been “authorized.” Regularly scheduled unit training assemblies, usually occurring on weekends, are not acceptable for military leave; however, employing agencies are encouraged to arrange work schedules to allow the employee to attend this training. Duty status may be verified with the Office of the Adjutant General, North Carolina National Guard, ATTN: Vice Chief of Staff - State Operations (VCSOP). Continued on next page

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Leave Section 5, Page 60 July 1, 2009

Military Leave, Continued SECTION 6 – REINSTATEMENT Reinstatement

The agency is required to provide the same treatment that would have been afforded had the employee not left to perform uniformed service. (This includes temporary and intermittent employees.) Reinstatement shall be made if the employee reports to work or applied for reinstatement within the established time limits, unless the service was terminated by the occurrence of either of the following: 1) A separation with a dishonorable or bad conduct discharge. 2) A separation under other than honorable conditions, as characterized pursuant to regulations prescribed by the Secretary of the applicable military branch.. Employees who resign to enter military service without knowledge of their eligibility for leave without pay and reinstatement benefits, but who are otherwise eligible, shall be reinstated as if they had applied for this benefit.

Time Limits

The employee shall be responsible for returning, or making application for reinstatement, within the time limits defined below. The time limit for submitting an application for reemployment or reporting back to work depends upon the length of uniformed service. If reporting back or submitting an application for reemployment within the specified periods is impossible or unreasonable through no fault of the employee, the employee must report back or submit the application as soon as possible thereafter. The service duration and periods for returning or applying for reemployment are as follows: Continued on next page

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Leave Section 5, Page 61 July 1, 2009

Military Leave, Continued Time Limits (continued)

Reinstatement Position

• less than 31 days, must return at the beginning of the next regularly

scheduled work period on the first full day after release from service, taking into account safe travel home plus an 8 hour rest period; • more than 30 days but less than 181 days, must submit a written or verbal application for reemployment with the agency not later than 14 days after the completion of the period of service; or, • more than 180 days, by submitting an application with the agency not later than 90 days after the completion of the period of service. Reinstatement shall be to the position they would have likely achieved had they remained continuously employed (escalator position); or, if the period of uniformed service was in excess of 90 days, their escalator position, or one of like seniority, status and pay with the same agency or with another State agency. In the case of reemployment, such reemployment is to be promptly effective. If, during military service, the employee suffers a disability incurred in, or aggravated during, uniformed service, to the extent that the duties of the escalator position cannot be performed, the employee shall be reinstated to a position most nearly comparable to the escalator position, with duties compatible with the disability and without loss of seniority.

Reinstatement Salary

The employee’s salary upon reinstatement shall be based on the salary rate applicable to the proper escalator position. In no case will the reinstated employee’s salary be less than when placed in a military leave status. If the employee was in trainee status at the time of military leave, the addition of trainee adjustments may be considered, at the discretion of the agency head, if it can be determined that military experience was directly related to development in the area of work to be performed in the State position. The addition of trainee adjustments must be made if it can be shown that progression within or through such status is based merely upon the passage of time with satisfactory performance. Continued on next page

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Leave Section 5, Page 62 July 1, 2009

Military Leave, Continued Reinstatement Salary (continued)

Note: It is assumed that an employee had at least satisfactory performance when placed on military leave; therefore, any cost-of-living adjustment should be included in the reinstatement pay. The addition of career growth adjustments or performance bonuses is determined in the same manner as any other employee on leave without pay.

Advisory Note: Federal law requires employers to notify employees of their rights under the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act. This requirement may be met by displaying a poster at the location where employers customarily place notices for employees. The poster developed by the U. S. Department of Labor may be found at the following web site: http://www.dol.gov/vets/programs/userra/poster.pdf

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EMP LOY ER SUP P ORT OF T HE G UA R D AND RESERV E (ESG R ) AWA R DS ECU received the Pro Patria, the state’s highest award for employers who have demonstrated support of the military through leadership practices and personnel policies, at its ESGR Committee’s annual awards banquet. ANG SFC Jimmy Smith nominated ECU for the Pro Patria for its continued support of him and other Guard and Reserve employees, as well as veterans who worked at the university. Chancellor Steve Ballard and Dr. Steve Duncan, director of military programs for ECU, were awarded the Patriot Award in November 2009 by Kenneth R. Oppenheim, area chair of ESGR’s North Carolina Committee. East Carolina has maintained a relationship with ESGR for more than a year, staying in contact in regard to special activities, awards, and events supporting the military Other employees have received the honor in past years, as well as other additional recognition for support of the US Armed Forces. “I believe that if someone is involved with our armed services, that we should be supportive.”

Carole Novick, president of ECU’s Medical & Health Sciences Foundation, received the award in 2008. She was nominated by Pat Frede, director of development and alumni affairs for ECU’s College of Allied Health Sciences and US Navy quartermaster senior chief and reservist, as a supportive supervisor. Frede also recognized ECU as her employer in her nomination.

CAROLE NOVICK

“Pat has been in the Navy Reserves since she began her job,” Novick says. “She participates in annual maneuvers and I support her work to keep our country safe. I believe that if someone is involved with our armed services, that we should be supportive. Pat shows her dedication to her job every day and her patriotism by serving our country.”

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East Carolina University honored with Patriot Award Press Release, December 2009

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East Carolina University honored with Patriot Award Press Release, full text, December 2009 Traditionally, Military Appreciation Day at ECU is a chance for the university to thank the brave men and women who serve in our nation’s armed forces by offering them a small token of our appreciation—tickets to a home football game—along with recognition by and showings of support from the Pirate Nation during the game. This year, however, the university was on the receiving end as the U.S. Department of Defense honored ECU for its support of National Guard and military reservists employed by the university. Dr. Steve Duncan (left) and Chancellor Steve Ballard (right) receive the Patriot Award on behalf of ECU. At a ceremony on Friday, November 20, representatives from the Department of Defense organization Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve presented the university with a ESGR Statement of Support, and awarded Chancellor Steve Ballard and Dr. Steve Duncan, assistant vice chancellor for military programs at ECU, the Patriot Award in recognition of outstanding service to guard and reservist employees. “The Patriot Award recognizes employers who go above and beyond what the law requires in supporting their employees who serve in the National Guard or reserves,” said Ken Oppenheim, area chair of the ESGR. “East Carolina University really leads in all of things it does with its support of the military.” The men and women of the National Guard and military reserves compose nearly half of the nation’s 2.4-millionperson military force. Since September 11, 2001, more than 800,000 of those men and women have been called up to active duty. In North Carolina, nearly one quarter of the state’s 22,000 guard and reservists are currently deployed, leaving thousands of families to cope with the emotional, financial, and legal demands of having a loved one deployed. The ESGR works with employers around the country to ensure that employees who serve in the guard or reserves face as little hardship as possible when they are called to active duty. Federal law protects guard members and reservists under the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act. It guarantees an employee will be reinstated at his or her former job, or similar position, with equal pay, seniority, and benefits upon returning from service. The law also entitles employees to the same benefits other employees receive during comparable leaves of absence.

ECU has a well-earned reputation for supporting the military and its employees who serve in the guard and reserves. ECU is a leader in the state for developing programs to assist military families, and the university’s work with the Wounded Warrior program at Camp Lejeune is well known in military circles. But it was a recent ESGR trip Oppenheim took with some area employers to visit their employees serving in the 1st Attack Reconnaissance Battalion of the 130th Aviation Regiment prior to their deployment to Iraq that crystallized for him why ECU was deserving of the Patriot Award. “They were training with the 1st Cavalry down in west Texas at a simulated forward operating base and they invited some of their employers to come and see them train before they deployed. We boarded a C-130 at RDU, and it was funny because these employers were probably used to flying first class or at least business class, but here they were on a C130 wearing earplugs just to support their people. We landed at what looked like an abandoned air strip and stepped out into 105-degree heat to find all of the employees lined up to greet us. If you could have seen the interaction between these employees and employers, it just makes your heart feel great. “ECU had two faculty members on that plane. They were going down there to see a young woman who had just graduated and was working for the university and was accepted to veterinary school in Louisiana. Of course, her life changed. She got mobilized. So she was now going to Iraq instead of vet school. But these two faculty members from ECU took their time to go down there and support her, to keep her morale up, and it was really great to see. Not many universities will do that,” he said. Also at the ceremony, Dr. Ledyard Ross, Col. Ellis F. Hall Jr., Dr. Leo Jenkins, and Col. David B. Stevens were enshrined in ECU’s Distinguished Military Service Society, and Dr. Elizabeth Carroll, Walter “Hunt” McKinnon, Dr. Carmen Russoniello, Dr. David Cistola, and Dr. Vivian Mott were recognized for their continued support of the military through research and academic pursuits.

ECU distributed 3,425 free tickets to area military bases for the football game against UAB, and provided halfpriced tickets to 570 more military veterans, National Guard members, and reservists. But, the Patriot Award is given to employers who go beyond the USERRA in supporting guard and reservist employees.

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SUP ERV I SOR T R A I N I N G Supervisors are aware of both university and state support of military duty, and they go above and beyond to provide support to employees who need to be absent from their university duties because of service to the National Guard and Reserve. The university fulfills and exceeds expectations in regard to support of its officers and enlisted employees. ECU’s Human Resources office provides on-demand training and support for supervisors’ understanding of deployed employees needs and rights. East Carolina serves a high concentration of current military service members, veterans, and family members of those members, and this awareness contributes to supervisors’ support of such leave. Supervisors often stay in contact with the deployed employee and boost morale through this correspondence. They also support their employees during training activities.

“My supervisor called to check on me.” STAFF SGT. ASHLEY BONNER

East Carolina serves many students who are members of the National Guard and Reserve. To meet their academic needs in times of deployment or duty, the university offers resources to help faculty accommodate these students. ECU’s Military Education Committee acts as a liaison between students and faculty, helping professors understand the need for flexibility in course-work deadlines and attendance for Guard and Reserve students.

“My supervisor called to check on me,” says Staff Sgt. Ashley Bonner, program assistant in ECU’s College of Nursing, and a medic in the Air Force Reserve. “My colleagues have all been very supportive.”

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ESGR A DVOC ACY East Carolina engages in activities on and off campus that demonstrate eagerness to support the Guard and Reserve and increase employer support at other businesses. ECU proclaims its dedication to National Guard, Reserve, and all branches of the military through public events like Military Appreciation Day, an annual event that recognizes specific service members and branches. Members also have performed the pre-game coin toss on the field and been the subject of special broadcasts on the JumboTron, among other honors. Representatives from ESGR’s North Carolina Committee have been present at many such events. ECU sets a standard in the community for support of the Armed Services. As one of the largest employers in eastern North Carolina, the university sets an example for other employers on how not only to support enlisted employees but also the military as a whole. In addition, East Carolina sets an example for other universities of how to As one of the accommodate students’ obligations to the Guard and Reserve while largest employers also ensuring their academic success. ECU recently was named a 2010 Military-Friendly School by GI Jobs magazine. in eastern North Carolina, ECU sets an example for other employers on how not only to support enlisted employees but also the military

East Carolina is located in the same region as Camp Lejeune, Fort Bragg, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, Pope Air Force Base, Cherry Point Air Station and Cherry Point Naval Air Depot, New River Air Station, Coast Guard Base Fort Macon, and the United States Coast Guard Air Station Elizabeth City. Because these bases are so close to the university, employees, staff, students, alumni, and their family members are—or have direct ties to—service members.

as a whole. East Carolina also sets an example for other employers in the community by sending news releases to local media announcing the achievements of enlisted ECU employees and university initiatives that will benefit the Armed Services. ECU also uses advertisements in newspapers and other publication and billboards across the region that target and support service members. East Carolina University, along with the City of Greenville and other local entities, signed the Armed Forces Community Covenant, a formal dedication to a military-support attitude and structure within the community. The covenant shows a commitment to help improve the quality of life for service members and their families and to give active support of officer and enlisted employees and students, and veterans living and working in the community.

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ECU Chancellor Steve Ballard greets members of the armed forces at the university’s Military Appreciation Day at Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium.

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SERVICE ME M BER R ECOG N I T I ON East Carolina has a reputation for being military-friendly, and it’s a reputation the university works hard to maintain. While this support extends beyond the campus and community, ECU is especially committed to showing support to service members who are members of the East Carolina family.

The university recognizes notable enlisted employees at athletic events, departmental and divisional meetings, ROTC events, and “shoutouts” at university athletic events.

ECU regularly provides positive recognition of its Guard and Reserve employees in East, the university’s official magazine, Pieces of Eight faculty and staff news bulletin, press releases through the News Bureau, university-produced videos, annual reports, and other institutional publications. Examples of this include ECU News Bureau coverage of Lt. Col. Steve Delvaux, professor of military science and battalion commander of ECU’s Army ROTC program. In 2007, Lt. Col. Delvaux ran in the 32nd Annual Marine Corps Marathon in Washington, D.C. and raised $12,000 for the Azalea Charity’s Aid for Wounded Soldiers project. Delvaux raised more money for the event than any other individual nationally.

Lt. Col. Schenarts also was featured in campus publications on numerous occasions, including during a 2005 deployment when he was awarded the Bronze Star for providing surgical care to wounded soldiers and providing command leadership during combat. The university recognizes notable enlisted employees at athletic events, departmental and divisional meetings, ROTC events, and “shoutouts” at university athletic events. East Carolina also honors veterans during its Founders Week ceremony each year, and turns to military officials and enlisted university employees and students to present guest lectures and graduation speeches.

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Marathon Runner Delvaux Runs for Wounded Soldiers Press Release, October 2009

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Marathon Runner Delvaux Runs for Wounded Soldiers Press Release, October 2009

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Army Awards Bronze Star to ECU Surgeon Press Release, March 2005

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Soldier, Surgeon Recounts Front-line Experiences Press Release, April 2006

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Soldier, Surgeon Recounts Front-line Experiences Press Release, April 2006

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News Clipping Pieces of Eight, August 1, 2008

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Service Honors ECU Military and Veterans Press Release, March 2006

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Highlights of the Distinguished Military Service Society Dinner and Ceremony, November 2009

Welcome to East Carolina University’s induction ceremony for the Distinguished Military Service Society. I particularly want to welcome the university leadership with us tonight: Chancellor and Ms. Ballard and Dean and Ms. Gilbert. Dr. Gilbert is head of the College of Health & Human Performance which is the academic home for our award winning Army and Air Force ROTC programs. I also want to take a moment at the start of this evening to publicly thank Ms. Francis Cain who so graciously agreed to play for our cocktail hour, Francis is an ECU graduate. Since tonight is a celebration of service I also have to make a comment about her husband Bill who has 52 years of service to ECU. I want to make a special note about the management staff of Plum Tree Ms. Heather Vandersloot and her husband Caird for their warm reception and point out that Caird was in the marine corps and is a purple heart awardee who served in Vietnam. The family has two sons who are on active duty with the Navy. They have gone out of their way to ensure tonight is a fitting tribute to those being honored. A warm welcome to all of our guests. During the course of the evening I will make special note of service for a number of those in attendance. Tonight’s event is rightfully called a Celebration of Service: We assemble here to note and honor service to nation, state and university as evidenced by the individuals we will recognize tonight and East Carolina University’s history of linkage to our military neighbors of eastern North Carolina.

A physical symbol of ECU’s commitment to service to our nation is the VICTORY BELL located outside the Christenbury gymnasium. The bell was first cast in 1855 and survived the civil war period. It re-emerged during WWII and was on the USS Broome, a naval destroyer. The Broome was scrapped in November 1946 and in 1951 the East Carolina College Veterans Club began the process to obtain the bell to commemorate ECTC’s veterans. The Veteran’s Club found that the college, not the veterans club, was eligible so the club leadership adjusted their approach and on April 6, 1951 a formal request was made for the bell. It read “East Carolina Teachers College wishes to make application for a ship’s bell for use here at the college. The size and type of bell is not of too much importance. We should like to have a bell taken from a ship which was in service during World War II.” It was noted in the application that graduates of ECTC had fought in both world wars. The Veterans Club paid for the transport of the bell from Washington DC to Greenville and the official presentation was held October 10, 1953 during a Homecoming ceremony. The bell was dedicated to students who served in the military during World War II and the Korean conflict.

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A little history to let you know about our past and now I want to focus on ECU’s current and future service. Most notable among a significant list of support to our military neighbors of eastern North Carolina is 5 efforts I want to highlight tonight: Bettie Ann Carroll, please stand. Thank you. Bettie Ann is a faculty member in the College of Human Ecology. She oversees a 2+M grant that has developed and taught “essential life skills for military families” Bettie Ann’s work has received high accolades throughout the North Carolina National Guard community. The North Carolina guard is deployed right now and Bettie Ann’s work centers on seeing that family members receive knowledge and support in the areas of finance, legal, and family management skills in order to prepare them to meet and manage the expected and unexpected issues that can occur when a family member or sometimes both members are on deployment. For the past year her operation reached 210% of their family outreach goal, and 143% of the individual goal in terms of family-support instruction. Hunt McKinnon, please stand. Thank you. Hunt is a lecturer in the College of Human Ecology. Hunt is best known for his outstanding work with the Wounded Warrior barracks project at Camp Lejeune. Hunt dedicated a complete class project to the interior design of the new wounded warrior living facility currently under construction. On various occasions he had students present their work to Chancellor Ballard, Provost Sheerer, Vice Chancellor Mageean, members of the wounded warrior community, members of the Wounded Warrior Board of Directors, and the 3-star general Dennis Hejlik commander of the 2d Marine Expeditionary Force. Hunt arranged for several of the students to go to the Wounded Warrior barracks at Camp Lejeune and brief the leadership. Each of Hunt’s students received a personal note of thanks from General Dennis Hejlik for their work. David Cistola, please stand. Thank you. David Cistola is primarily responsible for his work on Operation Re-entry. This project is intent on working with integrating the wounded veterans back into mainstream society. David has successfully guided a grant through the budgetary process within the House and Senate versions and ECU expects to soon begin to expand its efforts in post-traumatic stress disorder and mild traumatic brain injury research, as well as other valuable programs. Carmen Russoniello, please stand. Thank you. Carmen is the lead researcher on a program to assist post traumatic stress disorder impacted veterans back to full recovery and normal military activity or assist them in returning to a fully functional civilian life should they leave the military. Carmen is currently working with marines from Camp Lejeune. His work has been briefed to Congressman Jones and as high as the Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps. Tomorrow one of the wounded marines Carmen works with will toss the coin at the football game and receive an ECU flag to hang in the new Wounded Warrior barracks at Camp Lejeune. That individual


Highlights of the Distinguished Military Service Society Dinner and Ceremony, November 2009

is (Navy Corpman Dustin Kirby) It is important to note that Dr. Russoniello was a marine machine gunner in Vietnam who upon exiting the service started an educational path that led him to where he is today. Vivian Mott, please stand. Thank you. Vivian was instrumental in setting up a program within the College of Education where ECU is teaching the US Army Training Command’s education specialists. This masters level coursework is paid for by the US army and prepares government educators to prepare results based educational programs for our service members. This pilot program started with one cohort of 25 government employees and through the success of ECU’s college of education this program is currently serving 3 cohorts simultaneously.

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At this stage of the program I want to present to you Mr. Ken Oppenheim. Ken is a retired navy officer and he is here tonight with Mr. Darrell Johnson. Both Ken and Darrell are part of the organization called Employer Support to the Guard and Reserve (ESGR). Ken is an area chair and Darrell is the Executive Director. The Employer Support to the Guard and Reserve organization is a volunteer agency under the Department of Defense and both Ken and Darrell are active volunteers. Ken would now like to make a presentation. Before I close for the evening I would also like to acknowledge Mr. Clint Bailey from ECU’s marketing department who has done some wonderful work highlighting our military programs. One outstanding effort was his recent short video on our army ROTC program. I highly recommend it to anyone and it can be found on YouTube at ECU ROTC video.

Also critical to ECU’s success in our current and future service are people like retired marine Colonel Pete Grimes who sits on the Wounded Warrior board of directors as well as ECU’s military advisory committee. We also recognize retired Major General Bob Dickerson US Marine Corps and his wife Karen who have worked tirelessly to help the wounded and who have opened doors for ECU to work with these men and women. General Dickerson has just recently agreed to join ECU’s military advisory board. Included in our proud heritage is our link to Golden Corral which provides a free dinner to each veteran once a year on or near Veterans Day. Tonight Irwin Roberts, ECU graduate and Vice President is here from Golden Corral. Our proud heritage will continue since people like Jo and Eddie Smith of Grady-White boats have provided us a $12,500 challenge donation to help our ROTC cadets with college costs. We are actively underway to meet that challenge so that we can continue to work toward a goal of ensuring that no cadet who commissions as a second lieutenant out of ECU will go on deployment with unmanageable college loans. A difficult goal for sure but one we hope to be able to meet. Grady-White boats also provided a substantial gift to the Wounded Warrior Board of Directors earlier this year. Grady White Boats is represented here tonight by Jill and Danny Carraway. Jill is the Vice President for Finance and also works with the Smith Foundation. Also in attendance tonight is Ms. Kitty Wetherington, the past ECU attorney, and her husband Harley. Kitty’s father was a career officer. Recently the Employer Support to the Guard and Reserve organization sought pro-bono support to handle legal issues when the 30th Brigade of the NC National Guard returns from Iraq. Along with several other lawyers Kitty volunteered her time and for that we wanted her here this evening to publicly thank her. ECU’s history of support to the military family goes back to World War I. Whenever called upon ECU has distinguished itself as an active and engaged friend of the military. Our history confirms it and as you can tell our future will sustain it.

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ECU Honors Veterans in Founders Week Ceremony Press Release, March 2005

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Marine Commander to Speak at ECU Commencement Press Release, April 2007

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Service, Commitment Key Topics at Commencement Press Release, May 2007

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Service, Commitment Key Topics at Commencement Press Release, May 2007

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Marines Show ‘Pirate Pride’ Press Release, October 2007

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Krupa Receives Honorary Military Title Press Release, September 2006

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Coast Guard Honored at ECU’s Military Appreciation Football Game Press Release, October 2008

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Coast Guard Honored at ECU’s Military Appreciation Football Game Press Release, October 2008

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Baghdad Beat East Magazine, Fall 2003

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Baghdad Beat East Magazine, Fall 2003

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Baghdad Beat East Magazine, Fall 2003

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Baghdad Beat East Magazine, Fall 2003

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Called to Serve: Letters from Iraq East Magazine, Fall 2004

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Called to Serve: Letters from Iraq East Magazine, Fall 2004

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Called to Serve: Letters from Iraq East Magazine, Fall 2004

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Called to Serve: Letters from Iraq East Magazine, Fall 2004

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Called to Serve: Letters from Iraq East Magazine, Fall 2004

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Alumni Spotlight East Magazine, Fall 2009

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FAMI LY SUP P ORT East Carolina supervisors, colleagues, professors, and fellow students interact with Guard and Reserve—and their families—during their deployment. The university provides a full range of support during military leave for employees and their families. Lt. Col. Schenarts says the majority of his support before and during deployment comes from ECU employees. “I not only heard from colleagues,” Lt. Col. Schenarts says. “One of the nice things when you’re deployed is knowing your family back home is being cared for.”

“One of the nice things when you’re deployed is knowing your family back home is being cared for.”

From a student perspective, some academic departments on campus like the Department of History make it easier for students to drop classes without penalty if their spouse is deployed. The department also takes requests from the squads or family members of deployed students and fulfills those needs through care packages when permitted. ECU is known for being accessible and convenient for military families. Spouses of deployed soldiers can take advantage of flexible online degree programs that allow him or her to complete courses at his or her own pace while balancing family and work responsibilities.

LT. COL. PAUL J. SCHENARTS

East Carolina extends its family support beyond campus to National Guard and Reserve members throughout the region. The US Department of Health and Human Services awarded ECU a $3.1 million grant through the Healthy Marriage Initiative to develop and implement a community-based education program for National Guard and other reservecomponent couples. Essential Life Skills for Military Families (ELSMF), a series of one-day workshops, teach National Guard and Reserve members and their spouses to maintain strong families during deployment. The program is popular in particular with Reserve units, and it provides information on communication, finances, legal issues that may arise before or during deployment, and other topics of value to military families. “We work with the Guard and Reserve units to educate them about important family-readiness issues, and it’s been so rewarding for them and for us,” says Dr. Elizabeth Carroll, ECU family and community services faculty member and ELSMF operations director. “The program continues to grow as more Guard and Reserve members hear about it, and we feel like we’re making a difference for them and for their families as they serve.” E A S T C A RO L I N A U N I V E R S I T Y

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Military Families to Benefit from Education Program News Release, November 2006

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Military Families to Benefit from Education Program News Release, November 2006

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Essential Life Skills for Military Family Excerpts

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Essential Life Skills for Military Family Excerpts

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Essential Life Skills for Military Family Excerpts

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Essential Life Skills for Military Family Excerpts

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Essential Life Skills for Military Family Excerpts

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Essential Life Skills for Military Family Excerpts

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Essential Life Skills for Military Family Excerpts

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Military Outreach Web Page ECU Web Site

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DEP LOY ED M EM BER SUP P ORT ECU interacts with and supports Guard and Reserve employees during their periods of military service. Supervisors and colleagues regularly send e-mails and care packages as permitted, and coworkers rally to handle the deployed employee’s professional responsibilities while they are gone. Words from ECU Enlisted Employees

Lt. Col. Schenarts’ medical-practice partners cover his job duties while he is gone. “They are doing that as part of their service to our country,” he says. “People are serving even though they are not in uniform. People at ECU recognize that what we’re doing is serving a higher calling.” When Staff Sgt. Ashley Bonner deployed to Turkey in 2008, she knew she was fulfilling a life purpose. Serving as a medic, she focuses solely on her military duties, then returns to her civilian position with no added stress. “My colleagues support me by covering my work during that time.” Bonner needed additional time away from the office to present programs to service members at nearby military bases. Bonner says her supervisor and university administrators worked with her to accommodate that time. “The Human Resources director has been nothing but wonderful about it,” she says. Words from a Supervisor

“If our employees are guardians of our country, they should not have to worry about their job or job security,” says Carole Novick, president of ECU’s Medical & Health Sciences Foundation. She supervises Pat Frede, director of development and alumni affairs for ECU’s College of Allied Health Sciences and US Navy quartermaster senior chief and reservist. “All through her training prior to deployment, Pat was available for questions about her job “If our employees responsibilities. She is a great employee and deserves our support. Instead are guardians of of exchanging holiday gifts this year within our Foundation staff, we are packing up a box of supplies for Pat in Afghanistan. We all value the our country, they sacrifice she is making to keep us all safe.” should not have to worry about their job or job

The university also hosts special committees and societies that support enlisted employees and students, as well as veterans.

security.” ECU’s Division of Administration and Finance is home to the Office of Military Programs, which stands as a symbol and an active expression of the university’s commitment to service members. The office is particularly active in issues relating to the National Guard and Reserve. Military Programs helps National Guard and Reserve students achieve in-state status for tuition purposes, selects university “influencers” to participate in programs like summer camps, orientation flights, and base visits. “This has led to a broader understanding CAROLE NOVICK

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and appreciation for the roles of the Guard and Reserve students and employees, and strengthened ECU’s position as the most military-friendly university in the University of North Carolina system,” says Dr. Steve Duncan, ECU’s director of military programs. The Office of Military Outreach strives to meet the educational needs of deployed service members and their families. ECU leads the state in offering online degree programs, and the university actively recruits members of the military through ads in magazines, newspapers, and events that showcase online degree programs that suit the needs of deployed soldiers. ECU maintains an office at Fort Bragg to educate service members on The Military Education academic programs they need to enrich their lives, careers, and Committee is the vital service experience. communication link between students and faculty members

ECU’s Office of Veterans Affairs helps military service members handle educational benefits, military credit, and scholarship opportunities and applications.

regarding issues that The Military Education Committee is the vital communication link between students and faculty members regarding issues that Reserve students. confront Guard and Reserve students. The committee helps communicate to faculty members how military duty can impact a student’s participation in academic courses and how professors can accommodate student’s Armed Services obligations. The Military Education Committee includes representatives from every college within the university. confront Guard and

The ECU Veterans’ Society also provides support for active duty Guard or Reserve members. The society is a social organization for veterans of all branches of military service, their reserve components, the National Guard and active duty service members who are staff, students, or faculty at East Carolina University.

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Boss Lift Photos

Several ECU faculty members have participated in “Boss Lifts,” during which they traveled to visit employees and students in their training settings. The ESGR representatives worked with North Carolina “influencers” to fly faculty members to the sites. Dr. Dorcas O’Rourke (pictured), chair of comparative medicine at the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, and William Bagnell, associate vice chancellor for campus operations, are two ECU representatives who have participated in Boss Lifts to learn about the experiences gained by their employees and students in the National Guard and Army Reserve.

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Military Outreach Home Page ECU Web Site

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Military Programs Home Page ECU Web Site

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ECU @ Fort Bragg Home Page ECU Web Site

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Fort Bragg Education Center Offers Classes on Base News Release, December 2005

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ECU Students Recognized for National Guard News Release, March 2006

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Various Newspaper Ads

Our degree programs

go with you.

UnItEd StAtES AIR FORCE

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East Carolina University offers military men and women and their spouses a variety of online degrees in a number of different subjects. ECU is a leader in the field of online learning. What does that mean for you? It means we have a dedicated staff geared to serve your specific needs. It means you receive a degree from a respected university, and because that degree program is offered online, it travels with you wherever you serve. Visit www.militaryoutreach.ecu.edu or call 1-866-928-1710 for more information. You can also visit our office on base at the following location and time: ECU @ Seymour Johnson Air Force Base Base Education Center 1520 Goodson Street Wayne Community College, Room 206 Office hours: Wednesday, 11:00–17:00 An equal opportunity/affirmative action university, which accommodates the needs of individuals with disabilities.

4/24/08 11:10:58 AM

Our degree programs

go with you.

East Carolina University offers military men and women and their spouses a variety of online degrees in a number of different subjects. ECU is a leader in the field of online learning. What does that mean for you? It means we have a dedicated staff geared to serve your specific needs. It means you receive a degree from a respected university, and because that degree program is offered online, it travels with you wherever you serve. Visit www.militaryoutreach.ecu.edu or call 1-866-928-1710 for more information. You can also visit our office on base at the following location and time: ECU @ Fort Bragg Base Education Center Macomb Street Building 2-1105, Wing B, Room 314 Office hours: Monday–Friday, 08:00–17:00 An equal opportunity/affirmative action university, which accommodates the needs of individuals with disabilities.

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UNITED STATES ARMY

08-409-Air Force 11.625.indd 1


Various Newspaper Ads

Our degree programs

go with you.

UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS

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East Carolina University offers military men and women and their spouses a variety of online degrees in a number of different subjects. ECU is a leader in the field of online learning. What does that mean for you? It means we have a dedicated staff geared to serve your specific needs. It means you receive a degree from a respected university, and because that degree program is offered online, it travels with you wherever you serve. Visit www.militaryoutreach.ecu.edu or call 1-866-928-1710 for more information. You can also visit our office on base at the following location and time: ECU @ Craven Community College (Havelock) Aeronautical Technologies Building, Room 114C Office hours: Tuesday and Thursday, 11:00–17:00 An equal opportunity/affirmative action university, which accommodates the needs of individuals with disabilities.

Our degree programs

go with you.

East Carolina University and Craven Community College, as part of a longstanding commitment to serve the military community in North Carolina, bring the quality of two of the nation’s leading higher education systems to you—whether you are at home or deployed. You can complete your undergraduate degree or earn an advanced degree online. Choose from a variety of more than 60 programs that encompass business, education, health care, technology, computers, and more. You will have the flexibility to achieve your academic goals while you continue to serve your country. The expert faculty members who teach the courses online are the same professors who teach on campus. Advisors from both institutions will help you along the way. Register or get more information online at www.militaryoutreach.ecu.edu, or call 1-866-928-1710 for details.

An equal opportunity/affirmative action university.

U.S. Marine Corps Photo

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ECU AROTC cadets assemble at Sandhurst Military Skills Competition.

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HIRING P R EF ER EN C E Career opportunities at ECU are not limited because of active service in the armed forces, and service in the National Guard or Reserve does not impact employment at the university. East Carolina requests military service information on its applications for employment, and there is a Veterans Preference policy in place, which ECU applies appropriately in recruitment and service.

Career opportunities at ECU are not limited because of active

ECU also actively recruits military personnel as students for its on-campus and online degree programs, giving particular attention to deployed students and those who are working to further their education for officer training.

service in the armed forces, and service in the National Guard or Reserve does not impact employment at the university.

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ECU Human Resources Policy Statement 2: Employment Policies (SPA/CSS) Excerpt

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Workforce Planning, Recruitment and Selection Section 2, Page 35 August 1, 2009

Veterans’ Preference Statutory Provision

State law requires that employment preference be given for having served in the Armed Forces of the United States on active duty (for reasons other than training) during periods of war or any other campaign, expedition, or engagement for which a campaign badge or medal is authorized by the United States Department of Defense. The preference to be accorded eligible veterans shall apply in initial employment, subsequent employment, promotions, reassignments, horizontal transfers and reduction-in-force situations.

Who is Eligible?

“Veteran” means a person who served in the Armed Forces of the United States on active duty, for reasons other than training, and was discharged under other than dishonorable conditions. “Eligible veteran” means: • a veteran who served during a period of war; or • the spouse of a disabled veteran; or • the surviving spouse or dependent of a veteran who died on active duty

during a period of war either directly or indirectly as a result of such service; or • a veteran who suffered a disabling injury for service-related reasons during peacetime; or • the spouse of a veteran who suffered a disabling injury for service-related reasons during peacetime; or • the surviving spouse or dependent of a person who died for service-related reasons during peacetime. What periods are included?

• • • •

December 7, 1941 through May 15, 1975 June 6, 1983 through December 1, 1987 December 20, 1989 through January 31, 1990 August 2, 1990 through The date approved by Congress or the President as the ending date for hostilities for the War on Terrorism. Or, any other campaign, expedition or engagement for which a campaign badge or medal is authorized by the United States Department of Defense. Continued on next page

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North Carolina State Personnel Manual Excerpt

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Workforce Planning, Recruitment and Selection Section 2, Page 36 August 1, 2009

Veterans’ Preference, Continued How to claim veterans’ preference

To claim veterans’ preference, all eligible persons shall submit a DD Form 214, Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty, along with a State Application for Employment (Form PD-107 or equivalent) to the appointing authority. The agency shall verify eligibility.

Minimum Qualifications

In order to claim veterans’ preference, eligible veterans must meet the minimum training and experience requirements for the position and must be capable of performing the duties assigned to the position. In evaluating qualifications, credit shall be given on a year for year, and month for month, basis, for all military service training and experience which bears a reasonable functional relationship to the knowledge, skills, and abilities required in the position applied for. Advisory Note: In determining minimum education and experience, related civilian experience should be used prior to using related military experience, in order to give the veteran the maximum credit for unrelated military service.

Determining Military Service Credit

Veterans’ preference shall be accorded eligible veterans by giving credit as follows: (1) In initial employment, subsequent employment, promotion, reassignment and horizontal transfer procedures, where numerically scored examinations are used in determining the relative ranking of candidates, ten (10) preference points shall be awarded to eligible veterans. (2) In initial employment, subsequent employment, promotion, reassignment and horizontal transfer procedures where structured interview, assessment center, in-basket, or any other procedure, not numerically scored, is used to qualitatively assess the relative ranking of candidates, the eligible veteran who has met the minimum qualification requirements and who has less than four years of related military experience beyond that necessary to minimally qualify, shall also receive additional experience Continued on next page

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Workforce Planning, Recruitment and Selection Section 2, Page 37 August 1, 2009

Veterans’ Preference Continued Determining Military Service Credit (continued)

credit for up to four years of unrelated military service. (Exception: Eligible spouses and dependents shall not receive additional experience credit for the veteran’s unrelated military service.) To determine the amount of additional experience credit to be granted for unrelated military service, first determine the amount of related military service possessed by the eligible veteran beyond that required to meet the minimum qualifications and: • if the total of such experience equals or exceeds four years, the additional credit for unrelated military service does not apply, but • if the total of such experience is less than four years, the veteran shall receive direct experience credit for unrelated military service in an amount not to exceed the difference between the related military service and the 4-year maximum credit that may be granted. Example A: An eligible veteran has 2 years of related military experience beyond the minimum. The veteran also has 6 years of unrelated military service. Since the related military service beyond the minimum is less than 4 years, the eligible veteran shall receive 2 years credit for unrelated military service. [4 yrs. (maximum possible unrelated service credit) less 2 yrs. (related military service held by the applicant beyond that necessary for minimum qualification) = 2 yrs. (amount of the six years unrelated service which can be credited)]. Example B: An eligible veteran has only enough related military service to qualify for the minimum, but has 2 years, 3 months of unrelated military service. This person will receive 2-years, 3 months experience credit. [4 yrs. (maximum possible unrelated service credit) less 0 (related military service beyond that necessary for minimum qualification) = 4 yrs. (4 yrs. could be credited for unrelated military service, however, the person in this instance can only claim 2 yrs., 3 mos., the actual amount of unrelated military service)]. Continued on next page

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Workforce Planning, Recruitment and Selection Section 2, Page 38 August 1, 2009

Veterans’ Preference, Continued Determining Military Service Credit (continued)

(3) In reduction-in-force situations, when calculating length of service, the eligible veteran shall be accorded one year of state service for each year or fraction thereof of military service, up to a maximum of five (5) years credit. (This additional credit is not counted as total state service.)

Applying Preference

For initial employment or subsequent employment, after applying the preference to candidates from outside the State government structure, the eligible veteran shall be hired when overall qualifications are substantially equal to the nonveterans in the most qualified applicant pool unless there are State employees with a priority as described under “Relationship to Other Priorities” below. Substantially equal qualifications occur when the employing agency cannot make a reasonable determination that the qualifications held by one or more applicants are significantly better suited for the position than the qualifications held by another applicant. For promotion, reassignment and horizontal transfer, after applying the preference to veterans who are current State employees as explained under “Determining Military Service Credit,” the eligible veteran competes with all other applicants who have substantially equal qualifications.

Relationship to Other Priorities

If the selection decision is between a qualified non-State employee veteran and a substantially equivalent applicant with a priority described below, the applicant with the priority described below shall be selected. • a qualified current State employee with career status who is seeking a

promotional opportunity, • a qualified employee separated from an exempt policy-making or exempt managerial position for reasons other than just cause, • a qualified State employee with career status who is notified of or separated by reduction in force, or • an employee returning from workers’ compensation leave.

Continued on next page

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Veterans’ Preference, Continued Appeals

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Any claim or allegation that preference has not been accorded to an eligible veteran shall be filed with the State Personnel Commission through the established contested case procedures of the Office of Administrative Hearings. Such claims shall be filed in a manner consistent with the requirements of G.S. 150B-23 and G.S. 126-38. Such claims shall be heard as contested cases pursuant to G.S. 150B, Article 3. The State Personnel Commission may, upon a finding that veterans’ preference was denied in violation of this policy, order the employment, subsequent employment, promotion, reassignment or horizontal transfer of any affected person, as well as any other remedy necessary to correct the violation.

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GENERAL M I L I TA RY SUP P ORT East Carolina University is proud to show tremendous support of the US Armed Forces. Through services, donations, scholarships, special programs and events, research, outreach, university presence, and collaborations with military bases, the university is a true friend and supporter of service members. Listed here are specific initiatives ECU actively participates in to show this support. More information about these projects is provided in the following pages. Research and Initiatives

Basic Retraining: East Carolina’s Psychophysiology Lab and Biofeedback Clinic is assisting Marines of the Wounded Warrior Battalion East at Camp Lejeune return to civilian life. The Training for Optimal Performance program provides services to Marines returning from war, particularly those who need help adjusting to disabilities or Post Traumautic Stress Disorder. The program begin in 2008 under the direction of Dr. Carmen Russoniello, associate professor in the College of Health and Human Performance and director of ECU’s Psychophysiology Lab and Biofeedback Clinic. Operation Re-Entry: East Carolina trains more health-care professionals than any other university in North Carolina. Using this expertise and its strong partnerships with military bases, the university has placed a priority on initiatives to address the rehabilitation and re-entry of military personnel into society after deployment. ECU is positioned to serve these men and women by addressing the diverse health and rehabilitation challenges they face. “With all of our resources and talent, we can make our service to these

“With all of our resources and talent, we can make our service to these personnel bigger and better,” says Dr. David Cistola, project director of Operation Re-Entry. “We can train health-care workers to work in VA hospitals, and we can help those with battlefield experience train for health-care careers as well.”

personnel bigger and better.” DR. DAVID CISTOLA

The Operation Re-Entry information on the following pages includes a short list of examples of on-going ECU research projects that will benefit the Armed Services.

Wounded Warrior Barracks: East Carolina interior design students are helping make a difference in the lives of those who serve. The students, under the direction of Hunt McKinnon, professor of interior design, helped design Bachelor Enlisted Quarters for the Wounded Warrior Battalion. The barracks will provide assisted living for rehabilitating Marines. “ECU is putting itself on the map as being very involved in helping this part of our community,” says Dr. Steve Duncan, director of Military Programs. E A S T C A RO L I N A U N I V E R S I T Y

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Events

In his 2010 State of the University address to the campus community, ECU Chancellor Dr. Steve Ballard noted the university’s dedication to military programs on and off campus as one of its major accomplishments. East Carolina football fans bought tickets to the Pirates’ 2007 Hawaii Bowl game in Honolulu and donated them to military personnel stationed there. ECU’s Athletic Department matches each ticket donated to the Tickets for Troops program for Military Appreciation Day. The tickets are donated to members of the military serving in eastern North Carolina. ECU administrators regularly participate in events on and off campus that recognize and honor military service members. Provost Dr. Marilyn Sheerer, then the dean of the College of Education, participated in the Department of Defense’s Joint Civilian Orientation Conference, during which she visited military bases and studied how institutions of higher learning can address the complex educational needs of North Carolina’s troops. Last year, East Carolina hosted “Operation Re-Entry: Rehabilitation Challenges Facing Military Personnel, Veterans, and Their Dependents,” a symposium that addressed the challenges of military personnel returning from deployment. The academic community learned about the rehabilitation challenges facing service members and their health-care systems and about expertise at ECU that can provide collaboration and partnerships to address those critical needs. In 2007, Col. Adele Hodges presented ECU’s commencement address. She is one of many officers and military personnel to speak to students and graduates about their own calls to action to improve their state and country. Academics

The Troops to Teachers program offers retiring military personnel an option to become a teacher through ECU’s College of Education. East Carolina helps these service members use the high ideals they practiced in the military into the classrooms of high-need schools. The NC TEACH Military Cohort is a fast-track online program that fulfills the course-work component of teacher licensure. Active-duty military members with less than two years of service left, or any military spouse, with a bachelor’s degree, qualifies for the program. ECU offers educational options for the 30th Enhanced Heavy Separate Brigade, the largest brigade in the North Carolina Army National Guard. The university assists members of the “Old Hickory” Brigade accomplish their educational goals while they serve. 88

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East Carolina’s different colleges and departments offer military scholarships including ROTC scholarships and awards within academic programs with high concentrations of military students and alumni. Some examples are included in the following pages. ROTC

East Carolina’s rich military history is highlighted by its ROTC programs. The university is dedicated to the success of its cadets, some of whom require training during academic sessions. “Often, soldiers have to go to training during the summer, and they arrive at ECU two weeks late,” says Major Lawrence Woodrow of ECU’s Army ROTC program. “The school is very good about working with the soldiers when they need to be at training.” ECU allows its cadets to take their final exams in advance if duty requires them to leave before the end of a semester. Cadets also qualify for book scholarships and officer-training scholarships, receive in-state tuition rates, and receive other campus support. ECU’s ROTC cadets have a reputation for excellence at off-campus competitions. After two consecutive 1st place finishes, the Pirate Battalion, a team of exceptional Cadets traveled to Fort Bragg, North Carolina, and took 2nd place out of 39 teams in the All American Brigade’s 2009 Ranger Challenge contest. ROTC cadets also are very visible at campus events like Military Appreciation Day and traditional student activities, and are active in organizations under the Student Government Association. Cadets train on university land on West Research Campus, where their training includes practicing on a rappelling tower and learning basic foot movement and land-navigation skills. An in-depth article in East, the university’s official magazine, highlights the lives and duties of ROTC cadets on campus, and is included in the following pages. General

Representatives from ECU’s Office of Military Outreach regularly visit North Carolina’s military bases and attend military events to assess the educational needs of active-duty military personnel. ECU’s College of Nursing was awarded a $10,000 grant from the NC Center for Nursing to partner with area military bases to increase the number of men in nursing. ECU was named a 2010 Military-Friendly School by GI Jobs magazine. East Carolina’s online community, OneStop, has a Military Support forum, where students, faculty, and staff can post messages of support to on- and off-campus military personnel.

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Wounded Warrior Feature ECU Web Site

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Basic Retraining ECU Web Feature

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Basic Retraining ECU Web Feature

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Basic Retraining ECU Web Feature

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Basic Retraining ECU Web Feature

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Basic Retraining ECU Web Feature

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Operation Re-Entry NC Home Page ECU Web Site

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ECU Students Design Wounded Warrior Barracks Press Release, October 2008

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News Clipping Daily Reflector, September 3, 2007

ECU partnering with Army The College of Education and U.S. Army are starting a new partnership of college graduate level distance education classes in two programs. The courses are being offered to Army educational interns, individuals responsible for developing educational and training materials for the military and civilians who work for the Army. Each class will be made up of 25 students, some who are pursuing graduate degrees, others who are seeking improved job skills, according to a news release. The Department of Counselor and Adult Education and the Department of Library Science and Instructional Technology will be offering courses online each semester. Vivian W. Mott and Steve Schmidt in the Department of Counselor and Adult Education will teach the first two classes this fall. Ken Luterbach in the Department of Library Science and instructional Technology and Schmidt will teach the next two classes during the following spring semester. The College of Education expects to teach two graduate classes per semester for up to two years. This venture could be renewed for additional classes of educational interns.

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Branches of Military Getting Tickets to Bowl Game in Hawaii News Release, December 2007

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ECU Athletics to Match Tickets for Military Appreciation Day News Release, October 2006

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Sheerer Accepts Invitation from the Office of the Secretary of Defense News Release, April 2005

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Symposium Focuses on Rehabilitation Challenges News Release, October 2008

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East Magazine Military Committee List

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Various Photography from Enlisted ECU Employees

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helicopter in Afghanistan OH-58 Kiowa Warrior scout Delvaux, professor of military Submitted by: LTC Steven L. University Army ROTC lina science, East Caro

Flyover at ECU’s Military Appreciation Football Game Jay Clark, Photographer

Army Training at Fort Polk Louisiana Submitted by: Senior Chief Pat Frede, NCOIC, director of development and alumni affairs for ECU’s College of Allied Health Sciences

Victory Bell Ceremony Submitted by: Dr. Steve Duncan, director of military programs, ECU

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Various Photography from Enlisted ECU Employees

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The “Navy Team” at Arm y Training at Fort Polk Louisiana

Submitted by: Senior Chi ef Pat Frede, NCOIC, dire ctor of development and alumni affairs for ECU’s College of Allied Health Sciences

aks to ECU AROTC cadets LTC Steven L. Delvaux spe Point at West L. Delvaux, professor Submitted by: LTC Steven Army ROTC of military science, ECU

ECU Athletic Director Terry Holland presents a pirate jersey to Major General William E. Ingram, Jr. Submitted by: Dr. Steve Duncan, director of military programs, ECU

the Wounded Warrior Chancellor Ballard visiting p Lejeune Cam Battalion at

tary programs, ECU Duncan, director of mili Submitted by: Dr. Steve

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U.P. 09-534

Freedom Award  

Secretary of Defense Employer Support Freedom Award - Nomination Package

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