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earth song FA L L 2019

HEARD MUSEUM MEMBERSHIP MAGAZINE

David Hockney’S YOSEMITE AND MASTERS OF CALIFORNIA BASKETRY


HEARD MUSEUM, HEARD MUSEUM SHOP BOARD OF TRUSTEES John Melamed James R. Huntwork Patricia K. Hibbeler Leland W. Peterson David M. Roche TRUSTEES Karen Abraham Tony Astorga Arlene K. Ben-Horin Mark B. Bonsall Gregory H. Boyce John Coggins Adrian N. Cohen Dr. Craig Cohen Robert A. Cowie Elizabeth Murfee DeConcini Judy Dworkin John Furth John Graham David A. Hansen Carrie L. Hulburd Sharron Lewis LIFE TRUSTEES Kay Benedict Howard R. Berlin James T. Bialac Dr. George Blue Spruce, Jr. Herbert J. Bool Robert B. Bulla F. Wesley Clelland, III Norma Jean Coulter Alice J. Dickey† Robert J. Duffy Mary G. Hamilton Barbara Heard Joel P. Hoxie Mary Hudak Dr. Thomas M. Hudak Richard L. Johnes Edward F. Lowry † deceased

Chair Vice-Chair Secretary Treasurer Dickey Family Director and CEO Stephen R. Lewis Marigold Linton John F. Lomax Janis Lyon Robert Meyer Scott Montgomery Susan H. Navran Scott H. O’Connor William G. Ridenour Margo Simons Don Smith Sue Snyder Guild President Ginger Sykes Torres Christy Vezolles David Wilshin

2301 N. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85004 Monday to Saturday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed Easter Sunday, Independence Day, Thanksgiving Day & Christmas. Main: 602.252.8840 Events Hotline: 602.252.8848 Shop: 602.252.8344 or 1.800.252.8344 THE COURTYARD CAFÉ Open Every Day, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. 602.251.0204 COFFEE CANTINA Monday to Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. WE APPRECIATE THE SUPPORT OF THESE SPONSORS:

Partial funding provided by the Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture through appropriations from the Phoenix City Council.

INCREASE YOUR SUPPORT THROUGH OUR COMMUNITY PARTNERS: Frederick A. Lynn Dennis H. Lyon Carol Ann Mackay Clint J. Magnussen Robert L. Matthews Miriam J. McClennen Mary Ellen McKee James Meenaghan Dr. Wayne Lee Mitchell Dr. Arthur L. Pelberg Wick Pilcher David E. Reese William C. Schubert Sheryl L. Sculley Richard H. Silverman John B. Stiteler John G. Stuart

EARTHSONG Allison Lester

Associate Director of Visitor and Member Engagement

Caesar Chaves

Creative Director

Deborah Paddison

Copy Editing

Sarah Moore

Graphic Design

FRONT COVER: David Hockney, “Yosemite II, October 16th 2011” iPad drawing printed on four sheets of paper (46 3/8 x 34 7/8” each), mounted on four sheets of Dibond, Edition 1 of 12. 92 3/4 x 69 3/4” overall © David Hockney Collection The David Hockney Foundationn BACK COVER: Carrie Bethel (Mono Lake Paiute), 1898-1974. Bowl basket, c. 1929. Split sedge root, dyed bracken fern root, split winter redbud shoots, willow shoots. 8 x 17.5 inches. Collection of Edward J. and Mini Nusrala. Photo: Craig Smith, Heard Museum The Heard Museum is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization incorporated in the State of Arizona. Exhibition, event and program funding provided in part by the Arizona Commission on the Arts, the Arizona Humanities Council, the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture.


WHAT'S INSIDE VIEW

EXHIBITIONS ON DISPLAY

4

David Hockney’s Yosemite

10

Masters of California Basketry

14

Opening Events

16

Woman. A Series

20

Through the Lens of Barry Goldwater

GO + DO

earth song HEARD MUSEUM MEMBERSHIP MAGAZINE

EVENTS

22 Calendar 25

Member Exclusive Events

26

Public Programs

28

Indigenous Peoples’ Day Celebration

30

Honoring American Indian Veterans

31

Opening Events for MARIA HUPFIELD: Nine Years Towards the Sun

SHOP + DINE 32

Holiday Shopping Guide

36

Coffee Cantina

LEARN 37

Teacher Institute

38

Join the Guild

39

Short Course

EXPERIENCE 40

Member Highlights

43

Celebrate Your Special Occasions at the Heard Museum

GIVE 44

Moondance at the Heard

46

Welcome New Trustees

NEXT ISSUE 48

Celebrating 90 Years FALL 2019

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DIRECTOR’S LETTER Time Magazine recently placed David Hockney, the contemporary British painter, on their list of the top 100 most influential people in the world. A recent retrospective of his work was presented by three of the most prestigious museums in the world: the Tate Britain in London, Centre Pompidou in Paris, and The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Last spring, the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam presented the exhibition Hockney/Van Gogh: The Joy of Nature, which placed masterworks by Vincent Van Gogh alongside the work of David Hockney, so that audiences might discover what these two icons have in common, and it resulted in blockbuster attendance.

David M. Roche Dickey Family Director and CEO

On October 27th, the Heard Museum is providing our members with an exclusive opportunity to be amongst the first to see the original exhibition David Hockney’s Yosemite and Masters of California Basketry. The exhibition pairs works-of-art by David Hockney with spectacular examples of California basketry from the early 20th century by renowned artists such as Carrie Bethel and Lucy Telles. The exhibition highlights the impact that Yosemite has had over time and space on artistic production, from the Valley’s original Indigenous inhabitants to one of the most celebrated artists of our time. This is David Hockney’s first show in Arizona and the Heard Museum is the only place in the world to see it. Exhibitions like this reflect our efforts to create memorable, one-of-a-kind experiences for members. In the past year alone, we opened eleven exhibitions and organized more than 150 events with you in mind. In October, we will unveil a totally renovated courtyard and admissions lobby, made possible by the generosity of the Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust. This includes a new and dedicated membership desk at the entrance and a video welcome wall. Every feature and detail of this project has been designed to enhance your enjoyment of the museum. The Heard Museum’s 90th Anniversary is December 26th, 2019. We’ll be kicking off this momentous milestone at Moondance but have an entire season of celebrations planned. We look forward to sharing each and every one with you.

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David Hockney’S

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YOSEMITE AND MASTERS OF

CALIFORNIA BASKETRY A look at our original exhibition that examines how Yosemite Valley has inspired art production across time and space

David Hockney’s Yosemite page 4 BY ERIN JOYCE | FINE ARTS CURATOR

Masters of California Basketry page 10 BY ANN MARSHALL | DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH

Sponsors for David Hockney’s Yosemite and Masters of California Basketry Major Exhibition Support

Sacks Tierney P.A.

The Kemper and Ethel Marley Foundation

Carolyn and John G. Stuart

Additional Support

In Memory of Betty Lou Summers

Arizona Commission on the Arts

Grand Gallery Exhibition Fund Patrons

Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture

Carol J. Cohen

Robert Lehman Foundation

Dino J. and Elizabeth Murfee DeConcini

Grand Gallery Exhibition Fund Supporters

Dr. Meryl Haber Ann Kaplan and Robert Fippinger

Roberta Aidem

The Lester Family

Mary and Mark B. Bonsall

Janet and John Melamed

H. Malcolm Grimmer

Susan and James Navran

Dr. Marigold Linton and Dr. Robert Barnhill

Rose and Harry Papp

Kristine and Leland W. Peterson

Jody Pelusi

Jill and Wick Pilcher

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David Hockney’s Yosemite BY ERIN JOYCE | FINE ARTS CURATOR

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VIEW THIS WORK NOT ONLY REFLECTS HOCKNE Y ’S ONGOING AND INSPIRED VISUAL INTERPRETATION OF THE AMERICAN WEST, IT ALSO CAPTURES HOCKNE Y ’S WILLINGNESS TO EXPERIMENT, EMBR ACE AND EMPLOY DIFFERENT TOOLS FOR ARTISTIC PRODUCTION INCLUDING PHOTOGR APHY, DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES , AND HIS WORK AS A PAINTER AND DR AFTSMAN .

David Hockney is considered one of the preeminent draftsmen of the 20th and 21st centuries and is often referred to as Britain’s greatest living artist. His work has been shown in monographic exhibitions and retrospectives globally over the course of his more than five-decade career, though his involvement with Yosemite as a subject did not really begin until the 1980s. In 1982, Hockney began the first of his many expeditions to Yosemite, which resulted in a series of photographic collages, some of which are on view in this exhibition. The works comprise dozens of photographs assembled to make one cohesive, visually lush image. There is a cinematic quality in these collages. Movement and energy undulate within the work, as though the aura of the Valley is too big to be contained in one singular photograph. In 2010, and again in 2011, Hockney visited Yosemite Valley. There, for the first time, he used his iPad to draw en plein air while taking inspiration from the landmarks, vistas, and iconic landscape of the Valley. Featured in the exhibition are 29 limited-edition iPad drawings printed on paper. This work not only reflects Hockney’s ongoing and inspired visual interpretation of the American West, it also captures Hockney’s willingness to experiment, embrace and employ different tools for artistic production including photography, digital technologies, and his work as a painter and draftsman.

OPPOSITE PAGE: David Hockney, “Yosemite I, October 16th 2011” iPad drawing printed on four sheets of paper (38 7/8 x 34 7/8” each), mounted on four sheets of Dibond, Edition 1 of 12. 77 3/4 x 69 3/4” overall © David Hockney Photo Credit: Richard Schmidt Collection The David Hockney Foundation ABOVE LEFT: David Hockney. Photo: Hannelore Foerster (Getty Images) ABOVE: David Hockney, “Yosemite II, October 5th 2011” iPad drawing printed on four sheets of paper (46 3/8 x 34 7/8” each), mounted on four sheets of Dibond, Edition 1 of 12. 92 3/4 x 69 3/4” overall © David Hockney Photo Credit: Richard Schmidt Collection The David Hockney Foundation

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BOTH DAVID HOCKNEY AND THE BASKET WEAVERS EXTRACT THE YOSEMITE VALLEY THROUGH THEIR OWN PERSONAL AND CULTURAL LENS. Though, abstracted, the iconic imagery of the Valley is illustrated in Hockney’s capturing of Yosemite in his series—you see the famous silhouette of El Capitan, but it is through the artists’ eyes. Using supremely saturated, non-local digital colors, Hockney suggests the landscape but does not render it in a literal way. In such—both David Hockney and the basket weavers are extracting and abstracting the Yosemite Valley through their own personal or cultural lenses. The underlying thesis of the show is Yosemite as Muse— the star of the show. Yosemite’s geography and natural resources have inspired, and continue to inspire, artists across time and space. Further discussed by my cocurator, Ann Marshall, in the following article, Lucy Telles, Carrie Bethel, Tina Charlie and other Indigenous basketmakers used the fibers, pushing the medium of basketry beyond its habitual utilitarianism or ceremonial purpose to fine art objects intended for consumption. These baskets are Yosemite. Conversely, Hockney captures the majestic landscape through a very nonnatural tool, a computer, in a poetic and beautiful figural representation. Indeed, both David Hockney and the basket weavers express the Yosemite Valley through their own personal and cultural lens. The exhibition promises to be a rich visual and conceptual experience, one that will transport you to the Yosemite Valley and allow you to view the landscape through multiple perspectives.

ABOVE: David Hockney, “Yosemite I, October 5th 2011” iPad drawing printed on four sheets of paper (46 3/8 x 34 7/8” each), mounted on four sheets of Dibond, Edition 1 of 12; 92 3/4 x 69 3/4” overall © David Hockney Photo Credit: Richard Schmidt Collection The David Hockney Foundation OPPOSITE PAGE: David Hockney, “Yosemite III, October 5th 2011” iPad drawing printed on four sheets of paper (46 3/8 x 34 7/8” each), mounted on four sheets of Dibond, Edition 1 of 12. 92 3/4 x 69 3/4” overall © David Hockney. Photo Credit: Richard Schmidt Collection The David Hockney Foundation

IT’S YOUR TURN: YOSEMITE will be an interactive and educational space where guests of any age can learn more about the Yosemite Valley. Visitors will have the opportunity to learn more about the fauna of the Yosemite region; experience how basketry materials are cultivated, grown and harvested; try their hand at drawing landscapes with iPads and coloring sheets; and get cozy around a campfire to read stories about nature.

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Ta-buce, or Maggie Howard, out after acorns. Photo Courtesy of National Parks Service

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Masters of California Basketry BY ANN MARSHALL | DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH

During the early decades of the 20th century, artists of the Yosemite region created baskets that are regarded as the pinnacle of Indigenous basketry arts. Too often the names of weavers—textiles or baskets—are lost through the years. Even in the Yosemite Valley that was generally true, but, fortunately, a few outstanding weavers, such as Lucy Telles, Carrie Bethel and Tina Charlie, are celebrated into the present day. Baskets played a critical role in the lives of Yosemite people for centuries. Before the high glacier-carved valley of Yosemite on the western slope of the Sierra

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Nevada Mountains became a national park, it was a garden tended by its Indigenous residents. The Southern Sierra Miwok people of the region relied upon baskets to gather and process the seeds and berries that were basic to their diet. They tended the land through pruning and controlled burning to provide the materials for their baskets. On the eastern side of the mountain range, the Paiute of Mono Lake lived in a high desert formed by a rain shadow cast by the mountain range. Although in a very different ecosystem, basketry was essential to the lifeway of the Paiute, and they too tended the garden of Yosemite.


... DESPITE SOME ATTEMPTS TO ENCOURAGE SMALLER BASKETS THAT WERE READILY VIEW

AFFORDABLE AND TRANSPORTABLE BY TOURISTS, FIELD DAYS JUDGES AND COLLECTORS RECOGNIZED AND PURCHASED PHENOMENAL LARGE BASKETS WITH BOLD DESIGNS.

The lives of people in the Yosemite region changed radically and rapidly with the discovery of gold just west of Yosemite in 1849. A stampede of miners sought to make their fortune and leave. They killed Indigenous people with impunity, claimed Indigenous land, clear-cut trees, killed game animals and killed the plants people relied upon for food. Yosemite people starved. When they fought back, the Mariposa Battalion was formed to pursue, punish and force the resident Miwok and Paiute people onto a newly established Fresno River reservation in the San Joaquin Valley. The attempt failed, and Indigenous people gradually returned to Yosemite.

Soon, the beauty of Yosemite began to draw tourists. As early as 1869, there were three hotels and a cash economy became important. In 1890, Yosemite was designated as a national park. A growing number of Mono Lake Paiute were drawn to the area, gradually outnumbering the Yosemite Miwok. Indigenous people found low-paying jobs in tourism: women as hotel maids, kitchen helpers, laundresses; men as laborers on road crews and guides. Curio stores purchased baskets, but tourists were less interested in the traditional baskets and wanted a new style of basket with three colors, complex designs and lids.

OPPOSITE PAGE: Carrie Bethel (Mono Lake Paiute), 1898-1974. Basket, 1956. Sedge root, dyed bracken root, redbud, willow. 13 x 25 inches. Collection of Stevia and Wayne Thompson. Photo: Craig Smith, Heard Museum

LEFT: Maggie Howard with baskets. Photo Courtesy of National Parks Service. RIGHT: Showing handcraft. Alice James center, Maggie Howard right. [L-R: Tina Charlie, Carrie Bethel, Alice Wilson, Forest Townsley, Leanna Tom, Maggie Howard]. Photo Courtesy of National Parks Service.

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In 1916, the Yosemite Indian Field Days summer event was inaugurated by the National Park Service and park concessionaires. The Field Days were held from 1916 to 1926 and in 1929. The event included a rodeo, parade and baby contest. Indigenous participants were expected to dress in a manner that conformed to tourist stereotypes—basically Plains Indians with buckskin beaded dresses, shirts and feathered headgear. A basketry competition was part of the event, and despite some attempts to encourage smaller baskets that were readily affordable and transportable by tourists, Field Days judges and collectors recognized and purchased phenomenal large baskets with bold designs. Weavers received cash for entering and for award-winning baskets and displays. Beaded baskets, belts and hatbands were also popular and beadwork displays received cash awards. After the competition, the makers sold their baskets. The prize winning weavers were mainly Mono Lake Paiute.

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Following the end of the Field Days, the new-style baskets continued to be woven; however, with the end of the Arts and Crafts Movement and the Great Depression the number of the collectors dwindled, and by the 1940s most were not adding to their collections. A very few extraordinary baskets were woven in the 1950s. David Hockney’s Yosemite and Masters of California Basketry will feature more than 20 works from public and private collections that are part of the story of Yosemite and the inspiration it has provided to artists of many cultures through the years. ABOVE: Tina Charlie (Mono Lake Paiute), 1869-1962. Basket, 1928. Sedge root, dyed bracken root, redbud, willow. 10 x 20 inches. Collection of Stevia and Wayne Thompson. Photo: Craig Smith, Heard Museum RIGHT: Carrie Bethel (Mono Lake Paiute), 1898-1974. Bowl basket, c. 1929. Split sedge root, dyed bracken fern root, split winter redbud shoots, willow shoots. 8 x 17.5 inches. Collection of Edward J. and Mini Nusrala. Photo: Craig Smith, Heard Museum


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view DAVID HOCKNEY’S YOSEMITE AND MASTERS OF CALIFORNIA BASKETRY

Opening Events Moondance Gala SAT. OCT. 26 | 6 P.M.

The Moondance Gala is a beautiful, starlit evening in October, dedicated to celebrating friends and supporters of the Heard. This year’s Moondance also celebrates our 90th Anniversary Season and the grand opening of David Hockney’s Yosemite and Masters of California Basketry.

Circles of Giving Opening Brunch OCT. 27 11 A.M. BRUNCH

Circles of Giving members and their guests are invited to a private brunch celebrating the opening of David Hockney’s Yosemite and Masters of California Basketry.

Exhibition Lecture DAVID HOCKNEY’S AMERICAN TRAVELS WITH RICHARD BENEFIELD

Kindly RSVP by calling 602.251.0262 or emailing circles@heard.org.

CHAIRS:

Mary Ellen & Robert H. McKee

Member Preview Day OCT. 27 | 11 A.M. TO 5 P.M.

HONOREES:

Doug Hyde (Nez Perce/ Assiniboine/Chippewa) Ellen & John Stiteler See pg. 44 or visit heard.org/moondance for more information.

All museum members will have exclusive access to David Hockney’s Yosemite and Masters of California Basketry before it opens to the public on Monday, Oct. 28. No RSVP necessary. Please check in at your new Membership Services desk in the Admissions Lobby.

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OCT. 27 | 1 P.M. STEELE AUDITORIUM

Join Richard Benefield, former executive director of The David Hockney Foundation, for an in-depth discussion about David Hockney’s Yosemite series in context with his other work completed while the artist was in North America. Free and open to the public. Photo courtesy of Richard Benefield


FIND THESE GREAT PRODUCTS AT BOOKS & MORE

Tote Bag Size: 16” x 17”

Carrie Bethel

VIEW

shop Qty: 100

Print: Full Color Dye Sub Per unit cost: $4.59 Retail: $14.00

TOTE BAG $14

Sublimated Double Sided Hea Meeting Tote (White Polyeste

Heard Museum David Hockney’s Yosemite and Masters of California Basketry OCTOBER 28, 2019 – APRIL 5, 2020

Carrie Bethel, Mono Lake Paiute, 1898-1974 Bowl basket, c. 1929. 8 x 17.5 inches. Split sedge root, dyed bracken fern root, split winter redbud shoots, willow shoots. Collection of Edward J. and Mimi Nusrala. Photo Credit: Craig Smith, Heard Museum

David Hockney

2011 David Hockney, Yosemite I, October 16th overall. of Dibond. Edition 1 of 12, 77 3/4 x 69 3/4" x 34 7/8" each), mounted on four sheets 7/8 (38 paper of sheets four on d printe iPad drawing dt Schmi d Richar : Credit © David Hockney, Photo Collection The David Hockney Foundation

Heard Museum David Hockney’s Yosemite and Masters of California Basketry OCTOBER 28, 2019 – APRIL 5, 2020 David Hockney, Yosemite II, October 16th 2011 iPad drawing printed on four sheets of paper (46 3/8 x 34 7/8” each), mounted on four sheets of Dibond. Edition 1 of 12; 92 3/4” x 69 3/4” overall. © David Hockney, Photo Credit: Richard Schmidt Collection The David Hockney Foundation

DAVID SOCK-KNEES | $12

CARRIE BETHEL OR DAVID HOCKNEY POSTER 18” x 24” | $40 each

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WOMAN. A SERIES

BY ERIN JOYCE FINE ARTS CURATOR

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THESE EXHIBITIONS WILL ILLUMINATE THE RICH BODIES OF WORK OF FIVE WOMEN ARTISTS AND THEIR CONTINUING IMPACT ON THE

This December, we are pleased to announce an annual series of monographic exhibitions for contemporary Indigenous women and women-identifying artists. These exhibitions will illuminate the rich bodies of work of five women artists and their continuing impact on the field of fine art. The first in this series, MARIA HUPFIELD: Nine Years Towards the Sun, is a solo exhibition by Canadian conceptual performance artist artist Maria Hupfield. This show will feature more than 40 works spanning several exhibition spaces including sculptural installation, video, documentation and site-specific performances. Hupfield, an Anishinaabe-kwe and member of the Wasauksing First Nation, is primarily known for her sculptural work, film installation and activation of objects through performative gestural movement. Hupfield engages time as medium spanning across gradations and moments. Her work unsettles stereotypical and harmful notions of Indigenous peoples

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FIELD OF FINE ART.

in Canada and the United States, and intervenes with new histories and meanings. Hupfield pays special attention to the meanings and stories of objects, thereby inviting an evolving interpretation not constrained by colonial oppression and commercialism. Habitually working in the medium of grey industrial felt, a tactile material that neuralizes her work. The works she produces fight against reductive readings of her work, the commodification of Nativeness, and fetishized exoticism and replaces it with a reclamation of agency in representation, accountability, storytelling, and solidarity building. By choosing the subtle softness of the felt material, Hupfield accentuates its meaning with moments of warning, a precursor to danger, trauma or OPPOSITE PAGE: Maria Hupfield (Anishinaabek), 4 Lines in 4 Directions, performed as part of the BRIC Biennial, Volume II in fall 2016. ABOVE LEFT: Maria Hupfield (Anishinaabek), Backward Double Spiral, Industrial felt, tin jingles, 2012. Image courtesy of the artist. ABOVE RIGHT: Maria Hupfield (Anishinaabek), Jingle Gloves, Silver lamĂŠ, tin jingles, velvet disc, 2014. Image courtesy of the artist.

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IT IS NOT JUST ABOUT SHOWING THEIR WORK TO MAKE UP FOR THE LACK OF SPACE GIVEN TO THEIR SEX, BUT BECAUSE THEIR WORK IS IMPORTANT AND ENGAGING WITH CRITICAL DIALOGUES—IT IS ABOUT DE-GHETTOIZING THEIR WORK AND THEIR BODIES.

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MARIA HUPFIELD: Nine Years Towards the Sun will investigate the impact and residual consequences from colonial occupation of Indigenous lands in the United States and Canada. Exhibition spaces will be reconfigured from a static gallery into a laboratory, a performance venue and an archive that prioritizes and makes space for mixed bodies. MARIA HUPFIELD: Nine Years Towards the Sun will function as a living archive activated through movement, sound, memory, documentation, and collaboration, all the while replenishing itself with content throughout its fivemonth run. This exhibition will not only engage with the continuum of Anishinaabe culture, but will also engage with the continuum of thematic elements from major art historical movements, most notably the practices of 1960s post-war artists like Robert Morris, Jimmie Durham, Joseph Beuys, and Richard Serra.

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violence. Hupfield will also instrumentalize colors like fluorescent neon yellow and orange and use materials like mylar survival blankets. These colors and supplies are often associated with emergency services and act as a stand against the violence threatening people of color and Indigenous cultures.

Museums need to acknowledge and remedy the lack of space given to women artists in the global art community, and furthermore the lack of space given to women of color within that framework. The women selected for Woman. A Series are incredible, dynamic artists, and should be celebrated. It is not just about showing their work to make up for the lack of space given to their sex, but because their work is important and engaging with critical dialogues—it is about de-ghettoizing their work and their bodies. MARIA HUPFIELD: NINE YEARS TOWARDS THE SUN On view Dec. 6 through May 3, 2020 MEMBERS’ ONLY RECEPTION AND PREVIEW Dec. 6 | 5 to 8 p.m. See pg. 31 for more details OPPOSITE PAGE: Maria Hupfield (Anishinaabek), Jimaan, Projected two channel video installation with industrial felt canoe, 2015. Image courtesy of the artist. LEFT: Maria Hupfield (Anishinaabek), Trophy, Gold lamé, tin jingles, 2014. Image courtesy of the artist. ABOVE: Maria Hupfield (Anishinaabek), Aazhooningwa’igan Bag, Industrial felt, 2013. Image courtesy of the artist.

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Through the Lens of Barry Goldwater BY MARIO NICK KLIMIADES | LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES DIRECTOR & BETTY MURPHY | LIBRARIAN

Visitors to the Heard Museum frequently inquire about the Barry M. Goldwater Kachina Doll Collection. The question “Where are the Goldwater katsinas?” inevitably arises, with brave volunteers at the Information Desk and well-trained members of Las Guias prepared to answer. Senator Barry M. Goldwater’s donation of 437 carvings to the Heard Museum in 1964 is, indeed, one of the foundation collections of the katsina carvings in the Heard Museum and a cornerstone of its art collection. What is not well known about this great Arizonian is Barry M. Goldwater’s spectacular color slide collection, which, on April 1, 1993, was generously donated by Barry M. Goldwater to the Heard Museum at a press conference in the Mrs. Helen C. Lincoln Auditorium. His son Michael Goldwater was primary in coordinating this historic donation, which, along with the exhibition, received record-breaking media coverage. This extraordinary and rare collection comprises nearly 1,000 color slides and contains some of the earliest color landscape photographs of Navajo and Hopi tribal lands, the state of Arizona, and geographical areas that have long disappeared since the creation of Lake Powell. The slide collection is simply titled “Barry

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M. Goldwater Slide Collection” and is numbered RC20. It is not customary to label an archival collection with superlatives, but if given the chance, “spectacular” would be the appropriate adjective. The collection highlights both places and people in the American Southwest. Samples of its contents are expressed by the labels on the original carousel slide tray containers, such as “Navajo Nation, Hopi, Rainbow Bridge, Green River and Cataract Canyon Rainbow Bridge,” “Colorado River, Glen Canyon and Grand Canyon,” and “Sand Paintings, Navajo Nation, Canyon de Chelly, Trading Posts,” among many other categories. Using primarily Kodachrome film introduced by Eastman Kodak in 1935, Goldwater adopted this new technology and photographed and developed color slides for his personal pleasure as well as for lectures and publications.


VIEW In preparation for the 2019 Heard Museum exhibition Through the Lens of Barry M. Goldwater: Prints from the Goldwater Slide Collection, the Library and Archives staff, with the assistance of Craig Smith, selected several original Kodachrome and Ektachrome color slides to make new prints. These sparkling, new prints will be on display in the Howard and Joy Berlin Mezzanine Gallery beginning September 20, 2019. Visitors will travel with a young Barry M. Goldwater and share in his wonder at the Grand Canyon during a sunlit snowfall and the power of a rainstorm over Monument Valley.

the Billie Jane Baguley Library and Archives in order to create this nearly life-sized image. These photographic memories underlie the rich life of Barry M. Goldwater as observer and adventurer and come together to let us marvel in the magic of this 21st century art form. The photomosaic was the result of a museum collaboration in 2000 with the Arizona State University Information Technology and Runaway Technology, Inc.

Wait, there’s more! In addition, there will be a rare showing in the Billie Jane Baguley Library and Archives of computer artist Robert Silvers’ photomosaic portrait of Barry M. Goldwater. The portrait measures 72 inches high by 48 inches wide and utilized nearly a thousand images from several Goldwater archival collections in OPPOSITE PAGE: Barry M. Goldwater, Rain Storm over Monument Valley, ca. 1968. From an Ektachrome slide. Barry M. Goldwater Slide Collection, Billie Jane Baguley Library and Archives [RC20(25):15] TOP: Barry M. Goldwater, Looking east toward Yaki Point, Grand Canyon. From a Kodachrome slide. Barry M. Goldwater Slide Collection, Billie Jane Baguley Library and Archives [RC20(8):50] RIGHT: Barry M. Goldwater, Saguaro Blossoms. From a Kodachrome slide. Barry M. Goldwater Slide Collection, Billie Jane Baguley Library and Archives [RC20(25):30].

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This calendar is accurate as of August 28, but we are always planning more events. Check heard.org or our Facebook page for the most up-to-date information.

SEPTEMBER 14 | SATURDAY

18 | WEDNESDAY

28 | SATURDAY

11:30 A.M.

9:30 TO 11:30 A.M.

9:30 A.M. TO 12:30 P.M.

SCENE & HEARD FILM SERIES: NAVAJO MATH CIRCLES

GUILD MEETING

NATIVE PEOPLES IN THE SOUTHWEST SHORT COURSE

Steele Auditorium see p.27

11 a.m. Guest Speaker: Marcus Monenerkit, Heard Museum Director of Community Engagement, speaking on the Master Artist Workshop Series.

see p.39

see p.38

OCTOBER 4 | FRIDAY 5 TO 8 P.M. MEMBERS ANNUAL MEETING

see p.25

12 | SATURDAY EDUCATOR OPEN HOUSE

see p.37 10 A.M. TO 4 P.M. INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ DAY

6 TO 10 P.M.

Heard Museum Campus

FIRST FRIDAY: CANYON RECORDS NIGHT

10:30 A.M.

Listen to R.Carlos Nakai, Will Clipman, and Johnny Walker fill the museum with music. Artist Demonstrations will also be taking place until 9 p.m.

Steele Auditorium

Heard Museum Campus see p.26

5 | SATURDAY 9:30 A.M. TO 12:30 P.M.

FILM SCREENING: WHAT WAS OURS

11 A.M. FOOD DEMO & TASTING

Outdoor Parched Corn with Elroy Natachu (Zuni) and Kandis Guam (Zuni/Diné) 11:30 A.M. FOOD DEMO & TASTING

NATIVE PEOPLES IN THE SOUTHWEST SHORT COURSE

Navajo Beverage with “The Fancy Navajo” Alana Yazzie (Diné)

see p.39

FILM SCREENING: WHAT WAS OURS

SCENE & HEARD FILM SERIES: WARRIOR WOMEN

Steele Auditorium

Steele Auditorium

12 P.M.

see p.27

FILM SCREENING: I DREAM IN ANOTHER LANGUAGE

Steele Auditorium 12:30 P.M. FOOD DEMO & TASTING

Green Chili Stew with Norma Naranjo (Ohkay Owingeh) 1:30 P.M. LECTURE & DISCUSSION: ELIAS CASTILLO

Encanto Room see p.28

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14 | MONDAY

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11:30 A.M.

16 | WEDNESDAY 9:30 TO 11:30 A.M. GUILD MEETING

11 a.m. Guest Speaker: David M. Roche, Dickey Family Director and CEO of the Heard Museum, will present his annual remarks on the “State of the Heard,” including information about upcoming exhibititions and events. see p.38


27 | SUNDAY

6 TO 10 P.M.

11 A.M.

MOONDANCE GALA

CIRCLES OF GIVING BRUNCH

see p.44

GO + DO

26 | SATURDAY

RSVP Required. see p.14 11 A.M. TO 5 P.M. MEMBER PREVIEW DAY: DAVID HOCKNEY’S YOSEMITE AND MASTERS OF CALIFORNIA BASKETRY

1 P.M. EXHIBITION LECTURE: DAVID HOCKNEY’S AMERICAN TRAVELS WITH RICHARD BENEFIELD

Free and open to the public.

Steele Auditorium see p.14

ABOVE: David Hockney, “Yosemite III, October 5th 2011” iPad drawing printed on four sheets of paper (46 3/8 x 34 7/8” each), mounted on four sheets of Dibond, Edition 1 of 12. 92 3/4 x 69 3/4” overall © David Hockney Photo Credit: Richard Schmidt Collection The David Hockney Foundation

NOVEMBER 1 | FRIDAY

9 | SATURDAY

11 | MONDAY

6 TO 10 P.M.

10 A.M. TO 3 P.M.

5 P.M.

FIRST FRIDAY: CELEBRATION OF CALIFORNIA INDIGENEITY

SECOND SATURDAY: VETERANS & WEAVERS MARKETPLACE

7TH ANNUAL VETERANS SUNSET TRIBUTE

Come see David Hockney’s Yosemite and Masters of California Basketry on its first First Friday. We will have basket demonstrators in Crossroads Gallery, as well performances from the Bishop Paiute War Dance Group.

Central Courtyard see p.27

American Indian Veterans National Memorial see p.30

11:30 A.M.

20 | WEDNESDAY

Heard Museum Campus

SCENE & HEARD FILM SERIES: ISHI, THE LAST YAHI

9:30 TO 11:30 A.M.

see p.26

Steele Auditorium

GUILD MEETING

see p.27

11 a.m. Guest Speaker: Kelly Washington, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community see p.38

21 | THURSDAY 5 TO 8 P.M. MEMBERS EXTENDED HOURS

see p.25

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go + do DECEMBER 14 | SATURDAY 9 TO 10 A.M. CURATOR-LED TOUR OF DAVID HOCKNEY’S YOSEMITE AND MASTERS OF CALIFORNIA BASKETRY

Open to Members at the Experience level & above. RSVP required. see p.25 10 A.M. TO 4 P.M.

5 | THURSDAY

6 | FRIDAY

6 TO 8 P.M.

5 TO 6 P.M.

CIRCLES OF GIVING OPENING RECEPTION AND PREVIEW

MEMBERS-ONLY EXHIBITION PREVIEW

Circles of Giving Members and their guests are invited to a private reception and preview for MARIA HUPFIELD: Nine Years Towards the Sun. RSVP required.

Heard Museum Campus see p.31 ABOVE: Maria Hupfield (Anishinaabek), Jason Lujan (Chiricahua Apache/Indigenous Mexican), Drink Bar for Two, five sake bottles, pink light, shelf, 2016. Image courtesy of the artist.

RIGHT: In 1907, Maie, Dwight and their eight-year-old son Bartlett traveled to Yosemite. The trip was recorded in a family photo album with brief notes mentioning a mule train trip that encountered a rattlesnake and a stay at “the first hotel in Yosemite on the rim.” This photo shows Maie (second from left) and Bartlett mounted on mules.

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SECOND SATURDAY: BASKETS & INDIGENOUS FOODS MARKETPLACE

Central Courtyard see p.27 11:30 A.M.

6 TO 10 P.M.

SCENE & HEARD FILM SERIES: FRACTURED LAND

FIRST FRIDAY: INTERPRETING ART

Steele Auditorium

Celebrating the opening of the MARIA HUPFIELD: Nine Years Towards the Sun. Hupfield will be performing in the gallery at 7 p.m., DJ Miss Ginger will be mixing beats all evening.

see p.27

Heard Museum Campus

5 TO 8 P.M.

see p.26

MEMBERS EXTENDED HOURS

19 | THURSDAY

see p.25


GO + DO

MEMBER EXCLUSIVE EVENTS Annual Meeting OCT. 4 | 5 TO 8 P.M. All Members are invited to the Members Annual Meeting, where you’ll hear about the Heard Museum’s exciting 90th Anniversary Season! Following the meeting, Members are encouraged to stay for a special Members’ Lounge featuring fall menu samples from our Courtyard Café. Kindly RSVP to 602.251.0209 x6403 or email members@heard.org.

Extended Hours NOV. 21 | DEC. 19 | JAN. 16 | FEB. 20 MARCH 19 | APRIL 16 We’re staying open late until 8 p.m. exclusively for Members on the third Thursday of the month beginning this November through April. Let us know you are coming by emailing members@heard.org and present your Membership card at the Membership Services Desk when you arrive.

Members’ Lounge NOV. 9 | DEC 14 |JAN 11 10 A.M. TO 3 P.M. Members will continue to enjoy complimentary refreshments during our Second Saturday and Holidays at the Heard events in our Members’ Lounge located in the Pritzlaff Courtyard*. Look for the icon for corresponding dates. *location subject to change depending on the weather

EXPERIENCE AND CIRCLES OF GIVING MEMBER CURATOR-LED TOUR OF DAVID HOCKNEY’S YOSEMITE AND MASTERS OF CALIFORNIA BASKETRY DEC. 14 | 9 TO 10 A.M. All Members at the Experience level ($250 Supporter) and above are invited for a special, curator-led tour of David Hockney’s Yosemite and Masters of California Basketry before the museum is open to the public. Complimentary coffee and refreshments will be available immediately after the tour in the Members’ Lounge. Kindly RSVP by calling 602.251.0262 or emailing circles@heard.org. ABOVE: David Hockney, “Yosemite I, October 5th 2011” iPad drawing printed on four sheets of paper (46 3/8 x 34 7/8” each), mounted on four sheets of Dibond, Edition 1 of 12; 92 3/4 x 69 3/4” overall © David Hockney Photo Credit: Richard Schmidt Collection The David Hockney Foundation

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go + do First Fridays On the first Friday of the month from 6 to 10 p.m., the Heard will bring music, demonstrations,activities, food and drink to the museum. Free and open to the public.

OCTOBER 4

NIGHT

This is the first of three First Fridays collaborations with Canyon Records, one of the oldest independent record labels in the music industry as well as one of the oldest cultural institutions in the state of Arizona. Listen to R.Carlos Nakai, Will Clipman, and Johnny Walker fill the museum with music. Artist demonstrations will also be taking place until 9 p.m.

DECEMBER 6

INTERPRETING ART For this First Friday, we are celebrating the opening of the exhibition MARIA HUPFIELD: Nine Years Towards the Sun. Hupfield will be performing in the gallery at 7 p.m., and DJ Miss Ginger (Ginger Dunnill) will be mixing beats all evening. Come experience this fun evening at the Heard! ABOVE: Maria Hupfield (Anishinaabek), Memory Bones, Silver lamé, felt, 2016. Image courtesy of the artist.

JANUARY 3 NOVEMBER 1

CELEBRATION OF CALIFORNIA INDIGENEITY Come see David Hockney’s Yosemite and Masters of California Basketry on its first First Friday. We will have basket-making demonstrators in Crossroads Gallery, as well performances from the Bishop Paiute War Dance Group.

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STARTING THE NEW YEAR OFF RIGHT @ THE HEARD Welcome 2020 at the Heard's First Friday of the New Year. Come listen to Randy Kemp fill the museum galleries with music, and so much more. We hope to see you here!

FIRST FRIDAYS AND THE SCENE AND HEARD FILM SERIES ARE GENEROUSLY FUNDED BY:


SEPT. 14 | 11:30 A.M.

GO + DO

Scene and Heard Film Series NOV. 9 | 11:30 A.M.

Navajo Math Circles

Ishi, the Last Yahi

Join us after the film for a discussion with ASU faculty lecturer Michael Little Crow (Turtle Mountain AnishinaabeCree) on the connection between mathematical and cultural concepts of weaving.

Join us following the film for a discussion with Dr. Mona Scott (DinĂŠ), a professor at Mesa Community College, on the relevance of the film to the continued treatment by modern societies towards Indigenous peoples.

OCT. 14 | 11:30 A.M. Indigenous Peoples’ Day Special Showing of Warrior Women Warrior Women is the story of mothers and daughters fighting for Indigenous rights in the American Indian Movement of the 1970s. The film not only unveils a female perspective of history, but also examines the impact political struggles have on the children who bear witness.

DEC. 14 | 11:30 A.M. Fractured Land Film followed by discussion from Environmental Activist, and Dr. Manny Pino. Professor of Sociology and Director of American Indian Studies, Scottsdale Community College.

JAN. 11 | 1:30 P.M. Ohiyesa: The Soul of an Indian Following the film, Dr. David Martinez will discuss Charles Eastman (Ohiyesa). Dr. Martinez is the author of Dakota Philosopher: Charles Eastman and American Indian Thought.

Second Saturdays Join us for our second year of Second Saturdays. We will be hosting a marketplace on the Second Saturday in the months of November, December and January. Museum Members and attendees have the opportunity to meet and purchase art from Indigenous artists in an intimate setting in our central courtyard. We'll have live performances and artist demonstrations throughout the day. Best of all, Second Saturdays are free and open to the public.

VETERANS AND WEAVERS MARKETPLACE Nov. 9 | 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

BASKETS AND INDIGENOUS FOODS MARKETPLACE Dec. 14 | 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

JEWELERS MARKETPLACE Jan. 11 | 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. SPONSORED BY:

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go + do

Indigenous Peoples’ Day Celebration SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12

We invite you to join us in commemorating Indigenous Peoples’ Day weekend on October 12 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The day's events will include artists demonstrations, activities, food, film screenings and an author discussion. Browse tables with various types of Native food and talk with Indigenous farmers, food producers and chefs. Create a specialty print with an amazing artist. Come support Indigenous artists and see cooking demonstrations throughout the day.

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As we celebrate the third year of recognizing Indigenous Peoples’ Day in the City of Phoenix, we are honored to bring you a day of programming that will provide voices and perspectives dedicated to the preservation of Indigenous food sovereignty, cultural arts as well as communities across the Americas. All special events throughout the weekend are FREE and open to the public. Please join us from 10 a.m. - 3 p.m.


Join Indigenous artists throughout the museum grounds, including Ernesto Yerena Montejano of Hecho con Ganas, who will demonstrate live printmaking activities. Ernesto Yerena Montejano is fueled by his cross-national upbringing, and his art practice reflects his observations of the views and interactions between the Mexican communities living on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border. Although he identifies as Chicano, he also strongly identifies as Native/Indigenous to this continent, which is often seen in his work. His work depicts his frustrations with the oppression in his community as well as solidarity with the community in the defense of dignity and rights.

LECTURE AND DISCUSSION Elias Castillo, author of a Cross of Thorns, 1:30 p.m. | Encanto Room A Cross of Thorns describes the Mission Period when California’s coastal Indians paid a high price for their interaction with the church. St. Junipero Serra, who arrived in 1769, created a harsh and unforgiving regimen that would ultimately claim the lives of 62,000 California Coastal Indians, and devastate their civilization, including the total extinction of a number of small tribes. PRESENTING SPONSOR

ADDITIONAL SUPPORT BY

SCENE AND HEARD FILM SCREENINGS GO + DO

Event Highlights

What Was Ours | 10:30 a.m. | Steele Auditorium I Dream in Another Language | 12 p.m. Please also consider joining us on October 14 at 11:30 a.m. for a Scene and Heard film screening of Warrior Women. See page 25 for details.

FOOD DEMONSTRATIONS & TASTINGS

11 a.m. | Outdoor Parched Corn Demo & Tasting with Elroy Natachu (Zuni) and Kandis Guam (Zuni/Diné) 11:30 a.m. | Navajo Beverage Demo & Tasting with “The Fancy Navajo” Alana Yazzie (Diné) 12:30 p.m. | Green Chili Stew Demo & Tasting with Norma Naranjo (Ohkay Owingeh)

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go + do

Honoring American Indian Veterans Join us in November at the American Indian Veteran National Memorial, as the museum honors American Indian Veterans and all Veterans. The museum will get things started with free admission for active-duty military and Veterans plus one guest on Saturday, Nov. 9. Come to the museum between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. and celebrate Veterans’ service by donating to Packages From Home and learning how to give back and support Veterans through other service agencies. For an inspiring visit, meet with Veteran artists and the many Navajo weavers who will be joining us for the third annual Veterans and Weavers Marketplace. Then, on Nov. 11, the Heard will continue the important public acknowledgment of American Indian Veterans, and all Veterans, with the Seventh Annual Sunset Tribute. For the past 150 years or so, American Indian people have felt compelled to join the United

30

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States Armed Forces. Many early enlistees came from the fledgling boarding school system, despite the paradox of fighting for a country that considered them outside the mainstream. The museum invites the public to attend the event and use the opportunity to delve deeper into understanding of the American Indian Warrior experience. The evening will be a moving occasion beginning at 5 p.m. as we pay tribute to the service of our activeduty military personnel with gratitude, music, distinguished keynote address, and traditional dance. The Sunset Tribute will be followed by a dinner at 6 p.m. honoring Veterans. The dinner is free, but RSVP is required. VETERANS AND WEAVERS MARKETPLACE Saturday, Nov. 9 | 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. SEVENTH ANNUAL SUNSET TRIBUTE Monday, Nov. 11 | 5 p.m.


GO + DO

Opening Events for

MARIA HUPFIELD:

Nine Years Towards the Sun CIRCLES OF GIVING OPENING RECEPTION AND PREVIEW

MEMBERS OPENING RECEPTION AND PREVIEW

DEC. 5 | 6 TO 8 P.M.

DEC. 6

6:45 P.M. | Remarks

Circles of Giving Members and their guests are invited to a private reception and preview for MARIA HUPFIELD: Nine Years Towards the Sun. See pg. 16 for more information about this exhibition. Kindly RSVP to 602.251.0262 or email circles@heard.org.

5 TO 6 P.M. | Members-only Exhibition Preview 5:45 P.M. | Remarks 6 TO 8 P.M. | Preview 7 P.M. | Performance by Maria Hupfield

All Members are invited to a members-only exhibition preview and reception for MARIA HUPFIELD: Nine Years Towards the Sun. See pg. 16 for more information about this exhibition. Kindly RSVP to 602.251.0209 x6404 or email members@heard.org.

ABOVE: Maria Hupfield, image courtesy of Dylabn McLaughlin

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shop

GOTTA HAVE IT!

Holiday Shopping Guide FREQUENTLY STOCKED ITEMS/POPULAR PURCHASES: Because of the handmade nature of these items, there will be color and style variation.

STACKABLE CUFF BRACELETS WITH MULTI-STONES by Shawn Bluejacket (Shawnee) $295 each Shawn Bluejacket is best known for her unique and whimsical jewelry utilizing precious gemstones, various types of tourmaline and silver.

MULTI-STONE EARRINGS by Mary Tafoya (Santo Domingo) $55

TURQUOISE SLAB EARRINGS by Lester Abeyta (Santo Domingo) $28-$55 Deep blue, seafoam green, large and small, these slab earrings are truly one-of-a-kind!

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SHOP + DINE

APACHE BURDEN BASKETS by Mathias Miller $30

MONEY CLIP & KEY CHAIN by Peter Nelson (Navajo) $110-$145

by John Whiterock (Navajo) $50

m

by Leroy Pooley (Hopi) $20-$27

en

arketplac M t e

Orna

KATSINA DOLLS

ANASAZI WOMEN POTTERY FIGURES

2019 SIGNATURE ORNAMENT By Sampson Gray (Navajo) 1.75” diameter $175

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shop ONE-OF-A-KIND PIECES: 4-STRAND 14K GOLD/MULTISTONE NECKLACE by Boyd Tsosie (Navajo) $16,000 Turquoise (Candelaria, Sleeping Beauty, Red Mountain, Indian Mountain, and Fox), fossilized ivory, coral, lapis, sugilite, buffalo horn and opal.

TURKEY KACHINA DOLL by Arthur Holmes Jr. $3800

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SHOP

EYE DAZZLER RUG by Grace Yazzie (Navajo) 38” x 57” $3600

“CEREMONY CALENDAR” CARVED POT by Marty & Elvira Naha (Hopi) $3000

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dine

COFFEE CANTINA

Just a little over 10 years ago, in May 2009, the Courtyard Café opened its doors as the Heard Museum’s very own lunch destination. Its popularity grew so fast, that for the first time, guests experienced wait times for a Café table and a line formed for those wanting to get lunch to go. It was apparent that a new food-service opportunity for the museum would need to be created. In February 2011, the Coffee Cantina, along with Books & More, opened in the former preparatory and Artist Studio space to create a new quick-service retail grabn-go food and beverage operation. From day one, the Coffee Cantina was a great success. With the addition of specialty equipment, such as a whole-bean espresso machine and a hot panini press, the menu has continued to expand. The Cantina food has always been prepared fresh daily by our talented Café chefs. To support our community, most of our sweet treats come from local businesses like Paletas Betty and Barb’s Bakery. Espressions Coffee Roastery has created a specially selected “Heard Blend” coffee and espresso grind just for us! The “Latte of the

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Day” allows our baristas the chance to be creative and offer delicious flavor combinations. Today, the Coffee Cantina has become a refined quickservice retail operation for all of our visitors, staff and volunteers. Jackie Cruz has been the Cantina Supervisor since opening day, and all our Cantina staff is dedicated to serving and chatting with the friendly faces that come in for a treat. Whether you are just looking for a cold beverage or a hot cup of our famous posole, be sure to stop in to the Coffee Cantina on your next visit to the Heard, even if it’s just to say hi! SPECIAL EVENT: CAMPFIRE NIGHT Join us for an evening of outdoor grilling, storytelling, sing a-longs, s’mores and more! First Friday in November, 6 to 8 p.m. Call the Café at 602.251.0204 for your reservation.


learn LEARN

TEACHER INSTITUTE

I CAN ’T CHANGE THEIR HISTORY, BUT I WANT TO CHANGE THEIR PERSPECTIVE ON WHAT SCHOOLS CAN BE AND WHAT OUR SCHOOL CAN BE SO THAT WE CAN BETTER SERVE THEM .

- H O LB ROO K TE AC H ER Z AK ADAM S

This summer, the Heard Museum hosted its second Teacher Institute for thirty K-12 educators. This three-day course offered educators an opportunity to learn about American Indian boarding schools, Native peoples of the Southwest and contemporary American Indian art through lectures, presentations, demonstrations, tours and discussions with Native artists and scholars. This upcoming school year we will continue to host events like this for educators. In addition to professional development, the Heard offers a multitude of resources for educators, including free curricula and fun school tours. For more information on our programs and resources for educators, visit https://heard.org/education/.

2019-2020 EDUCATOR EVENTS: Educator Open House • Sat., Oct. 12, 2019 Boarding Schools Teach-In • Sat., Jan. 4, 2020 Teacher Appreciation Day • Sat., May 9, 2020 Teacher Appreciation Month • June 2020 Teacher Institute • June 22 to 24, 2020

GENEROUSLY SUPPORTED BY:

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learn

JOIN THE GUILD The Heard Museum Guild volunteers actively engage in all aspects of museum life. This dynamic and talented group leads gallery tours, promotes sales in our gift shop and bookstore, greets and assists museum visitors, conducts research in the library, designs educational programs, and plans and implements special events and projects such as the annual Indian Fair & Market and Student Art Show & Sale. Volunteer roles and schedules are flexible to meet the demands of everyone’s busy lives. Celebrated Guild volunteer Rusty Hale and artist Teri Greeves at the 61st Annual Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market. Photo: Haute Photography

Learn more about the Guild at one of the upcoming Guild General Meetings, free and open to the public!

38

SEPT. 18 | 9:30 A.M. GENERAL MEETING

OCT. 16 | 9:30 A.M. GENERAL MEETING

NOV. 20 | 9:30 A.M. GENERAL MEETING

11 a.m. Guest Speaker: Marcus Monenerkit, Heard Museum Director of Community Engagement, speaking on the Master Artist Workshop Series.

11 a.m. Guest Speaker: David M. Roche, Dickey Family Director and CEO of the Heard Museum, will present his annual remarks on the "State of the Heard," including information about upcoming exhibitions and events.

11 a.m. Guest Speaker: Cultural Resources Department Director Kelly Kelly Washington Washington, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community.

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LEARN

SHORT COURSE

Home: Native Peoples in the Southwest Saturdays, Sept. 28 & Oct. 5 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Note: This is a two-session course.

Come meet the peoples who have lived and thrived in the Southwest from prehistoric times to present day. The two-part course will include an exciting overview of the land, culture and history of both the ancient peoples of the Southwest and the federally recognized tribes and pueblos who call Arizona and New Mexico home today. Session Two on Oct. 5 will include an introduction to the Native American Fine Art Movement and a bonus Highlights Tour of the Heard Museum. Whether you have lived in the desert for years or are new to the Southwest, don’t miss this opportunity to deepen your understanding and appreciation of this special place we all call Home. Instructor: Linda Hefter (hefteraz@cox.net) Facilitator: Pat Briggs (pbriggs09@outlook.com) Information: shortcourse@heardguild.org Fee: $45 Pay online with a credit card at heardguild.org/learn-with-us.

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experience

Exhibition co-curator Ann Marshall, Director of Research, and Gail Getzwiller in the exhibition.

Mellon Fellows Natalia Miles and Ninabah Winton in front of a transitional blanket from 1890 - 1910.

Carol Ann Mackey, life trustee, noted textile collector and exhibition co-curator, shares one of her favorite pieces in the exhibition, a transitional blanket from 1890-1910.

Life Trustees John Stiteler and Mary Ellen McKee enjoying dinner provided by Fabulous Foods Catering.

Jill Pilcher and Lee and Kris Peterson in front of the entrance to Color Riot!

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Nancy Ganglehoff and Bunny Kuller in front of two Germantown Eyedazzler textiles, c. 1880 (right) and c. 1885 (left).


EXPERIENCE

MEMBERS’ OPENING RECEPTION FOR COLOR RIOT! Patrons of the Grand Gallery Exhibition Fund were invited to a special preview and dinner on April 4 to celebrate their support for the special fund and the opening of Color Riot! How Color Changed Navajo Textiles. Co-curators Ann Marshall, Director of Research; Carol Ann Mackay, life trustee and noted textile collector; and Mellon Fellows Velma Kee Craig, Natalia Miles and Ninabah Winton shared their insight how they prepared for this exhibition as well as their favorite pieces selected. Artist Raven Chacon (DinÊ) with Gil Waldman and museum trustee Christy Vezolles.

STILL LIFE NO. 3: RAVEN CHACON + FIRST FRIDAY On July 5, Museum Members attended an exhibition preview and opening reception for Still Life No. 3: Raven Chacon. Members were able to hear from exhibition artist Raven Chacon and were the first to experience the immersive sound and timed light installation.

STUDENT ART (NEXT PAGE) Student artists participating in the 2019 Heard Museum Guild American Indian Student Art Show & Sale submitted over 350 pieces of artwork and received $7,400 in award money and $15,500 in art sales. From Arapaho to Zuni, these students represented 33 tribal communities from across the country. Through the sale of Heard Museum Guild Student Notecards, the Student Art program granted $8,000 for supplies to art teachers with students in the show.

Bob Gilboy, Gretchen Bataille and life trustee Fred and Ann Lynn.

Photos: Haute Photography and Videography.

Museum Members viewing Still Life No. 3: Raven Chacon.

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experience STUDENT ART SHOW & SALE

42

Student artist Embree Chattin (Zuni) in front of her piece, Ma-wi, 2019.

Student artist Jaren Cachini (Zuni) behind his with his award-winning ceramic, U’deyanine Kwayi.

Student artist Loren Quam (Zuni) showing a museum member his awardwinning mixed media piece Ancient Mountain.

Student Art Chair Jane Przeslica and Guild Members and Student Art volunteers Pam Roland and Lori Surace.

A museum member asking a student artist about her submission.

A museum member looks in a case filled with small objects and jewelry.

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EXPERIENCE

Celebrate your special occasions at the Heard Museum Our members love spending time in the beautiful surroundings of the Heard, which makes it the perfect place to celebrate your special occasions. Whether it’s a get-together for friends and family or an event for your business, our staff can help you create an experience to remember. With a variety of indoor and outdoor spaces, groups and gatherings of all types and sizes, from small and intimate to grand and elaborate, are welcome. When the museum opened 90 years ago, the South Courtyard provided a lovely setting for receptions, concerts and community events. Today, the well-preserved charm of the space makes it a favorite spot for cocktails, dinners and wedding ceremonies.

have been updated. Upgraded seating and staging have been added, and we are eager to share all these improvements with you.

Among the many changes and expansions over the years, our largest venue, Steele Auditorium, was built in 1999. Thanks to recent grants from Flinn Foundation and Steele Foundation, exciting improvements to the space are underway. Our audiovisual equipment now boasts state-of-the-art projection and sound. Virtually all surfaces, from doors and floors to windows and walls,

• Circles of Giving members receive special discounts and rental fee waivers at the Silver and Gold levels.

• Day and evening rentals are available. • Events include museum access.

To schedule a site visit, contact: Email: privateevents@heard.org Phone: 602.251.0230 Web: heard.org/private-events/

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MOONDANCE AT THE HEARD THIS YEAR WE ARE CELEBRATING THE HEARD MUSEUM’S 90TH ANNIVERSARY, THE INDUCTION OF THE VIRGINIA G. PIPER CHARITABLE TRUST CENTRAL COURTYARD AND THE OPENING OF

DAV I D H O C K N E Y’S YOS E M I T E A N D M A S T E R S O F C A LI F O R N IA BA S K E T RY SATU RDAY, OC TOBE R 26, 2 019 • 6 P. M. GALA HONOREES

GALA CHAIRS

DOUG HY D E (N E Z PE RC E/ ASS I N I BO I N E/C H I PPE WA)

M ARY ELLEN & ROBERT H. McKEE

EL LEN & JOHN STITE LE R

COMMITTEE

EVENING EVENTS

E X H IBITIO N PRE V IE W CO C K TAILS & SILE NT AUC TION DINNER & DA N CIN G

MILENA & TONY ASTORGA ARLENE BEN-HORIN H OWA R D R . & J OY M . B E R L I N ALICE J. DICKEY NANCY HANLEY

I N F O R M AT I O N

MARY HUDAK

ARIZO N A COC K TAIL AT TIRE | VALE T PROV ID ED

CARRIE HULBURD

HE ARD.O RG /MOONDAN CE

TAY LO R L A R S O N & Z AC H R AW L I N G

DH AGERT Y@HE A RD.ORG OR 602.251.0218

SHARRON LEWIS

SILENT AUCTION

The Moondance Silent Auction will go live online at heard.org/ moondance by October 18 and culminate on October 26. We encourage you to check early and often to bid on one-of-a-kind artwork, jewelry, and more.

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CELEBRATING 9O YEARS | 1929-2O19

J A N I S LYO N C A R O L A N N M AC K AY JE AN & JAMES J MEENAGHAN JANET & JOHN MELAMED J I L L PI LC H E R J E A N S PA N G L E R AMY THURSTON


MOONDANCE PRESENTING SPONSORS Jacquie & Bennett Dorrance

Sharron & Del Lewis

Mary Ellen & Robert H. McKee

GIVE

S I G N AT U R E S P O N S O R S Ellen & John Stiteler

SUPPORTING SPONSORS Alice J. Dickey Sam & Betty Kitchell Family Janis & Dennis H. Lyon Carol Ann & Harvey Mackay Janet & John Melamed PREMIER SPONSORS Anonymous Arlene & Giora Ben-Horin Howard R. & Joy M. Berlin Jan Cacheris & Marilyn Harris Hana & Donald Callaghan

Pam Grant & Dan Cracchiolo Nancy Hanley Taylor Larson & Zach Rawling Susan & Bill Levine Jean & James J. Meenaghan

Rose & Harry Papp Merle & Steve Rosskam David Wilshin

Freeport-McMoRan Inc. Carrie & Jon Hulburd Perkins Coie LLP Kristine & Leland W. Peterson

Jill & Wick Pilcher/USI PARK Senior Villas Snell & Wilmer LLP Jean Spangler

C AT E R E D D I N N E R

HONOREE VIDEO

C U LT U R A L

Torrey Pines Club Corporation

Trudy & Steve Wiesenberger

PERFORMANCES

DÉCOR

HORS D’OEUVRES

Taylor Larson & Zach Rawling

Cindy & Joel P. Hoxie

DINNER WINE

BEER + SPIRITS

Francis & Dionne Najafi/Pivotal Foundation Ellen & John Stiteler

Hensley Beverage Company Jill & Wick Pilcher

E N T E R TA I N M E N T

Arlene & Giora Ben-Horin CopperPoint Insurance Companies Amy & Ray Thurston

SPONSORS Karen & Don Abraham/Sue & Jim Navran Lisa & Greg Boyce DLR Group/Okland Construction

GALA UNDERWRITING

Elaine & Scott Montgomery

F AV O R S

Kristine & Leland W. Peterson

VA L E T P A R K I N G Patience & Jim Huntwork

VOLUNTEER DINNERS Jennifer E. & Charles F. Sands

CENTERPIECES

Elaine & Scott Montgomery G A L A P AT R O N S Milena & Tony Astorga Anna Mary Glaab Betsy & Frank H. Goodyear Kathleen & John Graham Great Clips, Inc.

Mary & Dr. Tom Hudak Gerald Kaminsky Corine Longanbach Carole & Arte Moreno Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Traci Lee Poulsen Carol & Randy Schilling Margo & John Simons Christy Vezolles & Gilbert Waldman

FALL 2019

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give

Welcome New Trustees This Fall, we are pleased to announce the addition of four new members to our Board of Trustees. Since 1929, our board has provided invaluable leadership and support, and are an important link between the Heard and our greater community.

Adrian Cohen

John Furth

Adrian Cohen received a bachelor’s degree in journalism and a law degree, cum laude, from the University of Wisconsin. After graduating, he clerked on the U.S. Court of Appeals in Chicago. He then joined the Milwaukee law firm of Charne, Clancy & Taitelman as an associate and later as partner, practicing commercial litigation. He was president of the Milwaukee Young Lawyers Association. Mr. Cohen left the law firm to establish a video distribution business based in Prague, which became the exclusive film distributor for major studios such as Paramount Pictures and Universal Studios, and also distributed for Hanna-Barbera, Turner Pictures, and others. The company was acquired in 1995 by one of the largest American independent video distribution companies. Currently, he manages business investments, including a manufactured home community in the Milwaukee suburb of Cudahy.

John Furth has served as Vice Chairman of Peter B. Cannell & Co., Inc. since January 2014. Mr. Furth began his career at Burnham and Co., where he became a partner in 1962. He joined E.M. Warburg Pincus & Co. in 1970, where he was Vice Chairman and a Director until 1999. He also served as Chairman of affiliated companies, including Warburg Pincus Counsellors and Warburg Pincus Asset Management, of which he was a founder. From 1999 until 2013, he was Vice Chairman of Klingenstein, Fields & Co., LLC. He is a member of the New York Society of Security Analysts and the Institute of Chartered Investment Counselors (CIC), and holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation.

Since 1984, Mr. Cohen has taught Secured Transactions at the UW Law School, and was named 2018 Adjunct Teacher of the Year. During the Spring 2019 semester, he taught Secured Transactions at Arizona State University’s Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law. Mr. Cohen chaired the boards of the Center for Public Representation, the Milwaukee Center for Independence, and St. Luke’s South Shore Hospital. He also served as a trustee of the Ronald McDonald House of Southeast Wisconsin. He and his wife, Carla, divide their time between Whitefish Bay, Wisconsin and Scottsdale, Arizona.

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EARTHSONG

Mr. Furth is Trustee Emeritus of Barnard College. He has served as Trustee and Assistant Treasurer of the Foundation for Child Development, Trustee and former Chairman of Blythedale Children’s Hospital, Vice Chairman and President of the Board of Grand Street Settlement, and on the Yale Development Board and related Capital Campaign Committees. Mr. Furth served as an officer in the U.S. Army from 1952 to 1954, including service in Korea, for which he received the Bronze Star. He holds a B.A. in English literature from Yale University, attended the New York University Graduate School of Business, and is a member of Phi Beta Kappa.


Ginger Sykes Torres

Margo Simons grew up in Falls Church, Virginia. She graduated from the University of Arizona in 1987 with a degree in finance. She has subsequently lived in Washington, D.C., Las Vegas, the San Juan Islands, Fort Collins, Saint Helena, Cincinnati, and now Paradise Valley.

Ginger Sykes Torres, Diné (Navajo) of the Tódich’ii’nii (Bitter Water) clan, was born on the Navajo Nation in Tuba City, Arizona and raised in Mesa. In 1997, Ms. Sykes Torres became the first female to win a championship title at the Heard Museum’s Annual World Championship Hoop Dance Contest. Ms. Sykes Torres’ groundbreaking style was the first to combine traditional steps and hoop formations with modern dance and gymnastics. Her victory paved the way for female competitors of all ages.

Throughout, Ms. Simons has remained passionate and curious about the arts. Her travels around the world visiting museums and taking Art History classes (UNLV and lectures at Sotheby’s) have enriched her life. Ms. Simons worked as a volunteer at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and has remained active in the arts community throughout her life. Her relationship with the Heard Museum began in 2004. Ms. Simons also pursued her passion for horticulture and is a Master Gardener and Apiarist. She and her husband John divide their time between Paradise Valley and St. Helena in Napa Valley, where she tends to her vegetables, stone fruits, citrus trees and roses. Margo and John’s family foundation benefits communities and higher education. They are benefactors at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, where their gifts and grants benefit the Surgery Department for Innovation.

GIVE

Margo Simons

Ms. Sykes Torres graduated from Stanford University in 2003 with a degree in the Earth Systems Science Program. She is a certified environmental planner and consultant on tribal and environmental issues. She has worked with utilities, developers, and government agencies on transportation projects, energy projects, and public lands management. She led the climate resilience initiative for a large investor-owned utility and helped federal and state policymakers to determine environmentally responsible locations for renewable energy development in California. She currently serves as a Commissioner for the City of Phoenix Environmental Quality and Sustainability Commission. Ms. Sykes Torres enjoys mentoring younger dancers and continues to share and perform the hoop dance. She created and taught an American Indian dance class at Stanford University and she currently enjoys teaching children (including her own) in the Phoenix area about the hoop dance. Ginger and her husband, attorney Javier Torres, have a shared commitment to indigenous rights. They live in North Central Phoenix and have three small children, two small dogs, and one small cat.

FALL 2019

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next issue

In the next issue of Earth Song we’ll celebrate our founding and ongoing mission with a special 90th anniversary edition.

BY JANET CANTLEY | CURATOR Opening Oct. 4, Celebrate! 90 Years at the Heard Museum, will highlight some of the most spectacular art in our collection and recognizing major milestones from our collections accessions, exhibitions and building expansions. A Heard celebration would not be complete without a Barry Goldwater katsina, Charles Loloma (Hopi) jewelry, a classic Fred Harvey basket and jewelry, and this delightful painting (opposite page) by Harry Fonseca (Nisenan Maidu/Hawaiian/Portuguese). We’ll have some surprises as well! In addition to our collections and exhibitions, we will also recognize other spectacular features, including our Shops and Cafés. In 1958 the Heard Museum Guild opened the first sales room as a fundraising effort, selling books, pamphlets and souvenirs. In 1969, a Shop managed by Lovena Ohl opened with Native art, jewelry and books. Today, the expansive Heard Shop is managed by Director of Retail Sales Bruce McGee, and the majority of pieces in the extensive inventory are purchased directly from hundreds of American Indian artists.

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The Heard’s Courtyard Café is also an integral partner in the Museum’s success. A “visitor experience” survey in the 1990s indicated that the absence of a café negatively affected visitors’ time at the Heard. This prompted the Board of Trustees to budget for a permanent food service venue. Today our Courtyard Café and Coffee Cantina provide our guests with seasonally inspired menus and special dishes created to complement our featured exhibitions. In Celebrate! 90 Years at the Heard Museum, we hope you are wowed. The collections, the expansions, the amenities—these are all the physical aspects to appreciate. But the underlying vision, started by Dwight and Maie Heard, is the commitment to education, public service and leadership. CELEBRATE! 90 YEARS AT THE HEARD MUSEUM On view Oct. 4 Kitchell Gallery OPPOSITE PAGE: Harry Fonseca (Nisenan Maidu/Hawaiian/Portuguese), 1946-2006, Rainbow Koshare with Cotton Candy, 1983, acrylic and glitter on canvas, 30 x 24. Gift of Dr. Rennard Strickland, IAC2333.


2301 N Central Avenue Phoenix, AZ 85004 602.252.8840 | heard.org

Profile for Heard Museum

Heard Museum Earth Song, Fall 2019  

Earth Song is the Heard Museum's members-only publication on museum events, exhibitions and milestones. It is published 3 times a year.

Heard Museum Earth Song, Fall 2019  

Earth Song is the Heard Museum's members-only publication on museum events, exhibitions and milestones. It is published 3 times a year.

Profile for earthsong