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earth song HEARD MUSEUM MEMBERSHIP MAGAZINE

FA L L 2018

YUA  HENRI MATISSE  AND THE INNER ARCTIC SPIRIT Members Preview | October 28, 2018


BOARD OF TRUSTEES John Melamed Wick Pilcher Patricia K. Hibbeler Leland W. Peterson David M. Roche

Chair Vice-Chair Secretary Treasurer Dickey Family Director and CEO

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COVER: Central Yup’ik, Pastolik Village, Pastolik River, Alaska. Dance mask representing Tuunraq (Shaman’s helping spirit), c. 1880s. Wood, feathers, pigment. Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, 2-6625. Photo: Sibila Savage.

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The Heard Museum is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization incorporated in the State of Arizona. Exhibition, event and program funding provided in part by the Arizona Commission on the Arts, the Arizona Humanities Council, the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture.


earth song HEARD MUSEUM MEMBERSHIP MAGAZINE

WHAT'S INSIDE 4

Director's Letter

VIEW

EXHIBITIONS ON DISPLAY

7

Yua: Henri Matisse and the Inner Arctic Spirit

13

Yua Exhibition Symposium

14

 aitaq, an excerpt by Chuna McIntyre and P Sean Mooney from the publication, Yua: Henri Matisse and the Inner Arctic Spirit

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Sonwai: The Jewelry of Verma Nequatewa

22

Pablita at 100: The Legacy of Tse Tsan

25  Away From Home: American Indian Boarding School Stories

GO + DO

EVENTS

26 Calendar 29

Member Exclusives

READ SHOP DINE 32

Holidays at the Heard

34

Read, Arctic in Archives

36

Shop

38

On the Menu

TRAVEL + LEARN

EXPLORE WITH THE GUILD

39

Explore with the Guild

40

Excellence in Education

41

Rebels for Art

EXPERIENCE

MEMBERS EXPERIENCE MORE

42

Member Event Highlights

45

Dia del Niño

GIVE

ADVANCING AMERICAN INDIAN ART

46

Welcome New Trustees

47

Moondance Honoree Profile

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DIRECTOR'S LETTER The Heard Museum’s original and groundbreaking exhibition and publication Yua: Henri Matisse and the Inner Arctic Spirit tells the little-known story of one of the 20th century’s greatest artists and his connection to the Indigenous people of the Arctic. Yua is a Yup’ik word that represents the spiritual interconnectedness of all things and seems the perfect word for the exhibition title. Yua runs like a thread through a vast story that spans centuries, continents and cultures. It also captures its thematic essence, which is to celebrate the creative spirit that unites us all.

David M. Roche Dickey Family Director and CEO

Matisse is celebrated for his sensuous approach to color and composition. But, largely unknown to the general public are his striking black-andwhite portraits of Inuit people that were inspired, in part, by a group of Yup’ik masks collected by his son-in-law, Georges Duthuit. In the last decade of his life, while working on his masterpiece, La Chapelle du Rosaire de Vence, Matisse became interested in both the physical forms and spiritual concerns of the Inuit which inspired a series of 39 individual portraits depicting Inuit faces. Of particular significance is the fact that this story has inspired an effort to advance scholarship on the subject of Yup’ik masks. This includes reuniting pairs of masks that, due to a variety of circumstances, have been separated by time and great distances. On the opposite page is a Tunutellgem Yua mask that was collected by Duthuit. One of several important discoveries resulting from the research conducted for this exhibition by curators Sean Mooney and Chuna McIntyre is that we now have a name for the maker of this mask. His name was Ikamrailnguq. Recognizing the name of the maker upends the common museum practice of simply associating an object of Native creation with its originating tribe. This will encourage viewers to see the mask not just as an ethnographic object made by a faceless person, but as the creative expression of a specific person whose work is as worthy of consideration as that of any other great artist, including Matisse. As a member of the Heard Museum, take great pride in knowing that your support has made this important work possible. Thank you.

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Attributed to Ikamrailnguq Central Yup’ik, Napaskiaq Village, Kuskokwim River, Alaska Dance mask representing Tunutellgem Yua (Arctic loon spirit) ca. 1900. Wood, feathers, pigment, vegetal fibers. Private collection. Ex-collection Museum of the American Indian, 9/3409 This mask was collected by Georges Duthuit, and is among the masks shown to Henri Matisse by his daughter, Marguerite Duthuit.


Henri Matisse in his studio at the Regina Hotel, France, 1952. Photograph by Lydia Delectorskaya. Collection of Musée départemental Matisse, Le Cateau-Cambrésis

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© 2018 Succession H. Matisse / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


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BY DIANA PARDUE | CHIEF CURATOR

We present a Q&A with exhibition co-curators Sean Mooney,

curator of the Rock Foundation, and formerly of the Menil Collection, and Chuna McIntyre, Yup’ik artist and elder. Through their research,

Sean and Chuna are bringing new insights to the surprising artistic and

spiritual connection between the great 20th century French modern master, Henri Matisse, and the Indigenous people of the Arctic.

CONNECTING MATISSE AND YUP'IK MASKS

Sean Mooney: The foundation of

our exhibition is the family connections between Henri Matisse and his

daughter, Marguerite. She was married to the writer and historian Georges

Duthuit, who was closely associated

with the European Surrealist circle of

artists. Duthuit and others had studied and collected a variety of ethnographic art, and of especial interest to them

was Alaskan and Arctic art. In 1946,

Duthuit returned with a collection of masks he acquired in New York and

wrote a prose poem called Une Fête en

Cimmérie, an elegiac fantasy celebrating

Inuit people. He and Marguerite proposed that Matisse make three illustrations for a book Duthuit wished to make from this poem. Matisse ultimately made

dozens of drawings, using photos of Inuit people, as well as some of the masks themselves. This is but one connection, perhaps the most direct and basic one. But there are many other aspects. Matisse was very certainly interested in the

1922 film Nanook of the North, by Robert Flaherty, which was an international sensation. When Matisse traveled in 1930 to Tahiti, he learned that, by Above: Central Yup’ik, Lower Yukon, Alaska. Dance mask representing the spirit of the Moon-Woman, Iralum Yua, c. 1870. Private collection. Photo: Craig Smith, Heard Museum.

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coincidence, Flaherty was there also, shooting scenes for the film Moana (1926). Matisse was so excited to meet

Flaherty that he rowed a dugout canoe by himself to the remote island where Flaherty was filming. It is fair to

say that the distant world of the Arctic was very much on the minds of people in Europe in the early 20th century, especially among artistic circles.

Q: Can you elaborate on the spiritual

interconnectedness among Matisse, the Yup’ik masks and even broader artistic movements?

SM: At the same time Matisse was asked to make

drawings for Une Fête en Cimmérie, he was also

developing his new paper cut-out technique, as well as

working on the Chapelle du Rosaire in Vence, France. He was living in Vence, near Nice in the south of France, Henri Matisse Esquimau (Eskimo) [after Rasmussen, Qingaruvdliaq] Lithograph, ca. 1947 Musée départemental Matisse, Le CateauCambrésis, France, Gift of Barbara and Claude Duthuit, 2010. Plate XIX from Georges Duthuit’s Une Fête en Cimmérie, 1963. © 2018 Succession H. Matisse / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

during the war, recovering from a cancer surgery that almost ended his life in 1941. His work on the Vence Chapel was done partly in dedication to his friend,

Sister Jacques-Marie, a nun who had been his nurse for a short time, then was his model and assistant before entering the convent. So, the concepts of grace, and gratitude, were very much on Matisse’s mind as he

developed these bodies of work, in the last decade of his

life. Yup’ik masks, by tradition, are made for ceremonies of gratitude, in a sense. They are part of ceremonial

dance performances, typically held in late winter, in

preparation for hunting in the coming spring. The point of these festivals is to implore upon the spirit world, the yua of all the animals, birds and fish, to return these

essential beings to the village hunters. The dances are

part of a process of prayer, in a way, to the animals, to the spirits who guide them, to ask for them to come

back so the village may survive. This act is an expression of gratitude toward life itself.

Qingaruvdliaq, the woman who knew all the men’s songs and prompted them when they forgot the words. Photography by Leo Hansen published in Knud Rasmussen’s. Across Arctic America: Narrative of the Fifth Thule Expedition, New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1927, page 92.

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Attributed to Ikamrailnguq Central Yup’ik, Napaskiaq Village, Kuskokwim River, Alaska Dance mask representing Tumaneq (Windmaker) ca. 1900. Wood, feathers, pigment. National Museum of the American Indian Smithsonian Institution, 9/3427


VIEW


and often these are presented in a balanced way where one answers the other. The grouping of masks relates to this, and the narrative of the

dance is played out as each mask yua is called

upon. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when the masks were first field-collected for

museums, collectors were not informed about or sensitive to these distinctions. To their

untrained eyes, many of these masks appeared to be duplicates of each other, rather than integral members of pairs or groups. Paired masks were often separated.

In 2003 I began working with anthropologist

Edmund Carpenter on an exhibition titled Upside

Down: Les Arctiques — first presented at the Musée du Quai Branly in 2008, then reinstalled at the Menil Collection, Houston, in 2011. In both

exhibitions, we reunited only a small number of

mask pairs that had been separated for more than

100 years. Dr. Carpenter passed away in 2011, and

LOCATING THE MASKS Q: Talk about your journey to locate mask pairs and bring them together. What separated them originally?

in his honor I curated the exhibition MicroCosmos:

Details from the Carpenter Collection in 2015. While planning this exhibition, I learned that a mate to a

mask in his collection was on the market and made arrangements to acquire it. This pair, representing

Chuna McIntyre: We have always known

a wolf and a caribou, were permanently reunited

would be in Germany and one would be in Paris

first time since their separation. They are the

that the masks were separated, because one piece

and exhibited at the Menil Collection for the

and others are at the Smithsonian.

only masks known to have been restored in this

SM: By tradition, Yup’ik masks were often

created in pairs or groups of related masks. The Yup’ik term ilakelriit describes this, a group of

masks that are related for the same purpose and story. Yup’ik song and dance structure is very

formal, with a number of verses and movements,

manner, and we will be exhibiting them and other groupings at the Heard Museum. We have about

a dozen reunions planned. Some of the masks we

will be viewing haven’t been seen publicly in more than a generation, so this will be a very moving experience.

Above: Henri Matisse, Autoportrait (Self-portrait), 1937. Charcoal on paper. Private collection. © 2018 Succession H. Matisse / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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elder and dance performer to see these masks reunited?

CM: It’s incredible. It means that we now

have the opportunity to bring them together and see them like they were presented in ceremonial

houses. Having them together is like a restoration.

BEYOND YUA Q: What will happen to the masks and Matisse

drawings after this exhibition closes?

SM: Alas, this is a temporary exhibition, which will live on in the exhibition catalogue, and in

our memories, and afterward the masks and other works must return to their home collections,

which surely will miss them while they are away.

My wish is that this exhibition will influence the

approaches museums take in the future, to present

Yup’ik materials in respect to their original context and terminology.

Also, we have identified some of the original

Q: What do you want people to leave the exhibition knowing?

SM: To me, an experience that moves us should

spark our attention and curiosity. The very premise of this show is the most curious one: How did

VIEW

Q: What does it mean for you as a Yup’ik

Henri Matisse come to encounter the Arctic? And, that’s where we begin, telling such a complex story.

CM : That Yup’ik artworks, mainly the masks,

have a timeless quality. They inspire artists from various parts of the globe. That is the timeless

quality — that artists from another part of the globe can respond to them. The masks evoke

something on a visceral level. It’s the inspiration that we take away. The masks came from our

dreams. They transcend all boundaries. We are all going to be privileged to be part of this museum exhibition — Yup’ik people, all of the people

working toward the exhibition, and everyone who will see the exhibition. It has become an endeavor to bring the masks together. That is a privilege.

artists who made the masks, which is another

important outcome for me and my dear friend and colleague, Chuna McIntyre. By identifying the mask makers and seeing them as master artists

on a par with a master like Matisse, we recognize individual artists of our cultures equally, as real

people instead of anonymous members of separate groups. After Yua closes, we hope to further

expand public awareness of these art forms by

organizing a smaller exhibition in which some of

the masks we have borrowed from the Anchorage

Sean Mooney

Chuna McIntyre

Photos: Sebastian Kleihs, Heard Museum

Museum in Alaska can be reinstalled with their mates upon their return to Anchorage.

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YUA OPENING EVENTS MOONDANCE OPENING GALA

Oct. 27 | 6 to 10 p.m. CIRCLES OF GIVING BRUNCH

SYMPOSIUM

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS PRESENTING SPONSOR

Oct. 28 | 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Terra Foundation for American Art

For more details and a list of exhibition related programs, see page 13.

MAJOR SUPPORT

Oct. 28 | 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. MEMBER PREVIEW DAY

Oct. 28 | 12 to 5 p.m.

The Kemper and Ethel Marley Foundation Robert Lehman Foundation Arizona Community Foundation Howard R. and Joy M. Berlin ADDITIONAL SUPPORT Arizona Commission on the Arts Arizona Public Service BBVA Compass Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona Great Clips, Inc. Janis and Dennis H. Lyon Carol Ann and Harvey Mackay

Animals play an important role in Arctic cultures – and they did in Henri Matisse’s life too! It’s Your Turn: Yua will bring the inner Arctic spirit to life for our young visitors with original activities in a kidfriendly exhibit featuring two very special animals: Henri the Husky (see pg. 36), and Raoudi, Matisse’s beloved pet schnauzer. Children and the young at heart can view Yup’ik dolls from the private collection of Chuna McIntyre and then design a Yup’ik paper doll to take home. Back by popular demand is the Arctic game Never Alone, that kids can play in the gallery. And Henri the Husky and Raoudi will be your gallery “hosts” for more original activities. To fully experience this special installation, we invite you to join us for the After Lunch Art Bunch (see pg. 30) – a new program for families and kids on the third Saturday of each month during the exhibition.

Mary Ellen and Robert H. McKee Kristine and Leland W. Peterson Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture Salt River Project GRAND GALLERY EXHIBITION FUND PATRONS Mary and Mark B. Bonsall Alice J. Dickey Dr. Marigold Linton and Dr. Robert Barnhill Mim McClennen Janet and John H. Melamed Marie and Wayne L. Mitchell Susan and James Navran Jill and Wick Pilcher Sacks Tierney, P.A.

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Y UA : H EN RI MATIS S E AN D TH E I N N ER ARC TI C S PI RIT

Exhibition Symposium In conjunction with the exhibition Yua: Henri Matisse and the Inner Arctic Spirit, an VIEW

opening-day symposium will examine the themes, history, and new scholarship presented in the exhibition, while offering special opportunities to experience and learn about Yup’ik culture. Presenting curators, scholars and artists include: Chuna McIntyre (Yup’ik) Yua exhibition co-curator, artist Sean Mooney Yua exhibition co-curator, author Patrice Deparpe Director, Musée départemental Matisse du Cateau-Cambrésis Diana Pardue Chief Curator, Heard Museum David M. Roche Dickey Family Director & CEO, Heard Museum The Nunamta Yup’ik Eskimo Singers and Dancers

TICKETS Admission is free and open to the public. However, online or on-site registration for admission is required. Non-members will be required to pay the special exhibition fee ($7) to receive an exhibition tour following the program. Attendance is limited to 250 people. For more information, go to: www.heard.org.

Symposium Schedule, Sunday, Oct. 28 11:30 A.M. Coffee and refreshments available for purchase in Steele Auditorium Foyer NOON

OPENING REMARKS Welcome by ​​​​David M. Roche Dickey Family Director & CEO 12:15 – 1:15 PM

MATISSE AND THE ARCTIC Moderator: Diana Pardue Speakers: Patrice Deparpe, David M. Roche, Sean Mooney This panel will explore the stories behind Matisse’s introduction to Inuit and Arctic imagery, offering a historical overview as well as a reflection on Matisse’s widely unknown body of work depicting Arctic life. 1:15 – 2:30 PM

masks were collected and how their research revealed new details about the masks and their makers. Further discussion of the significance of the reunion project will be lead by Chuna McIntyre 2:40 PM – 3:45 PM

PERFORMANCE AND DISCUSSION WITH CHUNA MCINTYRE AND THE NUNAMTA YUP’IK SINGERS AND DANCERS Moderator: Chuna McIntyre In this concluding session, panelists will share the form, and function of Arctic artistic expression through song and dance. The dance group will also share perspectives on Yup’ik artistic expression, education, culture and community today and what the future may hold.

DANCE TRADITION: YUP’IK DANCE MASKS Speakers: Chuna McIntyre and Sean Mooney with Vernon Chimegalrea and John N. McIntyre

This project made possible by

Yua co-curators, Chuna McIntyre and Sean Mooney will discuss their research of the Yup’ik dance masks included in the exhibition, including how the FA L L 2 01 8

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Paitaq

An excerpt by Chuna McIntyre and Sean Mooney from the publication Yua: Henri Matisse and the Inner Arctic Spirit

The main body of Yup’ik masks included in this

Compare the weight and heaviness of Nushagak pieces,

among collectors in the 20th century, derive mainly

from Nushagak have impact, created in part by the

exhibition, and which have attracted the most attention from three Alaskan villages: Nushagak, Napaskiaq,

and Nunivak Island. Nushagak was primarily a trading post in the 19th century, and masks collected there

most likely represent a mask-making tradition reflective of many nearby villages within a certain radius. The

same is probably true for St. Michael’s and other places where trading posts were established at the time. In any case, these three locations offer an opportunity to analyze Yup’ik masks from the point of view of

localized styles, following family traditions passed down between generations. Variations from place to place can be interpreted in much the same manner as we might

look at different schools in European art, the Flemish

School or the studio of Rubens or the Carracci brothers,

for example, to the lightness of Nunivak works. Masks material weight of wood, which has been carved into shape from large masses. They are forceful and bold.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, Nunivak pieces

have an airiness, a sense of economy; everything springs out from the center, arranged along the outer rings of

hoops (ellanguaq). The central faces are smooth, clean,

and clearly defined. Nushagak masks are more sculptural and materially solid; Nunivak masks are like drawings,

almost immaterial, linear and floating, each independent element moving away from the other, freely and centrifugally.

Kuskokwim River pieces, for which those from Napaskiaq are the standard-bearer, are more

for example. Each locality exhibits the influences of

introspective: there is more painting, a wider variety of

of iconographic representation that became a local

oscillate back and forth between heaviness and lightness.

are the chief factor in self-identity and expression;

actually delicate; they achieve both qualities in an artful

construction, and mask iconography are intimately tied

Swan collected by André Breton, the Loon by Georges

particular master artists who developed a vocabulary

imagery. They employ the hoops to create openness, and

tradition for generations. In Alaska, Native villages

Napaskiaq masks look massive and sculptural, but are

thus, particular forms of dance, storytelling, parka

way. For instance, the pair of Swan and Loon masks (the

to location as well as to family.

Duthuit and shown on page 5) have incredible impact,

Local stylistic traditions vary according to the passing down of individual makers’ carving and decorating

techniques, but they follow common understandings of what compositional features should be included. Certain elements of masks are always present: the

yua representation of the entity described in the song, its animal or spiritual counterpart, and its activity or

movement within a spirit plane. Each village has, over time, created distinctive approaches to express this

vocabulary of elements, leaving the manifestations of the story open to visualization by the artist.

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but are physically small and delicate. These masks are

deceptive when seen in photographs, appearing much

larger in scale than in reality. They have grandeur and

expansiveness, albeit through an economy of means and materials. And they are quirky and inventive in their

interpretation of the elements required, using kinetic

features that make them appear to be in constant motion. Masks from the Kuskokwim are like poems, unique and

personal yet communicative and engaging, and surprising in their virtuosity.


VIEW Attributed to Ikamrailnguq Central Yup’ik, Napaskiaq Village, Kuskokwim River, Alaska Dance mask representing Negaqvam Yua (Spirit of the North Wind) ca. 1900 Wood, feathers, pigment 45½ x 21⅜ x 17⅞ in. (114.9 x 54.3 x 45.4 cm) Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, The Michael C. Rockefeller Memorial Collection. Purchase, Nelson A. Rockefeller Gift, 1961, 1978.412.76 Ex-collection Museum of the American Indian, 9/3393

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Central Yup’ik Nushagak Village, Bristol Bay, Alaska.

Shaman’s dance mask (Nepcetaq) c. 1890. Wood, pigment, vegetal fibers, baleen.

Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, 2-5852. Photo: Sibila Savage.

Cup’ik, Nunivak Island, Alaska. Dance mask. Late 1940s.

Wood, pigment, feathers, vegetal fibers. Heard Museum Collection, Gift of Lloyd Kiva New, NA-ES-I-1. Photo: Craig Smith, Heard Museum

The transfer of visual vocabulary is very much like

expression of village paitaq. Centrally located on the

successive members of a family their common history

surrounding villages, while maintaining its traditional

spoken language, as it is a way of communicating to

and inheritance. The Yup’ik term for this is paitaq, an

ancient word that suggests cultural heritage but is more nuanced in meaning. Paitaq is a form of gift, one given

to the next generation in a somewhat magical way. The term comes from paifluku: to make apparent, available,

to be made physical, to manifest at this moment. Paitaq is not simply passed down; it is granted, invisible until prepared and conveyed when its receiver is ready. It is

the ultimate form of wealth, the very essence of identity. Paitaq is a village’s form of communion with the spirit world, and with itself. Without such traditions, this

wealth disappears, for paitaq is the process of these riches

being made visible, so that paitaq may be transmitted and continued. It is entirely personal, yet communal, for it sets the stage for inspiration to be found.

Napaskiaq was an ancient cultural power, and to analyze its masks we read the symbols of a deeply traditional

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Kuskokwim, practices there reflect influences from

gravity and role of authority. This hybridization is visible in the incorporation of various elements, executed in a masterly fashion.

Once the basic elements of the masks have been

pointed out and understood, it is rewarding to apply the patterning of these terms to the interpretation of other

masks. This vocabulary has innumerable variations, each according to the uniqueness of each carver, each dance,

each village. It is possible to “read” each mask, with the

understanding that the masks are not texts but expressive guidelines for the choreography of song verses and

movements. One might say that the masks are a series of mnemonic devices that convey the stories danced before a community who would have been intimately familiar with their message and meaning.


A Groundbreak i ng P ublication

Catalogues will be available for purchase both online at heardshops.com or in person at Books & More. Don’t forget, you receive 10% off all exhibition merchandise with your membership!

Circles of Giving members receive a complimentary exhibition catalogue. For more details, call or email Allison Lester at 602.251.0262, circles@heard.org.


BY DIANA F. PARDUE | CHIEF CURATOR

When you read Verma Nequatewa’s book about her jewelry, Visions of Sonwai, you know from the onset that the land near her home has had an indelible impact on her work. The cover of the book shows details of lapidary work from a variety of bracelets and pendants. These images are stretched against a much larger photograph of the rugged mesas and rocks of Northern Arizona. Scattered quotes from Nequatewa in her book note the importance of the land. She describes airplane trips she took over Northern Arizona for the sole purpose of inspiring her work. Height bracelet, 1993. Coral, wood, fossilized ivory, turquoise, 18K gold. Private collection. Jewelry photos: Craig Smith, Heard Museum

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VIEW Bolo tie, 2016. Sugilite, turquoise, fossilized ivory, wood, lapis lazuli, coral, abalone, leather, 18K gold. Collection of Quincalee Brown and James P. Simsarian.

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In contrast to the ruggedness of the land, her jewelry has a softness. Although her designs reflect the linear qualities of the land, she creates a subtle beauty through her careful selection of soft-toned stones.

each with a distinctive look and personality. Some are formed of bold colors, some are large and others small, some clearly reflect a human shape, and others are so very abstract. Singularly, they reveal something of the imagination and design sense of the artist. Together, they are a testament to the long-standing career of this very talented jeweler.

Nequatewa’s distinctive and diverse designs are those of her maiden pendants. The tableta shapes atop their heads tell us they are maidens and remind us of historical photographs of Hopi women. But the shapes, colors of the stones, choice of metals, and emphasis on stonework or the metalwork distinguishes each pendant. As a group, Nequatewa’s pendants are like a village of people,

Fans of Southwest jewelry are familiar with the life and career of jeweler Charles Loloma (Hopi, 19211991), uncle to Verma Nequatewa and an artist who chose her to work as his apprentice in 1966 when she was just 17 years old. For 20 years, the two sat side by side at workbenches. Initially, Nequatewa was learning the steps of jewelry-making as well as design concepts. Later she was an active participant in the process.

Above left: Verma Nequatewa in Charles Loloma’s studio, Hotevilla, Arizona, 1969. Photographer unknown: courtesy of Eveli Sabatie.

Above: Buckle, 2014. Sugilite, turquoise, fossilized ivory, wood, lapis lazuli, coral, abalone, leather, 18K gold. Collection of Quincalee Brown and James P. Simsarian.

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VIEW Loloma’s experimentation, innovative designs and use of non-traditional materials had a lasting impact on generations of jewelers. Nequatewa had the privilege of learning directly from him and applying all that she had learned to her own creations. Two years ago, Nequatewa celebrated a 50-year career. That seems amazing for someone as youthful as she. In the Southwest, Nequatewa has been a groundbreaker and a leader among women lapidary artists. Her ability to shape stones and construct complex inlay is matched only by her technical skill and sense of design. The Heard Museum is pleased to have this opportunity to share with our visitors the beautiful jewelry of Verma Nequatewa/Sonwai.

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS: SIGNATURE SPONSOR

Linda and Jerry Bruckheimer CONTRIBUTING SPONSOR

Lovena Ohl Foundation PATRON SPONSOR

Judy and Ray Dewey MEMBERS' OPENING

Friday, Oct. 5 | 6 to 8 p.m.

Above left: Maiden pendant, 1989. Lapis lazuli, coral, turquoise, sugilite, 18K gold. Bowman Collection. Above right: Maiden pin, 1996. Coral, turquoise, sugilite, 14K gold, silver. Private collection.

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THE LEGACY OF TSE TSAN BY ERIN JOYCE | FINE ARTS CURATOR Puebloan artist Tse Tsan (Pablita Velarde, 1918-2006) was a pivotal figure in the Native American Fine Arts Movement of the 20th century, and one of the first Indigenous women to defy gender roles and pursue a career as an artist. Velarde was born on Santa Clara Pueblo, September 19, 1918 to Herman and Marianita Velarde. She was just two years old when her mother passed away. This prompted her father to send her, and her two sisters, to St. Catherine’s Catholic School in Santa Fe as they each came of age. By the seventh grade, Velarde and her sisters transferred to Santa Fe Indian School, where she stayed until she graduated in 1936. This was a seminal moment, as it set the foundation for her interest in art. Studying under Dorothy Dunn, Pablita and her sister Rosita, were the first girls to be admitted to Dunn’s art class at Santa Fe Indian School. Being outnumbered by her male counterparts, Velarde developed a tough exterior, often getting into fights with the boys in her class for catcalling or unwanted physical contact. Her willingness to stand up for herself and claim her own agency as a woman saw itself reflected in her approach to her artistic production. At the time Pablita was growing up, painting in the Pueblos was not seen as women’s work. Instead, women were active makers in mediums such as weaving, embroidery, textile production, and pottery. Painting was often reserved for ceremonial or spiritual purposes, and therefore limited to men. The notion of a woman being a painter within the context of Puebloan culture was radical. Under the tutelage of Dunn, as well as mentorship from San Ildefonso painter Tonita Peña, Velarde developed a style of art that was unique. Velarde borrowed from a Puebloan vocabulary, but created a framework for representation of not only her culture, but of her experience as a woman, as a woman of color, and as a woman who eschewed the pigeonholed gender roles that were forced upon her. Despite pushback from the men in her community, including her father, Velarde would not yield to the pressures of societal norms.

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Portrait of Pablita Velarde (Santa Clara Pueblo) painting by Herbert Lotz. Billie Jane Baguley Library and Archives

“Art was life. There was no escaping art,” said Helen Tindel, Velarde’s great-granddaughter. “That’s all she talked about, ‘not now, I’m painting’ was what I always heard,” remarked Tindel. Pablita rejected the perspectival systems of classical European painting and favored a flattened plane, layering the pigments of highly saturated hues upon the canvas or board she was using. In 1942, Velarde married Herbert Hardin, with whom she had two children, Herbert Jr. and the Helen Hardin, who would become a noted artist in her own right. The marriage ended in divorce in 1959. “Herb Hardin… never took her seriously,” said Tindel. “She [talked] to me about the struggles of being taken seriously as an Indigenous woman painter. I was always amazed how endless the struggles seemed to be,” remarked Tindel. Velarde packed up paintings in her car and would drive from her home in New Mexico to Texas, Oklahoma, Arizona, Colorado, and California, selling her work to galleries. Velarde helped form a market appetite for Indigenous fine art before there really was one, on her own terms, telling the stories she wanted to tell, and how she wanted to tell them. “She wanted to tell an Indian Right: Sad Eyes, from Old Father Story Teller. Casein on board, 1959 Heard Collection. Gift of Dan McGuiness, and Forrest and Helen Tindel.


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story through an Indian voice… culture that was so precious to her,” shared Tindel. Velarde was the recipient of numerous awards, including an honorary doctorate from the University of New Mexico and the Palmes d’Academie. Her pioneering efforts in the field of fine art paved the way for many Indigenous artists, and especially for Indigenous women, many of whom still face gender-based discrimination, with the majority of solo exhibitions in museums still going to men as of 2018. Velarde lived to be 88 and passed away in 2006. In 2012, the Pablita Velarde Museum of Indian Women in the Arts opened in Santa Fe, showcasing the work of Velarde, her daughter Helen Hardin (who died at the age of 41 from breast cancer), and her granddaughter Margarete Bagshaw (who died from a brain tumor in 2015 at the age of 50), as well as the work of other Indigenous women artists working across a wide range of mediums. Following the closure of the Velarde Museum in 2015, the family archive was generously given to the Heard Museum. The Velarde archives include more than 40 linear feet of material, including drawings and sketchbooks, family photographs and scrapbooks, news

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clippings, ephemera and awards, as well as a selection of original artworks by Velarde, Hardin, and Bagshaw. In addition to the holdings maintained in the archive, The Velarde Studio, an ongoing exhibition, is a faithful recreation of the artist’s studio. Complete with the actual television she watched soap operas on as she painted, her sewing machine she used to produce her dolls, her grinding stone where she made her pigments, and reproductions of some of her works, this re-creation gives the viewer insight into what her daily environment was like. The archive and studio are a significant resource for the Heard, documenting the work of a remarkable artist and woman like Pablita Velarde. As we enter the 100th year of her birth, we honor the legacy of Velarde, her impact, her work, and her life. Happy Birthday Pablita!

Above: Turkey Girl, from Old Father Story Teller. Casein on board, 1959. Heard Collection Gift of Dan McGuiness, and Forrest and Helen Tindel.


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AWAY FROM HOME: AMERICAN INDIAN BOARDING SCHOOL STORIES OPENS JAN. 26, 2019. BY JANET CANTLEY | CURATOR Over the winter, the popular Heard Museum exhibition Remembering Our Indian School Days: The Boarding School Experience will close for updates. The thematically powerful exhibition, which has been an eye-opener and emotional experience for so many visitors, has enjoyed an unprecedented long run of 18 years, when initially it was planned for five. Much of the content in the current exhibition remains relevant and continues to offer a profound visitor experience; that content will remain. However, after almost two decades, we feel the need to refresh and augment these complex stories. Replacing the antiquated technology and sharing the powerful personal stories that have emerged since 2000 also are priorities. Gallery observations (surveys) and conversations with Heard Guild members suggested that we needed to convey a clearer sense of change over time and bring the story of American Indian education up to date. The new technologies in the updated installation will add in-depth exploration of boarding-school stories. A digital timeline will allow visitors to scroll through dates and images from early 17th century mission schools to leading schools in self-determination on the Navajo Nation: Rough Rock Demonstration School and DinÊ College (initially known as Navajo Community College). A touchscreen map will provide visitors photo galleries of select schools with a long history in American Indian education. Video monitors will provide first-person stories about boarding schools from students, administrators, teachers and scholars. Away From Home: American Indian Boarding School Stories will open to the public on Jan. 26, 2019. We will present new works of art, archival material, first-person interviews and interactive elements in an immersive setting to encourage visitors to have a personal and visceral connection to the topics explored. We feel these stories must continue to be shared; they are central to remembering the nation’s past and understanding its present. Special events will take place prior to the opening, so watch for announcements.

Above: Class portrait of Chemawa School students. Salem, Oregon, 1905. Photograph no. 8617. Pacific University Archives, Forest Grove, Oregon. Heard reference: RC125(9):2.2.1.


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This calendar is accurate as of Sept. 27, 2018, but we're always planning more events. Check heard.org or our Facebook page for the most up-to-date information.

OCTOBER 6 | SATURDAY

17 | WEDNESDAY

28 | SUNDAY

9:30 A.M. TO 12:30 P.M.

9:30 A.M. TO 11:30 P.M.

11 A.M. TO 1 P.M.

GUILD SHORT COURSE: NATIVE PEOPLE IN THE SOUTHWEST

GUILD MEETING: FEATURED SPEAKER ED FOUTZ, OWNER OF SHIPROCK SANTA FE

YUA CIRCLES OF GIVING BRUNCH

Open to the public Steele Auditorium

See page 29

Monte Vista See page 39

1:30 TO 2:30 P.M. SONWAI LECTURE SERIES: VISIONS OF SONWAI

YUA EXHIBITION SYMPOSIUM

ALL DAY TRAVEL WITH THE GUILD: LAND OF SERI

See page 30

27 | SATURDAY

Steele Auditorium See page 13

12 TO 5 P.M. YUA MEMBER PREVIEW DAY

9:30 TO 10:30 A.M.

8 | MONDAY

MUSEUM YOGA

INDIGENOUS PEOPLES DAY

Heard Museum Campus

See page 29

6 TO 10 P.M.

29 | MONDAY

MOONDANCE GALA & YUA OPENING NIGHT

13 | SATURDAY

MEMBERS ONLY

Heard Museum Campus

Heard Museum Campus

11 A.M. TO 4 P.M.

Heard Museum Campus

11:30 A.M.

21-24 | SUN.-WED.

Steele Auditorium

CIRCLES OF GIVING

9:30 A.M. TO 5 P.M.

Heard Museum Campus

YUA PUBLIC OPENING

9:30 TO 10:30 A.M.

Heard Museum Campus

MUSEUM YOGA

Heard Museum Campus

12 P.M. SCENE & HEARD FILM SERIES:

REMINDER: WE CLOSE EARLY ON OCT. 27 FOR MOONDANCE

We Were Children Phoenix Indian School Visitor Center Steele Indian School Park 300 E. Indian School Road

Above left: Sonwai/Verma Nequatewa (Hopi, b. 1949), Bracelet, 2000. Sugilite, opal, turquoise, coral, 18K gold.

NOVEMBER 2 | FRIDAY 6 TO 10 P.M.

MEMBERS' LOUNGE

FIRST FRIDAY: I SING, YOU DANCE

Heard Museum Campus

10 | SATURDAY

SECOND SATURDAYS: MARKETPLACE SERIES KICKOFF

See page 30

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Steele Auditorium

Heard Museum Campus

3 | SATURDAY

Heard Museum Campus

Nanook Collections

MUSEUM YOGA

10 A.M. TO 4 P.M.

YUA: LECTURE SERIES BYRON NICHOLAI, UNPLUGGED

SCENE AND HEARD FILM SERIES

9:30 TO 10:30 A.M.

See page 31

1:30 P.M.

11:30 A.M. TO 1:30 P.M.

MEMBERS' LOUNGE

See page 28

12 | MONDAY 10 A.M. TO 8 P.M.

Heard Museum Campus

VETERANS TRIBUTE

See page 31

Heard Museum Campus


NOVEMBER Lyon Family Crossroads Gallery and O’Connor Gallery

9:30 TO 10:30 A.M.

See page 31

MUSEUM YOGA

19 | MONDAY

Heard Museum Campus

5 TO 8 P.M.

10 A.M. TO 2 P.M.

MEMBERS ONLY

MUSEUM YOGA Heard Museum Campus

28 WEDNESDAY GO + DO

17 | SATURDAY

9:30 TO 11:30 A.M.

APPRAISAL DAY

MATISSE MEMBER MONDAY

GUILD MEETING

Steele Auditorium

Heard Museum Campus

Steele Auditorium

10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.

See page 29

POP-UP STUDIO! WITH JACOB MEDERS

23-25

Piper Grand Gallery

9:30 A.M. TO 5 P.M., FRI & SAT

1 TO 4 P.M.

11 A.M. TO 5 P.M., SUN

AFTER LUNCH ART BUNCH: DANCE FOR JOY

Heard Museum Shop

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

| FRI.-SAT.

ORNAMENT MARKETPLACE See page 33

REMINDER: WE ARE CLOSED FOR THANKSGIVING, NOV. 22

24 | SATURDAY 9:30 TO 10:30 A.M.

Ornament Marketplace in the Heard Museum Shop

DECEMBER 5 | WEDNESDAY

11:30 A.M. TO 1:30 P.M. SCENE AND HEARD FILM SERIES

10 TO 4 P.M. GUILD HOLIDAY BRUNCH, SALE AND SILENT AUCTION

Open to the public Steele Auditorium

7 | FRIDAY 6 TO 10 P.M.

MEMBERS' LOUNGE

We Are All Related Here Steele Auditorium

1:30 TO 2:30 P.M. MEMBERS' LOUNGE

YUA: LECTURE SERIES – ENVIRONMENTAL PORTRAITURE

FIRST FRIDAY: INUINDIE WITH BEATRICE DEER

Heard Museum Campus

Heard Museum Campus

15 | SATURDAY

See page 31

1 TO 4 P.M.

8 | SATURDAY

AFTER LUNCH ART BUNCH: FURRY FRIENDS

9:30 TO 10:30 A.M. MUSEUM YOGA

Lyon Family Crossroads Gallery and O’Connor Gallery

Heard Museum Campus

See page 30

10 A.M. TO 4 P.M.

1:30 TO 2:30 P.M.

SECOND SATURDAYS: WEAVERS MARKETPLACE

YUA: LECTURE SERIES SAVE THE BEST 'TIL LAST

Heard Museum Campus

Heard Museum Campus

See page 31

See page 30

See page 30

17 | MONDAY 5 TO 8 P.M.

MEMBERS ONLY

MATISSE MEMBER MONDAY

Heard Museum Campus See page 29

22 | SATURDAY 9:30 TO 10:30 A.M. MUSEUM YOGA

Heard Museum Campus

26-30 | WED.-SUN. 11 A.M. TO 4 P.M. HOLIDAYS AT THE HEARD

MEMBERS' LOUNGE

Heard Campus See page 32

REMINDER: WE ARE CLOSED FOR CHRISTMAS, DEC. 25

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JANUARY 4 | FRIDAY 6 TO 10 P.M.

MEMBERS' LOUNGE

FIRST FRIDAY: BONNE ANNÉE! ANGNIQ QUKITIIG! HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Heard Museum Campus

16 | WEDNESDAY GUILD MEETING

YUA: LECTURE SERIES HENRI – AN INDIGENOUS ARTIST’S EXAMINATION

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Steele Auditorium

Steele Auditorium

21 | MONDAY

9:30 TO 11:30 A.M.

17 | THURSDAY

See page 31

12 | SATURDAY

1 TO 2:30 P.M.

5 TO 8 P.M.

MEMBERS ONLY

6:30 TO 7:30 P.M.

MATISSE MEMBER MONDAY

Heard Museum Campus

MUSEUM YOGA

YUA: LECTURE SERIES A DISCUSSION WITH CHUNA MCINTYRE

Heard Museum Campus

Crossroads Gallery

9:30 TO 10:30 A.M.

10 A.M. TO 4 P.M. SECOND SATURDAYS: JEWELERS MARKETPLACE

See page 30 MEMBERS' LOUNGE

Heard Museum Campus See page 31

11:30 A.M. TO 1 P.M.

See page 29

26 | SATURDAY 9:30 A.M. TO 5 P.M.

19 | SATURDAY

AWAY FROM HOME: EXHIBITION OPENING

10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.

Heard Museum Campus

POP-UP STUDIO! WITH CHUNA MCINTYRE

Piper Grand Gallery

See page 25

9:30 TO 10:30 A.M. MUSEUM YOGA

SCENE AND HEARD FILM SERIES

1 TO 4 P.M.

The Yup’ik Way

AFTER LUNCH ART BUNCH – LIFE IN A COLD PLACE

Steele Auditorium

Lyon Family Crossroads Gallery and O’Connor Gallery

Heard Museum Campus

11 A.M. TO 3:30 P.M. AWAY FROM HOME: EXHIBITION SYMPOSIUM

Steele Auditorium

Scene and Heard Film Series Drawing from programming and film partners, and from our extensive film collection in the Billie Jane Baguley Library & Archives, the Heard will debut a continuing film series, Scene & Heard, with monthly screenings incorporated into festival programs and events.

I AM YUP’IK, 30 MIN

NOV. 2 | 6 to 9 p.m. (repeating) NANOOK COLLECTIONS

Nov. 10 | 11:30 a.m. Nanook of the North, 1:18 min Nanook Revisited, 60 min WE ARE ALL RELATED HERE, 50 MIN Dec. 8 | 11:30 a.m. THE YUP’IK WAY, 53 MIN

Jan. 12 | 11:30 a.m.

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Member Exclusives

GO + DO

CIRCLES OF GIVING BRUNCH RECEPTION FOR YUA: HENRI MATISSE AND THE INNER ARCTIC SPIRIT SUN. OCT. 28 | 11 A.M. TO 1 P.M. 11 A.M. Exhibition preview and brunch Circles of Giving members are invited to a special brunch and private exhibition access prior to the Members’ Preview Day. Kindly RSVP to 602.251.0223 or circles@heard.org.

MEMBERS’ PREVIEW FOR YUA: HENRI MATISSE AND THE INNER ARCTIC SPIRIT SUN. OCT. 28 | NOON TO 5 P.M. Members will enjoy exclusive access to Yua: Henri Matisse and the Inner Arctic Spirit one day prior to the public opening. No RSVP necessary. Questions? Call 602.251.0261 or email members@heard.org.

Photo: Jim Louvau

MATISSE MEMBER MONDAYS NOV. 19, DEC. 17, JAN. 21 | 5 TO 8 P.M. The third Monday evening of each month from November through January is just for members. Members will enjoy evening exhibition-viewing hours without the crowds. No RSVP necessary; please check in upon arrival.

THE MEMBERS’ LOUNGE 5 TO 8 P.M. LOOK FOR THIS ICON IN THE CALENDAR, PAGES 26 - 28

MEMBERS' LOUNGE

We love that you’re loving the Members’ Lounge, so we’ve increased the number of dates it’s available! The Lounge will still be open for most First Fridays (including an hour of private museum access), PLUS during our new Second Saturdays events and Holidays at the Heard. Don’t forget to bring your membership card for expedited check-in.

Brandy Michell Adams at the opening of Dear Listener. Photo: Haute Photography and Videography

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Exhibition Conversations

After Lunch Art Bunch

SONWAI LECTURE SERIES: VISIONS OF SONWAI

Come look, and create! Join us each third Saturday of the month November through January 2019 for specially themed hands-on family fun presented in conjunction with the exhibition Yua: Henri Matisse and the Inner Arctic Spirit. All materials will be provided.

OCT. 6 | 1:30 P.M. Explore Sonwai’s stunning work with a discussion between the artist herself, Sonwai/Verma Nequetewa (Hopi), and Annie Osborn, author of the Visions of Sonwai. ARCTIC SPIRIT LECTURE SERIES: BYRON NICHOLAI, UNPLUGGED NOV. 3 | 1:30 PM Byron Nicholai (Yup’ik) of Toksook Bay, Alaska learned traditional Yup’ik drumming at the age of 12 and then became a YouTube sensation with thousands of followers who liked his “I Sing. You Dance.” fan page. Join us for an in depth look at Nicholai’s fascinating musical layers that straddle the ancient and contemporary. ARCTIC SPIRIT: LECTURE SERIES: ENVIRONMENTAL PORTRAITURE DEC. 8 | 1:30 P.M. Bryan Adams (Iñupiaq), a 2018 Native Arts & Cultures Foundation National Artist Fellow will present a photographic body of work that specializes in environmental portraiture documenting Alaskan Native people and villages. His work explores the intimacies of daily life in remote costal Alaska amidst the threat of rising sea levels.

No sign-up required, free with museum admission. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Please call 602.251.0259 if you require special medical accommodations. DANCE FOR JOY NOV. 17 | 1 TO 4 P.M. Join us for our first After Lunch Art Bunch event featuring a collage activity inspired by Henri Matisse’s cut-outs masterpieces. Staff from the Arizona Science Center will also assist in a crowd-sourced activity to demonstrate “Drawing with Lasers” and choreographer, Nicole L. Olson will lead a drop-in dance clinic. FURRY FRIENDS DEC. 15 | 1 TO 4 P.M. Henri Matisse LOVED dogs! Especially his Schnauzer name Raoudi. We invite you to meet some special furry guests all the way from the Arctic, listen to a reading of Kamik: An Inuit Puppy Story, and make your very own LEGO version of our exhibition mascot, Henri the Husky (See Page 36).

ARCTIC SPIRIT LECTURE SERIES: SAVE THE BEST ‘TIL LAST

LIFE IN A COLD PLACE

DEC. 15 | 1:30 P.M.

Learn about the love and care that goes into making parkas while coloring your own Yup’ik paper dolls, listen to a reading of Moma, do you Love Me?, a touching book that demonstrates the love between mother and child, and Museum Yoga! is just for kids this day.

The late period works by Henri Matisse are among his most revolutionary and important, including his contributions to George Duthuit’s surrealist poem, Une Fête en Cimmérie and his work at La Chapelle du Rosaire de Vence. Listen as we voyage into the last years of the master artist’s life.

JAN. 19 | 1 TO 4 P.M.

ARCTIC SPIRIT LECTURE SERIES: A DISCUSSION WITH CHUNA MCINTYRE JAN. 17 | 6:30 P.M. Join us for an evening with Chuna McIntyre (Yup’ik) who will reflect on the exhibition and upcoming plans for several of the Yup’ik dance masks that will travel, in their reunited pairs, back to Alaska for the first time in over 100 years. Exhibition Lecture Series Generously Supported By Kathleen L. and William G. Howard

Photo: Digital Preserve


NOV. 2 | 6 TO 10 P.M. Byron Nicholai (Yup’ik) is a celebrated Yup’ik youth whose artistic talents also promote language retention in his home village of Toksook Bay, Alaska. Byron was also the subject of an ESPN mini documentary I AM YUP’IK, which will be shown throughout the evening.

INUINDIE WITH BEATRICE DEER ​D EC. 7 | 6 TO 10 P.M. Featuring a performance by Beatrice Deer (Inuk and Mohawk), a Canadian Aboriginal Award-winning singer-songwriter who mixes traditional Inuit throat singing with Indie rock

GO + DO

I SING, YOU DANCE WITH BYRON NICHOLAI (YUP’IK)

in a style that she cleverly calls “Inuindie”. Deer will perform songs from her latest album, My All to You, including a special screening of her animated music video Fox. This performance was made possible through support from the Consulate General of Canada

BONNE ANNÉE! ANGNIQ QUKITIIG! HAPPY NEW YEAR! JAN. 4 | 6 TO 10 P.M. Ring in the new year with a celebration that will share traditions that cover the globe! Come and enjoy French wine tastings and cheese along with baked goodies from Arctic communities. Friends from Alliance Française of Greater Phoenix will also share French music for a truly festive evening.

MEMBERS' LOUNGE

MORE FUN We are still planning for future First Fridays. Be sure to check out heard.org/firstfridays/ closer to the event dates for more information including themes, acts and activities. We hope to see you here!

NEW

SERIES!

Second Saturdays

Beginning this November, each second Saturday of the month, museum attendees and members will have the opportunity to meet and purchase art from leading Indigenous artists in an intimate marketplace setting in our Central Courtyard. We’ll have live performances and make-and-take art activities for families to enjoy. Best of all, our Second Saturdays are free to attend!

ARCTIC SPIRIT SERIES KICKOFF NOV. 10 WEAVERS’ MARKETPLACE DEC. 8 JEWELERS’ MARKETPLACE JAN 12 Generously supported by

MEMBERS' LOUNGE

Performances supported by

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Holidays AT THE HEARD Celebrate the holidays with friends and family at the Heard. From December 26 through 30, we will present a variety of performances, demonstrations, and family fun activities – all free with museum admission! All hands-on activities, crafts, and book readings will showcase Yua: Henri Matisse and the Inner Arctic Spirit and its companion exhibition It’s Your Turn: Yua.

DAILY TIMES/LOCATIONS DEMONSTRATIONS/PERFORMANCES 12:30 and 2 p.m., Steele Auditorium HANDS-ON ACTIVITIES 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sandra Day O’Connor Gallery BOOK READINGS 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., Crossroads Gallery

Generously Supported by

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DEC. 26 Demonstration: Do you think you could live on the Arctic Tundra? Staff from the Arizona Science Center will be on hand to demonstrate the varying degrees of cold in the Arctic. Wear your mittens for a COOL demonstration! It's Your Turn acitivity: Make your own Yup’ik Dance Fan Featured book: When Pigasso Met Mootisse by Nina Laden

THURSDAY DEC. 27 Performance: Nunamta Yup’ik Eskimo singers and Dancers – Throat Singing and Dancing It's Your Turn activity: Learn how to make a Yup’ik Parka Featured book: Kamik an Inuit Puppy Story by Donald Uluadluak

FRIDAY DEC. 28 Performance: Nunamta Yup’ik Eskimo singers and Dancers – Throat Singing and Dancing It's Your Turn activity: Try your hand at Yup’ik beadwork Featured book: Akilak’s Adventure by Deborah Kigjugalik Webster

SATURDAY DEC. 29

Ornament Marketplace BY MEGAN RICHMOND E-COMMERCE MANAGER

Friday, November 23 | 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, November 24 | 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, November 25 | 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Let your home for the holidays reflect your one-of-a-kind style! Decorate your tree or home this year with handmade American Indian ornaments during the annual Ornament Marketplace at the Heard Museum Shop. You will find unique ornaments in a variety of styles and mediums for each person on your holiday list or branch on the tree. Featured artist, Kee Yazzie (Navajo), has created 30 limited edition signature ornaments (pictured below) for this year’s marketplace. Yazzie has created a sterling silver disc overlaid with the migration motif with a piece Sleeping Beauty turquoise dangling below. The ornament can also be worn as a pendant with its versatile hook. The signature ornament will go on sale at 9:30 a.m. on the first day of Ornament Marketplace, Friday, November 23rd for $195 each, first come, first served.

Performance: Nunamta Yup’ik Eskimo singers and Dancers – Throat Singing and Dancing It's Your Turn activity: How do you think animals survive the COLD Arctic winters? Staff from the Arizona Science Center will share how arctic animals have mastered the art of survival in one of the planet's coldest regions! Plus create your own "blubber" Featured book: The Iridescence of Birds: A Book About Henri Matisse by Patricia MacLachlan

SUNDAY DEC. 30 Performance: Yellowbird Indian Dancers Hoop Dancing It's Your Turn activity: Create your own Metis Beaded Moccasin Featured book: Henri’s Scissors by Jeanette Winter

Signature ornaments cannot be held for purchase prior to the event. All ornaments are available while supplies last so visit us early for optimal selection.

GO + DO

WEDNESDAY


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ARCTIC IN ARCHIVES BY MARIO NICK KLIMIADES LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES DIRECTOR The Heard Museum has a praiseworthy reputation for introducing visitors to new and exciting Native American art. As its Library and Archives director, I share this visitor experience. I remember vividly when I began my career several decades ago at the Heard Museum. In my office hung a print by Inuit artist Helen Kalvak that depicts an expressive couple with their faithful dogs. This was my first exposure to Inuit art and the beginning of a love affair. I not only encountered the magical world of Inuit art, but I also became familiar with Inuit literature that has a rich history in the collection of the Heard Museum Library and filled its shelves. The documentary history of Inuit art at the Heard Museum predates its founding and begins with the museum’s founders, Maie Bartlett Heard and Dwight Bancroft Heard, during the 1920s. In the Heard Family’s library collection is a priceless 1924 first edition of Robert J. and Frances Hubbard Flaherty’s classic My Eskimo Friends, Nanook of the North (1924); the book is especially noteworthy since it includes illustrations and information on one of the early Inuit artists noted for both his drawings and cartographic skills, Wetalltok (Uitaaluttuq). Over time the documentary collection grew with landmark and popular titles including Grasp Tight the Old Ways: Selections from the Klamer Family Collection of Inuit Art (1983) by Jean Blodgett; Arctic Spirit: Inuit Art from the Albrecht Collection at the Heard Museum (2006) by Ingo Hessel; Inuit Art Quarterly, published by the Inuit Art Foundation (1986-present); and Inuit Modern: the Samuel and Esther Sarick Collection (2011), edited by

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Couple with Two Dogs Print by Helen Kalvak IAC1609

CURRENTLY, THE LIBRARY'S INUIT BIBLIOGRAPHIC COLLECTION EXCEEDS 1,000 WORKS AND COVERS AN ASTOUNDING 45 LINEAR FEET OF SHELF SPACE.

First Nations artist and curator, Gerald McMaster. Currently, the Inuit bibliographic collection exceeds 1,000 works and covers an astounding 45 linear feet of shelf space. Coupled with a linear foot of ephemera and artists files on nearly 3,000 Inuit artists in the Native American Artists Resource Collection, the documentary collection would meet the needs of any student or scholar.


RE AD SHOP DINE

FRONTISPIECE AND TITLE PAGE: MY ESKIMO FRIENDS RBK: E99.E7F575 1924

In 2008, another history-making event occurred when the Library and Archives formally learned from E. Daniel Albrecht about the promised donation of the Albrecht Inuit Art Library that he and his thenwife Martha Albrecht amassed. The Albrechts were passionate about collecting Inuit art and some of the finest examples from their legendary collection are held in the Heard Museum’s art collection. In tandem with the art collection, the Albrechts recognized the importance of documentation and built a major library and archives on Inuit art and culture. Upon the passing of E. Daniel Albrecht, the wishes of Mr. Albrecht were fulfilled and the Albrecht Inuit Art Library became a major archival collection in the Billie Jane Baguley Library and Archives. Numbering approximately 3,000 items, the collection has been described by scholar Ingo Hessel as one of the finest in the United States. Combined, the Albrecht Inuit Art Library and the existing Library collection rank as one of the finest documentary collections on Inuit culture in a museum library, and certainly the finest in the continental United States.

INUIT MODERN, EDITED BY GERALD MCMASTER N6549.5.E7I57 2011

This fall the Yup’ik, an Inuit people of central and western Alaska, are featured in the Heard Museum’s exhibition, Yua: Henri Matisse and the Inner Arctic Spirit. In this exclusive exhibition, the brilliance of Yup'ik masks is matched with the genius of French master Henri Matisse. Use the Library collection to enrich your exhibition experience and find works like Matisse: the Inuit face = Visage inuit (1992), published by the Cultural Centre, Canadian High Commission; and Matisse and the Eskimos: an Overlooked Chapter in Art (2015), edited by Anne-Birgitte Fonsmark. With over 175 works on the Yup’ik, the Billie Jane Baguley Library and Archives stands ready to meet the needs of patrons wishing to explore the culture of this proud people.

Photo: Sesbastian Kleihs / Heard Museum

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shop INTRODUCING

HENRI THE HUSKY! MEMBER PRICE:

$14

Animals play an important role in Arctic cultures, so we created Henri the Husky to be the accessible “face” to help younger audiences engage and learn about the art and themes in Yua: Henri Matisse and the Inner Arctic Spirit. You’ll find Henri in the companion family exhibition It’s Your Turn: Yua, incorporated into our public events (including First Fridays and Holidays at the Heard) and in the Matisse Family Guide, available in the exhibition. After visiting Henri in the museum, stop by the Heard Museum Shop or Books & More to take home your own adorable plush version at a special members-only price of $14 (retail $17.50). Photo: Megan Richmond / Heard Museum

36 E A R T H S O N G


GOTTA HAVE IT!

MEMBER DISCOUNT:

10%

RE AD SHOP DINE

Photos: Megan Richmond / Heard Museum

ALASKAN WHALE BONE MASK Artist unknown $650

"DOLL MAKER II" LIMITED-EDITION PIN/ PENDANT WITH LAPIS AND FOSSILIZED IVORY by Denise Wallace (Aleut) $12,800

STERLING SILVER RING WITH FOSSILIZED IVORY by Denise Wallace (Aleut) $1,775

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dine ON THE MENU:

Taste of France BY IRENE RUTIGLIANO

COURTYARD CAFÉ SALMON RILLETTES

DIRECTOR OF RESTAURANT OPERATIONS

The opportunity to develop a menu around Yua:

Henri Matisse and the Inner Arctic Spirit brought so

MEMBER DISCOUNT:

many culinary possibilities that it was difficult to

10%

choose what would be on the final menu. We had a

lot of fun creating featured items that include French as well as Inuit influences.

In addition to our usual à la carte offerings, we decided to take this unique opportunity to offer a three-course table

d’hôte menu that is common in many European restaurants.

Rillettes are a coarse, pâté-like spread traditionally made from pork. Our special rillettes combine French and Alaskan elements by using indigenous salmon prepared two ways (poached and smoked). Serve with a toasted French baguette crostini to provide a little lift and crunch. 8 oz. poached salmon fillet 4 oz. smoked salmon fillet 1 Tbsp. chopped cilantro

This fixed-price menu will begin with a choice of salmon

1 Tbsp. chopped dill

rillettes or our very popular house-made French onion soup.

1 Tbsp. chopped capers

The main course will be our take on a croque monsieur, an elegant French version of a toasted ham and melted cheese

1 Tbsp. whole-grain Dijon mustard

sandwich, served with a salad of baby field greens and Dijon

1/4 cup mayonnaise

course will be a decadent chocolate mousse and a French

Café seasoning (use salt and pepper)

mustard vinaigrette. To round out the menu, the third

cookie. Of course, we will offer selected French wines by the glass to accompany the meal.

There are other French/Inuit influences throughout the new menu, so you should enjoy spotting those, along with a few changes we made to some of our favorite dishes.

Be sure to complete your day at the Heard by stopping at

the Courtyard Café for déjeuner or at the Coffee Cantina for a festin délicieux!

38 E A R T H S O N G

In a medium bowl, crumble and mix the salmon, then add the chopped cilantro, dill and capers, and season to taste. Gently fold in the Dijon mustard and mayonnaise, keeping the mixture chunky to create a luscious spreadable appetizer. Chill for 1 hour. Serve with toasted baguette crostini.


travel + learn Trips

TR AVEL + LE ARN

EXPLORE WITH THE GUILD Classes HOME: NATIVE PEOPLES IN THE SOUTHWEST SATURDAYS SEPT. 29 & OCT. 6 9:30 A.M. TO 12:30 P.M. Note: This is a two-session course

Location: Encanto Room Instructor: Linda Hefter (hefteraz@cox.net or shortcourse@heardguild.org) Facilitator: Phyllis Manning (pemanning@ hotmail.com or shortcourse@heardguild.org) HOPI ARTS, HOPI CULTURE MAY 10-13, 2019 In conjunction with Tohono Chul, we will travel to the land of the Hopi, where culture and tradition are rooted in the land. We will be introduced to

silversmiths, potters, basket weavers and katsina doll

carvers working in both historical and contemporary ways who will share with us their art, their lives,

Short Course Fee: $45 Come meet the peoples who have lived and thrived in the Southwest from Prehistoric to Current

times. The two-part course begins Sept. 29 with

exciting overview of the land, culture, and history of the ancient peoples of the Southwest and the

federally recognized tribes and pueblos who call Arizona and New Mexico home today.

and their rich cultural heritage. Departure over the

Session Two on Oct. 6 will include an introduction

witnessing the very special celebrations that may be

Highlights Tour of the Heard Museum.

Mother’s Day weekend will improve our chances of

to the Native American Fine Art Movement and a

taking place in many of the villages.

Whether you have lived in the desert for years

Please contact travel@heardguild.org to add yourself to the interest list.

Hopi Basket, c. 1970, .75 x 9. This wicker plaque was made by a woman from the Third Mesa village of Oraivi. It has a design of two rabbit sticks, which are hunting weapons. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Byron Harvey III.

or are new to the Southwest, don’t miss this

opportunity to deepen your understanding and

appreciation of this special place we all call home.

The Heard Museum Guild not only provides its members a wide variety of volunteering options at the museum, but Guild members also join together on regional journeys designed to better acquaint them with Native culture, art, and history. Join the Guild and travel with us! Visit heardguild.org/travel-with-us/. FA L L 2 01 8

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2018 Teacher Institue participants

Excellence in Education BY SHARAH NIETO DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION

“I ABSOLUTELY LOVED EVERYTHING ABOUT THIS! THANK YOU SO MUCH! THIS HAS BEEN A MARVELOUS START TO 2018!”

Comments like this from teachers who have attended Heard

Museum educator events are music to our ears. This has been an

2018-19 Events EDUCATOR OPEN HOUSE OCT. 8, 2018 Celebrate the curriculum release for the upcoming exhibition Yua: Henri Matisse and the Inner Arctic Spirit and enjoy a free day of programming for Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

exciting year for the Education Department at the Heard Museum.

BOARDING SCHOOLS TEACH-IN

have been met with great excitement and gratitude. We hosted

JAN. 5, 2019

We’ve developed a number of free resources for educators that

our first Educator Open House, Teacher Appreciation Night and

Teacher Institute, among several other educator-centered events. In addition, we released a free curriculum on the Ancestral Puebloan people. Hundreds of teachers attended this year’s events, and we hope to engage hundreds more during the 2018-19 school year. This school year we look forward to continuing to host similar

TEACHER APPRECIATION NIGHT MAY 7, 2019 TEACHER APPRECIATION MONTH JUNE 2019

events, in addition to developing new curriculum resources for

Free admission for educators during the entire month of June with valid educator ID.

package that will complement Yua: Henri Matisse and the Inner

TEACHER INSTITUTE:

educators. In October, we will release an original curriculum

Arctic Spirit. In January, we will continue our efforts with the release

JUNE 24 TO 26, 2019

Stories (see page 25).

Help us spread the word! Make sure your teachers know that the Heard has free resources at heard.org/education/ teacherresources

of curriculum for Away From Home: American Indian Boarding School

We also offer a special $30 Education level membership, valid for one full-time student or educator with proof of enrollment or employment; includes all Individual ($60) membership benefits. Call 602.251.0261, email members@heard.org or join online at heard.org/membership.

40 E A R T H S O N G

Generously supported by


Rebels for Art When I entered the 8th grade my grandmother

expanding her talent and enacting artistic agency. Dunn

needed to know how to take care of myself, which

that were considered off-limits at the time, creating

demanded that I take Home Economics, she said I apparently means human survival is dependent on

perfecting a meringue and wrangling a sewing machine bobbin. I lasted about a week in that class, eventually begging my grandmother to let me ditch Home ec.

for Art II (Drawing & Painting). The art teacher, Ms.

Alvarado had wild blonde hair streaked with pink, lots

of blue mascara, went braless most of the time, and held a deep love for the role playing game Dungeons and

TR AVEL + LE ARN

BY NINA SANDERS (APSAALOOKE) | CONTRIBUTING COLUMNIST

compelled Pablita to paint things of a cultural nature

such difficulty for Velarde that she relocated with her family to Albuquerque, NM. Since then much has

changed, a burgeoning population of celebrated Santa Clara Pueblo women artists have taken the stage.

Painters like Rose Simpson, Eliza Naranjo Morse,

and Michelle Tsosie Sisneros honor Pablita’s legacy by

exploring and understanding through art, and pushing

Dragons. Alvarado was cool, she let me paint blackened dismal floral arrangements, scantily clad Greek heroes, and unattractive bugs, images that were certainly not common among the Crow people. Once, she entered

a large painting I’d done of a dying floral arrangement into a state wide art competition, it placed first in its

category. When I took my grandmother to see it she

gazed at it for bit, wrinkled her nose, and told me she

didn't understand “that” kind of art. Ms. Alvarado knew that some of the art I was creating in her class wasn't

always in the best interest of my cultural aesthetic, she understood though how important it was for me to

express myself on my own terms. She told me about

artists like Frida Kahlo, Louise Bourgeois, and Pablita

Velarde, to encourage me to honor my own talents and voice as a female artist.

Many years later, during my time at the School for

Advanced Research I stumbled onto a book written by Shelby Tisdale, titled, “Pablita Velarde: In Her

Own Words” and a memoir by Pablita’s granddaughter Margarete Bagshaw. Both books went into great detail concerning Pablita’s many trials as a Pueblo woman

painter. Tisdale explored Velarde’s time as a student of Dorothy Dunn, the Santa Fe Indian School art teacher who encouraged and supported Pablita in

Pablita Velarde in front of her Father’s house, circa 1934.

new boundaries, but with the support of the community. Each of these women will tell you how Velarde

influenced and inspired their own lives and careers,

with stories so personal and thoughtful it becomes clear that Pablita was a feminist and art activist before it was

cool. Pablita withstood immense hardship and resistance for the love of art, she kicked open doors for not just

Native women artists, but all artists. As my 8th grade

art teacher Becky Alvarado once said, “leave it up to a rebellious artist to change it all.”

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experience STUDENT ART SHOW AND SALE

EVENT HIGHLIGHTS STUDENT ART On March 23, the Heard Museum Guild and museum members celebrated the opening of the 32nd Annual American Indian Student Art Show & Sale. Nearly 400 American Indian students in grades 7 to 12 submitted their original artwork to be judged by a professional panel, compete for ribbon and cash awards, and sell their artwork. This year, an intricate pottery-style concho belt, The Beauty of Life: An Infinite Circle, created by 17-yearold Nicklaus Stanaland (Diné), won the Best of Show award. ON THE NEXT PAGE: DEAR LISTENER VIP OPENING

Student artist Kenzi Bowekaty (Zuni) showing museum members her submission to the show

Guild members Carol James and Phillis Manning assisting with the silent auction

DEAR LISTENER MEMBERS OPENING

Student artist Darian Seowtewa (Zuni) with his submission

Student artist Loren Quam (Zuni) in front of his painting

42 E A R T H S O N G

Circles of Giving and Experience-level members were invited to an exclusive VIP reception and preview of Dear Listener: Works by Nicholas Galanin on May 3. Following the opening remarks, guests mingled with the artist and his collaborators while listening to a special violin performance by Laura Ortman (White Mountain Apache) in the Dennis H. Lyon Family Crossroads Gallery

Members David & Donna Zimmer showing off their new purchase with the artist Anyssa Sekakuku (Hopi)

All members were invited to a private viewing and Members’ Lounge on May 4 for the opening of Dear Listener: Works by Nicholas Galanin. The evening also coincided with First Fridays at the Heard and “Not a Block Party,” featuring Shabazz Palaces, Indian Agent, Heebie Jeebies and DJ Byron Fenix.

Photos: Haute Photography and Videography


EXPERIENCE

DEAR LISTENER VIP & MEMBERS OPENING

xxxxx

xxxxx

Dear Listener VIP opening

Laura Ortman (White Mountain Apache) performing at the VIP opening

Members Ashley Harder and Steve Hanson looking at artwork in Dear Listener

Indian Agent performs at NOT A BLOCK PARTY

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44 E A R T H S O N G

Photos: Sebastian Kleihs, Heard Museum


dia del niño

EXPERIENCE

S H A L I YA H B E N | D I R E C TO R O F P U B L I C P R O G R A M M I N G

In April of 2017 the Heard held its first Dia del Niño

event in conjunction with the wildly popular exhibition

Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. The exhibition provided the museum the opportunity to establish new

initiatives, including a focus on providing free public access to the arts for all Maricopa County youth. As

the program grows so does its impact within the

community. In its second year, we were honored to collaborate with over 10 Valley organizations that

joined us in our efforts to provide the best day possible

for Valley youth. With signature sponsorship from the

Tony & Milena Astorga Foundation and additional

support from Applied Materials Foundation and First

Things First, we welcomed over 1400 children and

2018 SIGNATURE SPONSOR Tony and Milena Astorga Foundation SPONSORS

adults for the one-day event. This year was especially

Applied Materials

Children of Arizona, an organization providing

PROGRAMMING PARTNERS

unique in that we partnered with Free Arts for Abused

First Things First

services to over 110,000 homeless and abused children

Act One

in need. Erina Meneses, Program Coordinator at

Free Arts said:

“Dia del Niño was a beautiful experience for the

children that attended… they don’t always have

the opportunity to enjoy all of the phases of being a child. This event allowed them to celebrate and create meaningful childhood memories!

Through our valuable partnership with the Heard Museum we provide children from all cultural

backgrounds the first-time experience of visiting

a museum.”

Arizona Diamondbacks

Consulate General of Mexico in Phoenix

Free Arts for Abused Children in Arizona

Harmony Project Phoenix

Japanese Friendship Garden of Phoenix Arizona Native Health

Phoenix Indian Center

Phoenix Public Library

Xico Arte y Cultura

Be sure to join us next year with your family for Dia del Niño on April 28, 2019.

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give DEAR MEMBERS,

It’s hard to believe that our new season of exhibitions and programs is about to begin! We couldn’t be more excited – or more grateful to you for making it possible. Your support as a Heard Museum member plays a critical role in our growth and success. Thank you! The year ahead is packed with original exhibitions and programs you won’t see anywhere else. From favorites like First Fridays and Holidays at the Heard to new events like monthly Second Saturday Marketplaces (beginning November 10), your membership offers you special access that brings you closer to the art and artists you enjoy. We hope you plan to join us for the exclusive Member Preview of Yua: Henri Matisse and the Inner Arctic Spirit on Sunday, Oct. 28, as well as participate in the Exhibition Symposium (see page 13). From original exhibitions and events, impactful educational programs and unique marketplaces to in-gallery yoga and live performances across our campus, your membership opens the door to exclusive experiences throughout the year. We hope to see you here at the Heard Museum often as we approach a major milestone – our 90th anniversary! It is thanks to our members and supporters that we are celebrating such a momentous occasion. You are an integral part of the Heard Museum family. Thank you, and see you soon! Warm regards,

Dan Hagerty

Director of Strategic Development and Programming

46 E A R T H S O N G

welcome new trustees JANIS LYON The Lyon Family has long been among the Valley’s leading philanthropists and the Heard Museum’s most active supporters. In May, the museum was delighted to welcome Janis Lyon to the Board of Trustees. Lyon is deeply involved with American Indian art. Over the past 45 years, she and her husband, Dennis — a Life Trustee of the museum — have lovingly established a significant collection of pottery and jewelry that includes important works by Maria Martinez (San Ildefonso Pueblo) and Charles Loloma (Hopi) as well as historical and contemporary pieces representing the Acoma, Ako, Zia, Cochiti, Puname and San Ildefonso pueblos, and more. In 2017, she served as guest curator (with her friend and Heard Life Trustee Carol Ann Mackay) for Beauty Speaks for Us, the inaugural exhibition in the Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust Grand Gallery. Lyon and Mackay are serving as co-chairs for the 2018 Moondance gala, celebrating the opening of Yua: Henri Matisse and the Inner Arctic Spirit. Of her appointment, Lyon shared, “I look forward to continuing to learn about so many beautiful cultures through my service to the Heard’s board and to doing what I can to help ensure that these cultures and artists continue to thrive.”

SUE SNYDER At its annual meeting in May, the Heard’s volunteer organization, the Heard Museum Guild, installed its new Board of Directors, now led by President Sue Snyder. Snyder, will lead the Guild over the next two years and served as an ex-officio member of the Heard Museum Board of Trustees. Snyder has been a member of the Guild since 2009, when she took the nine-month training course to become a museum docent, a role she continues to enjoy today. Her leadership positions have included serving as Guild Secretary, Student Art Chair, Education Coordinator, and as a facilitator for the Las Guias docent program that originally brought her to the Heard family. “It is my goal to help the Heard and the Guild to increase and diversify our membership base to be more representative of the Phoenix community,” Snyder says. She will seek to pursue this goal through the many programs and activities that the Guild coordinates, including producing the Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market, filling vital staff positions that greet and serve museum and library visitors, organizing a wide range of educational and travel programs, and much more.


moondance honoree profile Joy M. and Howard R. Berlin have made tremendous contributions to the Heard Museum in leadership, philanthropy, and as active participants as collectors of contemporary American Indian art. The Heard Museum is proud to honor them at the upcoming Moondance gala, alongside renowned Hopi jeweler Sonwai, to be held on Saturday, October 27, 2018 at 6 p.m. at the Heard Museum. WHAT DREW YOU TO THE SOUTHWEST?

The fresh air, beautiful scenery and the people drew us here following retirement. We settled in Carefree, Arizona, for a time spent our summers in the Adirondacks on Lake Champlain and then in 2005 purchased a home in Santa Fe, NM. We now spend roughly half of the year in Arizona and the other in Santa Fe. TELL US A BIT ABOUT YOUR PRACTICE OF COLLECTING AMERICAN INDIAN ART.

On a vacation trip, we purchased our first Katsina at the Museum of Northern Arizona in Flagstaff. While visiting the Museum, we met Gordon Von Wert, a sculptor and made our first purchase in that medium. That was the beginning of our love of American Indian art. Our New York apartment looked like an apartment in Santa Fe, with shutters, rugs, two- and three-dimensional art on the walls. DO YOU COLLECT WITHIN A PREFERRED MEDIUM? MOVEMENT OR TIME PERIOD? WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR MOST ADMIRED ARTISTS, WORKS WITHIN YOUR COLLECTION?

The majority of our collection was built with the assistance of Bruce McGee in the Heard Museum Shop. We jointly share our interest in all mediums, but of course, Joy specializes in jewelry. We have a greater shared passion, now, for painting. In 1998, we had a chance meeting with Lloyd Kiva New, one of the founders of IAIA (Institute of American Indian Arts) in Santa Fe and he is credited with being responsible for starting the contemporary art movement around 1960. He encouraged artists to branch out with

Photo: Haute Photography and Videography

their art and to express themselves with fewer boundaries. At the same time, he encouraged them to retain their cultural roots and to reflect that in their art. We have collected mostly contemporary art, that being defined as being created after the early sixties. WHAT DO YOU LOVE MOST ABOUT THE HEARD MUSEUM?

Clearly, the favorite assets of the Heard Museum are its people, leadership, staff and volunteers. People make the institution, for better and for worse. Following its people, I believe that the campus is a major asset. The campus is well located in an area slowly but steadily being improved. The Heard Museum is an internationally recognized Indian museum. In fact, it is more highly recognized in Europe than it is here in its home state of Arizona. I have been proud to be a member of the board for the last ten years. With good leadership (like now), I expect that our Museum will be recognized even more highly than before. My hope is that the audience will broaden based on imaginative programming and exhibits coupled with more engagement with the artists.

MOONDANCE AT THE HEARD Saturday, Oct. 27 | 6 to 10 p.m. For more information about this year’s Moondance Gala visit heard.org/moondance or contact Rebecca Simpson,

rsimpson@heard.org 602.251.0245

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Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PA I D Phoenix, AZ Heard Museum

To ensure continued delivery of this publication, please notify the Membership Department of any address corrections at 602.251.0261 or members@heard.org. Published by the Heard Museum. ISSN: 1070-8618 © 2018 Heard Museum. All rights reserved.

Josef Albers in Mexico

Josef Albers (1888-1976) Study for Homage to the Square: Starting, 1969. Casein and oil on Masonite. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Gift of the artist, 1969. 69.1916 © The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, 2018

The Heard Museum is proud to announce its presentation of Josef Albers in Mexico, Organized by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York, curated by Lauren Hinkson. Opening February 1st, 2019 and running through May 27th, 2019, Josef Albers in Mexico is an exhibition which elucidates the influence and connectivity between the work of Albers (German, 1888-1976), and the abstracted geometric vocabulary of preColumbian art, architecture, and material culture. Albers and his wife, Anni Albers (1899–1994), took frequent trips to Latin America, with particular interest in Mexico – visiting the country more than a dozen times from the 1930s to the 1960s. Albers’ fascination with the visual culture of Mexico left an indelible mark on his own artistic production and methodology, with sites like Teotihuacán, Chichén Itza, Monte Albán, and Mitla infiltrating the visual framework of his work. Included in the exhibition are rarely seen early paintings by Albers, seminal works like Homage to the Square and Variant/Adobe series, works on paper, and a selection of rich photographic and photocollage work, many of which have never before been on view. For more information please visit Heard.org

Profile for Heard Museum

Heard Museum Earth Song, Fall 2018  

Earth Song is the Heard Museum's members-only publication on museum events, exhibitions and milestones. It is published 3 times a year.

Heard Museum Earth Song, Fall 2018  

Earth Song is the Heard Museum's members-only publication on museum events, exhibitions and milestones. It is published 3 times a year.

Profile for earthsong

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