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earthsong MUSEUM MEMBERSHIP MAGAZINE

Y E A R S O F T H E H E A R D GU I L D I N D I A N FA I R & M A R K E T 19 SPRING

2018

RICHARD CHAVEZ OPENS FEB. 2 PG. 11


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TABLE OF CONTENTS 4

DIRECTOR'S LETTER

21

DIA DEL NIÑO

5

COVER: 60TH INDIAN FAIR & MARKET

22

PROGRAMMING

SYMMETRY IN STONE:

25

LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES

26

TRAVEL AND LEARN WITH THE GUILD

28

MOONDANCE

THE BIRTH OF AN EXHIBITION

30

CALENDAR

18

ON VIEW: AWA TSIREH

32

BY THE NUMBERS

19

THE ART OF BEING INDIAN

33

STAFF PROFILE: ERIN JOYCE

20

HOOP WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

34

SHOP: GOTTA HAVE IT!

35

DINING: AVOCADO TOAST

11

THE JEWELRY OF RICHARD I. CHAVEZ

15

ON VIEW: T.C. CANNON

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DEAR LISTENER:

IN THE NEXT ISSUE

NEW ON VIEW ARTISTIC EXCELLENCE: THE HEARD MUSEUM GUILD INDIAN FAIR & MARKET CELEBRATES 60 YEARS Opening Jan. 12, 2018 SYMMETRY IN STONE: THE JEWELRY OF RICHARD I. CHAVEZ Opening Feb. 2, 2018

Inside Cover: Richard Chavez (San Felipe Pueblo) Bracelet detail of black jade, coral, dolomite, and silver, 2010, 1.1875 inches wide. Private Collection. Right: Richard Chavez (San Felipe Pueblo) Ring of Siberian green jade, turquoise, coral, and 14k gold, 2006.

WELCOME TO OUR NEW CIRCLES OF GIVING MEMBERS:

Collection of Jurg and Christel Bieri.

Milena and Tony Astorga, Heard Museum Trustee The Heard Museum is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization incorporated in the State of Arizona. Exhibition, event and program funding provided in part by the Arizona Commission on the Arts, the Arizona Humanities Council, the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Phoenix Office of

Jennifer and Charles Sands

Arts and Culture.

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DIRECTOR'S LETTER Dear Heard Museum Members: I’ve attended Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market over the years, but it wasn’t until I participated as the Director and CEO in 2016 that I fully appreciated the vast effort required to transform the Heard’s eight-acre campus into a sea of white tents filled with artists representing tribes from across North America offering dazzling jewelry, intricate baskets, detailed pots, colorful paintings and every other kind of art imaginable from traditional to contemporary. This year we have much to be proud of in presenting the 60th edition of one the largest American Indian events in the United States, and the largest annual event at the Museum. The Fair has been a labor of love for the Guild since its inception, and continues to flourish under the creative inspiration, managerial skills, thoughtful leadership, and hard work of hundreds of volunteers. In honor of the 60th anniversary, the Guild is endeavoring to raise $60,000 to award to winners of the juried art competition. Additionally, the Guild typically donates over $100,000 of Fair proceeds to support the mission and programs of the Heard Museum. In conjunction with the Fair, we are excited to present a commemorative exhibition in the Kitchell Gallery entitled Artistic Excellence: The Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market Celebrates 60 Years. We are hope you will join us for the Members' Opening Reception on January 12, 2018. I look forward to seeing you there. One of my goals as Director is to continue nurturing this spectacular tradition, so as to ensure another 60 years of the Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair and Market. We hope your experience at the Fair gives you a greater understanding of and affinity for contemporary Indigenous arts and culture. I extend my deepest appreciation to the Museum Guild and all of you for making the Indian Fair & Market a success, and for your ongoing commitment to the Heard Museum.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES John Melamed Wick Pilcher Patricia K. Hibbeler Leland W. Peterson David M. Roche

Chair Vice-Chair Secretary Treasurer Director and CEO

TRUSTEES Karen Abraham Tony Astorga Arlene K. Ben-Horin Mark B. Bonsall Gregory H. Boyce Dr. Craig Cohen Robert A. Cowie Elizabeth Murfee DeConcini Judy Dworkin John Graham Carrie L. Hulburd James R. Huntwork Mary Endorf, Guild President

Stephen R. Lewis Marigold Linton John F. Lomax Robert Meyer Scott Montgomery Susan H. Navran Scott H. O’Connor William G. Ridenour Mark Schiavoni Don Smith Christy Vezolles David Wilshin

LIFE TRUSTEES Kay Benedict Howard R. Berlin James T. Bialac Dr. George Blue Spruce, Jr. Herbert J. Bool Robert B. Bulla F. Wesley Clelland, III Norma Jean Coulter Alice (A.J.) Dickey Robert J. Duffy Mary G. Hamilton Barbara Heard Joel P. Hoxie Mary Hudak Dr. Thomas M. Hudak Richard L. Johnes Edward F. Lowry

Frederick A. Lynn Dennis H. Lyon Carol Ann Mackay Clint J. Magnussen Robert L. Matthews Miriam J. McClennen Mary Ellen McKee James Meenaghan Louise Menk Dr. Wayne Lee Mitchell Dr. Arthur L. Pelberg David E. Reese William C. Schubert Sheryl L. Sculley Richard H. Silverman John B. Stiteler John G. Stuart

Caesar Chaves

Creative Director and Designer

Carli Krueger

Designer

Deborah Paddison

Contributing Editor

David M. Roche Dickey Family Director and CEO

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IN DI A N FA IR A N D M A RK E T

Celebrating Artistic Excellence The Heard Museum Guild 60th Indian Fair & Market

ANNA FLYNN, MARKETING CHAIR, HEARD MUSEUM GUILD INDIAN FAIR & MARKET

The Heard Museum Guild is proudly celebrating the 60th Indian Fair & Market on March 3 and 4, 2018. The celebration kicks off in January with two special events: a Members’ Opening Reception and preview of the exhibition Artistic Excellence: The Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market Celebrates 60 Years; and the January Guild Meeting, with presentations about the exhibition by members of the curatorial staff and the Director’s vision for the museum for the next 60 years. February brings the Prepare for the Fair Lecture Series, with presentations and art by three amazing families and a special Saturday session about living with Native art. The Best of Show Reception on March 2 is our chance to celebrate the art and honor the artists who are ribbon winners in the juried art competition. The Fair opens early Saturday for members only and ends Sunday afternoon with a rousing closing ceremony on the grassy amphitheatre. W I N T E R 2 01 8

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FAIR CHAIR'S LETTER Dear Heard Museum Members: On behalf of the Heard Museum Guild, I cordially invite you to join us at the 60th Annual Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market on March 3 and 4 and at other celebratory events leading up to the Fair, including the Best of Show Reception on March 2. In honor of the 60th Annual Indian Fair & Market, we are delighted to announce a one-time, special $10,000 Best of Show Award sponsored by Howard R. & Joy M. Berlin and Kristine & Leland W. Peterson. Peterson is Treasurer of the Heard Museum Board of Trustees and Berlin is a Life Trustee of the Heard Museum. The Guild thanks the Berlins and Petersons for their generous support of the Indian Fair & Market and our outstanding artists. For the Guild and the artists, the juried competition is one of the most important aspects of the Fair. Each year, many of our Fair artists submit their best work in hopes of winning a coveted ribbon and prize money. A renowned group of judges, composed of artists, collectors, and museum professionals, reviews and rates each submitted piece. In September 1974, a new top award of $500—Best of Show—was given at the Guild’s Arts & Crafts Exhibit. According to the October 1974 Guild Newsletter, members were asked to “…toss all spare change (and bills too, of course) into Awards Chairman Mary Guilford’s glass fish bowl. It will appear at all functions and be a permanent figurehead on the Information Desk.” We’ve come a long way to this year’s ambitious fundraising goal of $60,000 and the one-time $10,000 Best of Show Award. Your generous donation supports the artists’ careers and boosts their reputations. Join us for the Best of Show Reception on Friday evening, March 2 to celebrate the art and honor the artists who are ribbon winners in the 2018 juried art competition. You’ll also enjoy a fashion show featuring designs by Fair artists as well as hors d’oeuvres, dessert and a nohost bar all set in the historical Heard Museum courtyard. On behalf of the participating artists, and all who work to support the Fair, I sincerely thank you for your continued support. Shelley Mowry Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market Chair, 2018 The crowd at Arts and Crafts Exhibit in the early 1980s. Billie Jane Baguley Library and Archives

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THE FAIR SEASON JANUARY

FEBRUARY

MEMBERS’ OPENING RECEPTION FOR ARTISTIC EXCELLENCE: THE HEARD MUSEUM GUILD INDIAN FAIR & MARKET CELEBRATES 60 YEARS

PREPARE FOR THE FAIR LECTURE SERIES: CELEBRATE EXCELLENCE

Friday, Jan. 12 6 to 8 p.m. Both shops will be open.

EXHIBITION—ARTISTIC EXCELLENCE: THE HEARD MUSEUM GUILD INDIAN FAIR & MARKET CELEBRATES 60 YEARS

Jan. 13 – March 11 Samuel & Betty Kitchell Gallery In this exhibition we present art from the museum’s permanent collection that was purchased at the Fair or created by the honored and award-winning artists. Visitors have the opportunity to celebrate the newest trends and enduring classics of American Indian art over the years of the Indian Fair & Market.

GUILD MEETING (NON-MEMBERS WELCOME)

Wednesday, Jan. 17 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Steele Auditorium Topic: The 60th Annual Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market Kickoff Learn about Artistic Excellence from longtime Heard curator and Director of Research Dr. Ann Marshall. Find out from Diana Pardue, Chief Curator, how art at the Fair is identified as museum quality and purchased for the Heard’s permanent collection. Listen as Sharon Moore, Registrar, and Kristen Caughlin, Assistant Registrar, explain how art is handled and preserved. Hear David Roche, Director and CEO of the Heard Museum, talk about the past, present and future vision for the Heard Museum and the roles that the Guild and the Indian Fair & Market play in that vision.

Thursdays, Feb. 1, 8, 22 and Saturday, Feb. 17 9 to 9:30 a.m.: Registration, continental breakfast and mingle 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: Session (includes a refreshment break) Steele Auditorium Members: $50 (Admission included) Non-members: $70 (includes 2 Museum admissions, good for 1 year) Register at heard.org/fair/tickets Questions or to register offline: Contact Course Registrar Kim Schrader at 860.881.3833 or prepareforfair@heardguild.org.

1. GLITZ, GLAMOUR, IT’S THE GAUSSOINS

Thursday, Feb. 1 The Gaussoin Family, accomplished jewelers and artists, are descended from Navajo silversmiths and weavers, Picuris Pueblo potters, as well as singers and sculptors. Connie Tsosie Gaussoin; her sons Lt. Col. Jerry E. Gaussoin Jr. and David and Wayne Nez; her daughter Tazbah; and granddaughter (daughter of Jerry) Kehasbah. Connie was a trailblazer for women in metalsmithing in the late 1960s. She explores new possibilities of form, materials and expression based on personal experiences, including worldwide travel, that have provided opportunities to view and interact with people of other cultures and artistic abilities. Jerry Jr., a Lt. Col. in the U.S. Army, remains closely influenced by traditional Navajo and Pueblo silversmithing designs, though his experiences in Germany and during tours of duty in Kosovo and Iraq also influence his art. Jerry’s daughter Kehasbah will model some of the family’s jewelry. Wayne Nez works in a variety of media, including monumental sculpture, using unconventional materials like aluminum and found objects like steel mechanical parts in his jewelry and fashion design. David Nez expresses his innovative spirit through his use of new materials and forms. His recent fashion creations, including his head-to-toe statement of sustainability, encompass the entire body. Tazbah is a weaver and has also collaborated with David on fashion designs, frequently modeling the resulting apparel for publicity photographs.

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THE FAIR SEASON 2. FORM, FUNCTION, PHILOSOPHY, FOLWELLS

4. DAZZLE AND DELIGHT: THE PRUITT FAMILY

Thursday, Feb. 8

Thursday, Feb. 22

The Folwells are Santa Clara Pueblo pottery makers: Jody Folwell, daughters Susan and Polly Rose, and granddaughter Kaa (Polly’s daughter).

This talented family includes Pat Pruitt, Marla Allison and Chris Pruitt.

Jody Folwell is an eighth-generation Pueblo potter who is recognized as one of the finest modernist Pueblo potters. She uses traditional methods along with traditional and contemporary ceramics. While her art often touches on politics and social issues, it can also be playful and experimental using stylized designs, different clay colors and the addition of acrylic colors. Susan uses traditional clay and firing techniques and is inspired by traditional designs. She experiments with techniques, clays, designs and forms to create compositions with symbols from many Indian cultures, resulting in work that has global appeal. Polly Rose has created a variety of traditional and contemporary pieces of pottery over the years. She has won numerous awards for her work at Santa Fe Indian Market, the Heard Museum Indian Fair & Market and Gallup Ceremonials. Kaa learned to make pottery from her mother Polly and grandmother Jody. Her innovative pottery is inspired by graphic and graffiti art. Through her art she investigates what it is to be an Indigenous woman in the 21st century.

3.DECORATING WITH YOUR ART

Saturday, Feb. 17 Love basketry or pottery or Navajo rugs, but don't see them fitting into your existing decor? In this special Saturday session, we will explore how to live with the Native art we love and collect.

Norbert Peshlakai (Navajo, b. 1953) Mr. and Mrs. Slim Cowboy Nature Walk, 2017 Silver Gift of the Heard Museum Council

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Pat Pruitt (Laguna Pueblo/Chiricahua Apache/Anglo) combines his knowledge of traditional silversmithing, a degree in mechanical engineering and knowledge of stainlesssteel machining to create a distinctive style of stainless-steel jewelry that challenges notions of what Native American jewelry is. Pat won 2017 overall Best of Show at Santa Fe Indian Market for his contemporary sculpture Sentinel v1.0. Pat is the husband of Marla Allison, a contemporary painter from Laguna Pueblo. Marla is known for her vivid paintings that depict the landscapes, wildlife, architecture and particularly the people of her native New Mexico, as well as for experimenting with geometric patterns to depict living forms. Her paintings are based on the contemporary, which borrows from the past. Chris Pruitt (Laguna Pueblo/ Chiricahua Apache), Pat’s brother, lives in his boyhood village, Paguate, in Laguna Pueblo, New Mexico. His jewelry represents a contemporary style of silversmithing with a traditional touch. His techniques include fabricating, brazing, texturing, polishing, and cutting and inlay of precious and semi-precious stones and wood.

Concho stamping d


detail

MARCH BEST OF SHOW RECEPTION

March 2 5:30 to 8 p.m. Tickets: $75 Members/$100 non-members heard.org/fair/tickets In lieu of First Friday join us for a highlight of the Fair weekend and be the first to see the winning art, meet the artists and hear their stories. Preview fashions designed by Fair artists as models walk the Heard Museum’s own catwalk. Bid on art in the Silent Auction. Relax under the twinkling lights in the historic courtyard while enjoying hot and cold hors d’oeuvres, dessert, a no-host bar and music compliments of Canyon Records. Designers include Loren Aragon (Acoma Pueblo), Phoenix Fashion Week’s 2018 Designer of the Year; Della Bighair Stump (Apsáalooke/Crow Nation); Summer Peters (Ojibwa); and Nanibaa Beck (Diné). Visit the Fair website (heard.org.fair) for updates on the Fashion Show designers. Support the Best of Show Ribbon Awards: Juried competition is a rigorous process, and winning these awards means so much to an artist’s career. Please help support and encourage our artists by donating to ribbon awards. Gifts of all sizes will help us reach our 60th Annual goal of $60,000. Find details and donate online at heard.org/fair/support/donate. Questions? Contact the Fair Fundraising Chair, IlgaAnn Bunjer, at 602.438.4384.

HEARD MUSEUM GUILD INDIAN FAIR & MARKET

March 3 & 4 Saturday, March 3: 8:30 a.m. (Members only); 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. (general admission) Sunday, March 4: 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit heard. org/fair or call 602.252.8840. Members at the Experience and Circles levels look for your complimentary tickets in the mail in early January. Check heard.org/membership for more details.

All-Indian jury at Arts and Crafts Exhibit in 1972 Billie Jane Baguley Library and Archives

HISTORY OF THE FAIR The Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair, as it was known when it began 60 years ago, provided American Indian artists a place to display and sell their work and for Phoenix-area families to meet the artists and learn about American Indian art and culture. In 1991, the Heard Museum Guild created an event that would be held the Friday night preceding Fair weekend. Named the Best of Show event, it is an opportunity for artists selected for the Fair to receive special recognition through a juried competition with cash awards. It is an important and needed successor to the juried Heard Museum Guild Arts and Crafts Show, which ended in fall 1984. While much has changed, much has stayed the same. Hospitality is still the byword for the Fair. Each day, more than 300 volunteers work behind the scenes to execute the plans laid months earlier to ensure that the artists’ and guests’ experiences are memorable. The proceeds from the Fair still support the mission and programs of the Heard. Guild members are especially proud of the donations raised for ribbon winners in the juried art competition. This year’s goal is $60,000, in honor of the 60th Annual Fair. A long-standing nationally recognized event, the Fair is the second-largest market of its kind in the country. It attracts more than 10,000 guests and has become a gathering place for art lovers and the community to celebrate and learn about Native art and culture. The Fair features more than 600 artists from American Indian and Alaska Native tribes and Canadian First Nations. The artists are well established and emerging, acclaimed and yet-to-bediscovered, old and young, female and male. Ten categories of art are represented: baskets, beadwork & quillwork, diverse artworks, jewelry & lapidary, paintings-drawings-graphics-photography, personal attire, pottery, Pueblo carvings, sculpture and weavings & textiles. The Heard Museum Guild cordially invites you to join us in celebrating 60 years of artistic excellence. Come walk with us… You can see, feel and hear the generations.

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Student Art Show & Sale returns JANE PRZESLICA, STUDENT ART COORDINATOR, HEARD MUSEUM GUILD

The Heard Museum Guild invites you to support emerging artists

by attending the 32nd Annual American Indian Student Art Show

& Sale (SASS)! The event features the artwork of American Indian students in grades 7-12 from communities across the United States.

In 2017, over 350 artists participated in the SASS, entering over

500 pieces of original artwork. There is no better way to support

tomorrow’s master artists than by supporting today’s student artists.

As part of the weekend event, students will participate in a

juried competition and have the opportunity to earn ribbons

and cash awards. Artwork is judged by a panel of art scholars,

including professional artists, college professors, curators, and

collectors. Ribbons are awarded in two divisions and 13 art

categories, in addition to Best of Show, Best of Division, and

other special ribbons. On average, SASS distributes more than $4,000 to ribbon winners annually.

All student artwork will be for sale during the SASS and

student artists are often available to discuss their work. Imagine your newly purchased art signed in front of you! What a great

photo opportunity!

Why wait until the SASS to support American Indian student artists?

Ba'hookos Bi'aadii (Northern Female), watercolor and pen, 2017

You can own a piece of student art today. Purchase SASS student

Mikail Morgain (Navajo), Age 16, 2017 Student Art Show & Sale participant.

art images, on notecards, prints, and posters at the Heard Museum's Books & More, Heard Guild meetings, Heard-sponsored events, or the Heard Guild website. Profits from the sale of these items support

32ND HEARD MUSEUM GUILD AMERICAN

the Heard Museum Guild Internship/Scholarship program which

INDIAN STUDENT ART SHOW & SALE

places American Indian college students in paid intern positions with Heard museum staff. In addition to internships, profits fund art supply grants to teachers from participating SASS schools.

Your support of SAS encourages student artists to pursue careers in the art world. Someday, you may even see see their work for sale at the Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market!

March 23-26, 2018 | Monte Vista Room Members-Only Opening Night Silent Auction & Sale

Friday, March 23:

5:30 - 8 p.m.

Open to the Public

The Student Art Show & Sale is free and open to the public.

Saturday, March 24: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Learn more about SASS and how you can get involved at at

Sunday, March 25:

heardguild.org.

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11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Monday, March 26: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.


PREVIEW

Symmetry in stone Work by one of the Southwest's top jewelers comes to the Heard Diana F. Pardue, Chief Curator For the first time in Richard Chavez’s more than 40-year career, his jewelry will be featured in a retrospective exhibition. Symmetry in Stone: The Jewelry of Richard I. Chavez opens at the Heard Museum on Feb. 2.

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Since his early years of jewelry design and execution, Chavez has continued to painstakingly make each item by hand. An artist who enjoys designing, Chavez places an emphasis on stone selection, placement and presentation. Now, some 40 years since he first tried to solder metals, Chavez has become one of the Southwest’s leading jewelers, whose works are recognized for their complex inlay, architectural sensibilities and striking color patterning. Richard Chavez (San Felipe Pueblo, b. 1949) studied architecture at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque and worked as an architectural draftsman at the firm of Harvey S. Hoshour. One of the projects he assisted with was the design for the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque. In the 1970s, Chavez taught himself jewelry-making through diligence and trial and error. Initially he cut and shaped shells into heishi, but he stopped due to the influx of Asian shell beads. He entered his first competition, the Eight Northern Indian Pueblos Arts and Crafts Show, in 1976. Winning the grand prize for a white mother-of-pearl necklace, ring and bracelet set sparked Chavez’s jewelrymaking career. When Chavez’s career shifted from architecture to jewelry design and fabrication, he applied the design

Richard Chavez (San Felipe Pueblo) Bolo tie of Edwards black jade, coral, turquoise, and silver, 2013, 3 x 2.875 inches. Private Collection. PREVIOUS PAGE: Richard Chavez and Jared Chavez collaborative necklace of Sea of Japan coral and 18k gold, 2014, 28.5 inches long. The necklace is show in full on the previous page. Collection of Leslie Beebe and Bruce Nussbaum.

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skills he learned at Hoshour’s architectural firm and his additional training from his studies at the University of New Mexico to develop his own approach to jewelry design. He continued to perfect his skills at cutting and shaping stones and looked to minimalist designs for inspiration. As he began to refine his work, striving for color and balance in his designs, he was drawn to the simplicity of Danish jewelry and admired the paintings of Dutch artist Piet Mondrian. Like Mondrian’s work, Chavez’s jewelry is abstract and influenced by color choices. Chavez’s approach to jewelry fabrication is much like the way a painter employs a palette. Marti Struever noted that Chavez “creates pieces of jewelry that really are restrained compositions of modern art, perfectly attuned to form and color.” Chavez notes, “After I quit using beads in jewelry, tiger eye, malachite, ivory, sodalite, lapis and other nontraditional materials became part of my designs. It was through research and jewelry books I was collecting that I was realizing the potential of utilizing the different materials to incorporate into the jewelry. The books on

Richard Chavez (San Felipe Pueblo) Buckle of Edwards black jade, white jade, coral, Morenci turquoise, and silver, 2017, 1.375 x 2.5 inches. Private Collection.

CIRCLES COLLECTS: RICHARD CHAVEZ Thursday, Feb. 1; 6 to 8 p.m.

MEMBER'S RECEPTION Friday, Feb. 2; 5 p.m. viewing, 6 p.m. reception

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Feb. 3, 2017 through August 2018

Scandinavian designs were my favorite. Some of the jewelry photo designs were so simple and elegant it didn’t need much embellishment to make a statement. That’s what impressed me the most about Scandinavian and Danish designs, whether it was jewelry, furniture or flatware.”

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AVA I L A B L E AT B O O K S & M O R E

Symmetry in Stone:

The Jewelry of Richard I. Chavez

Silver and Gold Circles members may pick up their complimentary copy at the reception on Feb. 1 or at Books & More on the following Monday.

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ON VIEW

OF GOD AND MORTAL MEN

MASTERWORKS BY T.C. CANNON FROM THE NANCY AND RICHARD BLOCH COLLECTION THROUGH APRIL 15, 2018

Bill Richardson, former governor of New Mexico, Lisa Bloch and Andrew Bloch at the exhibition opening. ABOVE: Members get a first look at the exhibition during the reception on Oct. 6, 2017. Photos: Caesar Chaves

The paintings by T.C. Cannon that comprise the Bloch Collection represent the finest examples by a multifaceted artist whose voice and talent resonate and inspire nearly forty years after his untimely passing. The major canvases in the Collection speak to multiple themes—his early mastery of color in Man I’d Like to Have that Pinto Pony; his compelling and ironic twist on the Plains warrior motif and Kiowa history in Washington Landscape with Peace Medal Indian; his regard for family heritage in Grandmother Gestating Father and the Washita River Runs Ribbon-Like; and his tribute to the power of music in A Remembered Muse. Each work of art has a palpable power to engage, foster ideas and be truly memorable. It is the finest group of T.C. Cannon’s paintings known to exist in either private or public collections and is the first time in 20 years since they have been exhibited in public.

Cannon's paintings Chief Watching, A Remembered Muse (Tosca), and Washington Landscape with Peace Medal Indian, are featured in this exhibition shot. From the Nancy and Richard Bloch Collection. Reproduced with the permission of the Estate of T.C. Cannon. Image is © 2017 Estate of T.C. Cannon.

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Nicholas Galanin,Where did it Go?, 2014,GIF Images courtesy of the artist

SPECIAL EXHIBITION

The Birth of an Exhibition Placing contemporary art at the Heard ERIN JOYCE, FINE ARTS CURATOR

Upon joining the Heard in the fall of 2017, I immediately started planning an exhibition of contemporary art for the museum’s newly opened Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust Grand Gallery. Having worked with many artists on multiple shows, I knew exactly which artist I wanted to bring to the Heard. The exhibition, Dear Listener: Works by Nicholas Galanin, opens in May and will feature more than 12 years and 10,000 square feet of work by Native Alaskan artist Nicholas Galanin. Nicholas Galanin was born in 1979 in Sitka, Alaska, and is of mixed Tlingit/Aleut and non-Native ancestry. This will be my fifth year and ninth exhibition working with him, and I am so thrilled to be able to introduce his work to the Heard and to the Phoenix metropolitan area. Galanin’s approach to making art is conceptual; he thematically addresses issues of American Indian representation and cultural critique, often through a multidisciplinary approach. His body of work includes sculpture, installation, video, performance and new media. Galanin makes provocative work; he addresses issues of authority, authenticity, American Indian experience and the commoditization of Indigenous culture. He brings to his work

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a free space for engagement with people of all cultures, and he has built a platform to which they can relate from their unique cultural perspectives. I have worked with Galanin on many exhibitions over the years, each one bringing a new body of work and challenges. When I collaborated with the artist in the spring of 2017 for my exhibition My Country Tis of Thy People, You’re Dying in New York, Galanin’s work was proclaimed a “standout” by The New York Times, prominently featured on the front page of the Arts section. Galanin’s distinction in the contemporary art world only continues to grow. Dear Listener will explore themes of Indigeneity, the porosity of identity in both Indigenous and American contexts, and reciprocal dialogues therein. Works will inspect the notions of landscape and colonialism, redress the rampant misappropriation of American Indian aesthetics and visual culture by non-Native individuals, and highlight the artist’s nimbleness in the reclamation of Indigenous agency. I take the naming of a show very seriously. It sets the tone and becomes part of the broader narrative of the exhibition, what I am trying to convey as a curator, and

DEAR LISTENER: WORKS BY NICHOLAS GALANIN Opens May 4; on display through September 3, 2018

how that narrative works in consort with the artist’s vision as well. The title of the exhibition, Dear Listener, is an intentional direct address to the viewer—playing off of clandestine broadcasters addressing their listeners in the same manner, it is an active attempt at creating a discursive conversation between viewer and artist, and metaphysically to the theoretical concepts contained within the works. The works are visually powerful, imbricated, and arresting. Pieces include Galanin’s 2017 single-channel video “Unceremonial Dance Mask,” a commentary on mass-produced “Native-looking” objects from Indonesia; and “Indian Children’s Bracelet,” a pair of handcuffs used during the residential school period to remove American Indian children from their homes. The exhibition promises to be powerful and provocative and will be the start of a new incorporation of contemporary Indigenous art and a new visual vocabulary at the Heard.


We ♥ our Members

ON VALENTINE'S DAY, BRING YOUR MEMBERSHIP CARD TO THE MUSEUM AND YOU’LL RECEIVE A FREE CUP OF HOT CHOCOLATE AS A SPECIAL THANK-YOU FROM US TO YOU.

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ON VIEW

ON DISPLAY UNTIL JULY 1, 2018

Don't forget to visit and view Awa Tsireh: Pueblo Painter and Metalsmith, curated by Chief Curator Diana F. Pardue and collector Norman Sandfield. The exhibition shows the intricate paintings and metalwork of Awa Tsireh (San Ildefonso Pueblo, 1898 – 1955), the artistic connections through his family tree, and history of the Garden of the Gods Trading Post where Awa Tsireh and other Native artists' jewelry was sold. We are pleased to announce Mr. Sandfield has generously offered to donate his collection to the museum.

A member looks through an antique stereoscope to view reproductions of historic Garden of The Gods photos. Photo courtesy of Byron Sandfield

Awa Tsireh (Alfonso Roybal), 1898-1955 San Ildefonso Pueblo ABOVE: Detail of Eagle and Snake, c. 1920s The Cleveland Museum of Art, gift of Amelia Elizabeth White 1937.798 RIGHT: Detail of Eagle and Snake tray, c. 1930s - 1940s Howard Collection

Photos: Craig Smitth

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S TATE O F TH E A RTS

The art of being Indian NINA SANDERS, APSÁALOOKE | CONTRIBUTING WRITER

I own a marvelous studded leather belt that was made to resemble those worn by Northern Plains women in the 19th century. It is about 3 inches wide, covered in round brass tacks, and ties at the front with two soft strips of brain-tanned buckskin leather. It was made for me by a lovely and important man, and I cherish it. This belt of mine is powerful. I wear it when I am involved in meaningful or fabulous situations. I believe it is magic, or as my ancestors would say, sacred medicine. Aesthetically, it enhances the bright symmetrical flowers on my Bethany Yellowtail dress perfectly, and as for my Apsáalooke-red-elk tooth dress, the dark swath of leather against the bright-red wool invokes a sort of majesty. This belt turns heads; on more than one occasion I have been identified as “that woman with the fancy leather Indian belt.” My grandmother once told me that I should never leave the house without a great pair of earrings and a dab of perfume. We have a Crow phrase that translates as “Make all the things you do in life beautiful.” In my experience and observations, I have come to use the expression, “It’s the art of being Indian.” For most Native people there are things that are of the utmost importance, a time when great care and attention should be given to provide the best results. The art of being Indian is different things to different people: it is a beautifully made apple pie for a ceremonial feast, a stunning gift horse that is carefully broken for a brother-inlaw, the way a painter adorns his fingers in rings and speaks with his hands as well as his mouth. Though all of us have our own unique ways of expressing ourselves, it is the artists who seem to fascinate us the most. Many of the most famous Indian artists were masterminds at cultivating an

Scene from a parade. Photo courtesy of Nina Sanders

"The art of being Indian is

different things to different people: it is a beautifully

enchanting artistic image—Fritz Scholder, T.C. Cannon, Pablita Velarde, Charles Loloma and Kay WalkingStick, to name a few. T.C. Cannon’s life was as wondrous as his work was. He was traditional yet a little wild, graceful and passionate, a lover and a fighter. We capture glimpses of his soul in his sorrowful poetry, playful portraits and multilayered masterful paintings. Cannon had a love affair with life that lives on through his art. The Indian artists who make all of life an art form or “makes all things in life beautiful” will continue to capture our attention and possibly our hearts. They give us stories to tell, art to collect, and leave us wanting more.

made apple pie for a

ceremonial feast, a stunning

gift horse that is carefully

broken for a brother-in-law,

the way a painter adorns his fingers in rings and

speaks with his hands as

well as his mouth."

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PROGRAMMING

Generation to Generation Hoop Dance Contest is 28-years strong SHALIYAH BEN, DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC PROGRAMMING

In just two short years, the Heard Museum will celebrate three decades of hoop dance tradition at the Heard. In 1991, the first Hoop Dance Contest was a memorial competition honoring the late Tony White Cloud from Jemez Pueblo. Credited as the father of modern hoop dance, White Cloud incorporated aspects of this traditional and sacred dance into a contemporary expression in the 1920s and ’30s. From then on, hoop dancing grew in popularity, interpreted through the many Indigenous lenses and dancers who have transformed this dynamic art form into the respected competition celebrated each year. Over the past 28 years, the Heard Museum’s World Championship Hoop Dance Contest has witnessed several young competitors grow from humble beginnings in the Youth Division to spectacular performances in the Adult Division that earned them the title World Hoop Dance Champion: Tony Duncan (Apache/Hidatsa/Arikara/Mandan), Nakotah LaRance (Hopi/Tewa/Assiniboine) and now Tyrese Jensen (Navajo/Maricopa), the reigning 2017 World Champion. We’ve celebrated a female world champion who’s taken top honors twice, demonstrating that the hoop-dancing arena is an equal playing field. The most enduring aspect of this dynamic competition is the sense of family. There are over 80 in this hoop clan; more if you include the family that supports them in their efforts that come from all over the continental U.S. and Canada. It’s a literal kinship with the Duncans, who have made hoop dancing a family pursuit. World Champion Tony Duncan

CATCH THE ACTION ONLINE! We will be live-streaming the following events on Facebook Live (Mountain Standard Time): Saturday, Feb. 10 9 a.m: Grand Entry and Honor Song, immediately followed by competition in the Tiny Tots Division 12:30 p.m.: First Nations musical performance Sunday, Feb. 11 12:30 p.m.: First Nations musical performance 2 p.m.: Final rounds of competition www.facebook.com/HeardMuseum/ 2017 World Champion Tyrese Jensen (Navajo/Maricopa) Photo: Craig Smith

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28TH ANNUAL WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP HOOP DANCE CONTEST Saturday & Sunday, Feb. 10 & 11 Heard Museum, Libby Amphitheater Gates open for spectators at 8:45 a.m. each day; program begins at 9 a.m. Finals begin at approximately 2 p.m. on Sunday. Admission (per day): $18 general admission; $13.50 seniors (65+); $12 Heard Museum members and American Indians, $7.50 children 4-12; free for children 3 and younger. Tickets include the event and museum admission. Buy tickets in person or online at heard.org/hoop. has been a regular for years, starting out in the Youth Division. His wife Violet Duncan also competes in the Adult Division, and today their children are dancing in the Youth and Tiny Tot divisions. That sense of family is also felt in the overall spirit of the competitors, who support one another and cheer each other on. It’s a testament to the strength of the hoop-dancing family, which not only celebrates the good times but also has gathered together in times of sorrow when luminaries in the hoop-dancing community have passed on. Strong partnerships help sustain this important annual event. This year the Heard is happy to announce a new partnership arranged with the Consulate General of Canada through which we will showcase the artistry of a First Nations musical performance during the lunch breaks on Saturday and Sunday. The Consulate General also is placing programmatic support in the name of Canadian Hoop Dance Contest participants. This support helps the Heard maintain the high caliber of the World Championship Hoop Dance Contest, which spectators and performers alike come out to enjoy each year. We are very excited about this opportunity and hope the added programming during the lunch breaks on Saturday and Sunday will be a delightful addition to Hoop 2018. Members at the Experience and Circles levels look for your complimentary tickets in the mail in early January. Check heard.org/membership for more details.

SPONSORS Youth competition prizes are supported by Jay Kahn Memorial Fund Circles of Giving VIP tent is sponsored by

Photo: Craig Smith

VISIT THE HEARD FOR DÍA DEL NIÑO BY SHALIYAH BEN, DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC PROGRAMMING

Children’s Day is an international day set aside to honor our children and show respect for their place in society. Día del Niño (Children’s Day) at the Heard began last year as a family-oriented public program in association with the landmark exhibition Frida Kahlo & Diego Rivera. More important, it was a response to the museum’s new strategic initiative to create free public access to the arts for Maricopa County youth. The first-ever event, held on April 30, 2017, drew more than 3,000 visitors who enjoyed a day of free museum admission, hands-on activities, live performances, food tastings and music. The success of the inaugural event suggested that there was both interest and need for this type of event in the Greater Phoenix community. Once again this year, the Heard Museum is proud to present Día del Niño, a day of fun, arts, storytelling, music, dance, games and activities for kids of all ages! On April 29, children and their adult chaperones are invited to visit the Heard with free admission. The museum will partner with Valley organizations and artists to offer exciting performances and activities that will reflect the diversity of Phoenix and allow families to create lasting memories together at the Heard.

DÍA DEL NIÑO Sunday, April 29, 2018 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free admission for children ages 12 and under, along with two accompanying parents/guardians.

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Public Programs S HALIYAH BEN, DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC PROGRAMMING

EXHIBITION CONVERSATIONS

FAMILY AND MEMBER PROGRAMMING

RICHARD CHAVEZ LECTURE SERIES: LESS IS MORE

KÉSHJÉÉ (DINÉ SHOE GAME) 2ND NIGHT

Saturday, Jan. 6

Saturday, Feb.. 4

6 to 10 p.m.

1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Heard Museum Campus – Steele Auditorium

Steele Auditorium

Késhjéé (Diné Shoe Game) – Join us and the Phoenix Indian Center as we present a favorite Diné winter game in Steele Auditorium. This is a family friendly event where you can have fun, and learn more about Diné culture. Morning Star Youth Council will be collecting donations and blankets and socks (6 p.m. to 10 p.m.) for elders back home on the reservation.

Artist Ricard Chavez and son Jared Chavez, an artist in his own right who carries of his father’s artistic tradition will discuss Chavez’s career as it began in architecture and lead into jewelry; Chavez will discuss his artistic process and its place in the Bauhaus movement and beyond. Free and open to the public.

T.C. CANNON LECTURE SERIES: ART N’ ACTIVISM

Sunday, March 18

Friday, Jan. 12

1:30 p.m. to 2:30 pm Steele Auditorium

Thomas 'Breeze' Marcus

MEMBERS’ OPENING RECEPTION FOR ARTISTIC EXCELLENCE: THE HEARD MUSEUM GUILD INDIAN FAIR & MARKET CELEBRATES 60 YEARS

Moderated by mural artist and activist Thomas “Breeze” Marcus (Tohono O’odham), a panel of artists will discuss T.C. Cannon’s works and how his activism in the 1960s and ’70s speaks to the same political and cultural issues inspiring today’s young artists. Free and open to the public.

T.C. CANNON LECTURE SERIES: CONTEMPORARY — ­ FROM T.C. TO NOW

6 to 8 p.m. Heard members enjoy a first look at this extraordinary exhibition featuring award-winning pieces from the Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market over the last 60 years. RSVP by Monday, Jan. 8, to 602.251.0209, ext. 6402, or email members@heard.org.

T.C. CANNON POP-UP STUDIO WITH BILL DAMBROVA

Saturday, Jan. 20 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Heard Museum Campus – Piper Grand Gallery and Encanto Room

Sunday, April 15 1:30 p.m. 3 p.m.

Linda Lomahaftewa

Organized around the theme of contemporary expression witnessed decades ago – using TC Cannon as a model – we will revisit these themes and reflect upon whether this movement has evolved accordingly. Join us as we welcome artists and curators from varied backgrounds to speak to these concepts. Artist and T.C.’s classmate– Linda Lomahaftewa (Hopi/Choctaw) Artist – Marla Allison (Laguna) Curators – Joe Baker (Delaware)

Marla Allison

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– Erin Joyce, Fine Arts Curator

Bill Dambrova

Enjoy a private walk-through of the exhibition Of God and Mortal Men: Masterworks by T.C. Cannon from the Nancy and Richard Bloch Collection through the lens of guest artist Bill Dambrova, and spend time in our Education Building to complete your own guided art project to take home. Suitable for all ages. This is a specially ticket event; space is limited. Register online at heard.org.

DIA DEL NINO

Sunday, April. 29 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Heard Museum is proud to present Día del Niño, a day of fun, arts, storytelling, music, dance, games and activities for kids of all ages!Kids bring can bring adult chaperones to the museum for free admission! See page 21.


CIRCLES COLLECTS: RICHARD CHAVEZ

Thursday, Feb. 1

THE LAST ONES: LONG JOURNEY

Saturday, Jan. 20

6 to 8 p.m.

1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Heard Museum Campus Circles members will enjoy a private viewing and discussion with Richard Chavez prior to the opening of Symmetry in Stone: The Jewelry of Richard I. Chavez. Email circles@heard.org for more details.

OTHER PUBLIC PROGRAMMING EDUCATOR EVENT: FLAVORS OF THE PAST & PRESENT

Thursday, Jan. 4 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Heard Museum Campus This event is free for educators, but space is limited and reservations are required. To RSVP or for more information, visit heard.org.

MUSEUM YOGA!

Saturday, Jan. 13, 27; Feb. 24, March 10, 24; April 14, 28 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Join Rooted Community Yoga Project on the second and fourth Saturdays of the month through April 28 (except Feb. 10) for guided yoga practice. Each week, the yoga session will take place in a new surprise location on the Heard campus. All levels welcome. $10 per person; free for museum members (includes museum admission). Space is limited; register online at heard.org. (Medical disclaimer: Participants attend at their own risk.)

HEARD MUSEUM JEWELERS MARKETPLACE Saturday, Jan. 13

Steele Auditorium This documentary tells the story of two Lipan Apache children captured along the Texas-Mexico border in 1877 by the U.S. Army Richard Gonzales and 4th Cavalry. The children rode Daniel Castro Romero Jr. with the soldiers for three years in The Last Ones: Long Journey. before being taken to the Carlisle Photo: Courtesy Susan Rose. Indian School in Pennsylvania. Ties with their family were completely severed. The documentary reveals how in 2009, Lipan Apache descendants from California, Texas and New Mexico came to Carlisle to offer blessings so the children could be sent home. One of the collaborators directing and producing The Lost Ones, Susan D. Rose, professor at Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, will introduce the film and be available for discussion after the screening Free and open to the public

28TH ANNUAL HEARD MUSEUM WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP HOOD DANCE CONTEST

Saturday, Feb. 10 - Sunday, Feb. 11 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Libby Amphitheater More than 80 hoop dancers from across the U.S. and Canada vie for World Champion titles in Youth, Teen, Adult and Senior divisions. Tickets include museum admission. See pages 17-18

INDIAN FAIR & MARKET BEST OF SHOW RECEPTION

10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Friday, March 2

Central Courtyard

5:30 to 8 p.m.

Join the Heard Museum and Native Jewelers for a day of jewelry demonstrations, music, and a casual marketplace featuring the works of some of the most outstanding Native Jewelers of today. This event is free and open to the public.

Tickets: $75 Members/$100 non-members

HEARD MUSEUM GUILD INDIAN FAIR & MARKET

March 3 and 4 Saturday, March 3: 8:30 a.m. (Members only); 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. (general admission) Eddison Cummings (Navajo) Photo: Megan Richmond

Sunday, March 4: 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. See pages 5-9 W I N T E R 2 01 8

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M O R E P RO G R A M M I N G

U P DATE

U P CO M I N G F I R S T F R I DAYS

AWAY FROM HOME: AMERICAN INDIAN BOARDING SCHOOL STORIES

STEP INTO THE NEW YEAR WITH A DINÉ SHOE GAME!

Friday , Jan. 5 6 to 11 p.m. Steele Auditorium & Dorrance Children’s Courtyard Step into the New Year with fun with the Heard Museum and the Phoenix Indian Center who are proud to present Késhjéé, a centuries old favorite winter game of the Navajo (Diné) people. This fun game of choices represents life, natural order and carries on oral tradition brining the whole family and community together. Come and try your hand at a few rounds of shoe game, enjoy a hot bowl of posole from our award winning Heard Museum café, interact with Heard and Phoenix Indian Center employees to learn about Navajo shoe game and string game and enjoy a few activities! Inside the museum explore our galleries, enjoy music in the Crossroads Gallery and engage in art activities with guests from Burton Barr Library and IAIAI (Institute of American Arts). This event is free and open to the public.

BY JANET CANTLEY, CURATOR

We are honored with a recent recognition from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). The National Humanities Alliance is featuring our project, one of two from Arizona (and 80 from across the U.S.) in a highlight of NEH recipients called “NEH for All.” They recognize programs that support excellence in education and research, protect cultural heritage, offer learning opportunities for all ages and strengthen local economies. The link is: https://nehforall. org/projects/exhibiting-the-american-indian-boarding-schoolexperience Since the fall 2017 issue of Earthsong we have made great strides in the revision of the boarding school exhibit. We have refined and fleshed out content and design of the exhibition.

SYMMETRY IN STONE

We conducted more filmed interviews and continue to edit and place them, topically, in the exhibition space. In late November we interviewed Mr. Harold Pourier (Oglala Lakota), a 38-year educator at Albuquerque and Santa Fe Indian School. His “second home” at Santa Fe Indian School is where he promotes core values of the tribally managed school, selecting each month certain values for emphasis (i.e, respect and giving back, for the month of November).

Friday, Feb. 2

Pourier

*The shoe game program continues on Saturday, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. (Note: Museum galleries open until 5 p.m. on Saturday)

6 to 10 p.m. Join us for an artist-led mosaic activity in celebration of the opening of Symmetry in Stone: Richard I. Chavez. Stroll through the museum galleries and enjoy music by a guest DJ or relax by candlelight with a hot beverage in the Central Courtyard. This event is free and open to the public.

ROCK OUT WITH THE HEARD

Friday, April 6 6 to 10 p.m. Film and music goers can add another Phoenix venue to their list on First Friday April 2018 when No Festival Required screens RUMBLE: The Indians Who Rocked the World. RUMBLE tells the story of a profound essential, and, until now missing chapter in the history of American music: the Indigenous influence. Stick around following the film for a Q&A. Before the screening enjoy a special musical performance to rock the night away starting at 6:15 p.m. Be sure to stop by the Heard Museum’s café and cantina for snacks to enjoy throughout the movie! Music from the film will be played by guest DJ in the Central Courtyard. This event is free and open to the public.

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We are developing content for the exhibit interactives. One interactive will be a timeline where a visitor can explore the history of boarding schools and American Indian education at mission schools in the 1600s, or learn about the early influences of Indian activists such as Zitkala-Sa (Yankton Sioux) or Carlos Montezuma (Yavapai). Both activists advocated for Native rights and self-determination in the early 1900s. A sport enthusiast can scroll through a digital scrapbook of well-known figures from Carlisle’s legendary football team under “Pop” Warner, featuring Jim Thorpe (Sac and Fox). Or learn about Hopi longdistance running through Carlisle student Louis Tewanima and Sherman Indian School’s Philip Zeyouma.

We are building an interactive map to feature some of the longrunning federally operated boarding schools. They all started out based on a military model established by Richard Henry Pratt at Carlisle Indian School in 1879. The schools gradually changed from Pratt’s assimilationist institutions to schools that promoted Native language, history and cultural practices in the curriculum. With tribal involvement in teaching and administration of the Bureau of Indian Education schools, four boarding schools are still in operation: Chemawa Indian School at Salem, Oregon; Sherman Indian School at Riverside, California; Flandreau Indian School at Flandreau, South Dakota and Riverside Indian School at Anadarko, Oklahoma.


LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES

Rare Books: Picasso of the North Find Norval Morrisseau in the Heard’s Rare Book Collection MARIO NICK KLIMIADES, LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES DIRECTOR, AND BETTY MURPHY, LIBRARIAN

The history of the Heard Museum’s Rare Book Collection dates to the beginning of the 21st century, when the Billie Jane Baguley Library and Archives opened the door to the new Becker-Baguley Archival Vault. Made possible through the generosity of library volunteer Billie Jane Baguley to honor her parents, the library vault provides a safe and secure place for the Heard Museum’s priceless documentary and photographic works. Before the construction of the vault, rare and special books could be found housed in two locking antique hutches or on the library’s open shelves. These special volumes were methodically brought together, and the Rare Book Collection was born. Today, library patrons who want access to this material simply make an appointment; the staff stands ready to retrieve a treasure from the vault for consultation. Special books held in the vault include pre-20th-century titles, artists’ books, culturally sensitive works, fragile tomes, signed and inscribed books, presentation copies, uniquely designed works, publications only for exhibition, and finely printed books issued in limited editions. Among the rare books are many beautiful art books; The Art of Norval Morrisseau is one example. Anishinaabe artist Norval Morrisseau, popularly called the “Pablo Picasso of the North,” created paintings and drawings depicting the legends of his people and the artist’s own spirituality. With a style characterized by bright colors and thick black outlines, Morrisseau founded the Woodlands School of Canadian art and was a member of the world-renowned collective the Indian Group of Seven. This limited-edition book by one of Canada’s great First Nations artists was highly sought after. Its purchase was made possible by the Heard Museum Guild using proceeds from the Heard Museum Library Book and Art Sale.

The Art of Norval Morrisseau, by Lister Sinclair and Jack Pollock, was published in 1979 by Methuen Publications of Agincourt, Ontario, Canada. Featuring a personal essay by the artist, the book is considered the best introduction to the artist’s life and work. The text, an oblong quarto bound in natural finish calfskin with stamped design and lettering, is accompanied by five stunning color prints, signed and numbered, by Morrisseau. The gallery-edition prints measure 24 by 18 inches and are issued in a wooden box with cloth and leather accents. The Library has copy no. 66 of a limited edition. Art books in the Rare Book Collection number over 100 and include works on artists Fritz Scholder, Margarete Bagshaw, Abraham Anghik Ruben and Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas, among many others. The window to the Rare Book Collection is the Library’s online catalog at heard.org/ library. To truly marvel at the beauty of The Art of Norval Morrisseau and other rare art books, please call or visit the library.

The Dawn (print A) Norval Morriseau

ABOVE: The Art of Norval Morriseau RBF: ND249.M634A 1979a Photo: Craig Smith

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Travel With the Guild JOIN US FOR AN UNCOMMON ADVENTURE DIANE LEONTE, GUILD COMMUNICATION CHAIR, GUILD TRAVEL CHAIR

The Heard Museum Guild not only provides its members a wide variety of volunteering options at the museum, but Guild members also join together on regional journeys designed to better acquaint them with Native culture, art and history. Join the Guild and travel with us! ALAMOS! FESTIVAL ALFONSO ORTIZ TIRADO JANUARY 21ST – 27TH, 2018

Limited registration available. Experience the magic, music, & rich culture of Alamos. A truly unforgettable tour experience! Four luxurious nights at the Hacienda de los Santos. Days and evenings are filled with a wide variety of cultural events and musical performances along with private entertainment for our group!

MEMBERS ONLY

SPANISH MISSIONS OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA MARCH 16TH – 21ST, 2018

Join art conservator and historian Gloria Giffords and Alex La Pierre, an established guide in historic preservation and interpretation on an “ed-venture” visiting Spanish missions up the California coast. In addition to learning about the Spanish colonization throughout the Southern California region, we’ll visit other pertinent landmarks and beautiful scenic settings throughout the tour. LAND OF THE SERI – LATE MARCH, DATES TBA

Join us as we explore the little known world of the Seri Indians in northern Sonora Mexico. Our guides are cultural historian Jesús García and geologist Bob Scarborough. Both enthusiastically share with us the lifeways of this desert. Our voyage of discovery includes a panga ride to the mangroves of Isla Tiburón, birding the estuary of Laguna de la Cruz, a visit to Isla Alcatraz, and visiting the Seri people themselves on the beautiful beaches of Kino Bay. HOPI MESA II – MAY 10TH – 14TH, 2018

Price to be determined A unique experience led by lifelong trader, researcher, author, and native american expert Mark Bahti. Spend four wonderful days visiting various artists throughout the Hopi Mesas absorbing history and folklore of their ancestors. Our tour includes time with master basket weavers, katsina carvers, and jewelry artists as we learn their expertise and unique native perspective of their craft. FIRST NATIONS GARDENS OF THE NORTH - SEPT. 6TH-15TH, 2018

Encounter people of the First's Nations of British Columbia and experience world-class gardens of Vancouver and Victoria.

Alamos, Sonora

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Must be a Heard Museum member to participate. For more information and to register for any of these trips, contact Shelley Mowry at travel@heardguild.org.


Learn With the Guild TAKE A SHORT COURSE! DIANE LEONTE, GUILD COMMUNICATION CHAIR

HEARD MUSEUM, HEARD MUSEUM SHOP 2301 N. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85004 Monday to Saturday,

The Guild presents short courses in conjunction with current exhibitions. THE NATIVE AMERICAN FINE ART MOVEMENT: FROM AWA TSIREH TO T.C. CANNON

Session 1, Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018 Session 2, Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018

Presenters: Linda Hefter, Phyllis Manning

This two-session Short Course will explore the history of the Native American Fine Art Movement from the 1800s, when Native American artists first started drawing on paper to the birth of Native American Modernism in the 1960s and 1970s. Heard Museum staff and docents will explore a wide variety of topics including ledger art; San Ildefonso Pueblo watercolor artists, with emphasis on Awa Tsireh; Dorothy Dunn and the Studio style; the Kiowa and Bacone artists in Oklahoma; new Indian painting in the 1950s; and the founding of the Institute of American Indian Arts and the work of early instructors and students, including Fritz Scholder, Allan Houser and T.C. Cannon. Special focus will be given to Awa Tsireh and Cannon, two of the most prominent artists in the Native American Fine Arts Movement. Days: Saturdays, Jan. 13 and 20, 2018

Time: 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed Easter Sunday, Independence Day, Thanksgiving Day & Christmas. Main: 602.252.8840 Events Hotline: 602.252.8848 Shop: 602.252.8344 1.800.252.8344

THE COURTYARD CAFÉ Open Every Day, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. 602.251.0204

COFFEE CANTINA Monday to Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Place: Monte Vista Room

Presenters: Linda Hefter, Phyllis Manning

To Register: hefteraz@cox.net or pemanning@hotmail.com Registration Fee: $45

We appreciate the support of these sponsors:

HOME: NATIVE PEOPLES IN THE SOUTHWEST

9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturdays March 31 & April 7, 2018

This is a two session course

Come meet the peoples who have lived and thrived in the Southwest from Prehistoric to Current times. The two-part course will include an exciting overview of the land, culture and history of both the ancient peoples of the Southwest and the federally recognized tribes and pueblos who call Arizona and New Mexico home today. Session Two on April 7 will also include an introduction to the Native American Fine Art Movement and a highlights tour of the Heard’s T.C. Cannon and Awa Tsireh exhibits.

Increase your support through our community partners:

Whether you have lived in the desert for years or are new to the Southwest, don’t miss this opportunity to deepen your understanding and appreciation of this special place we all call Home. Location: Encanto Instructor: Linda Hefter (hefteraz@cox.net) Facilitator: Mary Lee Madison (mlmadison1@cox.net) Short Course Fee: $45

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DE VELOPMENT

Magic in the moonlight REBECCA SIMPSON, ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT PHOTOS COURTESY OF HAUTE PHOTOGRAPHY

The Heard Museum made magic at Moondance on Saturday, October 28, raising nearly $500,000. The events of the evening reminisced on a transformational year for the Heard and celebrated honorees Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona and Pulitzer Prize–winning author N. Scott Momaday (Kiowa/Caddo). After being greeted with champagne and customized sunglasses, guests were invited to view the exhibition Of God and Mortal Men: Masterworks by T.C. Cannon from the Nancy and Richard Bloch Collection and bid on silent-auction items including gorgeous turquoise squash blossoms, antique beaded bags, a studio session for three with Valley artist and icon Patsy Lowry and a stone inlay bolo tie by lapidary artist Jesse Monongye (Navajo). Dickey Family Director and Chief Executive Officer David M. Roche and Honorary Chairs Carol and Randy Schilling welcomed guests. Spirit of the Heard Award winner A. Joyce Hughes gave a blessing in her Akimel O’otham language. Guests, accessorized in their finest Southwest jewelry, then moved to the Freeport-McMoRan Plaza, where the architecture was lit in bright polka dots projected lights reminiscent of Cannon’s signature motifs. A video by mixedmedia artist Steven J. Yazzie (Navajo) recounted events from the last year at the Heard, highlighted Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona’s impact in the arts and culture community, and celebrated N. Scott Momaday’s creative expression and literary contributions. Dinner was catered by Arizona Taste, and Fosterson Music played a set list inspired by T.C. Cannon, who admired Bob Dylan and Woody Guthrie. At the end of the evening, guests received a gift bag with a copy of Momaday’s The Way to Rainy Mountain (1969). From top: Pulitzer Prize-winning author and Moondance 2017 Honoree, N. Scott Momaday in his Santa Fe, NM home during an interview with artist and filmmaker Steven J. Yazzie. Sue Glawe receives the Moondance honorary award, a bronze sculpture entitled “Inter-Tribal” by artist Doug Hyde (Nez Perce, Assiniboine, and Chippewa). Honorary Chairs Carol and Randy Schilling welcome guests to the event in the South Courtyard.

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Top left: Wick and Jill Pilcher, Carrie and Jon Hulburd, Mike and Mona Smith, Kim and Taber Anderson, and Leslie Jenkins and Guest don their Moondance sunglasses during dinner. Scott, Heard Museum trustee, and Joanie O’Connor arrive at Moondance in the South Courtyard. Life trustees Dr. Tom Hudak and Mary Ellen McKee share laughs during dinner. Clockwise from left: Spirit of the Heard Award Honoree A. Joyce Hughes (Akimel O'otham) gives the blessing before dinner. Russell Dickey, Alice J. Dickey, Erika Dickey pose for a family photo in the Central Courtyard. Dick and Susie Silverman and Janet and John Melamed gather under the ambient lights after the dinner and dancing in the FreeportMcMoRan Plaza. Molly Bonsall and Will Adrian mingle after dinner. Lapidary artist Jesse Monomgye (Navajo) holds up the signature silent auction item, a stone-inlay bolo tie depicting the solar eclipse. Chris and Julia Schumacher, Sharon and Dr. Craig Cohen, and JT and Daya Vandegriff show off their Cowboy cocktail duds.

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Programming & Events Calendar January 4 | THURSDAY

13 | SATURDAY

20 | SATURDAY

9 A.M. TO 12:30 P.M.

ARTISTIC EXCELLENCE OPEN TO PUBLIC Samuel & Betty Kitchell Gallery

1:30 P.M.

EDUCATOR EVENT: FLAVORS OF THE PAST & PRESENT Heard Museum Campus See page 23

FILM SCREENING: THE LAST ONES: LONG JOURNEY

9:30 A.M. TO 4 P.M.

Steele Auditorium See page 23

5 | FRIDAY

HEARD MUSEUM JEWELERS MARKETPLACE See page 23

6 TO 10 P.M.

9:30. TO 10:30 A.M.

2:30 TO 4 P.M.

FIRST FRIDAY: STEP INTO THE NEW YEAR WITH A DINÉ SHOE GAME! Heard Museum Campus

MUSEUM YOGA Heard Museum Campus

MAIE BARTLETT HEARD SOCIETY ANNUAL GATHERING Steele Auditorium

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17 | WEDNESDAY

6 | SATURDAY

9:30 TO 11:30 A.M.

6 TO 10 P.M. KÉSHJÉÉ (DINÉ SHOE GAME) Heard Museum Campus See page 22

12 | SATURDAY

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MEMBERS ONLY

HEARD MUSEUM GUILD MEETING

20 | SATURDAY

27 | SATURDAY

T.C. CANNON POP-UP STUDIO WITH BILL DAMBROVA

MEMBERS’ OPENING RECEPTION FOR ARTISTIC EXCELLENCE Heard Museum Campus

Reservations reserved for individuals who have designated the Heard Museum in their will or trust or who have been members of the museum for more than 25 years. To inquire about the Maie Bartlett Heard Society or make your reservation, contact Rebeca Simpson at 602.251.0245 or rsimpson@heard.org.

Steele Auditorium Non-members welcome.

10:30 A.M. TO 1:30 P.M.

6 TO 8 P.M.

23 | TUESDAY

Piper Grand Gallery and Encanto Room This is a specially ticketed event.

9:30. TO 10:30 A.M. MUSEUM YOGA Heard Museum Campus See page 23

February

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1 | THURSDAY

4 | SATURDAY

14 | WEDNESDAY

1:30 TO 2:30 P.M.

9:30 TO 5 P.M.

RICHARD CHAVEZ LECTURE SERIES: LESS IS MORE

WE ♥ OUR MEMBERS VALENTINE'S TREAT Courtyard Cantina

6 TO 8 P.M.

CIRCLES MEMBERS ONLY

CIRCLES COLLECTS: RICHARD CHAVEZ Heard Museum Campus

2 | FRIDAY

Steele Auditorium Free and open to the public MEMBERS ONLY

6 TO 8 P.M. MEMBERS OPENING RECEPTION FOR SYMMETRY IN STONE Heard Museum Campus

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10-11 | SAT. -SUN.

24 | SATURDAY

9 A.M. TO 5 P.M.

FIRST FRIDAY: SYMMETRY IN STONE Heard Museum Campus

28TH ANNUAL HEARD MUSEUM WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP HOOP DANCE CONTEST Libby Amphitheater

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6 TO 10 P.M.

Members can pick up a complimentary cup of hot cocoa in the Cantina.

MEMBERS DISCOUNT!

9:30. TO 10:30 A.M. MUSEUM YOGA Heard Museum Campus See page 23

MEMBERS ONLY!


March 2 | FRIDAY

10 | SATURDAY

5:30 TO 8 P.M.

9:30. TO 10:30 A.M.

60TH HEARD MUSEUM GUILD INDIAN FAIR & MARKET BEST OF SHOW RECEPTION Heard Museum Campus

MUSEUM YOGA Heard Museum Campus See page 23

18 | SATURDAY

3 - 4 | SAT. - SUN. SAT: 9:30 A.M. TO 5 P.M. SUN: 9:30 TO 4 P.M. 60TH HEARD MUSEUM GUILD INDIAN FAIR & MARKET Heard Museum Campus Early bird admission for museum members only at 8:30 a.m

MEMBERS DISCOUNT!

See pages 5-9

1:30 TO 2:30 P.M.

Photo: Caesar Chaves

T.C. CANNON LECTURE SERIES: ART N’ ACTIVISM Heard Museum Campus

24 | SATURDAY

Free and open to the public See page 22

FREE FOR MEMBERS

9:30. TO 10:30 A.M. MUSEUM YOGA Heard Museum Campus See page 23

April 6 | FRIDAY

15 | SUNDAY

6 TO 10 P.M.

1:30 TO 2:30 P.M.

FIRST FRIDAY: ROCK OUT WITH THE HEARD Heard Museum Campus

T.C. CANNON LECTURE SERIES: CONTEMPORARY ­— FROM T.C. TO NOW Heard Museum Campus

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14 | SATURDAY 9:30 A.M. TO 5 P.M. KATSINA MARKETPLACE The nation’s largest gathering of Hopi katsina doll carvers takes place at the Heard Museum as more than 100 artists gather to show and sell their unique creations. Visitors can enjoy musical performances, book signings, carving demonstrations and prize drawings. Admission to the Marketplace is free and museum admission additional.

9:30. TO 10:30 A.M. MUSEUM YOGA Heard Museum Campus See page 23

See page 22

28 | SATURDAY 9:30. TO 10:30 A.M. MUSEUM YOGA Heard Museum Campus See page 23

29 | SATURDAY 9:30. TO 10:30 A.M. DIA DEL NINO Heard Museum Campus See page 21 2017's Signature Katsina Doll Mavasta Honyouti (Hopi) Photo: Craig smitth

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BY THE NUMBERS

THANK YOU FOR MAKING 2017

A RECORD-BREAKING YEAR

6,263 MEMBER HOUSEHOLDS, ACROSS THREE MEMBERSHIP LEVELS. THE HIGHEST NUMBER OF MEMBERSHIPS IN 10 YEARS.

VIRGINIA G. PIPER CHARITABLE TRUST GRAND GALLERY OPENS

RECORD-BREAKING ATTENDANCE

225,000 $9.5 M IN CONTRIBUTED

$2.3 M

TOTAL VISITORS CAME TO VIEW EXHIBITIONS FEATURING ARTIST SUCH AS FRIDA KAHLO

IN ADMISSION REVENUE

AND DIEGO RIVERA AND RICK BARTOW

$17 M +

$8.1 M

IN TOTAL REVENUE

IN TOTAL EARNED INCOME

INCOME

Other Highlights: • NINA MASON PULLIAM CHARITABLE TRUST CROSS WALK OPENED • $495,000 RAISED AT MOONDANCE • THE FRIDA AND DIEGO EXHIBITION MAKING ITS ONLY NORTH AMERICAN STOP AT THE HEARD

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• BUT MOST IMPORTANTLY:

YOU! WE COULD NOT DO WHAT WE DO WITHOUT YOU. THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING THE HEARD MUSEUM THROUGH YOUR MEMBERSHIP.


S TA FF P RO FI LE

Erin Joyce FINE ARTS CURATOR In October 2017, the Heard Museum announced the hire of a new Fine Arts Curator, Erin Joyce. With over eight years in the contemporary art world, Joyce has worked as an independent curator and journalist, focusing on contemporary Indigenous North American art, as well as contemporary Middle Eastern and North African art. Joyce will be working with the team at the Heard to usher in a new wave of contemporary Indigenous artists. “I think it is so important, not only at institutions like the Heard, but for the art world in general, to acknowledge and embrace the significant contributions Indigenous artists are making to visual and material culture, and more importantly, their contributions to discursive conversations about broader culture, race, politics, and environmental justice,” said Joyce. Joyce holds a Bachelor of Arts in the History of Art from the University of North Texas, studied contemporary art at Sotheby’s Institute of Art in London, and received her Master of Arts in Museum Studies from Johns Hopkins University. Joyce has worked with both commercial galleries as well as non-profit art spaces and museums. Her notable exhibitions have included: You Are On Indian Land, which opened in New York at Radiator Gallery in spring 2015, and traveled to the Institute of American Indian Art - Museum of Contemporary Native Art in Santa Fe, NM, completing its run at the Museum of Northern Arizona in Flagstaff. The exhibition, which explored themes of identity, and appropriation and misappropriation of Indigenous cultures, featured Postcommodity, Michael Namingha, Edgar Heap of Birds, and Dana Claxton, as well as several other prominent American Indian and First Nations artists. Her spring 2017 exhibition, My Country Tis of Thy People, You’re Dying, featured in the New York Times, , dealt with environmental justice and energy extraction, unsanctioned land-rights abuses, and Indigenous sovereignty, featuring Galanin, Cannupa Hanska Luger, Tom Jones, and Steven Yazzie, as well as a video installation by Winter Count, an Indigenous art collective. “I am interested in creating environments within the gallery space and activating those spaces in new and engaging ways,” said Joyce. “I want to nurture existing audiences of contemporary art, while

William Ambrose Untitled Portrait of Erin Joyce Oil on Canvas 2015

also cultivating and inspiring a new cohort of art enthusiasts,” she remarked. “I want to disrupt notions of American Indian art, create sustainable platforms for the presentation of new works, and educate the public on Indigeneity, and I cannot think of a better venue for that than the Heard.” In addition to her curatorial work, Joyce is a respected journalist, writing for publications such as Hyperallergic, Canvas Magazine, Salon, and GOOD Magazine. Her writing will also appear in the forthcoming volume, A Companion on Contemporary Craft, edited by Namita Wiggers and published by Wylie-Blackwell. Joyce grew up in Northern Arizona, and has lived and worked in London, New York, Dallas, Santa Fe, Los Angeles, and the Central Coast of California. “My roots here in Arizona make my becoming a part of the Heard team so much more valuable to me personally,” she remarked. “It’s an exciting time for contemporary Indigenous art, for Phoenix, and for the Heard, and I am honored to be part of this momentum.”

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SHOPPING

Gotta have it! MEGAN RICHMOND, SHOP E-COMMERCE MANAGER

Saviki Katsina Doll by Michael Dean Jenkins (Hopi), $2800

Broadface Katsina Doll by Ron Honyouti (Hopi), $5800

Crow Bride Katsina Doll by Jon Cordero (Hopi), $2600

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DINING

I N TH E N E X T I S S U E

ON THE MENU BY IRENE RUTIGLIANO, HEARD MUSEUM RESTAURANT OPERATIONS MANAGER

MEMBERS DISCOUNT!

Photo: Carli Krueger

AVOCADO TOAST TUESDAYS: NO LONGER A SECRET Secret menu items have existed almost as long as restaurants have been in business. You may have heard about “Animal Style” at In-and-Out burger. These examples are available to the public, but have never been shown on the menu. “Secret” menu items usually start when a valued guest makes a special request, kitchen staff gets excited by it, chatter takes place and the next thing you know people are asking for it. Buffalo Chicken wings were probably one of the first “secret” menu items. The story goes that a guest of the Anchor bar in Buffalo, New York, wanted a spicy snack with his beer. The owner had just received a wrong shipment of chicken wings, so she decided to fry them up and cover them in her special recipe hot sauce. The guest loved them so much he asked for them every time he came to the bar. Word got around and other guests started asking for them and the rest is history! As you now may have guessed, we have our own little secret menu at the Courtyard Café. One item that was on the Café’s secret menu until recently was our Avocado Toast. The secret is now out so we have declared every Tuesday at the Courtyard Cafe Toast Tuesday. We offer two versions, the original preparation is using freshly mashed avocado, drizzled with extra virgin olive oil and a sprinkle of truffle salt on sourdough toast. On our other version, we have added elote, a Mexican Street corn that is roasted and cut off the cob, mixed with chipotle crema, veggies and a sprinkle of cotija cheese. Now here’s the secret, YOU can get it any day of the week! Just ask your server and they will be happy to serve it to you.

DEAR LISTENER OPENING MAY 5 ON DISPLAY THROUGH SEPTEMBER 2018 The Heard Museum is proud to announce their forthcoming exhibition, Dear Listener: Works by Nicholas Galanin. The exhibition, which opens May 4th, 2018 and runs through September 03, 2018, is a mid-career retrospective of contemporary Native Alaskan artist, Nicholas Galanin. Galanin, b. 1979 in Sitka, Alaska, is of mixed Tlingit-Aleut and non-Native ancestry. The exhibition will explore themes of Indigeneity, the porosity of identity in both Indigenous and American contexts, and reciprocal dialogues therein. Works will inspect the notions of landscape, colonialism, and redress the rampant misappropriation of American Indian aesthetics and visual culture by non-Native individuals. The exhibition will be installed in our newly opened Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust Grand Gallery, the Dennis Lyon Family Crossroads Gallery, Freeman Gallery, and the historic South Courtyard, Dear Listener, curated by Heard Museums’ Fine Arts Curator, Erin Joyce, will feature more than 10,000 square feet of new and existing works by Galanin including video installation, sculpture, performance art, works on paper, installation work, and fashion. Above: Nicholas Galanin Imaginary Indian, 2016, wood, wallpaper, paint Dimensions variable Image courtesy of the artist

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Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PA I D Phoenix, AZ Heard Museum

To ensure continued delivery of this publication, please notify the Membership Department of any address corrections at 602.251.0261 or members@heard.org. Published by the Heard Museum. ISSN: 1070-8618 © 2017 Heard Museum. All rights reserved.

GE T Y O U R L IMI T E D E DI T IO N C O M M E M O R AT I V E M E R C H A N DI S E AVA IL A B L E M A R C H 3 - 4 AT T H E F A IR L IMI T E D M E R C H A N DI S E AVA IL A B L E AT H E A R DM U S E U M S H OP S . C O M

36 E A R T H S O N G Limited Edition T-Shirt: Detail of concho stamping by Norbert Peshlakai (Navajo)

Profile for Heard Museum

Heard Museum Earth Song, Spring 2018  

Earth Song is the Heard Museum's members-only publication on museum events, exhibitions and milestones. It is published 3 times a year.

Heard Museum Earth Song, Spring 2018  

Earth Song is the Heard Museum's members-only publication on museum events, exhibitions and milestones. It is published 3 times a year.

Profile for earthsong