Page 1

September 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

1


Crouse Full Page ad

2

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Arts and Style Edition

September 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

3


C O N T E N T S

September

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR.......................................................6

20

38

CONTRIBUTORS............................................................................7 FASHION Special Feature: Syracuse Fashion Week........................... 9

Fashion Forward: Fall Fashion.............................................. 10 SYRACUSE EATS Salt City Coffee...................................................................... 14 FOR A GOOD CAUSE Syracuse Sounds of Music Association............................. 16 SPECIAL FEATURE Hope for Heather Reports on National OCRA Conference................................................. 20 ON THE COVER Sandra Sabene, Artistic Innovations.................................. 26 HEALTH & WELLNESS Reproductive Health Clinic: Get the Facts About Ovarian Cancer................................ 32 Fitness Forum: We Should All Be Drinking More Water................................................................................ 34

14

26

WISE WOMAN Chris Belna............................................................................. 37

37

4

WOMEN IN HISTORY Elizabeth Cotten.................................................................... 40 INSPIRE Dr. Patricia Murchison............................................................ 38 Rebecca Riley............................................................................. 42 Victoria Coit................................................................................ 46 UPCOMING EVENTS................................................................. 48 MOVERS AND SHAKERS......................................................... 50

16

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

42

46

40

The Arts and Style Edition

September 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

5


CONTRIBUTORS

LETTER from the Editor This month, we asked our contributors: How would you describe your style?

T

his is our arts and style issue, so you’re about to read a lot of relatively light-spirited articles about fashion, music and the arts. So let’s start with the heavy stuff, all right? September is National Suicide Prevention Month. We tend not to talk about suicide and mental health, because it’s a heavy topic, and because there’s still a lot of stigma associated with mental illness. Personally, I don’t get that. If you’re sick, you’re sick, whether it’s depression or cancer or lupus or multiple sclerosis, and you should feel no shame in seeking treatment for it. But everyone has their hang-ups, I guess. Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. More than 41,000 people die by suicide every year. In 2017 alone, there were an estimated 1,400,000 suicide attempts. And this is definitely a women’s issue. While statistically more men complete suicide, women show higher rates of suicidal ideation and are more likely to attempt suicide, according to studies by the World Health Organization. And since 2010, while suicide rates for both genders have risen, the spike is much higher among women — 50 percent vs. 21 percent among men. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, some 46 percent of people who die by suicide had a diagnosed mental health condition. But that’s not the only risk factor for suicide. Others include: • A family history of suicide • Substance abuse. Drugs can create mental highs and lows that worsen suicidal thoughts. • Intoxication. More than 1 in 3 people who die from suicide are under the influence of alcohol at the time of death. • Access to firearms • A serious or chronic medical illness • A history of trauma or abuse • Prolonged stress • A recent tragedy or loss And while there are some obvious signs that someone is thinking about suicide — called suicidal ideation, which necessitate an immediate call to emergency services — such as preparing a will, giving away their things, talking about death or suicide, saying goodbye to friends and family or attempting to procure a means of death like a firearm or pills, some warning signals aren’t so clear: • Increased alcohol and drug use • Aggressive behavior • Withdrawal from friends, family and community • Dramatic mood swings • Impulsive or reckless behavior If you or a loved one is exhibiting any of these behaviors, there are a number of resources at your disposal. Call the toll-free National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (NSPL) at 1–800–273–TALK (8255), 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The service is available to everyone. The deaf and hard of hearing can contact the Lifeline via TTY at 1–800–799–4889. All calls are confidential. Contact social media outlets directly if you are concerned about a friend’s social media updates or dial 911 in an emergency. Learn more on the NSPL’s website. If you don’t want to talk, you can text “HOME” to The Crisis Text Line at 741741 24/7. The old “it gets better” is a cliché. Sometimes it gets better. Sometimes it gets worse, then it gets better. Sometimes it’s awful for a long time. But there are people out there who will listen.

Sarah 6

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

syracusewomanmag.com

OUR TEAM Publisher

CONTRIBUTORS

David Tyler

Editor

Sarah Hall

Design

Andrea Reeves

PhotographERS Michael Di Giglio Ana Gil-Taylor Steven J. Pallone Alice G. Patterson Maureen Tricase

Christine Dunne Christie Donato Sarah Hall Farah Jadran Alicia Madonna Kathie Morris Heather Shannon Megan Sheehan Becca Taurisano Sarah Tietje-Mietz Cover photo by Alice G. Patterson at Liverpool Art Center. Hair and makeup by j. luxe salon.

Advertising sales

Renée Moonan Linda Jabbour 315.657.7690 315.657.0849 Rmoonan@eaglenewsonline.com Ljabbour@eaglenewsonline.com

ADVERTISE WITH US

Unlike any other publication in the Syracuse area, our feature articles address major topics that interest local women. Each issue includes articles on health, fashion, fitness, finance, home matters, dining, lifestyle and personal perspectives, as well as a spotlight on local Syracuse women. Ads are due on the 15th of the month prior to publication. The print magazines will be distributed locally in over 350 locations and will be in your inbox electronically by the middle of every month.

The publication is available free of charge.

CONTACT OUR HOME OFFICE

315.434.8889 | 2501 James Street, Suite 100, Syracuse, NY 13206

The magazine is published 12 times a year by Community Media Group, LLC and Eagle Publications, 2501 James St., Suite 100, Syracuse, NY 13206

Copyright © 2019 Community Media Group, LLC. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or republished without the consent of the publishers. Syracuse Woman Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited submissions, manuscripts, photos or artwork. All such submissions become the property of Community Media Group, LLC and will not be returned. The Arts and Style Edition

Christie Donato

Alice G. Patterson

I’ve been told that I’m your favorite camp counselor by day, and Gloria Steinem by night.

I think my style is reflective of my love of the oceans, memories of sailing, cotton and comfort, so I’d say my style is classic with a SoCal vibe.

Ana Gil-Taylor My style is very “free spirit” it all depends on my mood, I can literally wear anything!

Jamie Jenson Peering into my closet is like windowshopping at J. Crew. I love clean, classic outfits that can be updated with some chunky statement jewelry.

Alicia Madonna If I had to describe my style, it would be a cross between 15-year-old Goth girl, sophisticated businesswoman and casual hippie, if you can imagine such a thing. Hahaha. It is definitely a melting pot of all my fashion likes and completely me, which took many years to finally figure out.

Kathie Morris

Megan Sheehan I would describe my style as terrible. I’ve always struggled with feeling comfortable and confident in what I’m wearing. Jeans and a black shirt have taken over my closet for years. I’m newly opening my eyes to color and pattern. Accepting fashion help ASAP.

Lisa Sousou My style… easy, casual and comfy, I guess!

Becca Taurisano I would describe my style as classic. I am a traditional, southern girl so I am drawn toward conservative styles but adding a touch of color with bold accessories.

I would have to say my style is trendy and eclectic, I could go on and on... but I like classic pieces with a modern twist, throw in a little vintage and most of all, it has to be comfortable!

Sarah Tietje-Mietz

Steven J. Pallone

My personal style mirrors my photography style; creative, authentic and organic!

It’s taken me many years and many unfortunate fashion choices (from skinny leather ties to baggy pleated pants) to settle into a style that I can comfortably call my own. Being self employed, I’m able to steer clear of corporate conformity and can just keep it casual, functional and (hopefully) still a little bit hip.

I let my style change with my moods: Head-to-toe black one day, flouncy florals the next. It’s fun, it’s mercurial.

Maureen Tricase

September 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

7


Syracuse Fashion Week Fall 2019 By Lisa Marie Butler

W

e are so lucky to live in Central New York. We get to experience all four seasons, and for many people fall is their favorite. All of the sudden the phrase “sweater weather” makes its way into every day conversation. Boots, parkas, scarves, hats and, of course, sweaters are pulled out of storage, and assessed for wearability and stylishness. But what if they don’t pass muster? Syracuse Fashion Week to the rescue! SFW Fall 19 begins with the perennial, award-winning show, Syracuse Style. This event is part fashion show, part street party. Once again we will shut down Walton Street, construct a runway and showcase the finest boutiques in downtown. The owners of these shops have a keen curatorial eye. They present fashions and accessories that can’t be found any other place other than their shops. Syracuse Style starts at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 12. As always, admission is free. Preshow party and VIP tickets will be available as well. It is a beautiful, unique and charming evening in Armory Square. Halloween is second only to Christmas in the amount of money consumers spend. And it is our favorite holiday. At 8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11 at the Landmark Theatre, SFW presents the annual fun-filled event, Syracuse Snarl. Fashion as performance art is the name of this game. Past themes have been iconic Hollywood films, fractured fairytales, mythology, and the apocalypse. This year’s theme is Living Dolls. The most creative and daring local designers will present their interpret-ations in this wildly creative show. SFW Fall 19 ends with a brand new show — Winter Wonderland on Walton. Kick-start your holiday shopping and find your New Years Eve outfit as well. Winter Wonderland will be held at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 14 in the gorgeous banquet facility at Citronelle. Guests will sample hors d’oeuvres, enjoy music and shopping, while fashions from CNY’s best stores, boutiques and designers are modeled on the catwalk. Tickets for all events are on CNYTIX.COM, and all events benefit the Food Bank of CNY. Visit syracusefashionweek.com for more information. SWM

8

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Arts and Style Edition

September 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

9


fashion forward Fall fashion

Fall fashions

ANIMAL PRINTS

Call it leopard or cheetah, animal prints are everywhere! Mixing this print with a crayon color is a fresh new look. For example, an animal print dress with cobalt blue tights, or an animal print blouse with redorange pants makes a perfect pairing. Like black, adding a little leopard always works.

By Kathie Morris

P

ersonally, my favorite season is fall. Why do I love it so much? Well, there are the beautiful colors of nature, the wonderfully crisp weather, and of course fall fashions. I don't know if there is any one reason to love fall, but I know I'm not alone! In mid-August, as I'm beginning to display the newly arrived fall styles, I enjoy hearing my customers comment on their feelings about the season. We all agree, we hate to see summer come to a close, but boy do we love to see what's on trend for fall. Is it the memory of back-to-school shopping that gets us excited? Maybe, but the fall fashions are also what we’ll base our winter wardrobes on, so there’s plenty to think about and plan for. I can tell you that the 2019 fall season will definitely not disappoint! The top trends have something for everyone, whether your style is classic, feminine, or bold. Here are some fall trends to think about as you build your wardrobe, and give thought to you fall/winter purchases.

PLAID

Yes, plaid is still trending but think classic and boujie girl when wearing your plaid. When you purchase this staple, look for classic pieces with a cool twist. Maybe a plaid top with a peplum.

COLORFUL FUR

Faux fur, teddy jackets and mid-length coats are popping up in every color under the sun! You’ll find periwinkle, bright neons and even pistachio. There are tons of colors to choose from.

PANTS

Wide-leg pants, palazzo pants and culottes are being shown in a variety of fabrics and colors. The trend with pants is comfort, and I'm happy to report our skinny ankle-length pants, which can be worn with heels or booties, have become a staple.

EMBELLISHMENT

Why are we so attracted to shiny things? Embellishes are back with a vengeance, but you don't have to go full-tilt, head-to-toe sequins to be part of the trend. Adding an embellished accessory, or a separate, to your outfit is a fun way to start! A sequined top with jeans is a fun, casual look for a night out, and having a shiny garment always comes in handy for the holiday season.

10

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

ACCESSORIES

The return of the waist! Add a leather-crafted belt to your cinched-waist blazer, suit or jumpsuit for a modern look. And speaking of waists, the fanny pack, or belt purse, is back, demanded by our hands-free world. Continued on page 12

The Arts and Style Edition

September 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

11


fashion forward Fall fashion

Fall Fashion from page 11 THE ‘70S

Many designer’s inspirations are coming from the 1970s era. Turtlenecks, ponchos and bellbottoms in corduroy and suede are in the mix. Mini's, wrap and disco era dresses are lining the racks in specialty stores everywhere.

POCKETS

FINALLY. Designers are giving us pockets, at last. Oversized pockets that are actually big enough to hold things are being shown in contrasting fabrics on coats and jackets. Pockets in dresses and pants that are constructed to hide bulk! Yes, I am excited it's like a gift! When looking in your closet, think of your wardrobe as your artistic media and you are the canvas! Experiment with colors, patterns and styles. Build your wardrobe so that it is comfortable, stylish and fully functional for your lifestyle. What better way to enjoy our beautiful CNY fall season! SWM Kathie Morris owns The Changing Room, located at 425 South Warren St., Syracuse; (315) 299-4320. Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Photography by Dennis Fernando Styling by Pastel Makeup and Styling

12

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Arts and Style Edition

September 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

13


syracuse eats Salt City Coffee

Salt City Coffee: Making a Difference, One Cup at a Time

SALT CITY COFFEE

By Becca Taurisano

M

There are two parts to [Salt City Coffee]: getting really good coffee in Syracuse and using it for good.” — Maria Metthe Photos by Steven J. Pallone

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Pay It Forward board was part of the vision from the beginning. The goal is “giving everybody the dignity to have a good cup of coffee, a good bagel, but also to sit in a chair and relax…to use the bathroom. We get panhandlers in the parking lot and we go out there and say you are not allowed to pandhandle here but you know we will give you free food. If you are hungry and that’s why you’re asking for money, come on in and we will give you free food every day.” Salt City Coffee currently has a staff of five, but they are actively looking for baristas and they want employees to grow with them. “We look at their gifts,” said Maria, “If they are gifted in social media, sure, we’ll let you go that way. We run things completely different. There is a long-term place for you here.” Salt City Coffee sources natural, organic and fair trade coffee beans. One of the farms they buy from is women-owned. Salt City is becoming well-known for their cold brew, which is smooth and chocolatey. They serve breakfast all day. For lunch they offer salads, sandwiches, quinoa and acai bowls. Salt City also offers tea, fresh squeezed lemonade and pastries. A lot of the food they serve is tested in the Metthes’ home kitchen first, then they bring it to the staff and hone the recipe. The Metthes have three children: Miles, age 6, Eve, age 3, and Juliet, age 2. “Our family really comes first,” Maria said. Salt City Coffee has a nursery upstairs and plans to turn a storage closet into an art nook for kids. Their youngest, Juliet, came one month after they opened the café and they had to figure out how to balance a growing family with a new business. Maria suffered from postpartum depression when Juliet was born and had to take a step back from their new business at a time when she felt she was needed at the café the most. “You can’t open up a business and hit pause,” she said. “I literally checked out. It was hard for me not being a part of the café. I would say to [Aaron], this is our dream. His strong points are my weak and my strong points are his weak. I trust him more than anyone else. This is my dreaming partner about what life could be like.” Maria recently spoke at Crouse Hospital about postpartum depression to tell others about their experience. “It’s a quiet battle,” Maria said. The West Onondaga location is the first, but Salt City Coffee is opening their second location in the Salt City Market. The Metthes would like to open a third location on the Northside at some point in the future, but always off the beaten path. “We want to go where no other coffee shop wants to go,” Maria said. “We don’t want to get too big. We need to grow, but I still want to know every wholesale partner. I want to know all the baristas. I want it to feel like home. We dream of growth, we dream of impact, while still maintaining who we are. It’s personal to us.” SWM You can find them at 509 W. Onondaga St., Syracuse, NY 13204. Their hours are Monday through Friday 7a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturdays 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Visit saltcitycoffee.com or call (315) 888-1138 for more information.

Shown above: Maria Metthe. Left to right: Acai bowl, Breakfast burrito, Latte.

14

aria Metthe is all about relationships. “Coffee is a gateway to have conversations, and that builds relationships,” said Maria. She and her husband, Aaron, opened Salt City Coffee two years ago in its Near West Side location. Maria deals with wholesale and community connections and describes Aaron as the roaster and coffee genius. When scouting the location, Maria knew they wanted to be on the outskirts and be a part of the city’s revitalization. The building where they are located on West Onondaga Street was first a dentist office, then the old McMahon-Ryan location, and now belongs to a coffee shop with a unique mission — to make a difference. “There are two parts to [Salt City Coffee]: getting really good coffee in Syracuse and using it for good,” Maria said. “This is a hard business to be in and days get long. I need to know we are making an impact.” Maria and Aaron both came from the non-profit world, so when Aaron went from roasting beans for fun to realizing they had a business opportunity, the couple left their jobs in non-profit to start a new adventure in coffee. Maria did community outreach and fundraising for both a pregnancy center and a food pantry and Aaron worked as a social worker at Hillside Children’s Agency. Their passion for helping others spilled over into Salt City Coffee as they provide free meeting space upstairs to non-profits, give away coffee for fundraisers and galas, and offer free coffee and bagels through their Pay It Forward board. The Pay It Forward board is now well-known in the neighborhood and at the local shelters. Customers pre-buy tokens that are the value of a small coffee or bagel and the tokens are posted on a board near the register. If someone can’t pay for coffee or a bagel, they are encouraged by the staff to take a token. The token is an important part of the process. “There is still that level of transaction,” said Maria. The baristas are taught to look for signs if people can’t pay for coffee or food through mannerisms or behavior. “We hire baristas based on whether they fit with who we are and what we’re trying to do.”

The Arts and Style Edition

September 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

15


FOR A GOOD CAUSE Syracuse Sounds of Music Association

CNY Jazz Arts Foundation Onondaga Civic Symphony Orchestra Schola Musicorum Skaneateles Festival Society for New Music Symphoria Healing Harmonies Symphoria Youth Orchestras Syracuse Children’s Chorus Syracuse Chorale Syracuse Friends of Chamber Music Syracuse Opera Syracuse Pops Chorus Temple Concord Goldenberg Cultural Series

Donna McCann

Photo by: Maureen Tricase/Capture Your Moments

SYRACUSE SOUNDS OF MUSIC ASSOCIATION

What is the Syracuse Sounds of Music Association?

The Syracuse Sounds of Music Association, Inc. is a non-profit charitable organization that advocates for the promotion and support of music throughout the Central New York area. We do this through a number of fundraising activities and events. Proceeds from all our efforts are disbursed to a variety of nonprofit organizations that provide music programming. We also award two scholarships every year.

What is your role at SSMA?

Presently I hold the office of president and work collaboratively with board members to carry out our mission. Our board 16

Outgoing SSMA President Donna McCann, left, and incoming President Jennifer Loh.

consists of 22 amazing men and women from all walks of life who believe that supporting the vibrant music community in Central New York is important.

Can you tell me about the organization’s history?

In 1957, a dedicated group of women who believed that Syracuse should have an orchestra formed the Syracuse Symphony Guild. In 1960, the Syracuse Symphony Orchestra was established, and the Syracuse Symphony Association (the Guild’s successor) was there to help support it financially through fundraising. In the spring of 2011, the SSO began the transition to a new

business model and officially became Symphoria in December of 2012. The SSA reorganized as well, becoming the Syracuse Sounds of Music Association, Inc. (SSMA) in the fall of 2011. Since then, the SSMA has gone forward with a fresh new vigor, and a new mission: to raise funds to support not only Symphoria, but many CNY non-profit organizations that provide music programming.

What organizations do you support?

Grants are available to 501(c)(3) non-profit organizations for special events or projects having to do with music. This may include sponsorship of a concert, continuing education projects,

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

hiring guest artists, purchase of music, instruments or other music equipment or repair of instruments. CNY Association of Music Teachers was awarded grant funding for student tuition assistance for a summer camp. We assisted with the funding of the Brady Faith Center’s “Brady’s Seeds for the Arts” program which offers in-house music lessons on guitar, piano and voice to underprivileged youth aged 7 to 25. In addition to the above organizations, in December 2019, the following grants were disbursed to the following recipients: Central Winds: Music Educators’ Wind Ensemble Civic Morning Musicals Front Row Players The Arts and Style Edition

we awarded two scholarships in the amount of $2,000 each. Information regarding the application process can be found at syracusesoundsofmusic.org under the “Scholarship” tab. Updated information for 2020 will be available on our website mid-April, 2020. This scholarship is funded with 10% of all SSMA event proceeds, as well as contributions from the Whittle Family.

Why is music so important to the community? Why should we support it?

In December, the Syracuse Sounds of Music Association also helped to sponsor Symphoria’s Holiday Pops performances, Kids Concerts, and the “Kids 4 Free” ticket program. Grant applications and information for 2019 will be available at syracusesoundsofmusic.org in late September.

Music is the universal language. It can enhance your emotions and let your imagination flow. It’s good for your memory and brings us pleasure. With so much access to recorded music, we often neglect the importance of attending live events that can touch the soul in ways that recorded music simply cannot. It connects the performers with the audience in an intimate and powerful way that can’t be experienced through recorded music. There is also an opportunity for exposure to a wide range of music you may not hear in your daily life. Music plays an important role in bringing people together!

Tell me about the Encore Thrift Shop in Fayetteville.

Encore Thrift Shop, at 119 Brooklea Drive in Fayetteville, is our most successful “full time fundraiser,” and has been in business for almost 14 years. It is managed by Board Member Andrea Calarco and is staffed by volunteers from the community as well as other board members who volunteer their time. Hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. Donations of women’s clothing, shoes, books, jewelry and small household items in very good condition are accepted during business hours. If you haven’t visited us, please stop by. Many of our customers comment that we have a “boutique-like” atmosphere!

How do you raise money?

In addition to our Encore Thrift Shop, we host events at least twice a year. “Music Matters” has been our preeminent fall fundraiser where we conduct a silent auction with items donated by individuals from of our community as well as local businesses. Each year we recognize someone who has shown extraordinary support and dedication to music in Central

Is there anything else you’d like people to know? New York with the Ovation Award. This year we will be honoring Ida Tili-Trebicka on Oct. 24 at Traditions At the Links in East Syracuse. Our holiday event, “Intermezzo,” is a luncheon held in early December with musical entertainment, where we offer specially selected items from Encore. For the past two years, we have also held fashion show events that have been very successful. We strive to continue to support music in our community and greatly appreciate your support. Donations can be mailed to: SSMA, P.O. Box 85, Fayetteville, NY 13066.

Tell me about your scholarship program. Who was Sally Whittle? How can students qualify?

The SSMA presents the Sally Whittle Memorial Scholarship for Musical excellence to a high school senior planning to study instrumental music, voice or music education. To be eligible, the student must be accepted to an accredited music program at a college, university or conservatory. This scholarship was started over 25 years ago in memory of Sally Whittle, a past member of our board of directors. The amount granted will vary, dependent on that year’s proceeds and donations. In 2019,

We are always looking for volunteers to work at our thrift shop as well as new SSMA Board members. Please email any questions you may have to syracusesoundsofmusic@ gmail.com. SWM

September 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

17


18

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Arts and Style Edition

September 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

19


SPECIAL FEATURE No woman should die of breast or ovarian cancer

T

‘No woman should die of breast or ovarian cancer'

hough some women have more risks of developing breast or ovarian cancer — cancer itself is not biased. It’s not selective. It’s not political. It’s not prejudiced. Take a moment and think about your intermediate family, your closest circle of friends and your co-workers. Somewhere in those groups, including you, are people who have cancer, are currently fighting or have died due to the disease. Every year, representatives and members of Hope of Heather Ovarian Cancer Awareness travels to the National Conference now hosted by Ovarian Cancer Research Alliance (OCRA). The 2019 gathering, held July 12 to 14 in Seattle, Washington, brought together hundreds of ovarian cancer survivors, caregivers, researchers and community partners like Hope for Heather. Hope for Heather’s leadership was eager to attend the three-day conference to reconnect with survivors and community partners from across the country. In addition, one of this year’s keynote speakers included Mary-Claire King, Ph.D., a geneticist at the University of Washington. King first discovered BRCA1, the breast and ovarian cancer gene, in 1990. Her work on BRCA1 was a game-changer for how scientists thought about the role of genetics in complex diseases such as cancer.

CNY’s Hope for Heather reports back following 2019 National Conference By Farah Jadran

During King’s talk, she discussed how far research has come and how we should truly be living in a world where, “no woman should die of breast or ovarian cancer.” Because of King’s findings, women who are affected can make informed decisions about cancer prevention and screening options available to them, saving countless lives. Early detection is key in any cancer diagnosis. According to OCRA, women diagnosed at an early stage — before ovarian cancer has spread — have a much higher five-year survival rate than those diagnosed at a later stage. Being your own best health advocate is important and for those willing to share education with others could mean saving a life. “Join Hope for Heather by remembering TEAL,” said Frieda Weeks, founder of Hope for Heather. “TEAL stands for ‘tell every amazing lady’ about the signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer. They can seem common or easy to brush off. Bloating, constipation, urgency to urinate, feeling full sooner when eating, pelvic pressure and changes in bowel movements.” Weeks and the Hope for Heather team welcome every to TEAL by using resources on the website, hopeforheather.org, or stop by their booth inside the Science and Industry Building during the New York State Fair. Pick up a teal ribbon and symptom card for yourself and a few more for women you call family, friends and co-workers. It could save their life. SWM Farah F. Jadran is the media spokeswoman for Hope for Heather Ovarian Cancer Awareness. She is the CBS5 anchor for CBS This Morning and CBS at Noon for CNYCentral in Syracuse. Farah also served as editor of SWM for more than four years after she helped launch it in January 2011.

MEN OF TEAL 2019

For the next 30 days, Hope for Heather will introduce you to the 2019 Men of Teal roster featuring Central New York men who have pledged to raise ovarian cancer awareness by passing out teal ribbons and symptom cards. To learn more follow #MenOfTeal on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook with @Hope4Heather throughout September — National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month.

Submitted photos

20

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Arts and Style Edition

September 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

21


syracuse

style

Free Runway Fashion Show FASHIONS & STYLING BY DOWNTOWN SHOPS

GENERAL SEATING IS FREE.

SEPTEMBER 12TH | 7:30 PM 100 Block Walton Street, Downtown Syracuse (Rain Date: September 19)

PRE-SHOW PARTY AT EMPIRE BREWING COMPANY TICKETS - $20 VIP TICKETS & FRONT-ROW SEATS- $50 Presented by: the Downtown Committee of Syracuse, Syracuse Fashion Week, Empire Brewing Company, Syracuse Woman Magazine, Landmark Theatre

PURCHASE TICKETS AT EMPIRE BREWING CO. OR CNYTIX.COM PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE FOOD BANK OF CNY

NEW!

VISITING EXHIBIT OPENS

September

21st

presents

Take a virtual reality “brain cruise.” Immerse yourself in 3D displays that put you in the middle of an electrical “brainstorm.” Don’t miss the mind-boggling experience of the year’s most intriguing exhibit. There’s fun & amazement for every member of the family.

It’s your brain. Come discover it! 22

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Arts and Style Edition

local support provided by

made possible by

MILTON J. RUBENSTEIN MUSEUM OF SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY 500 S. FRANKLIN ST. | ARMORY SQUARE | www.most.org

Produced by Evergreen Exhibitions,

September 2019

in collaboration with the

National Institutes of Health.

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

23


24

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Arts and Style Edition

September 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

25


COVER story Sandra Sabene

The Art of Letting Go

SANDRA SABENE

SANDRA SABENE, ARTISTIC INNOVATIONS

ARTISTIC INNOVATIONS

By Sarah Hall

A

It’s always about empowering and self-awareness, but also connecting with each other. So community and connection are two things that I cultivate in everything.” — Sandra Sabene

rt has always been a haven for Sandra Fioramonti-Sabene. “Art has been a way for me to check in with myself, to express just whatever I really can’t put words to,” she said. “It’s always been that healing tool for me to be really connected with how I’m feeling, and the path that I’m on.” Sandra, who operates Artistic Innovations, LLC, believes that art should provide a safe space, a sense of belonging and, most importantly, an outlet for emotional expression. In all of her classes, from simple drawing and painting to her popular meditative painting retreats, she encourages her students to relax, breathe, not to worry about the aesthetics of the piece — and to feel.

She explained her philosophy in a TED Talk she gave last summer at Onondaga Community College. “Let go of the outcome, let go of trying to make something, or wondering what it would look like, or where you’re going to end up putting this product,” she said in the talk. “The magic, the art is truly in the letting go.”

THE ART OF EXPRESSION

That’s the kind of art Sandra teaches at her studio on Lake Drive in the village of Liverpool: what she calls the expressive arts. She seeks to make her studio, the Liverpool Art Center, a haven for all who enter. “It’s not about creating something that you want to take home and put on the fridge,” she said. “It’s about that moment where you had a deeper sense of self-awareness, or a moment of growth, or gratitude, or anything that has the shift inside of you.”

Photography by Alice G. Patterson

Continued on page 28

26

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Arts and Style Edition

September 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

27


COVER story Sandra Sabene

The Art of Letting Go from page 26 That’s not to say you can’t learn the basics of, say, drawing and painting from Sandra. She also teaches what she calls the academic arts. “There is art the way most people think of art, creating art,” Sandra said. “And I hear all the time, ‘I can’t even draw a stick figure.’ And so it’s those have-tos and shoulds. It’s that notion that we have to be good at something before we learn how to do it. Or there’s a whole process that we have to do it a certain way.” Sandra does offer more traditional painting and drawing classes and has since she started her business. “The ongoing, year-round classes for adults and teens offer support and hands-on instruction that allow the students to set the pace, choose the medium and discover their own unique style,” she said. “The challenges of learning something new and push the edge of our comfort zone in the art studio inspires students to connect and dig deep.”

But Sandra’s passion is in the expressive arts. “What I teach in the art of letting go is you have to have this space that feels safe to you, to be able to express in that way,” she said. It’s that kind of art — journaling, painting, visual art journaling — that has helped Sandra to express herself through the years. Art has been part of her world her entire life; her mother owned a gallery and studio much like the one Sandra runs now, though it focused much more on the academic arts. In addition, her grandfather had been a professional artist. Sandra herself grew up, got married and had children. She started out running a state-licensed daycare. For her, art was just a hobby. But things changed when her husband was diagnosed with cancer. “Watching him go through 18 months of regrets and wishes, that was the momentum that is behind [thinking about] what can I do with my

life and model for my own children, to not be in that moment of regret and wishing,” she said. Her husband passed away in 2000. By 2002, Sandra had opened her own studio in a small space in Baldwinsville. By the time she moved to the spot in Liverpool in 2004, she already had a loyal following. “That’s why I always say ‘we,’ because it’s like a community and a family,” she said. “And that’s really the foundation of everything I do is really to create community.” That community feeling is evident just walking into one of Sandra’s classes — there’s no tension, no sense that the students are stressed over their work or seeking perfection. They’re making art for art’s sake. “It’s really about taking time for yourself, and just connecting on a deeper level,” Sandra said.

THE ART OF RECOVERY

Sandra has always used art as a kind of therapy for herself, and she’s encouraged her two sons to do the same. For both of them, it proved to be a valuable tool keeping them away from the darker parts of life. “[If] my son has a hard day, [he could] just take some paint, and throw it on a piece of paper,” Sandra said. “Or just poking holes in the paper, whatever it takes to not have to put words to something that you’re feeling, or not define it in any way, but just express it and move on. He literally grew up in this environment, being able to do all these, drumming, painting, meditation, all these different things.” But as a teen, one of her sons began using drugs. He’s currently in a recovery program in California. In his recovery, he’s using a lot of the same tools his mother taught him growing up. “They do all of what I do as a part of the recovery system there,” Sandra said. “It was kind of crazy when he was experiencing

meditation, and art, and the journaling that I was doing here with [my kids] through his recovery process.” Getting to the point where her son was ready to enter recovery, however, was hardly easy. “It’s not like you have a son, and he’s struggling with addiction and he says, ‘I want to get clean, Mom,’ and then he goes and gets clean,” Sandra said. She said she had her own role to play in his addiction as an enabler, and it took her a long time to come to grips with the fact that she couldn’t make him better. “I can’t help him. I can’t fix him. I can’t cure him. And as a parent, that’s paralyzing. It’s heartbreaking. So that energy has to go somewhere.” Sandra started funneling that energy into helping others facing addiction. “What I have been hearing is the need to gather people that are in recovery in social type settings that were safe for them — substance-free, alcohol-free, but weren’t necessarily a 12-step program or something recovery-focused, just some kind of a social setting,” she said. Sandra launched the Creative Recovery Cooperative two years ago. According to its website, creativerecoverycooperative.com, the CR Co-op is “a collective network of businesses, healthcare professionals and community members, artists, musicians, teachers and families aiming to build an infrastructure of supportive community events… designed to offer substance free options following treatment from substance misuse and dissolve the stigma around addicts in recovery. Through the universal language of music, art and meditation communities unite, families heal and the potential to shift America’s response to addiction from one of rejection to one of inclusion is made possible. This online resource offers options for anyone touched by substance abuse or misuse. Options include recovery pathways, sober social events and classes, health focused events, meditation resources and live sober event calendar.” Sandra said the free resource has already proven to be useful. “People that are in recovery from addiction are really finding it helpful already,” she said. “What’s happened is we’ve connected with several different organizations that love the idea, that want to support and help us grow and sustain the idea.”

THE ART OF HEALING

In addition to maintaining the website, Sandra has undertaken several other initiatives to bring art into the recovery community, all under the same premise she’s always extolled: expressing yourself through art helps to exorcise all kinds of inner demons. “What we offer are creative pathways to express what you feel,” Sandra said. “The feedback I’ve heard is it’s so nice to not have to think. It’s nice not to have to focus only on the recovery words all the time.” Continued on page 30

[In the teen class], some just feel kind of like on the outskirts, and where do you go? Where do you belong? And it’s always in the studio because anything goes. There’s a sense of belonging, non-judgment. They support all pathways.” — Sandra Sabene 28

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Arts and Style Edition

September 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

29


COVER story Sandra Sabene

The Art of Letting Go from page 29 Sandra said her group has offered workshops in sober living centers and teen centers, as well as places like Vera House, where she has a facilitator specifically trained to work with women who have experienced trauma. Last year she started working with kids in summer camps and childcare centers. “Just this past year, we just did a group of a hundred kids at a summer camp, kindergarten through middle school,” Sandra said. “And it’s really all the same program that’s based on letting go of trying to make music perfectly like a musician and become a musician, letting go of trying to become an artist and just how do you feel, express how you feel.” Sandra said it’s often a challenge to get kids — and sometimes adults — to realize that music and art can make you feel something, but once they do, “the art just flows.” “You bond with the color, you bond with the texture,” she said. “And we incorporate music almost always. And the music kind of carries you through sound and through how the sound makes you feel, so that you can kind of shift through the art medium, and that back and forth between the music and the color, and it’s a sort of flow that that happens magically.” The events are run by facilitators, all of whom are trained through a nine-month Creative Rhythms Facilitator Training for expressive arts, rhythms wellness and meditation events Sandra created last year. Further trainings will be held in the future, and she hopes to bring regularly scheduled experiential art-based programs to sober living centers. Her own Serenity Studios, part of her Liverpool studio, will host two regular programs: Refuge Recovery a non-profit organization that believes Buddhist principles and practices create a strong foundation to recover from addiction, on Tuesdays, and Y12SR, yoga of 12-Step recovery offers a rich and powerful framework for addiction recovery and relapse prevention. Helping to create these programs has helped Sandra through her own recovery process. “I feel there’s a purpose in all the challenges that we have in our lives, and all the darkness that [my son] and I have been through over the years, I have to give it a purpose,” she said. “I have to be able to move forward. And the only way that I can say this was worth it at some point in my life is to help other people with what I’ve learned.” SWM

It’s not about creating something that you want to take home and put on the fridge, or you might not post it on social media. It’s about that moment where you had a deeper sense of self-awareness, or a moment of growth, or gratitude, or anything that has the shift inside of you.”— Sandra Sabene

Photography by Alice G. Patterson

To see Sandra’s TED Talk, “The Art of Letting Go”, visit youtube.com/ watch?time_continue=5&v=GOdbUYslEks

30

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Arts and Style Edition

September 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

31


Health & Wellness Women's Reproductive Health

Get the Facts about Ovarian Cancer By Lisa Sousou, PA

S

eptember is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month. Although the rate of its diagnosis has decreased over the past two decades, ovarian cancer still has the lowest survival rate of any female cancer, and was responsible for an estimated nearly 14,000 deaths in the U.S. in 2019. Most cases of ovarian cancer are not diagnosed until they reach an advanced stage, at which time successful treatment is much more difficult. However, survival rates are over 90% if it is detected at its earliest stages.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?

Early on, it is common for ovarian cancer to have no noticeable symptoms. Later, the symptoms are often vague and nonspecific, and can mimic other medical problems, which can cause a delay in diagnosis. Symptoms can include: • Bloating, indigestion or nausea • Pelvic or abdominal pain or pressure • Feeling full quickly when eating, or loss of appetite • Urinary urgency or frequency • Changes in bowel habits or bowel movements • Extreme tiredness, decreased energy

WHAT ARE THE RISK FACTORS?

Ovarian cancer is most commonly diagnosed in women in their fifties and sixties. Other than age, the following factors may be associated with an increased risk: • A history of starting your period at an early age, or reaching menopause late • Never having been pregnant • Smoking • Overweight • Family history of ovarian cancer, or inherited genetic syndromes that are associated with it • Some studies have found a small increased risk with hormone replacement therapy use after menopause, but other studies have not found an increased risk

32

HOW IS IT DETECTED?

Unfortunately, there is still no reliable screening test for ovarian cancer. However, there are steps you can take to be vigilant: • See your health care provider for routine screening gynecologic examinations (pelvic exams) as often as he/she recommends. A Pap smear does not test for ovarian cancer (it screens for cervical cancer), and a pelvic exam alone cannot be reliably used to rule it out. However, a routine exam may still be able to pick up enlarged ovaries, pelvic masses, or pain, which can be signs of ovarian cancer. • If new symptoms last more than a couple of weeks, talk to your health care provider. A pelvic exam and imaging (like an ultrasound) are starting points if he/she feels your symptoms are concerning. • Sometimes, ovarian cancer can have a genetic basis. If you have a family history of ovarian or breast cancer, have a family or personal history of BRCA genetic mutation, or have Lynch syndrome, you may be at higher risk than most women. Talk to your provider about whether genetic testing may be right for you. For high-risk women who choose not to have genetic testing, other additional screening tests may be an option.

HOW CAN I REDUCE MY RISK?

These factors have been found to be associated with lower risk of ovarian cancer: • Birth control pills or tubal ligation (having your tubes tied) if you want to avoid pregnancy • Breastfeeding your baby • Maintaining a healthy weight • Avoiding, or quitting, smoking Because diagnosis at an early stage vastly improves rates of survival, early detection is key. Be sure to keep up with regular gynecologic visits, be aware of the signs and symptoms, and bring any symptoms to your provider promptly. You are your own best advocate! SWM

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Arts and Style Edition

September 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

33


Health & Wellness Women's Fitness Forum

We should all be drinking more water By Christine Donato

E

very single year, on Jan. 31, I plan out my New Year’s Resolutions for the year ahead. Some are more general changes I want to make, like this year’s goal to “Limit Household Waste,” while others are purely aspirational, such as 2018’s dream to “Reduce Student Loan Debt.” Without a doubt, the goal that shows up year after year is the one and only “Drink More Water.” If you’re anything like me, then you’ve probably vowed at one point or another to drink more water, or perhaps you’re one of those superwomen who actually gets her eight, 8-oz glasses of water every day — if so, what’s your secret? Seriously. Either way, most of us agree that drinking more water is something we should all be striving for, so why do I still find myself going days subsisting on only coffee? What happens to the body if it’s not properly hydrated, and how does it affect performance? Well, it turns out that even minimal levels of dehydration during exercise, as well as other forms of physical exertion, can cause symptoms like “reduced endurance, increased fatigue, altered thermoregulatory capability, reduced motivation, and increased perceived effort.” The next time you hit the gym, try hydrating before, during and after your workout, and see if it makes a difference. Even when we’re not at the gym, dehydration may still play a role in our cognitive performance, especially when it comes to short-term memory impairment. This is particularly worrisome in children and the elderly, but even for adults, reaching for a glass of water instead of yet another coffee or energy drink may be the key to better focus at work. In the aptly titled Women’s Health article “Once And For All∫ How Much Water Do I Have To Drink Each Day?” Amanda Baker Lemein, MS, RD, explains that, for the average adult, eight ounces of water eight times a day is a good rule of thumb. However, your exact needs may vary depending on your circumstances. For example, exercise, living in high altitudes, and those who may be sick, breastfeeding or pregnant will most likely need to increase their overall water intake. If you’re curious how much water you should be drinking daily, it’s best to consult a physician or dietician for a recommendation. Be careful not to go overboard, though, as it is actually possible to drink too much water, which “can lead to dangerously low levels of sodium through blood dilution, known as hyponatremia.” Now we know that drinking 64 ounces of water a day, on average, is very necessary for our overall health and wellness, but is all water created equally? I’ve often been told that warm water is better for you, but I absolutely despise drinking room temperature water. It is the absolute least refreshing way to quench your thirst. Surely it’s just some old wives’ tale, right? Wrong, much to my dismay. It turns out that drinking warm water is better for you, and drinking hot water might be even better still. Hot water offers a myriad of health benefits for the body, especially when it comes to digestion, circulation, and has even been shown to ease congestion in those suffering from a respiratory tract infection. Drinking hot water for better digestion isn’t a new concept either, as many cultures believe that drinking hot water is good for the body’s health. In Ayurvedic medicine, one should drink hot water in the morning and evening, while in Italy, there is the popular drink consisting of hot water and lemon peel, known as a canarino. Both of these practices are intended to help the body digest. However, this doesn’t mean those of us who enjoy drinking cold water have to give it up quite

34

yet. Drinking any temperature water throughout the day will increase energy levels and lower food cravings, as more often than not we tend to mistake thirst for hunger. As for me, I’m not going to stop keeping my Brita in the fridge, but perhaps incorporating hot water into my day wouldn’t be such a terrible idea either. We’ll consider it a compromise. SWM

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

Committed To Lifelong Dental Health... For You & Your Family

Dr. Karen Lawitts & Dr. Nancy Yeates • Teeth Whitening • Crowns & Veneers • Cleaning • Oral Cancer Screening

• Implants • Sleep Apnea Appliances

“We brighten your SMILE & build your CONFIDENCE!”

100 Intrepid Lane, Syracuse, NY | 315-492-8138 | www.dentistsyracuse.com The Arts and Style Edition

September 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

35


WISE WOMAN Chris Belna

We Capture it all - Engagement Session - Both Photograpy & Videography - Crystal cover Wedding Album - All digital images - For an affordable price - Text for a free consultation

315-373-3469 Maureen & Chris Tricase

CaptureYourMoments.net

36

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Arts and Style Edition

September 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

37


inspire Dr. Patricia Murchison

Dr. PATRICIA MURCHISON

New Symphoria Director looks to strike the right note By Jamie Jenson

A

SYMPHORIA EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

ccepting the position of executive director of Symphoria earlier this year felt like the next logical step for Dr. Pamela Murchison’s career. Her life has always been influenced by music, and from an early age, she had a passion for it. “I grew up surrounded by music,” Murchison said. “My parents had everything on, from Beethoven’s symphonies to Mississippi John Hurt to The Eagles to Johnny Mathis, so lots of family sing-alongs on car trips and things like that.” Murchison’s musical training began in kindergarten, when she began taking classes from her best friend’s mom, who played the flute. Her friend’s mom wanted to learn how to paint, so Murchison’s mom, an artist, bartered with her. They exchanged painting lessons for flute lessons. “I had just seen James Galway on Sesame Street playing probably ‘Danny Boy’ for Big Bird and so my mom said, ‘Well, do you want to take flute lessons?’ And I said, ‘Well, sure,’ and that ‘Well, sure’ has gotten me pretty far in life,” Murchison laughed. Murchison pursued bachelor’s and master’s degrees in music before earning her Doctor of Music Arts degree in flute performance from West Virginia University in 2011. “I loved being in high school orchestra and band and I never wanted to not do it, and so I’ve had a really exciting career as a performer,” she said. Murchison played in both the Akron Symphony Orchestra and the West Virginia Symphony Orchestra, and then about six or seven years ago, Murchison’s friend, who was playing with a group called the Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble, told Murchison her organization needed an executive director. She thought Murchison would be perfect for the job. “I said, ‘Well, sure,’ and I really developed a love for being on the other side of things, as well, because it’s not really the other side, right? We’re all kind of doing the same thing, just from different perches.” In 2015, that directorship led to a development job with the West Virginia Symphony Orchestra, where Murchison was also performing as a musician. When Symphoria offered Murchison the job in Syracuse, she said she and her husband jumped at the chance to move here.

Photo by Michael Di Giglio/MDG Images

What Symphoria is doing is really exciting to us, in terms of the passion of the organization, the commitment that the community has and that the musicians have.”— Dr. Patricia Murchison

“What Symphoria is doing is really exciting to us, in terms of the passion of the organization, the commitment that the community has and that the musicians have, and so it felt like a really exciting next step for us, and so here we are,” Murchison said. Murchison said she has much to be excited about here in Syracuse. “When you come into a community through an orchestra or musical organization, there are people in the community who love it already, so you have a million friends — you just don’t know them yet — because of this thing that connects us all, and so it’s so fun for me to be in a new community and learning stories about people and hearing them talk about why they love the orchestra so much,” she said. Murchison believes it’s a gift that people share their time with Symphoria and look to the organization as a place to share memories. “When I see people’s faces light up when they talk about it — and it’s the people sitting in the seats, it’s the people on the board, it’s the musicians on the stage, it’s the kids who are participating in the youth orchestra — I feel a little bit like ‘Well, what can’t we do?’” Murchison said. Murchison is also excited for the programs that are available next season, which include pianist Natasha Paremski, who will be performing Rachmaninoff’s “Concerto” over two nights, which has only been done one other time in the United States. Symphoria will also be hosting a concert called “Ellis Island,” where they’re partnering with Syracuse Stage in order to perform music that’s indicative of the experience of coming to the United States, and they’ll will be showing the Robert Zemeckis’ 1985 classic, “Back to the Future,” while the live orchestra performs the music. Wherever one’s interests lie, Murchison is sure there is an event at Symphoria to peak one’s interest, because music, she believes, is something that unites us all. “Regardless of any of our differences, everybody has this thing in common,” she said. “Every culture, every region, every person, we’re all musical. And that’s just a really universal thing. I love it — I love it so much.” SWM

38

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

TheThe ArtsEducation and Style Edition

August September 2019 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

39


WOMEN IN HISTORY Elizabeth Cotten

40

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Arts and Style Edition

September 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

41


inspire Rebecca Riley

REBECCA RILEY

Despite struggles, baker rises to the occasion By Megan Sheehan

PEACE, LOVE & CUPCAKES

N

Photo by Ana Gil-Taylor

I love to stress my appreciation for the support behind me. That’s the biggest part of my story. I would have never had the confidence or the guts to go for this if I didn’t have so many people believe in me.” — Rebecca Riley

42

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Arts and Style Edition

one of the great stories out there have been written without conflict or struggle. What’s a protagonist without some fantastic battle of sorts? Your favorite character is situated in front of the ultimate of circumstances. They fight and fight and fight until they want to give up! And then? They come out on top. This may ring true all too well for self-taught baker Rebecca Riley. Here we have a series of very specific and defining points which made this story possible. Most stories end up with a sweet ending. Rebecca’s story does not disappoint — in the end, we all get a touch of Peace, Love, and Cupcakes. It all started back in 2007. Rebecca and her husband both began working for Insomnia Cookies, where she really got her first taste of baking and decorating. It was a skill she may not have even known she possessed. It didn’t take long for her to realize how much she enjoyed this seemingly minor trade. Rebecca would spend her downtime baking at home and practicing for fun. The next few gigantic pushes came in 2011 from two separate customers while Rebecca was working at Denny’s. The first came from a regular customer who heard all about Rebecca’s joy of baking. He surprised her one day with a trunk full of cake pans, a Wilton decorating kit, piping bags, frosting tips, and other various baking tools. The next came from a woman who simply said “Just do it!” in regards to starting her own business. “I’ll give you an extra $10 on top of your tip,” she told Rebecca. “Go home tonight and print 500 business cards from Vista Print. Make up a name — something cute that represents you. Create a Facebook page, invite all of your friends and family, start your prices really low. You don’t even have to make a profit yet; just get your money back. Get your name out there. Practice, and see what happens.” So, being the wise woman she is, Rebecca did just that, forming Peace, Love and Cupcakes. Her first big order came a few months later in 2012: 200 cupcakes for a wedding reception. “It was really exciting!” she said. Rebecca worked at several other bakeries, including Corso’s Cookies, WalMart, Modern Malt and the Half Moon Bakery. There has been no other formal training for Riley who is otherwise self-taught. She recalls practicing at home “I’d sit there on my couch with a piping bag and a flower nail, trying to make butter cream roses and just getting these little blobs every time,” she said. “I must have made 1,000 little blobs before I got a rose!” Riley was baking out of her home kitchen for friends and family and taking online custom orders. She began offering weekly specials.

Wedding orders were coming in. She was pulling all nighters trying to juggle her dream but also continue working and drawing income for her family of five. Her business was growing and her kitchen was shrinking. She decided she really did want a bakery of her own. This is where things got difficult. The Rileys found a storefront to rent. They were hours from keys in hand when Rebecca received a terrible bit of business advice. The Rileys pulled out and, feeling deflated and defeated, gave up for a time. Rebecca shut down their page, and in that, her business. But she didn’t give up baking. Rebecca continued to work, and dream. She got her DBA and began baking through the Syracuse Co-Op. As wonderful as that was, she missed doing her stuff. She opened the page back up and like a shot, they were back in business again. With new confidence, the Rileys found another store to rent, a café this time. Once again, however, it was just not meant to be. The lease fell through. “I was crushed. I couldn’t even talk,” Rebecca said. Again, she reached out to her following and explained her heartache and struggle. But this time, someone had a great piece of information. The old Liberty Bakery was looking for a renter. With a much-needed nudge from her husband, Rebecca reluctantly reached out. This, friends, is where Rebecca’s luck turned. On Aug. 14, Rebecca Riley opened the doors to her own bakery at 1428 Burnet Ave., Syracuse. The old Liberty Bakery is once again filled with delicious smells, and Rebecca is doing her part to keep the historic atmosphere. She cherishes the 100-year-old prep table, and the marble table from Woolworth’s closing. Old pictures of the original owners and a Liberty bakery calendar dated 1946 adorn the walls. Rebecca is working on perfecting the classic Liberty Bakery custard to pay homage to the original bakery as a nod to her historic new home. “I love to stress my appreciation for the support behind me,” she said. “That’s the biggest part of my story. I would have never had the confidence or the guts to go for this if I didn’t have so many people believe in me.” SWM Peace, Love, and Cupcakes is located at 1428 Burnet Ave in Syracuse and set to celebrate their Grand Opening on Sunday, Sept. 8. Hours of operation are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Sunday and closed Monday.

September 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

43


Share. Share. Care. Support.

SCHOOLS OF EXCELLENCE

YOUR YOURGUIDE GUIDETO TO PROFESSIONAL PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT

YOUR LIFE. Bursting with possibilities!

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, est probatus convenire te, te sit summo sententiae. Cu vix velit elitr viderer eos eu. Aliquam utroque prodesset cu cum, est ad viderer debitis. 315.XXX.XXXX Address website

YVONNE M CALLAGHAN, LMFT Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, est probatus convenire te, te sit summo sententiae. Cu vix velit elitr viderer eos eu. Aliquam utroque prodesset cu cum, est ad viderer debitis. 315.XXX.XXXX Address website

44

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Arts and Style Edition

elitr viderer eos eu. Aliquam utroque prodesset cu cum, est ad viderer debitis. 315.XXX.XXXX Address website

MY CONSCIOUS LIFE COACH Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, est probatus convenire te, te sit summo sententiae. Cu vix velit elitr viderer eos eu. Aliquam utroque prodesset cu cum, est ad viderer debitis. 315.XXX.XXXX Address website

ALLISON HASLAM Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, est probatus convenire te, te sit summo sententiae. Cu vix velit

KATHLEEN PRINGLE Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, est probatus convenire te, te sit summo sententiae. Cu vix velit

elitr viderer eos eu. Aliquam utroque prodesset cu cum, est ad viderer debitis.

elitr viderer eos eu. Aliquam utroque prodesset cu cum, est ad viderer debitis.

315.XXX.XXXX Address website

315.XXX.XXXX Address website

September 2019

July 2019

MY CONSCIOUS LIFE COACH Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, est probatus convenire te, te sit summo sententiae. Cu vix velit

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

45

29


inspire Victoria Coit

Celebrating community and culture in the ‘Cuse

VICTORIA COIT

By Sarah Tietje-Mietz

W

Photo by Maureen Tricase/Capture Your Moments

CUSE CULTURE

46

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Arts and Style Edition

diverse. While in D.C., she worked in project management for a hen Victoria Coit moved back to the Syracuse area from contracting company while simultaneously training to be a chef. Washington, D.C., she knew she wanted to do something “I was a really good cook... and then realized that I didn’t really want that mattered. to do that as much. But I did have fun,” Coit said of her time in D.C., “I think I was on a quest,” said Coit. “I felt like I was supposed to be “and I learned a lot about contracting and was fascinated with it... doing something here... it was just sort of like a soul yearning.” There were so may cranes in the sky, and there was always something One night, from the inspiration that only dreaming can provide, being built on top of something on top of something. And so that Coit awoke with a clear vision of her purpose. “I was just... constantly asking God, ‘So what am I supposed to do?’” fascinated me.” It was this building up of neighborhoods, and of watching how Coit said. “And... it was clear that everything that I did, and everything communities could grow and evolve that affected Coit. Instead of that I saw and experienced in Syracuse... what if I created a magazine, leaving Cuse Culture behind to start a new venture, Coit changed how and put it all in there.” she approached it, and so Cuse Culture has grown and evolved along This was when Cuse Culture was conceived. with her. The first iteration of this idea was called SOTE, pronounced so-tay, Now a multi-faceted company that does marketing, events, which stood for Salt Of The Earth. It was a magazine focused on and outreach, Cuse Culture has moved beyond telling the stories of women of color in Syracuse and the great work they were doing for those making a difference, to creating events and resources that make a themselves, for each other, and for the community. Seeing a lack of difference for the community it serves. publications addressing these topics, Cuse Culture organizes professional Coit decided it was time to create one. networking events for the Syracuse “I saw the narrative was twisted when area, each time taking over a different came to women of color,” said Coit. neighborhood spot, like a recent “As a woman of color, I wanted just to As a woman of color, I wanted occasion at Barclay Damon Rooftop and say we’re here, and we’re brilliant. just to say we’re here, and we’re featuring DJ Soulstar. Their networking And you know, we deserve the same event for September, hosted at Eleven positive light.” brilliant. And you know, we Waters, focused on bringing together SOTE began publishing online in deserve the same positive light.”— area educators. 2012, but went dormant when Coit Coit knows how to throw a party became pregnant and her focus turned Victoria Coit that has both style and depth. from media to motherhood. Becoming a On Saturday, July 20, she organized parent was a big lifestyle change for Coit, the Cuse Culture Festival, a 12-hour who had been known for kidnapping event filled with international music, her friends for day-long adventures local food, activists and fun, activating discovering new social hotspots. the downtown Syracuse area. Coit reimagined and restructured her life so she could give her child as “A street festival with music, food, arts, and games that engages much of herself as possible. residents in our corridors is exactly the type of festival we’d like to see This did not mean she was giving up on her quest. Instead, Coit grow and draw neighbors to Downtown,” said Ruthnie Angrand, refocused what she wanted her purpose to be. When a friend approached the director of communications and marketing for the city of Syracuse. her about doing another magazine, she agreed, but she wanted to “Cuse Culture has shown a tremendous commitment to connecting broaden the scope from what SOTE had addressed. Naming it Cuse with the people by highlighting the diversity of our city,” Culture, the magazine would be for people of all colors working and Held right in front of City Hall, Coit’s goal for this event was far bigger growing Syracuse, and highlighting the positive stories they had to tell. than just a great party. “Because it’s not constantly someone’s getting murdered or shot, you know, which you see in the mainstream news,” said Coit. “In order “It’s a celebration of culture. Its a celebration of people’s dreams... it’s for people to see themselves differently,” Coit said. “In this city, to see for us to... come together, or be respectful of each other, this narrative themselves in the midst of infinite possibilities...We all have that one had to change.” thing inside of use that pushes us to want more of ourselves. And this Change is a word Coit is very familiar with. Describing herself as someone “notorious for starting and stopping things” and at learning is a celebration of it.” SWM new skills and moving on, Coit’s background is varied and her skillset

September 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

47


UPCOMING SWM Events Wednesday, Sept. 4

WBOC Member Program When: 5 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Genesee Grande Hotel, 1060 E. Genesee St., Syracuse What: Jen Liddy, “You Haven’t Come This Far to Only Come This Far: What’s Your Next Step?” Cost: $10 for members, $25 for non-members Info: wboconnection.org/event-3513776 Wednesday, September 4

Bistro Night When: 6 to 9 p.m. Where: SKY Armory, 351 S Clinton St, Syracuse What: Enjoy first Wednesday’s Bistro Night at SKY Armory, where we’ve created a cozy, casual atmosphere to meet friends and enjoy fresh cocktails, light fare, and live music. Reservations not required. Cost: Free Info: skyarmory.com Tuesday, Sept. 10

Syracuse Business Professionals/RNG monthly breakfast When: 9 a.m. Where: The Gem Diner, 832 Spencer St., Syracuse What: The purpose of this group is to make business connections. A member of the group does a presentation each month and breakfast is available, but optional. Cost: Free Info: eventbrite.com/e/syracuse-business-professionalsrng-monthly-breakfast tickets-42541252030?aff=ebdssbdestsearch Tuesday, Sept. 10

Seven Habits of Seven Highly Successful People 2019 When: 3 to 6 p.m. Where: Craftsman Inn, 7300 E. Genesee St., Fayetteville What: Hear from seven of the region’s most influential executives and community leaders. Cost: $25 for CenterState CEO members; $35 for non-members Info: lmetot@centerstateceo.com Tuesday, September 10

PowerUp Social When: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: SKY Armory, 351 S Clinton St, Syracuse What: PowerUp is about working hard to reach the next level together.  We are here to connect you with the tools you need to sharpen your skills, the resources you need to get where you want to be, and the network you need to support you along the way. Join us to connect, network, and learn more about how to get involved! Cost: Free Info: powerupsyr.com/   Thursday, Sept. 12

Innovation Village When: Noon to 1:30 p.m. Where: The Tech Garden, 235 Harrison St., Syracuse What: Get familiar with the resources and programs for startups in the Central New York entrepreneurial ecosystem. Join us in an informal discussion on the people and organizations that can help you start and/or grow your business. Cost: Free Info: eventbrite.com/e/innovation-village-tickets-66923769797?aff= ebdssbdestsearch 48

Thursday, Sept. 12

2019 Best Places to Work Awards When: 5 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Drumlins Country Club, 800 Nottingham Road, Syracuse What: Best Places to Work recognizes and celebrates Central New York’s leadingemployers. We are looking for the very best companies that foster a great place to work, are innovative,  promote technology, offer people-focused programs and have great leadership. Results are based on employee feedback. Cost: Up to $600 Info: cnybj.com/2019-best-places-to-work-awards/ Thursday, Sept. 12

Handbags Helping Hearts When: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Stickley Furniture Showroom, 300 Towne Drive, Fayetteville What: Cleverly themed purses and bags, including luxury items and experiences! Music by DJ Bella J. Cost: $1 to $250 Info: goredsyracuse@heart.org Thursday, Sept. 12

Syracuse Style Runway Fashion Show When: 7:30 p.m. Where: 100 block of Walton Street, Armory Square, Syracuse What: Fashions and styling by downtown shops. Rain date is Sept. 19. Info: syracusefashionweek.com Cost: General admission - free; VIP front row seating - $50

Tuesday, Sept. 24

Thursday, Sept. 19

Thursday, Sept. 26

League of Women Voters 100th Anniversary Celebration When: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Pascale’s Italian Bistro at Drumlins, 800 Nottingham Road, Syracuse What: The Syracuse Metropolitan Area LWV will be celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the LWV in New York at a reception and fundraiser. Cost: $40 to $100 Info: (315) 396-8225 or email lwvsyr@gmail.com Savoring Science Gala When: 6 to 7:30 cocktails and auction; 7:30 p.m. dinner Where: Cocktails and auction at The MOST, 500 S. Franklin St., Syracuse; dinner at Citronnelle, Walton Street, Syracuse What: Fundraiser for The MOST. Cost: Sponsorship info at shorturl.at/hmAO7 Info: (315) 425-9068 ext. 2116 Thursday, Sept. 19

Nurses’ Night Out When: 5 to 8 p.m. Where: Sheraton Syracuse University Hotel & Conference Center, 801 University Ave., Syracuse What: A night celebrating all nurses and all healthcare professionals. Free welcome drink when you arrive. Free hors d’oeuvres, vendors with info and displays, music and dancing. Please wear your badge or name tag. Cost: This event is free with a ticket. Limited to two tickets per person. Info: eventbrite.com/e/nurses-night-out-tickets-68137022669?aff= ebdssbdestsearch Saturday, Sept. 21

Friday, Sept. 13

NightLab: Crime Scene When: 6 to 9 p.m. Where: The MOST, 500 S. Franklin St., Syracuse What: Join us at the MOST for an evening exploring the methods and techniques used by law enforcement, forensic scientists, and researchers to help solve crimes. Must be 18+ with valid ID. Cost: $12 for MOST members, $15 for nonmembers Info: most.org/learn/nightlab/ Saturday, Sept. 14

Clams 4 Cures 2019 When: 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Where: The Spinning Wheel Restaurant, 7384 Thompson Road, North Syracuse What: Proceeds from the event support Paige’s Butterfly Run, Inc. and its mission of supporting current & future pediatric cancer patients and families at Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital. Cost: Advance sale $50; group of 10 for $450; walk-up $60. Info: eventbrite.com/e/clams-4-cures-2019-supporting-paiges-butterfly-run inc-tickets-63478033507?aff=ebdssbdestsearch Tuesday, Sept. 17

SyracuseFirst Lunch Mob When: Noon to 2 p.m. Where: 301 Fayette St., Syracuse What: Attendees of the Lunch Mob will be directed to sit in a specific area of the restaurant to encourage networking and meeting new people. Cost: $12 plus tax Info: sfults@centerstateceo.com

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

Thursday, Sept. 19

The Arts and Style Edition

2019 Teal Ribbon Run When: 10 a.m. Where: Lewis Park, South Main Street, Minoa What: Event to support ovarian cancer research and awareness. Runners 5K, walkers 3K and Teal Kids Dash for kids 10 and under. 2019 Donations to support registrants will remain open through Oct. 22 Cost: $30 to $40 for registration Info: hopeforheather.org/TealRibbonRun.htm Saturday, Sept. 21

‘Rent’ When: 7 p.m. Where: Red House Arts Center, 400 S. Salina St., Syracuse What: During this special performance, playgoers will hear from key community members who are working on the challenges of HIV and drug addiction in CNY. Amuse-bouches will be offered before the play by popular chefs, and desserts and coffee will be provided at intermission. Proceeds will benefit Road2RecoveryCNY. Cost: $75 Info: For tickets, or to contact Road2RecoveryCNY for further information, go to road2recoverycny.com/events or facebook.com/events/ 392740598008656/. Tickets may also be purchased at eventbrite.com/e/ setting-the-stage-rent-at-redhouse-tickets-65105902507.

Oswego Women Lead

Oswego Women Lead When: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Where: Duskees Sports Bar & Grill, 8 Bridge St., Phoenix What: Join us for the first meeting of Oswego Women Lead. This group will meet once a quarter and each time benefit a local non profit or community cause. Cost: Free Info: eventbrite.com/e/oswego-women-lead-tickets-68292860785?aff= ebdssbdestsearch Syracuse Woman Magazine Ladies Night Out When: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Where: Press Room Pub 220 Herald Place, Syracuse What: Enjoy a night of socializing and networking, free light fare and a cash bar. Cost: Free. Info: PressRoomPub.com or (315) 569-4345 Saturday, Sept. 28

Family Fun Run When: 8:30 to 10 a.m. Where: Rosamond Gifford Zoo, 1 Conservation Place, Syracuse What: 2.5K (1.5 miles) child-friendly run/walk through a portion of Burnet Park and the zoo’s Wildlife Trail. Paid registrations include a free race T-shirt, access to the post-race party and zoo admission. Register by Sept. 1 to guarantee your free T-shirt. Cost: $20 per adult, $15 per child ages 4 to 12, free for children 3 and under Info: syracusezooevents.org/family-fun-run/ Saturday, Sept. 28

Fire Fighters of Color United in Syracuse: 25th Anniversary Gala When: 6 to 11 p.m. Where: Embassy Suites by Hilton Syracuse Destiny USA, 311 Hiawatha Blvd., Syracuse What: Join us for a celebration of excellence honoring: Danita Thomas, First Female Fire Fighter, Darrick Jackson, First Minority Officer, Henry “Hank” Chisholm Jr., Longevity, and Keith Muhammad, Commitment to Fire Prevention. Cost: $75 to $5,000 Info: eventbrite.com/e/fire-fighters-of-color-united-in-syracuse-25th-anniversary gala-tickets-63514366179?aff=ebdssbdestsearch Sunday, Sept. 29

Ophelia’s Place Fall Fundraiser: Slow Supper 2019 When: 6 to 9 p.m. Where: Café at 407, 407 Tulip St., Liverpool What: Join us for an intimate fall feast at Café at 407 with Oh My Darling! Four courses, plus cocktail hour paired with local wine and beer. Please reach out to director@opheliasplace.org with any food allergy concerns. Cost: $100 Info: eventbrite.com/e/ophelias-place-fall-fundraiser-slow-supper-2019 tickets-65529433299?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

September 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

49


movers AND Shakers American Heart Association announces first Go Red for Women Lifestyle Change Award

Nominations now being accepted for Go Red for Women honor. Do you know someone who has made changes to live a heart-healthy life? The American Heart Association is working to celebrate individuals who have made a positive impact on their health with the Lifestyle Change Award. The Lifestyle Change Award, sponsored by Wegmans, honors someone who has made significant, positive changes in an effort to live a longer and healthier life. Nominations can be submitted by friends, co-workers or relatives. Individuals can also choose to nominate themselves. Nominations are due by Tuesday, Oct. 1. The winner will be chosen based on criteria including physical activity, eating habits, managing heart-related risk factors, lifestyle change and impact on others. The winner will then be recognized at the Go Red for Women Luncheon on Oct. 24 at the Nicholas J. Pirro Oncenter Convention Center. Nomination forms can be submitted online, or a hard copy can be requested by emailing GoRedSyracuse@heart.org or calling Go Red for Women Director Trina Tardone at (716) 713-3066. Completed nominations can be emailed to GoRedSyracuse@heart.org, or printed versions may be mailed to: Go Red for Women, American Heart Association, 2 Clinton Square, Suite 305, Syracuse, NY 13202. Go Red for Women is nationally sponsored by CVS Health and locally sponsored by Life is Why sponsor St. Joseph’s Health and Lifestyle Change Award sponsor Wegmans.

Central NY’s Susanne Angarano named 2019 One to Watch by ASID

Susanne Angarano, a principal and senior interior designer at Syracuse’s Ashley McGraw architectural firm, was awarded the 2019 Ones to Watch Award this week by the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID). In an effort to facilitate and grow diversity and inclusion within the profession of interior design, ASID created the Ones to Watch program — through which the society supports rising leaders to ensure that diversity is reflected at all levels of the industry. The annual program identifies and honors rising interior designers who demonstrate exceptional leadership potential and a willingness to push the boundaries of the profession. Emphasis for selection is placed on participants whose backgrounds are currently under-represented in management roles in the interior design industry — including women, members of racial and ethnic minority groups, LGBTQ, and persons with disabilities. ASID has honored 12 applicants as the Ones to Watch Award Winners within the four categories: Design Excellence, Education Leadership, Manufacturing Leadership, and Volunteer Leadership.  Angarano is a graduate of Syracuse University, earning a Bachelor of Fine Arts and Cornell University, where she earned her Master of Art, Design: Sustainable Studies. She has been with Ashley McGraw,  ashleymcgraw.com, since 2012.

American Heart Association welcomes new advisory board members

Three local leaders are joining the American Heart Association’s mission to be a relentless force for a world of longer, healthier lives. These volunteers officially joined the American Heart Association’s Syracuse advisory board at the beginning of the month.

50

Diane Benedetto, CPA – Diane Benedetto has more than 30 years of accounting and operations experience. She currently serves as Manager, Customer and Community Management for National Grid. Benedetto is passionate about fitness and is also a spin instructor at Elevate Fitness in Liverpool. Neil Buch, Pharm. D. – Neil Buch is the Area Healthcare Supervisor for Western and Upstate New York at Walgreens. As part of his role, Buch serves as a pharmacy expert for more than 90 stores in the area. Grahame Gould, MD – Grahame Gould is a neurosurgeon specializing in cerebrovascular neurosurgery and interventional neuroradiology at Upstate University Medical Center. Gould is a member of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, and the Society of Neurointerventional Surgery.  “The American Heart Association has a mission to save lives, but we can’t do that without volunteers,” said Franklin Fry, Executive Director of the American Heart Association in Syracuse, “The Syracuse advisory board is a group of dedicated local leaders that is truly making a difference in the health of our community.”  The new members join an award-winning advisory board. The Syracuse area advisory board has been honored with the national Gold Standard Board designation from the American Heart Association for seven consecutive years.

New technology at Loretto to reduce cardiac hospital readmissions

Loretto has implemented a new advanced technology for cardiac patients in its TeliStat Restorative Care Unit (RCU). The ReDS lung fluid management system enables registered nurses to monitor fluid levels noninvasively. Loretto is the first and only provider in Central New York to offer this cutting-edge technology. The Facts: • Many of the signs of cardiac stress rely on the human eye and appear when the condition has already elevated to a medical emergency. • The ReDS lung fluid measurement system is a non-invasive way to identify issues faster than the human eye to mitigate potential risks and get interventions in place before it develops into a medical emergency. • Residents wear a vest with a miniature radar system that employs low-power electromagnetic energy to measure lung fluid in approximately 90 seconds. “Heart failure is one of the main reasons our residents are readmitted to hospitals,” said Joelle Margrey, vice president of clinical skilled nursing at Loretto. “The ReDS system is especially helpful for patients with congestive heart failure (CHF), a condition in which fluid increases in the area surrounding the heart and causes it to pump inefficiently.” Patients with shortness of breath can also benefit from the use of this technology, to see if a build-up of fluid is causing their symptoms. Loretto works closely with St. Joseph’s Health, Crouse Hospital, and Upstate University Hospital to maximize the effectiveness of its RCU and reduce hospital readmissions. Some of the local hospitals have visited Loretto to see how this new technology works. The 25-bed Telistat RCU opened at the Loretto Health and Rehabilitation Center in Syracuse last spring. The unit uses innovative technology to monitor multiple health risks in real-time via portable monitors and gives cardiac patients the opportunity to complete rehab at a lower cost with a lower risk of rehospitalization. Patients benefit from a patient-to-RN ratio of 6-to-1, with additional support coming from certified nursing assistants. The TRCU at Loretto is the only unit of its kind in Central New York.

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Arts and Style Edition

September 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

51


Profile for Eagle Newspapers

Syracuse Woman Magazine September 2019  

Syracuse Woman Magazine September 2019  

Advertisement