Page 1

November 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

1


2

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Philanthropy Edition


November 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

3


C O N T E N T S

November

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR.......................................................6 CONTRIBUTORS............................................................................7

42

PAST EVENTS.................................................................................9 FASHION

Fashion Forward: Giving Back Never Goes Out of Style........................... 10

25

WISE WOMEN Latisia Hall-Cannon............................................................... 13 SYRACUSE EATS Mission District Catering Co. ............................................. 14 SPECIAL FEATURE

Everson: On My Own Time Exhibit.................................... 16

League of Women Voters...................................................... 20

FOR A GOOD CAUSE

13

ON THE COVER Jordan Sheridan Zapisek, On My Team16....................... 25 HEALTH & WELLNESS

Reproductive Health Clinic: Getting Real About IUDs.................................................. 30 Self Care: Solving the Social Problem of Mental Wellness........ 32

10

SYRACUSE WOMEN OF DISTINCTION Margaret Olivia Slocum Sage............................................. 37

INSPIRE

46

4

Mary Lou Sayles...................................................................... 38 Beth Trunfio................................................................................ 42 Debbie Monaco and Ruth Bates......................................... 46

UPCOMING EVENTS................................................................. 48 MOVERS AND SHAKERS......................................................... 50

14

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

14

38

16

The Philanthropy Edition


November 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

5


LETTER from the Editor

I

n November, we write about philanthropy. Philanthropy in its most basic definition means “love of humanity.” I like to believe that people are basically good — that we all start out with the best of intentions, full of that love of humanity. Sometimes the world is a cold and lonely place and that love fades (and maybe some people are born jerks, I don’t make the rules). But philanthropy is a way to spread that love back into the world and fix problems — poverty, hunger, homelessness — where we see them. Women are well-represented in charitable efforts in Central New York. Some of them are described in these pages: cover woman Jordan Sheridan Zapisek, who, at just 22, started her own nonprofit to guide families through the process of dealing with a pediatric cancer diagnosis; Mary Lou Sayles, executive director of the Huntington Family Centers, which provide a laundry list of services to residents of the Near West Side; Beth Trunfio, who this year marks her 20th year at the Syracuse Ronald McDonald House, a home away from home for families of kids battling major illnesses; and Debbie Monaco and Ruth Bates, who started a chapter of Dining with Women to aid families half a world away. But they’re not alone. Look at all of the other women leading nonprofits across Central New York — Vera Jones at the Dunbar Center, Kate Houck of David’s Refuge, Lyn Hy at the Food Bank of Central New York, Jennifer Covert at North Area Meals on Wheels, Elizabeth Dunbar at the Everson, Dr. Najah Salam Jennings-Bey at the Street Addiction Institute. The list goes on. And that trend of women heading up nonprofits isn’t just a local one. According to an article in the August 2019 issue of NonProfit PRO, more women are taking the lead at nonprofits nationwide. In fact, Forbes Magazine reports that more women are gaining ground in many spheres — their 2018 list of billionaires included 256 women out of 2,208 entries, an all-time high. While Forbes, in an article from July 25, 2018, reports that wealth is still predominantly controlled by men, women’s private wealth grew 50 percent over a five-year period — from $34 trillion in 2010 to $51 trillion in 2015. As women gain more wealth, the way the world gives will change. The NonProfit PRO article notes that women are “twice as likely to view charitable giving as the most satisfying aspect of wealth, and women are more likely to value their wealth as a way to create positive change.” Statistically give away almost twice as much of their money as men (3.5 percent vs. 1.8 percent), and they’re more likely to give to causes they feel a personal connection to — causes that benefit women and girls, which have historically been underfunded. The Forbes article explicitly states, “investing in women and girls yields one of the best social returns.” There’s a lot of philanthropy in Central New York, but there’s also a lot of need. And women have historically been up to the task. As more and more women get to the corner office, let’s make sure we remember to love our fellow man.

Sarah

6

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

syracusewomanmag.com

OUR TEAM Publisher

CONTRIBUTORS

David Tyler

Editor

Sarah Hall

Design

Andrea Reeves

PhotographERS Ana Gil-Taylor Steven J. Pallone Alice G. Patterson Maureen Tricase

Angela Antonello Nichole A. Cavallaro Alyssa Dearborn Sarah Hall Jamie Jenson Alicia Madonna Heather Shannon Megan Sheehan Staci Solsowitz

Cover photo by Alice G. Patterson at her studio. Makeup by Michaela Rose by Glam by Michaela.

Advertising sales

Renée Moonan Linda Jabbour 315.657.7690 315.657.0849 Rmoonan@eaglenewsonline.com Ljabbour@eaglenewsonline.com

ADVERTISE WITH US

Unlike any other publication in the Syracuse area, our feature articles address major topics that interest local women. Each issue includes articles on health, fashion, fitness, finance, home matters, dining, lifestyle and personal perspectives, as well as a spotlight on local Syracuse women. Ads are due on the 15th of the month prior to publication. The print magazines will be distributed locally in over 350 locations and will be in your inbox electronically by the middle of every month.

The publication is available free of charge.

CONTACT OUR HOME OFFICE

315.434.8889 | 2501 James Street, Suite 100, Syracuse, NY 13206

The magazine is published 12 times a year by Community Media Group, LLC and Eagle Publications, 2501 James St., Suite 100, Syracuse, NY 13206

Copyright © 2019 Community Media Group, LLC. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or republished without the consent of the publishers. Syracuse Woman Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited submissions, manuscripts, photos or artwork. All such submissions become the property of Community Media Group, LLC and will not be returned. The Philanthropy Edition


CONTRIBUTORS This month, we asked our contributors: What’s your favorite local nonprofit?

Angela Antonello I have two: Maureen’s Hope and Hope for Heather.

Nichole A. Cavallaro Ophelia’s Place in Liverpool.

Alyssa Dearborn I'd say that my favorite local nonprofit is the Literacy Coalition of Onondaga County.

Ana Gil-Taylor The Jim and Juli Boeheim Foundation.

Jamie Jenson The ASPCA does such wonderful things for our four-legged friends, and as an animal lover, I am eternally grateful for their hard work.

Alicia Madonna I may be biased, but the Onondaga Historical Association is an amazing non-profit with immense resources for the community's history and stories and therefore is my favorite.

Steven J. Pallone This is a tough one as I have several friends and former colleagues involved with various local organizations (and have myself volunteered as well), but going to go with ACR Health for somehow managing in this challenging socioeconomic climate to continue to provide free community health services and outreach at a time when it is much needed.

Alice G. Patterson I’ve recently become aware of Mockingbird Farms, which is a compassionate vegan farm animal sanctuary, rescuing factory farmed, abused and/or neglected animals. I also love Helping Hounds Dog Rescue, which matches homeless dogs from overcrowded shelter systems with loving homes.

Heather Shannon My favorite nonprofit agency is Oswego County Opportunities, Inc. They serve over 30,000 individuals and offer over 50 public health programs and services to people of Oswego County. Their mission is to “build partnerships that improve the quality of life and create successful communities.”

Megan Sheehan My favorite local nonprofit organization is Vera House. They have been an incredible resource for myself as well as many other survivors in Syracuse. If you are in crisis, contact their 24-hour crisis and support line at (315) 468-3260.

Staci Solsowicz The Boys and Girls Club of Syracuse

Maureen Tricase Sarah's Guest House provides a home for families of patients receiving medical care in Central New York. During times of crisis Sarah's Guest House opens their doors and hearts to those in need. Thank you to David Haas, the executive director, and all the staff and volunteers!

November 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

7


8

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Philanthropy Edition


swm past events

On Sept. 26, Press Room Pub joined with Syracuse Woman Magazine to host its first-ever Ladies’ Night Out. The event invited women to the bar, located at 220 Herald Place, Syracuse, for an evening of networking and socializing while enjoying the Press Room’s signature cocktail, the Syracuse Creamsicle, and reading the magazine’s September issue.

November 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

9


fashion forward Giving Back Never Goes Out of Style

Giving Back Never Goes Out of Style By Angela Antonello

10

F

ashion has power. Industry powerhouses like Tommy Hilfiger, Donna Karan and TOMS can create impactful educational opportunities both on and off the runway. This type of support for a cause doesn’t just come from luxury designers and mainstream brands. Meet Central New York entrepreneur Kelly Kinahan, whose K.K. Discovers, LLC melds fashion with philanthropy.

Kinahan’s mantra is “do what you love.” Her inspiration started with a visit to San Jose del Cabo, Mexico, where she was inspired by a local designer, the collaboration began, and the first PRO*JECT LOVE yoga bag was born. The meaning behind the name is twofold. PRO*JECT LOVE, in the form of a noun, means a collaborative design made from love, or, as a verb, a movement to love to one another.

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The meaning behind the logo is mirrored after her tattoo: it’s her “one love.” The circle represents the world, her hope is that when we all come together and share our love and light we can then create one unified “heart.” Spreading awareness is her mission and her vision is to have an impact not only in our local community, but across borders and oceans, to create positive change throughout the world.

The Philanthropy Edition


Kinahan’s work supports a number of local charities. Ten percent of all STRONGER apparel sales are donated to Vera House of Syracuse. The popular Black and White Signature Logo line currently supports Ophelia's Place, whose message is “Every Body Is Beautiful.” And Kinahan is happy to support other causes, as well. K.K. Discovers Pro*Ject LoVe offers non-profits marketing services

through developing apparel and merchandise using their logo. The ideas are endless, one option is to replace the "O" in words such as: HOPE, LOVE, COURAGE, or JOURNEY. The color of the logo can also be customized to reflect the cause it is associated with. A rainbow logo to support LGBTQ nonprofits is also available. Pro*Ject LoVe apparel is available at two local locations,

The Fashion Rescue 911 Boutique in Baldwinsville and Hot House Brewing at Barone Gardens in Cicero. You can also visit the website kkdiscovers.com. Spread love and light by sharing your photos in your favorite Pro*Ject LoVe apparel on K.K Discovers Facebook and Instagram pages. Giving a gift that "gives" even more than the actual item makes both the gift's giver and receiver feel a part of something greater. SWM

Angela Antonello owns Fashion Rescue 911 Fashion Truck & Boutique, located at 52 Oswego St., Baldwinsville; (315) 857-6690. Hours are noon to 7 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, noon to 6 p.m. Friday and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.

November 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

11


12

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Philanthropy Edition


WISE WOMAN Latisia Hall Cannon

November 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

13


syracuse eats Mission District Catering Co.

Mission District Catering Co.

Photo by Steven J. Pallone

By Megan Sheehan

Zachary DeRose and Karl Dawkins

“Come on down — we’re open to the community. We feed everyone in the world. There’s no income requirements for the Rescue Mission, nothing like that. I don’t care if you make $2 million a year or are just hard on your luck, you need a meal come on down and get a meal. We’re not here to ask questions.” – Karl Dawkins, director of food services, The Rescue Mission Kitchen

14

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Philanthropy Edition


E

very chef has a mission: to prepare food and get it to the people who need food. As caterers, Karl Dawkins and Zachary DeRose prepare lots of food for lots of people who need food. But they also do a little more. Dawkins, the director of food service at the Rescue Mission, first came up with the idea after noting the number of talented chefs on his staff. He wanted to harness that talent to do something for the community — but something was missing. “We had to wait until we had the right person here,” Dawkins said. “We had the concept going, we had the logo design, we did a couple small parties, but we were missing a piece. Hired Zach [DeRose], Zach came aboard and we were able to start running it.” And in June of 2018, Mission District Catering was born. The agency hit the ground running with a Ride and Run event for 1,200 people — not a bad start! Originally from Connecticut, Dawkins made his way to CNY after culinary school, where he began his externship at The Turning Stone Casino. DeRose is a local from Lakeland who took on the downtown Syracuse food scene after his culinary school adventure. The two were past co-workers whose paths crossed again. DeRose was more than thrilled to jump into this supervisor position with an excited “I’m in!” With 25 years of experience between them, this pair is able to give other catering companies a run for their money. They aren’t bound to any specific style of food. They’re able to work with each client and either run with something from their menu, or come up with something specific, and original. From BBQ, to tacos, to short ribs, it seems they can pull off pretty much anything. With such a unique concept, this was a way to bring in more money to help the local hungry in the Syracuse community. With The Mission District Catering, anything that rolls over after food, labor, and other expenses goes back into the food budget for food services itself. “All of the food that we’re feeding the clients,” DeRose said. “It goes right back to the Rescue Mission, serving people in community.” Having their own in-house catering company also does a lot to cut costs and save money. The Rescue Mission hosts their own events, board meetings and staff training sessions which typically require outside catering which can cost the company several hundred dollars each time. But now, DeRose is able to offer up grub prepped in their own kitchen at cost—unfortunately, the kitchen they had was in dire need of an upgrade. So for the first time in 25 years, The Rescue Mission opened a $5.8 million capital campaign. “It wasn’t any funding from the government. This building was built by the donations and everything else from the community,” Dawkins said. “So this was really a response from the community. If they said there’s no need for a new building, everything is fine, no one is going hungry in Syracuse, they wouldn’t have opened their wallets and helped us build this for the whole community. [It’s] all from the generosity of Syracuse.” The 15-year-old equipment has been replaced, and the staff has a much larger working space. The old space held only 75 hungry people. The new space will hold more than 200 in brand new booths, tables, a family section and high boy seating overlooking an electric fireplace and phone charging cables. “We’re trying to change what people think of a soup kitchen,” Dawkins said. “Sandwiches are very rare here.”

Signature Sandwich Board

Shaved turkey with roasted red peppers, smoked Gouda & pesto aioli

Grand opening for the renovated dining space will be at lunch time Nov. 7. Dawkins invites all. “Come on down — we’re open to the community,” he said. “We feed everyone in the world. There’s no income requirements for the Rescue Mission, nothing like that. I don’t care if you make $2 million a year or are just hard on your luck, you need a meal come on down and get a meal. We’re not here to ask questions.” If you’re interested in donating to The Rescue Mission, contact the food service center from 6 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. seven days a week. Arrangements for large donation picks are also available. SWM Catering inquires and menu available at www.rescuemissionalliance.org Photos by Steven J. Pallone

November 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

15


SPECIAL FEATURE Four Female Artists Bring Creativity into the Workplace

Everson: On My Own Time Exhibit By Staci Soslowitz

A

rt comes in many forms. Whether it’s a painting, a knitted scarf or simply a photograph, each creative piece has a creator behind it. These artists may not always be professional painters or photographers, they may be dermatologists or teachers who seek a creative platform simply for pleasure. But art as a hobby does not always come with the same recognition. That was until programs like On My Own Time (OMOT) came to be. The OMOT program hosts several contests as a means for acknowledging artists within their places of business. Colleagues select participants and winners, while the finalists go on to display their work at the Everson Museum of Art. Now in its 46th year, OMOT has 15 companies and organizations participating. The grand finale exhibit will be held at the Everson Museum of Art from the beginning of October through early November. Artists from many different career backgrounds have been selected to display their work, which to them, is an honor. The exhibition connects Central

16

New York businesses and promotes the benefits of the creative process within the workplace. DONNA BRITTON, the director of human resources at Syracuse Orthopedic Specialists, decided to show her quilting abilities in a company art show. Now, her quilts will be shown for all to see at the Everson. “To have my quilt hanging in the Everson is beyond words,” Britton said. “I think it is taking my level of skill and expression to the next level which makes me proud and excited.” Britton got involved with OMOT when a colleague introduced it to the company. She sent out a company-wide email stating they were looking for artists to bring and exhibit work in the conference room one day. Britton, who showcases her quilts in local shows, decided to participate. “I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to have it in our company art show,” she said. From there, she was chosen to have her quilt displayed in the OMOT exhibit.

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

Donna Britton, Syracuse Orthopedic Specialists. Human resources. Donna first became interested in quilting in 2005 taking a class at one of the area quilt shops. This grew into a hobby that has resulted in over 100+ quilts being made over the past 14 years.

The Philanthropy Edition


It lets me be able to show my artwork, not just to my family and friends but to the community. Maybe someone will see it and be inspired to start creating pieces too!” Lisa Kinne, OMOT finalist

KELLEY PARKER has been participating in the program since 2014 and had her photographs selected for the exhibit. Parker, who works for Syracuse University, decided to get involved with OMOT to showcase her talent and enjoy her colleague's talents as well.

“It allows you to enjoy the art, whether it’s photography, painting, or some other art form, of your colleagues,” she said. When Parker first got involved, she had just started to show her photos publicly online, and the program granted her the opportunity to show her work in an exhibition setting. Being a finalist in the program is even more rewarding. “It is such an honor to have my artwork chosen for the exhibit at the Everson and to be included in such a talented group of people,” said Parker. Her photographs are unique in that she adds various textures and layers to make them stand out which makes the final product very different from the captured image. “The textures I use give the subject depth and interest,” she said. “It is my wish that my images become a unique style of art.” Lisa Kinne, United Radio. Customer service. Graduated with an associate’s degree in fine arts and still worked on set designs for plays at local high school and small theaters after college.

MADELINE BARTLEY, who has participated in the program for the last two years. Bartley believes the program offers more than just the chance to display your work. “For all participants, you really feel a great acknowledgment of the artistic talent in the professional community,” she said.

November 2019

Continued on page18

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

17


SPECIAL FEATURE Four Female Artists Bring Creativity into the Workplace

Everson: On My Own Time Exhibit from page 21 Bartley had displayed her work in other galleries but had a lot of encouragement from coworkers to get involved in the OMOT program. “Deciding what to choose for OMOT submissions can be really exciting, because you are getting to discuss with your coworkers about their artist practices and recent projects they have been working on in their free time,” Bartley said. “It feels energizing.” The inspiration for her artwork came from a recent trip to California. She enjoys illustrating imaginary landscapes, yet includes memories of places she has traveled. Using gifted pastel pencils, Bartley created vibrant drawings that stand out. Madeline Bartley, Boxcar Press. Letterpress operator. She has exhibited her work in solo and group shows including exhibitions at the Hand Held Gallery (Melbourne, Australia), Walnut Ink Projects (Michigan City, IN), The Rogue Space (New York, NY), and the Museum of Latin American Art (Long Beach, CA). Currently she lives in Syracuse, where she works as a letterpress printer and dedicates her free time to her studio practice.

18

She continued to show her work in the company-wide exhibit and was chosen as a finalist this year. Participating in the program, Kinne says, allows full-time employees an artistic escape and encourages artists to take the risk of showing their work in public. For Kinne, having her work shown in the Everson Museum offers her a feeling of accomplishment and success. “It lets me be able to show my artwork, not just to my family and friends but to the community,” she said. “Maybe someone will see it and be inspired to start creating pieces too!” LISA KINNE heard about OMOT from the human resource representative while interviewing for her current job. Many of her co-workers have made it to the final exhibit before and encouraged her to get involved. “I was very nervous to enter my work,” Kinne said. “I am so glad that I did even though I didn't make it the first time. I was told even if you don't make it in now, there is always next year.”

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

Kelley Parker, Syracuse University. Executive Assistant to the Dean of Libraries and the Dean’s Office Manager. Kelley is a fine art photographer based in Syracuse. Her primary focus is on wildlife photography. She has been featured in both solo and group exhibitions and is the recipient of several awards for her work. SWM The On My Own Time grand finale exhibit will be held at the Everson Museum of Art Oct. 12 through Nov. 17. For more information, visit OnMyOwnTime.org

The Philanthropy Edition


November 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

19


FOR A GOOD CAUSE League of Women Voters of the Syracuse Metropolitan area

League of Women Voters of the Syracuse Metropolitan area ROBERTA MILLERT, TREASURER

VOTING TIMES

Friday, 11/1: 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, 11/2: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, 11/3: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

EARLY VOTING POLL SITES

ARMOND MAGNARELLI COMMUNITY CENTER AT MCCHESNEY PARK 2300 Grant Blvd, Syracuse, NY 13208 Handicap Accessible: Yes Parking: Yes, Free Public Transportation: Yes, Centro CLAY TOWN HALL COURTROOM (rear entrance) 4401 Route 31, Clay, NY 13041 Handicap Accessible: Yes Parking: Yes, Free Public Transportation: Yes, Infrequent, Centro DEWITT TOWN HALL COURTROOM 5400 Butternut Drive, E. Syracuse, NY 13057 Handicap Accessible: Yes Parking: Yes Public Transportation: Yes, Infrequent, Centro LAFAYETTE FIRE STATION #1 (rear entrance) 2444 Route 11 South, LaFayette, NY 13084 Handicap Accessible: Yes Parking: Yes Public Transportation: No SOUTHWEST COMMUNITY CENTER 401-425 South Ave, Syracuse NY 13204 Handicap Accessible: Yes Parking: Yes Public Transportation: Yes, Centro VAN BUREN TOWN HALL 7575 Van Buren Road, Baldwinsville, NY 13027 Handicap Accessible: Yes Parking: Yes, Infrequent, Centro Public Transportation: Yes, Infrequent, Centro

20

CAN YOU EXPLAIN THE MISSION OF THE LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS?

The League of Women Voters, a nonpartisan political organization, encourages informed and active participation in government, works to increase understanding of major public policy issues, and influences public policy through education and advocacy.

HOW WAS THE LWV FOUNDED? WHAT’S THE ORGANIZATION’S HISTORY?

In 1919, the League of Women Voters of New York State was formed out of a 
desire to ensure that newly enfranchised female voters were educated, regardless of political leaning, to use their power effectively.

WHEN WAS THE SYRACUSE CHAPTER FOUNDED?

On May 28, 1919, local members of the old Suffrage Party were invited to attend a luncheon and meeting at the Onondaga Hotel, where the question of forming a league for

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

women voters will be taken up. The meeting was called by New York State Women Voters for the purpose of electing officers in this district which included Onondaga and Cortland counties. Politicians who opposed the meeting believed it was a covert effort to start a new political party. The Onondaga League of Women Voters was officially formed in 1921. Later its name was changed to the League of Women Voters of the Syracuse Metropolitan Area.

HOW HAVE THE ORGANIZATION’S GOALS CHANGED OVER ITS 100YEAR HISTORY?

While the League’s programs, priorities and procedures have changed over the years to meet changing times, a League pamphlet written in 1919 describes with remarkable accuracy its basic aims today. The organization has three purposes: to foster education in citizenship, to promote forums and public discussion of civic reforms and to support needed legislation. The Philanthropy Edition


YOU TAKE CERTAIN POLICY POSITIONS, BUT YOU’RE STILL A NONPARTISAN ORGANIZATION. CAN YOU TALK A LITTLE ABOUT THAT?

The Leaque’s non-partisan policy is maintained through our consensus process. We examine all aspects of a selected subject and try to reach agreement on which to base a position. The LWV’s reputation for fairness rests on its practice of thorough and impartial study. Members discuss the issues; pros and cons are researched; and everyone has an opportunity to express an opinion. Once the LWV has a position on an issue, material is published to promote that position, always ensuring the distinction between LWV action on specific issues and the League’s nonpartisan voter information.

We do not support a party or candidate; we only advocate for and support issues we have thoroughly studied.

officials to advance democratic values in America. This has been our goal for 100 years and will continue into the future.

WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO YOU TO BE CELEBRATING YOUR CENTENNIAL THIS YEAR?

WHAT KINDS OF THINGS DO YOU DO TO PROMOTE VOTING?

The League of Women Voters was formed after women in New York were given the right to vote in 1917, two years before the ratification of the 19th amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1920 when women across the nation were granted the right to vote. The League was an outgrowth of the New York State Woman Suffrage Party. Although they had won the vote, it became clear that social change for women and other disfranchised groups would not be easy. It would be necessary to study the state of affairs in America and then vigorously lobby elected

We provide a printed Voters’ Guide brochure that gives information on what offices are up for election in any given year, who is eligible to vote, registration information for absentee voting, military voters, and college students as well as other information related to voting in New York State. Our electronic voters’ guide (Vote411.org) allows you to find information on if you are registered to vote, where you vote, and your personal ballot that gives you the offices and candidates you will be voting for all by simply entering your mailing address. Candidates are also given questions on the Continued on page 22

November 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

21


FOR A GOOD CAUSE League of Women Voters of the Syracuse Metropolitan area

League of Women Voters of the Syracuse Metropolitan area from page 21 issues relating to the office they are seeking. This is an interactive process where the League provides questions and candidates submit the answers themselves. Registering new voters is a continuous process throughout the year, focusing on registering young people and newly naturalized citizens. We are also available to organize and moderate candidate debates and forums.

WHAT ARE YOUR CURRENT LEGISLATIVE GOALS?

For a full description of the LWV’s legislative goals, visit my.lwv.org/sites/ default/files/leagues/wysiwyg/%5Bcurrentuser%3Aog-user-node%3A1%3Atitle%5D/ legislative-agenda-2019.pdf or check out the November edition of Syracuse Woman Magazine online.

22

CAN YOU EXPLAIN NEW YORK’S RECENT CHANGES TO ELECTION LAW?

The big change to New York Election Law is early voting. It allows you to vote in person at a poll site within your county for nine (9) days, beginning Saturday, Oct. 26 and continuing through Sunday, Nov. 3. You do not need to have a reason or excuse to vote early. 

The poll sites for early voting will not necessarily be your usual poll site location. Each county will determine where the poll sites for early voting will be and the hours each site will be open for voting. Some counties will assign you to a specific poll site during early voting days and other counties will allow you to go to any poll site within the county to vote early. Each county can make this decision and you can see on the county Board of Elections (BOE) website or the

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

New York State League’s website where you can vote in your county. A county is required to have one (1) poll site for every fifty thousand (50,000) registered voters, though some counties may have more. There are six (6) early voting poll sites in Onondaga County. Voters can go to ANY of the early voting poll sites in this county during early voting. (See chart on page 20.) On Election Day (Nov. 5) voters must go to their assigned Election Day poll site. Visit Onondaga County Board of Elections, New York State Board of Elections Voter Look Up (http://www.ongov.net/elections/) to see if you are registered and to see your assigned Election Day poll site.

The Philanthropy Edition


YOUR SLOGAN IS “DEMOCRACY IS NOT A SPECTATOR SPORT.” CAN YOU EXPLAIN THAT?

Voting and participating in the political process is not a spectator sport. You need to get in the game by knowing who the candidates are, where they stand on the issues important to you, their qualifications to seek a specific office, who has endorsed them, where their campaign contributions come from and the techniques they use to campaign on. Do they promise the impossible? Evade the issues? Take part in name calling and rumor mongering?

IS THERE ANYTHING ELSE YOU WANT PEOPLE TO KNOW?

As we look to the future, we are excited by the fact that our dedicated members across the country are increasingly being joined by

significant numbers of online activists who share the League’s commitment to Making Democracy Work. We will continue to fight voter discrimination and to keep secret money out of our elections in order to ensure that our elections are fair, free and accessible. We will also continue to push for improved access to health care, as well as a sustainable planet for everyone. All the while, the League’s historic commitment to register, educate, and mobilize voters is not only stronger, but more effective than ever, utilizing such tools as an electronic voting guide, vote411.org a cuttingedge election information website utilized by millions of voters each election cycle. As we celebrate our 100th anniversary, we celebrate our many accomplishments. League members are keeping their eyes and energies firmly on the future and the actions we will be undertaking to realize our goal: a better local community and state and a better America.

The League of Women Voters is not an exclusive club; we have a diverse membership. Anyone 16 years of age or over can join. For more information about the League or becoming a member go to our website, LWV.ORG , or email us at lwvsyr@gmail.com or call (315) 396-8225. SWM

November 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

23


24

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Philanthropy Edition


COVER STORY Jordan Sheridan

The Ultimate Fantasy Team

JORDAN (SHERIDAN) ZAPISEK, FOUNDER, ON MY TEAM16 By Sarah Hall

Photo by Alice G. Patterson

It’s not that I don’t want to [put the money] into research,” Jordan said. “It's that I want to do the things that we needed help with when we were going through it." — Jordan Sheridan

November 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

25


COVER story Jordan Sandra Sheridan Sabene

The Ultimate Fantasy Team

JORDAN (SHERIDAN) ZAPISEK, FOUNDER, ON MY TEAM16 By Sarah Hall

J

ordan Sheridan Zapisek has always had a charitable disposition. “I've always had kind of a philanthropic side to me since high school,” Jordan said. A 2013 graduate of Christian Brothers Academy, Jordan started her own charity drives while she was in high school. Her Strike Out Hunger Campaign from 2011-13 raised just over $25,000 for the Samaritan Center by collecting donations from her friends and family — over the school’s objections — for every strike she threw on the softball team. At St. Lawrence University, where she received a bachelor’s degree in business and communications in 2017, Jordan chaired two Relay for Life events, lead a fundraising campaign for a new building at the Potsdam Children’s Museum and interned at the Make-A-Wish Foundation. But the endeavor she’s most proud of — the nonprofit to which she now dedicates all her time — came to be in the wake of a cancer diagnosis for her younger brother, Jack. “I always wanted to move away and do my own thing, create my own path,” Jordan said, “but something like that wants you to keep your family together and stay close.”

JACK’S DIAGNOSIS

Jack was diagnosed May 29, 2014, when he was 15. “He actually played a baseball game two or three days before he was diagnosed and he pitched,” Jordan said. “It was the best he's ever pitched.” But within a few days, Jack’s joints were so sore he could barely get out of bed. His mother, Kim, took him to the family doctor. Jordan was home from her first year at college; she was at work when she got the call from her mother. “I got a call that I needed to go home,” she said. “My little sister [Charlie, then 10] came home from school and I was the only one home so I had to tell her, which was really hard.” It wouldn’t get any easier. The Sheridans were fortunate to live close to the resources Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital, so Jack was able to get the best treatment, but treatment was still a grueling process — one his sisters had no interest in watching. “I didn't go to the hospital with him a lot,” Jordan said. “I was more on the phone with my sister, talking to her because she didn't want to go either. She didn't want any part of going into the hospital.” But Jordan felt that she needed to do something more proactive for her brother. “She wanted to do something, start a charity,” said Kim Sheridan. “Her father and I told her no, not at this time. We all needed to put all our focus on his fight for his life. But Jordan continued to plan and dream of a charity she could start sometime soon.”

26

So while Jack battled leukemia — he was declared cancer-free in late September of 2017 — Jordan laid the groundwork for what would ultimately become On My Team16.

ON EACH OTHER’S TEAM

Jordan describes On My “It's kind of cool to Team16, which she launched in December of 2017, as “a fantasy witness, watching a league for charity.” professional baseball “I wanted to do patients, families, and caregivers… just like player come into a we were touched,” Jordan said. 12-year-old’s room “And then our family is huge into sports, so we wanted to tie in that and talk to him and or athletic standpoint… so I really her and just give liked like the fantasy league for charity idea and getting a lot of them motivation." athletes involved.” — Jordan Sheridan Jordan said she a lot of connections between athletes and cancer patients. “Athletes and pediatric cancer patients have a lot in common, just with their mentality and how to have a routine and do the same thing every day, and work at the same thing, and be able to make themselves get out of bed because their joints hurt,” Jordan said. “So I think there's a lot in common.” Given that commonality, Jordan said she didn’t think creating On My Team16 was much of a leap. According to its website, the nonprofit aims to “ensure no child feels alone in their fight against cancer. The mission is to provide personal comfort and support to pediatric oncology patients, families and caregivers. Every child will know they are a part of something bigger – part of a team focused on fighting and winning their battle together.” The 16 is the jersey number Jack wore during his baseball career. “It's kind of cool to witness, watching a professional baseball player come into a 12-year-old’s room and talk to him and or her and just give them motivation or even play video games with them,” Jordan said. “It's kind of cool to see that everyone's real and we all have these things that we like to do no matter who we are.” The main component of OMT16 is to connect pediatric cancer patients with professional athletes—Jordan played softball, and now that Jack is cancer-free, he’s back on the baseball diamond, as well.

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

Continued on page 28

The Philanthropy Edition


Photo by Alice G. Patterson November 2019 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

27


COVER story Jordan Sheridan

The Ultimate Fantasy Team from page 26 Individual or corporate donors can either make single donations or start their own campaigns, but they also have the option to connect them to certain athletes — the nonprofit is currently working with Washington Nationals pitcher Patrick Corbin, a Cicero-North Syracuse graduate, among others. Previous partners include Alex Tuch, Paschal Chukwu, Tyler Cavanaugh, Anthony Angello and several FayettevilleManlius girls’ teams. Donors choose the amount they want to give per stat — say, per strikeout or per goal. At the end of the season, OMT16’s team will tally the results and divide it between pediatric hospitals in Phoenix, Buffalo, Las Vegas, Pittsburgh and Syracuse, as we as the local Ronald McDonald House. “I really want to spread our wings a little bit, and get into different hospitals, but also continue to grow here because this is where Jack got treated,” Jordan said. “This is the doctors and the nurses that took care of him, and all these other kids.”

MAKING THE CLIMB

While donors support the mission, they can’t support it entirely. Last year OMT16 launched The Climb, which requires participants to either run or walk each floor of the State Tower Building — a total of 338 stairs. Each participant climbs for a kid with cancer, and on each floor is a kid who has survived the disease, a child fighting cancer or a family member representing a lost fighter. If you’d like to sign up, visit onmyteam16.com or see the sidebar. Jordan said The Climb isn’t as hard as some people might fear. “People sign to climb the 20 flights of stairs in the State Tower Building, and it's 338 steps, and people really are like, ‘I can't do that. I can't do that,” she said. “It's just like a 5K or a road race.” Jordan said the event, which has become OMT16’s biggest fundraiser, is an “empowering and inspiring event.” She wants the entire community to come out to participate on Nov. 23 to support kids fighting pediatric cancer. “You'll be hugged and want to keep coming back, and that's what we want,” she said. “We want the kids to be able to see that. The whole Syracuse community is following them.” Jordan said it’s an amazing event to witness. She recalled the inaugural event last year when a wheelchair-bound leukemia patient named Bryce waited with the Onondaga Community College baseball team on the 17th floor to cheer on runners. “Towards the end of it, he asked the baseball players to help him stand up out of his wheelchair and walk up the last three flights,” Jordan said, “And his mom said, ’He hasn't gotten out of his

28

wheelchair in so long. That is so hard to do.’ And then his OCC baseball team was like on the sides of him helping him up, and it was really cool.”

COMFORTING THE AFFLICTED

Once that money is raised, where does it go? As Jordan said, the goal of OMT16 is to help the families, the patients and the caregivers — there are other organizations out there working on research. “It’s not that I don’t want to [put the money] into research,” Jordan said. “It's that I want to do the things that we needed help with when we were going through it." Since its inception, OMT16 has donated more than $100,000 to kids and families. Jordan said they’re having to do less outreach as more families come to them for help. “We try and do the comfort items,” she said, “gas gift cards and food gift cards and things like that. People like people don't really think about, and insurance won't be like, ‘Oh, here's $50 for gas.’” There are a few different programs that OMT16: Socks4Pops: Buy a pair of OMT16 socks, give a pair of fuzzy, comfy socks to a pediatric oncology patient (or, if you’re an athlete, you wear your socks while competing). You will also have the chance to personalize a card to go with the socks to the patient. Project CARE (Cancer Aid for Resiliency and Empowerment) is designed to help members of my community who are affected by cancer by giving them care packages made with love. This program was created by Ellie Sommers in memory of her father, Tom Sommers, who passed away on May 12, 2015, a mere nine months after his initial diagnosis of Pancreatic cancer. Care packages include items such as snacks, healthy beverages, inspirational signs, journals, and prayer books, trinkets, small games, books, movies, gift cards to local restaurants, and more. Celebration dinners for children who win their battles against cancer. OMT16 provides gift cards to families to celebrate the victory. Sporting events: provide tickets to sporting events to children and their families. In other words, On My Team16 Is determined to help families facing the same path they did. “My mom said it the other day, she didn't realize how many questions other people have, and how nice it is to be there if they have question,” Jordan said. “You still think about it to this day you're like, ‘Oh, my God. Like that could have went way worse.’ And it didn't. And we're lucky. So take that positive spin, and give it to someone else who needs it.” SWM

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Philanthropy Edition


The Climb 2019 will be happening on Nov. 23 at the State Tower Building in Downtown Syracuse. Registration is now open at onmyteam16.com! Who will you climb for? Registration will be $35 up until Nov. 1, with a fundraising requirement of $100. Your registration fee goes towards your fundraising requirement. After Nov. 1, the registration fee is $40 with a fundraising requirement of $100, with your registration fee still going towards that requirement. You have the option to sign up as a team of four with a total amount donated being $338, including all four members registration fee and fundraising requirement. We will also have a corporate element if your company and employees are interested in getting involved. To learn more about that please contact jordan@onmyteam16.com. Each floor of the state tower building going up and down the 20 flights will be dedicated to a child who is currently battling cancer, who has battled and beat cancer or who has sadly lost their battle with cancer. If your business or family is interested in sponsoring one of these floors, please reach out to jordan@ onmyteam16.com to learn more. The Climb 2019’s presenting sponsor for the second year in a row is SIDEARM Sports! If your business or family is interested in sponsoring the event in any way (t-shirt sponsor, timing sponsor, etc.) please reach out to jordan@onmyteam16.com. Questions? Email jordan@ onmyteam16.com or visit onmyteam16.com to learn more.

You still think about it to this day you're like, ‘Oh, my God. Like that could have went way worse.’ And it didn't. And we're lucky. So take that positive spin, and give it to someone else who needs it." — Jordan Sheridan

November 2019

Photo by Alice G. Patterson

The Climb for On My Team16

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

29


Health & Wellness Women's Reproductive Health

Getting Real with IUDs By Heather Shannon, MS, CNM, NP, MPH

M

ost of us know about intrauterine devices (IUD) and most of us have heard the horror stories surrounding IUDs. Many years ago, there was only one type of IUD, which did come with problems. However, over the years, IUDs have been improved and are safer than ever. Did you know there are five types of IUDs on the market today? They last from three years up to 10 years, offer excellent pregnancy prevention, and help with menstrual problems. Let's talk about the basics. An IUD is a small T-shaped device that is inserted into the uterus and left there for a number of years. There are two types of IUDs. The first is a hormonal IUD, which releases the hormone progestin (a progesterone) into the uterus to prevent ovulation and fertilization. These last three to five years and there are four types. The differences are size, amount of hormone and length of use. Hormonal IUDs are classified as Long Acting Reversible Contraception (LARC), which means fertility resumes shortly after its removal. The second is a non-hormonal IUD that is made with copper, no hormones, and lasts for up to 10 years. It works by preventing fertilization (union of egg and sperm). With the hormonal IUD, the progestin thins the lining of the uterus and thickens cervical mucus making it more difficult for the sperm to enter the uterus. With the non-hormonal IUD, copper affects the sperms ability to move and

30

is very toxic to the sperm, therefore, making it difficult to reach the egg. Both types of IUD are over 99 copper effective in pregnancy prevention, making it extremely reliable. Possible side effects of the hormonal IUD are changes in menstrual bleeding. You may experience absent bleeding, regular bleeding that is lighter and less painful or frequent bleeding. Rest assured this is normal and not harmful. Unfortunately, there is no way of predicting your bleeding profile until three months post placement. There are medicines that can help with frequent bleeding and you can talk to your health care provider about these options. In most cases, the bleeding will improve over time. Benefits of an IUD are numerous. The biggest benefit is its ease of use. Once it is placed, there is nothing more you need to do to prevent pregnancy. The IUD is placed at any time, even post or immediately after pregnancy. The procedure is conveniently performed in your provider’s office as a minor procedure. The IUD is discrete. No one knows you are using it and it does not interfere with your daily or sexual activities. For those women who have painful periods or a heavy menstrual flow, the hormonal IUD helps reduce these symptoms. This is especially true for perimenopausal women dealing with difficult menses while they are transitioning into menopause. Talk to your provider to see if this is an option for you.

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Philanthropy Edition


The placement is a minor office procedure. Your provider will counsel you on IUD options and the risks and benefits of use and placement. The IUD is placed through the vagina and cervix and rests in the uterus. You may experience minor cramping that is temporary and usually treated with over-the-counter pain relievers (ibuprofen, Advil or Aleve, etc.). You may need to continue the pain relievers for the next several hours and limit any extraneous activity, but in most cases, you can resume normal activity 24 hours after placement. You can have the IUD removed at any time and it is completely reversible. The IUD removal is very simple with very little discomfort and done in the office. It was once thought that IUDs affect your ability to get pregnant after its use. That is a myth and is proven to not affect fertility. Most women will resume normal menstruation four to six weeks after removal. In cases where menses does not return, further evaluation by your provider is necessary. There may be an underlying hormonal imbalance as the cause of delay or irregular menses. Potential risks during or shortly after the placement of an IUD are few, but important to understand. A small number of women may experience the IUD expulsion, or falling out. It can happen with teenagers, as the uterus is a smaller muscle. It responds to the IUD by contracting (cramping) and works to push it out. Another very

uncommon risk factor is the potential risk of the IUD going through the wall of the uterus during placement. This does not cause any major health problems, but the IUD will need to be removed. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) is a serious pelvic infection that requires treatment. If a woman has a sexually transmitted infection (STI) at the time of insertion, she is at risk of developing PID. Screening for STI’s is recommended before IUD placement. Because the IUD is more than 99 percent effective in preventing pregnancy, it is rare to become pregnant. However, if pregnancy does occur, you will need to talk with your OB/GYN provider about your options and whether the IUD should be removed or not. So, the next time you are thinking about birth control options or is having menstrual problems, consider using the IUD. There are many great benefits to its use and convenience. Talk to your women’s health care provider for more information. SWM Resource: ACOG: https://www.acog.org/Patients/FAQs/Long-ActingReversible-Contraception-Intrauterine-Device-and-Implant#iud

November 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

31


Health & Wellness Self Care

Philanthropy: Solving the social problem of mental wellness By Nicole Cavallaro

“P

hilanthropy can be broadly defined as love for humankind.” Philanthropy exists to improve the wellbeing of humankind in preventing and finding a solution to social problems. Philanthropy is not to be mistaken as charity. Charity works to eliminate the suffering caused by problematic areas in society, while philanthropy focuses on eliminating social problems. “For example, giving food to a person who is suffering from a famine is charity. The food helps the person for a brief period of time, but the person will become hungry again in the future. Teaching the person how to grow food is philanthropy because it eliminates the social problem causing the person's hunger.” How can we provide philanthropy for mental health and wellness? There are many funders and organizations who work to improve and/ or solve the mental health problems that exist. But what is realistic as far as working toward an inclusive goal of “stamping out mental health stigmas” and “creating more awareness”? The goal is find a solution – for all of society. Advocating for mental illness and giving back to the mental health community can be extremely powerful for both families and patients. Patient advocates even say that their advocacy work helps to strengthen their own mental health recovery. And activism is a way that caregivers, loved ones, patients, and all those touched by mental illness can give back to and aid others. The following are just a few of the leading organizations that raise awareness and provide support and resources for mental health. They offer a number of ways to turn your, or others’, suffering into action. Child Mind Institute. The Child Mind Institute an independent, national nonprofit devoted to transforming the lives of children and families struggling with mental health and learning disorders. This organization is an invaluable resource for parents. They provide expert guidance on how to effectively respond to a variety of parental concerns as well as offer resources that can help parents find the best care for their child. Their website also has a symptom checker tool where parents can answer questions and receive information about possible diagnoses and guidance about what to do next.

32

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) is a non-profit organization dedicated to saving lives and bringing hope to those affected by suicide. The AFSP feels that too many people at risk for suicide do not seek help. Thus, the organization has created education programs to reach those who are suffering as well as teach schools, workplaces, and communities on how to prevent suicide and make mental health a priority. National Alliance on Mental Illness. (NAMI) is one of the largest grassroots mental health organizations dedicated to creating better lives for Americans affected by mental illness. This group started around a kitchen table and has now become one of the nation’s trailblazing voices on mental health. NAMI is made up of state organizations, hundreds of local affiliates, and volunteers. They provide education, hold events, provide resources, and work in the community to raise awareness and offer support to all who need. National Institute of Mental Health. (NIMH) is the leading federal agency for research on mental disorders. NIMH is one of the 27 institutes and centers that make up the National Institutes of Health which is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIMH is the largest scientific organization dedicated to research focused on the understanding, treatment, and prevention of mental illness. Additionally, NIMH partners with these organizations in efforts to foster public awareness of the most current mental health research. Mental Health America. Founded in 1909, (MHA) is the nation’s leading community-based organization devoted to addressing the needs of people living with mental illness as well as promoting their overall mental health. This nonprofit group believes that mental health is, in fact, a critical part of overall wellness. They are an authority in mental health support, recovery, and advocacy. MHA’s philosophy is to address and treat mental health conditions before they cause individual suffering. They advocate for prevention services, early identification, and intervention of symptoms, and plans of action to hopefully stop the progression of mental illness. SWM

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Philanthropy Edition


November 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

33


34

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Philanthropy Edition


November 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

35


36

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The The Philanthropy Survivor Edition Edition


SYRACUSE WOMEN OF DISTINCTION Margaret Olivia Slocum Sage

SYRACUSE

Women

Margaret Olivia SlOcuM Sage Margaret Olivia Slocum was born in Syracuse in 1828. Olivia’s uncle sponsored her education at the prestigious and expensive Troy Female Seminary, which quietly advocated financial independence for women through education. The Slocum family’s financial demise forced them to abandon their home in 1854 and Olivia went to live with more affluent family and friends. Until she was 41, Slocum found employment as a governess for

OF

some of Syracuse’s very wealthy families. She also taught at several schools, including St. Paul’s Female School in Syracuse. Slocum became the second wife of financier and railroad baron Russell Sage in 1869. Upon his death in 1906, Sage left his widow almost $75 million dollars (the equivalent of about $1.8 billion today), and she immediately began to donate it to various causes. Among the places she donated were the Women’s Hospital of New York City, the Y.M.C.A., and the Y.W.C.A. Olivia also bought Yates Castle, once owned by Cornelius T. Longstreet, and donated the building to Syracuse University, which used it as a teachers’ college. She also used the money to establish the Russell Sage Institute of Pathology, the Russell Sage College in Troy, and the Russell Sage Foundation in NYC. In the remaining 12 years of her life, Olivia donated over $45 million dollars. It was her generous donations that gave her recognition as America’s foremost female philanthropist.

This page is presented by the Onondaga Historical Association 321 Montgomery Street Syracuse, NY 13202 315-428-1864 | cnyhistory.org

From trailblazing professionals and social advocates to politians and philanthropists, our local women have met societal challenges head on and made their mark while making their communities better places to live.

DISTINCTION

“One should remember that in America what is called ‘blue blood’ is distributed through both classes—with a preponderance of it, perhaps, among the unmoneyed class.” - Margaret Olivia Slocum Sage

Give back by becoming a member and help make sure all our memories are saved for future generations. cnyhistory.org/membership

November 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

37


inspire Mary Lou Sayles

MARY LOU SAYLES

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR HUNTINGTON FAMILY CENTER

Photo by Maureen Tricase/Capture Your Memories

I feel pretty strongly about making a difference kind of on the ground… I feel like when we hand pantry bags to one family, we've made a difference in that family's life. Long term, maybe not. One week, absolutely.” — Mary Lou Sayles

38

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Philanthropy Edition


A century of service

MARY LOU SAYLES EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, HUNTINGTON FAMILY CENTER By Sarah Hall

M

ary Lou Sayles isn’t the kind of executive director to lock herself away in her office and busy herself with paperwork while people need help outside her door. “I am a firm believer [in the idea that if] you help one person, that’s a good day,” said Sayles, who heads up the Huntington Family Center. “Sometimes I go home thinking, ‘Wow, I didn’t get anything on my list done, but I filled four pantry bags.’” But that’s the purpose at Huntington — it’s the people, not the paperwork. “I feel pretty strongly about making a difference on the ground,” she said. “I step in if we need help anywhere. It's the kind of leader I wanted to be.” Sayles, who has a master’s degree in social work and a long career in the nonprofit sector, took the helm at Huntington Family Center eight years ago. But her biggest struggle is getting the word out about the organization. “I am sad at the number of people who don't know what Huntington is,” Sayles said. “How do we get that word out? How do we get people to know us and visit?”

The settlement house tradition

Sayles said the organization’s board has tried a number of things over the years to try to increase its visibility, including changing the name. But there’s a lot of history behind the Huntington name. Huntington was founded as a settlement house 100 years ago. Settlement houses grew out of the Progressive Era’s efforts to confront issues like chronic poverty, overcrowded tenements, child labor, industrial accidents, and public health. Settlement houses served as a place where young people, particularly women, intent on reform would gather to share ideas and ultimately put in motion the wheels of change. Huntington Family Center was founded as part of that tradition in May of 1919. Then known as the Huntington Club, its original goal was to help the growing numbers of women who had moved to Syracuse looking for factory work while their husbands were fighting in World War I. “Huntington Family Center is one of the first, if not the first, settlement house in Syracuse,” Sayles said. ”We are neck and neck with the Dunbar Center. We're both celebrating 100 years this year.” The center has moved a few times over the years, but ultimately landed at its current location at 405 Gifford St. on the city’s Near West Side. “The whole purpose is to be in a neighborhood that was struggling with poverty and to provide a one-stop shop for social services,” Sayles said. “That's what the settlement house tradition really means.”

A place of hope

And Huntington Family Center lives up to that tradition. “When I say one-stop shop, I mean really, from birth to aging,” Sayles said. “Huntington provides universal pre-K, toddler and 3-year-old programming, afterschool program for youth and teens, support programs for parents with disabilities and parents [of] children with disabilities, supervised visitation program for parents… and a robust senior services program. And then, we have a basic needs program, so we do free food through the food pantry and free clothing, right here on this corner.”

Sayles said Huntington meets a critical need in communities like the Near West Side, which has one of the highest concentrations of poverty in the country. Median income in this area according to the U.S. Census is $22,567; the poverty line in the U.S. is $25,750 for a family of four. While median home value in Onondaga County is $142,000, on the Near West Side, it’s $63,300. “We are one of the neighborhoods that they are talking about in all of their articles [on concentrated poverty],” Sayles said. “That is still unfortunately what we see here.” While the agency’s programs help, they’re not always enough to address the generational poverty that has plagued the neighborhood for decades. “We have folks who live here as adults, who come and use the food pantry, who come for the parenting program, who came as children,” Sayles said. “The need continues to be great.” The upside of that relationship is that the residents of the community know the staff at Huntington does care about them. “The fact is they may not ever have had experience trusting an agency or a social service setting, and maybe that helps them if they trust us, then they would be open to the next service, that then hopefully puts them on a path to be better positioned maybe for the next opportunity,” Sayles said.

Stoking passion

Huntington, too, must always be open to new opportunities. As funding streams dry up, Sayles said she’s had to get creative to keep Huntington thriving. While the bulk of the center’s funding comes from several United Way grants and a portion of the remainder comes from the county and the state, Sayles has also started clinical programs for youth and families in Oswego, Cayuga and Delaware counties that helps support programs in Syracuse. For a while the center also operated an on-site café. “Over time, the agency tried a couple of different things,” she said. “If you are not nimble, and you don't provide opportunities to bring in other kinds of revenue, it is really impossible to manage the day-to-day needs of a community neighborhood center.” The other critical piece to keeping the center running, Sayles said, is making sure the staff is happy. “In order for your agency to thrive, your staff has to thrive,” Sayles said. “They have to feel like they're valued, that they matter, that you listen to them, and that you have their back. I don't know how you can demonstrate clients matter if you can't demonstrate that your staff matters.” Much of the staff comes from the neighborhood, so they, too, have a vested interest in doing what’s best for the community. They all share the same passion Sayles has for the agency’s mission. Sayles said she hopes that passion endures after she eventually retires. “I want it to go past me,” she said. “I am so proud that this agency is 100 years old… The key is I'm passionate about it. I think in order to get more donor revenue or fundraising revenue is that level of passion. That's my challenge.” SWM

November 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

39


SCHOOLS OF EXCELLENCE

40

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Philanthropy Edition


Share. Care. Support.

YOUR GUIDE TO PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

November 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

41


inspire Beth Trunfio

BETH TRUNFIO

Photo by Maureen Tricase/Capture Your Memories

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE

It’s rewarding to be able to wake up every day for more than 30 years — 20 of them at the Ronald McDonald House — and be able to really look forward to my day and then go home at the end of the day feeling satisfied, gratified, and grateful.” – Beth Trunfio, executive director, Ronald McDonald House

42

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Philanthropy Edition


The Glass is Half-Full

BETH TRUNFIO, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE By Alyssa Dearborn

B

eth Trunfio’s fingerprints are everywhere at the Ronald McDonald House in Syracuse. Celebrating her 20-year anniversary with the local organization — a significant milestone for anyone — Trunfio instills a sense of community, hard-work, and perseverance in everything she does. “This living room where we’re seated today is the culmination of a lot of people’s hard work, vision, and support,” Trunfio said of the building, which was completed in 2012 and has served thousands of families since then. “Building this new larger, fully handicappedaccessible Ronald McDonald House so that we can better serve families who are in crisis is really something that I am so proud of. It’s not just what we built, it’s what we’re able to do in this home.” Although Trunfio spent a significant amount of time helping better the lives of families and their children through her work at the House, her passion for giving began early in her career. “Volunteering has always been something that I was interested in as a young person,” said Trunfio. Trunfio’s first “real job” was as an assistant to the director at a television station, and one of her major tasks was coordinating the station’s annual telethon. “It was so much fun,” she said. “I loved the logistics, I loved meeting new people and coordinating those people to be an honest program.” Helping to organize that one televised charity event led her into working with a human services non-profit organization. After spending seven years with her first non-profit job, she found her way back to the Syracuse area and to the Ronald McDonald House of Central New York. Through many happy coincidences, Trunfio created her own path in a rewarding career. “I have been fortunate that I fell into this incredible career that I seemed to have an affinity for,” Trunfio said. “It’s rewarding to be able to wake up every day for more than 30 years — 20 of them at the Ronald McDonald House — and be able to really look forward to my day and then go home at the end of the day feeling satisfied, gratified, and grateful.” As director she saw the opportunity to make visitors’ lives easier. In her years spent at the Central New York organization she oversaw the building of a second larger, handicapped-accessible home and helped pioneer a community giving event called the Many Hearts One Home Celebration. “My hope is that we can all continue to work together and partner together in what we’re doing to ensure the good for everyone,” Trunfio said. “I think having the opportunity to live in a community

that is so caring and compassionate — and the be able to witness that on a daily basis — is just rewarding and a gift.” Though the generous nature of her work helped her to develop, as she called it, “A glass is half full” mentality, she never forgot credit the inspiration that came from the community as well as from the visitors. “To be able to meet families and be a part of the families’ lives,” Trunfio added, “and to know that we’re partners with a lot of their providers and team members shows how fortunate we are in this community.” The sense of hopefulness effected both her professional outlook as well as her personal outlook on life over the years. “My hopes and dreams are so tied to this organization’s mission and to children, family, health, and wellbeing,” Trunfio said. “I hope the same for the good health and wellbeing for my family and certainly for those around me.” Trunfio — and the Ronald McDonald House as a whole — is without a doubt fortunate to have accomplished great things that make the lives of others better. But she is consistently realistic about what it means to be a leader in a non-profit organization. “All of these service agencies and non-profits rely on volunteers,” Trunfio said. “We were founded as a grassroots organization and that’s what sustains us today. We rely on the community for funding and support.” Over the past years Trunfio has worked with the community to ensure that the House would never run short of enthusiastic community partners and volunteers. From encouraging high school students to join the House’s Youth Advisor Board and inviting young adult professionals to join the Red Shoe Society to accepting enthusiastic volunteers who want to help at the House every once in a while, Trunfio has seen young people standing up to make a positive influence in their own community. “We always welcome young people who are interested in learning more about the organization,” she said. “You can certainly do online research, but there’s nothing like sending an email and arranging a time to learn more about it.” To young people looking to make a difference in their community, the seasoned executive director said, “Just take the first step.” SWM

November 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

43


BRYANT + STRATTON HALF PAGE AD

44

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Philanthropy Edition


November 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

45


inspire Debbie Monaco and Ruth Bates

DEBBIE MONACO AND RUTH BATES

Photo by Ana Gil-Taylor

DINING FOR WOMEN

46

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Philanthropy Edition


Passing a plate for women in need DEBBIE MONACO AND RUTH BATES DINING FOR WOMEN By Jamie Jensen

D

The chapters are able to organize their events in a way that works best ebbie Monaco first heard about Dining for Women, a “global for their members. For the Syracuse chapter, Ruth said, once-a-month giving circle that funds grassroots projects working in developing potluck dinners have been the most successful. countries to fight gender inequality,” in January 2011, after her “The original concept of the meeting was that you would get together sister-in-law attended one of their events in Skaneateles. with your friends and you would donate whatever you would have Debbie helped to get the Syracuse chapter of Dining for Women spent going out to dinner with your friends…We usually have dinner, off the ground in January 2011. “I spent a couple months with the watch the videos and talk about the program, and then there’s a long Skaneateles chapter leader, and then we decided to launch one in the discussion about what the program is,” she said. Syracuse area,” she said. Since then, the chapter has grown, with members While a member will usually volunteer to host one of the meetings coming to events from Liverpool, Manlius, and Camillus. at her home, Debbie and Ruth said this is not a requirement of being Debbie said the organization, which now has 451 chapters a member. Members are free to bring any dish, and some women will nationwide, provides grants to organizations that uplift women even make a dish that is popular in the and girls in developing nations. grant-winner’s country. The date and time An organization that applies for funding of the meeting is normally selected by from Dining for Women must go the member who is hosting. through a rigorous vetting process. Debbie said that the main goal of the Once an organization has been selected I want every woman to be able organization is obviously to raise awarefor a grant, they must send videos in to have the opportunity to do ness of international organizations in need order for Dining for Women members of funding, but there is an added benefit to see how their grant has helped. what they’re passionate about.” to becoming a member. For many of these organizations, — Ruth Bates “We’ve managed to find like-minded which have ranged from programs in women, and even though the point of India that are providing technology for this organization locally or nationally is girls’ schools to foundations that cover not social, that is certainly been a side the cost of fistula surgeries to new benefit of it. I, myself, feel like I have met women that I would have mothers in Africa and Asia, the grant money is life-changing. never met otherwise. People will bring people, so it really reaches out.” When Debbie realized what the goals of Dining for Women were, Since its inception in 2011, the Syracuse chapter of Dining for she knew she had to be a part of it. Women has raised $70,000 for organizations around the world, “This appeals to me,” Debbie said, “because I believe strongly in and Debbie and Ruth are hoping the Syracuse chapter will continue supporting philanthropy where you live but over and above that, to grow and find new members or even inspire other women in the the power of the U.S. dollar internationally is so much greater. I have area to start their own Dining for Women chapter. daughters, and I’ve always been attuned to women’s issues.” “There’s no requirement to have a large chapter. The model really Deb is now co-leader of the Syracuse chapter with Ruth Bates, who what you want it to be,” Ruth said. has been a member of the Syracuse chapter from the very beginning. Anyone who is interested in joining the Syracuse chapter or “I love this organization,” Ruth said. “I was an engineer back in the starting her own chapter can email Ruth and Debbie at manliusdfw@ 1970s, and my daughter is getting her PhD in bioengineering, and I gmail.com. SWM want every woman to be able to have the opportunity to do what they’re passionate about.”

November 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

47


UPCOMING SWM Events Friday, Nov. 1 to Friday, Nov. 22

Art Gone Wild! When: 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Where: Rosamond Gifford Zoo, 1 Conservation Place, Syracuse What: Enjoy extraordinary artwork created by our animals as part of their enrichment activities. Pieces produced by elephant trunks, red panda paws, penguin feet and octopus arms will be on display leading up to our reception and art auction on Nov. 22 from 6 to 8 p.m. Cost: Exhibit: Free with membership or zoo admission; reception: $8 per person, $10 at the door, free for kids 12 and under. Info: syracusezooevents.org/event/art-gone-wild-exhibition-2019/ Saturday, Nov. 2

New York State Craft Brewers Festival: Syracuse When: To be announced Where: Landmark Theater, 362 S. Salina St., Syracuse What: The unique and beloved event brings together over 60 New York State Breweries from every region of the state featuring 130 hard to find and award-winning beers. We'll also have local food vendors and restaurants. Cost: $20 to $75 Info: eventbrite.com/e/new-york-state-craft-brewers-festival syracuse 11219-tickets-72429006107?aff=ebdssbcitybrowse Sunday, Nov. 3

Squishing of the Squash When: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Where: Rosamond Gifford Zoo, 1 Conservation Place, Syracuse What: What happens to the pumpkins when Halloween’s over? The squash get squished – by our zoo animals! Come out and have a “gourd” time at the zoo! Cost: Free for members or with zoo admission Info: syracusezooevents.org/event/squishing-of-the-squash-2019/ Wednesday, Nov. 6

WBOC November Program When: 4:30 to 5 p.m. Networking; 5 to 6:30 p.m. Monthly Program Where: SKY Armory, 351 S. Clinton St., Syracuse What: “Fast-track your success with accountability,” with speaker Barb Stone. Cost: Members $10; first-time guests $10; non-members $25 Info: wboconnection.org/event-3577857 Wednesday, Nov. 6

2019 40 Under 40 When: 5 to 8 p.m. Where: The Oncenter Convention Center, 800 S. State St., Syracuse What: 40 Under Forty recognizes 40 ambitious, hard-working, civic minded individuals, who are under the age of 40. These individuals have excelled in the workplace and in the community. Cost: Up to $750 Info: cnybj.com/2019-40-under-forty/

48

Saturday, Nov. 9, and Saturday, Nov. 10

TitBits When: 7 to 9 p.m. Saturday and 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday Where: Joyce Hergenhan Auditorium, Newhouse 3, Syracuse University campus, Syracuse What: A panel of breast cancer survivors and their families as well as plastic surgeons who specialize in reconstruction will tell their stories. Rescheduled from October. Cost: Free Info: http://looknowproject.org/author/tulagoenka Thursday, Nov. 14

2019 Upstate Latino Summit/ La Liga 50th Anniversary Gala When: Summit: 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; gala begins at 5:30 p.m. Where: Marriott Syracuse Downtown, 100 East Onondaga St., Syracuse What: Please join us in celebrating 50 years of dedicated service and advocacy! Cost: $75 and up Info: eventbrite.com/e/2019-upstate-latino-summit-la-liga-50th anniversary-gala-tickets-58383093404?aff=ebdssbdestsearch Thursday, Nov. 14

Au Chocolat! The event of the season When: 3 to 9 p.m. Where: Downtown Baldwinsville village shops and boutiques What: Event includes a complimentary trolley shuttle service, door prizes, special promotions, shop passport, chocolate and more at various participating Baldwinsville businesses. Cost: Free Info: Follow us on facebook for event updates @auchocolatbville Wednesday, Nov. 20

WBOC Member Connections Breakfast When: 9 to 10:30 a.m. Where: Market Diner, 2100 Park St., Syracuse What: Come and learn about all the benefits available for our WBOC members. Take this opportunity to meet other members in a small group setting. Cost: Free to attend. You just pay for your breakfast. Info: wboconnection.org/event-3577895 Sunday, Nov. 24

Cosmic Disco Bowling /Dance Party When: Noon to 3 p.m. Where: Flamingo Bowl, 7239 Oswego Road, Liverpool What: Support Wanderers’ Rest Humane Association. Tickets include three hours all you can bowl (including shoe rental), pizza and soda. Cost: $25 Info: wanderersrest.org Monday, Nov. 25

Buy Local Bash When: 5 to 8 p.m. Where: F Shed - CNY Regional Market Authority, 2100 Park St., Syracuse What: Going into its 10th year, the Buy Local Bash brings community members and local merchants together for a one-of-a-kind social, shopping and tasting event to highlight the locally owned, independent businesses of Central New York. Cost: $5 Info: Vendor space and sponsorship opportunities are available. Contact Shannon Fults at sfults@centerstateceo.com to learn more.

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Philanthropy Edition


Wednesday, Nov. 27

Wild Wednesday When: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Where: Rosamond Gifford Zoo, 1 Conservation Place, Syracuse What: Parents... need extra time to get your house ready or to prepare for Thanksgiving? Register your kids for this awesome one-day all day zoo camp for kids ages 6 to 11.Pizza party lunch included! Cost: Members: $55 per child; Non-members: $65 per child Info: Classes fill quickly; reserve at reservations.rosamondgiffordzoo.org/ Info.aspx?EventID=4. Questions: call (315) 435-8511 ext. 8560 or email education@rosamondgiffordzoo.org Saturday, Nov. 30

Syracuse Wine and Chocolate Festival When: 1 to 8 p.m. Where: Horticulture Building, 581 State Fair Blvd., Syracuse What: Enjoy a fabulous selection of tasty nibbles and treats, chocolates, cheeses and sweets. Get a free chocolate treat or two. Then browse some great fun products for you and your home. Cost: $10 to $30 Info: eventbrite.com/e/syracuse-wine-and-chocolate-festival-tickets 73281586197?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Kristen Orts MSN, CNM, IBCLC

Linda Lovig MSN, CNM, NP

Saturday, Nov. 30

Fall Night Market When: 3 to 10 p.m. Where: SKY Armory, 351 S. Clinton St., Syracuse What: Sell your products to over 2500 shoppers who come to check out our fun and eclectic, locally-focused urban pop-up market. Cost: $12 to $175 Info: eventbrite.com/e/fall-night-market-2019-vendor-registration tickets-53312960500?aff=ebdssbcitybrowse Wednesday, Dec. 4

Annual Holiday Auction & Party When: 5:30 to 9 p.m. Where: SKY Armory, 351 S. Clinton St., Syracuse What: The festivities celebrate all professionals in business and supports the work WBOC does year-round. Great music, fabulous food, fun raffles, unique auction items, and SURPRISES! Cost: Includes parking. $50 until Nov. 15, then $60 after that date. Info: WBOConnection.org

Lisa Benedetto MSN, CNM

November 2019

Yuliya Labko MSN, CNM

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

49


movers AND Shakers New CEO appointed at local credit union

The Board of Directors of Cooperative Federal is pleased to announce that Christina Sauve was appointed to the position of Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Oct. 15. Christina, who is currently the credit union’s Chief Operating Officer (COO), was selected to succeed founder Ron Ehrenreich. Ron has led the organization for over 37 years and will continue to work with the credit union’s management team to ensure a smooth and successful transition, in a new position focused on risk analysis and specialized lending. Christina Sauve was born and raised locally, attending public school in Syracuse’s Near West Side and Solvay and graduating as valedictorian of her high school class. A first-generation college student, she graduated with honors from California’s prestigious Stanford University in 2003 and returned home to begin her career. She first joined Cooperative Federal’s staff in 2005, working as Executive Assistant, Community Development Coordinator, and Assistant Treasurer before becoming COO. Christina has also served on local nonprofit boards including Home HeadQuarters (2014 present) and Syracuse Community Connections (2011-2017). Cooperative Federal (Syracuse Cooperative Federal Credit Union) is a non-profit, mission-driven credit union founded in Syracuse in 1982. With a focus on community development and financial inclusion, to date it has invested over $150 million in local neighborhoods. Its mission is to rebuild the local economy in ways that foster justice, serve people and communities that are underserved by mainstream banks, and responsibly manage its members’ assets. Learn more at www.coopfed.org.

Crouse Health Celebrates National Coming Out Day

Each year, National Coming Out Day is celebrated to promote a safe world for LGBTQ individuals to live truthfully and openly. To celebrate, Crouse Health’s Diversity and Inclusion Committee held a ‘lunch and learn’ event featuring Crouse physicians Kevin Johnson, MD, and Alann WeissmanWard, MD. Both spoke to their colleagues and guests about coming out and coming out as transgender in the workplace. Dr. Johnson, a psychiatrist for Crouse Substance Use Disorder Treatment, spoke about what coming out means and how we can support people when they come out. "I happen to be fortunate to work in an environment where I can be out as a gay man but many people aren't that lucky," said Dr. Johnson.

50

Dr. Weissman-Ward, medical director of Crouse’s Commonwealth Place for inpatient substance use disorder treatment, shared information about coming out as transgendered and offering support to the trans community. “It's actually pretty normal for people to feel depressed when they don't feel like they fit into what normal society expects you to be,” Dr. Weissman-Ward said. After both presentations, the doctors took questions and comments from their colleagues, some of whom shared their own experiences with coming out. Crouse Health values diversity among its employees, patients, families and communities we serve. The Diversity and Inclusion Committee, comprised of Crouse staff from across the organization, was formed in 2014 with a goal to better serve our organization and our community.

Women’s Fund Awards $45,000 to Projects that Support Women and Girls in Central New York

Nine nonprofit organizations from Onondaga, Madison and Cayuga counties were awarded grants from the Women’s Fund of Central New York. The grants, totaling $45,000, will fund projects that support the advancement and full participation of women and girls. Auburn Public Theater, Inc. received $5,000 to perform The Tubman Troupe’s “A Gatherin’ Place” at Auburn Public Theater and SALTSpace. Boys & Girls Clubs of Syracuse received $5,000 to support the Girls After School Coding Club. This grant is made possible with gifts from Lockheed Martin and the Central New York Community Foundation, as well as the Women’s Fund. Child Advocacy Center of Oswego County received $5,000 to form the Girls Circle, a structured support group for girls aged 9 to18 years old. The Haven at Skanda received $5,000 to build the Self-Care at Skanda, a new all-female, multigenerational program to support women who have survived domestic violence while at the same time cultivating the leadership skills of Skanda's teenage female volunteers. The Image Initiative, Inc. received $5,000 to support the Sisters Empowering Sisters 16th Annual Conference, a two-day empowerment conference focusing on self-esteem, relationship violence, STDs/HIV/AIDS awareness and teen pregnancy. PGR Foundation received $5,000 to support its Safe Sitter Training, which provides girls 10 years old and older with training on childcare and babysitting, first aid/CPR, rescue skills, safety skills, life and business skills. Providence Services of Syracuse received $5,000 to support its Shuttle to Work van pools, which will give women the critical opportunity to get to work, make a living, and begin paths to financial independence. Vera House (in partnership with RISE) received $5,000 to support its Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention program for refugee and immigrant youth, offered to students and young adults ages 14 to 21 enrolled in RISE’s CORE youth group. You Can’t Fail received $5,000 to build its You Can't Fail Experience and Learning Community, in which 10 to 15 millennial women participate. Each participant will be paired with an industryspecific mentor with whom they will develop an individualized leadership development plan.

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

The Philanthropy Edition


American Heart Association advisory board receives Gold Standard Board recognition

Local volunteers are getting some national recognition. Members of the Syracuse American Heart Association (AHA) advisory board are being honored by the national AHA for their work to improve the heart health of Central New York. The Syracuse advisory board was recently recognized at the silver level of the organization’s “Gold Standard Board” program for the 2018-2019 fiscal year. The honor recognizes board members for helping the AHA in its mission to be a relentless force for a world of longer, healthier lives. With the help of these high-level volunteers, the American Heart Association is leading the way in efforts to improve the health of Central New York through programs like Growing Healthy Hearts with St. Joseph’s Health and the Syracuse School District aimed at fighting childhood obesity; Loving Myself, Loving My Sisters, which brings together several groups focused on the heart health of the Syracuse African-American community; the Check It! CNY blood pressure monitoring program and advocacy efforts, including helping Onondaga County pass Tobacco 21 legislation before New York State.

November 2019

SYRACUSEWOMANMAG.COM

51


BURDICK FULL PAGE AD

Profile for Eagle Newspapers

Syracuse Woman Magazine November 2019  

The Philanthropy Edition

Syracuse Woman Magazine November 2019  

The Philanthropy Edition

Advertisement