Syracuse Woman Magazine Digital Edition - Nov. 2022

Page 1


2

CROUSE FULL PAGE AD

NOVEM BER 2022

PH I L ANTH ROPY EDITION


3

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAG.COM


4

TABLE OF CONTENTS

november

GUEST COMMENTARY Carolyn Hendrickson At the heart of giving.................................................................. 6 PAST EVENTS............................................................................................... 9

35

SPECIAL FEATURE Women's Fund founders built legacy for community's daughters and granddaughters ......... 12 Dr. Wanda Fremont A helper to the youngest among us...................................16 Sweetening the deal - Home cookie business shows attention to detail................................................... 28

20

WISE WOMAN FEATURED ENTREPRENEUR Liz Cox............................................................................................. 18 ON THE COVER Laura Hand Using her platform for good............................................ 23

23

FOR A GOOD CAUSE A helping hand where it's needed most ........................ 32

16

HEALTHY EATING Chef Eric Rose Holiday traditions around the table............................... 35 INSPIRE Sharye Skinner.......................................................................... Christina McNeely...................................................................

38 40

UPCOMING EVENTS............................................................................. 44

6

MOVERS & SHAKERS ........................................................................ 46

40

12

38

NOVEM BER 2022

PH I L ANTH ROPY EDITION


5

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAG.COM


6

GUEST COMMENTARY

At the heart of giving Carolyn Hendrickson

A

s someone who genuinely enjoys building relationships, I am always curious what motivates people to give. In a study referenced in Psychology Today, 85% of respondents said the reason they gave was simply because someone asked them. I have been asked whether the inclination to give is more likely to be grounded in family values or is it a learned behavior. The good news is that there is no firm answer; it’s likely to be a combination. And, with the advances in social media, the “asking” by nonprofits is highly visible and reaches a much broader audience than ever before. Having grown up on a farm in Central New York, my formative years of financial giving was limited to dropping money into the collection plate on Sunday. I watched my parents’ do that as the plate was passed down the pew, and inherently knew I wanted to be part of it. I didn’t know all the ways the money would be used, but I knew some of it helped poor people in our community. Even as a child it felt good to help and be connected with something bigger than myself. Whether it was a quarter or a dollar bill I earned from babysitting, I wanted to contribute. Little did I know this was the start of what would become my life’s passion. Throughout my childhood and emerging adulthood, I thought philanthropy was something only for the incredibly wealthy. Over the past 25 years as a development professional, I now know that philanthropy—the act of giving to help others or society—is a meaningful opportunity for everyone. I have had the good fortune to know people considered wealthy and those with very limited resources give generously. Helping others simply feels good. Of no less importance are gifts of time—volunteering, pitching in. My father was quick to help other farmers when the need was apparent, and his caring ways still impact my actions today. Answering phones at a fundraiser, serving on a board, collecting hygiene items for families in need might speak to your heart, or knitting hats for a street outreach providing medical care. Giving your time and talent can change your life and the community around you. Through the years, my personal philanthropy is a result of learned behavior. My former career in financial services gave me insights on tools and strategies for giving. Though knowledge of tax advantages is helpful, my career in charitable giving has helped me better recognize how much the heart is connected to giving. Listening to donors, understanding what matters to them, and helping them find a meaningful opportunity to have impact—whether it is a gift of time, money, or both—is incredibly rewarding. There is no such thing as a too-small gift. Giving is deeply personal. It is about a relationship. One thing that the cloud of a two-year pandemic has reinforced for me is that people and relationships are what matter most in our lives. American researcher and author Brené Brown tells us “We are hard-wired to connect with others, it’s what gives purpose to our lives and without it there is suffering.” My hope is that going forward we never forget how human connection and wellbeing are intricately tied. My wish for each and every one of you, is that you richly experience the joy of friendship and the love of others in a way that will replenish your spirit. May every gift you make come from your heart. SWM

SyracuseWomanMag.com contact@syracusewomanmag.com

PUBLISHER

David Tyler dtyler@eaglenewsonline.com

DESIGN Andrea Reeves

PHOTOGRAPHERS Susan Kahn Photography Nancy Miller Alice G. Patterson Chef Eric Rose David Tyler

CONTRIBUTORS

Iris Buczkowski Alyssa Dearborn Renee Gadoua Kate Hanzalik Carolyn Hendrickson

Kate Hill Jason Klaiber Norah Machia Chef Eric Rose

Cover photo by Alice G. Patterson

ADVERTISING SALES

Renée Moonan Linda Jabbour 315.657.7690 315.657.0849 Rmoonan@eaglenewsonline.com Ljabbour@eaglenewsonline.com

ADVERTISE WITH US

Unlike any other publication in the Syracuse area, our feature articles address major topics that interest local women. Each issue includes articles on health, fashion, fitness, finance, home matters, dining, lifestyle and personal perspectives, as well as a spotlight on local Syracuse women. Ads are due on the 15th of the month prior to publication. The print magazines will be distributed locally in over 350 locations and will be in your inbox electronically by the middle of every month. The publication is available free of charge.

CONTACT OUR HOME OFFICE 315.434.8889 | 2501 James Street, Suite 100, Syracuse, NY 13206

The magazine is published 12 times a year by Community Media Group, LLC and Eagle Publications 2501 James St., Suite 100 Syracuse, NY 13206 Copyright © 2022 Community Media Group, LLC. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or republished without the consent of the publishers. Syracuse Woman Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited submissions, manuscripts, photos or artwork. All such submissions become the property of Community Media Group, LLC and will not be returned.

Carolyn Hendrickson is the Director of Planned Giving at The Upstate Foundation. NOVEM BER 2022

PH I L ANTH ROPY EDITION


7

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAG.COM


SPONSORED CONTENT

8

The Art of Giving Iris Buczkowski

The holidays are my favorite time of year for several reasons! I find that no matter where I go people are generally happier, caring and more helpful because that is the true spirit of the season. There is simply just something magical about it. Webster Merriam defines philanthropy as the desire to promote the welfare of others, expressed especially by the generous donation of money to good causes. I think it is safe to say that most people agree it is good to help people and causes that need additional help and support, but there is no one way to do it. In my practice I am often tasked with helping clients achieve their goal of leaving a legacy. Most times legacy planning is centered on their families, but several people have joined a continued movement to leave a legacy to help others. Charitable giving has become very popular over the past few years. What most people don’t know is that you have ways to leverage your money to make a more meaningful impact to those you wish to support. A few examples would include the following: 1. Charitable Trusts: A charitable trust allows you to place assets into trust and generate an income to you while you are alive to yourself, or to your charitable recipients with the promise for them to receive the principal in the future time of you passing. This is popular for those with the good fortune to have highly appreciated securities in their portfolio and can use them for tax planning purposes. The most common types of charitable trusts are called remainder trusts and lead trusts, with the difference being how you structure the income derived from the trust while you are alive. 2. Donor Advised Funds: Donor advised funds have become increasing popular because the are easy to administer and do not require the use of an attorney to established them. Many custodians have a donor advised fund platform that allows you to work with your financial advisor to open an account where may choose several charities you wish to support. This allows you to make charitable contributions with more flexible terms and grow the contributions you make through investing.

NOVEM BER 2022

3. Using Life Insurance: Many people have policies they have taken with accumulated cash value they may not need or where premium payments are no longer due. You can donate life insurance to a charity and take a deduction for the gift in the present. When you pass away, the charitable entity receives the benefit. Philanthropists of any age can do this as part of their planning. For example, a healthy 40 year old person could buy a $100,000 life insurance policy with an annual premium of $1,000. The life expectancy of this person may be 45 years. If they live to be 85, the $45,000 they paid during their lifetime will give a gift of $100,000 at their passing for a gain on their investment of $55,000. This can be a very effective way to give if your goal is to make a larger, longer term impact. A core tenant of how I live is with the belief that you cannot get ahead in life unless you give back. Money is not the only way to do this because you also have your time and talent. If you combine the three you accomplish what science says you get from philanthropy – a healthier mind and body experience because our whole being medically benefits from the psychological impact of giving back. Along with the science though is the art you can create. You can use some or all of these strategies and if you do you will complete a beautiful masterpiece that will live far beyond you with your personal style embedded in it. That is the true art of giving back. Iris Buczkowski is the founder and CEO of Birch Wealth Management (birchwealth.com). Birch Wealth Management is an Investment Adviser registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission. All views, expressions, and opinions included in this communication are subject to change. This communication is not intended as an offer or solicitation to buy, hold or sell any financial instrument or investment advisory services. Original content provided by Iris is for educational purposes only and should not be construed as investment advice.

PH I L ANTH ROPY EDITION


PAST EVENTS

A

utumn is always a busy time for community events in Central New York. In September, Nascentia Health celebrated the 10th annual Raise a Glass fundraiser and awarded the 2022 Civic Engagement Excellence Award to Dr. Linda LeMura, president of LeMoyne College and the 2022 Community Champion Award to Jan Maloff, founder of the CNY Bicycle Giveaway. In early October, the YWCA hosted its first annual Block Party to Eliminate Racism on the north side of Syracuse. On Oct. 13, the American Heart Association played host to the annual Go Red For Women Luncheon to raise awareness of heart disease in women. On Oct. 12, Francis House hosted the There's No Place Like Home gala fundraiser at the Expo Center at the New York State Fairgrounds.

9

Nascentia's 10th annual Raise a Glass fundraiser

YWCA Block Party to Eliminate Racism

Continued on page 10 SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAG.COM


10

PAST EVENTS

American Heart Association's Go Red For Women Luncheon Photos by Nancy Miller

NOVEM BER 2022

PH I L ANTH ROPY EDITION


11

There's No Place Like Home Gala to support Francis House

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAG.COM


SPECIAL FEATURE

Women’s Fund founders built legacy for community’s daughters and granddaughters Renee Gadoua

Photography by Susan Kahn Photography

12

P

eggy Ogden remembers a woman walking into her office about 25 years ago to contribute to the newly-created Women’s Fund of Central New York. “She said it was the first time she had written a $1,000 check,” Ogden recalled. “It was self-empowerment for her: ‘This is something I believe in and will use my resources to support.’” Ogden was among several Syracuse-area women who harnessed determination and donations to start the Women’s Fund of Central New York, an endowed fund to address gender inequity that limited opportunities for the region’s women and girls.

NOVEM BER 2022

After participating in the national Leadership Women America program in the mid-90s, a small group of Syracuse-area women wanted to use their leadership positions, skills and resources at home. Hillary Clinton’s 1995 declaration to the United Nations that “women’s rights are human rights” had highlighted the low profile and paltry resources the community committed to women’s and girl’s programming. A nod to the region’s history of female leaders in the Iroquois Confederacy and the women’s suffrage movement also influenced their thinking. “We’re leaving a legacy for our community, our daughters and our granddaughters,” one fundraising appeal noted. “This fund is another chapter in that legacy of women’s rights,” said Aminy Audi, who hosted one of the early organizing meetings. Their initial goal was to raise $100,000 through 100 founding donations of $1,000. They raised more than $170,000 in about four months. “Women just took out their checkbooks and started writing checks,” Ogden said. “We were helping women recognize the power of philanthropy.” "The timing was right," said Ann Higbee. "Women were looking for an outlet to be supportive of ideas and programs that were meaningful

PH I L ANTH ROPY EDITION


13

to them and supported women and girls. It was bite sized. It was manageable. It was local.” The founders partnered with the Central New York Community Foundation to create the endowment, formalize their goals and create an advisory council. The Women’s Fund now has more than $1.2 million in total assets and has awarded nearly $450,000 in grants since inception. Marcie Sonneborn, who was teaching entrepreneurship at Syracuse University at the time, was frustrated at the stark difference between how male and female students talked about startups and venture capital. “The men were gung-ho and ready to go out and do something and the women said, ‘My ideas are not well thought out enough.’” She hoped the fund would help women realize their ideas were valuable, too. Council members also got a chance to learn leadership skills through networking and assessing grants. “It was a first experience for many women,” Judy Mower said. “That builds leadership. That's a skill. That builds mental capacity. It makes women better at civic leadership and entrepreneurship.” Audi agreed: “You don’t have to be the CEO to be a leader. Being able to see how others function, how they resolve conflict and how they interact with others, provide valuable lessons in leadership skills for women at every level.” Maeve Lanning Stockman, current Women’s Fund Advisory Council chair, leads the 28-member group in assessing and awarding grants. “We are the stewards of this fund,” she said. “We receive many more applications than we can fund.”

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

She finds the nonprofits’ stories both inspiring and heart-breaking. “We know that women are often the economic powerhouse of their family,” she said. “It is an honor and privilege and a heavy weight to be able to support these extremely worthy organizations to keep the basic foundation under the people they serve.” In 2022, the fund awarded 10 grants totaling $50,000. They included: Black Girls Don’t Get Love, to convert a popular book into a short film for girls; Partners for Education and Business, to connect girls with local companies and hands-on activities to explore engineering, manufacturing and skilled trade careers; and BLOOM of CNY, to facilitate workshops for girls and young women on health and wellness, financial literacy and building healthy habits. Continued on page 14

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAG.COM


14

SPECIAL FEATURE

Women's Fund built legacy from page 13 Council members are being more intentional about diversity, equity and inclusion in their operations and grantmaking. They also want to hold events for girls around age 12 to start learning self-empowerment at early ages. They’d also like to engage more with the founders, a goal the founders share. “It was a different time for women then, but the problems facing our community are the same,” Lanning Stockman

NOVEM BER 2022

said. “We are extremely grateful for the generosity and foresight and gumption of these women.” The founders, meanwhile, are still full of ideas: What are the unmet needs? How do we help women feel comfortable moving into the circles still filled by men? How can we act as connectors? The work, they noted, goes on. SWM

PH I L ANTH ROPY EDITION


15

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAG.COM


16

SPECIAL FEATURE

DR. WANDA FREMONT

A helper to the youngest among us Jason Klaiber

L

ooking back on decades of work in psychiatry, predominantly in the branch dedicated to children and adolescents, Dr. Wanda Fremont traces her interest in her specified field back to a longheld fascination in the biopsychosocial model. Originally a general practitioner, Fremont had patients come in with headaches and pain in places like the neck, belly and lower back, but X-ray examinations would oftentimes reveal that nothing was physically amiss. Such results were followed by sitdowns with the patients to talk about aggravations in their lives and medical workups that indicated their physical complaints were manifesting from psychological stress. Fremont later directed her focus to what she called a “great need”: helping children in the Syracuse area facing mental health challenges, believing they deserved to be listened to at the crucial stages before adulthood. After working in direct, multi-disciplinary clinical care for a forerunner to insurance company Excellus during the 1990s, she was recruited in 2001 to become a full-time faculty member at Upstate Medical University, where she had been voluntarily teaching in the department of psychiatry. At Upstate, she restarted the child psychiatry fellowship program, and she has stayed to become a full professor while taking on administrative duties, contributing to program development and wearing several other hats, such as chief of child psychiatry and vice chair as well as training director and medical director for her discipline’s outpatient clinic. In addition, she has taught family medicine residents at St. Joseph’s Health, and she operated a face-toface private practice that she kept going for 25 years. As part of her role on the executive steering committee for the New York State virtual program Project TEACH, Fremont collaborates with and provides consultation to primary care clinicians, pediatricians and family practice doctors, with Upstate stepping in as one of seven involved institutions by way of phone line support and weekly Zoom meetings. “We’re trying to put our energy into educating the primary care docs and helping them with the difficult cases of kids they see,” Fremont said. Started in 2010, that statewide program also has sessions for maternal mental health treatment in order to evaluate the troubles of pregnant and postpartum moms and address how their feelings could affect their infants. On the side, Fremont also serves as a consultant psychiatrist for Elmcrest Children's Center, a guidance agency for at-risk, developmentally disabled, socially and emotionally disordered, and neglected children with complex trauma. She has lent assistance to its mission for 15 years now, usually on a routine of two half-day visits a week. According to Fremont, that location on Salt Springs Road by Le Moyne College is opening a Therapeutic Crisis Respite Program (TCRP), which will be an opportunity for “intensive, shorter-term” treatment lasting about four weeks that precedes admittance to an inpatient unit. Continued on page 18

NOVEM BER 2022

PH I L ANTH ROPY EDITION


17

For the public charity’s initiative—pursued in conjunction with Upstate Medical University, Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital and Upstate’s department of psychiatry—there is an emphasis on engaging stakeholders “at all levels,” including local government officials and heads of community organizations. As planned currently, the fundraising campaign will benefit Elmcrest while creating levels of care aside from in-between places to board children and adolescents waiting for room to open up in the psychiatric ward. The money raised will also go toward building up a program to train child nurse practitioners, an eating disorder treatment program, an opioid clinic, and a dual diagnosis program, Fremont said. Through her career, Fremont has delved into issues of babies’ attachment to their mothers, the treatment of disorders like early bipolar, the subject of disruptive behaviors in grade schools, and, as some make their way through high school, substance abuse. Though she acknowledges the strides made in telepsychiatry at the height of COVID, Fremont said that the pandemic left not only a medical footprint but also a mental one. For kids, there were the ramifications, especially with regard to basic development, of being kept away from the school environments they were used to for an Continued on page 18

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAG.COM


18

SPECIAL FEATURE

A helper to the youngest among us from page 17 Gone are Fremont’s days of seeing individual adults for appointments, but she said her attention to treating patients in the age range of newborn to 18 years old has always incorporated talks with the parents, other older family members and school district representatives within that context. “You can’t treat a child in a vacuum,” Fremont said, adding that the choice to specialize in child and adolescent psychiatry requires precursory training in the realm of adult care. On the heels of child and adolescent mental health being declared a national emergency last year by the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and the Children’s Hospital Association, Fremont is joining the effort to combat a shortage of treatment facilities, a lack of available beds, waiting lists that stay stagnant for up to six months, and the disparity between the demand for services and the amount of licensed child psychiatrists. Along with those common sights, she points to a record number of kids that are presenting to emergency rooms and a statistic that one out of five children and adolescents is in need of mental health care. That’s why the Upstate Foundation is looking to bring in funders and philanthropic investment for a $3 million campaign to increase clinical capacity, boost access to service providers and back issuepreventative work for families.

NOVEM BER 2022

extended period of time and the lessened socializing that came with quarantine, Fremont said. But the numbers were already rising before COVID, she clarifies, noting that the number of adolescent suicides had doubled between the years 2010 and 2017. She also attributes mental anguish to certain family dynamics and the trickle-down effect of other nationwide problems having to do with such concerns as the economy and race relations. “Kids are like sponges—they pick all of our societal woes up,” Fremont said. She also sees the effects of social media and the proliferation of cell phones among younger crowds as stressors. “Now there’s no end to bullying because it continues on the phone,” she said. “You don’t just come home at 3 p.m. after school and the bullying ends. It can be midnight and you can be bullied even though you’re not at school.” She said social media platforms have a tendency to showcase the uninterrupted highlights of others’ lives or a distortion of reality, thereby perpetuating stereotypes of what girls and boys should act or look like and causing drops in self-esteem when comparisons are made with the profile pages on a timeline. On the brighter side, Fremont said the stigma attached to mental health is slowly eroding, in part due to the heightened presence of

PH I L ANTH ROPY EDITION


19

therapists on school grounds and the underscoring of self-care in the workplace. However, along with suggestions to buck up and notions that such problems are “all in one’s head,” she said there are still insurance companies that don’t treat mental health issues the same way they treat physical ailments and injuries. “If you have your appendix out or break an arm, insurance will cover for it, but if you have anxiety, some will cover five visits maybe depending on the policy,” Fremont said. “There’s huge discrimination with health insurance policies.” She said measures can be taken on one’s own time to work on better-ing their mental health through meditation and exercise, but she said professional help from a therapist is akin to personal training as long as overmedication is avoided. The fine-tuning resulting from therapy can come from relaying self-soothing skills to those with trauma and coping skills to someone on the verge of a meltdown, she said. “The therapist helps you to put words to your feelings and understand where they’re coming from so that you don’t act out on them,” Fremont said. When it comes to giving back and embracing her passion as a psychiatrist, Fremont said she finds a rewarding and humbling aspect in witnessing the “resiliency” and smiles of the kids she treats. SWM

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAG.COM


20

WISE WOMAN FEATURED ENTREPRENEUR

NOVEM BER 2022

PH I L ANTH ROPY EDITION


21

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAG.COM


22

NOVEM BER 2022

PH I L ANTH ROPY EDITION


23

COVER STORY

LAURA HAND

Using her platform for good Norah Machia

L

aura Hand had always believed she could use her position as a broadcast journalist to shed a positive light on the Syracuse community and all it had to offer. During her 47-year career as a reporter and anchor at NBC 3 and CNY Central News, “I saw my job as giving a voice to people and groups who were doing good things, but didn’t have a place to tell their stories,” she said. “I was never at a loss for having people who wanted to come through the door and talk.” Laura built a reputation for inviting guests with a variety of different backgrounds to speak about the issues in their communities, and how they were working to address them. “I didn’t just report the news, I really became friends with several of those people,” she said. She tackled topics such as domestic violence, mental illness, grief and loss, and gambling addiction. Local firefighters talked with her about safety issues, and members of the 174th Tactical Fighter Wing spoke about their organization’s mission. Continued on page 24

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAG.COM


24

COVER STORY

Using her platform for good from page 23 “I wanted to bring as many guests as possible into the studio to share their stories,” and provide information about their positive efforts to offer programs and services to the community, she said. At the same time, Laura helped to publicize fund-raising events, heritage festivals, road races, parades and many other activities held throughout Central New York. An animal lover, Laura also hosted a pet adoption segment each week. Laura was the first female reporter hired at WSTM-TV, an NBC affiliate station. Her first day at the station was Election Day in 1972, the year Richard Nixon defeated George McGovern in the presidential election. She held numerous positions at the television station, including reporter, anchor, and community relations director. Laura produced the popular “Weekend’s Best Bets” and “The Weekend Ahead” segments, and later maintained the CNY Central “In Your Community” web events calendar. The top-ranked television segments were popular “because people really wanted to see what was going on in the community,” and often made their weekend plans based on that televised information, she said. During those early years, social media didn’t exist as a resource for publicity, she noted. When she was first hired, Laura worked as the anchor for the 6 p.m. and 11 p.m. newscasts. The earlier broadcast was typically produced by others, and “I was there to put a face to the newscast,” she said. Laura was the only nighttime reporter at the station, and it was her job to develop stories for the 11 p.m. broadcast. “I did an original story every night, and I had to dig deep,” she said. “I really got to know the community.” “But if there was a major breaking news story, I would be diverted,” added Laura. During her broadcast journalism career, she covered many important news stories throughout the Central New York region. She vividly recalls interviewing Nancy Reagan, after managing to secure an interview with the former First Lady following a speaking engagement held at the Syracuse Hancock International Airport. After the other journalists left, Laura asked Mrs. Reagan if she would do an interview with her crew, and she readily agreed. Laura also had the opportunity to interview former New York State Governor Nelson Rockefeller. In 1993, Laura reported on the Tully mudslide, where she found a vantage point to stand safely in the mud while watching state police pull homeowners off their roofs to safety. “Those were the days before live trucks,” she said. “We’re talking film, not tapes. We had to get back to the station by 9 p.m. to edit the film before it could air on the 11 p.m. newscast.” Laura is the first to admit that it’s “uncommon” in the television news business for one person to stay at the same station for 47 years. “No one usually lasts that long,” she said. “But I was always able to produce my own content. I knew the important issues because I was in touch with the community.” She was from a generation of reporters who made daily “physical rounds” to talk with sources at the police station,

NOVEM BER 2022

the mayor’s office, and other key locations, Laura noted. “It was basic journalism, but it was good journalism,” she said. In 1994, she was appointed the station’s community relations director, and oversaw the internship and career fair programs at local schools. In that role, Laura was also responsible for filing required Federal Communications Commission (FCC) reports to document how the station was addressing some of the most pressing issues in the community. Laura established a library reading program called “Book Breaks” that brought television staff into the public libraries for more than 30 years to read to children during the summer months. Although she signed off the air for the last time in 2019, Laura has not slowed down. She continues to be a strong community advocate, and her commitment to helping others is reflected in her busy volunteer schedule. Laura has continued her dedication to library programs, but she has a different type of companion accompanying her these days. She brings Moose, her child therapy dog, along on her visits. Moose, a 15-pound Pomeranian, became therapy-certified through the PAWS (Pet Assisted Wellness Services) organization of Central New York. When she first adopted the rescue dog, “I realized she needed a job,” said Laura. Laura has taken Moose with her to several different libraries and daycare centers. “She has a calming effect on the children,” she said, and added the visits allow her the opportunity to teach children how to safely interact with a dog. They have done programs together at the Onondaga Free Library, the Paine Branch Library in Eastwood, and the Salvation Army Day Care. Laura primarily works with 3- and 4-year-olds. She takes advantage of Moose’s charms to help keep the children’s interest when teaching them about letters, numbers and colors. “The dog is the answer,” Laura said. “The kids see the dog, and they pay attention.”

PH I L ANTH ROPY EDITION


25

Laura now volunteers with PAWS to help certify other dogs. “We’re looking for more volunteers to go through the training with their own dogs,” she added. Moose accompanied Laura to the recent Syracuse Mets “Bark in the Park” event held at the NBT Bank Stadium She and Moose lead the pre-game parade on the field, where she also helped judge nearly 100 dogs for various awards. Laura also volunteers for the Oasis Senior Education Program, sponsored by Upstate Medical University. She gives her time to serve as a technical assistant for the Italian language classes. Laura learned to speak Italian as a child, when she spent many summers with her mother’s relatives in Italy. Although she is retired, Laura is often called upon to help promote different community events. During the past New York State Fair, she was asked to volunteer as a judge in the milkshake contest. Laura also gives her time to help fund-raise for different nonprofit organizations, including Hope for the Bereaved, which offers support groups and other services to those who have lost a loved one. When she is not giving her time in the community, Laura can be found volunteering in her neighborhood during the warmer months. An avid gardener, she maintains several gardens located in the medians of her neighborhood roads. As a child, Laura grew up in many places throughout the world and the United States because her father served in the military and was often transferred. Born in Virginia, Laura lived with her family in England, Germany, Thailand and Italy. Continued on page 26

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAG.COM


26

COVER STORY

Using her platform for good from page 25 Laura enrolled in Syracuse University to study news and politics, graduating in 1971. She was the first female director of the campus radio station, WAER, and recalls covering the anti-war protests by students that resulted in cancelled classes for two days. After graduation, she decided to stay in Syracuse because “it’s such a great place to work and raise a family,” said Laura, who has two adult children. “I’ve never lived in one place for very long until I came to Syracuse,” Laura said. “It’s just been wonderful.” SWM

HERE ARE JUST SOME OF LAURA’S AWARDS: Hope for the Bereaved Award for being a founder of the Butterfly Garden of Hope at Onondaga Lake Park The Onondaga Kennel Association Award for her support of animals The Central New York Firefighter’s Association Fire Services Journalism Award Community Action Network for Exceptional Merit Award to WSTM-TV for its “Feed the Hungry” segments Award for Outstanding Support from the 174th Tactical Fighter Wing The Gentile Advocacy Award from National Alliance on Mental Illness Syracuse Chapter for Mental Health Reporting The CNY Business Journal Nonprofit Award for Career Achievement

“I’ve never lived in one place for very long until I came to Syracuse, it’s just been wonderful.” —Laura Hand

NOVEM BER 2022

PH I L ANTH ROPY EDITION


27

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAG.COM


28

SPECIAL FEATURE

Sweetening the deal

HOME COOKIE BUSINESS SHOWS ATTENTION TO DETAIL Jason Klaiber

NOVEM BER 2022

PH I L ANTH ROPY EDITION


29

B

ack when Sarah Germain was involved in the news business, it tended to be unpredictable what slate of stories would come her way day to day. But now that the East Syracuse resident has made the switch to cookie making on a full-time basis, she’s kept on her toes by the various types of dessert orders she’s entrusted with by her loyal customers. Formerly a senior producer in charge of a live, late afternoon cable news program, Germain began dabbling in baking as an outside-of-work hobby that doubled as her creative outlet. As she practiced, she tested out her recipes by sharing them with her colleagues in the newsroom, but eventually she decided to depart from her career in local television news to focus on her passion and officially start a household bakery out of her kitchen called Salt City Sugar. In the summer of 2020, at the onset of the pandemic, she had her first order to fill when she took up the task of making a box of cookies for a neighbor’s bridal shower. “I was nervous, but I was like, ‘You know what, I’m just gonna go for it,’ and then it kind of just picked up quickly from there,” Germain said.

Her foundational forte from the beginning has been a classic sugar cookie with royal icing and a thin, soft consistency. “I’m not a fan of a really hard cookie,” she said. “I feel like sugar cookies can sometimes get a bad rap for being too sweet or hard as a rock. That’s not what I’m going for.” After meeting New York State’s home processing guidelines and maintaining patience through the “time-consuming” drying stage, Germain applies hand-mixed coloring, intricate designs and a metallic shine to the smooth cookie surfaces. Since she mostly sticks to bringing the customized ideas of others to fruition with a sprinkle of creative freedom, Germain’s resume is already brimming with a wide range of designs just two years into Salt City Sugar’s operation. The themes have included ones referencing TV series like “Sesame Street,” “Grey’s Anatomy” and “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” as well as cookies that pull inspiration from the invitations and party decor for wedding receptions and birthday parties. Others are decorated with holidays like Halloween and Thanksgiving in mind. Earlier this month, for example, she made about seven dozen pumpkin-shaped sugar cookies on an assembly line and with extra Continued on page 30

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAG.COM


30

SPECIAL FEATURE

Sweetening the deal from page 29 dough she carved out time to prepare a batch of samples based on the newly released movie “Hocus Pocus 2,” all of which sold out a matter of minutes after she posted a notification online for the flash sale. Germain artistically layers the details of her freshly baked creations with either a freehand approach or a guided projector that casts specialty text onto the cookies. To bring the illustrations to life, she uses an airbrush for heightened definition and shading, viewing each cut-out shape as a canvas. When the baking process is completed, she bags and heat seals the sets of cookies and photographs them, capturing a memory to look back on for anyone who thinks their purchased treats are too pretty to eat. To preserve a separation of business and her private life even with an in-home bakery, Germain runs the orders out to customers who pop in the driveway and hands off the sweets with a hello and a quick chat. Lately Salt City Sugar has booked requests a month or more in advance, with some single orders amounting to a count of 16 dozen. “I’m a one-woman show, so that’s a lot of cookies,” Germain said. When it comes time for pick-up, Germain checks with customers’ availability and arranges to connect with them at her residence near the Fremont neighborhood or another decided-upon location. She said she hopes to bring her frosted sugar cookies to festivals in the future in addition to selling them at interested cafes and hosting pop-up events. To get to know her customer base better, she also plans to offer and personally instruct paint-your-own-cookie classes. More information on the business can be found by visiting saltcitysugar.weebly.com, where an inquiry form streamlines the ordering process. The bakery can also be contacted with a message to its Facebook and Instagram pages or an email to Salt.City.Sugar315@ gmail.com. SWM Submitted photos For the past two years, Sarah Germain has operated Salt City Sugar out of her East Syracuse home. The business’ decorated sugar cookies have been tied to themes such as Halloween and space travel.

NOVEM BER 2022

PH I L ANTH ROPY EDITION


31

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAG.COM


32

FOR A GOOD CAUSE

A helping hand where it's needed most

LOCAL RED CROSS VOLUNTEER ASSISTS WITH HURRICANE IAN RECOVERY

Kate Hill

E

arlier this month, Cazenovia resident Anne Saltman returned from Florida, where she worked with the American Red Cross on its hurricane recovery efforts. Saltman, a Red Cross volunteer, was recruited on Sept. 26 for a two-week deployment to Orlando in preparation for a massive hurricane expected to make landfall on the west coast of Florida. With just 24 hours to pack and prepare, she set out to join a group of volunteers tasked with caring for an influx of homeless families at a Red Cross shelter. Saltman explained that she joined the Red Cross after researching the effects of climate change and deciding she wanted to help families impacted by strong storm events. “After several months of coursework and planning, this would be my first deployment,” said Saltman, who was deployed as a mass care/ sheltering service associate. “As I packed my red and white Red Cross vest, I felt confident, well-prepared, eager to help, and proud to be associated with a well-respected humanitarian organization.”

Saltman described the Orlando airport as bustling with anxious families trying to leave before the storm’s arrival and soldiers, electricians, road crews, and others headed into the area as first responders. All the hotels in the region were at full capacity, filled with families seeking safety. Many of the hotel employees, however, had left the city. As a result, her hotel had limited meal options that were served on paper plates with plastic utensils. Saltman recalled that the hotel

NOVEM BER 2022

halls were busy with anxious guests, many of whom had brought their dogs; one man arrived with five. To distract the hotel’s younger guests, a large ballroom was made available as a play area. According to the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service, Hurricane Ian made landfall near Cayo Costa in southwestern Florida on Sept. 28 as “a dangerous, high-end Category 4 storm after plowing a path of destruction

through the Caribbean, bringing particularly heavy rainfall and dangerous surf to Jamaica, the Cayman Islands, and western Cuba. After crossing over the Florida peninsula, where it had weakened to a tropical storm, it strengthened again over the water to a Category 1 hurricane and made a second landfall near Georgetown, South Carolina.” The hurricane hit the Orlando area with what Saltman described as a relentless howling wind, thunder, lightning and pounding

PH I L ANTH ROPY EDITION


33

rain that continued throughout the day and night. Several hurricane, tornado, and flood alerts appeared on her phone. Her hotel was fortunately situated on high ground and relied on backup generators when the electricity flickered. Guests were advised to close their curtains and stay away from the windows while sheltering in place. “The storm’s 150 mile per hour winds and 12- to 14-foot storm surge had destroyed homes, overturned vehicles, and tossed boats like toys onto dry land,” Saltman said. “The level of destruction was overwhelming, and thousands of people were now left homeless.” Saltman said that once the weather had settled down, some hotel guests cautiously ventured outside, but they remained on lockdown until road crews removed uprooted trees and large piles of debris from the highways. “The Red Cross hit the ground running,” she said. “On Sept. 27, 1,600 people had sought refuge in 12 Red Cross and partner

shelters as the hurricane approached landfall. By the following night, more than 33,000 people had sought refuge in approximately 260 evacuation shelters throughout the affected area. Most of the residents were elderly and many were dealing with health challenges. In the previous 24 hours, they had lost everything they owned – homes, vehicles, jobs, and even family members.” From Oct. 1-4, Saltman worked with a team of volunteers at Red Cross shelters in Longwood and St. Cloud, FL. From Oct. 5-10, she worked at the Hertz Arena in Fort Myers, one of the hardest-hit communities in Southwest Florida. At the Hertz Arena, Saltman teamed up with seven other Red Cross volunteers from across the country to register new arrivals and provide cots, blankets, clothing, hot meals, water, and comfort to over 500 people. Her team worked side-by-side with nurses, social workers, security personnel, and federal, state and county agency

The Hertz Arena in Fort Myers, FL

representatives. Also present at the arena were staff members from a nearby animal shelter, who provided round-the-clock care to dogs and cats. Local restaurants sent mobile kitchens that pre-pared thousands of hot meals each day, large vans arrived to provide hot showers and laundry services, and “a steady stream” of Fort Myers residents stopped by daily to deliver donated clothing. Other Red Cross teams distributed on-site emergency shovels and clean-up kits, conducted assessments of damaged homes, and provided mental health counseling and spiritual care to traumatized victims. Volunteers with medical backgrounds helped the injured and worked with the local drugstore to replace prescription medications, medical equipment, and wheelchairs that had been lost in the storm. Saltman described her exper-

ience of Category 4 Hurricane Ian as humbling and remarked that working long hours at the Red Cross shelter was both physically challenging and emotionally stressful. “However, I learned a lot about human nature and resilience and was extremely thankful for an opportunity to help with the recovery,” she said. “I remain forever grateful to the Red Cross and for my many blessings of family and friends.” The American Red Cross shelters, feeds, and provides comfort to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; distributes international humanitarian aid; and supports veterans, military members, and their families. The Red Cross is a non-profit humanitarian organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of donors to deliver its mission. Volunteers make up 90 percent of the Red Cross workforce and help respond to an average of more than 60,000 disasters every year. To learn more about the Red Cross hurricane recovery efforts, donations, and volunteer opportunities, visit redcross.org. SWM Anne Saltman, Cazenovia resident, recently spent two weeks in Florida assisting the American Red Cross with its hurricane recovery efforts. Photos courtesy the Red Cross.

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAG.COM


34

NOVEM BER 2022

PH I L ANTH ROPY EDITION


HEALTHY EATING EATING HEALTHY

35

Holiday traditions around the table Chef Eric Rose

T

he fall and winter holidays are full of cultural traditions typically centered around kitchen table. These traditions usually have memorable histories to them tracing back generations. One of my favorite holiday traditions growing up was making fresh gnocchi as a family. We all took turns kneading the dough, shaping, cutting and forking them. It was a family affair. Do you have a favorite holiday tradition centered around the table? Do you know the history of that tradition? Have you ever asked questions to learn about your family traditions and how they started? Typically, there are often foods and dishes that are only brought out at the holidays, so this is a perfect opportunity to ask questions. It’s also a great time to share memories with your family. At your table what are the special dishes that are served? Do you have the family recipes? Have you actually made them? (Often, relatives don’t make the dish exactly the way the recipe is written. Making the dish with the relative is often the best way to get the “real scoop.”)

I have personally never been able to make meatballs like my mother, and my kids remind me of that. Her handful of this and a pinch of that seems to be much different than mine. Oh… and my favorite is her Italian Wedding Soup (recipe included). Although mine is awesome, it doesn’t exactly taste like hers. I guess I will keep trying to master it. It’s so important that you take the time to ask questions and even get the recipes and make the holiday dishes — because we all know that at some point that special cook or baker will no longer be with us, or relationships and

situations will eventually change. Just like when a new couple gets together and are challenged to blend or create their own new traditions. This can be both sad and exciting as it is both a give and a take. For most people, holiday food equals love. Holiday food traditions are not only appealing because of all the nostalgia, but also because they include the foods we may eat only once a year. But food-centric traditions can be isolating for some people. They can also be overwhelming. One of the best things we have ever done — and now a new family tradition — is to invite someone Continued on page 36

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAG.COM


36

HEALTHY EATING

Pumpkin Holiday traditions spice andaround everything the table nice from frompage page35 35 As an acclaimed health coach and chef, I get asked all the time about different squashes and how to best use them. Below are a few of the questions that seem to continuously be asked:

What is your favorite squash?

This is a toss-up between Delicata and Butternut squash. Butternut squash is quite a bit more versatile; it sautés quickly and is especially delicious when roasted. Best of all, it mashes and purees smoothly, with no thick strands or fibrous bits, making it perfect to turn into a luscious soup.

What nutrients are in pumpkin and most winter squashes?

Pumpkins and winter squashes are packed with nutrients, especially beta-carotene and fiber. Our bodies use beta carotene to produce vitamin A. In fact, a half cup of pumpkin provides 200 percent of the current recommendation for vitamin A, along with lutein and zeaxanthin, which are pigments that promote eye health. They are rich in potassium, which helps our muscles contract and nerves fire. Pumpkin and winter squashes are low in calories.

What are some good ways to prepare or eat?

They can be used in a wide variety of creative ways beyond the typical pumpkin pie and roasted squash. Try pumpkin soup or pumpkin hummus. Add some pumpkin puree to pasta sauce or chili. Sweeten pumpkin with some honey and create a pumpkin parfait by layering yogurt with honey-sweetened pumpkin. You also can use pumpkin to substitute for part of the fat in baked goods such as brownies.

Does it make a difference if you start fresh and cook the pumpkin yourself or use canned or processed pumpkin? Both canned and fresh pumpkin are very nutritious. Canned

pumpkin offers one-step convenience; simply open the can and use. “Sugar pumpkins” are smaller, rounder pumpkins that can be used for cooking purposes, and they differ in their texture from the pumpkins used to make jack-o’-lanterns. Fresh pumpkin can be baked/cooked and used in the same way you would use canned pumpkin. Freshly cooked pumpkin often will have a lighter color and a texture more like sweet potatoes. Canned pumpkin usually has a stronger pumpkin flavor and results in a pie with a firmer, smoother texture. Pumpkin is pulverized before commercial canning to give it a uniformly smooth texture; however, we do not have an approved (safe) method for canning mashed pumpkin at home.

Pumpkin spice is a popular (and delicious) fall flavor. What spices are usually in it?

Pumpkin spice is a blend of cinnamon, nutmeg, ground ginger, ground allspice and cloves. You can make your own blend at home or purchase ready-to-use pumpkin pie spice. Many recipes to make your own pumpkin spice blend are available online.

Sausage and Delicata Squash Galett by Eric Rose Serves 6-8 Ingredients

18 oz Delicata squash 2 cups of mild, cooked sausage 2 Tbsp unsalted butter, divided 2 Tbsp maple syrup, divided Arugula for garnish ¼ tsp cinnamon Instructions 2 sheets of ready-made 1. Preheat the oven to 400˚F. shortcrust pastry 2. Cut the squash in half lengthwise ¼ cup blueberries 4 oz honey goat cheese crumble and scoop out the seeds and pulp. Cut each half into relatively thin half-circles. 3. Melt 1 Tbsp of the butter and mix with 1 Tbsp of the maple syrup and cinnamon. Lay the squash slices out in a single layer on a baking sheet. Drizzle over the butter-maple mixture, toss gently then roast for approx. 20 minutes until the squash is tender but not quite browning. You can do this ahead of time if desired. 4. Cook and drain sausage crumble. 5. Roll out the pastry on a lightly floured surface into a circle. Lay the squash slices on the pastry, leaving a rim around the edge to fold in slightly but only slightly cover on top. Sprinkle over the sausage crumble and blueberries. Melt the rest of the butter, mix with the remaining 1 Tbsp maple syrup and drizzle over the filling. 6. Fold in the sides of the pastry, making slight folds as you go, then bake for approx. 20 min until gently browned. 7. Garnish with goat cheese and Arugula.

Rose Health Chicken Mulligatawny Soup by Eric Rose Serves 8 Ingredients

1 Tbsp olive oil 4 Tbsp butter 1 onion, chopped 1 inch piece of ginger root, minced 1 celery stalk, chopped 1 small carrot, diced

AUGUSTBER NOVEM 2022 2022

PH I LEDUC ANTHATION ROPY EDITION


37 who is lonesome or in need to dinner, as well as donate groceries to a few families. Holidays can be so much more rewarding when you make them not about you but about others, and not about presents but about acts of kindness. Plus, think of the lessons witnessed by the younger ones. It’s such a great time to step outside yourself and do something you wouldn’t do any other time—like invite a deserving guest to holiday dinner. Here are five reasons why this is a good idea: • Demonstrate kindness: Here’s the obvious one, even if it bears repeating. Inviting someone into your home is a nice thing to do, regardless of the circumstances. This holiday is not about gifts, football, fireworks, costumes, or parades – but about simple human connection and a breaking bread with other people. • Provide a welcome family buffer: If the warm fuzzies aren’t enough of a reason, consider this: What family is going to break out into its yearly argument about politics when there is an unfamiliar presence at the table? Aunt Agnes might limit her whiskey to just two glasses, and the kids will be on their best behavior. In short, it might just be the most civil, calm family dinner you’ve had in years. • Broaden your social circle: If you’ve been meaning to get to know Nurse Marly from 3rd floor a little bit better and overheard that she’s not going home for the holiday, it’s a perfect time to put yourself out there and initiate a relationship — platonic or otherwise. Make something happen that could turn out mutually beneficial to both of you. • Model behavior: If you’re looking for a good teaching moment, the holiday meal is a prime opportunity. Your kids can see what it feels like to offer your home to others during special occasions. They might even hear a story that lets them know how good they have it. • Stave off your own loneliness: You yourself might need a little company if you don’t plan to head to a family member or friend’s home. Gather together a bunch of other people and make an event of it. It’ll beat eating a frozen meals or delivery on a tray in front of the television. If you are worried about all the work, go potluck as much as possible. After you’ve done it once, maybe you’ll get addicted to the gesture and make it a recurring event throughout the year. It’s crazy how this small gesture can create such a huge impact not only on the person provided for but the family that served. Easy recipes for any holiday:

Ingredients (Soup): 1 Tbsp olive oil Italian Wedding Soup 1 c. 1/4-inch diced carrots By: Chef Eric Rose 1 c. diced yellow onion Serves 6-8 1 c. ¼-inch diced celery Ingredients (Meatballs): 4 cloves garlic, minced (1 ½ Tbsp) 8 oz lean ground beef 9 c. low-sodium chicken broth 8 oz mild Italian sausage ½ c. fresh hearty white breadcrumbs 1 c. dry acini de pepe 6 oz fresh spinach or escarole, ¼ c. chopped fresh parsley chopped 1 ½ tsp minced fresh oregano Pinch of thyme ½ c. finely shredded parmesan Pinch crushed red pepper 1 large egg Salt and pepper to taste Salt & freshly ground black pepper Finely shredded parmesan, for serving 1 Tbsp olive oil Directions (Meatballs): 1. Add beef and sausage to large mixing bowl. Add breadcrumbs, parsley, oregano, parmesan, egg, 1 tsp salt and ¼ tsp pepper. 2. Gently toss and break up mixture with hands to evenly coat and distribute. Shape mixture into very small meatballs, about 3/4" to 1 inch and transfer to a large plate. 3. Heat 1 Tbsp olive oil in a large non-stick skillet over medium-high heat. Add half of the meatballs and cook until browned, turning occasionally (to brown on 2 or 3 sides), about 4 minutes total. 4. Transfer meatballs to a plate lined with paper towels while leaving oil in skillet. Repeat process with remaining meatballs (note that meatballs won't be cooked through at this point, they'll continue to cook through in the soup). Directions (Soup): 5. While meatballs are browning, heat 1 Tbsp olive oil in a large pot over medium-high heat. Add carrots, onions and celery and sauté until veggies have softened, about 6 - 8 minutes; add garlic and sauté 1 minute longer. 6. Pour in chicken broth, season soup with thyme, red pepper flakes, and salt and pepper to taste. Bring mixture to a boil. Add in pasta and meatballs, reduce heat to light boil (about medium or medium-low). 7. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally until pasta is tender and meatballs have cooked through, about 10 minutes, while adding in spinach during the last minute of cooking. Serve warm, sprinkling each serving with parmesan cheese.

Brussel Sprouts Butternut Squash/ Dried Cranberries/Toasted Pecans By: Chef Eric Rose Serves 6-8

Ingredients: 2 Tbsp olive oil, divided 3 c. Brussels sprouts, ends trimmed, 3 Tbsp maple syrup sliced in half ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon 3 Tbsp olive oil, divided 1 c. pecan halves, coarsely chopped ½ teaspoon salt ½ c. dried cranberries 1 ½ pounds butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and cubed into 1" cubes (4 cups) 2-4 Tbspmaple syrup (optional) Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400˚ F. 2. In a medium bowl, combine halved Brussels sprouts, 2 tablespoons of olive oil, salt, and toss to combine. Place onto baking sheet, cut side down and roast for about 20-25 minutes. 3. During the last 5-10 minutes of roasting, turn them over for even browning. 4. To prepare butternut squash, spray another sheet pan with cooking spray. In a medium bowl, combine cubed butternut squash (peeled and seeded), 1 Tbsp of olive oil, maple syrup, and cinnamon; toss to mix. 5. Place butternut squash in a single layer on baking sheet. Bake for 20-25 minutes, turning once half-way through baking, until softened. 6. In a large bowl, combine roasted Brussels sprouts, roasted butternut squash, pecans, and cranberries, and mix to combine. For more sweetness, add 2-4 Tbsp of maple syrup, if desired.

Spatchcock Chicken By: Chef Eric Rose Serves 6

Roasted Spatchcock Chicken (removing the backbone and flattening) is the answer to the ultimate juicy bird. Both dark and white meat will cook quicker and more evenly. Ingredients: 1 (5lb.) whole chicken 4 garlic cloves, chopped 1 tsp kosher salt ¾ tsp black pepper 6 Tbsp (3 oz.) salted butter, softened 1 Tbsp chopped fresh thyme 3 Tbsp apricot or peach preserves Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 450°F. Rinse chicken, pat dry. Place chicken, breast side down, on a cutting board. Using poultry shears, cut along both sides of backbone and remove backbone. (Discard or reserve for stock.) Turn chicken breast side up and open the underside of chicken like a book. Using the heel of your hand, press firmly against breastbone until it cracks. Place chicken in a large baking pan. Tuck wing tips under chicken so they don't burn. 2. Combine garlic and salt on a cutting board. Using the flat edge of a knife, mash into a paste. Combine garlic salt, butter, thyme, and pepper in a bowl. Set aside 2 tablespoons of the garlic mixture. Rub remaining garlic mixture under skin of chicken breasts and thighs. Then add preserves to remaining butter mixture. 3. Bake chicken in preheated oven 10 minutes. Reduce heat to 400°F and bake 20 more minutes. Spread remaining butter preserve mixture on breasts; return to oven and bake until a meat thermometer inserted in thickest portion registers 165°F, about 20 minutes. Let rest 10 minutes. Carve chicken and serve.

Chef Eric Rose is an award-winning chef and health coach.

Let Us Host Your Visiting Family!

1854 Farmhouse Stay

Quiet Countryside Getaway in Cazenovia NY Complimentary Package with Reservation www.redfoxrunbb.com

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAG.COM


38

INSPIRE

SHARYE SKINNER

NOVEM BER 2022

PH I L ANTH ROPY EDITION


39

Affecting social change with faith and fearlessness Kate Hanzalik

W

hen Sharye Skinner was a child, she woke up every Christmas to see a tree that had very few presents beneath it. For many children, this would be disappointing. But to Skinner, the daughter of a successful textile executive, it has been a blessing, a lesson in understanding her privileged life and deciding what to do with it. So what did the girl who never wanted for anything do with her privilege? She has made it her life’s work to support those in need. Now, at 72, the Cazenovia resident has either volunteered or worked for numerous organizations and affected change on some of the issues that matter most to her–anti-war, inclusion, women’s empowerment, the arts, child welfare, and voting rights. Her Protestant faith has guided her down this path of serving others. “It’s been part of my life my whole life,” she said. “So I’ve never known what it’s like not to have a relationship with Christ, and not to live in fear, and to know that He’s with me.” In the 1960s, she fearlessly took a carload of people to Washington D.C. to protest the Vietnam War. She got arrested and thrown into a patty wagon with all men, but she considers this one of her proudest moments. In 1976, she joined The Junior League, an organization that helped her to hone her skills with leadership, civic engagement, and community service. By the 1980s, she was attending the Maxwell School of Citizenship at Syracuse University and working at the YWCA as a grant writer to obtain funding for school-aged childcare. Meanwhile, she hosted a talk show about women’s issues on cable TV called “Perspectives.” Over the years, Skinner has supported Planned Parenthood and other women’s empowerment organizations. She is a longtime member of Portfolio Club, one of the oldest Women’s Study groups in the United States founded in 1875. Skinner’s first research paper for Portfolio was on the Oneida Land Claim. With all of her skills, knowledge, and experience, she is committed to advocating for the rights of marginalized people and tries to make everyone feel welcome. In 2014, she and other members of the Presbytery of Cayuga-Syracuse brought forth a motion to redefine the definition of marriage to be between two persons who love each other. A few years ago, she discovered Cazenovia Welcomes Refugees through her church, First Presbyterian, and wanted to contribute. She helped find housing in the Village of Cazenovia for families from Iraq and Afghanistan. “Now the family from Iraq has permanent housing, and they can apply for citizenship,” she said. One of the initiatives that has been especially rewarding for her is working with Cazenovia Counterpoint, a month long celebration of the art and music in Caz, a program of Society for New Music. One program is called Young Composers Workshop, where kids attend a week-long music workshop, create their compositions and

then perform at Lakeland Park. Another is called Rising Stars, where teenagers perform classical and new music. Many times the Rising Stars play their own compositions. Many times they perform a premier performance work with the composer in the audience. “It is so special to see the face of the composer filled with such joy”. Over the years, she has met a lot of people that inspire her, including Rachael whom she met through Caz Counterpoint’s Young Composer class. “Rachel is 100 percent blind and has perfect pitch,” she said. “She is such a positive person. She always has a smile on her face, instead of saying, ‘Why, Lord, did you make me blind?” Skinner is also inspired by artist and philanthropist Dorothy Riester who founded Stone Quarry Art Park. Riester had a reputation for her generosity, for pushing boundaries, and rethinking the possibilities for art. “What a wonderful vision she had to set that land aside,” she said. “[Stone Quarry Art Park] is such an important part of our community.” Today, one of Skinner’s priorities is to encourage young people in the area to vote. She is currently the Chair of Voter Services for the League of Women Voters in Cazenovia, and she’s leading an initiative to get young people more involved in democracy through voting. For those who are interested in volunteering but do not know where to start, she said, “Find an organization that can inspire you.” For those who are in need of inspiration to volunteer, “break out of your shell,” she said. “What is our purpose here?,” she encourages us to ask. “It’s not just to sit with our friends. There is nothing wrong with having beautiful things, but if that’s all that you’re doing with your money, there’s a lot more you can do. When you give money to a good cause, you know you are helping somebody and making the world better,” she said. “Money doesn’t buy happiness, but it can go a long way to make people’s lives better.” Reflecting on life in 2022 America, Skinner said she is troubled by mounting social problems and the widening divides in our country, particularly the growth of movements that weaponize faith as a political instrument. “This movement has taken the word Christian but is not doing what Christ asked us to do: ‘Do justice, love mercy, and walk humbly with the Lord.’” In the face of these social divides, Skinner has courageously and graciously found small steps to take that have made a huge difference in the lives of many people. She is grateful for her life and her ability to affect change. “I wake up with the beautiful sun coming up and the peace and quiet. I thank the Lord that I live in this community and in this country,” she said. SWM

“Do justice, love mercy, and walk humbly with the Lord.”—Micah 6:8 SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAG.COM


40

INSPIRE

CHRISTINA McNEELY

NOVEM BER 2022

PH I L ANTH ROPY EDITION


41

Putting her life experience to work Alyssa Dearborn

A

lthough Christine McNeely has been the new executive director of the Chadwick Residence for only four months, she looks forward to furthering the Chadwick Residence’s mission of helping women move past homelessness to live successful lives. Before becoming the executive director of the Chadwick Residence, Christine was the executive director for the Humane Association of Central New York for over eight years. She has a background in healthcare and social services and she would eventually find herself wanting to return to her passion for human services. During the height of COVID, she re-evaluated her life and decided that she wanted to spend more time with her family and return to her roots in human services. “I kind of really settled on that it was time to return to directing,” Christine said about her transition back into non-profit directing. “I really was interested in Chadwick and I was interested in their mission. And I was interested in the fact that previously I’ve been a single mother more than once. As a single parent, I worked my way through school and had some hiccups along the way. And I really felt like this was a great organization [where] not only could I lead with my skill set and my talent and my expertise, but also, I felt like I belonged here. I have a history similar to a lot of the ladies that we help here.” Having a similar background to some of the women receiving support has helped Christine better understand how to help the residents. “We receive a variety of women from a variety of backgrounds and situations,” she said. “Everybody that does come into our program comes in homeless through one of the shelter programs or through one of the local domestic violence programs. And we are able to bring them into one of our two different programs.” “Right now,” Christine continued, “we’re seeing a really big influx of women who are currently in a mental health crisis. It’s beyond, at this point, being diagnosed and treated. A lot of the ladies that we’re coming across have no service providers, they have no health-care assistance, there’s no therapy happening, no medication. We’re recognizing that there’s a huge issue with mental health in our immediate area and it’s making it a lot harder for some of our women to be successful. That’s probably the biggest issue right now facing our community and what we’re getting so many people in.” The Chadwick Residence has two programs that address different needs. There’s a permanent support housing program where residents live independently offsite and receive assistance from a caseworker. And there’s an in-house program where residents live onsite and receive services and learn life skills. “So we have the two programs.” Christine explained, “There’s the permanent support housing program and we have case managers that ensure that all of their needs are met so they can be successful…

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

We would step in and assist with making sure that you’re getting your prescriptions filled, regularly following up with doctors, things like that. Making sure they have gainful employment so they can pay their utility bills. Things of that nature. Then the inhouse program, it’s more of a single room and they would share a bathroom and a kitchen area. And they can live in this program up to two years. So that’s the program that we would assist them with life skills. And we do have single women that come and live, but we also do have moms and children as well.” Christine elaborated on the variety of life skills taught in the in-house program. “Cooking, cleaning, maintaining a household, learning how to pay bills. Making sure that we have transportation set up for getting back and forth to employment, or getting children back and forth to school,” she said. “And then we do help a lot with hands-on parenting skills. We end up with quite a few ladies that stay with us that are actually working on reuniting with their children. And we do assist with ensuring that they’re on the right path to make that happen.” When asked how individuals interested in the programs can get help from the Chadwick Residence, Christine emphasized that it’s important for them to follow through on the program’s requirements. “So, they can always call and we can help direct them to where they need to go.” She replied when asked what women seeking help should do, “But the way that people come into our program is directly through the shelter program. So to get a direct referral for our program, everyone must come from a shelter. Always reach out to us directly and we can give direction on how to best get into our program. Or they can call 211 and get referred that way. But once they’re here, it’s a great program. We just wish that we could get more ladies to follow through with the requirements to get here.” Christine is still at the beginning of her work with the Chadwick Residence, but she wants to prepare for the organization’s future with increased fundraising and more community engagement. “We’d like to get out into the community more. But I did come from an organization where we had an operating budget of half a million dollars and every single dollar was individually fundraised. And [at Chadwick Residence], there’s very little fundraising. We need to get out into the community. I would like to start introducing us to corporations and things like that. We’ve been here for like 50-ish years and a lot of people don’t really know about us. And we really kind of want to get out there more so that we’ll not just be able to help more people, we’ll also benefit by people knowing about us.” If you are interested in finding work opportunities, collaborating, or sponsoring a resident as a “Holiday Angel” with the Chadwick Residence, Christine McNeely would like to hear from you. You can email her at christinem@chadwickresidence.org. SWM

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAG.COM


42

NOVEM BER 2022

PH I L ANTH ROPY EDITION


43

ALICE PATTERSON FULL PAGE AD

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAG.COM


44

UPCOMING EVENTS Saturday, Nov. 5

Friday, Nov. 11 to Sunday, Nov. 13

What: The 15th annual CNY Veterans Parade and Expo offers the community the opportunity to both recognize veterans' service, and to highlight organizations in the community that offer resources. The 90-minute long parade features more than 70 veterans and military organizations from throughout Central New York and beyond. When: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Parade steps off at noon. Where: The NYS Fairgrounds 581 State Fair Blvd, Syracuse, NY 13209 Info: cnyveteransparade.org

What: Join for the Junior League of Syracuse’s three-day shopping extravaganza featuring over 100 artisans and merchants. Where: The NYS Fairgrounds, Horticulture Building 581 State Fair Blvd, Syracuse, NY 13209 When: Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Info: Buy tickets in person at Price Chopper or Topp’s. Buy tickets online at www.jlsyracuse.org

Veterans Parade and Expo

Sunday, Nov. 6

Silverwood Clarinet Choir Presents “Clarinet Colors”

What: A free concert featuring the many colors of the clarinet ensemble. The eleven-member Silverwood Clarinet Choir performs on clarinets encompassing all the voices of a true choir. Where: Fayetteville Free Library 300 Orchard St, Fayetteville, NY 13066 When: 1:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 6

Onondaga Civic Symphony concert

What: This concert features the amazing New World Symphony by Dvorak! Bassist Spencer Phillips will perform the Dragonetti concerto with the orchestra. “The Karelia Suite” by Sibelius is also on the program. Where: St. Marianne Cope/St. Cecilia Church 1001 Woods Rd, Syracuse, NY 13209 When: 3 p.m. Info: Admission available at the door is $15 ($10 seniors/students) Tuesday, Nov. 8

Election Day Spaghetti Supper

What: All proceeds will benefit the Parish Center Improvement Fund. Supper includes pasta, meatballs and/or sausage, salad, bread/butter, lemonade, coffee and dessert; $12 adults, $10 seniors (65 and older), $7 youth ages 5-12, free for children 4 and under. Eat in or take out. There will be a bake sale, music, basket raffles, 50/50 and a 65-inch TV grand raffle. No reservations required. All tickets purchased at the door. When: Noon to 7 p.m. Where: St. Francis of Assisi Parish 7820 Route 298, Bridgeport 13030 Info: For more information, call Donna or Frank Vavonese at 315-436-0038 Thursday, Nov. 10

Au Chocolat in Baldwinsville

What: Au Chocolat is Baldwinsville's annual holiday kick off event, featuring open houses at 17 specialty shops in the village, trolley rides, and of course, chocolate. Pick up an event passport at any of the specialty shops in town and get it stamped during Au Chocolat to win chances at several gift giveaways. When: 3 to 9 p.m. Where: Baldwinsville Info: Visit Au Chocolat on Facebook or Instagram

NOVEM BER 2022

27th Annual Holiday Shoppes

Saturday, Nov. 12

Holiday craft & vendor show

What: Hosted by the ESM Cosmetology Club, in past years the show have featured more than 200 booths. Food will be available. Where: ESM Central High School 6400 Fremont Rd, East Syracuse, NY 13057 When: 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info: Contact the Cosmetology Dept. at 315-434-3305 or email nplanty@esmschools.org Sunday, Nov. 13

Hope & Heels: Fashion Show and Brunch

What: Join Hope for Heather for an afternoon to benefit local ovarian cancer awareness. Enjoy fashion, vendors, brunch and cocktails, a silent auction and a celebration of survivors. Where: Marriott Syracuse Downtown 100 E Onondaga St Syracuse, NY 13202 When: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Info: Purchase tickets at www.hopeandheels.eventbrite.com Wednesday, Nov. 16

2022 YWCA Spirit of American Women Celebration

What: This evening event highlights the spirit, empowerment, and accomplishments of women and girls in Syracuse and Onondaga County. Where: 6301 NY-298, East Syracuse, NY 13057 When: 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Info: $100 per ticket. By tickets at www.eventbrite.com/o/ywca-of-syracuse-and-onondagacounty-8040985630 Thursday, Nov. 17

A Holiday Ladies Night

What: Join Welch & Co. Jewelers and Syracuse Woman Magazine for an evening of fun. Bring your friends and enjoy a special gift, door prizes, hors d’oeuvres and adult beverages. Where: 513 South Main Street (Rt. 11) North Syracuse, NY 13212 When: 4 to 8 p.m. Info: RSVP recommended. Call 315-452-0744 Saturday, Nov. 19 & Sunday Nov. 20

Salt City Holiday Antiques Show

What: Shop from 150 selected dealers selling , antiques, collectibles and vintage items. Where: The NYS Fairgrounds, Horticulture Building 581 State Fair Blvd, Syracuse, NY 13209 When: Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Info: Buy a day pass for $8 or a weekend pass for $9

PH I L ANTH ROPY EDITION


45

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAG.COM


46

MOVERS & SHAKERS

Empower hires DEI officer

Empower Federal Credit Union has hired Ebony King as its Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Officer. King will be responsible for the development, implementation, and oversight of the credit union's diversity, equity, and inclusion strategy. King has more than 16 years of experience in the field, most recently serving as the diversity and inclusion specialist for Office of Diversity and Inclusion (ODI) at Syracuse University. In this capacity she led and facilitated ODI diversity, equity, and inclusion training and workshops. King implemented the ODI workshop program and served as office liaison to campus departments, offices, committees, and programs. She also conducted diversity and inclusion presentations, facilitated dialogue on race and ethnicity and communicated with various programs throughout the university. Prior positions held: Director of Multicultural Engagement and Senior Director of Diversity and Inclusion, for Buena Vista University in Iowa. Ebony is from the Bronx. She received her bachelor’s degree in social work with a minor in psychology and a master’s degree in higher education administration, both from Syracuse University. King also received a diversity and inclusion certificate from Cornell University. She currently resides in Liverpool and enjoys movies, dancing, interior design and spending time with her miniature Dachshund, Coco. “We are excited to have Ebony join our team in the role of the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Officer”, said Senior Vice President/ Chief Administrative Officer Erin Fuller. “This new position is vital to the success of our company.”

Andrea has more than 40 years of experience in the nursing field and has been with Nascentia Health for the past seven years. She oversees the organization’s licensed home care services agency (LHCSA). In that role, she manages more than 10 registered nurses and 120 home health aides. Andrea leads Nascentia’s caregiver respite program that has impacted the lives of hundreds of seniors and their families. She also manages Nascentia’s in-house home health aide training program that teaches critical caregiving skills and prepares trainees to pass their home health aide certification exam. Andrea is a hands-on leader who is always focused on including her team in the decision-making process. Her team says that she is a compassionate leader whose unique blend of strength and empathy is the perfect fit for her role. She connects on a personal level with her staff and truly gets to the root causes of the situation. Through her commitment to understanding and patience, she develops well-rounded solutions that she can implement with strong support. She received her bachelor’s degree in nursing from Hartwick College. She resides in Auburn.

Named Norman Odell Citizen of the Year

The town of Nelson and the Erieville-Nelson Heritage Society have announced that Nancy Demyttenaere is the 2022 Norman Odell Citizen of the Year. This award is given to a citizen of the town for volunteer work in and around the community. Demyttenaere is being recognized for her work in changing the character of the four corners in the hamlet of Nelson, making it a place of note and activity. Using her background in historic preservation, she has transformed a number of buildings including the Mad Tacos building, a house on Route 20, and a building in the back of Mad Tacos that was once a blacksmith shop. She is now leading a group of preservation-minded people who has purchased the Old Drovers Inn and working on getting grants to restore the Inn in hopes of having it listed on the state and national register of historic places. A reception to celebrate Demyttenaere is planned for Nov. 6 at 2 p.m. at the Erieville Fire Hall. All are welcome.

Registered nurse honored with national award

Nascentia Health has announced that Andrea MacDonald, RN, the organization’s clinical operations manager, was named the winner of the 2022 Joan Anne McHugh Award for Leadership in LTSS (long-term services and supports) Nursing. The award is given by LeadingAge, a national organization comprising more than 5,000 aging services nonprofits. The award is given annually to one nurse leader in the United States who “creates a supportive and engaged workplace environment by displaying excellent leadership skills while managing nursing and frontline staff.” The award was given in person at LeadingAge’s Annual Meeting and EXPO, Oct. 16-19, in Denver, CO. Along with the award, Andrea receives $1,000 toward leadership training of her choice. NOVEM BER 2022

PH I L ANTH ROPY EDITION


47

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAG.COM


DRIVERS VILLAGE FULL PAGE