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TABLE OF CONTENTS

NOVEMber GUEST COMMENTARY...........................................................................6

FEATURED ENTREPRENEUR 10

PAST EVENTS................................................................................................. 7 SPECIAL FEATURE

Carolynn Lemke: Celebrating our Noble Friends....... 10

Megan Cuculich Vintage: It's hot! It's cool!........................................................ 14

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Founder, Modern Romance Boutique

Elbridge native Transforms with new books................. 16 Nina Albino:: Support without specificity .........................28

is the Founder of Modern Romance Boutique, WISE WOMAN FEATURED ENTREPRENUER on retailer that aims to make women feel Megan Cuclich.............................................................................. 14 beautiful. Modern Romance was opened ON THE COVER or to opening Modern Romance Boutique, he Fashion Institute of Technology, Carolynand Hendrickson, Upstate Foundation Philanthropy hion industry, before moving on to luxuryas a lifestyle.................................................. 19 m her job because of COVID-19, Megan HEALTH perfect time to try something new. Getting sexy with Phexxi........................................................ 24 Modern Romance, she was not necessarily She was hoping to gain experience INSPIRE as a et kept her open to new ideas. Megan first Joanne Spoto Decker ........................................................... 32 of an existing business, but ultimately Caragh Fahy .............................................................................. 34 m the ground up. She started the business UPCOMING EVENTS............................................................................. 36 of loungewear, after looking at the trending autiful clothing during the pandemic. MOVERS & SHAKERS.......................................................................... 38 ndemic has pushed Megan to pay close nd keep a manageable amount of clothing kly the trends are changing. Creating and ce has helped Megan realize how much ons for her business. With no lengths to go e is able to quickly implement her vision and the box, asking Megan questions that she does no siness as needed while moving it forward. on her own. approach to business ownership has After a year in business, Modern Romance now c ance to be agile as curveballs come and go. clothing for dressing up and going out, in addition nges is keeping up with digital marketing. loungewear that started it all. Megan carefully wa hed everyone online, putting more weight retail trends as people began to go out more as th ng and making connections with people. The rates improved. She hopes to continue growing he or paid advertisements can change quickly. boutique, and would like to resume doing pop-up ging technology as needed and through trial NOVEM BER 2021 PH I L ANTH ROPY EDITION as well! Megan’s advice for aspiring business own nto business, Megan conducted her own

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GUEST COMMENTARY

Your local community foundation:

CONNECTING AND RESPONDING TO LOCAL NEEDS Pragya Murphy

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century ago, Cleveland banker Frederick Goff had a vision: to pool the charitable resources of his community's philanthropists into a single permanent endowment for the betterment of the city. That vision led to the formation of the Cleveland Foundation and a movement that has transformed philanthropy in the United States and worldwide. Today, there are nearly 800 U.S. community foundations that collectively grant more than $6.5 billion each year in their respective regions. The Central New York Community Foundation, established in 1927, has invested more than $230 million in community improvement projects that strengthen our local nonprofits and address the most critical issues of our times. The gifts we receive come from those who want to give back to Central New York in some way – either during their lifetimes or as a legacy that carries on after they are gone. We then turn those dollars into community change – by supporting and mobilizing nonprofit efforts around the region’s most critical needs. Our impact is most notable when you hear how residents’ lives have been changed thanks to the generosity of our fundholders: affordable rental apartments have been made lead-safe and families of children with elevated blood lead levels have been relocated for their safety; visitors to food pantries are finding fresh, healthy produce to choose from; low-income residents are being connected to job opportunities in high-need industries; young children are receiving a steady stream of new books to read with their families; high-achieving students are going to college with the help of scholarships, and much more! The local value of a community foundation is never more evident than when a community faces urgent, unexpected adversity. When a crisis like the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic hits, our goal is not to do less because of uncertainty but to do more because our neighbors need us. Our resources and community knowledge allow us to act quickly during times like these, raising and deploying funds to fill gaps or justify ideas, and supporting a scaled-up response from the government. Thus, it should not come as a surprise that in the face of a pandemic that posed an unprecedented threat, more than 400 community foundations in every U.S. state immediately set up COVID-19 response funds. In the early stages of the pandemic, we committed initial funding and management services to create a series of COVID-19 support funds across our region in partnership with local government and regional funders. These new coalitions resulted in stronger collaborations, streamlined resource deployment and, most importantly, responsive grants to nonprofits working with communities that were disproportionately impacted by economic consequences of the pandemic. Altogether, $2.3 million was raised and distributed in response grants to meet basic needs. Community isn’t just part of our name. It’s central to who we are and what we do. We invest millions each year in improving Central New York, while also ensuring that our donors will leave a legacy that will make a difference for generations to come. As community connectors, we link donors with the nonprofits that can help them transform lives. And as philanthropic first responders, we step up to the call when our region needs us. Pragya Murphy is a development officer with the Central New York Community Foundation. To learn more about the community foundation, visit cnycf.org.

NOVEM BER 2021

SyracuseWomanMag.com contact@syracusewomanmag.com

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Pragya Murphy Olivia Poust Heather Shannon Ken Sturtz

Cover photo by Alice G. Patterson

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PAST EVENTS

Great turnout for Teal Ribbon Run Photos by Rick Policasto

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n Saturday, Sept. 25, the 13th annual Teal Ribbon Run/ Walk organized by volunteer organization Hope for Heather took place in the village of Minoa. Participants could walk or run the 5K route and all proceeds went to support ovarian cancer research and awareness. The Teal Ribbon Run is one of Hope for Heather’s largest community awareness events.

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SPECIAL FEATURE

CAROLYNN LEMKE: Celebrating our Noble Friends Alyssa Dearborn

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arolynn Lemke, the owner and illustrator behind Noble Friends Shop, has made a successful business out of illustrating people’s animal companions. Her work and products have appeared on the Today Show and she is making her children’s book illustration debut this November.

But hints of where she would take her artwork have always been a part of her experience as an artist. “I always liked to draw people and pets and I tried to work that into every project I did. And then it just kind of segwayed into that” she said when asked about her beginnings as an illustrator, “My favorite thing is probably the fact that anything I am drawing, I get to put a personality into it. Whenever I’m drawing pets, the customer will email me three descriptor words about their dog or cat or horse or bunny or whatever, so I can kind of imagine their personality and I try to put that into the illustration itself. I’d say that’s the most fun, enjoyable part of it.” Her clients’ happiness is the driving force behind her work. “A lot of my clients who come to me, some had pets pass away or people are celebrating getting a new puppy,” she said. “So, I feel like even if the pet has passed away I’m still hoping to bring people joy by remembering their pet or by celebrating a new baby coming into the family.” By taking her art and love for animals to the next level by illustrating a book, Lemke hopes that people will enjoy a beautiful book based on a true story and remember to take care of the pets in their lives. Continued on page 12

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SPECIAL FEATURE

Support without specificity from page 11 “The story is really cool.” she said when asked about the book, “It’s about a girl who goes down to the Dominican Republic and she was already a dog lover - and they find this dog on the beach. You could feed the dogs there and they fed them hotdogs. So, the dog took the hotdog and buried it, and she was so upset because this dog thinks it’s not going to have food anymore. She’s not even eating the hotdog - she’s hiding it because she thinks she’s not going to have food. So they fall in love with this dog and they end up being able to adopt it. And they brought it back to New York City.” “I really love this story.” she continued, “I sort of knew the author a little bit before we started working together. She is a huge dog lover and an advocate for adopting dogs. It was just such an awesome story.” The publishing process itself was a new experience for Lemke. It took years to get the story illustrated, published, and then ready for readers in November. “We found a publisher, which was step number one.” she said about the process, “And that was really cool because I have worked with publishers before, but on a completely different type of project. This was really an experience in itself, working with a publisher and just have everything be, like, super legit.” It took about two years to illustrate this book start to finish. Once that was completed, it took a little more than a year to get the book printed and ready to be sold.

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“The whole process has been quite a while, but it was awesome,” she said. “And it was during COVID, so it was a little bit challenging because my kids were home from school. I had this massive deadline, so that was a little difficult. But other than that, it was cool.” Projects such as her work with the book as well as her work with her clients has given Carolynn Lemke a unique way to support the welfare of animals, both globally as well as in her own life. “I’ll do a lot of projects.” she replied when asked about her work helping animals, “The book for example, a percentage of the proceeds go to an organization called Global Strays for the first round of books that come out, and then we’re going to pick another organization.” “We’re always trying to give back in some way to help other animals that might not have the best life.” One thing that Carolynn Lemke wants people to know is, despite her personal success, creating a business she loves took years of work and perseverance. “I have been working on my own for about 11 years now and I started doing this when I got laid off from an advertising agency. And I feel like I kind of just been hustling for the last 11, 12 years,” she said. “I feel like Rome isn’t built in a day and there’s a lot of ups and downs of being an entrepreneur and a woman owned business. And also being a work-from-home mom. That’s pretty important to me too. It’s difficult and has its challenges, and it’s pretty rewarding too because I can be here for my kids and my animals.” SWM

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SPECIAL FEATURE

Vintage: IT’S HOT! IT’S COOL! Judy Allman

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ne of my favorite things to use when setting a table for family dinners is my vintage, blue and white ironstone platter that my mother gave me. It was her mother’s and over the years has seen almost 70 years of family meals. The platter is not too fancy or valuable, but it is charming and holds a comforting reminder of good times, loved ones and warm feelings. In these times of uncertainty, it is good to be reminded of what makes us feel happy and safe. There are many reasons to appreciate and use vintage items, obviously utility; there are a lot of meals yet to be served on that vintage platter and I hope my granddaughter will one day enjoy the nostalgia of using it as well. We value vintage items because they have stood the test of time. Vintage can be any desirable item that speaks of a past style or time period that reflects that time period. The word “Vintage” is used here to describe a broad class of collecting or the reusing of worthwhile items that are more than 20 years old but not yet 100 years old. Any item one hundred years or more would be considered an antique. Buying and using vintage items is a hot and timely trend! The reason that buying and using vintage items is so cool is that buying vintage is a unique way of recycling. Too many useful and beautiful things end up in the landfill simply because they don’t fit the fickle changing trends of the day. That is why the hot trend of using vintage is timely. When we reuse and recycle, whether with awareness or just enjoying the style and coolness of a well-made and beautiful thing, we are recycling. Be it be clothing, shoes, bags, jewelry or kitchen and decorative items; recycled vintage items are good for the planet. It is guilt free shopping with a purpose. The giving season is upon us so If you are looking for some super cool vintage gifts, or decorating for the holidays, why not use something that may invoke a happy memory. Set a table with your grandmother’s china, wear your mother’s favorite piece of jewelry, pull out your dad’s favorite vinyl music and let tradition fill you. Vintage can be found at thrift shops, antiques shops and antique shows - or at Grandma’s house. Enjoy an environmentally guilt free way to shop. SWM Judy Allman owns Allman Promotions, which will host the Salt City Holiday Antiques Show Nov. 20 and 21 in the Horticulture Building at the New York State Fairgrounds. For more information, visit syracuseantiqueshow.com.

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Elbridge native Transforms with new books Jason Gabak

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hen Lori Ann King wrote Come Back Strong Balanced Wellness After Surgical Menopause (2017) she shared her experience of waking up from a devastating surgery, finding herself in sudden surgical menopause, and her journey back to health. Little did she know, she would face more setbacks that would require another comeback a few years later. Like so many others, 2020 hit King’s family like a hurricane. In March, her husband retired as a personal trainer due to the pandemic. They decided to pursue a life-long dream of moving to the Southwest, traveling over 2,100 miles to New Mexico where they would experience isolation like never before. With the move, came the loss of her own job and primary income. Just 30 days prior to their departure, the transmission went on their only vehicle. Parts were not available, and they were without a car for nearly a month. If that wasn’t stressful enough, King’s husband was diagnosed with prostate cancer six weeks prior to their move. Despite the setbacks and challenges, they came back strong. King’s husband beat the cancer and regained his health and vitality while King wrote two books, launched her own online store, and dove into a career as an author. They are steadfast and diligent in their effort to keep the promise they made to each other long ago: to be as healthy as they possibly can be, every single day, for the rest of their lives. With a focus on nutrition, sleep, stress reduction, play, and self-care, they remain resilient through the toughest of times. “I believe that no matter how dark the night, joy comes in the morning, whether that joy comes tomorrow, or some morning in the future. Bad things have a time limit. While it is sometimes hard to find the purpose in challenges or traumas, I believe that things that stem from harm can be used for good.” Self-care, self-awareness, and self-empowerment are themes that run throughout Wheels to Wellbeing: A Practical Self-Care Guide to Living a More Balanced Life. Wheels to Wellbeing is intended to help readers analyze, reprioritize, and balance their lives. Self-love and strengthening your mindset are at the center of Transform: Building the Mindset to Change Your Body and Your Life. King taps her keen understanding of the mind-body component involved in transforming your body. She survived her own obstacles and setbacks along her journey to becoming a finalist in a 16-week transformation challenge and she draws on those experiences to help readers focus on the habits that support their goals rather than sabotaging their quest for transformation. SWM Lori Ann King is the Amazon best-selling author of Come Back Strong, Balanced Wellness after Surgical Menopause and a two-time contributor to the Chicken Soup For the Soul series. She is a former runner-turned-cyclist, a 2019 IsaBody Challenge Finalist, and 2017 IsaBody Honorable Mention. King has an undergraduate degree in Recreation from Western State College of Colorado and an advanced certificate in Information Management from Syracuse University. When she’s not writing, you’ll find her with her husband Jim on their bikes, paddleboards, kayaks, or in the gym. For more information on King visit www.LoriAnnKing.com.

NOVEM BER 2021

Congratulations to the Syracuse Woman Cover Story woman, Carolyn Hendrickson. Thank you for all you do!

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COVER STORY

CAROLYN HENDRICKSON UPSTATE FOUNDATION

For Carolyn Hendrickson, philanthropy is a lifestyle Ken Sturtz

Photo by Alice G. Patterson

“I see myself as a connector. I want to help people connect with something that’s meaningful to them.” — Carolyn Hendrickson

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COVER STORY

CAROLYN HENDRICKSON UPSTATE FOUNDATION

For Carolyn Hendrickson, philanthropy is a lifestyle Ken Sturtz

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stillness swept over the church as the congregation sat enthralled by a visitor’s story of how he’d been called upon to make a life-changing decision to leave a career in business and devote himself to missionary work. Then he offered a piece of advice: if you feel that God has something else planned for you, don’t ignore it. Seek it out. Carolyn Hendrickson felt her heart racing as she listened. “I knew that something spoke to me that day,” she says. “I didn’t know if I was supposed to become a missionary or what. I just knew in my heart there was something else for me.” She spent months reflecting on his words. It hardly seemed like the right time to make a big change. Hendrickson, of Liverpool, was 37 years old, had already worked in financial services for 14 years and was making a good living. Her husband was in the middle of a career as a teacher. She eventually realized she’d never figure out what she was looking for if she didn’t give herself a push, so she gave her notice. With no job and unsure what was next, Hendrickson began visiting people in the business community, asking why they did the work they did and what they loved about it. A business owner asked if she’d ever volunteered. Hendrickson had volunteered at the Rescue Mission in Syracuse and that got her thinking about her values and what she really cared about. She began sharing her resume. One day in 1997 she received a call from Clarence Jordan, the longtime executive director of the Rescue Mission. He thought she’d be a good fit for a development position. “I think I kind of instantly knew it was a fit way back when,” she says. Nearly a quarter of a century later, she believes that day in the church was a turning point. Through her work – first at the Rescue Mission and now at The Upstate Foundation – Hendrickson has raised millions of dollars and helped connect thousands of donors to meaningful causes. And philanthropy has become much more than a job. “For me philanthropy is a lifestyle,” she says. “My goal every day is to help our community.” That can mean helping financial resources get to the right place where they can make a difference, but it also includes a hands-on approach. For example, Hendrickson knew she wanted to help young married couples. So, she joined a program at her church meant to help young mothers learn to cook, manage a household and navigate marriage. That allowed her to share her cooking skills as well as her life experience. Hendrickson volunteers with several other charities and sits on the board of David’s Refuge. NOVEM BER 2021

In many ways her dedication to philanthropy is an extension of her upbringing. Her parents were regular churchgoers and espoused Christian values to Hendrickson and her siblings, including the importance of helping others. Her parents led by example. If someone new moved into the community, they’d be knocking on their door to welcome them. If someone was sick or in need, they’d bring food to their house. Part of her parents’ philosophy included the notion that a certain amount of do-gooding was simply expected of people and wasn’t cause for boasting. “You don’t stand on the street corner and tell other people what you do,” she says. “It is not about me, it’sabout what I can do to help others and that’s what drives me.” Philanthropy of course still requires development professionals to raise money to help people connect with causes that matter to them. “It isn’t always about the money,” she says. “Money makes thing happen, but people want to know that you care; you have to believe in your work.” Successful development pro-fessionals need to have a strong work ethic, good communication skills and a certain amount of raw enthusiasm. Hendrickson rises at 6 a.m. and is in the office by 8 a.m., calling donors and writing thank you notes (in a digital world, handwritten notes are especially appreciated, she says). Much of Hendrickson’s experience and training in financial services served as useful training for a career in philanthropy - in particular, the ability to connect with people, understand who they are and what’s important to them, and develop relationships. It’s important to understand the balance between development and relationship-building. Some donors are comfortable writing a check with very little interaction, while others have become close friends over the years, Hendrickson says.

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Most people are somewhere in the middle, though none wants to be treated like a number. Stewardship matters, Hendrickson says, which is why donors don’t hear from her just when she’s asking for money. But asking for money can be one of the most challenging hurdles for new development professionals. Hendrickson is often asked if she hates asking for money. “When you know the cause and there’s an alignment for the donor it’s up to them, it’s their decision,” she says. “I see myself as a connector. I want to help people connect with something that’s meaningful to them.” Raising money for even the worthiest causes can lead to burnout. It’s easy enough to lose sight of the mission and see only the dollars and cents. Whenever she needs to stay grounded, Hendrickson thinks back to her early days at the Rescue Mission when a homeless man came in during the dead of winter in an old pair of cowboy boots. There were holes in the bottom of the boots and his socks, which showed through the holes, were caked with ice. He was freezing and his feet had frostbite. He just wanted a better pair of boots or shoes. The Rescue Mission provided him with a pair, which he gratefully accepted. Afterward Hendrickson plucked the old boots from the trash and placed them in her office. “I don’t ever want to forget the impact of that man feeling like somebody helped him,” she says. “That act of him getting a pair of new used winter boots, that might have been the most philanthropic thing we could have done at that time.” Experiences such as that were not uncommon at the Rescue Mission, which among its other programs provides shelter and food to people in need. With a relatively small development team, Hendrickson, whose title was senior philanthropy officer, handled major gifts, planned giving and managed a multi-milliondollar capital campaign. Depending on the day she might find herself calling prospective donors, leading supporters on a tour or recruiting volunteers. Continued on page 22

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Photo by Alice G. Patterson

“Philanthropy is a wonderful career. I am honored to be a small part of helping others fulfill their philanthropic goals and witnessing the difference their gifts make for others.” —Carolyn Dickerson

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...philanthropy is a lifestyle from page 21 When she joined The Upstate Foundation a year ago as director of planned giving her focus narrowed considerably. The foundation primarily raises money for Upstate Medical University for things such as patient care, education of healthcare providers, scientific research and community health and well-being. It has more than $250 million in assets and more than 1,000 funds under management. Hendrickson says the desire to leave a legacy gift can be the result of everything from gratitude for great care, an excellent education or a meaningful career, to supporting medical research or unmet patient needs. “While the cause is different, people’s hearts and wanting to help, that element stays the same no matter where you are,” she says. “And I get the privilege of working with them.” Hendrickson reflects on a couple who lost their only child to suicide. Their desire was to turn the tragedy into an opportunity to help other teenagers in the community. So, they established an endowment and a legacy gift to ensure others dealing with suicide will receive help. “This is humbling beyond words, philanthropy in action,” she says. Not all donors are interested in planned giving – some prefer to give everything away while they’re alive – and starting a conversation with donors about it is a delicate matter. Some people know exactly what they want while others have never thought about it. Such gifts can be particularly exciting to work on because they are often the largest gifts someone has made and sometimes have the potential to be transformative. They’re also often the most meaningful because the donor typically has to sit down and put more thought and planning into it. It takes a certain kind of person to be comfortable with the knowledge that their gift doesn’t happen until they’re gone.

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“They’re not alive to receive any accolades and to me that’s just one more statement about their philanthropic intent,” Hendrickson says. “Those to me are some of the most humbling experiences.” Since that day in church decades ago Hendrickson has experienced numerous ups and downs, but says she never doubted her commitment to philanthropy. When she thinks back to all the donors she’s worked with and all the people they helped it fills her with a sense of wonder. “Philanthropy is a wonderful career,” she says. “I am honored to be a small part of helping others fulfill their philanthropic goals and witnessing the difference their gifts make for others.” SWM

“For me philanthropy is a lifestyle, my goal every day is to help our community.” — Carolyn Hendrickson

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Celebrating over 12 years as a Medicare specialist Medicare consultation & enrollment services

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HEALTH

Getting sexy with Phexxi Heather Shannon, MS, CNM, WHNP, MPH

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any of us struggle with finding the right birth control. Many cannot or will not take hormonal options like the pill, patch or ring due to its estrogen (and progesterone) component. Some are not interested in a procedure to have an intrauterine device or a contraceptive implant placed as their birth control. Diaphragms, cervical caps and sponges have low interest or are hard to find. Others cannot find a birth control that is convenient or works well for them. So besides condoms, what other non hormonal contraceptives are available to women? Well, hold on to your hat. Meet Phexxi. This is the first Food and Drug Administration approved non hormonal, on demand contraceptive that is a vaginal pH modulator (VPM).

What is that?

A vaginal pH modulator (VPM) gel is inserted into the vagina to keep the pH level acidic. The ingredients are lactic acid, citric acid and potassium bitartrate. Studies have shown that sperm is not able to survive in a high acid environment. Phexxi is not a spermicide or a hormone. With proper use, Phexxi is up to 93 percent effective in preventing pregnancy. You get it by prescription only. When you pick it up at the pharmacy, you receive 12 prefilled applicators. The convenience of this birth control is on demand use. When you have sex, you insert one applicator within one hour of the act. Each applicator is one dose. If you decide to have sex again, you will insert a new applicator. Think of it as one applicator is needed with every act of sex.

How does it work?

When you insert Phexxi, the gel will adhere to the vaginal walls allowing the pH of the vagina maintain a high acidity, which is toxic to sperm. You will need to have sex within one hour of inserting the gel. If it is longer than one hour before you have sex, you will need to insert another applicator. If you decide to have sex again later, you will need to insert another applicator then and have sex within that hour as noted above. Your body will absorb the medication and it does not need to “washed” out.

Who should not use it?

Women who have problems with urinary tract infections (UTI) and are recurrent should avoid Phexxi. Those who use Nuvaring for birth control cannot use Phexxi as it can affect the Nuvaring material. You should also avoid Phexxi If you or your partner have an allergy to any components of its ingredients. There are minor side effects like vaginal itching and burning in up to 18 percent of users. Yeast infection, vulvar discomfort, bacterial vaginosis infection, discharge and discomfort when urinating are some of the other potential side effects. Most common reasons for stopping Phexxi are bladder infection, kidney infection (pyelonephritis) and other urinary tract problems. Another reason for stopping is partner symptoms and discomfort. Phexxi’s effects are temporary and easily reversible, and therefore, are not a concern for future childbearing. Phexxi is ok to use with other forms of birth control, except for the Nuvaring. Remember that Phexxi is a form of birth control and does not protect from sexually transmitted infections including HIV. It is recommended to use condoms with any new partners. To learn more about Phexxi, contact your health care provider. Isn’t it nice to know there are more hormone free birth control options for those who need alternatives? SWM Heather Shannon is a certified nurse midwife and women’s health nurse practitioner at Oswego County Opportunities. She has a master of science and a master of public health degree.

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WISE FEATURED ENTREPRENEUR

FEATURED ENTREPRENEUR Megan Cuculich

Founder, Modern Romance Boutique

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egan Cuculich is the Founder of Modern Romance Boutique, an online fashion retailer that aims to make women feel confident and beautiful. Modern Romance was opened in November of 2020. Prior to opening Modern Romance Boutique, Megan graduated from the Fashion Institute of Technology, and worked in the bridal fashion industry, before moving on to luxury fashion. Furloughed from her job because of COVID-19, Megan decided that it was the perfect time to try something new. When Megan launched Modern Romance, she was not necessarily looking to make money. She was hoping to gain experience as a retail owner. This mindset kept her open to new ideas. Megan first considered the purchase of an existing business, but ultimately decided to build one from the ground up. She started the business by curating a collection of loungewear, after looking at the trending demand for cozy and beautiful clothing during the pandemic. Launching during the pandemic has pushed Megan to pay close attention to the trends and keep a manageable amount of clothing in stock due to how quickly the trends are changing. Creating and growing Modern Romance has helped Megan realize how much she loves making decisions for her business. With no lengths to go through for approval, she is able to quickly implement her vision and make changes to the business as needed while moving it forward. Megan’s open-minded approach to business ownership has positioned Modern Romance to be agile as curveballs come and go. One of her bigger challenges is keeping up with digital marketing. COVID-19 has really pushed everyone online, putting more weight on social media marketing and making connections with people. The social media platforms for paid advertisements can change quickly. Megan keeps up by changing technology as needed and through trial and error. Before going into business, Megan conducted her own market research by looking at similar businesses and seeing how they accomplish their goals, and communicate their brand values. Megan became adept at crowd sourcing the information she needed to understand her target audience and consumer patterns. Shortly after her launch, Megan began meeting with a WISE business counselor to create a business plan and new marketing goals. This support has helped Megan bring in new customers to Modern Romance. Her business counselor helps her think outside of

WISE HAPPENINGS: Check out www.wisecenter.org for a complete list of upcoming events!

WISE Women’s Business Center Orientation

Building Blocks for Starting a Business

November 15th 12-1:00pm

Held Twice monthly! Dates TBD

...and more!

the box, asking Megan questions that she does not think of on her own. After a year in business, Modern Romance now carries clothing for dressing up and going out, in addition to the loungewear that started it all. Megan carefully watched the retail trends as people began to go out more as the COVID-19 rates improved. She hopes to continue growing her online boutique, and would like to resume doing pop-up boutiques, as well! Megan’s advice for aspiring business owners is, “try different things, experiment, get opinions and feedback and always be open to new ideas.”

WISE words of wisdom… Keep trying. Even if you have a bad day. Take it day by day and don’t give up. – Megan Cuculich

All events, unless otherwise indicated, are being held virtually. // WISE Women’s Business Center, Equitable Towers // 100 Madison Street // Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 443-8634 // wisecenter@syr.edu // www.wisecenter.org // FIND US ON: A Project of the Martin J. Whitman School of Management at Syracuse University Funded in part through a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration. All opinions, conclusions or recommendations expressed are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Small Business Administration. Reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities will be made if requested at least 2 weeks in advance. Call (315) 443-8634.

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SPECIAL FEATURE

Nina Albino: SUPPORT WITHOUT SPECIFICITY Jason Klaiber

“The premise that Charity for Children was founded on was that we would be a unique organization available to any kids with chronic or terminal diseases.”—Nina Albino

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round 2004, having already spent years in the not-for-profit world, Nina Albino had developed a n appreciation for the philanthropic work being done around Central New York, but she also grew used to seeing charities focus on specific diseases, seemingly never able to find one in the area committed to running the gamut. Before that void lasted too long, though, she and Kathleen Miller Murphy co-founded the all-inclusive Charity for Children to fill in where others might have left off. “The premise that Charity for Children was founded on was that we would be a unique organization available to any kids with chronic or terminal diseases,” said Albino, who also serves as the executive director. With the only catch being that these clients must live in the CNY area, the charity’s child-specific emphasis has brought it to the aid of those with juvenile diabetes, dog bite injuries, severe asthma and mitochondrial disorders among other medical and sometimes even emotional issues. The nonprofit’s direct assistance largely has to do with relieving certain expenses racked up by family members of affected children. This help wouldn’t normally deal with anything taken care of by a family’s insurance, like a series of surgeries, but it has taken the shape of fully covered parking payments and gift cards for groceries. In the event that local families have to venture out of town to see a specialist, Charity for Children has been known to foot the bills for extended hotel stays, dining out and fuel for travel.

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Despite being centralized around Albino’s one-person office, the grassroots charity tackles a lengthy agenda day to day all without any red tape, seeing as how the organization’s listed phone number leads callers right to Albino’s cell. “We try not to use the revenue that we get for anything or anyone other than our clients, so if I can save money by not having an actual landline phone and I can use my own personal one, then that’s one more way,” she said. “We continue to plug along with the little that we have—and it doesn’t take weeks or months for families to get assistance either.” Never alone in her mission and her planning, Albino is quick to give credit to the advice and supervision of Murphy,

the Charity for Children president, and the rest of the governing board, which altogether makes sure that everything is running smoothly and in accordance with the charter. On the homepage of the main website, there is also an “In Loving Memory” section devoted to Lou Aiello, who, in Albino’s words, “breathed life” into the organization with his support. “He was around in the early days when things were tight financially,” she said. “From that point on, up until he passed away, he was just one of my guardian angels whenever I got stuck. I’m not sure where we would be today if it hadn’t been for him.” Continued on page 30

At Werth Wealth Planning, we remain steadfast in our commitment to our clients and to supporting our local community. We are thrilled to join with you in making a positive impact in central New York. For clients who actively engage with their financial plan, Werth Wealth Planning donates to one of two charities - Vera House or Golisano Children’s Hospital - on their behalf. Any burden becomes lighter as we come together to lift it.

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SPECIAL FEATURE

Support without specificity from page 29

Charity for Children has purchased items like strollers and gift cards for its clients over the years. It has also held events like its fundraising dinners and its annual golf outings. In 2004, Nina Albino co-founded Charity for Children with Kathleen Miller Murphy. Since then, the organization has assisted hundreds of families with peripheral payments associated with medical treatment.

Through the years, Charity for Children has overseen 16 annual golf fundraisers, a string of outings set in motion by former event chair Diane Schmid-McCall, who has since been succeeded in that role by the nonprofit’s current vice president, Matt Bulger. The charity has also organized gift deliveries for kids around the holidays as well as the First Duds program, which has provided infants with bottles and new sets of clothing. Over a combined 20-plus years, Nina Albino was a director for both the American Cancer Society and March of Dimes, the latter serving as the way she met Murphy. For these two organizations, Albino said she was more involved with raising money and administrative tasks than direct work with clients.

Now, 17 years after co-founding Charity for Children, she has worked one on one and face to face with hundreds of children possessing various ailments, some of them from the age of six to the time they graduate. “With a lot of these kids that are chronically ill, it isn’t like you meet them, talk to them and help them once and then they go on their merry way,” Albino said. “These families are coming back to us week after week, month after month, and year after year. That’s why we say they become a part of the Charity for Children family.” Donations can be made to the local organization through the PayPal button or by way of the Venmo address found via the “Donate Now” tab on charityforchildren.net. SWM

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3 5 LO C AT I O N S T O S E R V E YO U B E T T E R 26 Genesee Street • Auburn.......................................... Tel: 315-258-9141 24 E. Genesee Street • Baldwinsville............................. Tel: 315-635-6291 8007 State Route 31 • Bridgeport ................................. Tel: 315-633-2063 8313 US Route 11 • Cicero ......................................................................... 8440 Oswego Road • Clay ............................................. Tel: 315-622-4469 13 River Street • Cortland ............................................. Tel: 607-758-7830 307 W. Manlius Street • East Syracuse .......................... Tel: 315-431-9453 3606 W. Genesee Street • Fairmount ............................ Tel: 315-701-4483 160 S. Second Street • Fulton ....................................... Tel: 315-598-1755 100 Grand Avenue • Syracuse ....................................... Tel: 315-476-9855 138 N. Exchange Street • Geneva.................................. Tel: 315-781-0901 489 James Street • Syracuse ......................................... Tel: 315-472-9435

408 Oswego Road • Liverpool ....................................... Tel: 315-457-2413 105 W Seneca Street• Manlius ...................................... Tel: 315-682-0785 222 N. Massey Street • Watertown ............................... Tel: 315-779-2266 100 Matty Avenue • Mattydale ..................................... Tel: 315-455-1938 330 Costello Parkway • Minoa ...................................... Tel: 315-656-3321 6131 S. Salina Street • Nedrow ..................................... Tel: 315-214-8760 3 Henderson Street • NY Mills ....................................... Tel: 315-736-5075 500 N. Main Street • North Syracuse ............................. Tel: 315-458-7658 502 Lenox Avenue • Oneida .......................................... Tel: 315-363-0345 65 E. Bridge Street • Oswego ........................................ Tel: 315-342-5998

120 Black River Blvd. • Rome ........................................ Tel: 315-281-0014 1805 South Avenue • Syracuse ..................................... Tel: 315-472-6577

Salute Our Veterans Thank You For Your Service NOVEM BER 2021

3901 S. Salina Street • Syracuse.................................... Tel: 315-378-0016 1547 State Street • Watertown ..................................... Tel: 315-786-3998 5864 Thompson Road • Dewitt ..................................... Tel: 315-449-4326 1601 West Genesee Street • Syracuse ........................... Tel: 315-471-7472 16 E. Main Street • Trumansburg .................................. Tel: 607-387-4021 1502 Genesee Street • Utica ......................................... Tel: 315-732-0758 120 E. Fourth Street • Watkins Glen .............................. Tel: 607-535-5534 820 Wolf Street • Syracuse ............................................ Tel: 315-425-0899 59 Central Avenue • Illion ............................................. Tel: 315-894-2737 416 Velasko Road • Western Lights ............................... Tel: 315-475-0864 2685 Erie Drive • Weedsport ......................................... Tel: 315-834-9386

OPEN 24 HOURS

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Dr Suzanne Shapero, DMD, MBA, PC Family & Cosmetic Dentistry

“Don’t be afraid of the dentist, Dr Shapero is not only a dentist, but a good friend. Thanks to everyone there for making the trip to the dentist a painless and friendly experience.” - - Phillip E., patient

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Jussara Potter Photography

Our Advanced Services performed in a safe environment with our state-of-the art filtration system We Accept: Cigna 1 Charlotte Street, Baldwinsville (across from the Police Station) In the old Post Office building opposite the Village Hall

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INSPIRE

NOVEM BER 2021

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JOANNE SPOTO DECKER Alyssa Dearborn

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oAnne Spoto Decker, Onondaga County Office for the Aging’s Commissioner of Adult and Long Term Care Services, has worked in county government for 30 years and has found those years rewarding. She has been able to forge a career all while making an impact on the community she loves. “It’s been a huge milestone. Working for the county and having multiple jobs in different units and in different departments has been such a fulfilling role.” Decker said about her 30 years with the county, “It’s just been wonderful. I would encourage everybody to look at working in government and in Onondaga County. It’s been great. It’s hard work but being in human services, for me, has been really a blessing.” Decker has experienced many challenges over her career in Onondaga County’s offices, but the COVID-19 pandemic has given her department a new challenge that changed the ways they serve the community. “So, each [unit] has worked a little differently during COVID. Some of our staff were working remotely, some of our staff were her. I was here, all the time. Adult Protective was still under mandates, so we were still making our regular visits that we’re mandated to make. In New York Connects, the only change was that we were not doing home visits. We did everything telephonically.” The biggest change in Decker’s department came when the Office for Aging was forced to close its dining sites. “We made a decision back in March to close our dining sites and that was a very tough decision to make.” she said. “It’s such a popular program for the seniors who attend, but also for the socialization for so many. But for older adults, I think they mostly wanted to remain at home. So we provided them with the information and assistance they needed, whether it was health insurance consoling during enrolment period, or helping them telephonically fill out a HEAP application. All of those other programs and services that we do really. Meals on Wheels, of course, was still operational.” But as more services are allowed to resume, Decker and her department can work toward servicing more adults in need of these services, both in person and digitally. “Right now we’re transitioning our senior dining sites and we have some open in the county. It’s going fabulously. We opened under the direction of our Onondaga County Health Department Commissioner. It’s been very well received. People have just been so happy to be together. So we’re happy they’re happy.” Something Decker noticed about people during the pandemic was their eagerness to help others. What can people do to help older adults in need? “One thing that I would think people can do to help — not just folks who are aging, but people who are at risk — is to check on your neighbor. Just check on your neighbor,” she said. “You may want to volunteer. You may want to be a Meals on Wheels volunteer driver, you may want to call a senior center

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and see if they need assistance. During the pandemic, I think everybody was looking [to help].” During the pandemic, the Office for the Aging answered the Senior Nutrition and Healthcare Worker Hotline was broadcasted on the news and during County Executive Ryan McMahon’s daily briefings. So far, more than 3,000 calls for assistance have come in resulting in the delivery of about 350,000 meals to people in need, Decker said. Her own experience as a caregiver has equipped Decker for the demands of her position. Her department works with caregivers from many different backgrounds every day, but her experience lets her better help those who are trying their best to help others. “I think the advice that I have for caregivers, primarily, would be to take care of yourself and practice self-care,” she said. “ I know it’s difficult. I know definitely that it’s difficult to do that. Also, to get as much information that you can. And one of those ways that you can get that information is to call our Onondaga County Office for Aging unit and we have a caregiver specialist here who is extremely knowledgeable and able to provide information.” She also recommends that caregivers join support groups, to ensure that they maintain their own mental health. “Sometimes when you’re a caregiver, you know you’re not alone in caregiving, but you feel alone,” she said. “You’re not. And that’s why you need support.” It is easy to find information about all of the services that the Department of Adult and Long Term Care Services has to offer online, but not every adult in our community has internet access or abilities. So the department has to be creative with the ways it provides information to its clientele. “A lot of seniors do not use the internet, or can’t use the internet, or can’t afford to use the internet. So we have come up with ways to make sure that they get the information,” she said. “During COVID, we’d do bag outreach. We would drop off the bags at the senior centers and people would drive up and pick up their bag. And it would [include] all of our programs and services. The department also maintains a program called the Neighbor Advisor Program. “What these Neighbor Advisors do is that they go to people’s homes and they go over a checklist of all the services that are out there and available,” she said. “So we have that group of wonderful outreach workers getting the word out in their own communities.”Because of all her years working with several offices within the county — combined with her experience as a caregiver — Decker knows what it takes to serve and make a difference in her community. And she wants the community to know that these services are not exclusively for seniors. “Whether you come in as a 19-year-old looking for long term care services or you’re 99 and you’re looking for Meals on Wheels, it’s a circle,” she said. “We’re always able to close the loop.” SWM

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INSPIRE

NOVEM BER 2021

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CARAGH FAHY Olivia Poust

W

hen Caragh Fahy, owner and president of Madison Financial Planning Group, was starting her career, her parents would send her $100 about twice a year. Their intent was not for her to keep this money; they instructed her to find someone who needed it without them knowing where it came from. This “quiet generosity,” as she describes it, has stuck with her ever since and guides her work and philanthropy. “I had to find a lot of stealthy ways to slide envelopes under doors,” said Fahy. Her giving spans between her personal and professional life and is best represented by the very name of her donor-advisory fund at the CNY Community Foundation. To keep her gifts anonymous, Fahy named the fund after her sons’ favorite childhood stuffed animals. It was important to her to include her children in charitable works so they could better understand the issues in their world and community. “I think it’s important for them to know that, yes, there are issues all over the world, but you have people right here that are also facing that kind of issue as well,” said Fahy. Now her sons are 20 and 17 years old, but the fund maintains a name that was originally given to a stuffed turtle and dinosaur. “When my boys are older, it’s a way to draw them back to the Central New York area, if they happen to leave, and always give them that connection,” said Fahy. Fahy’s work with the Community Foundation goes much further than her donor-fund; she serves on the board and operates as the finance chair. “It’s very rewarding. We end up acting in the spirit of the community, coming together on certain causes, and really pooling the resources of many donors to make an impact,” said Fahy. “Rather than just sending your one-off donations here or there, it’s coming together as a community.” Recently, the foundation has focused its efforts on addressing lead poisoning in Syracuse neighborhoods and supporting organizations that were impacted by the pandemic and needed extra assistance. In 2020, grants given to various organizations in the community totaled over $20 million. Within the umbrella organization of the Community Foundation, Fahy chaired and worked on the board for the Women’s Fund of Central New York for about six years. This foundation, which operates on endowments, gives out approximately $40,000 each year in grants to organizations that support women and girls in the Syracuse community. Even at Madison Financial Planning Group, Fahy brings service with her. She works to assist clients prepare for and transition into retirement, putting a particular focus on helping them to set and achieve their charitable goals. Madison Financial Planning Group’s specialty is guiding clients through their retirement

SYR ACUSE WOMAN MAGA ZI N E

transition and continuing to work with them in the years to follow which offers natural opportunities to discuss their charitable goals, she said. “After raising families and understanding their own financial independence, our planning process provides clients the confidence to give back to their communities.” In reflecting on her own childhood and her parenthood, Fahy noted the thread that runs through both. Her parents instilled in her a sense to do good unto others, which she taught to her children as they grew up. “Raising my sons into charitable and kind adults… That to me is a pay it forward to our society in raising good children, raising children that are kind,” said Fahy. In her eyes, this is her proudest accomplishment and best gift to the community. If this butterfly effect persists, more $100 bills may just be found slipping under the doors of unsuspecting neighbors, friends, and strangers. SWM

Caragh Fahy, with her two sons, Conor, left, and Declan.

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UPCOMING EVENTS

Wednesday, Nov. 3

Thursday, Nov. 18

What: Join the League of Women Voters for a discussion on the re-developed Interstate 81 project and its impact on our Syracuse neighbors living in its path. The guest speaker will be Lanessa Owens-Chaplin, project counsel for the ACLU of NY. Lanessa is a local attorney whose concentration is work on racial issues through a civil rights and environmental justice lens. When: Noon Where: Virtual on Zoom Info: www.lwvsyr.org

What: A Ladies Night event to get together with friends to sip, shop and enjoy jewelry. Refreshments, door prizes and a free gift will be given at the door. When: 4 to 8 p.m. Where: Welch & Co. Jewelers, 513 S. Main St., Rt. 11, N. Syracuse, NY 13212 Cost: Free (R.S.V.P. recommended), concierge parking. Info: welchjewelers.com

LWV discussion on Route 81

Friday, Nov. 5

SPS Open House

Welch Jewelers Holiday Ladies Night!

Thursday, Nov. 18

YWCA 22nd Annual Spirit of Women Gala

What: Get to know Syracuse Plastic Surgery with surgery seminars and opportunity to meet the staff, tour the state-of-the-art surgical center, and see live demonstrations in our Medspa. One free raffle ticket will be given to each attendee for a variety of services/products. Discounts given on aesthetic services and surgical fees purchased the night of the event. Wine and refreshments served. When: 3 to 6 p.m. Where: Syracuse Plastic Surgery, 3107 E. Genesee St., Syracuse, NY 13224 Cost: Free Info: syracuseplasticsurgery.com or 315-299-5313

What: Spirit of American Women highlights the empowered and accomplishments of women, girls, and families served through YWCA programs. It is also a fundraiser that celebrates the power of individual philanthropy. Guests will enjoy hors d’oeuvres and dessert, live speakers, and networking with peers. Please Note: The YWCA and Drumlins will follow the CDC’s COVID-19 guidelines in relation to masks. When: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Where: Drumlins, 800 Nottingham Rd., Syracuse , NY Cost: $75 Info: ywca.org

Thursday, Nov. 11

Saturday, Nov. 20

What: Au Chocolat is Baldwinsville’s annual holiday kick off event, featuring shopping, trolley rides, and of course, chocolate. Pick up your event passport at any of the specialty shops in town and get it stamped during Au Chocolat to win chances at several gift giveaways. When: 3 to 9 p.m. Where: Baldwinsville, NY Info: Visit Au Chocolate on Facebook or Instagram

What: Join On My Team 16 in raising money by climbing the way to end pediatric cancer. This annual event features a fund-raising walk, run or climb at the State Tower Building, downtown Syracuse. When: 10 a.m. Where: State Tower Building, 109 S. Warren St., Syracuse, NY 13202 Info: To register, visit www.onmyteam16.com

Au Chocolat in Baldwinsville

Friday, Nov. 12 - Sunday Nov. 14

25th Annual JLS Holiday Shoppes is back IN PERSON!

What: JLS’s annual fall fundraiser, is a three-day holiday marketplace known throughout CNY as a shopping destination. Get all your holiday shopping done in one place! Holiday Shoppes helps to support our mission and vision and our continued investment in the Syracuse community. When: Fri., Nov. 12: Noon to 8 p.m., Sat., Nov. 13: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sun., Nov. 14: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Where: Horticulture Building, NYS Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd., Syracuse, NY 13209 Cost: $7 Info: Tickets: www.jlsyracuse.org, Tops, Prie Chopper or in persn at the event.

On My Team 16 The Climb

Saturday, Nov. 20 & Sunday, Nov. 21

Salt City Holiday Antiques Show

What: A holiday shopping event. Enjoy the beautiful array of antiques, collectibles and vintage all under one roof. When: Sat. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Where: Horticulture Building, NYS Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd., Syracuse, NY 13209 Cost: Day pass $8/Weekend pass $9 Info: SyracuseAntiqueShow.com

Sunday, Nov. 14

Hope for Heather - Hope & Heels Fashion Show & Brunch

What: Hope & Heels Fashion Show and Brunch to raise ovarian cancer awareness and education across the community. Enjoy shopping from local vendors and artists, raffles, silent auction, cocktails, brunch and beautiful spring fashions modeled by community leaders and cancer survivors. All funds raised will benefit Hope for Heather, a 501c3 nonprofit in memory of Heather Weeks. Hope for Heather's mission is to raise money for ovarian cancer research, promote awareness and education and patient support. When: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Where: Marriott Syracuse Downtown, 100 E. Onondaga St., Syracuse, NY 13202 Cost: $75 Info: hopeforheather.org NOVEM BER 2021

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Nov 20 & 21 2021 150 Selected dealerS

Antiques, Collectibles, Vintage!!

Salt City Holiday Antiques Show Quality, Choice, Value in Holiday Shopping! Sat. 9am-5pm Sun. 10am-5pm

Admission: Day Pass $8 Weekend Pass $9

HORTICULTURE BUILDING! Nys Fairgrounds, Syracuse, NY

Allman Promotions LLC • 315-686-5789 SyracuseAntiqueShow.com

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MOVERS & SHAKERS

Journalist named Distinguished Alumni

The New York Community College Trustees named Onondaga Community College alumna Karin Franklin-King ’69 recipient of its Distinguished Alumni Award for Professional Achievement for 2021. She will receive the award during November in Saratoga Springs. The New York Community College Trustees is a voluntary, nonprofit consortium of community college trustees. Their Distinguished Alumni Award for Professional Achievement highlights contributions made by community college graduates in an effort to showcase the exceptional value of a community college education. Franklin-King came to Onondaga Community College from Brooklyn and earned an associate degree in drama in 1969. She would go on to earn a bachelor’s degree from SUNY Oswego and a master’s degree from Cornell University. While her first loves were in music and theater, she was also well-known throughout Central New York as a news anchor at WIXT Television (now known as WSYR TV) and WSYR Radio. She also hosted live call-in and public affairs shows on local radio and television stations. In recognition of her outstanding career in broadcasting and her contributions to the community, she was inducted into the Syracuse Press Club’s Wall of Distinction. Franklin-King was also active in the areas of nonprofit and corporate consulting, and education. She’s a past member of the OCC Foundation Board, and in 2011 was named an OCC Alumni Faces honoree. “Karin is such an amazing example of the value and impact of a community college education. She came here from Brooklyn, fell in love with OCC and the region, and never left. She became an active and beloved member of the community and was always available to help others and provide guidance to people of all ages. We’re so proud of everything she has done and grateful she is still an active member of our college community,” said OCC President Casey Crabill.

DeSiato named Superintendent of the Year

Dr. Donna DeSiato of the East Syracuse Minoa Central School District has been chosen as the 2021 New York State Superintendent of the Year. This annual accolade focuses on the calendar year at hand, but its bestowing by the New York State Council of School Superintendents also takes into account a cumulative look at the selected educator’s entire career. “It is truly an honor that I take extremely to heart with regard to the gratitude for our community, for our board of education and for all of the partnerships and

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relationships that we have that help us to be successful as a school system,” DeSiato said. Throughout the application review process, candidates from across the state were judged on their leadership for student learning, their communication skills, their professionalism and their active community involvement. Since DeSiato’s start in the district in 2005, ESM has introduced three five-year strategic plans, the state’s first career pathway courses in aviation, and the Spartan Academy, which is a tuitionfree way for the high school’s students to earn college credits and eventually two-year degrees from Onondaga Community College in either computer science, math science or engineering science by the time they receive their regents diplomas. The school district’s capital improvements, its nationally acknowledged STEM ecosystem, its New Heights program for special needs students, and the 10%-plus increase in its graduation rate have also stood as hallmarks of her time at the helm.

Joins Oswego Health

Lorraine A. Ladd-Falanga joins The Center for Wound Healing at Oswego Health. Ladd-Falanga will see patients at the center which offers leading-edge treatments including hyperbaric oxygen therapy, negative pressure therapies, bioengineered tissues, and biosynthetic to reintroduce the body's innate ability to heal. Ladd-Falanga brings over 20 years of experience to The Center for Wound Healing and is no stranger to Oswego Health. Throughout her career, she held various positions at Oswego Hospital including being a nurse practitioner in the emergency department and serving as a hospitalist. She’s worked throughout Central New York at the major healthcare systems and most recently was a nurse practitioner at Delph Health Care where she provided medical care to patients requiring admissions. Ladd-Falanga is a New York licensed registered nurse, registered vascular technologist and cardiac sonographer. She earned her master of science and bachelor’s degree in nursing from SUNY Upstate Medical University.

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