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January 2021

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

january PUBLISHER'S WORD..........................................................................6 KINDNESS COUNTS Central New York, you've surprised me yet again!.................................................................................................. 8

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SYRACUSE EATS How sweet it is! Sugar Blossom Cake Shop opens in Liverpool......................................................................... 10

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WISE WOMAN Tiffany Munford................................................................................ 12 SPECIAL FEATURES Wedding woes: Couple keeps smiling despite postponing wedding three times................................................................ 14 The women of Syracuse Woman Magazine.............. 30 Cheers to 10 years going strong Celebrating 10 years in pictures.......................................... 32

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ON THE COVER Farah Jadran: An attitude of gratitude SWM's founding editor reflects on the gift of giving back.......................................................................... 19

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WOMEN'S FITNESS Don't look back. You're not going that way..................... 24 WOMEN'S HEALTH The challenges of life as an "XX".............................................. 26

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Pap smears and preventing cervical cancer................. 28

INSPIRE Kelly Kinahan.................................................................................... 34 UPCOMING EVENTS..................................................................................... 36 MOVERS AND SHAKERS.......................................................................... 38

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PUBLISHER'S WORD

Thank you for a 10-year journey

SyracuseWomanMag.com contact@syracusewomanmag.com

PUBLISHER

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t’s funny how things start. In the fall of 2010, I received a phone call on a sunny afternoon from the copublishers of Rochester Woman Magazine, asking if I could meet with them for a few minutes to discuss an opportunity. “Sure,” I said. “When would you like to meet?” I didn’t realize that they were currently en route to my office, but they were at the front door within a few minutes. It wasn’t a long time to prepare for what would end up being a major shift in the focus of our company. I’ve always been a community news guy. To this day, I enjoy covering a beat, watching the machinations of local government, following up on the quaint features that make up a community newspaper and getting my fingers dirty leafing through the pages of our papers. But in the fall of 2010, as the folks from Rochester showed me their beautiful magazine, and described how we could create something similar here, I was wowed by the opportunity for our little community newspaper group to evolve and grow. It would take the right people to get it off the ground, and that’s where we were very lucky. Our first hire for the job of editor was Farah Jadran, who had previously worked in Eagle’s newsroom and was perfectly suited to be the editor of a women’s magazine (see cover story). Bright, energetic and enthusiastic, Farah saw it as her mission not only to tell great stories through the magazine, but also to be its face in the community. In her four years at the helm of SWM, Farah was omnipresent at community events, seeking out great stories and championing the magazine’s role in the lives of women in the Syracuse area. Farah’s hire was followed shortly thereafter by Renée Moonan on the advertising sales side, who was joined later in 2011 by Linda Jabbour. A magazine, by necessity, is a business, and businesses succeed or fail on the strength of the relationships they develop. Renée and Linda have worked tirelessly for a decade advocating for their clients and helping them promote their products and services in an attractive and compelling way. More than that, they love and believe in the magazine and what it means to the community of Syracuse women. It’s that passion that makes them, and by extension Syracuse Woman Magazine, successful. Like in any business, there have challenges along the way. Our vision in Syracuse of what Syracuse Woman Magazine should be differed from the that of our partners in Rochester, and after five years together, we bought out their share of the magazine and gained the freedom to produce the magazine in the way that we felt resonated with our local audience. That meant bringing on a new designer, and we were fortunate to find someone in Andrea Reeves who provided not only a great eye for what the magazine should look like, but insight into how the design, content and advertising intermingled to create a great reader experience. And of course, like so many local businesses, the pandemic made the celebration of our 10th anniversary anything but secure, forcing us to change how we staff and manage not only the magazine but our weekly newspapers as well. But with hard work and a loyal following, we’ve persisted. I’d like to congratulate the whole team from Syracuse Woman Magazine on 10 amazing years, and thank you, our readers, who make it all worthwhile. Best of luck in 2021 and beyond.

David Tyler January 2021

David Tyler dtyler@eaglenewsonline.com

DESIGN

Andrea Reeves

PHOTOGRAPHERS Alice G. Patterson Nancy Miller Sarah Heppell

CONTRIBUTORS

Sarah Tietje-Mietz Farah Jadran Nichole Cavallaro Amber Howland Jason Klaiber Lisa Sousou Russ Tarby Kenneth Sturtz

Lorna Oppedisano Alyssa LoFaro Sarah Hall Alice G. Patterson Renee Moonan Linda Jabbour Andrea Reeves

Cover photo by Alice G. Patterson

ADVERTISING SALES

Renée Moonan Linda Jabbour 315.657.7690 315.657.0849 Rmoonan@eaglenewsonline.com Ljabbour@eaglenewsonline.com

ADVERTISE WITH US

Unlike any other publication in the Syracuse area, our feature articles address major topics that interest local women. Each issue includes articles on health, fashion, fitness, finance, home matters, dining, lifestyle and personal perspectives, as well as a spotlight on local Syracuse women. Ads are due on the 15th of the month prior to publication. The print magazines will be distributed locally in over 350 locations and will be in your inbox electronically by the middle of every month. The publication is available free of charge.

CONTACT OUR HOME OFFICE 315.434.8889 | 2501 James Street, Suite 100, Syracuse, NY 13206

The magazine is published 12 times a year by Community Media Group, LLC and Eagle Publications, 2501 James St., Suite 100, Syracuse, NY 13206 Copyright © 2020 Community Media Group, LLC. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or republished without the consent of the publishers. Syracuse Woman Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited submissions, manuscripts, photos or artwork. All such submissions become the property of Community Media Group, LLC and will not be returned. 10th Anniversary Edition


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KINDNESS COUNTS

Central New York, you've surprised me yet again! Farah Jadran

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lthough this edition is published and it’s online and on stands - I am still letting the fact that I am the January 2021 cover woman, soak in. My journey with Syracuse Woman Magazine is one that will always be a part of me. SWM is more than a publication - it’s a community and it’s one that has made me and many others feel welcome. In this month’s column, I am reflecting on the kindness that’s been extended to me. I have lived in Syracuse for more than 12 years now and I would be lying if I said every single day was perfect. Life is flawed and that is part of why it’s so special. There were tough times and tough people determined to put me down or make me feel less than I truly am. Again, that’s life and it’s our choice to persist or retreat. I am proud to say I persisted. The Central New York community has become a part of me as I have joined boards and committees over the years, but it’s the people that have become my circle. I am grateful for each and every person I have had the honor to work with or to become friends with. These are special connections that have helped me thrive in many ways.

I must extend special thanks to the original SWM team - the group of passionate, dedicated and fun people that believed in what it could become. This is the group that helped get some of the first editions out into the community. I say my sincerest, “thank you,” to the publishers and designers, and also people like Colleen Farley, Renée Moonan, Linda Jabbour, Cindy Bell, Jussara Potter, Caitlin Bom, Rick Needle, Janet Detota and so many more people who have gone on to contribute over the years. Incredible women have also come on board to serve as editor over the years including Alyssa LaFaro, Lorna Oppedisano and Sarah Hall. Their talent and commitment will always be a part of the SWM history. I am blessed to do what I love every day in my job as anchor for CBS5 This Morning and CBS5 News at Noon. I am also blessed to work with amazing people at CNYCentral and many more across the region. I thank everyone in this community for their kindness to me. I hope everyone feels this welcoming spirit and then passes it on to others. Syracuse is the place where I earned my master’s degree, worked as a magazine editor and community newspaper editor, met the love of my life and continued my dream job in TV journalism. For all those things and more, I say, “thank you.” Kindness can change someone’s heart. It can help others realize there is a world around them and more to life than possessions and petty arguments. Kindness can be the message you wear and walk with because you choose to live life with genuine gratitude for each day you are given. Tomorrow is not promised. Why not spend today being kind and being positive? SWM

Farah Jadran is the anchor of CBS5 This Morning and CBS5 News at Noon for CNYCentral in Syracuse. Farah also served as editor of SWM for more than four years after she helped launch it in January 2011. If you or someone you know is spreading kindness in our community -- tweet at her -- @FarahJadran using #BeKindSyracuse. January 2021

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10 Years

together Spreading

Ovarian Cancer Awareness

Many Heartfelt Thanks:

Farah for dedication to sharing love & hope Syracuse Woman for bringing hope to CNY women Together - stronger - hope has flourished!

Hope is faith holding out its hand in the dark Do you know your ovarian cancer risk? Hope for Heather, PO Box 2208, Liverpool, NY 13089 501(c)3 hopeforheather.org Syracuse Woman Magazine

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SYRACUSE EATS

How sweet it is!

SUGAR BLOSSOM CAKE SHOP OPENS IN LIVERPOOL Russ Tarby

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wo innovative young pastry chefs – Kaleigh Ligoci and Lauren Scarpelli – are sweetening the Liverpool village business district by opening the Sugar Blossom Cake Shop at 304 Tulip St., across the street from the Cobblestone tavern. A ribbon cutting hosted by the Greater Liverpool Chamber of Commerce was held last month. “We’ll be specializing in custom cakes,” Ligoci said, “but we also plan to offer a variety of flavors of French macarons, specialty brownies and bars, cupcakes, cookies, cake slices, flourless chocolate cakes as well as coffee and tea.” On weekends, Sugar Blossom will also sell assorted breakfast pastries; sugarblossomcakeshop.com; 315-214-5637. Although the two baking ladies have barely passed age 30, they are each well-experienced in their chosen craft. An alumna of Cicero-North Syracuse High School, Ligoci went on to study baking production and management at Alfred State College. “After that I dove into the baking world at Mario’s Bakery in North Syracuse. I was there for a little over two years and then went on to work at Turning Stone Casino and Resort where I spent most of my six years there creating wedding cakes.” More recently Ligoci worked as pastry chef at Sugar and Company in Syracuse’s Armory Square and later at Half Moon Bakery and Bistro in Jamesville. Sugar Blossom co-owner Lauren Scarpelli graduated from Lake Placid High School before majoring in baking and pastry Arts at Paul Smith’s College in the heart of the Adirondacks. She interned at Cake Placid before accepting a pastry position at Adams Fairacre Farms in the Hudson Valley.

January 2021

Scarpelli then moved to Central New York and became pastry chef at Wysockies Manor in Cicero for a short time before joining the baking team at the Half Moon Bakery in Jamesville. The new cake shop will be open for business from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday through Friday and from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

Macaron vs. macaroon

Prepare to be dazzled by dozens of multi-colored French macarons at the Sugar Blossom Cake Shop. And make no mistake, we’re talking French macarons (pronounced “mack-ah-ROHN”) and not coconut macaroons (“mack-ah-ROON”). These two cookies are constructed in totally different ways. French macarons are sandwich cookies. They consist of two halves of delicate, airy cookie with a layer of filling in between. They’re like brightly colored Oreos. Sugar Blossom bakers Ligoci and Scarpelli said they will do their best to ensure that the size and shape of each macaron is as identical as possible. Color and flavor are what distinguish one macaron from another. By comparison, macaroons are fairly dense, ambiguously shaped dollops of coconut-flavored cookie, baked to a moderate shade of golden brown. For now, Sugar Blossom will only be serving French macarons, but Scarpelli said they may bake some coconut macaroons once warmer weather returns next year. SWM Kaleigh Ligoci and Lauren Scarpelli recently opened Sugar Blossom Cake Shop at 304 Tulip St. in the village of Liverpool.

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WISE WOMAN TIFFANY MUNFORD

January 2021

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SPECIAL FEATURE

Wedding woes

COUPLE KEEPS SMILING, DESPITE POSTPONING WEDDING THREE TIMES Kenneth Sturtz

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rittany Hoffmann wasn’t worried in December 2019 when she learned her maid of honor was pregnant and needed a new dress for the wedding, set for March 2020. The COVID-19 virus had temporarily shuttered production overseas, but Hoffmann stayed calm and eventually secured the needed dress. “I remember thinking that was our biggest problem,” she says. Looking back, the delay overseas was a harbinger of trouble to come. Before 2020 was over, the pandemic forced Hoffmann and her fiancé, Anthony Smith, to reschedule their wedding three times: from March to August, then to March 2021, and finally to October 2021. The ordeal left some emotional bruises, but the couple remains committed to each other and to getting married.

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Hoffmann, 28, and Smith, 29, met while students at SUNY Oswego. She was president of the figure skating club, which needed $17,000 to go to the U.S. Synchronized Skating Championships. He was president of the student government, which controlled the purse strings. When they ran into each other in a bar, Hoffmann gave Smith the hard pitch for the synchronized skating money. “We didn’t get that money, but I came out of it with a boyfriend,” Hoffmann says, laughing. After graduating in 2014, Hoffmann began working overnight shifts as a television producer at CNYCentral. Smith began graduate school at Syracuse University. In June 2018, Smith surprised Hoffmann with a marriage proposal on the shore of Lake Ontario at their alma mater. The couple settled on a long engagement, in part because they had decided to pay for the wedding themselves and wanted time to save. When they heard about the former Hotel Syracuse reopening as the Marriott Syracuse Downtown, they knew they wanted to get married there. But they weren’t sure if the venue was attainable. To their surprise, Hoffmann says a spring wedding at the hotel turned out to be more affordable than expected. They also pushed their engagement out to 2020 to leave them plenty of time to pay for everything. The couple were optimistic they would be able to have their wedding up until two weeks beforehand. Smith traveled to Las Vegas in February for his bachelor party and in March had a second party in Central New York for friends who couldn’t make the first one. The party was the weekend before St. Patrick’s Day. The morning after, they woke up to the news that seemingly everything in the state was closing down. “We knew that was it,” Hoffmann says.

Reluctantly, the couple began calling family, friends and their vendors. The news was somewhat of a surprise to the couple’s vendors and venue, which hadn’t yet had to deal with pandemicrelated wedding cancelations. The next Saturday the hotel had available was Aug. 29, 2020, which was wasn’t booked because it coincided with the New York State Fair. They took the date and all their vendors were available then too. “We’re thinking ‘Oh my god that’s so far away,’” Hoffmann says. ‘We thought we’d do a two-week shutdown and everything would be fine.” Friends and family were supportive. They’d already paid all their vendors so the change didn’t cost much. In about 10 hours the couple had postponed their wedding, rescheduled it and called everyone to let them know. “That was stressful for a day,” Smith says. “It was one day of stress and we just rolled with it.” Throughout the day Hoffmann maintained her composure, but a call to her florist brought her to tears. The flowers had already been ordered and half were already in transit. Hoffmann wondered what she was supposed to do with a mountain of flowers. They couldn’t be donated to nursing homes, as is typical, because of COVID. There was something especially disappointing about all those flowers sitting around the house on what was supposed to be her wedding day. In the end, the florist was able to cancel more of the order than anticipated. On March 28 – what should have been their wedding day – they picked up $500 worth of hydrangeas and greenery, made up 15 bouquets and placed them in vases around their Baldwinsville house.

Photos by Sarah Heppell

Continued on page 16

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SPECIAL FEATURE

Wedding woes from page 15

"At this point all I want is to wear my dress and walk down the aisle." — Brittany Hoffmann

Photos by Sarah Heppell

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“It was sad, but we had fun,” Hoffmann says. Joined by her fiancé, brother and mother, they had a taco party, mixed some of the signature drinks they had planned for their wedding and played a few wedding games. Their photographer sent them a box of delicious chocolate-covered strawberries. Their baker sent a special order of cupcakes. And that night Hoffmann’s bride’s maids surprised her with a video chat. Hoffmann and Smith were soon looking toward August with anticipation. By May the number of people allowed at private gatherings had increased. But the infection rate soon spiked again. When the state fair was canceled, their venue advised the couple to postpone yet again. The decision marked a low point. Hoffmann cried most of that weekend. The stress of picking another date mounted. More than a few friends suggested scrapping their wedding plans, getting their money back and doing something small. While Hoffmann and Smith say the thought crossed their minds, they rejected it for two reasons. The first was that they had already paid for their wedding well in advance. They’d grown friendly with many of their vendors, who now faced the economic destruction of the pandemic. “We couldn’t go to these people we knew and ask for the money back while they’re struggling,” Hoffmann says. “We knew we couldn’t do it.” The other hinderance was the fact that the couple were tied to the idea of having a big wedding with all their family and friends. Hoffmann and Smith “do nothing small,” she says. They love throwing over-the-top parties and events. A friend advised Hoffmann that she would regret not having the wedding she and her fiancé had imagined together. “We were already paid, so it was just a matter of finding a date that worked,” Hoffmann says. “So, we kept at it.” To the couple’s surprise, all their vendors and their venue had an opening for March 27, 2021, a year after their original wedding date. They scooped the date up, confident that the world’s troubles would be contained and their wedding day safe.

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But that wasn’t meant to be either. In late 2020, they began discussing the possibility of having their March wedding and reception with just 50 people. Whittling their guest list down from 150 wouldn’t be easy: Hoffmann’s father’s side of the family alone includes 75 people. The couple’s immediate family and bridal party worked out to 35 people. That left room for just 15 others. “I was OK with that,” Hoffmann says. “At this point all I want is to wear my dress and walk down the aisle.” When the couple discussed it, they realized the cost would be roughly the same whether they had 50 people or all their family and friends. They decided to take a chance again and reschedule their wedding once more. “If there’s one mistake we’ve made over and over it’s that we keep not pushing far enough,” Hoffmann says. “We’ve been wrong each and every time.” They kept the same venue and vendors and found just one open date all could make work: Oct. 15, 2021. They’ve become so close with them – especially their photographer, DJ and makeup artist – that they didn’t want to move ahead without them. As much as their wedding ordeal has consumed their attention, the planning was done long ago and the couple has moved on in some respects. Hoffmann now works in donor relations at Syracuse University and is finishing a master’s degree. Smith is an engineer at SRC and is in the process of earning a second master’s degree. Still, Smith says he’s glad they’ll be able to have the wedding they wanted, even if it is delayed. He says they devoted so much time and effort in planning a wedding that really reflects their personalities that it would have been sad not to get to share it with their loved ones. “Really the only difference is the day,” he says. “It’s worth holding out and waiting for.” Hoffmann agrees wholeheartedly, though she says they’ve got to make this date work. “That’s it though,” she says. “I’m not going to do this again.” SWM

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COVER STORY FARAH JADRAN

FARAH JADRAN

An attitude of gratitude SWM'S FOUNDING EDITOR REFLECTS ON THE GIFT OF GIVING BACK

Sarah Tietje-Mietz

Photo by Alice G. Patterson

"You know, when you live your dream, it feels so special." — Farah Jadran

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COVER STORY FARAH JADRAN

“I want to make sure that people know there are community members out there ready to support them and ready to help.” — Farah Jadran

Photo by Alice G. Patterson

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ore accustomed to breaking news and asking the questions, finding herself the subject of a story took journalist and anchor Farah Jadran out of her comfort zone. While others might react with trepidation to this role-reversal, Jadran responded with such openness and with such emotional vulnerability that the sincere and joyful person shone through. Jadran is someone who’s heart is filled to the brim with gratitude, with determination, and with love. Unselfishly, she pours her heart - and her talents into her community. “I want to make sure that people know there are community members out there ready to support them and ready to help,” Jadran said. “That's a gift to be able to do that. When I tell people it's a privilege to be a news anchor or a news reporter, it really is, because we're sharing stories for people who may not have a voice or who don't know how to get their voice and their message out there.” A decade ago - which both feels a lifetime and a moment to her Jadran was approached by David Tyler, publisher of Eagle News publications about coming in as editor for a new publication. At the time, Jadran was working as a copy editor at the Cortland Standard, but had worked with Eagle News as an editor after graduating from SU. The idea Tyler presented was for a magazine focused on the meaningful work being done by the women of the Syracuse region, and Jadran immediately jumped on board. “I remember in graduate school, when everyone was saying they wanted to work at Vogue, or Vanity Fair, or GQ, I raised my hand in my magazine editing class, and was like, it'd be really cool to be a part of a local or regional women's magazine,” said Jadran. “Because then people who are on the cover or in the stories – people know them. Women that they're like, ‘hey, she lives on my street,’ or ‘I go to her business,’ or ‘I've seen her do this!’ It'd be so neat to have a local women's magazine celebrating what women are achieving.” In January 2011, with Jadran on as editor, Syracuse Woman Magazine hit the newsstands. For Jadran, this was the start of a journey - a dream made reality - and she was helping it grow with each monthly edition. She met with leaders at the Women Business Opportunities Connection (WBOC,) the WISE Women’s Business Center, and local entrepreneurs. She brought in expert voices from healthcare, wellness, sports and fitness, and highlighted important community resources like Ophelia’s Place, Hope for Heather Ovarian Cancer Awareness, and Vera House. She gave readers faces and voices to connect with in these organizations. Miss America Nina Davuluri, Pastabilities owner Karyn Korteling, SU alumna and supermodel Emme Aronson, Beth Baldwin, Aminy Audi and Carolyn Audi, to name a few, all had their stories told by Jadran. She maintained her post as full-time editor of Syracuse Woman Magazine until July of 2014, making the difficult decision to move on work in the world of broadcast journalism at Time Warner Cable News (now Spectrum News). Leaving Syracuse Woman Magazine was like leaving a part of her identity, reflects Jadran. She strived to establish it as a meaningful local publication, and in turn, it had helped propel her further in her career in the mighty Salt City. Raised in the northwest suburbs of Chicago, a city much larger and with winters to rival our own, Jadran moved to Syracuse to pursue her master’s degree. Since then, she has found more

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meaningful friendships, more opportunities for mentorship, more rewarding career opportunities, and more love than she realized could exist in a small city like Syracuse. She met, fell in love with, and married her soulmate here. She accomplished her dream of becoming a television news anchor here. She created a life filled with dreams come true, all here in Syracuse. So how did a print journalist - someone who pursued writing in both her undergraduate and graduate education - move from writing new for the page to reporting it on air? Turns out, it was Jadran’s plan all along. As a child watching the local Chicago news, she saw her future; someone who brought viewers their news every day. Her colored markers became microphones and her family her interview subjects; breaking news came from her father while he shaved in the mornings. Her mother gave gifts of microphones and recorders, encouraging the budding reporter in her daughter. Jadran had no reservations for speaking in front of crowds and did not shy away from being on camera, but she knew to be the news anchor she aspired to be she would need to become a great writer. She worked her writing muscles in undergrad at Colorado State University at Pueblo, earning her bachelor’s in mass communications and news editorial and minoring in creative writing. At the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, she earned her master’s degree in magazine, newspaper and online journalism. As her peers at Newhouse learned of her goal to deliver the news on camera, she encountered questions and criticism for her choice of degree. “I probably heard that once or twice a week that I was wasting my time, I didn't know what I was doing, I was in the wrong program, I was never going to be a TV broadcaster. But I just knew that if I wanted to do it, I could do it,” said Jadran. “I just wanted to be a good journalist at the heart of everything. I consider myself not lucky, but blessed, because I've always kept the faith in myself.” Now the weekday anchor for CNY Central’s CBS 5 This Morning and CBS 5 at Noon, it was not just faith in herself that drove Jadran but the unfaltering support from her family. She grew up as part of a close-knit family of five, and speaking of them Jadran’s eyes well up, the love she feels for them overwhelming her. Her parents - “Papa'' who grew up in Afghanistan and “Mama” from Mexico - were the loves of each other's lives. Mama is Jadran’s rock, and though distance and the pandemic separate them, the two speak multiple times a day. Her father, a hero in Jadran eyes, was a machine operator who could fix anything. He passed away four years ago, and the grief from this loss is still fresh for Jadran. She holds his memory dear, recalling his love and selflessness for her family and for others. If there was someone in need, if a family was struggling, he would find a way to help. “He would come home and my mom and him would come up with ways to help them, whether it was buying some groceries for them, or if we had a piece of furniture we could give them,” Jadran said. “If you can't help someone with money or food or a tangible object, like, you know, what is it that you can do? There's always something you can do.” Continued on page 22

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COVER STORY FARAH JADRAN

An attitude of gratitude from page 21 This selfless spirit was deeply instilled in Jadran, and she perpetuates this legacy of giving back to her community. Three local non-profits - Helping Hounds Dog Rescue, Vera House, and Hope for Heather Ovarian Cancer Awareness of CNY - receive much of her benevolent focus, as each holds a special place in Jadran’s heart. When Jadran and her husband Niko Tamurian, sports director at CNY Central, began dating, he took her to Helping Hounds Dog Rescue. Having done volunteer work with them before, Tamurian knew Jadran was a lover of animals and brought her there to help walk the dogs. For her, it was such a meaningful experience to share with him, and the two continue

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volunteering with and promoting the organization. They bring this love for the organization home, with two of their three dogs - Bear and Bogey - coming to them through Helping Hounds. With the mission of preventing, responding to and partnering to end domestic and sexual violence and other forms of abuse, Vera House has many times been the subject of Jadran’s reporting. Understanding what an important resource it is to those experiencing abuse drove Jadran to make them an ally of Syracuse Woman Magazine. Personally, she wanted to ensure the resources they offered the community were known and celebrated in the community. An abuse survivor herself, Jadran wishes she had known about Vera House during her own experience, and takes promoting their mission to heart. In 2019, she was elected to and served as president of Vera House’s board of directors and continues to advance their work through her media channels. When Jadran first approached Hope for Heather’s founder Frieda Weeks, it was to help share their mission through Syracuse Woman Magazine. The two connected on a personal level immediately, and a friendship quickly developed. Weeks’ daughter, Heather, a professional dancer, had lost her battle with ovarian cancer at the age of 23, and Weeks and her husband established the organization to perpetuate their daughter’s work in raising ovarian cancer awareness. Jadran felt a meaningful connection with Heather’s story, with her own history with dancing and battling cancer. Since meeting Weeks, Jadran has become a spokesperson for Hope for Heather and uses her visibility in the media to promote their work and their daughter’s legacy. “Farah has helped Hope for Heather in so many ways. She has given her voice to the cause and helped us to share the importance of ovarian cancer awareness and education,” said Weeks. “Farah shows empathy and such compassion for our survivors. Because of Farah, lives are being saved in our community - what a precious gift.” It seems this desire to give of herself is compulsory for Jadran, and that spreading compassion and charitableness fuels her. Her social media feeds are filled with messages of positivity and inspiring stories. Though she is no longer the editor at Syracuse Woman Magazine, she contributes a regular column, “Kindness Counts.” where she focuses on spreading love and kindness through the community through simple acts. When the pandemic hit full swing she began sharing her personal affirmations of gratitude on her social media, reminding herself, and her followers, to take stock of the gifts in their lives. For Jadran, there have been so many blessings in her life so far, and there is not a moment that she is not thankful for each day. “It's been really a rewarding journey. When I look back at it, I just smile with so much gratitude, because I wanted all of these things,” said Jadran. “But they did start as dreams. You know, when you live your dream, it feels so special.” SWM 10th Anniversary Edition


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FITNESS

Don’t look back. You’re not going that way. Amber Howland

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ou made it. We made it. Pat yourself on the back because 2021 is here! However, a lot of what came with 2020 is still around us. I know many of you, myself included, woke up on Jan. 1 hoping that 2020 was a bad dream, and birds would sing in your window and pick out your clothes, just like Cinderella (but maybe that was just me). Either way it is a new year, and this time we are prepared for whatever this year throws at us. One of the more powerful quotes I have come across lately is: ‘Don’t look back. You're not going that way.’ That is how I want to kick off 2021 both mentally and physically. We can’t rewrite history and change what we did or how we coped with quarantine and the pandemic. However, we can write a more healthy and happy way of living in 2021. The most common New Year’s resolutions all revolve around losing weight, exercise, and eating healthier. We also know that these common resolutions often fall by the wayside after a few weeks or months. We are then left feeling defeated and say, ‘Next year will be my year!’ Let’s collectively not go down that road in 2021. What if we set small, attainable goals that don’t put all of the pressure on that one resolution? What if we keep commitments to ourselves instead of launching into a spiral of tasks that we think make us happy but just fill us with anxiety and madness? This year we are going to find healthy habits that make us smile and fill our minds and bodies with positive vibes! I want to share with you a few ‘life hacks,’ if you will, that might spark some motivation and joy in your world in 2021. Since losing weight and exercise are the most common, we will concentrate on those. It’s January, and it is cold. Honestly, there is no better place than the couch, watching Netflix under a heated blanket, but that can wait. We have work to do, and this year we are going to overcome obstacles and not just let life happen to us. Now, there are hundreds, if not thousands of excuses that we can use for why we are not getting any physical activity this winter. Trust me, I have heard them

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all and have used a few myself. There are just so many cool and fun ways to move your body for 30 minutes a day that won’t make you feel overwhelmed and will help you hit your fitness goals for 2021. Yes, some gyms are open but since everyone has varying comfort levels of public spaces, here are some options that you can put to work in your own home. Let’s start with steps. It really is that simple. According to our friends over at Fitbit.com, completing an extra 10,000 steps each day typically burns about 2,000 to 3,500 extra calories each week. One pound of body fat equals 3,500 calories. You do the math! It seems like a no brainer to me. Start being more mindful throughout the day of the number of steps you are taking. Most smart phones and watches track your steps. You can also find an inexpensive pedometer on Amazon. This makes it simple to track, so get to steppin’! Challenge a friend, co-worker, or just yourself to get the most steps in a week or month. Who doesn’t love a friendly competition? Next up, thanks to the beauty of the internet and various video sharing platforms out there, you can bring the joys of movement and the gym to your own living room. I’m not saying you need to invest in equipment like treadmills and weight machines. All you really need is the internet! There are thousands of fitness classes of various levels that are offered free to anyone at any time. You can find yoga, meditation, stretching, Zumba, high impact, or low impact workouts and even ones that use soup cans and wine bottles as weights. You might even want to squat with your newborn on your back or puppy in your arms! There are so many opportunities to move your body this winter and make yourself proud in 2021. Just remember that we are not going backward this year. 2020 is a wrap, and the future is forward. Sticking to small attainable goals will lead you to a healthier and happier you. This is your year so be proud, be strong and be well in 2021. See you on the road, Amber. SWM 10th Anniversary Edition


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WOMEN'S HEALTH

The challenges of life as an “XX” Dr. Shane Sopp, Urogynecologist

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have one wish when I die: don’t bring me back as a woman! Seriously, men could never do what women endure. That’s hard to fathom coming from a man, right? Not for me... when you’ve cared for 30 women a day for four decades, well, you do the math. But if you look at many of the physiologic challenges women have to face throughout their lifetime, I’m confident that we can find solutions to most if not all of them. I believe an educated patient is an empowered patient. As such, I invest time in our patients so that their decisions are based on current facts. The suggestions that follow assume that you have no medical conditions that would preclude you seeking my options. • Menstrual cycles: if yours are easy, don’t brag... your friends might hate you! They can be heavy, painful, irregular, and sometimes feel like they last forever. What causes the symptoms? Well there’s a domino effect. Your brain controls your ovaries and your ovaries control your uterus. And if you don’t have a perfect signal between the brain in the ovaries, to have a perfect ovulation, the receiver of that dysfunction is the uterus and, it doesn’t know when to grow a lining, how much to grow and when to shed it. There are also some benign disease states that can cause this such as endometriosis (when the lining of the uterus, called the endometrium, develops outside of the uterus and grows and sheds when the inside of the uterus does) which can also cause non-menstrual pain and pain with intercourse. • PMS (premenstrual syndrome) is a collection of emotional dysfunctional symptoms that occur before and during your period because that’s when your estrogen levels drop. • Functional ovarian cyst can also develop from that irregular signal between the brain and the ovary. They’re called functional because they’re actually a dysfunctional ovulation; typically most of the time they go away on their own. But while they’re there they can cause some significant one-sided pain. • A simple treatment for all of the above problems is something that controls ovulation. This can be a birth control pill or patch or ring, etc. and this is safe to take all the way to menopause. A progesterone IUD is another option for controlling painful/heavy menses, and it also gives birth control. And it has no negative affect on conceiving.

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• If endometriosis is the cause of your problems and you don’t want to take any of these above options, there are now some new medications to treat endometriosis more effectively than the birth control pill. • Fibroids don’t usually develop in women until her 30s or 40s. These are muscle balls in the wall of the uterus. Fibroids are to a uterus what knots are to a piece of wood. They don’t always cause problems, but when they do there are a number of medical or surgical options to take care of them and preserve your fertility. • Menopause, premenopause, perimenopause, postmenopause… very confusing. Let’s instead call it estrogen deficiency. Right around your early 40s your ovaries start to lose estrogen; just like cell phones losing their charge. And you start getting a plethora of symptoms, not just hot flashes: sleep disturbance, fatigue, decreased sex drive and orgasm, vaginal dryness, palpitations, depression and anxiety, decreased focus and memory, changes in your hair, facial hair, joint pain, headaches. If you don’t experience these, again, don’t tell those same friends! But just like cell phone batteries, you can recharge, and here’s something I’ll bet most of you are not aware of: estrogen does not cause breast cancer. Actually, it allows a breast cancer to be picked up earlier than if you’re not on it. Take it to the bank. Unfortunately, there’s not enough time to expand on this. But my wife has been on HRT for 20 years, and I love my wife. • PS: XX are your chromosomes. SWM

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WOMEN'S HEALTH

Pap smears and preventing cervical cancer Lisa Sousou

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anuary is Cervical Health Awareness Month. Did you know that cervical cancer used to be the most common cause of cancer death among women in the United States? Deaths in the U.S. from cervical cancer have declined more than 70 percent since the 1950s, after the introduction and widespread adoptionof cervical cancer screening. It is possible to drastically reduce your risk of developing cervical cancer by simply keeping up with regular Pap smears.

What is cervical cancer, and what causes it?

The cervix is the tip of the uterus, which protrudes into the back of the vagina. Almost all cervical cancers are caused by an extremely common virus called human papilloma virus, or HPV. Genital, including cervical, infections with this virus are sexually transmitted; almost all sexually active people will be infected with it at some point in their lives. Most people’s bodies do fight off and clear the virus eventually, and in most people, it does not cause any major or persistent problems. In some less common cases, the virus persists long-term, and in a proportion of these cases, it can cause cervical cancer. In men, it is common for HPV infection to have no symptoms. Some types of HPV can cause genital warts in men or women. Other types do not cause warts or anything visible but can still be transmitted to a sexual partner. In women, some types of HPV can cause changes in the cells of the cervix. These changes are called dysplasia. Over time, as the cells change more and more, dysplasia can progress from mild to moderate and then to severe. Most cases of mild cervical dysplasia, especially in young women, will resolve back to normal eventually. Some cases will progress to moderate and then to severe dysplasia. If severe dysplasia is not treated, it can progress to cervical cancer. This timeframe typically takes years.

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What is a Pap smear, and how does it help reduce cervical cancer risk?

If you are sexually active, especially with a new partner, using condoms can help reduce risk of catching HPV. If you do have sex without a condom, having regular Pap smears is the best way to reduce your risk. A Pap smear (or Papanicolaou smear, named after George Papanicolaou, its inventor) is a simple screening test whereby a sample of cells is obtained from the surface of the cervix, using a soft brush, and is examined in the lab for dysplasia or cancer. For many years, Pap smears were recommended yearly for all women once sexually active. In recent years, these guidelines were modified, and Pap smears are now recommended every three years starting at age 21. If any Pap results are abnormal, closer monitoring with more frequent Pap smears - up to yearly - are recommended, and sometimes further testing or biopsy of the cervix is done. Paps are recommended to be continued until age 65, at which time they can be discontinued if they are consistently normal. The point of the Pap smear is to catch cervical dysplasia in its early stages, when it is mild, so that it can be monitored for any progression, or until it resolves back to normal. Moderate or severe dysplasia is treated by removal of the dysplastic cervical tissue, which removes the HPV-affected cells, and thereby aborts the risk of progression to cancer. Cervical cancer typically develops so slowly that regular Paps are sufficient to catch early dysplasia before it leads to cancer. In women who are 30 or older, a test for high-risk types of HPV is often recommended in addition to the Pap. Combined Pap smear and HPV testing, called “cotesting,� may only need to be performed every five years. Some types of HPV are more associated with risk for cervical cancer than others. If a high-risk HPV type is detected, further testing or cervical biopsy may be recommended, whereas if HPV testing is negative, monitoring may be all that is required.

Resources for free or reduced-cost cervical cancer screenings for women without health insurance: New York State Cancer Services Program: (866) 442-CANCER (2262) Oswego County Opportunities Centers for Reproductive Health: (315) 598-4740 or (315) 342-0888 (Fulton, Oswego, and Mexico)

Family Planning Service: (315) 325-2010 (Syracuse and North Syracuse)

Planned Parenthood: (866) 600-6886 (Syracuse)

Are there other ways to help reduce cervical cancer risk?

The HPV vaccine helps protect against types of HPV which are associated with cervical, vaginal, and vulvar cancer. It is recommended to be given at age 11-12, but can be given up to age 26, and may even be an option up to age 45 if personal risk merits it. Using condoms and limiting the number of sexual partners can also decrease your risk of HPV infection, and quitting smoking is helpful as well. Of all cancers, cervical cancer is one of the most preventable, with regular screenings and prompt management of dysplasia. A gynecological provider or your primary care provider can perform cervical screenings. Make it a goal for the new year to schedule your well-woman exam and Pap! SWM

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SPECIAL FEATURE THE WOMEN OF SYRACUSE WOMEN MAGAZINE

The women of Syracuse Woman Magazine RENÉE MOONAN

ADVERTISING SALES CONSULTANT 2011 TO PRESENT

Putting pen to paper to write about something I have loved for 10 years has been an emotional challenge. A decade of Syracuse Woman Magazine has created so many beautiful and heartfelt memories. I truly believe in this magazine's mantra, "Women Supporting Women." That is why I decided to honor my mother, who passed away in 2018. She is the reason I love this magazine so much. Most women's lives are better when supported by other women - a lesson I learned early on in life. I was blessed with an amazing first woman role model in my Mom and she was the guide on which I patterned my life. My Mom's love was unconditional, her faith in God resounding and her support of her children was unwavering. I was raised with tenacious encouragement. My Mom was always in my corner and really made me feel like I could accomplish anything if I put my heart and soul into it. Even when I stumbled she never gave up on me. To this day this was her greatest gift: she believed in me even when I gave up on myself. I may falter along the way but that's OK because she taught me to just keep trying. Syracuse Woman Magazine has allowed me to live out how I was raised and to improve every day on being a better person. When we launched this beautiful magazine there were three amazing women by my side - Farah Jadran, Linda Jabbour and Colleen Farley whom I remain friends with to this day. There are so many women to thank: our talented creative director (and my prayer warrior) Andrea Reeves who came aboard in 2014; Cindy Bell, our past cover photographer; and Alice Patterson, our current cover photographer, who empowers women all over CNY to feel comfortable in front of a camera. The man at the helm of Syracuse Woman Magazine, publisher Dave Tyler, who trusted in the dream of a woman's magazine enough to make it a reality. Thank you from the bottom of my heart to all our loyal supporters, readers and clients. We are here today because of you, and only you! ■

LINDA JABBOUR

ADVERTISING SALES CONSULTANT 2011 TO PRESENT

2011 marks the beginning of the best and most inspiring and rewarding professional relationships that I have made through my work with Syracuse Woman Magazine, and its community of local women. While working at SWM since August 2011, as one of two major sales account managers for our monthly magazine, I have had the pleasure to meet and work with so many local women, and help promote what they do for their individual businesses and organizations. Many of our advertising clients have been with us since the beginning and the relationships that we’ve developed have gone beyond professional interactions and become personal and meaningful friendships. For each month's issue of SWM, we strive to feature the most inspiring and engaging local women - women who come from all walks of life and who have interesting, compelling, and thought-provoking stories. I also feel a very strong sense of purpose and direction, not just for what we bring to our Syracuse community in telling the stories of these wonderful women, but also with our continued partnerships and affiliations with so many charitable organizations that focus on improving the lives of women in Central New York. On a personal note, I cannot say enough, and give enough praise to our team at Syracuse Woman Magazine. We have had the most amazing group of talented editors, writers and designers during our 10-year journey. I am grateful for their time and efforts in making this beautiful magazine what it is today. January 2021

I know there are so many more exceptional and inspiring stories to tell for SWM. I look forward to continuing to meet our great women throughout CNY, and I look forward to reading these on the pages in the coming issues and years to come! Happy 10th Anniversary to us at Syracuse Woman Magazine! Let's celebrate in 2021 for all the good things to come! ■

ANDREA REEVES

CREATIVE DIRECTOR/DESIGNER 2014 TO PRESENT

My only other job was a cashier at Nichols in Liverpool and we counted back change in those days. So, art, design and teaching has been my life, love and career for a very long time. I am the history of graphic design. I believe art is not what you see but what you make others see. Ruth Ansel, first art director of Harper’s Bazaar in the sixties said, “being a magazine designer is like being an orchestra conductor.” For me, the challenge, beauty and magic of the composition that is Syracuse Woman Magazine lies in the visual “sounds” of diverse photography styles and subject matter with content that tells each story in a way that is functional, aesthetic and wrapped in human feelings. Our talented and well-rehearsed ensemble brings their best to each issue. I wish I could say I had the luxury of time, but my ultimate inspiration is the deadline. When I’m not burning midnight and weekend hours putting my SWM masterpiece together, I’m an art director at Zoey Advertising, adjunct professor at OCC, coproducer of nationally-airing docuseries, “Honor Flight Heroes” and a magnet for an eclectic collection of professional and familial relationships. Sometimes it feels more like plate spinning! It takes orchestration, sure, but I’ve built a life I don’t need a vacation from. How many can say that? I don’t let anyone rent space in my head who isn’t a good tenant and I am the energy I want to attract… I just can’t help myself… we designers don’t retire, we die. ■

ALICE G PATTERSON

COVER PHOTOGRAPHER OF SYRACUSE WOMAN MAGAZINE 2014 TO PRESENT

Shining a light on women entrepreneurs and community leaders is what I’m all about, both literally and figuratively. Over the last six years, I’ve photographed remarkable women with such interesting and varied stories for Syracuse Woman Magazine. There are cancer survivors, cystic fibrosis warriors, allies for refugees, government officials, financial planners, performers, educators, artists, neighborhood volunteers, small business owners, corporate leaders, and about everything in between. While each has their unique paths, there’s a common thread (most likely orange in color) which is Syracuse - a community they have found, built and leaned on. Growing up in a military family, and then moving often as an adult, I never had one city or town to call home for long. I had no idea what to expect when I left Los Angeles and relocated to Syracuse, in 2007. Rebuilding my business from scratch, was challenging, but when I pivoted to personal brand photography for creative women entrepreneurs, I discovered my happy place at work, and I also found my hometown. With both of my businesses Alice G Patterson Photography and Loving My Company LLC, I help women entrepreneurs with all of their personal brand photos and social media marketing images. I’ve put all of my blood, sweat and tears into building these businesses, and yet, when someone asks “What do you do?,” I often lead with, “I’m the cover photographer for Syracuse Woman Magazine.” It’s become a major part of how I define myself. ■ 10th Anniversary Edition


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NICHOLE CAVALLARO

CONTRIBUTING WRITER, SOCIAL MEDIA COORDINATOR 2016 TO PRESENT

My name is Nichole Cavallaro, and I am a licensed mental health provider, based here in Syracuse. I work as an online therapy provider, and blog about mental health on my practice site (www.mhwellnesstherapy.com). I started with Syracuse Woman Magazine in 2016, as a contributing writer on fashion/lifestyle for women. I wanted to write in hopes of empowering women to be confident with what they do, eat or wear. After writing on various themes throughout the year, I felt that I could offer something different to readers. I was starting my own private practice at the time and writing about fashion no longer fit my intentions. I wanted to write articles that would give women knowledge with regards to their mental health, so I presented this idea of a mental health and wellness section, and it was received well. I then started writing about various topics such as post-partum anxiety, parenting, holidays, the pressures of everyday life changes, and seasonal depression, to name a few. I choose to do all of this voluntarily because I believe in providing support if I am able to, as a qualified professional. I think it’s important to share my ability to educate women of all ages about mental health. A free magazine like SWM is so important to have as it showcases local businesses, helpful resources, and thoughtfully written pieces from many different writers who have a range of experience. I write for the woman who wants knowledge and support and I truly hope that my writing helps. ■

ALYSSA LOFARO SWM EDITOR 2014 TO 2015

Even though I had only been editor of Syracuse Woman Magazine for one year, my relationship with the publication extended well beyond that. I actually began writing for the magazine in the spring of 2012, working as an intern while pursuing my master’s degree at S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. I continued to produce stories for the magazine well beyond graduate school, until I was ultimately hired full-time in the summer of 2014. My beat for those few years before becoming editor was the WBOC feature. Little did I know at the time how large a role that organization would eventually play in my life; the friendships I’d form because of it, and the lessons I would learn. Perhaps the biggest lesson, WBOC — and, really, my entire experience at Syracuse Woman Magazine — taught me is the power of community. I don’t think I’ve ever felt that level of support in any other instance of my life. Even when I decided to leave Syracuse, and ultimately the magazine, to move to North Carolina, so many people encouraged me to follow that dream. A few who were particularly instrumental are Nicole Davidheiser, Allison Haslam, Mary Ellen and Dan Clausen, Jussara Potter, Linda Jabbour, and Renée Moonan. There are so many stories I could share here about the impressive people we featured, stories of grit and grace, of love and loss. But it’s my own personal story that was most changed by this publication and this place. I am forever grateful for that. To everyone who ever came across my path in Syracuse, please know I haven’t forgotten you. In the words of E. E. Cummings: “I carry your heart (I carry it in my heart).” ■

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LORNA OPPEDISANO SWM EDITOR 2016-2018

As I sit down to reflect on my time as editor of Syracuse Woman, the first thought that comes to mind is a slightly panicked one: how can I sum this up in a few paragraphs?! I could write a book about the influence the magazine played — and still plays — on my life. About two years ago, I left the world of journalism and joined the nonprofit community, working daily with people I’d had the privilege of writing about as SWM editor. These past couple of years have been a winding adventure, ultimately leading to the Museum of Science & Technology. Now, I work for an organization led by an amazing team of strong women. That’s only half the impact SWM has had on my life. Since my time as editor, I’ve had an idea simmering in the back of my mind. Since I had the honor of interviewing leaders and entrepreneurs, served on the WBOC Board of Directors, learned about the WISE Women’s Business Center — all with the amazing SWM team alongside me — I’ve thought about following in the footsteps of those influential women, to continue sharing their stories. This year, with the help of the community SWM built, I’m taking the next step on my own entrepreneurial journey and founding a storytelling business — Tell Me A Story. As I start down this path, I know that if not for my time as editor, I wouldn’t have an idea of which direction to turn. Thank you, SWM family, for being my foundation. ■

SARAH HALL SWM EDITOR 2018 - 2020

I took over as managing editor of Syracuse Woman Magazine in November of 2018. After 12 years with Eagle Newspapers covering Onondaga County’s northern suburbs, I was thrilled to be focused on telling the stories of some of the area’s most incredible women. Take survivors like Tiana Mangakahia. The Syracuse University women’s basketball guard was diagnosed with breast cancer last year at just 24. Her determination and poise was incredible to see in someone so young. Or public servants like Sharon Owens, the deputy mayor of the city of Syracuse, who has spent her life working to improve housing for city residents and provide a better life for mothers and children—and has done it with the brightest, most optimistic attitude I’ve ever seen in an elected official. (She gives Leslie Knope a run for her money.) Or Drs. Amy Tucker, Theresa Waters, Priyanka Pitroda and Luna Bhatta, who entered the traditionally male-dominated field of cardiology even though the odds were stacked against them. These are just a few of the stories I was able to share in my time as editor. There’s a lot more I would have liked to do with the magazine, and I’m disappointed I wasn’t able to pursue those goals. Unfortunately, the pandemic cut my career short. But I’m happy I was able to highlight just a few of the amazing women in the Central New York community. ■

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SPECIAL FEATURE 10 YEARS OF SYRACUSE WOMAN MAGAZINE IN PICTURES

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CELEBRATING 10 YEARS! (OR 120 MONTHS OR 522 WEEKS OR 3650 DAYS OR 87600 HOURS OR 315360000 SECONDS) AND COUNTING...

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INSPIRE

KELLY KINAHAN

AND THE APPLES OF DISCOVERY

Photo by Nancy Miller

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Local wellness educator goes picking for the positives with Beak & Skiff Jason Klaiber

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n old saying contends that one bad apple spoils the bunch, but to wellness educator Kelly Kinahan of Syracuse, some of those good apples deserve not to be discarded. While hoping to both avoid naïveté about present troubles in the world and counterbalance the negativity she traces back to news channels and social media outlets, Kinahan has sought to shine a spotlight on what she calls the “love and light” in life. This mission led her to team up with Beak & Skiff Apple Orchards for the launch of the “Good Apple” campaign this past fall. The campaign, which kicked off Oct. 5, involves the donation of all proceeds raised from purchases of a custom line of apparel to local nonprofit PEACE Inc., specifically its mentoring program Big Brothers Big Sisters, its early childhood development service Head Start and its Family Resource Centers located throughout Onondaga County that come to the aid of low income individuals. As stated on its official website, PEACE Inc. focuses on helping people in the local community realize their potential and become self-sufficient. For the campaign, the Beak & Skiff logo was fused with a symbol Kinahan had tattooed of a heart shape filling out a circle that represents Earth, denoting the spirit of her favorite Bob Marley anthem, “One Love.” The apparel options include a women’s scoop-neck sweatshirt, a women’s v-neck T-shirt and a crew-neck tee designed for men. The clothing, laundered for reduced shrinkage, was ordered from Rochester-based screen printer and embroiderer Grizzly Graphics Outfitters Inc., for which Kinahan’s brother-inlaw Erik Mort serves as the operations manager. The idea that blossomed into the recent “Good Apple” endeavor originated at an August yoga retreat organized by Fayetteville studio Mindful Yoga, where Kinahan had met Marianne Brennan, Beak & Skiff’s co-owner and senior director for brand development. The two had been paired together for a meditative exercise involving prolonged staring into each other’s eyes from a specified distance, which sparked an instant connection. As they left the site, Kinahan and Brennan began conversing about the ideograph the former’s tattoo depicts, a now-trademarked symbol which adorns her Jeep’s tire cover and the shirt she wore the day of the excursion. Within a month, they had put the finishing touches on designs for the new apparel line and had established contact with Sharon Thompson, the marketing and special events director for PEACE Inc.

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“Marianne and I wanted to support a local nonprofit with programs that support the youth in our county,” Kinahan said. Kinahan acknowledges that she may never meet the children and the families the campaign will assist, but she said she takes pleasure in knowing the project could change others’ lives for the better. The autumn-through-winter campaign ties back to the Pro*Ject LoVe movement she initiated for the purpose of collaborating with artisans to design “high-quality” products and benefit nonprofits either through a larger company or directly, past recipients of support being the eating disorder treatment center Ophelia’s Place and the abuse prevention organization Vera House. “Month after month, it’s a snowball,” she said. “Wherever the project is meant to go, it’ll go, but I'm trying for now to start local.” The positivity-centered objective of Kinahan’s personal blog, called K.K. Discovers after her initials, has acted as something of a spiritual compass. The blog, along with its corresponding Instagram page, is part travelogue and part health and wellness guide. Kinahan, who has been diagnosed with Lyme disease and shows symptoms of multiple sclerosis, shares information about her mental and physical progression through the struggles of her afflictions along with nods to holistic and natural approaches she finds useful. On top of featuring yoga bags and other apparel for sale, she also posts free-to-watch Pilates instruction videos to kkdiscovers.com to help people strengthen their bodies and alleviate pains. “Whether you’re a mom at home with kids now or somebody who just financially can’t afford a yoga or Pilates class, I just want to share that with people,” she said. Kinahan, by day the president of facilities services company Kinahan Associates LLC, said she hopes her passion projects can, at some point, morph into a full-time venture. “Good Apple” apparel, previously available in-store at the grounds on Cherry Valley Turnpike in LaFayette, can still be purchased online. More information can be found on beakandskiff.com under the “Shop” tab. “I love how people throughout our community and beyond come to Beak & Skiff to support their efforts, enjoy a variety of apples and other staples while creating lasting memories,” Kinahan said. “Through the 'Good Apple' campaign, all of us can show how a simple act can truly make a positive impact on the lives of others." SWM

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MOVERS AND SHAKERS

Douglas joins Bregman as co-executive directors of Vera House

Effective Dec. 1, Randi Bregman and Angela Douglas now serve as co-executive directors of Vera House, Inc. Bregman was appointed executive director of Vera House, Inc. in 2001 and has been with the agency since 1990. During her first 11 years at Vera House, she served as the coordinator of the Syracuse Area Domestic Violence Coalition. Over the past 19 years, she has overseen the everyday work at Vera House and is responsible for administration and financial management, supervision of staff, fundraising and fund development, community education and professional training and program development for the agency. Douglas left her role as executive director of Mercy Works to join Vera House as associate director in the fall of 2017. She had also served as the executive director and founder of Visions for Change, another local human service agency. Douglas came to Vera House having served on several non-profit boards and with extensive experience as a consultant on leadership, conflict resolution and board development. “Angela has the experience, skills and talent to be the executive director of Vera House,” said Bregman. “Furthermore, she is a woman of color and a survivor - identities that help our agency advance our strategic direction and further our mission. I am confident that Angela serving as co-executive director will strengthen Vera House as we head into 2021 and beyond.” “I am passionate about the mission of Vera House, the quality of the work we do and the staff who implement our programs and services,” Douglas said. “Working together, we can enhance the impact Vera House will have on the communities that we want to serve. We will leverage our strengths outside of the traditional avenues and build greater community partnerships that impact clients and center the voices of survivors.” Bregman and Douglas will formally share leadership of Vera House in partnership with other executive leaders. Both will be actively engaged with

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the board of directors and foundation board of trustees, and will play key roles in budgeting, program development and fund development. “The combined leadership, skills and talents of Randi and Angela is a recognition of the reality of how Vera House can operate more effectively,” said Barbara Karper, president of the board of directors.

Regan’s Acts of Kindness brings holiday joy to families Regan’s (“ree-gan’s”) Acts of Kindness is proud to announce it brought smiles to the faces of more than 1,000 children and adults, thanks to the generous response to the 2020 Regan’s Ornament Drive. The annual event got off to a slow start; due to the COVID pandemic, donations to local businesses were way down. But then, with the help of social media and an Amazon Wish List, donations started pouring in. The record was 36 separate boxes delivered in one day! Ornaments were given to babies born at St. Joseph’s Health Hospital, Albany Medical Center in Albany, and Fairview Hospital in Great Barrington, Mass. Hundreds more were handed out to children who are patients at Golisano Children’s Hospital, the Upstate Cancer Center and Joslin Diabetes Center in Syracuse. Still more are going to residents at the Nottingham Assisted and Independent Living, Vera House, McKinley Brighton Elementary School, and Tillie’s Touch. Regan’s Acts of Kindness is a 501c3 charity started after 3-year old Regan Shetsky was hit by a car and killed in her nursery school parking lot in Eastwood. January 4, 2021 will be the 4th anniversary of her death. For more information, visit regansactsofkindness.com or follow them on Facebook. Regan Shetsky’s big brother, Gavin, and little brother, Grayson, help with deliveries of ornaments that Regan’s Acts of Kindness is distributing to are children and families. SWM

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UPCOMING EVENTS Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays during January

Nature’s Ninjas at the MOST What: When: Info:

Every species of animal has evolved some mechanism to protect themselves from attack – every animal has a self-defense strategy; size, claws, teeth, venom, poison, and so many more. Nature’s Ninjas explores some of the most common and most unique mechanisms of self-defense in the animal kingdom in this kid-friendly, interactive, live animal exhibit. Included in the exhibit will be varied species of animals, vibrant panels of content about the animals and their natural disguises, and a full-time staff member to educate guests, as well as perform four live animal programs per day. Live shows at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. (the museum is closed daily from 1 to 2 p.m. for cleaning) most.org/natures-ninjas/

Sunday, Jan. 17

Your Favorite Things with Symphoria What: When: Info:

Last season, you loved it when Symphoria played our favorite pieces. This season, patrons get to vote on your favorite pieces. What will the program include? The only way to find out is to come to the concert! Voting took place during the fall of 2020. This event is livestreamed. 3 p.m. For information and tickets, visit experiencesymphoria.org

Friday, Jan. 22 & Saturday, Jan. 23

Guided Moonlight Snowshoe Hike What: When: Info:

A winter moon lights the way as your group explores the Beaver Lake Nature Center’s woodlands and frozen marshes on snowshoes. Registration is required beginning at 8 a.m. the day of the hike, and space is limited. This program will be offered only when conditions are acceptable. Rent snowshoes for $5. Masks are required, if unable to social distance. 7 p.m. onondagacountyparks.com

Saturday, Jan. 23

Tai Plays Tchaikovsky What: When: Info:

Ring in 2021 with Tai Murray and the amazing Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto. Samuel Barber’s Essay No. 1 will be sure to please. Sibelius’s inventive and powerful Symphony No. 5 is the perfect finale. This event is livestreamed. 7:30 p.m. For information and tickets, visit experiencesymphoria.org

Saturday, Jan. 30

Japanese Ikebana and Culture What: When: Info:

Ikebana is the ancient Japanese art of flower arranging. It has become an art form that is associated with a meditative quality. This virtual talk will introduce the principles of Japanese Ikebana and demonstrate the Sogetsu style Ikebana. Let’s learn, practice, and experience Japanese Ikebana and Japanese culture together. Led by Jia Man, Japanese and Chinese instructor of Foreign Language at LeMoyne College. Materials list is provided and you must pre-register to participate. $16 for Everson Museum members and $20 for non-members. Available on Zoom. 2:30 to 4 p.m. everson.org, or call 315.474.6064

January 2021

10th Anniversary Edition


39

Syracuse Woman Magazine

SyracuseWomanMag.com


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Syracuse Woman Magazine - January 2021 - 10th Anniversary Edition  

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