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CROUSE FULL PAGE

April 2021

Leadership and Entrepreneurs Edition


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Syracuse Woman Magazine

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

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april PUBLISHER'S WORD................................................................................6 KINDNESS COUNTS Leading by example.................................................................... 8

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BACK TO WORK Employment: Thinking of re-entering the job force? Where to start?...................................................................... 10 Fashion: Business casual is in.............................................................. 12 WBOC Leading Lady: Elizabeth Allen Don't be afraid to take a risk............................................... 14

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SPECIAL FEATURES The women of WISE................................................................... 16. Evoking creativity in Marcellus............................................28 On the front lines....................................................................... 34 ON THE COVER Pam Brunet: Leading the way............................................... 18

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HEALTH Women's Health Making heads or tails of your annual GYN checkup...................................................................... 24 INSPIRE Ellen Goodeve - Witness Investigations.......................... 32

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MOVERS & SHAKERS........................................................................... 37 UPCOMING EVENTS............................................................................. 38

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WELCH JEWELERS FULL PAGE

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PUBLISHER'S WORD

Brighter days are ahead The April edition of Syracuse Woman Magazine has always had a focus on women in business, and from my perspective, the timing in 2021 couldn’t be better. As I write this, we are a few days removed from the grim first anniversary of the declaration of the COVID-19 pandemic, and while the challenge is not over, bluer skies are approaching. Vaccinations are up. Hospitalizations and deaths are down. Schools are preparing for five days a week of in-person instruction. Restaurants are opening to a greater capacity. People in many industries are returning to their offices. With grandma and grandpa vaccinated – and perhaps others as well - families are safely resuming small social gatherings. What seemed never-ending now appears to have a defined end. We don’t know exactly when that will be, but each day we are getting closer to the time when life will return to normal and it feels hopeful and good. We’re getting back to business. So in this edition on Leadership and Entrepreneurship, we focus much of our attention on returning to work, whether that be looking for or creating a new job, or returning to the office after a year of working from home. We also examine some of the resources that are available to entrepreneurs, to include the WISE Women’s Business Center. Historically, WISE has hosted a symposium in April where women entrepreneurs in Central New York have come to share ideas, network and be inspired. Although the symposium is on hiatus, WISE continues to support female entrepreneurs with classes and counseling in smaller or virtual settings. And we meet some new entrepreneurs as well as some that have run their own businesses for some time, in fields as diverse as early childhood education and private investigation. Every entrepreneur has a unique story to tell, but to be successful, they all share a passion for their chosen field. Finally, our cover woman for the month of April is someone who embodies the CNY spirit. As the executive director of Leadership Greater Syracuse, Pam Brunet is an enthusiastic and energetic supporter of this great community and leads an organization that helps train Central New Yorkers to step up and make a difference, whether that is in government, their professional life, or in service to the many not-for-profits that contribute to the area. In describing her work, Brunet said: “We do have so much going right in our community, and we do have a lot of serious concerns, but the people who are attracted to us are the people that say, ‘This is a great place to work, this is a great place to live, we have our problems, but I want to be a part of solving those problems.’” For much of the past year, we’ve focused our attention on protecting our community, nation and world from the scourge of a deadly virus. While that challenge still exists, we now must redirect our focus to safely reigniting our economy. As you will read in this edition, that course is being charted in large measure by Central New York’s women entrepreneurial leaders.

David Tyler April 2021

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Farah Jadran Heather Shannon David Tyler Emma Vallelunga

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KINDNESSCOUNTS KINDNESS

Leading by example:

YOUR IMPACT IS BIGGER THAN YOU KNOW Farah Jadran

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ith social media becoming such a big part of our daily lives, it's very possible you don't know who is watching. Even with privacy settings, some people are scrolling and seeing what you're saying, doing or planning on doing. Your freedom of speech and ability to express yourself is important and something we all enjoy. However, I think it's important to know just how much of an impact you can make even when you are not intending to. I love when I see people posting kind words, encouragement or happy news. It's not just a positive experience for me, but I know other people may have a chance to see it too. If we are constantly focusing on the negative or putting out opinions to put down other people, what are we doing? Are we truly being our best selves and setting the best example? Outside of the digital world, keep in mind how important a smile is. Nowadays, people can't see your smile because it’s usually behind a mask, but they can tell if you are smiling through your eyes and if you wave or have a positive tone in your voice. A simple wave, kind word or smile could change someone's day. It could change somebody's outlook and could inspire them to lead by example as well. If we are all focusing on being our best selves even on the hardest days, we would likely see more ripples of change in our community.

April 2021

Take a moment to think twice. What are we doing to make a positive impact on our own lives? If we aren't even doing that, we know that we are not benefiting those around us. If you are always seen as negative, angry, rude or jealous, it will impact others. Being a leader is a lot to ask. It is a responsibility but also something to be proud of. We can all be leaders in our own ways. Remember, someone is always watching in some form or fashion. It's easier said than done. Every day is not perfect, but it is a gift. Each day is what you make of it. I am pledging to do my best to be my best self, lead by example and inspire others to do the same. Kindness can change someone’s heart. It can help others realize there is a world around them and more to life than possessions and petty arguments. Kindness can be the message you wear and walk with because you choose to live life with genuine gratitude for each day you are given. Tomorrow is not promised. Why not spend today being kind and being positive? SWM Farah Jadran is the anchor of CBS5 This Morning and CBS5 News at Noon for CNYCentral in Syracuse. Farah also served as editor of SWM for more than four years after she helped launch it in January 2011. If you or someone you know is spreading kindness in our community -- tweet at her -- @FarahJadran using #BeKindSyracuse.

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Celebrating over 12 years as a Medicare specialist Medicare consultation & enrollment services

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SPECIAL FEATURE: EMPLOYMENT

Thinking of re-entering the job force? Where to start? Susan Crossett

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ow more than ever women need to support one another, stand up for each other and find ways to empower each other. The pandemic has impacted each of us in some way, but women have felt the brunt of it from an economic perspective. Unemployment among women has hit double digits for the first time since 1948. Many women have had to leave the workforce to care for loved ones or due to lost childcare, and then they have been forced to become teachers on top of everything else. Now as schools start to reopen and jobs are coming back, women are thinking about how to return to the workforce. How do I find my next position? Are there safe jobs out there? For current jobs available one resource is the NYS Department of Labor jobs board. Local staffing and recruiting firms are additional good resources. Temporary employment may be a good way to determine if a role is a good match for you or if a position is something you would like to take on permanently in the future. Check out positions listed at staffing firms like CPS Recruitment. We have a variety of open positions with local employers looking for talent. Network with your friends and neighbors to let them know you are looking for work. Conversely, if you know someone looking for work, offer to review their resume, and share it with your contacts. Some women are still fearful to return to work as the pandemic continues. In light of this, many employers have decided that some jobs can and will remain remote. Often, they will provide employees the tools to work from home including computers and training. This arrangement helps women find gainful employment while still taking care of their family. Work-from-home positions can frequently be found in call center or customer services roles, medical billing, or proofreading/editor jobs. These jobs can often be part-time or full-time with different shifts available, offering greater flexibility. Start-up businesses often use temporary staffing firms to manage workload as they grow. This provides companies the opportunity to determine if there is a good fit and/or if the job needs to be restructured or redefined. A recent study by the National Women’s Law Center found since February 2020, 5.1 million women lost jobs compared to 4.4 million men. Through this massive job loss many women have decided to start their own businesses. We can support one another by seeking out women owned businesses and buy from them. As we emerge from this emerge from this pandemic, we must remain committed to supporting women and their career goals. SWM Susan Crossett is the Chief Executive Officer of CPS Recruitment.

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FASHION

Business casual is in when heading back to the office Chiara Giannuzzi syracuseny.clothesmentor.com

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t is finally spring 2021, and you have spent the last year working from home. But with many women traveling back to the office, it begs the questions: What's in? What’s out? What can I wear? All these questions are traveling through our heads. Since the pandemic, you feel like you have been in a bubble and it’s time to conquer the world. After all, you have probably been rewashing the same sweatpants or pajamas every week to get ready for the following work week...from your kitchen counter. So now the big question is, ‘What to wear into the office?’ Well it’s simple and we'll break it down. And yes, all your dreams are coming true because business casual wear is in and it’s here to stay! Business casual is fun. It’s somewhat dressy and who doesn’t miss dressing up? There is nothing more comfortable and fashionable than that jogger/blazer look! Grab a pair of grey or any color jogger (the stretchier the better, they can even be sweat-pant style), your basic white T shirt (make sure to tuck in the front just a little) and any color blazer of your choice. You can add a chunky high heel or even some fashionable athletic type sneakers! Yes...sneakers, they are now part of business casual. How fun and exciting, right? There are so many different looks and styles when it comes to business attire at the office and one favorite for many is the oversized T-shirt (don’t forget to tuck the front or tie it) paired with a long pencil skirt and a flat sandal. The options are truly endless. You may also want to bring out the full on suit jacket and matching pants since it’s here to make a comeback. Add the vintage sunglasses for that fly 1970s look! A further option is the oversized casual lightweight long coat style over a legging and Crew neck top. It’s an appealing look for many. Also keep in mind the wide leg dress pant is also back in town. Pair it with a button down blouse tucked in and your favorite pump and you are guaranteed to steal the show! One last fun way to get trendy with footwear this spring is the chunky flat shoe (platform style). It's huge this year and can really spice up your business casual look! There really is no crucial rule for heading back to the office this spring... it’s truly all about being comfortable and fashionable and this year fashionable means bold and bright. It means casual yet stylish. It means confidence and charisma! SWM Chiara Giannuzzi is a personal stylist with Clothes Mentor. Find her on Instagram: @chiaraconcepts.

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WBOC LEADING LADY

ELIZABETH ALLEN WBOC LEADING LADY

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Don’t be afraid to take a risk Alyssa Dearborn

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tepping into the world of entrepreneurship can be an intimidating goal for anybody. But local entrepreneur and WBOC member Elizabeth Allen proved that stepping into the world of business is a realistic and achievable goal. “We all have something inside of us that we can share,” Allen said when asked about her own entrepreneurial philosophy. “We’re all unique. We have something to share, something to offer. And you have to believe that. There’s something that you’re interested in, that you’re passionate about. Take that risk. Believe you can do it. Take that first step.” Allen is a Mary Kay independent seller and beauty consultant. She recently became an advanced skin care and color consultant with the company. Although the company has gained a reputation for being a makeup company, Allen wants customers to remember that at its core, Mary Kay is in the skin care industry. “My current and potential customers are anyone with skin. Women and men. Everything that I do is with a desire to help women feel beautiful inside and out, to empower, inspire, and support my customers by providing quality products and exceptional customer service.” Like it is for many other businesspeople in other industries, Allen finds developing reliable clientele to be both a blessing and a curse. “The biggest challenge for me is building my customer base,” She explained. “But the most rewarding thing is—at the same time—meeting people and building the relationships with other women, with my team members, or my sales director, or my customers. It’s not just about sharing the products—I mean it is—but it’s more about the relationships and helping women realize their beauty by caring for their skin.” When building those vital connections for a business or entrepreneurship opportunity, sometimes the roots of a good client list begin with the people who you already know. That is a lesson that Allen learned early on in her work. All of her early connections were people she already knew well and already supported her. All those existing connections would turn into new leads. “You set up skin care parties, cosmetic parties, or pedicure parties and you share the products with your customers or potential customers.” She said when asked about her contact

building strategies, “So then she purchases the products. Then she might want to host a party and invite her friends, her family, and hopefully that’s going to build that way. You’re going to meet new people that way. You can just chat people up and you’ll start to know each other and share.” The WBOC, an organization that connects and helps women in a variety of industries, has been a vital resource in helping Allen on her journey, providing her with networking opportunities and educational experiences. “The WBOC, again, it’s the wonderful, smart, kind women that I met through the programs, the networking, gives me an opportunity to share our business with the members of the WBOC,” Allen said. “It’s really the encouragement, the support, educational opportunities, and the relationships. I just really have gotten to know some really impressive women.” A great aspect of the WBOC is how businesswomen are able to learn from one another. When asked what advice she had for other entrepreneurs starting their journey, she was able to recall some things that she learned from her own experiences. “I think time management, you know, organizing your time. Working the time and creating a work schedule for yourself. And it depends. I think it depends on the business. But definitely managing your time, being consistent with the things that you need to do to get things done, to realize things. I think education is important. Staying educated, getting connected with organizations and groups that are supportive of you and what you’re doing. Just taking it one day at a time. It’s pretty cliché, but it’s true.” But one of the most important pieces of advice Allen had for new entrepreneurs was a simple bit of inspiration: take the risk. “Again,” she added, “these are trite, cliché things about falling down and getting back up, but it’s important. Don’t be afraid of failure because we all learn from our mistakes. You’ve got to allow yourself to make mistakes. And again, reach out. We need to do it together. You need to have some support.” But at the core of Elizabeth Allen’s work is a deep desire to connect with her community and help her fellow women. “It’s about giving back and supporting other women and building relationships. I think that’s something that’s pretty important.” SWM

“It’s really the encouragement, the support, educational opportunities, and the relationships. I just really have gotten to know some really impressive women.” — Elizabeth Allen

Syracuse Woman Magazine

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SPECIAL FEATURE

The Women of WISE Emma Vallelunga

The leadership team at the WISE Women’s Business Center are Carolyn Tucker, administrative specialist, Meghan Florkowski, director, and Kim Dryden, program manager, pictured below.

Photo by Ana Gil Photograhy

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t one point in time, business was a man’s world. Women dreamt of being more than just the secretary who only took his phone calls, scheduled his meetings or fetched his coffee. Today, those dreams are a reality, and women who run their own businesses can achieve greater success with the help of the WISE Women’s Business Center. Funded by the U.S. Small Business Administration and hosted by the Whitman School of Management at Syracuse University, the WISE (Women Igniting the Spirit of Entrepreneurship) WBC has provided business and economic resources, connections and counseling for women entrepreneurs in the Central New York area for more than 15 years. Along with an advisory board of about 16 members, the center’s management team consists of three experienced and highly qualified women who are inspired by entrepreneurship, female empowerment and love of Syracuse. Meghan Florkowski was appointed WISE director in November 2019. Her entrepreneurship experience came from her work leading various training programs at the Institute for Veterans and Military Families at SU, including the Veteran Women Igniting the Spirit of Entrepreneurship program, or V-WISE, which focused on inspiring women veterans to seek opportunities in business. As a former USO operations manager, a military transition career-training leader stationed in Germany and a military spouse, Florkowski saw the value in working for service organizations and helping people solve their problems. “My favorite part of our work is when we can make those connections that we feel are truly going to take those businesses ahead,” Florkowski said. “Sometimes it’s just as simple as opening April 2021

the door to an introduction that can make all the difference. I feel honored to get to do the work we do every day.” For Kim Dryden, being WISE’s program manager was a perfect option for her when she joined the team last October. After receiving her MFA in documentary film-making in North Carolina and working as head of video for a tech start-up company in California, Dryden moved back to New York as a self-employed digital marketing and content creation consultant for small businesses and nonprofits in the Syracuse area. “I wanted to find a way to plug back in to the Syracuse community after growing up here but not being here for so long,” Dryden said. “When the WISE position popped up, everything clicked. Entrepreneurship is one of the most empowering things you can do with your life if it’s what you want to do, and I didn’t know that was on the table for me either, so I love the idea of celebrating stories of women entrepreneurs that come from all different types of backgrounds.” Carolyn Tucker became WISE’s administrative specialist in September. With a bachelor’s in communication studies from SUNY Oneonta and career backgrounds in customer service, operations and human resources, she served as a student services coordinator with SU’s University College where she became passionate about Syracuse and later heard about WISE’s open position. “I really enjoyed that environment of teaching and learning, and I’ve always really liked being able to help people,” Tucker said. “One of my favorite things is getting to know the community and getting to see all the connections that I was already aware of Leadership and Entrepreneurs Edition


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Photo by Ana Gil Photograhy

Barb Stone, Caeresa Richardson and Lacey Roy-Ciciriello make up the business counseling team at the WISE Women’s Business Center.

downtown and in the greater area, so [it’s] knowing that you’re helping people to grab hold of some of that economic power that [women] are so often denied.” The women working at WISE collaborate almost every day, but because of the COVID-19 pandemic, their in-person interactions have become limited or nonexistent. The environment of both nonprofits and small businesses across the country has changed dramatically, but the center took those challenges in stride with many changes to its programming and accessibility for its clients. Because Dryden’s position as program manager is grant-funded until the end of the year, her main role at WISE is all about combating COVID. Dryden said many women have reached out asking for business advice, questions and counseling for problems that seemed more complicated because of the pandemic. In order to dispel some of that confusion, the center created the Small Business Resilience Course on its website. The program offers seven easily accessible and free-to-download modules that give entrepreneurs lessons and tips on topics like mitigating the economic impact of the pandemic, protecting employees and even working remotely. Dryden said the SBRC was a good example of the center’s responsiveness to people’s needs by providing them with important information. “If you look at the modules, they at first maybe feel a little scattershot, but the way that it happened was through focus groups, so it’s very tailored to what the local community needs,” Dryden said. Syracuse Woman Magazine

“We’re taking a lot of that material, and [we’re] updating, repurposing and trying to find new ways to get it out there.” Another initiative the center provides is free small business counseling. Its three counselors, Barb Stone, Caeresa Richardson and Lacey Roy-Ciciriello, are experienced business owners in the Syracuse area who work with WISE to help others achieve their goals. Tucker said each client who fills out a counseling intake form on the center’s website is matched by the management team with a counselor. “They can talk about strategizing for their business, help with a business plan, get marketing assistance, really anything that they need, they can talk about with their business counselor,” Tucker said. “We also do our best to connect that client, in addition to the business counselor, to other mentors or resources, so it allows them to get really personal connections outside of their counselor as well.” In years past, the center organized a WISE Symposium in collaboration with the Whitman School every April. It featured a wide range of keynote speakers and networking opportunities for women leaders to share insights and empower others in their own business models. But the pandemic put the 18th annual symposium on hold in 2020. Florkowski said there are no solid plans to host a symposium in 2021, but the center is brainstorming other event opportunities for the future and is hoping to gather safely in-person again soon. SWM To learn more about the WISE WBC, visit their website at wisecenter.org, or email them at wisecenter@syr.edu or call (315) 443-8634 SyracuseWomanMag.com


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April 2021

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COVER STORY

PAM BRUNET Leading the way BRINGING ENTHUSIASM AND EXPERIENCE TO LEADERSHIP GREATER SYRACUSE Emma Vallelunga

Pam’s hair and makeup stylist – Ashleigh Minnoe. Syracuse Woman Magazine

Photo by Alice G. Patterson

"All of [the programs] are about inspiring people to make a difference in the community, and for me, it’s truly about connecting them to their passion." — Pam Brunet

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COVER STORY

Leading the way from page 19

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am Brunet has put her heart and soul into Central New York. The executive director of Leadership Greater Syracuse has connected thousands of people to their passion through years of hard work, advocacy and philanthropy on her mission to make Syracuse a better place one leader at a time. Brunet said her career path has led her exactly where she needs to be. After earning her associate’s degree in journalism from SUNY Morrisville in 1983 and her bachelor’s degree in public relations and journalism from Utica College two years later, she worked for Dairylea Milk Cooperative, now known as Dairy Farmers of America. As communications manager, she wrote newsletters and organized special events for farmers in the Syracuse area. It was that job where Brunet learned one of her most important career values — you have to love what you do. “I met a lot of wonderful people who believed wholeheartedly in their field,” Brunet said. “It was really cool to see people who worked very hard and got a lot of reward, so it was a good lesson for me early on.” In 1993, Brunet worked for Bristol-Myers Squibb in East Syracuse as a community relations manager. She supported the company’s scientists and engineers, managed a charitable-giving budget and served as the liaison between them and other local communities. That career formed a foundation in her passion for giving back. “That was when I discovered Leadership Greater Syracuse,” she said. Leadership Greater Syracuse is a nonprofit, civic engagement training organization that works to connect local leaders and community members through collaboration and leadership skills in order to make a difference in the Syracuse area. BMS helped Brunet pay for her tuition to LGS, and she graduated from its Flagship Program in 1998. While continuing to work for BMS, she also served on the board of directors for Hope for Bereaved in Syracuse. But she always remembered everything LGS taught her. “Just like a lot of graduates, I felt at the time I knew a lot about the community, but [LGS] opened my eyes so much more wide to other things,” she said.

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Inspired by a rural lifestyle and the apple orchards of LaFayette where she lives, Pam Brunet has won the blue ribbon at the LaFayette Apple Festival twice and third place at the New York State Fair with her mother-in-law's apple pie recipe. She also bakes pies for LGS donors and board members as thank-yous and retirement gifts. Syracuse Woman Magazine

passion, positivity and enthusiasm for LGS is evident in her work ethic. “We’re able to fill in the gaps for each other,” Macaluso said. “She’s great at communicating and being in the spotlight. Even when we do interviews with candidates, you could feel the energy that she has just talking about LGS. Anytime she talks about LGS to somebody, you can hear it in her voice.” LGS’s Flagship Program is a year-long experience open to any individual by application. Candidates are selected based on an inclusive process that creates a class reflective of the CNY community. Once applicants complete an interview process and pay for tuition, the time commitment includes one twoday overnight retreat in January and 10 monthly classes until graduation in December. Gathering about 50 people over the course of a year was a staple for LGS — until COVID-19 became a new challenge the class of 2020 had to overcome.

Photos by Alice G. Patterson

After 17 years at BMS, her position was no longer needed. Brunet realized she needed a job that allowed her to use her communication skills while still serving her community. LGS was her first choice, but without a position open, she was out of work for over a year until she was offered a position with the Upstate Foundation in 2012. The university had just purchased the community campus, so part of Brunet’s job as director of development was focused on communicating with existing donors for the project during that transition period. That was when she learned the art of fundraising. “I really learned the other side,” she said. “When I was at Bristol, I was giving away the money. I had a large charitable-giving budget, but when I jumped over to the Upstate Foundation, I was working with a top-notch leadership team that taught me how to be a great fundraiser.” Six months later, the executive director of LGS resigned, and after being nominated to the board through her work with Hope for Bereaved, Brunet finally secured her dream job. “I’ll never forget sitting in those interviews at LGS because I knew in my heart it was absolutely where I needed to be,” she said. “I was like, ‘I need to have this job. How do I convince these people that this is who I am?’” Brunet is still passionate about LGS eight years later. In the organization’s 31 years, she said she believes LGS has remained relevant to the community because of its focus on diversity and its ability to bring people from all walks of life together for a common goal. “We have [people] who rescue donkeys. We have people who run for office,” she said. “Through our programs, we are putting diverse people together who are dramatically different in many ways, and it’s pretty cool to see what they do with these relationships. All of [the programs] are about inspiring people to make a difference in the community, and for me, it’s truly about connecting them to their passion.” In many ways, Brunet gets to be a part of every class of LGS, and her excitement never gets old. “When I get to introduce or meet the class, and I see them together for the first time, they are an unopened present to our community, and I’m like a little girl on Christmas Eve who comes down the stairs and looks at the presents and says, ‘What could be in those packages?’” Program Director Robin Macaluso has worked with Brunet since she became executive director. While their personalities are different, they complement one another well in order to balance LGS and its mission. Macaluso said Brunet’s dedication, energy,

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COVER STORY

Leading the way from page 21 “COVID came upon us, and obviously we had to start doing things very differently,” Brunet said. “At the board level, we had a lot of conversations and looked at a lot of different options, but we decided to forge ahead.” The 2020 class completed its year with a few postponed class days and many virtual ones and has decided to postpone graduation until this summer. For 2021, LGS made changes, like accepting a smaller number of students, applying for and being granted a PPE loan and creating assignments where classmates could meet one another outside of class in smaller groups. The current class has organized its schedule to meet both virtual and hybrid since they began in January. “It wasn’t perfect when we started, but thankfully we’ve evolved, and thankfully we’re in a much better spot now,” Brunet said. From Hartford, Conn. and Chicago, Ill., to Washington D.C. and Little Rock, Ark., other Leadership Greater organizations have the same goals as LGS. But Brunet believes CNY has a strong passion for giving back like no other community, and no one is more excited to see what it has to offer than her. “We do have so much going right in our community, and we do have a lot of serious concerns, but the people who are attracted to us are the people that say, ‘This is a great place to work, this is a great place to live, we have our problems, but I want to be a part of solving those problems,’” Brunet said. “I’m always excited when we start a new class because people connect in ways I never [could’ve] imagined.” SWM

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Syracuse Woman Magazine

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WOMEN'S HEALTH

Making heads or tails of annual GYN exams Heather Shannon, MS, CNM, WHNP, MPH

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hen was your last annual gynecological (GYN) exam? No really? How long has it been? I am hoping you said sometime in 2020. Women who have had a hysterectomy, are post-menopausal or no longer need birth control may think they no longer need to see the GYN. In fact, it is more important that you do continue with your GYN health. The GYN provider has special training in caring for women throughout her lifecycle. Many women think the GYN exam is just a pap smear and a breast exam.

April 2021

Think of this visit as an opportunity to learn about your sexual/ reproductive health, discuss concerns you have and make a plan to reach optimal health. This is your opportunity to ask those very personal questions that you have not had the nerve to ask your other health care providers. Besides addressing GYN concerns, your GYN provider will want to understand your current state of psychosocial health and overall wellbeing. Why? There are certain mental health medications or conditions that interfere with your birth control

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or menstrual/sexual functioning that you will want to understand better. You will be asked about cardiovascular health risks or certain medical illnesses, which can affect the type of birth control you use or affect your menstrual/sexual health. One important area your GYN provider will want to understand is your exercise and nutritional habits. Unbalanced eating can affect your hormone regulation and cause menstrual irregularities, libido changes, mood disruption and weight gain. As we know, weight gain increases your risk for many other health problems, which in turn can affect your sexual and reproductive health functioning. For those women who are post-menopausal (PMP), you are at risk for osteoporosis and certain cancers and need regular screening. In order to help you maintain optimal health, your GYN will perform certain cancer screenings (cervical and breast) and provide health prevention education. If you plan to have a baby, your GYN provider will provider will guide you on pre pregnancy

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planning that can include adjusting current medications that are dangerous to the baby during pregnancy. They will provide you with valuable information and recommendations that can improve pregnancy outcomes. Regarding certain cancer screenings such as pap smears or breast cancer screenings, your GYN provider will discuss with you the current timing of screening recommendations that are affected by your personal and family history. Your GYN can then provide you with a plan of when these screenings will occur. There is so much more that happens at your GYN appointment than just the speculum exam. In fact, the current recommendations regarding pelvic examination is based on your clinical concerns and not considered an automatic during the visit. You and your GYN provider will decide if a pelvic exam is necessary at each annual visit. To help keep it straight, refer to the table of recommended exams and testing, based on your age. Continued on page 26

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WOMEN'S HEALTH

Making heads or tails of annual GYN exams from page 25 Some testing might be in line with what your primary care provider (PCP) does and will not be duplicated if you see your PCP regularly. As always, talk to you GYN provider about your women’s health concerns and expectations at your visits. SWM

Ages 40-64 History:

Reason for visit, current health status, changes in medical history, physical activity, menopausal symptoms, fecal/ urinary incontinence, pelvic support problems, sexuality, abuse, sexual practices, substance use, medications, any complimentary supplements, prior cervical cancer screenings, GYN surgeries

Physical Exam and Testing:

Height and weight, BP, BMI, breast exam, pelvic with cervical cancer screening, STD testing, HIV, syphilis, other vaginal infection assessment, teach and perform breast exam, oral cavity, evaluation of neck/thyroid and abdomen, skin assessment, colorectal cancer screening, cholesterol, thyroid, hepatitis C, screening f or osteoporosis

Sexuality:

Contraception, high risk behaviors, prevention of unwanted or unintended pregnancy for those still menstruating, orientation, protection from STI

Fitness & Nutrition:

Exercise and nutrition habits (eating disorders) and provide recommendations, vitamin intake, calcium intake

Psychosocial:

Suicide assessment, sexual orientation, supportive relationships, intimate partner violence, life/stress, work satisfaction, sleep disorders, depression

Cardiovascular:

Family history, diabetes, obesity, cholesterol, high BP, lifestyle

Health Risks:

Cancer screenings (breast/pap with HPV per standards), hygiene, injury prevention, tobacco, alcohol and drug use, skin protection, hormone therapy

Immunizations:

Up to date with Tdap, MMR, HPV vaccine, shingles vaccine, pneumococcal, influenza, COVID-19

History:

Reason for visit, current health status, changes in medical history, physical activity, menopausal symptoms, fecal/urinary incontinence, pelvic support problems, sexuality, abuse, sexual practices, substance use, medications, any complimentary supplements, prior cervical cancer screenings, GYN surgeries

Heather Shannon, MS, CNM, WHNP, MPH, is a women’s healthcare provider at Oswego County Opportunities.

Ages 13-18 History:

Reason for visit, current health status, changes in medical history, sexuality, abuse, sexual practices, substance use, medications

Physical Exam and Testing:

Height and weight, BP, BMI, pelvic if with problems, teach breast exam, STD testing, HIV, syphilis

Sexuality:

Development, high risk behaviors, prevention of unwanted or unintended pregnancy, orientation, abstinence, protection from STI

Fitness & Nutrition:

Exercise and nutrition habits (eating disorders) and provide recommendations, vitamin intake, calcium intake

Psychosocial:

Suicide assessment, sexual orientation, supportive relationships, family dynamics, abuse, neglect, learning delays, school experiences

Cardiovascular:

Family history, diabetes, obesity

Health Risks:

Hygiene, injury prevention, tobacco/drug use, skin protection

Immunizations:

Current status for all recommended vaccines, HPV

Age >65

Ages 19-39 History:

Reason for visit, current health status, changes in medical history, sexuality, abuse, sexual practices, substance use, medications, complimentary supplements, prior abnormal cervical cancer screening, GYN surgeries

Physical Exam and Testing:

Height and weight, BP, BMI, breast exam, pelvic with cervical cancer screening, STD testing, HIV, syphilis, other vaginal infection assessment, teach and perform breast exam, evaluation of neck/thyroid and abdomen, skin assessment

Sexuality:

Contraception, high risk behaviors, prevention of unwanted or unintended pregnancy, orientation, abstinence, protection from STI

Fitness & Nutrition:

Exercise and nutrition habits (eating disorders) and provide recommendations, vitamin intake, calcium intake, folic acid

Psychosocial:

Suicide assessment, sexual orientation, supportive relationships, intimate partner violence, life/stress, work satisfaction, sleep disorders

Cardiovascular:

Family history, diabetes, obesity, cholesterol, high BP, lifestyle

Health Risks:

Cancer screenings (breast/pap with HPV per standards), hygiene, injury prevention, tobacco, alcohol and drug use, skin protection

Immunizations

Up to date with Tdap, MMR, received HPV vaccine, influenza, COVID-19

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Physical Exam: Height and weight, BP, BMI, breast exam, pelvic with cervical cancer screening, STD testing, HIV, syphilis, other vaginal infection assessment, teach and perform breast exam, oral cavity, evaluation of neck/thyroid and abdomen, skin assessment, colorectal cancer screening, cholesterol, thyroid Sexuality:

Protection from STI, satisfaction with sexual experiences

Fitness & Nutrition:

Exercise and nutrition habits (eating disorders) and provide recommendations, vitamin intake, calcium intake, folic acid

Psychosocial:

Suicide assessment, sexual orientation, supportive relationships, intimate partner violence, life/stress, work satisfaction or retirement, sleep disorders, depression

Cardiovascular: Family history, diabetes, obesity, cholesterol, high BP, lifestyle Health Risks:

Cancer screenings (breast/pap with HPV per standards), hearing, eye health, injury prevention, tobacco, alcohol and drug use, skin protection, hormone therapy, suicide

Immunizations: Up to date with Tdap, MMR, pneumococcal, influenza, COVID-19

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SPECIAL FEATURE

Evoking creativity in Marcellus SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER AT OCC HELPS CHELSEA LEMBO GET HER BUSINESS OFF THE GROUND Jason Gabak

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ometimes it is one moment or chance encounter that helps a person discover their path in life. For Chelsea Lembo, M.Ed., the arts and creativity were an important part of her life from an early age. “Growing up I was always involved in dance, theater, musicals, I was always interested in creativity,” Lembo said. Lembo earned her bachelor’s degree in theater studies, acting with a minor in dance from Emerson College in Boston. While doing her undergraduate work, Lembo said she became interested in ways to combine her passion for the arts and creativity with education. “I wanted to find creative outlets and I wanted to find ways to integrate art with education,” Lembo said. “I started to look for a program and it turned out there was one the next town over.” It was at Lesley University in Cambridge, Mass, that Lembo would find her path and receive her master’s degree in elementary education/creative arts in learning. “It was an incredible opportunity at a great school,” Lembo said. Lembo has her professional license for elementary education in Massachusetts and her initial license in New York. Professionally she worked in a number of classroom settings in elementary schools in Massachusetts. When she relocated to Central New York, Lembo wanted to take her experience with art integrated education and create a new opportunity for herself as well as for students in the community where she could offer creative programs and workshops geared toward building confidence in students. Lembo worked with the Small Business Development Center at OCC and said she has had a great experience and guidance

throughout the process of opening her business with her business advisor. “I chose to keep working with them because the communication was excellent, and I feel that my advisor (Keyona Kelly) really listens to what I need and helps me to develop a plan for success by providing support and guidance as I navigate my business venture,” Lembo said in a recent interview with the SBDC. “Having an ally who has the best interests of my business in mind, who can coach me on aspects of the business world as I learn to navigate it, has been an enormous asset.” With this assistance, EVOKE opened Jan. 4. Prior to COVID-19 Lembo had planned to start EVOKE Creativity with a specific focus on creative based learning experiences. But assessing the situation during the pandemic, Lembo saw there were additional needs and she adapted her business plan to also provide support for parents contending with work and helping their children who were learning remotely. Lembo refers to this aspect as the Learner’s Lounge. Through this, Lembo was able to offer a safe place for students to go during the pandemic and assist with the remote learning taking place while also offering creative classes and programs. Lembo said as an educator it is important to recognize that each student is unique and that students do not all necessarily learn the same way or at the same time. This is where some of the more creative aspects of her work come into play. Lembo said there are many ways to approach her work based on the student she is working with as she strives to learn as much as possible about each student and tailors her approach based on what

April 2021

will work best for that individual. Concepts like modeling and authenticity are important to her work. Lembo said if there is something a student wants to do, she will try to do it first to show the student how to do it, that it can be done, and explain that if she or the student isn’t successful, they are taking a step in the right direction by trying and learning from their experiences. Through this work Lembo seeks to give students an outlet to express themselves and what they are thinking and how they are processing what they are learning. Creating a safe space for exploration and failure, encouraging curiosity, growth, and creativity, valuing unique and varying perspectives and providing an outlet for all of that are all vitally important aspects of her work. Students who are given these kinds of opportunities not only learn but also gain confidence. Lembo also works to help develop self-awareness, selfdiscipline, independent learning skills, organizational skills, and any specific skills unique to the child's learning needs. So far, she said, things have been going well and there has been a lot of interest in her work. “It is a very exciting time,” Lembo said. “It has been a great start and I have had great support.” But for an educator like Lembo, success is measured by a higher standard. “I believe every student has value and they have the capacity to do the things that matter to them,” Lembo said. “To me that is what this is really about, helping them see that anything is doable and we have to be willing to go with the flow and learn and never be discouraged.” SWM For more information, visit evokecreativity.com.

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April 2021

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INSPIRE

ELLEN GOODEVE

The relentless search for truth David Tyler

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s a teenager living with her adoptive parents in Liverpool, Ellen Goodeve was obsessed with finding her birth parents. “I was dying to know where I came from. It drove me crazy,” she said. “As a teenager I was constantly trying to figure out how I could get this information.” Every dark-haired woman she would pass on the street she would wonder ‘is that my mother?’ This was in the late 1980s and early 90s, when internet research was just starting and there were no searchable records databases like there are today. So at the age of 21, Goodeve joined an adoption research group that helps people find their birth parents. After months of digging, they had success. “To find them, it was so exciting for me,” she said. “I just couldn’t stand not knowing.” After finding her own birth parents, Goodeve spent much of her free time helping others do the same through the adoption research group. She was trying to build a career selling real estate, but her true passion was seeking the information that others couldn’t find – and she became good at it. “I was so determined because I knew what it felt like, not knowing where you came from,” she said. One of her favorite cases was helping a woman, Caroline, who just happened to pick up the phone when Goodeve dialed a wrong number. Caroline had put two babies up for adoption

decades earlier – one the product of a rape – and she wanted to know what had become of her children. Goodeve found both of them, now middle aged, and after 40 years, Caroline for the first time had a relationship with her children. Goodeve admits she was terrible at selling real estate, and she began to wonder if she could make a career of being a private investigator. The road to that career, however, is long. In New York, investigators are only licensed after 6,200 hours working for a licensed investigator. As fortune would have it, a family friend, Joseph Leonard, was a retired Onondaga County sheriff’s deputy who had a private investigation business. He hired her and immediately gave her field work investigating cheating spouse cases. “He has helped me so much and he has been a tremendous friend to me and my children,” she said of her mentor. “If it weren’t for him, I probably wouldn’t have any confidence.” Between working for Leonard and doing worker’s compensation investigations for another company, Goodeve put the hours in to earn her license and formed her company – Witness Investigations – in 2010. After more than a decade in business, she now has six investigators working for her. The job of being a private investigator is part spy, part actress, part researcher. It may

April 2021

involve surreptitiously sitting in a car for 12 hours down the block from the person you’re investigating, waiting to catch a glimpse of an incriminating act. Or it could be pretending to be a bride-to-be with a finicky mother-in-law, to check out whether the bridal shop owner who is collecting worker’s comp is actually still on the job. Or it may be calling one lead and tracing it to the next, and then to the next, trying to track down a birth parent. “No day is the same as the one before it,” she said. “They’re all different.” And some-times they can result in sticky – even dangerous – situations. Often, she is approached by neighbors or police who see her sitting in a car for hours on end. Once she was investigating a man who suddenly came out of his residence with a gun and approached her vehicle. Another time, when she was process serving, a man grabbed an axe, “literally raised it over his head while swearing at me and calling me names” and chased her off his property. When on a surveillance, she comes armed with a back story, so if she is ever questioned

by a neighbor or the person she is watching, she has a readymade excuse for her actions. Sometimes, she’ll be in disguise, or at least have one in the car, ready for a quick change of clothing and appearance.

She likes to do investigations in person, rather than over the phone or through other means, because reading someone’s body language helps her get at the truth. “I’m better at putting on those performances in person than on the phone,” she said. “I don’t care what I have to say. Whatever I have to be, I’ll be.” She doesn’t scare easily, she said, because most of the people she surveils aren’t violent criminals, they’re cheaters – of a spouse, or a workplace, or a custody agreement. And she sees her gender as an advantage, she said, because people are less suspicious of a woman sitting in a car for hours on end than they would be of a man doing the same.

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Apparently, Goodeve’s relentless curiosity has rubbed off on those closest to her. Her eldest son Justin, 31, is a military police officer in the Air National Guard who is currently stationed in Qatar and her younger son, Jared, 24, is a public health investigator for Seneca County. Her longtime significant other, Brian, is also an investigator who works for Goodeve’s company. “I never tried to push either kid toward this field,” she said. “It must just be in their system.” While every case is different, Goodeve said that invariably, if people have a gut feeling that something is wrong … it is. “They might not be fully right about what they thought,” she said, “but there’s usually something that’s not right.” Goodeve estimated that 90 to 95 percent of the time that she investigates someone in an infidelity case, the spouse who believes he or she has been cheated on is proven right. And usually, she said, if someone believes that the terms of a child custodial agreement aren’t being adhered to, their investigations will bear that out. “I want people to really trust their instincts,” she said. “Because sometimes the unknown is worse than any answer you can get.” SWM For further information, you can visit, syracusepi.com or email Ellen at ellengoodeve@yahoo.com.

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SPECIAL FEATURE

On the front lines

TEAM OF FIVE FEMALE SURGEONS STANDS STRONG AT UPSTATE Emma Vallelunga

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hey say the sickest of the sick go to Upstate University Hospital in Syracuse, and in the teaching hospital’s Level One trauma center, exactly half of the surgical team who save lives every day are women. These trauma surgeons take pride in what it means to be a woman in trauma surgery, a hero during a pandemic and a physician in the Central New York community. Most of the women surgeons on the Upstate trauma team didn’t think surgery was for them until they simply fell in love with it. Dr. Joan Dolinak said she was biased before doing her surgical rotation in medical school and never looked back.

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“I enjoyed coming to work. It wasn’t a job. It was fun,” Dolinak said. “I liked the aspects of trauma surgery because every day was like Christmas. You never knew who was coming in or what you were going to get.” Dr. Jessica Summers said she always knew she wanted to be a surgeon from the moment she got to watch a live heart surgery after volunteering at UC Davis School of Medicine in Sacramento. “I love being able to fix things,” Summers said. “We do take people who are broken or have something that we can fix. We get to make people better, and that was always what drew me in.” Leadership and Entrepreneurs Edition


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On a national level, the number of women in surgery used to be few and far between. In 2001, 14 percent of U.S. surgical residents were women, a low percentage in comparison with the number of women medical students at the time, according to a study from the American College of Surgeons in 2018. However, an increasing number of women have entered medicine and the surgical workforce since 2017. That year, more women were enrolled in medical school than men, and about 40 percent of U.S. general surgery residents, and 20 percent of general surgeons were women. Syracuse Woman Magazine

During her residency, Dr. Roseanna Guzman-Curtis said she felt lucky to have many female colleagues at the University of Rochester School of Medicine, where her class was the first in the history of the university to graduate with all women. “While I knew it was a fact that women surgeons are more rare than male surgeons, it didn’t cross my mind as much because I was surrounded by powerful women surgeons all the time, so in some ways, it didn’t form a part of my reality,” Guzman-Curtis said. “My reality included female surgeons.” Continued on page 36 SyracuseWomanMag.com


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SPECIAL FEATURE

On the front lines from page 35 In contrast, Dolinak said she came from a medical school program where there were no female surgeons at the time but had enough support from other male surgeons to feel comfortable working with them. She said she realizes more women are joining the field, so having an all-female team doesn’t feel abnormal anymore. “I remember the first time we had an all-woman team in the OR and thought that was something special, and now it’s not as special as it used to be because it’s more commonplace,” Dolinak said. What wasn’t commonplace in medicine was the nature of the COVID-19 pandemic when it began just over a year ago. In addition to being on the trauma team, Dr. Amie Lucia was also the Surgical ICU director. At Upstate, she said many surgeons routinely took care of critically ill patients, but before the pandemic, patients with respiratory illnesses like COVID-19 would normally go to the Medical ICU, not the Surgical ICU. As the hospital system became overwhelmed, the SICU had trauma patients, burn patients, emergency general surgery patients and now COVID-19 patients to keep track of, so adjusting to those changes so quickly was difficult at first. “None of us were ever quiet,” Lucia said. “A lot of surgeons’ business went down in a lot of ways because there were fewer elective cases, but the group of us stayed extremely busy. If I look back on the past year, exhausting is the word that comes out of everything in my mind.” Guzman-Curtis also had other responsibilities at Upstate during the pandemic, like being in charge of the medical student rotations. Educating students at the hospital while they weren’t always allowed to be on campus was hard to adapt to from an administrative standpoint.

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“I never had more meetings than those initial months as the year progressed having to refashion and rework a lot of the systems that were already well-oiled and running,” Guzman-Curtis said. And in general this past year, Guzman-Curtis said there was a palpable stress about keeping herself safe from the virus. “I feel like a lot of times, especially at the beginning, the stress we were experiencing was how can we keep to our duties as physicians and as surgeons,” Guzman-Curtis said. “It was [about] how we should keep ourselves safe so that we could take care of a whole group of people. For weeks, I just had a little to-go bag packed in my car because I thought ‘What if I just shouldn’t go home and I should just stay here for a while?’ It never came to that, but I guess I just went into disaster mode.” But despite the usual stress of the job, Lucia said she was proud to provide patient care over the past five years for a hospital like Upstate to a familiar CNY community where she and her family grew up. “From an institution standpoint, it was kind of a no-brainer when I went into trauma surgery that Upstate was the place to be,” Lucia said. “Our job tends to be very kind of grueling and long hours and busy and stressful, but if you really love what you do, the hours go by a lot faster, and I think working with a group of people that support you makes it a lot more tolerable too.” At Upstate, Summers said being a female surgeon gives her a better opportunity to teach other female medical students that surgery is an option for them too. “Medical schools are 50-50 now,” Summers said. “If I can empower or inspire some female medical students to want to do surgery, I think that’s really something I enjoy and want to strive for.” SWM

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UPCOMING EVENTS

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Saturday, April 10

Sunday, April 18 – Sunday, May 9

When: 7:30 to 9 p.m. Where: This is a virtual event What: Music Director Lawrence Loh leads Symphoria in Schumann’s Symphony No. 2, a work which served to reinvent his compositional style after suffering a number of mental and physical setbacks. Violinist and Central New York native, Sarah Crocker Vonsattel joins to perform Mozart’s brilliant Fifth Violin Concerto. Cost: $20 – $35

What: The annual CNY Home & Garden Show is going virtual this year, but participants can still interact with the vendors traditionally found at the in-person event. Grand opening week will feature several prize drawings, culminating with a $1,000 cash giveaway on April 25, sponsored by Murtaugh Restorations. Attendees should bring a list of home improvement plans and inspiration ideas. With checklist in hand, they can visit local home improvement specialists through a virtual floor plan, learn about their services, request a quote, view their work and get contact information. Where: This is a virtual event Info: CNYHomeandGardenShow.com

Symphoria Masterworks Livestream: Mozart’s Fifth Violin Concerto

Monday, April 12

Doulas Tell All

When: 6 to 7:30 p.m. What: Doulas are well-versed in all things surrounding pregnancy, labor & delivery and the postpartum period. Have a question you’d like to bounce off of a doula? We’d like to answer it for you! When registering, please submit your question(s) and we will answer them anonymously. (Questions can also be answered during the meeting as well.) Cost: Free, visit https://www.eventbrite.com/e/141162630227 Info: www.cnydoulaconnection.com or 315.707-8097 Saturday, April 17

Symphoria Spark Livestream: Gospel Meets Symphony

When: 7 to 8:30 p.m. Where: This is a virtual event What: Musical worlds collide as world-renowned gospel music expert Dr. Joan Hillsman and Symphoria sing the good news of our culturally rich and vibrant community. Cost: $20 – $35 Info: experiencesymphoria.org

2021 Virtual CNY Home & Garden Show

Friday, April 23

Road2RecoveryCNY Free Yoga 12-Step Recovery Class

What: Road2RecoveryCNY will host a series of free virtual yoga 12-step recovery classes. The 90-minute online class is open to people in recovery from any addiction and their families. The sessions will be taught by Colleen LaGasse, studio manager at In Bloom Yoga Studio. Yoga 12 Step Recovery (Y12SR) “connects the dots” between the ancient wisdom of yoga, the practical tools of 12-step programs, and the latest research on trauma healing and neurobiology. The program serves people recovering from all manifestations of addiction, from behavioral addictions to substance abuse – creating a safe place on the mat where trauma can be released. It also supports those who are impacted by a loved one’s addiction. When: 6:30 to 8 p.m. Cost: Free Info: www.road2recoverycny.com Saturday, May 1

ONC’s Crawfish and Food Truck Rodeo

What: Operation Northern Comfort.s first Crawfish and Food Truck Rodeo in the Syracuse Inner Harbor. This order and take event will feature our festival favorites including Louisiana Crawfish and Shrimp; Syracuse salt potatoes and clams and seven other local food trucks. There will be music to listen to while you wait. Some of the food trucks are Glazed and Confused, Bold Coast Lobster, Limp Lizard, and Toss & Fire Pizza COVID safety protocols will be practiced. In October, ONC set a goal of delivering 500 desks to kids in need and is currently very close to delivering its 1,000th desk. When: Noon to 6 p.m. Where: Syracuse Inner Harbor, 328 W. Kirkpatrick St., Syracuse Info: www.operationnc.org

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MOVERS AND SHAKERS

Mother and daughter open Savage Homestead Janine Savage can recall many happy memories visiting Skaneateles with her family during summers and holidays. This is a feeling Savage said her daughter, Krista, who is now married with a family of her own in Western New York, also shares. Originally hailing from the Southern Tier, Savage said about three years ago she and her husband decided to make a change and relocate. Finding the bucolic life she was seeking, Savage said she found herself pursuing new hobbies as time allowed. “I got interested in learning how to make soy candles,” Savage said. “That inspired Krista who started making her own hand made beauty and bath products.” The mother and daughter duo kept working at their crafts and as they found their footing they began sharing their creations as gifts for friends and family. “It started as a hobby,” Savage said. “And then we started giving things we were making as gifts and then people started asking where they could buy them.” Savage said she has the opportunity to share a candle with Tom Filicia, an interior designer, known for his role on Queer Eye for the Straight Guy as well as being the co-author of a book based on the show. “He really liked it,” Savage said. “He was very encouraging.” With Filicia’s encouragement and the support of friends and family who enjoyed their products, Savage and Krista decided to take what they were making to the next level. Savage said a limited liability corporation was formed and Savage Homestead became a more formal business sharing products through various outlets like their website as well as at local events like the Curbstone Festival in Skaneateles and at several shops in Western New York. On March 6, The Savage Homestead opened at 3 Fennell St., in the Old Stone Mill. In the shop Savage offers a full array of item from soy scented candles to apothecary items such as handcrafted soaps and solid body lotions to dog and cat toys and fragrance diffusers. “It has been great,” Savage said. “We had a great start. Everyone who came in said they really liked everything. I think we are off to a good start.”

Department in its Emergency Quality Network (E-QUAL) Honor Roll for leading the way for how the nation cares for emergency services patients. Crouse’s emergency services team was recognized for improving outcomes for sepsis patients and for high performance in acute stroke diagnosis and treatment. The 2020 E-QUAL Honor Roll is based on a learning collaborative that includes virtual quality improvement activities and sharing of clinical performance data. “This recognition reflects our team’s ongoing focus on improving clinical outcomes and the overall patient experience for our emergency services patients,” says David Mason, MD, medical director of emergency services for Crouse Health. “It's gratifying to see the work we have done in the areas of sepsis and stroke care receive national recognition.” ACEP President William Jaquis, MD, FACEP, says, “Through collaboration and innovation, the emergency departments that participate in E-QUAL are transforming emergency medicine and advancing how we care for millions of people. E-QUAL Honor Roll awardees are the shining example for how emergency departments can lead the way in practice transformation and quality improvements.” Crouse’s Pomeroy Emergency Services Department treated 50,000 patients in 2020. The hospital’s door-to-cardiac treatment times are among the lowest in the region and the hospital is a New York State and DNV Healthcare-designated Comprehensive Stroke Center.

To learn more visit thesavagehomestead.com. The Savage Homestead recently opened at 3 Fennell St. in Skaneateles, offering an array of handmade candles and apothecary items.

American College of Emergency Physicians recognizes Crouse Health’s Emergency Department for improving outcomes of sepsis and stroke care The American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) has recognized Crouse Health’s Pomeroy Emergency Services April 2021

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Profile for Eagle Newspapers

Syracuse Woman Magazine - April 2021  

In the Leadership and Entrepreneurs edition, Syracuse Woman Magazine highlights some women who are taking a leading role in moving the Centr...

Syracuse Woman Magazine - April 2021  

In the Leadership and Entrepreneurs edition, Syracuse Woman Magazine highlights some women who are taking a leading role in moving the Centr...

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