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parent Fabulous fall SYRACUSE

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September 2012

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MOM

Seasonal tips, trends, styles, recipes and events for you and your family

on a mission

Mother, daughters share experience 5


Openers

2 • Syracuse Parent and CNY Family • September 2012

A summer of loss, tempered with growth Ad Sales - David Tyler 434-8889 ext. 302

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Wing

on the cover From left, Olivia, Stevi and Nora Wilson, of Fayetteville, pose with crafts made by children who live in an orphanage they visited in the Dominican Republic. See related story, page 5. Jennifer Wing

See Momsense, page 3

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Jennifer

Having gone through this experience, and moving on to other feelings we are still experiencing in the aftermath, I realize that we now have yet another thing to share — our memories of that special person, that one-of-a-kind individual who made our life richer having known her. That is another bond that ties us together as a family. There also have been bonds forged through happier occasions, however, such as the new experience of my husband’s debut as defensive coach for our son Jacob’s football team. My daughter, Cassidy, and I also recently bonded in what became for us a celebration of being female. As models featured in the recent Syracuse Woman Magazine’s Runway Celebration benefitting Ophelia’s Place, we spent quality time getting “girly.� We had the pleasure of going to Destiny USA to pick out our runway gear, including jewelry, footwear and, of course, pretty dresses. (Thanks, Francesca’s, The Hair Jeweler and H&M for the wonderful clothing and help from employees!) The day of the show, we had our hair done by professionals and, with our stage makeup on and personal cheering section

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Associate Editor - Farah F. Jadran

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434-8889 ext. 340 editor@syracuseparent.net

This sumThe devastation of somemer was a very one close to you passing away rough one for was all too easy to see in both my family, as my husband and myself and, we lost a dear paired with their own feelfriend, taken far ings of grief, must have been a too soon. It was whammy. Momsense double my children’s Although both my son and first real experidaughter handled it with wisence with losing someone, as in the past dom and an eventual acceptence I found to be beyond their years, I nonetheless they were too young to understand and, quite frankly, we sheltered them from that felt somewhat shattered for myself, my husband and, of course, the two of them. particular reality for as long as we could.

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Editor - Jennifer Wing


Openers

Syracuse Parent and CNY Family • September 2012 • 3

Because I said so! That’s why! What we’re thinking The following is an essay submitted to Theressa McMorris by intern Matt Maynard: By Matt Maynard “Because I said so!” might be one of the all time greatest phrases to come out of parenting since “didn’t I tell you!” This simple phrase has been used over and over again and to no avail. It was Einstein who defined insanity as, “doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.” No wonder most parents feel like they actually are going crazy! Being a parent is the hardest job on the planet and takes a ton of time, energy, and money. Not to help matters, parents are generally bombarded with a variety of competing “parenting tips” This ultimately leads to conflicting information on varying topics and leaves parents feeling more confused, than when the conversation started. Here’s the thing! Teenagers are at a very important developmental stage of personal growth involving independence. This is a great time for learning and personal development as long as someone is there to guide them. Unfortunately, due to the fast paced life of parent’s careers, grocery lists, home repairs, and bills; parenting responsibilities can sometimes become fast paced too. (Marriage too?) This however conflicts with the learning process of teenagers. They need to understand logic and feel as if they are understood. They want to feel like their parents have genuinely heard them and taken the time to listen to their point of view. This can be difficult for parents as it takes a lot of time, energy, and patience (which some parents may be running low on). Let’s face it, no parent knows absolutely everything and because teenagers know this, they cannot understand “because I said so”. This

phrase threatens the very nature of the stage of development that they are in, which is to seek answers and understanding for themselves. For teens, these are great learning years and require exploration and guidance around this exploration. The transition for parents to watch their children turn into teenagers is difficult for a variety of reason, including the parents fear that their kids will make the same mistakes they made. . Let me translate how this phrase sounds to your teenager. “You need to listen to me because I am the parent and I know what is correct. You are too immature and do not know as much as me, therefore you need to just take my advice at face value. Do not question me!” When your teenager messes up, talk about it, and try to understand their feelings around their behavior. Express your feelings as well this is helpful for them to understand another’s perspective. This dialogue could change your entire relationship and shape the great understanding of each other’s inner world that make you and your teen unique, yet understood. What if this changed your entire thinking as a parent? Steven Hawking once said, “The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge.” Keep learning, as this is growth towards a better person and parent.

Matt Maynard is currently a Syracuse University student in the Marriage and Family Therapy Program. He is currently interning at Harvest House Marriage and Family Therapy. Theressa D. B. McMorris, MS, LMFT, can be reached atHarvest House Marriage and Family Therapy, 526 Oak Street, Syracuse, NY 13203; harvesthousecounseling.com; 263-3544.

Momsense entrenched in the front row, we ambled down the runway to the beat of the latest music and the cheers of the crowd. The behind-the-scenes action was just as wonderful and, for me, was an empoweringly-wonderful time. Our fellow “catwalkers” were women who had achieved much through ingenuity and hard work, and came in all shapes and sizes, proud of their accomplishments and confident in their stride. This, after all, was a show celebrating all things woman. A show which raised more than $3,500 for Ophelia’s Place, a non-profit organization supporting people who have struggled with eating disorders and body image, something all too easy to understand with the pressures today of being perfect in all things. What a great way to share with my daughter to glory of being a strong, capable woman comfortable in her own skin! We chatted with our fellow models, laughing and cheering each other on as we took our turns in the spotlight. We had so much fun that it seemed to infect the crowd as well; there were smiles and cheers all around. I think the message was loud and clear, and the event was a smashing success. As summer turns to fall and the setting changes from the beach to the classroom, I know both of my children will be moving forward with memories of a wonderful woman who touched our lives as well as new bonds formed together as a family. See related story, page 4.

from page 2

Plant the seed of compassion early

Fayetteville resident Stevi Wilson has it right. It isn’t what you have, it’s what you have to give. And giving doesn’t necessarily mean a donation of money, although that certainly can help. The mother of two is giving her daughters a gift that goes beyond the trappings of ribbons and bows, can’t be contained in a box and expands exponentially with the passing of time. The gift of compassion, of understanding that there are others out there who do not have the basics - a mother and father, clean drinking water, the knowledge of where their next meal is coming from, and experiencing what it is like to know that you are helping someone who needs it, has been imparted to her daughters through their trip to visit orphans in the Dominican Republic. True, there is fun to be had on the trip, as evidenced by the wide smiles and fun times depicted in the photos the family brought back with them. But their time there was nonetheless overshadowed by uncertainty and the feelings of fear that these children live with every day. For Olivia, 14, and Nora, 8, to know that they helped those children hold those fears at bay during the course of their trip was an experience they will likely cherish forever, and they both have expressed plans to go back and continue their mother’s mission of compassion. As parents, we can certainly take a page out of Stevi’s book. We don’t need to travel overseas to find people who need help. There are many worthy organizations in our own backyard that need volunteers. There are also countless events benefitting causes such as searching for a cure for cancer, helping feed the hungry and house the homeless. We certainly want our children to have a fun, happy childhood, but we must also look at what we are doing to help usher them into adulthood. Perhaps by giving them life experiences that will help them grow into strong, compassionate and confident adults we are also helping our community form connections that will stand us in good stead for the future. It seems the Wilson family has already made a move in that direction, not just locally, but globally as well. We would do well to follow the example set by a mother who has found it in her heart to share such a wonderful mission with her children. See related article, page 5.

Fabulous fall

INSIDE:

Recipes...........7 Style................8 Events.............9 Home............11

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photography by cathryn lahm

Cassidy and I on the runway.

s fall approaches, make sure to look for Explore CNY Fall, out Sept. 12, for all the best autumn events and activities to be found in Central New York.


Health & nutrition

4 • Syracuse Parent and CNY Family • September 2012

Are you worried your child might have an eating disorder? An overview of what to look for

An eating disorder is an illness that causes serious disturbances to your everyday diet, such as eating extremely small amounts of food or severely overeating. A person with an eating disorder may have started out just eating smaller or larger amounts of food, but at some point, the urge to eat less or more spiraled out of control. Severe distress or concern about body weight or shape may also characterize an eating disorder. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, eating disorders frequently appear during the teen years or young adulthood but may also develop during childhood or later in life. Common eating disorders include anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and bingeeating disorder. Eating disorders are real, treatable medical illnesses. They frequently coexist with other illnesses such as depression, substance abuse, or anxiety disorders. And eating disorders can be deadly. According to nimh.nih.gov, people with

anorexia nervosa are 18 times more likely to die early compared with people of similar age in the general population. Anorexia nervosa symptoms According to NIMH, anorexia nervosa is characterized by: Extreme thinness. A relentless pursuit of thinness and unwillingness to maintain a normal or healthy weight. Intense fear of gaining weight. Distorted body image, a self-esteem that is heavily influenced by perceptions of body weight and shape, or a denial of the seriousness of low body weight. Lack of menstruation. Extremely restricted eating. Many people with anorexia nervosa see themselves as overweight, even when they are clearly underweight. Eating, food and weight control become obsessions. People with anorexia nervosa typically weigh themselves repeatedly, portion food carefully and eat very small quantities of only certain foods. Some people with anorexia nervosa may also engage in binge-eating followed by extreme dieting, excessive exercise, self-induced vomiting

and/or misuse of laxatives, diuretics or enemas. Some who have anorexia nervosa recover with treatment after only one episode. Others get well but have relapses. Still others have a more chronic, or longlasting, form of anorexia nervosa, in which their health declines as they battle the illness. Symptoms of bulimia nervosa Bulimia nervosa is characterized by recurrent and frequent episodes of eating unusually large amounts of food followed by behavior that compensates for the overeating such as forced vomiting, excessive use of laxatives or diuretics, fasting, excessive exercise, or a combination of these behaviors. Unlike anorexia nervosa, people with bulimia nervosa usually maintain what is considered a healthy or normal weight, while some are slightly overweight, but often fear gaining weight, want desperately to lose weight, and are intensely unhappy with their body size and shape. Other symptoms include: Chronically inflamed and sore throat Swollen salivary glands in the neck

and jaw area; Worn tooth enamel, increasingly sensitive and decaying teeth from stomach acid exposure; Acid reflux and other gastrointestinal problems; Intestinal irritation from laxative abuse; Severe dehydration from purging of fluids; and an electrolyte imbalance (too low or too high levels of sodium, calcium, potassium and other minerals) which can lead to heart attack. Symptoms of binge-eating disorder Unlike bulimia nervosa, periods of binge-eating are not followed by purging, excessive exercise, or fasting. As a result, people with binge-eating disorder often are overweight or obese. According to nimh.nih.gov, people with binge-eating disorder who are obese are at higher risk for developing cardiovascular disease and high blood pressure. They also experience guilt, shame and distress about their binge-eating, which can lead to more binge-eating. Make sure to consult with a physician if you are concerned that you or someone you know may have an eating disorder. Source: nimh.nih.gov.

Fashion show celebrates real women, benefits Ophelia’s Place By Farah F. Jadran More than 250 people gathered on Thursday evening, Aug. 16, to support a mission born right here in Liverpool. This mission was started by Mary Ellen Clausen, the founder of Ophelia’s Place in Liverpool, and since January of this year, Jodie Wilson-Dougherty has stepped in and taken the reigns as executive director. The non-profit supports women and men of all ages in their battle with eating disorders and body image issues. Syracuse Woman Magazine has seen the true benefit of Ophelia’s Place and shares its mission. SWM wanted to show its appreciation to Ophelia’s Place since it has been there for the almost two-year-old publication since it was first published. To show its appreciation, members of the SWM staff decided that organizing a Runway Celebration for real, everyday women to show off fashions to their community was the right thing to do. The show was held on a runway set up in the Canyon Area of Destiny USA. It featured hair and makeup by Royal Image Salon in North Syracuse, and fashions from stores such as Saks Off 5th Avenue, H&M, Chico’s, Dress Barn, Francesca’s Collections, Lane Bryant, Harstrings, The Hair Jeweler and Off Broadway Shoes. Also, Saks Off 5th Avenue and Hickey Freeman’s Streets of America featured some men’s wear in the surprise finale that featured a walk-off among Jim Reith (WCNY), Michael Benny (CBS5), James Gaddis (WSYR9), and Brad Vivacqua (YNN).

In addition, SWM was proud to be a part of new movement in the media, to remind all women that their individual beauty is a unique and wonderful part of our society. Each woman that walked the runway had a beauty all her own. “I would do it again in a heartbeat,” said Caterina D’Agostino, an SWM Runway Diva. Other women who admitted they were nervous beforehand, all said their two “walks down the runway went too fast” and that they wanted to do it again. Both the Ophelia’s Place founder, Clausen, and executive director, WilsonDougherty, said the event “captured” the mission of celebrating everyday women on the runway and for them not to fear it because of any body image issues. “It absolutely embodied what it the heart of Ophelia’s Place,” Clausen said. “Because we are about celebrating all women, all shapes and all sizes. I so appreciated the women that were willing to support that and willing to embrace who they were.” Also, Wilson-Dougherty said this was a great way to make fashion, clothing and shopping a positive for women, something she says is a big part of the women’s movement. “At times it seems that unless you burned your bra and didn’t shave your legs, you weren’t a part of the movement,” she said. “However, this fashion show made it so that women could see that it’s OK to ‘play dress up’ and show off fashion.” Having everyday, “ideal women” on

photography by cathryn lahm

MOVIN’ 100.3/96.5’s morning DJ Heather Daley, of North Syracuse, rocked the runway in fashions from Francesca’s. the runway helped communicate this message, according to Wilson-Dougherty. There wasn’t an unimaginable lineup of women showing of the latest fashions, it was women who were identifiable to those in attendance. “The runway divas took their time out of their busy lives to help us spread the message — that our worth and value is not determined by our clothing sizes or a number on scale,” Wilson-Dougherty said. Thanks to events like the SWM Runway Celebration, Dougherty hopes that one day,

WCNY associate producer Caterina D’Agostino, of North Syracuse, struts her stuff in Lane Bryant fashions to benefit Ophelia’s Place. women will wake up and “look in the mirror and say, ‘I love my amazing body.’” Also, Syracuse Woman Magazine would like to thank both Koto Japanese Steakhouse and The Melting Pot for providing food to their guests and to MOVIN’ 100.3/96.5’s Brandon C for spinning tunes for the Runway Divas. And a special thanks to representatives of local nonprofits that SWM supports: Ophelia’s Place, The Carol M. Baldwin Breast Cancer Research Fund of CNY, Go Red For Women and the American Heart Association, and Hope For Heather, an ovarian cancer awareness organization.


On the cover

Syracuse Parent and CNY Family • September 2012 • 5

A mother’s gift

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By Jennifer Wing any Central New York families use their summer vacation to take a family trip. This year, Fayetteville resident Stevi Wilson took the opportunity to bring her two daughters to a warm, tropical climate with white sand beaches and blue-green water. Paradise, right? For Stevi, Nora, 8, and Olivia, 14, the paradise was not necessarily the place they visited, but its people. This “vacation” was, in fact, a mission that has become a passion for the three Wilson women. The trio, along with other mothers, children and students, visited Emiliano Tardif Hogar (hogar is orphanage in Spanish) and its special inhabitants. Located in the Dominican Republic, the orphanage houses anywhere from 20 to 45 children at any given time. Olivia and Stevi, a Spanish teacher at East SyracuseMinoa High School, have been making such visits to the Dominican Republic since 2006. This trip, made in July, was Nora’s first. “I have been a Spanish teacher for 25 years and always used to travel around Latin America and take classes,” Stevi said. “I decided I wanted to do volunteer work, and there is such a need, not just at the orphanage we visit, but all over the country. We actually help at a couple of orphanages and always go to Mustard Seed, an orphanage for disabled children. I was shocked by how much is needed – these babies were found in garbage dumpsters and toilet bowls. One of the groups I brought raised enough money to put in a well here and they are forever grafteful. We are always welcome there. We gave them a gift that many others in the country do not have.” In order to raise money for the well Stevi and her volunteers scooped poop at a dog show for several days and hosted several other fundraisers. Stevi said that although they are very poor and the children in that orphanage are “severely disabled…the place is filled with love. We feed the children, hold them and sing with them. It is humbling and rewarding and we truly feel the people that are inside their distorted bodies. They know we are there and we know they appreciate their presence. It is an amazing, life-changing experience.” At the Emiliano Tardiff Orphanage “the children are wellcared-for, but the fact is they are alone,” she said. “They don’t have a mother, they don’t have a father. They don’t have a lot of the things that we take for granted, but they make the most of what they have.” Olivia, who will be a freshman at Fayetteville-Manlius High School this fall, said the orphanage’s name is appropriate. “The reason it’s called Mustard Seed is that it’s a little seed but it grows to be the biggest plant,” she said. “Just like the kids start out small but grow.” When Stevi first looked into volunteering in the Dominican Republic, she and Olivia had to pay to take the trip. “I think it cost $1,000 a person,” she said. “That first trip we went to an orphanage in Monte Cristi and it was a wonderful experience, but the fact was that they were paying a salary to people to plan the trip.” She did make an important contact, however. “I visited an online bulletin board and met Luis Midence, a Peace Corps worker from New Jersey who married a Dominican woman and stayed in the country running a bed and breakfast. He teaches history and his wife teaches

See Orphans, page 6

One mother shares her passion for volunteering with her daughters

courtesy of Stevi Wilson

Pictures of love

Fayetteville resident Stevi Wilson and daughters Olivia and Nora brought home photos and memories of their time with orphans in the Dominican Republic. Clockwise from top: Olivia does hair wraps for one of the girls at Emiliano Tardif Hogar; Nora enjoys time with her friends at the orphanage; Olivia and Stevi feed one of the children at Mustard Seed, an orphanage for disabled children; Nora gives advice while crafting with one of the children.


Orphans math at the best university in the Dominican Republic, and he has been a godsend. We needed a place to stay, initially, and he helped. He keeps us safe when we are there. He is a warm, wonderful man whom the neighborhood kids call Santa Claus.” He told Stevi she was crazy, paying for the trip. “He said, ‘Are you insane, paying money when all of these people need help?’ The next year we were able to come and help without paying. Since there is no salary involved, everything goes directly to the kids,” Stevi said. “I learned how to organize a good trip, including what kinds of rules you need to establish and how to fill out forms for guardianship in order to travel with a minor. So now, instead of using an organization I organize it on my own.” She said Midence also lets her use his extra cellphone, helps with bus arrangments and coordinate field trips. “This year we went to a great organic chocolate factory – a cooperative run by women who are truly peasants. It was a great educational field trip that shows the value of hard work.” So, what do Nora and Olivia do when visiting the orphanage? “We play with them, take them on field trips and do crafts with them,” Nora, who enters third grade at Fayetteville Elementary in the fall, said. “This year we took them bowling, which was something they’d never done, and one of the girls tried to kick the ball down the lane,” she added with a laugh. Nora’s favorite thing to do was take the children for ice cream, a special treat. “I like the coconut the best.” She said she was happy to finally be able to go on the trip with her mother. “I loved to play with the kids and learned new games and some Spanish, too,” she said, adding that she wants to keep helping them. “We’re going to try to get them money. We are going to bring them a lot of stuff. They’ll like anything because they don’t have anything. Half-used coloring books, anything.” Now that she is home she is writing about all of her experiences in a journal, filling the book with her day-to-day experiences. Olivia said it was nice that the children remembered her from past trips. “As I’ve gotten older, I’ve realized how lucky we are in America,” Olivia said. “The kids in the Dominican Republic have so little, but are happy with what they have. And it’s not just them. It’s everyone. If you are driving through a poor neighborhood people sitting on their porches are always smiling. They all wave and say hi. All you hear is ‘Hola! Hola! Hola!’ on the street.” Stevi said that although the bonding and fun is an important part of visiting with the children, there are other things uppermost in her mind when she plans the trips. “Each person on our trip brings a carry-on with their clothing in it, but their luggage is full of donated items,” she said. “We bring everything we can fit, because they have nothing. And they will use everything we bring them, This year Jet Blue allowed us several extra bags at no charge.” She said she is certainly not alone in the mission to help children in the Dominican Republic. “Mustard Seed also runs a school for Haitain refugees that live in a garbage dump in Domincan Republic,” she said. “Because the kids don’t have papers, they can’t legally go to school, so they created one for k through 12 in a church. We bring them school supplies and clothing. In the past Croc has donated recycled Croc shoes, which are perfect for that climate.” Another big donor has been Brother’s Brother, which donates medicine for the children. “They pull things from shelves that are within six months of their expiration date. They can’t be sold here, but are good for years. I give them a list of what is needed from the doctor at Mustard Seed – usually anti- fungals, breathing medications, antibiotics and anti-virals,” Stevi said. “They are so wonderful they ship me boxes and boxes and boxes - big bottles of antibiotics, tylenol, motrin, everything they could use.” She said they cannot mail supplies to the Dominican Re-

from page 5

One orphan’s tale The family of orphans that lives at Emiliano Tardif Hogar is made up of children whom the director has taken in upon hearing they are living on the street or are being abused. One such girl is Noelia, pictured above left, who was brought to the orphanage because her mother, who works as a servant in someone’s home, was told she can only keep one of her two children with her. So she made her choice, and the 9-year-old went to live at her grandmother’s house, where she then lived with abuse until someone brought her to Emiliano Tardif Hogar, where she now laughs and plays with her housemates. “We were there when she arrived,” Stevi said. “My girls understood that her mother had to sacrifice one to save two. It was very sad, but she is in a good place now. I asked the girls if they could imagine me having to make that choice, and they both agreed that I could never do that.”

public because the mail system is “corrupt.” “It will be stolen. I don’t blame them, they are all so poor,” she said. “But I can’t send things knowing they won’t go to the orphanage.” Stevi said she is also always trying to find a way for the orphanage to make money of its own. “The last few trips the groups I brought stayed at hotel and rented a bus, but my thought was that we could house them in the orphanage and pay the orphanage instead of paying a hotel,” she said. “This year we did this and paid them $3,000 for lodging and food when we left, which turned out to be something they desperately needed this year, as the orphans had just found out they had to leave their home, which was a huge house owned by a drug lord who was in jail for nine years in the U.S. While he was in jail the government allowed the orphans to live there.” But now the drug lord has gotten out of jail and wanted his house back. “They found an abandoned school to live in, but it is in grave disrepair, with no working plumbing, electricity or running water,” she said. “In the few weeks that we have been back we have already raised money to buy a Tinaco water tank which sits on the roof, gathers rain water and runs on gravity. It is always hard to say goodbye but this time it was particularly hard because they knew they would be out the house the following day.” She said she will continue to visit the Dominican Republic, and will bring her girls with her, along with others who want to help. “There is a rigorous screening process that will be involved,” she said. “But you do not need to know Spanish to help. Love is a universal language and these children find a way to communicate.” She said she is proud of her girls and is gratified to see that they have as much fun on these trips as the children they visit. “This year Olivia took a leadership role which made me very proud,” Stevi said. “She was able to speak Spanish, now

that she has a year under her belt, and even taught the college kids on the trip how to do hair wraps so they could do that as an activity.” She said summer is still a vacation from school for the orphans, who have so little, but find fun ways to spend their time. “It’s amazing what they can do without money,” Stevi said. “They took a bottle cap and a stick and used them to play baseball. They are just the most joyful kids.” She said there is such resiliency to be witnessed there. “One little girl, just 18 months old, was found tied to garbage at a dump,” she said. “She was terrified when she first came to the orphanage. She was so afraid of adults she wouldn’t even look up. She would eat garbage and people would make fun of her, but now she is just all smiles. When I see this I know that there is progress and growth.” Olivia said the story of one of the orphans really stuck with her. “The orphanage would always try to find the parents, in order to bring the family back together,” she said. “They brought one girl to her father, who said, ‘Don’t leave her here. I will kill her if you do.’ You think that these parents might be looking for their children, but they’re not.” She said spending time in the Dominican Republic has changed the way she looks at life in the U.S. “In America we can turn on the faucet for drinking water or open the fridge for food, but in the Dominican Republic it is so different — kids don’t have these things.” She said her experience has changed over the years, and she is reminded of that when she sees her little sister visiting the orphanage. “When I was Nora’s age I was more of a bystander,” Olivia said. “I could play with the kids but wasn’t a big influence in the activities. This year I was more involved with everything. I could speak a little bit and played more of a role in helping. I felt like I made a difference.” And that’s the lesson that Stevi wants her children to come away having learned: You can make a difference. “They appreciate things more, and know they can help and pitch in to make the children’s circumstance better,” Stevi said. “Initially, I brought the children because I had been to Latin American countries before and knew that the culture and people are so beautiful — a lot of them have so little but are so happy; I wanted to have my kids be exposed to other cultures and see you don’t need all that to be happy,” she said. But it grew from that to a true passion to help others, another thing that can be shared, mother to daughters. “Watching them interact, I am so proud of them,” Stevi said. “It is a win-win.”

Want to help the children of Emiliano Tardif Hogar? Stevi and her volunteers are currently fundraising to build a house for the orphans of Emilio Tardif Hogar, including housing for volunteers, for the orphans as well as to provide school supplies and food. Information about donations, voluntering or participating on an upcoming trip can be received by emailing suibst@yahoo.com.


Fabulous fall

Syracuse Parent and CNY Family • September 2012 • 7

by Heather Richardson RD, SUNY

Upstate University Outpatient Adult Nutrition

It’s back to school and time to think about packing that nutritious lunch for your children. This maybe an easy task or one that is dreaded by having “picky” eaters- if this is so, then it may be a good idea to have several lunches that work for your child (ren). Doing so can help in preventing boredom, give them variety, definitely make your shopping easier and hopefully minimize the stress that often occurs with packing a healthy lunch. Some children may like a “conventional” lunch containing a sandwich, fruit and/or vegetable, snack item, and a drink. Some may prefer a lunch made up of several snacks; either way, make sure the meal is a balanced meal containing protein, fruit and/or vegetables, some whole grain carbohydrate and a small amount of healthy fat. Here are some ideas to consider and have your children choose from: Lean deli meat sandwich-try whole grain,oat or whole wheat breads,pita or wraps. Peanut butter*(or almond butter, sunflower butter or soy nut butter) and jelly. Hummus and low-fat cheese sandwich on a pita. Whole grain mini-bagel and reduced fat cream cheese or laughing cow cheese.

Vegetarian pita pocket. Low fat salad mix for sandwiches –tuna, chicken salad, ham salad; try and sneak some extra veggies-chopped peppers, carrot, celery, cucumber, onion or roasted red peppers. Dinner leftovers (meat, chicken, fish, pork, grain plus pasta, rice or potatoes and vegetables). Whole grain crackers and low-fat cheese. Leftover veggie pizza. Homemade or lower sodium soup, stew or chili. Quesadilla with salsa. Calzone or Stromboli . Single-serving cereal or cereal from home in storage container (just add milk). Hardboiled eggs or Quiche. Yogurt with granola. Bean and rice salad. Partner them with a choice of fruit, vegetables and healthy snack for a great side: Fruits to consider: apples, pear, banana, grapes, berries, oranges, grapefruit sections, canned fruit in juice, fruit cocktail, cherries, pineapple, melon, pomegranate, mango, tangerines, clementine, homemade fruit salad  Vegetables can be eaten raw, steamed, grilled and with or without dip. Consider cucumber slices, celery, peppers, carrots,

Southwestern beef roll-ups 4 Whole wheat tortillas (6 ½ inch) 4 red leaf lettuce leaves, rinsed and dried 4 oz Low Sodium deli roast beef Spread: 1 Tbsp light mayonnaise, mix in 1 tsp lime juice Directions: 1. Combine ingredients for the spread. Mix well 2. Spread about 1 tsp of spread on each tortilla. green/wax beans, snow peas, broccoli, asparagus, cauliflower, grape tomatoes, beets, corn, salad, guacamole, bean salad, edamame Healthy Snacks to consider: 100% fruit leather, sunflower seeds, baked potato chips, pretzels, multigrain crackers, highfiber granola bar, graham crackers, applesauce, multigrain chips or tortilla, dried fruit, nuts,* tube yogurt (try freezing), cereal bars, dry cereal, trail mix, popcorn, dried peas, packaged pudding Remember you must always use good food safety when packing food especially for your children—foods that are most susceptible are meats, eggs and dairy. So, always pack cold items with a frozen ice pack or use frozen juice boxes, try to use

3. Top each tortilla with one lettuce leaf and 1 ounce roast beef-about 2 slices 4. Fold in sides, and roll. Then serve. Nutritional Facts: Calories 190, Total fat 5 gms, Chol 21 mg, Fiber 2 gm, Protein 11 gm, Soduim 302 mg Recipe from deliciously healthy family meals cookbook by the NHLBI @nhlbi.nih.gov.

insulated lunch boxes and pack nonperishable foods, such as nut butter* and jelly, fruit, raw vegetables, crackers, nuts, and packaged pudding. When using a thermos or other insulated container for packing hot items make sure the thermos is cleaned and rinsed with very hot water before adding food. Together these ideas and tips should bring about good nutrition, variety and healthy eating which always makes for better learning-Have a super school year. *Nut allergies- please find out what the rules are where your child goes to school and instruct him/her about the importance of not sharing foods with individuals who may have allergic sensitivities.  Source: RD411.com

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Back to school lunch ideas


Fabulous fall

8 • Syracuse Parent and CNY Family • September 2012

For him:

Fall style trend:

Left: The North Face Boy’s Denali hoodie, thenorthface.com; Burberry Check rain boots; us.burberry.com.

cozy! As temperatures dip, keep the kids comfy , dry and stylish in this oh-so-cute outerwear.

For her: Left: Gap Faux Fur Ruffle Vest in Claret, gap.com; Ugg Kids Bailey Button Triplet in Rose Quartz; uggaustralia.com.

Great Northern Mall • 622-3926 www.pianoandorgancenter.com

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Things Baltimore Woods Nature Center Interpretive Center Closed. The interpretive center will be closed for the holiday. Trails are open dawn to dusk. The center will re-open 9 AM Tuesday, Sept. 4. Baltimore Woods Nature Center is located at 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus. 673-1350.

Tue Sept 4

Jan Myers Newbury - Shibori Fabrics for Quilting. Sept 4 through 8. Learn the basics of patternmaking by binding, clamping, stitching and pole-wrapping. Combine layers of pattern and color to achieve fabrics with amazing depth and luminosity. Work with cellulose fibers and procion dyes. Sept 1 registration deadline. Schweinfurth Art Center, 205 Genesee St., Auburn. 255-1553. mtraudt@schweinfurthartcenter.org.

Fri Sept 7

Montezuma Muckrace. 7 PM. Help celebrate the diversity of birds at the Montezuma Wetlands Complex by participating in the 16th Annual Montezuma Muckrace. This 24-hour birding event raises funds to support conservation projects within the Montezuma Wetlands Complex. This year our goal is to raise $12,000 to fund an observation platform at the Deep Muck Restoration Project on Northern Montezuma WMA and to supplement wetland enhancement projects along the Seneca River. For details and registration, visit friendsofmontezuma.org/muck_race.html.

Sat Sept 8

Montezuma Muckrace. 7 PM. Help celebrate the diversity of birds at the Montezuma Wetlands Complex by participating in the 16th Annual Montezuma Muckrace. This 24-hour birding event raises funds to support conservation projects within the Montezuma Wetlands Complex. This year our goal is to raise $12,000 to fund an observation platform at the Deep Muck Restoration Project on Northern Montezuma WMA and to supplement wetland enhancement projects along the Seneca River. For details and registration, visit friendsofmontezuma.org/muck_race.html.

Sun Sept 9

Friday Fun. 10:30 to 11 AM. A craft program for children ages 7 to 12. Make your own dreamcatcher, create art using just sunlight and photo-sensitive paper, learn how to track phases of the moon, and more! Maxwell Memorial Library is located at 14 Genesee St. in the village of Camillus. For more information, call 672-3661. Summer Movie Series: “Wanderlust”. 2 PM. Rattled by sudden unemployment, a Manhattan couple surveys alternative living options, ultimately deciding to experiment with living on a rural commune where free love rules. Runtime: 98 minutes, Rated: R! Join us for an afternoon movie with popcorn! Fayetteville Free Library, 300 Orchard St. Fayetteville. 637-6374, ext. 319.

Mon Sept 10

Maxwell Movie Night. 5:15 PM. Author Suzanne Collins’ mega-hit trilogy is over. Jennifer Lawrence plays a girl who must use her wits and her hunting skills to survive the brutal competition forced upon the youth of her country (2012; PG-13; 142 minutes). It is also meant for a slightly older audience. Movie Nights are free and open to the public. Seating is limited, so come

early. You are welcome to bring a brown bag snack or dinner. Maxwell Memorial Library is located at 14 Genesee St. in the village of Camillus. For more information, call 672-3661. Sally’s Story Time. 10:30 AM. For preschoolers ages 3 to 5 is held on Mondays and Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m. Maxwell Memorial Library is located at 14 Genesee St. in the village of Camillus. For more information, call 672-3661.

Tue Sept 11

Acrylic Painting 2 with Chris Baker. 2 to 4 PM on Tuesdays through Oct. 16. Designed as a continuation of Acrylic Painting for Beginners, this class is for painters with a basic background in acrylics and will focus on drawing as a preliminary step to painting as well as basic color theory and the use of light and shadow to create the illusion of space in a painting. Participants will visit the galleries for inspiration and instruction. This class is for beginners to intermediates. Supply lists will be provided after registration. Cost: $149. To register, visit www. cayuga-cc.edu/communityed or call (315) 294-8841. Sally’s Story Time. 10:30 AM. For preschoolers ages 3 to 5 is held on Mondays and Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m. Maxwell Memorial Library is located at 14 Genesee St. in the village of Camillus. For more information, call 672-3661.

Wed Sept 12

Community Wesleyan Church. 6:45 to 8:15 PM. High Point Weekly Kids Program kickoff. High Point meets Wednesdays from through May. Each week there is a travel theme fun with games, crafts, snacks and weekly Bible lessons.Free for all kids in Kindergarten through 5th Grade. 112 Downer St., Baldwinsville. Registration is free and open to the public. To register, you can call the church office at 638-2222 or visit us online at www.communitywesleyanchurch. com. Stories with Sally. 10:30 aM.For the under-3 crowd is on Wednesdays. Maxwell Memorial Library is located at 14 Genesee St. in the village of Camillus. For more information, call 672-3661.

do

Star Party: Elusive Planets.8 to 10 PM Backup date, Sept. 15. Farewell to the summer Milky Way, hello to the fall skies! Without the Moon, many distant galaxies can be viewed in a telescope, as well as the elusive planets Uranus and Neptune. $5 for members, $15/family; $8 for nonmembers, $25/ family. Baltimore Woods Nature Center is located at 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus. 673-1350.

Sat Sept 15

Saturday Story Time with Ms. Rose. 10:30 AM. For infants and toddlers to age four. No registration is required for any of our story times, but please sign up through our online event calendar. A parent or guardian must remain with children and participate with them during Stories with Sally and Saturday Story Time. Maxwell Memorial Library is located at 14 Genesee St. in the village of Camillus. For more information, call 672-3661. LIVE CONCERT: Man of 1000 Voices. 7 PM. Nick Mulpagano IS Frank Sinatra, Neil Diamond, Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Elvis, Roy Orbison, Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis, Hank Williams, Sr., Glen Campbell, and Engelbert Humperdinck. Nick will “WOW” you with his impersonations of some of the greatest singers ever. Special Guest Appearance by Dove Creek (Putter Cox and Reyna Stagnaro) performing favorite classics by Peter, Paul, and Mary; Kingston Trio, The Beatles, and others. An Art Zimmer Production. Tickets are $10 advance-$15 at door. Contact The Palace Theater, 19 Utica Street, Hamilton, NY, at 315.824.1420 or

visit palacetheater.org. Mile-Long Sale. 10 to 11:30 AM. Children’s librarian Rose Burdick will have an extended story time; drop in anytime for a listen! Maxwell Memorial Library is located at 14 Genesee St. in the village of Camillus. For more information, call 672-3661.

Sun Sept 16

EnvIRONmental CHEF homegrown. 3 to 6 PM. Second annual Culinary Cook-Off Competition. The area’s best chefs cook-off in a culinary competition using local foods. Sous chefs are chosen from patron ticket holders, and the audience are the judges! Locally grown and produced foods connect people to the abundance available in CNY. This event sold out last year, reserve your spot now. $75/pp general admission; $100/ pp patron admission includes a chance to be a sous-chef at the event. This is a fundraiser for Baltimore Woods Nature Center’s Nature in the City science education programming. Call 673-1350 or visit www. baltimorewoods.org for full information and reservations.

Mon Sept 17

Sally’s Story Time. 10:30 AM. For preschoolers ages 3 to 5 is held on Mondays and Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m. Maxwell Memorial Library is located at 14 Genesee St. in the village of Camillus. For more information, call 672-3661.

Tue Sept 18

Sally’s Story Time. 10:30 AM. For preschoolers ages 3 to 5 is held on Mondays continued on next page

Thu Sept 13

Montezuma Birding Van Tour. 8 to 11 AM. Migrating raptors, waterfowl, shorebirds and songbirds are on the move as the autumn migration season is in full swing. Hop in our van for an excursion to Montezuma’s birding hotspots where dozens of species can be seen and heard! Participants are encouraged to bring their camera and binoculars. Expect to walk short distances. Fee: $7.50/child; $12.50/adult. Poetry Appreciation with Georgia Popoff. 6 to 9 PM on Thursdays through Oct. 4. Do you want to learn more about poetry? During this class, participants will listen to poetry readings by guest poets during the Schweinfurth Art Center’s Fall Poetry Series. Published poet and author Georgia Popoff will lead this four-part class for adults who want to learn more about understanding poetry. The class will meet before and after the readings to discuss content, style, and composition. No experience necessary. Cost: $69. To register, visit www.cayuga-cc. edu/communityed or call (315) 294-8841.

Fri Sept 14

BLESSED SACRAMENT SCHOOL

3 year olds through 6th grade Elementary School Accredited by the Middle States Commission Offering Faith, Knowledge, Discipline, Morals, and Dividends for Life since 1931. Providing your child with academic excellence in a positive and personal environment!

3219 James Street, Syracuse, NY 13206

315-463-1261

Tours available. Call for an appointment. www.blessedsacramentschool.org

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Mon Sept 3

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Syracuse Parent and CNY Family • September 2012 • 9


1 0 • Syracuse Parent and CNY Family • September 2012

Things

Stories with Sally. 10:30 aM.For the under-3 crowd is on Wednesdays. Maxwell Memorial Library is located at 14 Genesee St. in the village of Camillus. For more information, call 672-3661. Storytelling in Photography with Kevin Rivoli. 6 to 8 PM on Wednesdays through Oct. 10. The goal of this class is to learn how to tell a story through photography and to expose students to the philosophies, techniques, and methods of photojournalism. The course is designed for photographers of all levels who want to learn how to understand composition and capture the moment for a more poignant storytelling picture. This class will also touch on the basics of using a camera, flash, and post-processing of digital files. Kevin Rivoli is a photojournalist whose work is published weekly in newspapers and magazines across the country. A digital camera with SD card is strongly recommended. $119. To register, visit www. cayuga-cc.edu/communityed or call (315) 294-8841.

Sat Sept 22

Saturday Story Time with Ms. Rose. 10:30 AM. For infants and toddlers to age four. No registration is required for any of our story times, but please sign

do

ing) will be provided. Cost: $79. To register, visit www.cayuga-cc.edu/communityed or call (315) 294-8841.

Mon Sept 24

Sally’s Story Time. 10:30 AM. For preschoolers ages 3 to 5 is held on Mondays and Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m. Maxwell Memorial Library is located at 14 Genesee St. in the village of Camillus. For more information, call 672-3661.

Tue Sept 25

Sally’s Story Time. 10:30 AM. For preschoolers ages 3 to 5 is held on Mondays and Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m. Maxwell Memorial Library is located at 14 Genesee St. in the village of Camillus. For more information, call 672-3661.

Thu Sept 27

Ophelia’s Place Presents: Raise the Green 11th Annual 9-Hole Golf Tournament. Registration 3 PM; Shotgun start 3:30 PM. Ophelia’s Place is a non-profit organization providing support and resources for those impacted by eating disorders. Golf foursome $260; Individual golfer $60 each. Fee includes Greens fees, golf cart, dinner, T-shirt, giveaways and opportunities to enter to win door prizes, silent auction and raffles. Foxfire Golf Course in Van Buren. Get your registration form online at www.opheliasplace.org, bring it in completed and get a free cup of coffee at Café at 407, 407 Tulip St. in Liverpool or call 451-5855.

DOORS TO MUSIC

MUSIC CLASSES FOR CHILDREN 4 TO 6

A good ear is learned... We can teach it!

All children are born with talent. It needs to be awakened! All children can learn music if it’s introduced in their formative years!

• Piano/Keyboard • Ear Training • Percussion • Music Reading

Musical skills that last a lifetime Convenient DeWitt Location

655-3274

16010

Wed Sept 19

up through our online event calendar. A parent or guardian must remain with children and participate with them during Stories with Sally and Saturday Story Time. Maxwell Memorial Library is located at 14 Genesee St. in the village of Camillus. For more information, call 672-3661. Classic Campfire Fun with Jay Guss. Call for times. Turn off the TV and join Jay Guss for a good old fashioned campfire sing along and storytelling! Bring a family friendly joke or campfire stories and join in the fun! If that’s not enough, top off the fun with a warm gooey s’more! $5 for members, $15/family; $8 for nonmembers, $25/family. 673-1350. Baltimore Woods Nature Center is located at 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus, baltmorewoods.org. Food Preservation and Canning. 10:30 AM. NOPL at Cicero. No cost. Get a thorough tour of the canning process, from setup to safe storage, as well as a view of all of the equipment used for canning, a look at finished canned goods, and some sample canning or recipe books. 8686 Knowledge Lane, Cicero. 699-2032. Handbuilding Ceramic Bowls with Cheri Haring. Noon to 4 PM. Have you always wanted to take a ceramics class? Join Auburn potter Cheri Haring for this one-day workshop to learn the basics of handbuilding. Pinch, coil, and slab techniques will be featured. Participants will make up to four different bowls during this afternoon class. All supplies (including fir-

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and Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m. Maxwell Memorial Library is located at 14 Genesee St. in the village of Camillus. For more information, call 672-3661.

2

Member

Fri Sept 28

LIVE MUSICAL: Swiete Chocolate Factory. 5 PM. The Swiete Chocolate Factory is a light-hearted original musical. Purity Swiete, founder, opens her doors for a special tour to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the factory’s opening. The tour guide escorts visitors (the audience) through the chocolate factory to experience a day in the life of the Swiete Chocolate factory. This is a Palace Players’ Production. Tickets are $8 for youth and $14 for adults (18+). Contact The Palace Theater, 19 Utica Street, Hamilton, NY, at 315.824.1420 or visit www.palacetheater.org.

Sat Sept 29

Saturday Story Time with Ms. Rose. 10:30 AM. For infants and toddlers to age four. No registration is required for any of our story times, but please sign up through our online event calendar. A parent or guardian must remain with children and participate with them during Stories with Sally and Saturday Story Time. Maxwell Memorial Library is located at 14 Genesee St. in the village of Camillus. For more information, call 672-3661. Robin Blakney Carlson – Artfelts. Sept 29 and 30. Create small-scale work with highly textured and embellished surfaces. Work intuitively combining a variety of fibers using resist and collage techniques. Develop the surface with stitching, beads and embellishment. Sept 1 registration deadline. Schweinfurth Art Center, 205 Genesee St., Auburn. 255-1553. mraudt@ schweinfurthartcenter.org. LIVE MUSICAL: Swiete Chocolate Factory. 5 PM. The Swiete Chocolate Factory is a light-hearted original musical. Purity Swiete, founder, opens her doors for a special tour to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the factory’s opening. The tour guide escorts visitors (the audience) through the chocolate factory to experience a day in the life of the Swiete Chocolate factory. This is a Palace Players’ Production. Tickets are $8 for youth and $14 for adults (18+). Contact The Palace Theater, 19 Utica Street, Hamilton, NY, at 315.824.1420 or visit palacetheater.org.palacetheater.org. Jazzknitting – Sept. 29 and 30. Learn to create shapes like ginko leaves & butterflies. Use the natural tendency for yarn to curl and pool and take cues from color changes in hand painted yarns. Learn pooling techniques and how to collage shapes together. Sept 1 registration deadline. Schweinfurth Art Center, 205 Genesee St., Auburn. 255-1553. mraudt@ schweinfurthartcenter.org. Campfire Cooking 101. 6:30 to 8 PM. Nothing makes an autumn camping trip complete like a hot bed of coals and the smell of cobbler wafting up from the dutch oven. In this delicious program, Tom will help get you started with campfire cooking – covering a wide range of techniques, giving away some of his favorite recipes, and a sampling of the tasty results. $7 for members, $20/ family; $10 for nonmembers, $30/family. 673-1350. Baltimore Woods Nature Center is located at 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus,baltimorewoods.org.


Fall... in

Relax with these classics after you tuck the kids in on a cool fall evening

Pier One Oversize Goblets, amber with gold stem, pierone. com; West Elm Cozy Throw, westelm.com; Scrabble board game, hasbro.com.

Immaculate Conception creates a faith-filled future, one student at a time. • Full Day Kindergarten • Pre-K - 6th grade • One of the top academic schools in a three-county area on NYS tests. • Spanish taught beginning in kindergarten • Instrumental & Vocal Music Programs • Hot Lunch Program • Art appreciation • Technology Classes integrated throughout the school

• Partnership with LeMoyne College & Syracuse University • Transportation available • Tuition Scholarships available • After School Program

Immaculate Conception School 400 Salt Springs Street • Fayetteville • 637-3961

www.icschool.org

“Academic excellence in a Catholic Tradition.” Prestigious Middle States Accreditation

Bully Busting

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Fabulous fall

Syracuse Parent and CNY Family • September 2012 • 1 1

Open House!

Is your child Bully-proof?

Let us teach your child how to be prepared, not scared!

Classe s EWery 15 Minut es t Free 1riz es t And More! This FREE Class will cover: “Today, 77% of school age t1SFQBSBUJPO children are bullied... t1SFWFOUJPO One child every 7 minutes.” t1SPUFDUJPO

Call Today 437-9417 or visit: www.cnykarate.com 8FTU.BOMJVT4USFFUt&BTU4ZSBDVTF /:

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When: Saturday, September 22, 2012 Time: 10am - Noon Where: CNY Karate, 720 W. Manlius St., East Syracuse


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Syracuse Parent September 2012  

Syracuse Parent September 2012

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