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VO L U M E 3 6 I I S S U E 5 I M AY 2 018

SPECIAL TOPIC

Modelling/Interpretation CROSSTALK STATOIL TO EQUINOR - WHAT’S IN A NAME? INDUSTRY NEWS Brazil 15th licensing round nets $2.4 billion


JumpStart Your Exploration

Of the Gabon South Basin

Top Miocene co-rendered with depth from CGG’s Multi-Client & New Ventures Gabon JumpStart program.

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FIRST BREAK® An EAGE Publication

CHAIRMAN EDITORIAL BOARD Trude Støren (elna@emgs.com) EDITOR Damian Arnold (editorfb@eage.org) MEMBERS, EDITORIAL BOARD • Paul Binns, consultant (pebinns@btinternet.com) • Patrick Corbett, Heriot-Watt University (patrick_corbett@pet.hw.ac.uk) • Tom Davis, Colorado School of Mines (tdavis@mines.edu) • Anthony Day, PGS (anthony.day@pgs.com) • Peter Dromgoole, Statoil UK (pdrum@statoil.com) • Rutger Gras, Oranje-Nassau Energy (gras@onebv.com) • Hamidreza Hamdi, University of Calgary (hhamdi@ucalgary.ca) • Ed Kragh, Schlumberger Cambridge Research (edkragh@slb.com) • John Reynolds, Reynolds International (jmr@reynolds-international.co.uk) • James Rickett, Schlumberger (jrickett@slb.com) • Dave Stewart, Dave Stewart Geoconsulting Ltd (djstewart.dave@gmail.com) • Femke Vossepoel, Delft University of Technology (f.c.vossepoel@tudelft.nl) MANAGER MEDIA PRODUCTION DEPARTMENT Arjan Kors (aks@eage.org) MEDIA PRODUCTION MANAGER Thomas Beentje (tbe@eage.org) ACCOUNT MANAGER ADVERTISING Charles Callaghan (ccn@eage.org) ACCOUNT MANAGER SUBSCRIPTIONS Ben Love (ble@eage.org) PRODUCTION Saskia Nota (layout@eage.org) Ivana Geurts (layout@eage.org) EAGE EUROPE OFFICE PO Box 59 3990 DB Houten The Netherlands • +31 88 995 5055 • eage@eage.org • www.eage.org EAGE RUSSIA & CIS OFFICE EAGE Russia & CIS Office EAGE Geomodel LLC Novocheremushkinskaya Str. 65 Build. 1 117418, Moscow, Russia • +7 495 640 2008 • moscow@eage.org • www.eage.ru EAGE MIDDLE EAST OFFICE EAGE Middle East FZ-LLC Dubai Knowledge Village Block 13 Office F-25 PO Box 501711 Dubai, United Arab Emirates • +971 4 369 3897 • middle_east@eage.org • www.eage.org

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Understanding frequency decomposition colour blends using forward modelling

Editorial Contents 3

EAGE News

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Crosstalk

15

industry News

Special Topic: Modelling/Interpretation 31

Revisiting Dix’s RMS approximation for Normal Move-Out Velocity Huw James

37

Structurally oriented coherent noise filtering Geoffrey A. Dorn

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GLCM-based anisotropy estimation — the influence of computation parameters on the results Christoph Georg Eichkitz and Johannes Amtmann

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Understanding frequency decomposition colour blends using forward modelling — examples from the Scarborough gas field Chris Han

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Seismic anisotropy estimation of the Talang Akar formation in south Sumatra basin, Indonesia, using ultrasonic tomography in core plugs Vani Mutia Sari, Sigit Sukmono, Teuku Abdullah Sanny and Benyamin Sapiie

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Re-interpreting the South Atlantic Pre-Salt ‘Microbialite’ reservoirs: petrographic, isotopic and seismic evidence for the shallow evaporitic lake depositional model Paul Wright and Karyna Rodriguez

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Joint inversion of multi-component seismic data: application to Bakken petroleum exploration and development Kritti Kreeprasertkul and Thomas L. Davis

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Calendar

EAGE ASIA PACIFIC OFFICE UOA Centre Office Suite 19-15-3A No. 19, Jalan Pinang 50450 Kuala Lumpur Malaysia • +60 3 272 201 40 • asiapacific@eage.org • www.eage.org EAGE LATIN AMERICA OFFICE Carrera 14 No 97-63 Piso 5 Bogotá, Colombia • +57 1 4232948 • americas@eage.org • www.eage.org EAGE MEMBERS CHANGE OF ADDRESS NOTIFICATION Send to: EAGE Membership Dept at EAGE Office (address above) FIRST BREAK ON THE WEB www.firstbreak.org

cover: 2D seismic reflection measurements at the Erzberg mine, Austria (photo courtesy of Geo5).

ISSN 0263-5046 (print) / ISSN 1365-2397 (online) FIRST

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European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers

Board 2017-2018 Jean-Jacques Biteau President

Near Surface Geoscience Division Oliver Kuras Chair George Apostolopoulos Vice-Chair Micki Allen Contact Officer EEGS-NA Riyadh Al-Saad O&G Liaison George Apostolopoulos Awards Committee Representative Peter Bergmann Technical Programme Representative Albert Casas Membership Officer Ranajit Ghose Editor in Chief Near Surface Geophysics Heinrich Horstmeyer Education Officer/Conference Liaison Officer Andreas Kathage Liaison Officer First Break Koya Suto Liaison Asia Pacific Endre Törös Awards Committee Representative Jiangha Xia Liaison China

Oil & Gas Geoscience Division

Juan Soldo Vice-President

Michael Poppelreiter Vice-President-Elect

Jorg Herwanger Education Officer

Caroline Lowrey Chair Michael Peter Suess Vice-Chair Øistein Bøe Resource Evaluation Committee liaison Phil Christie Chief Editor Petroleum Geoscience Rick Donselaar Technical Programme Representative (Geology) Xavier Garcia NSGD liaison Sebastian Geiger Resource Evaluation Committee liaison Olivier Gosselin Technical Programme Representative (Reservoir), Resource Evaluation Committee liaison Juliane Heiland Committee member David Halliday Technical Programme Representative (Geophysics), YP liaison Tijmen Jan Moser Editor-in-Chief Geophysical Prospecting Ann Muggeridge IOR Committee liaison Walter Rietveld Technical Programme Officer Michael Welch Technical Programme Representative (Geology), NSGD liaison Martin Widmaier Technical Programme Representative (Geophysics) Paul Worthington Resource Evaluation Committee liaison Michael Zhdanov NSGD liaison

SUBSCRIPTIONS First Break is published monthly. It is free to EAGE members. The membership fee of EAGE is € 50.00 a year (including First Break, EarthDoc (EAGE’s geoscience database), Learning Geoscience (EAGE’s Education website) and online access to a scientific journal. Roald van Borselen Membership and Cooperation Officer

Ingrid Magnus Publications Officer

Everhard Muijzert Secretary-Treasurer

Companies can subscribe to First Break via an institutional subscription. Every subscription includes a monthly hard copy and online access to the full First Break archive for the requested number of online users. Orders for current subscriptions and back issues should be sent to EAGE Publications BV, Journal Subscriptions, PO Box 59, 3990 DB, Houten, The Netherlands. Tel: +31 (0)88 9955055, E-mail: subscriptions@eage.org, www.firstbreak.org. First Break is published by EAGE Publications BV, The Netherlands. However, responsibility for the opinions given and the statements made rests with the authors. COPYRIGHT & PHOTOCOPYING © 2018 EAGE All rights reserved. First Break or any part thereof may not be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transcribed in any form or by any means, electronically or mechanically, including photocopying and recording, without the prior written permission of the Publisher.

Walter Rietveld Technical Programme Officer

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Oliver Kuras Chair Near Surface Geoscience Division

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Caroline Jane Lowrey Chair Oil & Gas Geoscience Division

2018

PAPER The Publisher’s policy is to use acid-free permanent paper (TCF), to the draft standard ISO/DIS/9706, made from sustainable forests using chlorine-free pulp (Nordic-Swan standard).


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HIGHLIGHTS

EAGE MEMBERS

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Inaugural EAGE/IFPEN conference on sulfur challenges in E&P

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Workshop finds rock physics on a roll

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Workshop makes headway on naturally fractured reservoirs

Experience the new EAGE Community Hub in Copenhagen! At this year’s 80th Annual Conference and Exhibition in Copenhagen, the popular EAGE Pavilion will have a new look and a new name: EAGE Community Hub. This is where all EAGE’s activities will be integrated into one single location. Special interest groups such as Women in Geoscience and Engineering and Young Professionals will feature alongside the Career Advice Centre and student activities. The EAGE Community Hub will also include the EAGE Bookshop, with books and merchandise available for purchase.

The EAGE Pavilion in Paris, 2018.

The EAGE staff at the Community Hub will be on hand to answer any questions you may have about the EAGE Annual Conference & Exhibition 2018, future EAGE activities, EAGE membership, EAGE Student Programme or about EAGE in general. Regional EAGE representatives will also be in attendance in the regional booth situated within the EAGE Community Hub.

Connect with the EAGE Community One of EAGE’s goals is to connect professionals, scientists and students in geoscience and engineering. Two communities with special interests meet during the Annual Meeting. The Women in Geoscience and Engineering Special Interest Community (WGE SIC) aims to be a worldwide reference group for women professionals operating in these fields. The Young Professional Special Interest Community (YP SIC) is focused on industry professionals (aged 35 or under) in the early stages of their careers. Both communities will be organizing special sessions in Copenhagen. In addition, the YP SIC will hold a symposium for young professionals in industry and academia on Monday 11 June during the day before the opening, to discuss how to build and explore their leadership, teamwork and communication skills. Career Advice Centre The EAGE Career Advice Centre organizes activities to support EAGE members with their professional, educational and career development and personal growth. The programme offers a range of activities for different career stages, from university selections and panels, advice on CV FIRST

preparation and job searching methods to requalification of existing skillsets to new disciplines. Socialize and engage in the student area The EAGE Annual 2018 also offers an extensive student programme with activities including the Laurie Dake Challenge 2018 (formerly known as the EAGE FIELD Challenge), workshops, a short-course, the Geo-Quiz, and more. Previously, we created a Student Court, but this year, it will be a part of the EAGE Community Hub. Each day students can meet and chat with EAGE staff who will organize a range of activities, networking events and presentations. You won’t be able to miss the coloured carpet! Discounts at the Bookshop Looking for sharp prices on geoscience books? Make sure you visit the EAGE Bookshop at the EAGE Community Hub to take advantage of a range of discounts available for members. The Bookshop at the EAGE Annual 18 in Copenhagen will for the most part be a familiar sight but with some differences. As usual there will be a great variety of titles on offer, many of them published by EAGE. But there will also BREAK

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EAGE NEWS

be numerous titles from other publishing companies. Visitors can purchase hard copies as well as e-books, and there will be a reading area so you can take the time to browse, read and relax in between the many great sessions on offer throughout the conference. As part of a new initiative at the Bookshop, there will be daily discounts,

so make sure you come past every day to see what’s on offer. As always, there will also be several books offered at bargain prices, so be sure to save some extra space in your luggage! And remember, if a title is not available on site, a range of available books can easily be ordered through the the easy-to-use and restyled EAGE bookshop website:

www.bookshop.eage.org. Bookshop staff will be available throughout the week to answer any questions you have. The EAGE Community Hub will be stationed at Booth 410 in the main area of the exhibition. Make sure you keep an eye on the EAGE Annual 2018 website for the latest updates: www.eageannual2018.org.

Inaugural EAGE/IFPEN conference to focus on sulfur challenges in E&P EAGE and IFP Energies Nouvelles (IFPEN) are jointly organizing the first conference on Sulfur Risk Management in E&P (SRM2018), taking place in Rueil-Malmaison close to Paris, France from 18-20 September 2018. The SRM2018 conference will focus on the origin, transformation and behaviour of organic sulfur and their species, and discussions related to prediction and production challenges in the oil industry. Co-chairs of the Organizing Committee, Isabelle Kowalewski (IFPEN) and

is encountered in sedimentary organic matter and reservoir fluids as elemental sulfur, H2S gas, or as volatile and heavy organic sulfur compounds (sulfides, mercaptans, thiophenes derivatives). Sulfur and its derivatives are found in nature depending on the conditions prevailing in the depositional environment and subsequent diagenetic changes in the geosphere. But they can also be generated during various secondary processes and production scenarios, e.g., reservoir souring after waterflooding. As sulfur-bear-

Dallol: the sulfur lake area in the Danakil Depression, Ethiopia.

Artur Stankiewicz (Schlumberger) say that while H2S issues have been heavily featured in various international meetings, topics of elemental and organic sulfur, and their fate in the subsurface following impact on production, have been marginal. ‘By bringing scientists from various disciplines together, we hope to foster discussion on this important area of oil and gas exploration and production.’ Sulfur is an ubiquitous and ‘unwanted’ element in petroleum industry. It 4

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ing compounds are corrosive, toxic and detrimental to oil quality, they can cause considerable technical, environmental, economic and safety challenges in all segments of the petroleum industry, from upstream, through midstream to downstream. To anticipate and optimize E&P activities, a key issue is the prediction of the sulfur risk in exploration and subsequently at the earliest stage of reservoir characterization. With a constant and rapid increase of computing power, new 2018

innovative approaches can be proposed from in-situ characterization to reservoir modelling (digital solutions). Simultaneously, the oil and gas industry will have to improve upon current safety solutions which are being challenged by increasing stringent safety and environmental regulations. The organizers wish to make the conference a catalyst for current research in sulfur science. Principal topics of the conference sessions will be: E&P challenges for fields with high sulfur and H2S content, future challenges for development and production of H2S and sulfur bearing fluids, and new analytical tools for characterization of petroleum sulfur compounds. Regional cases with sulfur issues are also expected to be discussed. A unique opportunity is being offered to present papers on the way to de-risk sulfur problems in E&P operations with state of the art geology, geochemistry, reservoir and experimental studies. If sulfur issues matter to you, experts at the conference from different fields sharing up to date knowledge will hopefully trigger the emergence of novel approaches and methodologies for the prediction of the sulfur risk in the upstream and for the development of technical innovations for reducing the risks downstream. The technical programme will consist of oral and poster presentations on a broad selection of topics. If you would like to share your ideas at this conference, Extended Abstracts (1 to 4 pages) will be welcome via the event page at events.eage.org. Deadline for submission is 15 May 2018.


EAGE NEWS 

EAGE to collaborate on SAGEEP 2019 in the US EAGE and EEGS (Environmental and Engineering Geophysical Society) have just created a little bit more history in their longstanding relationship serving the near surface geophysics community. At this year’s annual SAGEEP (Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems) in Nashville, representatives from EAGE and EEGS signed an agreement between the two organizations to organize the EEGS annual SAGEEP together in the coming years. EAGE will take care of the handling of the Call for Papers, registration and promotion of the event. The collaboration was announced by EEGS president Laura Sherrod during the 2018 SAGEEP meeting in Nashville

in March. Both Oliver Kuras, chair, Near Surface Geoscience Division, and Marcel van Loon, EAGE executive director, were present. Marcel van Loon welcomed the initiative. ‘This is a logical and constructive development from which members of both societies will benefit. The whole cooperation falls perfectly into place with the EAGE mission statement where we strive to promote the development and application of geosciences and related engineering subjects. We also think that there is scope to organize parallel events, as we have successfully done in Europe generating more delegates and exhibitors.’ EAGE has long been closely involved with EEGS, a relationship which has

been nurtured ever since the merger of the European section of the EEGS with the EAGE Near Surface Division in 2004. The best of SAGEEP and the annual EAGE Near Surface Geoscience meeting are presented at the respective events. EAGE has also been organizing short courses at SAGEEP for years, and the two societies exchange booths at their annual meetings. In the past, EAGE has also encouraged cooperation between the EEGS journal JEEG and Near Surface Geophysics. Abstracts from SAGEEP are published on Earthdoc. SAGEEP 2019 will take place in Portland, Oregon from 17-21 March next year.

EAGE Education Calendar EAGE EDUCATION TOUR 12

AL KHOBAR, SAUDI ARABIA

SHORT COURSE ON BOREHOLE SEISMIC

KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA

10-11 MAY

SHORT COURSE ON SEISMIC ACQUISITION PROJECT ESSENTIALS

BEIJING, CHINA

14-18 MAY

EDUCATION DAYS BUENOS AIRES MULTIPLE SHORT COURSES PROGRAMME

BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA

10-15 JUN

EAGE ANNUAL CONFERENCE: MULTIPLE SHORT COURSES PROGRAMME

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK

12-27 JUL

EDUCATION DAYS BEIJING: MULTIPLE SHORT COURSES PROGRAMME

BEIJING, CHINA

5-18 JUL

EDUCATION DAYS PERTH: MULTIPLE SHORT COURSES PROGRAMME

PERTH, AUSTRALIA

9-16 JUL

EDUCATION DAYS KUALA LUMPUR: MULTIPLE SHORT COURSES PROGRAMME

KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA

SHORT COURSE ON SIMULTANEOUS SOURCES: INTRODUCTION TO ACQUISITION AND PROCESSING AND RECENT ADVANCES

KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA

27-31 AUG

EDUCATION DAYS RIO DE JANEIRO: MULTIPLE SHORT COURSES PROGRAMME

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL

28-31 AUG

EDUCATION DAYS ABERDEEN: MULTIPLE SHORT COURSES PROGRAMME

ABERDEEN, UK

EDUCATION DAYS MEXICO CITY: MULTIPLE SHORT COURSES PROGRAMME

MEXICO CITY, MEXICO

9-13 SEP

24TH EUROPEAN MEETING OF ENVIRONMENTAL AND ENGINEERING GEOPHYSICS

PORTO, PORTUGAL

9-13 SEP

3RD APPLIED SHALLOW MARINE GEOPHYSICS CONFERENCE

PORTO, PORTUGAL

9-13 SEP

2ND CONFERENCE ON GEOPHYSICS FOR MINERAL EXPLORATION AND MINING

PORTO, PORTUGAL

EAGE EDUCATION TOUR 13

CHINA, INDIA, INDONESIA, JAPAN, MALAYSIA, AUSTRALIA

7 MAY 9-10 MAY

23 JUL

3-7 SEP

17 SEP - 3 OCT

EAGE EDUCATION TOUR 13

ANAHEIM, USA

22-26 OCT

EDUCATION DAYS STAVANGER: MULTIPLE SHORT COURSES PROGRAMME

STAVANGER, NORWAY

5-9 NOV

EDUCATION DAYS HOUSTON: MULTIPLE SHORT COURSES PROGRAMME

HOUSTON, USA

14 OCT

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND REGISTRATION PLEASE VISIT WWW.LEARNINGGEOSCIENCE.ORG.

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EAGE NEWS

Workshop finds rock physics on a roll A dedicated group of rock physics enthusiasts from across the world met up last November last year in Abu Dhabi, UAE, to participate in the 4th EAGE Workshop on Rock Physics which focused on The Role of Rock Physics in Reservoir Modelling and Simulation The three-day event from 11-13 November provided the occasion for 22 oral presentations by geoscientists from both academia and industry. The first day featured a half-day short course titled ‘From the Cradle to the Grave – The Rock Physics Life Story of a Clastic Sediment and its Significance in QI Studies’ presented by well-known specialist Dr Per Avseth (NTNU). The course addressed the link between various geological processes and rock physics properties, and showed a few examples where it was important to integrate burial history and rock physics modelling. In the afternoon, delegates enjoyed a half-day in-depth tour of Khalifa University of Science and Technology Research Centre which is focused on the energy industry of Abu Dhabi. Ibraheem Assa’adan, vice-president of exploration, Saudi Aramco opened the technical programme of the workshop with an invited address offering the audience a positive outlook on future world markets and economic development and emphasizing the importance of sharing knowledge within the industry and the empowerment of our young professionals and future generations. One of the key takeaways from the opening session on the second day on ‘Carbonate Rock Physics’ was the importance of characterizing a formation properly in terms of pore shape and structure when predicting elastic properties in these types of rocks. The morning concluded with a session on ‘Sedimentological Integration with Rock Physics’. Several talks demonstrated that present-day rock properties and their associated seismic signatures are strongly dependent on the geological life-cycle and burial history of the rocks. A highlight in the afternoon was the keynote speech from Prof Tapan Mukerji (Stanford University) entitled ‘Effect of

Delegates from the 4th EAGE Workshop on Rock Physics 2017.

Rock Physics Uncertainties on Reservoir Flow Simulations’. This was followed by a session on ‘Computational Rock Physics’ where one of the key messages was that different scales of measurements are a significant challenge for digital rock physics. In the ‘Geomechanics & Fracture Characterization’ session, an interesting integrated case study from artic Norway was presented on CO2 storage. Drone technology is used in sunny months of the year for mapping outcrops, and in the winter months interpretation of the images, geological models and simulations are the focus. On the final day of the workshop delegates welcomed keynote speaker Dr Michel Kemper (Ikon Science) with his talk on ‘Facies-based Reservoir Characterisation through the Asset Lifecycle’. This was a great appetizer to cover the topics for the day, most notably the first session on ‘AVA Seismic Data Conditioning & Inversion’. Throughout the final day a nice variety of theoretical and experimental studies were showcased in three final sessions: ‘Reservoir Modelling & Simulation’, ‘Experimental Rock Physics’ and ‘Geophysical Petrophysics’. Some of the key takeaways from these sessions were that anisotropy effects on 4D seismic response can vary both during pressure and saturation changes, that drainage and imbibition FIRST

will cause different saturation patterns and therefore affect seismic velocities differently, and that Gassmann theory is likely to break down in carbonate rocks owing to complex pore structure and rock-fluid interaction. At the end of the workshop, it was concluded that rock physics is now an entirely integrated science and features significantly in our everyday geoscience workflows, from frontier plays to field development and optimization. Future advances in rock physics will come through further integration with other disciplines, and this integration must be a two-way road. Furthermore, rock physics needs to be adapted to the whole workflow of QI, from processing, via inversion, to interpretation/classification. Machine learning will play a key role in rock physics/QI, but there will likely be challenges when it comes to training and classifying ‘unknown’ seismic data away from boreholes. We must not forget that the ultimate goal of rock physics in the oil industry is to reduce exploration risk and increase recovery rate during production. However, we should also keep in mind a rock physics future beyond oil, with the focus on CO2 sequestration, geothermal energy, geohazard monitoring, and water aquifer characterization. The rock physics future looks bright as we look forward to the announcement later this year of Rock Physics 2020. BREAK

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Competition is hotting up in Laurie Dake Challenge A check for €2000 and the chance to have a meeting with senior geoscientists at Maersk oil, a company of Total, is this year’s prize for winning the student Laurie Dake Challenge. Together with travel grants and free tickets to the 80th EAGE Conference & Exhibition in Copenhagen, there has been much at stake for the ten competing teams still standing, and the excitement is building. To qualify for the Laurie Dake Challenge 2018, EAGE invited multi-disciplinary teams of students to unleash their creativity and technical excellence on interpreting a Maersk exploration dataset in order to generate the most attractive prospects. In an application of around 3000 words, the teams were required to describe the reason why particular areas were selected as more prospective than others, based on their interpretation of the dataset. The judges, members of the Student Affairs Committee, focused their evaluation of the proposals on two main categories, readability and technical ideas and creativity. The two categories highlight not only important aspects for a successful bidding and exploration evaluation process, but also lay out prerequisites critical for university graduates when seeking a career as geoscientists or engineers in the petroleum industry. Good technical writing skills are paramount not only for writing proposals and other documents but also for communicating concepts and analytical processes to peers. Furthermore, a good technical background is important to understand

problems and develop concepts, approaches and new ideas. Finally, the ability to work successfully in a team of people from different disciplines should be part of any geoscience and engineering programme offered in universities. After the evaluation process, the judges noted that the teams appeared to be particularly challenged by the bidding task and need for concise up-front summaries as well as conclusions at the end of the proposal. The areas of interest for the contest lie in the central UK North Sea basin, and applicants had to provide an integrated interpretation of 294 km2 of 3D seismic data and well data. This type of exercise is typical of the professional activities that they will soon be undertaking in their professional careers, and is therefore a great opportunity for students. The teams being considered for the second round in the Laurie Dake Challenge 2018 are: Dalhousie University (Graham Kerford, Sam Balcom, Jennifer Lee, Massoud Alli, Colton Bentley and advisor Grant Wach); Memorial University (Larry Sandoval, Francis Mujica, Daniel Sivira, and Jenny Kim and adviser Lesley James); IFP School (Julien Gasser Dorado, Mogbolu Uchechukwu Jonathan, Mohammad Reza Eskandari, Isabella Rivas Lepage, Farid Gurbanov, and adviser Jean-Marie Voirin); Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (Huang Khai Lin, Muhammad Aiman Amiz bin Abdul Mutalib, Leonard Lim YiSheng, Chang Jia Liang, and adviser Md Yazid Mansor); University of Oslo (Trisha Grace Ilagan, James Johnson, Muna Hassan

Mohamoud Haid, Andrew Johnson and adviser Nazmul Haque Mondol); University of Manchester (Max Casson, Alice Dwyer, Georgina Lockham, and advisor Mads Huuse); King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (Septriandi Asmaidi Chan, Muhamed ElMuzafar Ahmed, Mohammed A. AlBrahim, Aviandy Widya Ismanto, Abdullah M. AlSaggaf and adviser Osman Mahmoud Abdullatif); NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology (Team 1) (Devina Anisa Wikaputri, Ilina Yusra, Isa Adi Subagjo, Anisa Noor Corina and advisor Milan Stanko), NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology (Team2) (Yona Akbar, I Gusti Agung Gede Angga, Muhammad Iffan Hannanu, and Einstein Sintong Anugrah Siregar) and Universidad Mayor de San Andrés (UMSA) (Salvador Yamil Limachi, Grecia Carolina Mendoza Sarco, Marion Rosy Gareca Quispe and adviser Marco Antonio Montesinos). At the end of March the eight finalists were due to be selected based on an interim review. The teams were required to record a pitch for their development plans. The judges will be selecting the best eight as finalists, who will receive travel grants to come to Copenhagen 2018 to present their fully integrated development plans in front of the expert judges. The presentations will be held on Sunday 10 June. During the official Opening Ceremony on Monday 11 June, the EAGE President will be announcing the official Laurie Dake Challenge 2018 winners. We wish all participants good luck and may the best team win!

EAGE Student Calendar 10 JUN

LAURIE DAKE CHALLENGE FINAL

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK

11 JUN

LAURIE DAKE ANNOUNCEMENT

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK

EAGE ANNUAL 2018: STUDENT PROGRAMME

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK

13 JUN

GEO-QUIZ

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK

3-8 JUL

ACEG, SEMANA TECNICA DE GEOCIENCIAS DE LA ASOCIACIÓN COLOMBIANA DE ESTUDIANTES DE GEOLOGÍA

MANIZALES, COLOMBIA

11-14 JUN

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND REGISTRATION PLEASE CHECK THE STUDENT SECTION AT WWW.EAGE.ORG

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multi-client seismic

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Spectrum’s Multi-Client library now includes over 50,000 km of newly-acquired data over the Austral Malvinas and the Argentina Deepwater basins, presenting some of the year’s most promising exploration opportunities. Our modern, premium, long-offset seismic data is processed and ready to give explorers the competitive advantage in unlocking these exciting new areas. Both surveys are being acquired with 12,000 m offsets with continuous recording to enable extended recording lengths and high fold data to support full interpretation from Moho to water bottom. The new data is already assisting the Ministry in block placement and design for 2018/2019 licensing rounds.

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EAGE NEWS

Workshop makes headway on naturally fractured reservoirs The 3rd EAGE Workshop on Naturally Fractured Reservoirs themed as ‘Calibration Challenges’ was held in Muscat, Oman on 5-7 February. Prof Sebastian Geiger (Heriot-Watt University) and Bertrand Gauthier (Total), co-chairs of the Technical Committee, report.

Group photo in Muscat.

After the successful EAGE Workshops in Nafplio, Greece (2011) and Muscat, Oman (2013), the third instalment of the series took place again in Muscat. It was delayed until 2018 due to the downturn in the industry. However, this delay allowed EAGE to ensure that, once again, a strong and diverse group of delegates was able to attend. In total 61 delegates from 32 different institutions and 17 countries, including six students, attended, and the workshop was generously supported by Saudi Aramco. The theme of the workshop ‘Calibration Challenges’ was recognition of the significant difficulties that are encountered when calibrating static and dynamic models of naturally fractured reservoirs to reduce uncertainties at any stage of the field life. Excellent oral and poster presentations explored what kind of analogue data could be used to calibrate reservoir models, at what scales reservoir models need to be built to ensure efficient calibration, and how to best use dynamic data to calibrate reservoir models. The workshop began with an inspiring field trip to Jebel Madmar, organized by Loic Bazalgette and Pascal Richard. These world-class outcrop analogues of a fractured reservoir allowed the delegates, forming syndicate teams to stimulate discussion, to observe 2D and 3D geometries of fractures and fracture corridors, debate 10

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which scales and geological features could be observed in wells and represented in reservoir models, and explore the practical aspects and challenges of characterizing, modelling, calibrating and drilling naturally fractured reservoirs. Back in Muscat, the first session on the use of analogue models for calibration welcomed Kevin Bisdom (Shell) as a keynote speaker. His intriguing talk reviewed the good, the bad, and the ugly in the practice of fractured reservoir characterization, a talk which not only linked back to the field trip but set the scene for the rest of the workshop. Key challenges are still the use of 1D data (e.g., fracture spacing) to characterize 3D fracture networks in the subsurface, and the fact that high-resolution 3D outcrop models are still reduced to 1D data to populate reservoir models. Yet, modern data collection methods (e.g., drone imagery) and simulation approaches (e.g., unstructured grid reservoir simulation) now allow us to generate detailed 3D outcrop models and compute effective properties (e.g., permeability), which can be used as input to, or constraints for, the calibration of 3D reservoir models. Presentations by Giovanni Bertotti (TU Delft), Juliette Lamarche (University Aix-Marseille), Claire Bossennec (Universite de Lorraine) and Pierre Bruna (TU Delft) all reiterated the value of detailed 2018

outcrop analogue studies for identifying the drivers that form fracture networks and predicting subsurface fracture patterns more reliably. However, they also emphasized that outcrop data are not always conclusive and should hence be used to define end-members of fracture network types, which can then be linked to the tectonic stress evolution to obtain more valuable information for the calibration of reservoir models. The second session on the scales of models was highlighted by the excellent keynote lecture from Steven Laubach (UT Austin), who provided clear evidence for the need to include the role of diagenesis for understanding the formation and growth of fractures, as well as the creation and destruction of mechanical fracture apertures. Presentations by Michael Welch (DTU), Mochel Garcia (KIDOVA) and Bertrand Gauthier (Total) discussed how discrete fracture network (DFN) models could be improved to account for geomechanical effects and how geological constraints observed in wells can be used to improve the uncertainty quantification in DFN models. Romain Plateaux (Schlumberger) showed how the likelihood of fracture reactivation is influenced by the local stress regime and fracture orientation, valuable insights which could be used in conjunction with DFN modelling. Stephan


EAGE NEWS

Matthai (University of Melbourne) and Hamid Nick (DTU) both revisited the challenges constraining and quantifying fracture apertures, as these are first order controls on single- and multi-phase flow in fractured formations, and strongly impact the estimation of effective permeability tensors. Daniel Wong (Heriot-Watt University) offered a new workflow based on effective medium theory, which not only allows us to compute effective fracture and matrix permeabilities efficiently and accurately, it also enables us to quantify the impact of upscaling smaller-scale fractures. The last session, on using dynamic data for calibrating fractured reservoir models, began with an inspiring keynote presentation from Hussein Hoteit (KAUST). He reviewed the state-of-the-art of fractured reservoir simulation methods that aim to represent fractures explicitly, emphasizing the opportunities that advanced gridding methods and simulation algorithms offer for overcoming long-standing problems in the dynamic simulation of naturally fractured reservoirs, presenting the Tengiz field as an interesting case-in-point. Dan Bonter (Hurricane Energy) gave a detailed review of the characterization and appraisal of the Hurricane Field, a recently discovered fractured basement reservoir offshore UK, while Lingli Wei and Keith Rawnsley (both Shell) discussed a case study that demonstrated how they were able to represent multi-scale fracture networks in a reservoir model that was used to manage a steam flood project in Oman. Pascal Richard (Shell) and David Egya (Heriot-Watt University) presented case studies which emphasized the value of linking pressure transient data with geological insights, fracture properties, and conceptual fracture models to improve the calibration of fractured reservoir models

rather than relying on classical pressure transient analysis. The session was concluded by a presentation by Victoria Spooner (Heriot-Watt University), who demonstrated how fast numerical screening methods, so-called flow diagnostics, can provide insights into the dynamic properties of different fractured reservoir models, before selected models are deployed for subsequent reservoir simulation. As with the previous EAGE workshops in the series, ample discussions accompanied the interesting talks and around the posters, ranging from detailed technical aspects such as the role of geomechanics for constraining fracture networks, the challenges surrounding uncertainty in data, or the need to build models that are approximately right, not precisely wrong. The delegates also agreed that there are key problems that still need to be solved, namely how to include and preserve uncertainties in reservoir modelling throughout all stages of field life to make informed reservoir management decisions, how to take the knowledge generated in academia to iden-

tify and make viable short cuts in everyday workflows, how to generate fully integrated models that include geomechanical effects and not only focus on the fractures but the reservoir as a hole, how to accurately model relative permeability in fractures, and how to generate shared datasets that can be used by the entire community as a resource to drive R&D and innovation. Overall, the workshop highlighted the excellent progress that is being made, and has been made, in the challenging field of naturally fractured reservoir characterization, modelling, and simulation. Industry and academia alike share the same struggles and need to continue to share ideas and exchange data in order to further advance our knowledge. Hussein Hoteit’s keynote talk asked the question ‘Are we there yet?’. The answer was: ‘We continue to move in the right direction and covered significant ground, but our journey is far from over’. Hence we all look forward to meeting again in 2020 for the 4th EAGE Workshop on Naturally Fractured Reservoirs.

Field trip to Jebel Madmar.

The EAGE Student Fund supports activities that help bridge the gap between the university and professional environments for students of geosciences and engineering. Thanks to our Student Fund contributors we can continue supporting students around the globe and through this securing the future of our industry. For more information to become a Student Fund contributor, please visit eagestudentfund.org or contact us at students@eage.org. SUPPORTED BY

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CROSSTALK BY AN D R E W M c BAR N E T

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What’s in a name In the early 1970s when Standard Oil of New Jersey consolAccording to Statoil chairman Jon Erik Reinhardsen, lately idated its Esso, Enco and Humble companies under the new boss of PGS, the new name ‘reflects ongoing changes and supname of Exxon, it was unkindly pointed out by some that it ports the always safe, high value and low carbon strategy we had become the ‘double-cross’ company. Such are the perils of outlined last year’. That is not obvious and frankly sounds like rebranding. the pitch one imagines the producers of the new logo provided to Scott Bedbury, a branding guru credited with Nike’s ‘Just do the management. it’ campaign and the marketing of Starbucks’ recognition worldIn one respect Statoil does get full marks because it managed wide, says that ‘For every grand and finely worded statement by to come up with a surprisingly accessible name which is not in the CEO, the brand is also defined by derisory consumer comthe dictionary. Years ago Exxon qualified in this regard. More ments overheard in a hallway, or in a chat room on the internet.’ recently in the geoscience field, Polarcus has proved an ingenThis was certainly a hazard that Statoil risked when it decided ious, invented moniker to give a new company. to change its name to Equinor. The idea is to distance itself from The disingenuous part of Statoil’s rebranding is that it does being regarded solely as an oil business when it has been a signot alter the company’s continuing dependence on its core businificant investor in alternative energy. The rebranding proposal ness of oil and gas. You can access on the web a brilliantly made awaits shareholder approval at the company’s annual shareholder but ultimately bogus two-minute video introducing the name meeting in May, but is supported by the Norwegian governchange. It extolls the need to embrace change with surprising ment and is unlikely to be opposed. However, according to a images of people at various stages in their lives, e.g., a potentially poll conducted by local newspaper Stavanger cross-dressing man trying on women’s clothAftenblad, 809 readers liked the new name ‘Don’t expect Equinor ing for the first time and a young lady dealing while 4730 did not. That said, employees repwith her adolescent pimples in the mirror! The resented by the main Statoil trade unions have to be love at first sight video ends with the words ‘Say Hi to Change, all endorsed the proposed change. Say Hi to Equinor.’ for everyone’ Meanwhile, social media and some indusBut the press release on the rebranding try commentators have been having a field day with the choice tells the real story. A key passage reads: ‘Statoil will develop of name and its justification. As many pointed out, the ‘Equi’ long-term value on the Norwegian continental shelf, deepen in Equinor comes from Latin and has a horsey connotation as in core areas and develop new growth options internationally. in equine. This makes sense in that rights to the full name were Statoil is one of the world’s most carbon-efficient producers of reportedly acquired from an Oslo veterinary practice specializing oil and gas, and will develop its low carbon advantage further. in horses! Statoil is building a material industrial position within profitable At the official launch of Equinor, Eldar Saetre, Statoil CEO, renewable energy, and expects to invest 15-20% of total capex in said: ‘Reflecting on the global energy transition and how we are new energy solutions by 2030.’ No prizes for guessing where the developing as a broad energy company, it has become natural to other 80% is being spent. change our name.’ But why Equinor? The official explanation Critics term this ‘green washing’, best exemplified by BP. is that Equinor is a combination of ‘equi’, the starting point The company reputedly spent more than $200 million to rebrand for words such as equal, equality and equilibrium, and ‘nor’ to with a green and yellow sunburst and a new slogan ‘Beyond acknowledge the company’s Norwegian roots. Petroleum’. The move in 2000 followed the company’s acqui-

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sition over the two previous years of Amoco, Arco and Burmah with relatively few players for customers to seek out; so while Castrol. Lord Browne, chairman at the time, had also emerged branding as part of company marketing is still important, it may as the first major oil company leader to acknowledge climate not be as vital as in the consumer market. change and the need to reduce dependence on fossil fuels. For BP The Philip Morris tobacco group famously changed its this image obviously turned sour in the light of the Deep Horizon identity to Altria, and thus vaguely associated itself with the oil spill disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. Some Latin word for high. Harvard University’s have also observed that Lord Browne has lateexperimental psychologist Professor Steven ‘In the geoscience ly been leading a company in the UK advocatPinker in his book Stuff of Thought sugbusiness, rebranding gested that this was an ‘egregious examing development of shale resources employing hydraulic fracking, which is of course highly ple’ of phonesthesia whereby the company of companies … contentious. attempted to ‘switch its image from bad has rarely been Rebranding will always be a gamble on people who sell addictive carcinogens to a public perception. Statoil’s CEO was realistic place or state marked by altruism and other remarkable.’ in saying ‘Don’t expect Equinor to be love at lofty values.’ At the time in 2004 Philip first sight for everyone. Give it a little time, let it mature. I feel Morris was embroiled in a legal quagmire over the health very confident that this is right and important for the company risks of smoking and is said to have wanted some rebranding to do.’ He could probably have added that the Statoil name has to accommodate other products in its portfolio such as Kraft earned a very strong and respected presence in the market and at Foods. home in Norway, so saying goodbye is a bold decision. Not all such rebranding has had such sinister connotations. The effects of rebranding are not always readily calculable For example, who would have thought that Pepsi Cola started in terms of the bottom line. In the case of Statoil, other factors life as Brad’s Drink before its inventor Caleb Bradham , a drug such as public and employee feeling about the company’s operstore owner in North Carolina, changed the name in 1898. ations, were possibly uppermost in the decision. For Danish Many of today’s household names have an etymological hiscompany Dansk Olie og Naturgas, most recently trading as tory. Yahoo was once Jerry’s Guide to the Worldwide Web, the DONG Energy, a change of name was long overdue if only to brainchild of two Stanford University students. PayPal was also remove the unfortunate connotations of the abbreviation (see a software creation out of Stanford, first known as Confinity. urban dictionary for further explanation). The change last year From Stanford again, Google cofounders Larry Page and Sergey to Ørsted, after the Danish scientist Hans Christian Ørsted, a Brin called their first search engine BackRub. Google reportedpioneer of electromagnetic theory, was also green. It signalled ly arose during a brainstorming session when googol, the digit the company’s exit from the oil and gas industry after the sale of 1 followed by 100 zeros, was being considered to indicate a lot the business to Ineos and its decision to phase out its coal-powof information. In a company name search to see if googol was ered electricity generation. available, it was apparently misspelt as google. Page and Brin In the geoscience business, rebranding of companies - and liked the word and the rest is history, although now the parent naming of new companies for that matter - has rarely been company has been christened Alphabet. remarkable. Schlumberger went through a few somersaults in its Best Buy used to be called Sound of Music, EBay started as seismic company acquisition phase before ending up with WestAuction Web, Nike was once Blue Ribbon Sports and Subway ernGeco. CGG returned to base after a period as CGGVeritas. was originally Pete’s Super Submarines. Predictably perhaps, In recent years ION Geophysical can claim to have managed Playboy used to be Stag Party, and the World Wrestling Federa notable transition from Input/Output when it rebranded in 2007 ation (WWF) finally came clean in 2001 by changing to Worldto message its move away from manufacturing to a more broadwide Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) thereby dropping any based geophysical services offering. Probably the most quirky pretence to being a sport. Actually it was all much more compliand hence distinctive name to emerge in the last few years is cated and litigious but that is one interpretation of the outcome. inApril, a Norwegian company developing a new seabed seismic According to Scott Bedbury cited earlier, ‘A great brand is acquisition system. Apparently, inApril was the holding name a story that’s never completely told. A brand is a metaphorical used to register the company, management liked its eccentricity story that connects with something very deep – a fundamental and have stuck with it. For the typographically fussy it does have appreciation of mythology. Stories create the emotional context the challenge of a lower case beginning. This was the case when people need to locate themselves in a larger experience.’ another Norwegian service provider Electromagnetic GeoservicThat is probably a little bit over the top, but the Statoil es launched as emgs in the early 2000s. It has since reverted to management for one is clearly hoping that its transformation more traditional capitals. into Equinor will resonate in the energy business and a wider The real question in rebranding is how much it can impact community in Norway and the world at large. The company a company’s business. The geoscience services market is small cannot be faulted for daring to put it out there. Views expressed in Crosstalk are solely those of the author, who can be contacted at andrew@andrewmcbarnet.com.

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VISIT OUR BOOTH

11 – 14 June 2018 W W W. E A G E A N N U A L 2 0 1 8 . O R G

DTCC/SmartSolo will be attending EAGE Copenhagen June 11-14. Our booth number is 1152


HIGHLIGHTS

INDUSTRY NEWS

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CGG name Sophie Zurquiyah as new CEO

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Ecuador tenders four oil fields and one gas field

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Rosgeo upgrades its fleet in line with market upturn

Big seismic surveys start in Brazil after 15th licensing round A raft of seismic data acquisition surveys will be carried out offshore Brazil after the country’s government announced the results of the 15th licensing round and ahead of the 16th licensing round in 2019.

ject in the Campos and Santos Basins. The project will cover existing TGS surveys in these hydrocarbon-rich basins as well as the highly prospective pre-salt trend where many untested structures exist.

An oil platform off the coast of Rio de Janeiro. CGG will process its data in the city.

ExxonMobil will this year shoot 4000 km2 of 3D seismic data in Brazil’s pre-salt basins covering the eight exploration blocks it has won in the latest licensing round and all the blocks it won in 2017. TGS has started to shoot surveys in the Brazil Southern Basins SeaSeep Pro-

Acquisition of the multi-beam data will commence in late Q1 2018 with the coring and geochemistry stage to follow. Final results in all areas will be available in late 2019. The multi-beam programme will cover approx. 200,000 km2 and will be used to identify 330 core target locations. FIRST

‘The Brazil Southern Basins SeaSeep Project will provide further insight into the Southern Basins of Brazil and contribute to the knowledge and understanding of these highly prospective areas. I am very pleased to see TGS returning to Brazil to acquire new data after a four-year absence,’ said Kristian Johansen, CEO of TGS. CGG has started acquisition of a large broadband 3D multi-client survey in the pre-salt area of the deepwater Santos Basin, offshore Brazil. Santos VIII covers an area of more than 8000 km2 adjacent to the Peroba, Pau Brasil and Boumerangue fields. The resulting BroadSeis data will be imaged with CGG’s full-waveform inversion (FWI) technology in its Rio de Janeiro Subsurface Imaging Centre and merged with the Constellation reprocessing project to provide a regional broadband image of the basin. Fast-track products will be available in the fourth quarter of 2018 and final products will be available in the second quarter of 2019. Constellation is a 44,000 km² project that upgrades CGG’s existing Cluster Extension surveys with its latest subsurface imaging technology, including 3D deghosting with bandwidth extension and TTI FWI velocity model building, to provide detailed broadband pre-salt images. BREAK

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Jean-Georges Malcor, CEO, CGG, said: ‘The addition of Santos VIII is the latest installment of our contiguous volume of more than 94,000 km2 of seismic data and integrated geologic studies that bridge the Santos and Campos Basins to cover the entire pre-salt area.’ Spectrum and BGP have started a 6000 km 2D programme over the lightly explored Pernambuco-Paraiba basins along the Eastern Margins of Brazil. The survey covers an area north of the pro-

lific Sergipe Basin that will be included in Round 16 scheduled for 2019. The survey is being acquired with a 12,000 m cable to record data necessary to understand basin architecture as well as to image prospective zones similar to the large oil discoveries in the Sergipe Basin. Data will be processed in Spectrum’s Houston processing centre with final PSTM and PSDM Broadband products available in Q4 2018.

Richie Miller, EVP Multi-Client Americas, said: ‘This survey is the next step in producing a continuous modern long-offset survey covering all of the offshore areas of Brazil. The industry has a need for modern seismic data in this region, especially when the area will be included in Round 16. The Sergipe Basin area to the south of Pernambuco has seen strong interest in the past three rounds and we expect the same for this area in Round 16, scheduled in 2019.’

Brazil’s 15th licensing round is hailed as a big success The offshore segment Brazil’s 15th licensing round has been hailed as a big success by the country’s government, raising more than $2.4 billion with 22 blocks sold, compared with its forecast of $1.4 billion from both onshore and offshore rounds. In the Campos basin, a consortium of Petrobras (30%), Statoil (30%) and ExxonMobil (40%) has won Block 657 with a signature bonus of $640 million and Block 709 for $450 million and Block 753 for $100 milllion. A consortium of BP (60%) and Statoil (40%) has won Block 755 for $13 million. A consortium of ExxonMobile (40%), Petrobras (30%) and QGI (30%) has won Block 789 for $850 million. A consortium of Shell (40%), Chevron (40%) and Petrogal (20%) has won Block 791 for $167 million. A consortium of BP (60%) and Statoil (40%) has won Block 793 for $13 million. A consortium of Chevron (40%), Wintershall (20%) and Repsol (40%) has won Block 821 for $15.6 million. A consortium of Repsol (40%), Chevron (40%) and Wintershall (20%) has won Block 823 for $12 million. In the Santos basin, a consortium of Exxonmobil (64%) and Qatar Petroleum (34%) has won block 536 for $50 million and block 647 for $15 million. A consortium of Chevron (40%), Repsol 40% and Wintershall (20%) has won block 764 for $40 million. In the Potiguar basin, Petrobras has won block 762 for $1.55 million.

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The sale raised some £2.4 billion.

Wintershall has won won Block 857 for $17.3 million. A consortium of Petrobras (60%) and Shell (40%) has won block 859 for $4 million. Wintershall has won block 863 for $7.4 million. Wintershall has won Block 865 for $5 million. Shell has won Block 948 for $600,000. A consortium of Petrobras (60%) and Shell (40%) has won Block 952 for $6.2 million. In the Ceara basin Wintershall has won block 601 for $2.7 million. In the Sergipe-Alagoas basin a consortium of ExxonMobil (50%), Murphy (20% and QGEP (30%) has won block 430 for $1.1 million and Block 573 for $1.1 million. Results exceeded expectations despite a ruling by a Brazilian court to remove two

2018

of the most attractive blocks in the Santos basin from the round, based on the argument that they should be auctioned under a production-sharing regime to create more value for the government. The government will seek to auction those blocks as part of a pre-salt round in June. The big bids signal an urgency from big oil companies to win stakes in Brazil’s offshore oil sector before a presidential election in October that could bring in a government seeking to halt private investment in Brazil’s oil sector. Brazil’s government aims to hold an oil and gas auction in the second half of this year for areas left over after it settles a disputed contract with Petrobras. The areas in the offshore Santos basin are part of the ‘transfer-of-right’ area that the government passed to Petrobras. Petrobras has already started the sale of its interest in several offshore and onshore fields. Among the fields it has put up for sale is its 50% non-operated working interest in the Tartaruga Verde field (BMC-36) and Module III of Espadarte field, both deep water offshore fields in the Campos Basin. It is also selling its total stake in Baúna field (BM-S-40 Concession) in the Santos Basin, and its exploration, development and production rights in two sets of onshore fields, Riacho da Forquilha and Miranga, in Rio Grande do Norte and Bahia states.


INDUSTRY NEWS

Big US Gulf of Mexico sale generates $125 million in high bids US Gulf of Mexico Lease Sale 250 has generated $124,763,581 in high bids for 148 tracts covering 815,403 acres in the Gulf of Mexico. Thirty-three companies participated in the lease sale, submitting $139,122,383 in bids. Lease Sale 250 was the second offshore sale held under the National Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Programme for 2017-2022 of ten regionwide lease sales. The sale on 21 March included all available unleased areas in federal waters of the Gulf of Mexico. Some 77.3 million acres was offered offshore Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida for oil and gas exploration and development in the largest region-wide lease sale yet. It included 14,776 unleased blocks, located from three (4.8 km) to 231 miles (372 km) offshore, in the Gulf’s Western, Central and Eastern planning areas in water depths ranging from nine to more than 11,115 feet (three to 3400 m). Meanwhile, the US will offer 77.3 million acres offshore Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida for oil and gas exploration and development.  Lease Sale 251 on 15 August will be the third offshore sale under the National Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing Programme for 2017-2022 and will include approx. 14,474 unleased blocks, located from three (4.8 km) to 231 miles (372 km) offshore, in the Gulf’s Western, Central and Eastern planning areas in water depths ranging from nine to more than 11,115 feet (3 to 3400 m).   The Gulf of Mexico OCS, covering about 160 million acres, contains about 48 billion barrels of undiscovered technically recoverable oil and 141 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered technically recoverable gas.  In January secretary of the interior Ryan Zinke announced a draft proposed programme for a new national OCS programme for 2019-2024. Two Gulf lease sales will be held each year and include all available blocks in the combined Western, Central, and Eastern Gulf of Mexico Planning Areas. The 60-day public comment period for the draft ended on 9 March. After con-

ModelVision Magnetic & Gravity Interpretation System

sidering all public comments, the US Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) will develop and publish a programme for public comment later this year, and is expected to publish the final programme in 2019. Blocks that are subject to the congressional moratorium established by the Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act of 2006 are excluded from the lease sale, as are blocks that are adjacent to or beyond the US Exclusive Economic Zone in the area known as the northern portion of the Eastern Gap; and whole blocks and partial blocks within the current boundary of the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. Leases issued as a result of these sales will include stipulations to protect biologically sensitive resources and mitigate potential adverse effects on protected species. BOEM’s fiscal terms include a 12.5% royalty for leases in less than 200 m of water depth, and a royalty of 18.75% for all other leases issued under the sale. BOEM estimates that the OCS contains about 90 billion barrels of undiscovered technically recoverable oil and 327 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered technically recoverable gas. The Gulf of Mexico OCS has technically recoverable resources of more than 48 billion barrels of oil and 141 trillion cubic feet of gas. Meanwhile, New York State has asked to be excluded from the offshore drilling programme. ‘New York State strongly opposes the Department of the Interior’s National Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Programme as it poses an unacceptable threat to New York’s ocean resources, to our economy and to the future of our children,’ said Andrew Cuomo, New York State governor. The five-year programme would open two areas of the North Atlantic coast adjacent to New York State for fossil fuel exploration, according to a statement from Cuomo’s office.

All sensors Processing 3D modelling 3D inversion Visualisation Analysis Utilities

Minerals Petroleum Near Surface Government Contracting Consulting Education

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INDUSTRY NEWS

Mexican shallow water auction sells less than half

Presidential candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador.

Mexico has awarded just under half of the 35 shallow-water contracts in a result that was affected by statements from the presidential candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, who said that if he wins the election in July he will review more than 90 contracts signed since 2013. Sixteen blocks in the Gulf of Mexico have been awarded to companies including Repsol, Total, Eni, Premier Oil and Mexico’s state-run Pemex, which was the biggest winner overall.

In the shallow water area of Burgos, Repsol won area 5 and area 12. Premier Oil won Area 11 and Area 13. In the Tampico-Misantla-Veracruz area Capricorn and Citia won Area 15; and Pemex, DEA and and Compañía Española De Petróleos won areas 15, 16, 17 and 18. In the South East basin Eni and Lukoil won area 28; Pemex won area 29; DEA, Premier Oil and Sapura of Malaysia won Area 30; Pan Ameriacn energy won Area 31; Total and Pemex won Area 32 and Area 33; Total, BP and Pan American won Area 34; and Shell and Pemex won Area 35. Companies losing out in the bidding included Chevron and ONGC Videsh. The production sharing contracts will yield the Mexican government $124 million in additional bonuses. About $8.6 billion in investment is expected from the projects to be developed in the awarded blocks, Mexico’s Energy Minister Pedro Joaquin Coldwell said, with early production starting in 2022 and a production potential of 280,000 barrels per day (bpd). Meanwhile, the head of Mexico’s oil regular CNH Juan Carlos Zepeda has urged the Mexican government to float a minority stake in the national oil

and gas company Pemex on the Mexican stock exchange. Pemex controls the majority of hydrocarbon reserves in Mexico, but it lacks funds to properly explore and develop the assets, the regulator said. Zepeda said that constitutional changes were needed to allow a stake in Pemex to be sold while keeping the company under state control. Finally, Pemex and Lewis Energy have signed the first Integrated Exploration and Extraction Contract (CSIEE) for the Olmos field in the state of Coahuila to assess and develop the Eagle Ford field in Mexico. An investment of $617 million dollars is expected, and the companies aim to reach a daily production of 117 million cubic feet of natural gas by 2021. Lewis Energy is a private operator of unconventional fields in the south of Texas. It has drilled more than 500 wells in Eagle Ford, focusing on natural gas production. For the past 14 years, the company has executed a public works contract in the Olmos field, which contains an estimated 800 billion cubic feet of natural gas.

Statoil changes its name to Equinor Statoil will change its name to Equinor on 16 May to reflect its changing emphasis in ‘a low carbon future.’ ‘The company’s strategy and its development into a broad energy company are future-oriented. This makes it natural to adopt a name that better reflects all energy forms that the company will produce; oil, natural gas and renewables,’ said a company statement. ‘We are proud of our Norwegian heritage, of the company’s history, and of Statoil’s ambition to be the leading and most carbon-efficient producer of oil and gas. ‘At the same time, energy will in the future increasingly come from renewable sources, and we are already seeing how

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we can utilize our competence within the area of renewables. The company’s Annual Sustainability Report showed that in 2017 the company launched a new climate roadmap outlining aims to reduce the carbon intensity of its upstream oil and gas portfolio to 8 kg CO2/ boe by 2030, achieve annual CO2 emission reductions of 3 million tonnes by 2030 and build an industrial position in profitable new energy of up to 15-20% of capex by 2030. The company will also invest around 25% of research funds into new energy solutions and energy efficiency by 2020. ‘In Statoil we believe the winners in the energy transition will be the producers that can deliver at low cost and with low carbon emissions. We also believe there

2018

are attractive business opportunities in the transition to a low-carbon economy,’ said Eldar Sætre, Statoil CEO. Statoil reduced its CO2 intensity from its production of oil and gas by 10% year-on-year, from 10 kg CO2 per boe to 9 kg CO2 per boe. In 2017 it achieved CO2 reductions of 356 000 tonnes. ‘CO2-emissions from our oil and gas production were reduced with an additional 10% per barrel last year,’ Sætre added. ‘In the fall 2017 we started production from Dudgeon, and the floating windfarm Hywind. Today, we operate three offshore wind projects in the UK, delivering competitive returns. Statoil will continue its journey from a focused oil and gas to a broad energy company.’


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INDUSTRY NEWS 

UK to launch National Data Repository The UK Oil and Gas Authority has received significant support from the industry to create the UK’s first oil and gas National Data Repository (NDR), to be launched in early 2019. The NDR will preserve, regulate and provide greater access to the country’s collection of valuable petroleum-related information. Implementing the NDR will fulfil a key recommendation of the UKCS Maximising Recovery Review by Sir Ian Wood, by ensuring ready access to timely and transparent data to help maximize the recovery of economically recoverable petroleum. ‘The future NDR will support regulatory compliance as well as providing a rich resource of comprehensive data for analysis, which will help to drive inward investment, new technologies and exploration activity,’ said an OGA statement.

‘The OGA continues to make more data and information available as soon as possible to improve the commercial, operational and technical performance of the UK oil and gas industry.’ The organization has enhanced and redesigned its Open Data Centre which is providing free access to a wide range of data that is free to download and share. A consultation, carried out last year, sought views on establishing and maintaining the NDR, which would be funded through the OGA levy, payable by all offshore petroleum licence-holders. The OGA’s newly published response to the consultation documents the response from licensees, trade associations, service providers and academia. It shows most respondents are supportive of funding the NDR through the levy, with 28 out 32 respondents backing the proposal.

Nic Granger, director of corporate at the OGA said: ‘Having a UK NDR is vital to unlocking the huge prize of the United Kingdom Continental Shelf’s potential 10-20 billion barrels of resources.’ The OGA is entering into a two-year contract with Common Data Access Limited (a wholly owned subsidiary of Oil & Gas UK) to deliver the initial phase of the NDR. In subsequent phases, the OGA will undertake a procurement for new NDR services, with a planned contract award in mid-2020 and service expected to commence in January 2021. Malcolm Fleming, chief executive of Common Data Access Limited (CDA), added: ’The effective collection and availability of well, seismic and other petroleum-related information is crucial to unlocking the significant remaining hydrocarbon potential of the UKCS. The UK NDR will play a central role in this.’

Two PGS geoscientists win awards Sverre Brandberg-Dahl of PGS has won this year’s Norwegian Geophysics Prize. He joined PGS in 2007 as a section manager in the research and development organization G&E, advancing to the rank of chief geophysicist imaging in 2013. At PGS, he has overseen key developments such as FWI, SWIM, RTM, and ISIC. Brandsberg-Dahl received an MSc in geophysics in 1998 from the Norwegian University of Science. After internships in Amoco and BP, in Norway and the USA, he entered the Colorado School of Mines as a PhD candidate in geophysics at the Centre for Wave Phenomena, under Martijn de Hoop. Upon graduation in 2001, he joined BP Upstream Technology Group, Houston, working on milestone projects such as the first permanent reservoir monitoring (PRM) project over Valhall and on the wide azimuth towed streamer project BP WATS.  On receiving his award, Brandberg-Dahl exhorted the geophysics com-

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munity to sponsor internships even during the downtime, for the opportunities they provide to shape individuals in the early stage of their careers. Companies can benefit from the ‘fresh thoughts’ of interns, he added. His prize was a chunk of Norwegian anorthosite (a phanaritic, intrusive igneous rock of enormous geological interest), a diploma and $2600. This year’s jury comprised of Gunhild Myhr (PGS), Terje Dahl (Statoil), Martin Landrø (NTNU) and Trond Skjerven (Sclumberger). Meanwhile, PGS’ Sören Naumann has won the best paper award of the Norwegian Petroleum Association (NPF) geophysics seminar for his presentation on imaging in the presence of ooze. Solving Imaging Challenges in a Deep-water, Complex Ooze Regime — A Case Study from the Outer Vøring Area outlines how to derisk by resolving complexities and create accurate velocity models and reliable images. The paper describes how reservoir targets in the area sit deeper than complex

2018

ooze bodies. The ooze bodies must be effectively resolved in order to accurately image the targets. Traditional Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) is not successful owing to a combination of deep water, and a lack of refractions from strong negative velocity contrasts at the top of the ooze bodies. The ooze also causes strong scattering of the wavefield and results in distortions and amplitude dimming effects, which must be addressed. The solution is to use PGS FWI, which includes reflections and refractions to provide deeper and higher resolution velocity models. Small-scale velocity variations and sharp velocity contrasts between the ooze bodies and surrounding lithology are captured. Q-modelling is included to compensate for amplitude distortions and to ensure absorption is incorporated during the migration. Naumann joined PGS as a graduate in 2009 and has held various roles at its Imaging organization in the UK and Norway. He holds an MSc Geophysics from the University of Kiel.


INDUSTRY NEWS

CGG names Sophie Zurquiyah as new CEO CGG has unveiled a new leadership team with Sophie Zurquiyah taking over as CEO of CGG from Jean-Georges Malcor and Philippe Salle taking over as chairman from Rémi Dorval. Zurquiyah is being promoted from chief operating officer (COO) and senior executive vice-president in charge of the GGR segment, Technology and Global Operational Excellence. She joined CGG in 2013 after 22 years in the oilfield services industry, working for Schlumberger in global executive positions ranging from business, operations to technology, based in France, the US and Brazil. She is a graduate from École Centrale de Paris, holds a master’s in numerical analysis from the University of Paris VI (UPMC) and a master’s in aerospace engineering from the University of Colorado. CGG chairman Mr Rémi Dorval said: ‘With the appointment of Sophie as chief executive officer and the recent co-optation of new directors, the board has now completed the process of renewing its governance. The board is convinced that with Sophie, CGG will get a CEO with a strong knowledge of the company and the industry that will be able to lead the CGG Group successfully for years to come. The board would like to thank Jean-Georges for his exceptional leadership at CGG and his outstanding contribution during the financial restructuring of the company.’ Meanwhile, the board has nominated Philippe Salle as chairman of the board of directors to replace Rémi Dorval at the end of April. He has replaced Loren Carroll on the board.

Sophie Zurquiyah.

Salle graduated from l’Ecole des Mines de Paris. He started his career in Total and several consulting firms, and served as CEO of Vedior, Geoservices, Altran, Elior. Since December 2017, he has served as CEO of Groupe Foncia. He is an independent board director at Banque Transatlantique, GTT (Gaz transport & Technigaz) and Bourbon. The CGG Board has also co-opted Helen Lee Bouygues to replace BPI France Participations and Heidi Petersen to replace Didier Houssin, who is resigning from his board position. Lee Bouygues received a Bachelor of Arts, magna cum laude, from Princeton University in political science and an MBA from Harvard Business School. She started at JP Morgan in the M&A group. Later, she joined Pathnet as CFO, and Cogent Communications as director. She became a partner at Alvarez & Marsal Paris, leaving in 2010 to launch her own consulting firm. In 2014, she integrated her team at McKinsey where she was partner responsible for

the Recovery and Transformation division. Since June 2017, she has been president of HLB Partners, a consulting firm. Heidi Petersen is a graduate from the Norwegian College of physical education and holds an MSc from the University of Trondheim in chemistry and mathematics. She has 19 years’ experience in the oil and offshore industry in different positions at Kvaerner Oil & Gas and Ramboll Oil & Gas. She has board experience of industrial, oil and gas-based companies, as well as energy supply and financial services. She owns Future Technology AS, a consultancy and technology company. CGG has also co-opted two other new board members to replace Jean-Georges Malcor and Hilde Myberg, who are resigning from the board. Colette Lewiner will replace Hilde Myberg and Mario Ruscev will replace M. Jean-Georges Malcor. Both appointments are confirmed until the end of the year. Colette Lewiner graduated from Ecole Normale Supérieure and has a PhD in physics. A nuclear energy specialist, she is presently an independent board director at EDF, Groupe Bouygues, GETLINK (formerly Eurotunnel), EDF, Nexans and Ingénico. Mario Ruscev has a PhD in physics (Yale), after spending 23 years with Schlumberger working mainly the seismic business. He has been since CEO of FormFactor, a provider of unique nanotech connectors for the semiconductor industry, CEO of IGSS (GeoTech) a Russian seismic company, and chief technology officer (CTO) at Baker Hughes, then Weatherford.

Belarus uses seismic data to monitor mining operations Belarusian scientists are developing software to seismically monitor the safety of mining operations. Sergei Kruglikov, deputy director general for science and innovations of the United Informatics Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, said that the the new software is being tested in shafts of the Belarusian potash extracting company Belaruskali.

The software is designed to process a set of seismic data fed by various sensors, which are placed inside the shafts. It is claimed that the software can predict a cave-in seven minutes before the event. The software has been developed as part of the SKIF-Nedra R&D programme of Belarus and Russia. Specialized software is being developed to accomplish the FIRST

processing and analysis of seismic data and the geological, hydrodynamic, and geomechanical modelling. A supercomputer is also being developed in addition to a supercomputer for data centres. The results are assimilated by Belarusian companies, including Belaruskali and the Applied Science Centre for Geology. BREAK

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INDUSTRY NEWS 

UK North Sea oil exploration hits 45-year low Exploration in the North Sea oil and gas sector is at its lowest level since the early 1970s, according to a report by the industry body Oil and Gas UK. Its Annual Business Outlook said only 94 wells were drilled last year. This is the first time the number has fallen below 100 since 1973. However, the report said the sector is in a healthier state with a rising oil price leading to more companies returning profits. About 600 million barrels of oil and gas are produced from the North Sea each year and for long-term sustainability exploration is needed to find more. Although a small number of wells were drilled, the amount of oil discovered was the highest since 2008 at 350 million barrels. However, the delayed impact of the downturn also meant that revenue in the supply sector has fallen by more $10 billion. Deirdre Michie, chief executive of Oil and Gas UK, said: ‘We must recognize that many areas of the supply chain are still struggling with the impact of the downturn and have yet to benefit from any upturn in activity. It’s vital that we keep driving fresh thinking, innovative

approaches and efficiency efforts. The short-term outlook for our sector is more positive with new projects and new entrants bringing new life to the basin, but there are undoubtedly longer-term challenges. ‘We need more exploration if we are to get close to recovering the three to up to nine billion barrels of yet-to-find hydrocarbons on the UKCS, matched by a continuing focus on improving recovery from existing fields.’ The Scottish government said the oil industry remained a key component of Scotland’s economy. The report suggested that material conditions were right for more exploration drilling with changes to the fiscal regime and decreasing overheads making it more cost effective. But it said early indications suggested companies were instead committing money to areas of the business which produced more certainty that exploration. With thousands of jobs being shed, companies have managed to drive down by half the cost of producing a barrel of oil. That has made it easier for new players such as Siccar Point Energy to enter the market. This relatively small company,

backed by private equity investment, now holds a large portfolio and intends to begin drilling in the Cambo and Lyon fields in the spring. Chief executive officer Jonathan Roger said: ‘Companies investing through the cycle are really what will make a big difference. When we raised our finance in 2014 it was just ahead of the oil price crash and although doing deals was very difficult through that downturn it allowed us to use our financial strength to get the very best quality opportunities as other companies were looking to reduce their capital expenditure. We’ve got interests in three of the largest assets left in the UK in Schiehallion, Mariner and Rosebank.’ The Annual Business Outlook expects a big increase in investment during 2018 totalling more than for the last three years combined. Between 12 and 16 oil and gas developments are expected to be given the go ahead this year which would unlock about $5bn. Production is predicted to increase by 5% making it 20% higher than five years ago. And after a huge reduction in headcount, more than half of companies in the sector are expecting employee numbers to rise.

Ecuador tenders four oil fields and one gas field Ecuador has launched an oil and gas bidding round for four oil fields in the country’s eastern Amazon region and one natural gas field in the Gulf of Guayaquil under ten-year service contracts with payments linked to global oil prices. The Cuyabeno-Sansahuari, Yuralpa, Oso and Blanca-Vinita fields produce 36,300 barrels per day (bpd). The government hopes to raise output by about 15,000 bpd. ‘Current (oil) prices allow us to increase activity in eastern Ecuador to boost employment, boost production and explore for new reserves,’ Alex Galarraga, manager of state-run oil company Petroamazonas, said. The Amistad natural gas field produces 39 million cubic feet per day, which the company expects will rise by 11 million cubic feet per day. Ecuador’s president 22

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Lenin Moreno has said the government plans to increase crude production by 80,000 barrels per day (bpd) this year by adding barrels from the Amazon area. The government said that it hopes to attract some $800 million in investment from tendering the oil fields.

2018

Oil minister Carlos Perez said Ecuador was producing below its quota allowed by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), so it has room to raise output. The auction is expected to take place in June.


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INDUSTRY NEWS 

PGS starts triple-source 3D survey offshore West Timor Seismic vessel PGS Apollo has started a large, high-density, triple-source multi-client 3D GeoStreamer survey in West Timor as part of a wider campaign in Indonesia. The vessel is towing a triple-source configuration and an efficient wide spread that is designed to deal with operational constraints in the locality and to address geophysical objectives for the survey. ‘Operationally, the only viable direction of acquisition is parallel to the coast, which is the orientation of geological strike,’ said a PGS statement. ‘Therefore, high-density recording in the crossline direction is required to achieve the necessary spatial sampling in the geological dip direction. This is achieved by deploying a triple-source configuration together with a dense streamer spread of 75 m separation, to produce a crossline bin width of 12.5 m.’ The company said that typically triple-source solutions have been used in the industry for gains in efficiency of acquisition. In this instance, PGS is using the technology to deliver denser subsurface crossline sampling. Shot interval in the

inline direction is maintained at 12.5 m, to produce an inline bin density of 6.25 m. This will provide uniform illumination of the complex structural regime in Timor, allowing confidence in interpretation and prospect generation. The region immediately south of West Timor, offshore Indonesia, has been largely underexplored, with only one well drilled onshore within the West Timor Block PSC, and no wells drilled offshore. The area is located along the Outer Banda Arc, a geologically complex, non-volcanic semi-circular belt where the Australian and Asian Plates obliquely collide. ‘Consequently, the same geological sequences, which form part of the highly prolific Australian Northwest Shelf hydrocarbon province, extend into this more challenging exploration setting, which must therefore also be considered highly prospective for hydrocarbon exploration,’ said PGS. The company said there is a working petroleum generative system in the region demonstrated by the abundance of oil and

gas seeps on Timor. The main reservoir target is the clastic Late Triassic-Early Jurassic ‘Malita-equivalent’ and ‘Ploverequivalent’. Imaging and resolution of the Top Jurassic horizon and the overlying accretionary section is the primary geophysical objective for prospect generation

The survey will cover areas to be included in future licensing rounds.

and poses a formidable challenge to marine seismic acquisition and processing. The survey data will cover areas to be included in future licensing rounds. The latest data will be available in Q4.

Aranz Geo launches 3D geothermal modelling tool Aranz Geo has launched the first purpose-built 3D geothermal modelling solution that integrates with leading reservoir engineering and geophysical software. Leapfrog Geothermal 3.3 includes time-based visualization of geophysical data and connectivity to Leapfrog’s model management platform, Leapfrog Central. The software’s time-based visualization of Geophysical Point Data feature enables micro-seismic data to be visualized over time, assisting with the early identification of reservoir structures and delineation of these as more data becomes available. Geophysical data has also been reorganized into a single

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Geophysical Data folder, with related functionality and the ability to import numerous data types including magneto-telluric (MT) data. Users can now also import 2D points into the Geophysical Data folder. Product manager Brennan Williams said: ‘With Geothermal you’re often dealing with limited data so it’s important to be able to readily incorporate geophysics like MT data to inform the reservoir conceptual model and help make critical decisions such as where to drill early exploration wells.’ The release includes new statistical functionality and improved statistics on Block Models, and new options for a wealth of tools including numeric com-

2018

positing as well as structural modelling improvements. The company has so far sold licences in Australia, Iceland, East Africa, the US and across Asia Pacific. Shaun Maloney, Aranz Geo managing director, said: ‘The growth of Leapfrog Geothermal includes working with Non-Government Organisations (NGOs) to add value in developing countries. We’ve upskilled geothermal professionals across East Africa so they can use Leapfrog software on the increasing number of renewable energy operations. We’re also working with a relief group in Saharan Africa to enable groundwater evaluations for siting new wells in refugee and aide camps in the area.’


INDUSTRY NEWS

Cuadrilla drills UK’s first horizontal shale gas well Cuadrilla has completed the UK’s first ever horizontal shale gas well at its exploration site at Preston New Road in Lancashire in the north of the country. This first horizontal well, drilled through the Lower Bowland shale at a depth of approx. 2700 m below ground, extends laterally for some 800 m through the shale gas reservoir. Work will now begin on drilling the second horizontal shale gas exploration well through the Upper Bowland shale, with planning consent granted to drill a total of up to four horizontal wells on the site. Cuadrilla plans to apply to the UK government for consent to fracture this first

horizontal well. The company plans to be in a position to hydraulically fracture the first two horizontal wells in Q3 this year. Earlier this year analysis from core and other test data taken from Cuadrilla’s vertical pilot well drilled through the Upper and Lower Bowland shale rock, along with data recovered and analysed from Cuadrilla’s three previous Lancashire shale exploration wells, informed us on where best to drill these initial horizontal wells into the shale rock’s gas-rich zones. This analysis also confirmed that both the Upper and Lower Bowland shale rock formation has low overall clay content and is therefore very well suited to hydraulic fracturing.

Francis Egan, CEO of Cuadrilla, said: ‘From the data we have amassed so far we are optimistic that, after fracturing the shale rock, natural gas will flow into this horizontal well in commercially viable quantities.’ After hydraulic fracturing of the first two horizontal wells in Q3 Cuadrilla will run an initial flow test of both wells for approximately six months with plans to connect those wells to the local gas grid network in 2019. The company is still waiting for planning consent to proceed at another shale gas exploration site at Roseacre Wood in Lancashire.

DRL shoots 3D survey over Colorado goldmines Gold mining and exploration company Dateline Resources Limited is to carry out a 3D seismic survey over its newly acquired Raymond and Carter mines in Colorado, US. DTR is digitizing all of the old maps and workings that including assay results taken from surface samples. The data will be used in conjunction with a 3D seismic survey of the area. Work completed last year at the Gold Links property (2150 vein) indicated that the high-grade gold shoots are associated with heavy sulphide (galena and pyrite) with the remainder of the vein being quartz and carbonate. The company stated in its announcement that ‘this mineral density contrast should make any mineralized shoots on our land clearly evident in a 3D seismic survey’. DTR chief executive officer Stephen Baghdadi said: ‘We have identified over 3 km of potential strike across the combined acreage from the Sacramento to the Carter and there are potentially multiple high-value targets that we plan to test as part of our exploration and development programme on this exciting goldfield.’

Both mines adjoin DTR’s Gold Links property, and are highly prospective historical gold mines covering approximately 1300 acres.

was made to not rebuild. However an Atlas Minerals non JORC compliant Estimated Mineral Resource report claimed that the Raymond and Carter properties

DTR has identified more than 3 km of potential strike at the mines.

The Carter mine was in production until 1982 when the mill burnt down. Owing to the low gold price, the decision FIRST

hosted 1.5 million tonnes at 15.5 grammes per tonne for a total of 750,000 ounces of gold. BREAK

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INDUSTRY NEWS

Bahrain reports largest ever oil discovery

Bahrain hopes to boost its average daily production of 210,000 barrels.

Bahrain has made its largest oil discovery since the commodity was first discovered in the country in 1932. ‘The new resource is forecast to contain highly significant quantities of tight oil and deep gas, understood to dwarf Bahrain’s current reserves,’ said the kingdom’s official news agency of the find off its west coast.

Bahrain is the smallest oil producer in the Arabian Gulf. Most of its current oil production, which averages 210,000 barrels per day, comes from the offshore Abu Safah field, which it shares with Saudi Arabia. Bahrain produces around 50,000 bpd from the Bahrain Oil Field, according to the Energy Information Administration.

The news agency said: ‘Last year the [Higher] Committee [for Natural Resources and Economic Security] took the decision to accelerate initiatives to explore sites to the west of Bahrain, which resulted in the discovery of the resource and oil being struck in the fourth quarter of 2017.’ Bahrain will also start developing its tight gas reserves this year. Bahrain has ‘large’ tight gas deposits within the onshore Khuff reservoirs, said the Kingdom’s oil minister Sheikh Mohammed bin Khalifa Al Khalifa. The kingdom is likely to co-operate with international oil companies to develop its latest discovery, according to Iman Nasseri, acting managing director Middle East at Facts Global Energy. ‘There are major issues to deal with when it comes to shale developments,’ said Nasseri. ‘On the gas side, however, it is gradually happening with Oman’s Khazan field being developed now and Saudi Aramco also working on their shale gas development.’

ION reimages data offshore Australia ION Geophysical has started a 3D multi-client broadband reimaging programme in an underexplored area offshore northwest Australia. The North Vulcan 3D multi-client reimaging programme covers the northern part of the Vulcan sub-basin offshore northwest Australia in an area known for complex imaging challenges. The ~17,000 km2 programme seamlessly integrates and reimages data from 15 vintage surveys using modern depth imaging. It builds on knowledge gained from ION’s regional 2D WestraliaSPAN survey and incorporates additional geophysical insight and geological interpretation to create new images and enhanced subsurface understanding. Reprocessing has delivered significant imaging uplift in geologies with similar imaging challenges, said the company. ION added that its broadband processing 26

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and GMO tomography can overcome subsurface imaging challenges stemming from a complicated velocity structure owing to both shallow carbonates and salt. The company said that the reimaging will help to derisk future exploration in an area where there are a number of existing fields and discoveries as well as available acreage in upcoming licensing rounds within the boundary of the North Vulcan 3D multi-client reimaging programme. ‘Based on our recent proof of concept, we expect to reveal new subsurface insights and hope to breathe new life into this relatively underdeveloped area,’ said Joe Gagliardi, senior vice-president of ION’s E&P Business Development group. ‘The North Vulcan 3D reimaging programme will be available to re-evaluate this complex province and inform investment decisions ahead of upcoming licensing rounds.’ 2018


INDUSTRY NEWS

CGG donates software suites to Delft University CGG GeoSoftware has donated its Jason and HampsonRussell seismic reservoir characterization software suites to Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) in the Netherlands.

Kees Wapenaar of Delft University.

The donation of a full HampsonRussell suite and the renewal of an enhanced Jason package will enable students at the Department of Geoscience and Engineering to expand their theoretical and practical knowledge of quantitative reservoir characterization and inversion techniques. Myrna Staring, PhD student at TU Delft, said: ‘A team of students are

BRIEFS

currently using our new HampsonRussell software suite to take part in the AAPG’s Imperial Barrel Award programme, an annual prospective basin evaluation competition for geoscience graduate students from universities around the world. So far, we have used it to perform an acoustic post-stack inversion for both acoustic impedance and velocity and to make a porosity estimation of our reservoir. We are very pleased with the results and also impressed with the software’s user-friendliness thanks to very helpful user manuals embedded in the programme.’ Kees Wapenaar, professor of applied geophysics, Department of Geoscience & Engineering, TU Delft, said: ‘Over 30 years ago, a group of students at Delft University started a company called Jason Geosystems, which laid the foundations for the geophysical software package that Jason has become today.’ Kam al al-Yahya, senior vice president, GeoSoftware, CGG, said: ‘TU Delft has a thematic approach to national and international research and we support its Delft Energy Initiative to contribute to energy innovation and ensure that sustainable energy provision remains an urgent priority for society.’

US proposes Beaufort Sea Planning Area ahead of licensing round The US Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) has published a call for information and nominations covering a proposed lease sale in Alaska’s Beaufort Sea Planning Area in 2019. ‘Available information indicates that the Beaufort Sea possesses great oil and gas potential,’ said Dr James Kendall, director of BOEM’s Alaska OCS Region. ‘It also contains unique, environmentally sensitive areas important to the subsistence needs of the region’s Alaska Native communities. This process will help us

to identify not only the areas that can be safely and responsibly developed, but also those areas that should be protected for wildlife and traditional uses.’ A 30-day comment period on the Beaufort Sea Call, to help determine what specific blocks to include, leasing terms and environmental mitigation measures, ended on 30 April, 2018. The proposed sale is listed in the draft proposed 2019-2024 National Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Programme announced by the secretary of the interior on 4 January. FIRST

Sercel has delivered a 25,000-channel 508XT land seismic acquisition system and 15 Nomad 65 Neo broadband vibrators for a 3D survey in the northeast of Algeria. Algeoland will deploy the Sercel equipment to conduct a 3D seismic survey over 2000-km² in the RhourdeNouss desert on behalf of the national oil company. Emerson has signed a multi-year contract with Repsol to supply its Paradigm Exploration and Production software suite across all Repsol’s exploration operations. ‘Implementing Emerson’s E&P software suite across our global exploration programme will increase efficiencies, reduce costs and improve our understanding of the subsurface,’ said Agustin Diz, director of exploration petrotechnical services at Repsol. A news story in the February issue of First Break was headlined, ‘Study links fracking in Texas to earthquakes’. The study, Discriminating between natural versus induced seismicity from long term deformation history of intraplate faults by Maria Beatrice Magnani et al says ‘Large volume injection’ of wastewater was associated with the earthquakes and not hydraulic fracturing. We are happy to clarify this. Iraq plans to award oil and gas exploration and development contracts in 11 new blocks on 15 April. Iraq had initially set 21 June as the date to open the bids for the new blocks, located in border areas with Iran and Kuwait and in offshore Gulf waters. Colombia is expected to award 15 onshore licences in May. Colombia’s first offering of new areas in four years will be in the Sinu-San Jacinto basin, in the northwest of the country. SeaBird Exploration has signed an agreement to provide a source vessel for an upcoming undershoot project in the Asia Pacific region.  The one-month project will start in Q2. SeaBird will be using the vessel Voyager Explorer for the project.

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INDUSTRY NEWS

Ikon Science releases latest RokDoc softare for enhanced reservoir characterization Ikon Science has released RokDoc 6.5.2 with enriched reservoir characterization and ML enabled Python interface. The software includes Scikit-learn and Google Tensorflow machine learning applications incorporated into the RokDoc-Python interface enabling users to leverage the RokDoc platform’s

rich data types to identify and extract meaningful relationships across large, multi-disciplinary, multi-scale datasets and to visualise outputs across the full spectrum of RokDoc and Python viewers. Batch workflows and processes combine with multi-data selectors to significantly reduce button clicks. New

algorithms are available in the Reservoir Characterization inversion suite delivering enhanced stability during AVO and inversion studies Cross-disciplinary workflows combine outputs from geomechanical and image log interpretation with geophysical fracture and anisotropy analysis and seismic modelling workflows.

UK council rejects Ineos’ application for shale test well Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council in the north of the UK has rejected Ineos’ application to carry out test core shale drilling at the company’s PEDL 304 licence in Woodsetts, South Yorkshire. Ineos said that the application would allow for the drilling of a single vertical core bore well to gain scientific knowledge of what is below the surface.

‘We feel that that the plans presented offer the right amount of ecological mitigation as part of what is a straightforward application,’ said Ineos in a statement. ‘The fact that a majority of external statutory consultees agree that this is the case, exemplifies this point. ‘Shale gas is a resource that is of strategic importance to the UK and issues of energy security always have to be

factored in. The UK’s energy supply is in a much weaker position than many believe, with sudden adverse weather events bringing the UK to the brink of running out of gas. Shale gas is offering us the potential to have our own native natural gas industry, strengthening our security of supply and making us less reliant on countries such as Russia or the Middle East.’

Rosgeo upgrades its fleet in response to market upturn Russian geological company Rosgeo has introduced a 12-streamer 3D vessel to meet the stronger demand for marine seismic surveys both in the Russian Arctic and elsewhere. The extra vessel reflects the company’s ‘focus on long-term development strategy’ as the industry upswing is forecast to continue. The vessel Akademik Primakov, named in honour of the scholar and politician, has already acquired two surveys. The first one was a 4150 km2 project for Gazprom in the Barents Sea, which was followed by a multi-client 1000 km2 survey offshore Morocco for Geoex Ltd. 28

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The company said that it expected to be busy in the Arctic season ahead. ‘Rosgeo is looking forward to putting the company in a significantly stronger posi-

tion with a substantial backlog building up owing to the resurgence in both multi-client and proprietary data acquisition all across the globe,’ said a Rosgeo statement.

The new 12-streamer vessel Akademik Primakov has acquired two surveys.

2018


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Simulation cases


Special Topic

MODELLING/INTERPRETATION In an era of tighter budgets, modelling and interpretation has an even bigger role to play in making sure that explorers can find the sweet spots and stay competitive. The field continues to evolve at incredible speed and several of the latest high-performance computer and algorithmic innovations, aimed at enhancing the ability to accurately model and interpret the most challenging data, are presented here. Huw James explains how a clearer understanding of Dix’s analysis will enable NMO-derived velocities to be better used in reflection seismic imaging. Geoffrey A. Dorn presents a novel post-stack structurally oriented coherent noise filter that removes footprint of any orientation and wavelength from a seismic volume. Christoph Georg Eichkitz et al analyse the main parameters used in GLCM calculations and their effect on GLCM-based anisotropy estimations. C.J. Han presents examples of how forward modelling can be incorporated into a frequency decomposition and colour blending workflow to aid in linking the colour responses to the underlying geological and geophysicals controlling factors. Vani Mutia Sari et al discuss the application of ultrasonic-tomography in the core plugs to estimate the anisotropy parameters of the Talang Akar Formation rocks. Paul Wright et al review the current controversy over the South Atlantic Pre-Salt ‘Microbialite’ reservoirs and how the initial interpretations based on seismic data have been shown to be incorrect, opening up new possibilities for exploration. Kritti Kreeprasertkul demonstrate how multi-component seismic data improves inversion and provides more accurate reservoir characterization than P-wave simultaneous inversion.

Submit an article

Special Topic overview January

Land Seismic

First Break Special Topics are covered by a mix of original articles dealing with case studies and the latest technology. Contributions to a Special Topic in First Break can be sent directly to the editorial office (firstbreak@eage.org). Submissions will be considered for publication by the editor.

February

Reservoir Monitoring

March

Petroleum Geology

April

Passive Seismic

May

Modelling/Interpretation

June

Opportunities presented by the energy transition

It is also possible to submit a Technical Article to First Break. Technical Articles are subject to a peer review process and should be submitted ia EAGE’s ScholarOne website: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/fb

July

Unconventionals & Carbon Capture and Storage

August

Near Surface Geoscience

September

Reservoir Geoscience and Engineering

October

EM & Potential Methods

November

Marine Seismic

December

Data Processing

You can find the First Break author guidelines online at www.firstbreak.org/guidelines.

More Special Topics may be added during the course of the year.

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Technical Contents Special Topic: Modelling/Interpretation Revisiting Dix’s RMS approximation for Normal Move-Out Velocity Huw James Structurally oriented coherent noise filtering Geoffrey A. Dorn  LCM-based anisotropy estimation — the influence of computation parameters on G the results Christoph Georg Eichkitz and Johannes Amtmann  nderstanding frequency decomposition colour blends using forward modelling — U examples from the Scarborough gas field Chris Han  eismic anisotropy estimation of the Talang Akar formation in south Sumatra basin, Indonesia, S using ultrasonic tomography in core plugs Vani Mutia Sari, Sigit Sukmono, Teuku Abdullah Sanny and Benyamin Sapiie  e-interpreting the South Atlantic Pre-Salt ‘Microbialite’ reservoirs: petrographic, isotopic and seismic evidence for R the shallow evaporitic lake depositional model Paul Wright and Karyna Rodriguez  oint inversion of multi-component seismic data: application to Bakken petroleum exploration and development J Kritti Kreeprasertkul and Thomas L. Davis Calendar

INTERESTED IN OUR TECHNICAL CONTENT? Our Technical Articles and Special Topics are available to all EAGE Members.

C l i ck

Read more on how to become a member at www.eage.org/membership

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Mexico Well Data The Missing Piece

TGS has been authorized by the National Hydrocarbons Commission (CNH) to process and deliver high-quality, high-value well data products to companies exploring in offshore and onshore Mexico. TGS’ complete Mexico well data packages offer workstation ready subsurface data including: • Well Logs in LAS+ format • SmartRasters • Validated Well Headers • With available Directional Survey, Checkshot, Mud LAS, and other critical data These packages provide key coverage of all basins including exploration, appraisal and development wells with ties to TGS’ existing offshore 2D survey, Gigante, and are complemented by TGS’ reprocessed onshore Mexico 2D seismic datasets, including plans to build interpretive products covering the area. TGS processes hundreds of wells weekly and has a suite of data currently available to help you prepare for upcoming bid rounds. Evaluate petroleum systems from Mexico’s offshore deep water to conventional and unconventional onshore plays with TGS’ comprehensive well data packages. TGS, where successful exploration begins.

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CALENDAR

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 13-15 NOVEMBER 2018

EAGE Fourth AAPG/ EAGE/MGS Myanmar Oil & Gas Conference www.eage.org • Yangon, Myanmar

May 2018 2-3 May

Seismic 2018

7-9 May

GeoConvention 2018

14-15 May

First EAGE Workshop in Deepwater Exploration

14-16 May

EAGE Geoinformatics 2018

14-16 May

EAGE/SEG Workshop on Marine Multi-Component Seismic

16-18 May 20-23 May

Aberdeen

UK

Calgary

Canada

Cancun

Mexico

Kiev

Ukraine

Kuala Lumpur

Malaysia

12th Polish Congress of Oil and Gas Industry Professionals

Krakow

Poland

AAPG 2018 Annual Convention & Exhibition

Salt Lake City

USA

www.spe-aberdeen.org/events/seismic-2018-seismic-asset-lifecycle-building-future/ www.geoconvention.com www.eage.org www.eage.org www.eage.org

www.aapg2018.org

June 2018 11 Jun

Your Career Symposium http://events.eage.org/en/2018/eage-annual-2018/highlights/young-professionals-symposium

Copenhagen

Denmark

11-14 Jun

80th EAGE Conference & Exhibition 2018

Copenhagen

Denmark

17-20 Jun

7th International AEM Conference and Exhibition

Kolding

Denmark

18-21 Jun

17th International Conference on Ground Penetrating Radar

Rapperswil

Switzerland

www.eage.org

www.conferencemanager.dk/AEM2018

www.gpr2018.hsr.ch

EAGE Events

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CALENDAR

August 2018 11-17 Aug

GeoBaikal 2018

22-24 Aug

Marine Acquisition Workshop 2018

www.eage.org

www.eage.org

Irkutsk

Russia

Oslo

Norway

Barcelona

Spain

Cheng Du

China

Barcelona

Spain

Porto

Portugal

Gelendzhik

Russia

Barcelona

Spain

Rueil-Malmaison

France

Santander

Colombia

Dallas

USA

Muscat

Oman

Perth

Australia

Anaheim

USA

Tunis

Tunisia

September 2018 3-6 Sept

ECMOR XVI 2018

5-7 Sept

Unconventionals in China – The Next 10 Years

7 Sept

EAGE/ TNO Workshop on OLYMPUS Field Development Optimization

9-13 Sept

Near Surface Geoscience Conference and Exhibition 2018

10-14 Sept

EAGE Geomodel 2018

17-20 Sept

DMG Gastech 2018

18-20 Sept

First EAGE/IFPEN Conference on Sulfur Risk Management in E&P (SRM 2018)

21-22 Sept

First EAGE Workshop on High Performance Computing for Upstream in Latin America

24-26 Sept

SPE SPE ATCE 2018

www.eage.org

www.eage.org

www.eage.org

www.eage.org

www.eage.org

www.gastechevent.com

www.eage.org

www.eage.org

www.atce.org

October 2018 1-4 Oct

Second EAGE Workshop on Geochemistry in Petroleum Operations and Production

10-11 Oct

EAGE Workshop on Continuous Improvement in 4D Seismic

14-17 Oct

SEG International Exposition and 88th Annual Meeting

22-24 Oct

The 14Th Tunisian Exploration & Productions Conference

24-26 Oct

EAGE CO2 workshop 2018

Utrecht

Netherlands

29-30 Oct

EAGE Symposium on Maximising Carbonate Asset Values through Collaboration and Innovative Solutions

Bintulu

Malaysia

Strasbourg

France

Yangon

Myanmar

www.eage.org

www.eage.org

www.seg.org

www.etap.com.tn/index.php?id=1048

www.eage.org

www.eage.org

November 2018 8-9 Nov

EAGE/IGA workshop on Geothermal energy

13-15 Nov

2018 EAGE Fourth AAPG/EAGE/MGS Myanmar Oil & Gas Conference

  EAGE Events  

www.eage.org

www.eage.org

  Non-EAGE Events

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First Break May 2018  
First Break May 2018