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Tuesday, July 30, 2013

The Official Daily Newspaper of EAA AirVenture Oshkosh

www.AirVenture.org

Only at Oshkosh: Jetman and a flying car

PHOTO BY JASON TONEY

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his week at EAA Oshkosh two of humanity’s longest dreams reach fulfillment, starting with Monday’s first public demonstration of the Terrafugia folding-wing flying car followed today by Yves “Jetman” Rossy’s U.S. public demonstration of his jetpowered wings.

PHOTO BY DENNIS BIELA

Both have been a long time coming. Well before the invention of the automobile humans dreamed of flying— some fantasizing about machines they could wear to launch themselves into the sky. By the time the Wright brothers launched the age of powered flight humans were well on their way to substituting automobiles for horsepowered transport. We don’t know how quickly it happened, but it wasn’t a big leap from Model A’s to dreams of a “flying flivver,” a conveyance that let us decide: drive or fly? These incarnations of aviating dreams are due to make history here and once again cement EAA’s signature event as The World’s Greatest Aviation Celebration and show us how we’re all one step closer to a world once only seen in The Jetsons. AVT

Sponsor of the day

PHOTO BY DEKEVIN THORNTON


Joe “planning”

Matt RV-7

John RV-9A

Steve Long-EZ

Tim “dreaming”

Lee RV-7

Meet Team They’re real people. True professionals. Part of a special force we call Team X – the guys who put the X factor in our Experimental class avionics. Long-time design and support engineers at Garmin, they’re also pilots and homebuilders (or soon-to-be ones). Which means they’re all about creating the kind of smart, cost-friendly avionics they’d want for their own aircraft. You can see the difference that makes in every G3X™ glass package Garmin offers. Starting at $4,375.* For more information, visit Garmin.com/experimental

Garmin 1 Tent – Seminar Schedule

Garmin 2 Tent – Seminar Schedule

10:00 AM – ADS-B Academy: iPad and Portable Solution (GDL 39)

10:30 AM – Weather in the cockpit: Your options and practical tips

11:00 AM – aera portables: Flight planning and flying

11:30 AM – Fast Track ADS-B Academy: Installed and Portable Solutions (GDL 88/GTX ES/GDL 39)

12:00 PM – Flying with Upgrade Avionics: GTN 750/650 Series and G600/G500 1:00 PM – G3X System: New Autopilot, New Options, New Low Price

12:30 AM – Garmin Pilot: Using the iPad to Plan, File, Fly

2:00 PM – ADS-B Academy: Installed Solutions (GDL 88/GTX ES)

1:30 PM – GTN: Flying hands on with real world scenarios

* MFR’s lowest suggested retail pricing at time of publication. ©2013 Garmin Ltd. or its subsidiaries


TUESday, JULY 30, 2013

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ICON’s A5 gets weight exemption from FAA By James Wynbrandt The wing design and a combination of other non-visible features work together to make sure Icon aircraft do not spin, according to Icon founder and CEO Kirk Hawkins.

PHOTO BY MARNO BORIC

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CON Aircraft, developer of the amphibious A5 light-sport aircraft (LSA), announced at EAA Oshkosh 2013 Monday that the FAA granted its exemption request for a gross weight increase to accommodate safety features, including a spin-resistant airframe (SRA). The exemption, requested in May 2012, allows the A5’s takeoff weight to rise as high as 1,680 pounds, 250 pounds above the 1,430-pound limit for amphibious LSA. Frank Paskiewicz, FAA’s deputy director, Aircraft Certification, determined “a grant of exemption is in the public interest” for the increase of the A5 maximum takeoff weight (MTOW). The Grant of Exemption Number 10829 states, “The FAA believes it achieved an acceptable balance between enabling innovation and regulating safety in the regulations covering the certification and operation of light-sport aircraft.” The FAA also noted that it hadn’t considered the weight of SRA technology compliant with 14 CFR Part 23 spin-resistance standards in establishing the MTOW for LSA. “This news is good not just for us, but all of GA,” said ICON founder and CEO Kirk Hawkins. “We spent a lot

of time and energy trying to crack the code on building a spin-resistance aircraft, and that accomplishment took additional weight.” (Loss of control due to stall/spin is a leading cause of fatal GA accidents.) In pursuit of a safer LSA

A5, introduced at EAA AirVenture 2008, initially was designed to meet mandated weight limits for LSA; during development the company decided to make the airframe spin-resistant to maximize safety. That objective required increasing the wing size and, consequently, the empennage, changes that put the aircraft’s weight over the LSA amphib limit. The initial production A5 will weigh 1,510 pounds, according to ICON. A video at the Los Angeles-based company’s display area (Booth 162 in the Main Aircraft Display Area) presents a side-by-side demonstration of stalls involving a Cessna 152 and an ICON SRA A5 prototype; upon stalling the 152 enters a spin, while the A5 remains wingslevel at a 1,000 fpm descent rate—slower than a conventional parachute. ICON also plans to equip the A5 with a BRS parachute recovery system.

In another safety development from the fledgling plane maker, the company is showcasing many of the A5’s design features, including an angle of attack (AOA) indicator. Prominently positioned on its instrument cluster, the AOA indicator gives pilots a simple, clear indication of how close the aircraft is to a stall, regardless of bank or pitch angle. A green light

With its exemption in hand, the company can proceed with it plans, Hawkins said. The first four conforming prototypes for certification are

expected to be completed in spring of 2014. If certification proceeds as expected, deliveries will commence in the middle to third quarter of 2014. The company currently has more than 900 refundable deposits of $5,000 each. Since launch, the ICON’s price has risen to $189,000, $50,000 above initial estimates. “The airplane’s gotten better, it has more features, and it costs us more,” Hawkins told AirVenture Today in an exclusive interview. “There are probably some customers who’ll say, ‘You had me at $139,000, but you lost me somewhere between $139,000 and $189,000.’ We understand that. We’re not looking to hold anybody hostage.” Hawkins noted the company had never used depositors’ money to fund operations. The A5 is designed to appeal to power sports enthusiasts rather than the traditional aviation market, and Hawkins said one-third of depositors have no aviation experience. To celebrate its production progress, ICON is reducing the deposit for a production position from $5,000 to $2,000 during AirVenture, whether placed at the show or online. AVT

AirVenture Today The official daily newspaper of EAA AirVenture Oshkosh • Vol. 14, No. 3 Publisher: Jack J. Pelton, EAA Chairman of the Board

Photographer: Phil Weston

Editor in Chief: J. Mac McClellan

Design: Chris Livieri, Phil Norton

Editor: Ric Reynolds

Advertising: Katrina Bradshaw, Jeff Kaufman, Sue Anderson, Larry Phillip

Managing Editor: Dave Higdon Photo Editor: Sonia Zimmerman Editorial Staff: Joseph E. (Jeb) Burnside, Randy Dufault, Gary Flick, Jack Hodgson, Frederick A. Johnsen, Barbara Schmitz, James Wynbrandt Copy Editors: Meghan Hefter, Colleen Walsh

AirVenture Today is published during EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2013, July 29-August 4, 2013. It is distributed free on the convention grounds as well as other locations in Oshkosh and surrounding communities. Stories and photos are copyrighted 2013 by AirVenture Today and EAA. Reproduction by any means is prohibited without written consent.


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AirVenture Today

HondaJet brings two FAA-conforming jets By Ric Reynolds

“I remember standing here with my HondaJet surrounded by enthusiastic aviation fans. The response was truly overwhelming for me. “Today I am very pleased that AirVenture has once again provided a setting for another milestone in HondaJet’s history.”

PHOTO BY CHET WEHE

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onda Aircraft let it be known last week it planned to bring an FAA-conforming HondaJet to Oshkosh opening day. But it went one better—it brought two. Honda Aircraft Company President and CEO Michimasa Fujino took to the podium with EAA Chairman Jack Pelton in front of a red jet—the company’s third FAA-conforming airframe—and a blue one, the fifth of six aircraft in Honda Aircraft’s certification program. Oshkosh served as the launching pad for Honda Aviation, he said. “This show has a very special meaning for me, because I introduced the concept for HondaJet to the world for the first time at this air show,” Fujino said to the assembled Oshkosh crowd.

Plane progress Over the past three years Honda Aircraft has developed and produced six conforming airframes. Four are used for flight testing and two for ground structural testing. The test fleet maintains a very active flight schedule, and continues to achieve milestones for FAA certification flight testing. The red HondaJet made its first flight in November 2011; it serves mainly to flight test mechanical systems—brakes, flight controls, etc. The aircraft was also used for hot weather testing in Yuma, Arizona, after first visiting NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia to examine the effects of water spray The blue jet, which flew for the first time on May 16 this year, is the final configuration of a customer aircraft with production interior, Fujino said, anchoring home stretch in the company’s certification flight testing. The blue jet will also undertake the FAA

function and reliability testing, usually the last step of the process. Plane passion “I first sketched the HondaJet on the back of a calendar and Honda engineers took that sketch from the drawing board to the sky,” Fujino explained. “We come to OSH every year because we have a deep passion for aviation. “I see the same passion and aviation spirit in AirVenture. The support of the aviation community has been tremendous encouragement to me and our associates who work on the HondaJet program.” Pelton said that Honda has “really defined and recognized what EAA is all about, that is innovation, pioneering aviation, and that passion that runs deep through all of us. “You’re what EAA is all about.” By the numbers The HondaJet specs include a maximum cruise speed of 420 knots true airspeed and a service ceiling of 43,000 feet. After taking off in less than 4,000 feet, it has a 3,990 fpm climb rate and can land in less than 3,000 feet. Power for this performance comes from two GE Honda/HF120 engines, each generating 2,050 pounds of thrust. AVT

PHOTO BY CHET WEHE


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AirVenture Today

PHOTO BY FREDERICK A. JOHNSEN

The twin R2800 engines have just ticked to a simultaneous halt as crewmembers greet pilot Steve Hinton, who delivered Jim Slattery’s F7F Tigercat to AirVenture 2013 on Sunday.

PHOTO BY FREDERICK A. JOHNSEN

Polishing the aluminum to a high sheen, Eric Fatla of Brookfield, Wisconsin, prepared a PT-22 trainer for show at AirVenture on Sunday morning.

PHOTO BY JASON TONEY

EAA Chairman Jack Pelton and Rose, his wife, at the Volunteer Park ribbon-cutting.


I Wanna Blimp Ride! ENTER FOR A CHANCE TO WIN ONE OF 7 RIDEs FOR TWO

Every Day a New Chance to WIN A RIDE on the GOODYEAR BLIMP! Each day at AirVenture, we’ll draw a certificate for the winner and a guest to ride on the Goodyear Blimp. Fly over to Goodyear Aviation booth #B2131 to enter. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Void where prohibited. Open only to legal U.S. residents 18 years of age or older. Subject to all federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and ordinances. To Submit entries and view complete rules and eligibility requirements, visit booth B2131 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. CST, 7/29/13 to 8/4/13. Odds of winning the prize depend on the number of eligible entries received. One (1) Winner will be selected by random drawing each day of Sweepstakes on or about 8 p.m. Limit one (1) Entry per person each day of the Sweepstakes. Limit one (1) prize per household. Rides take place at Goodyear Blimp bases in OH, FL, or CA. Transportation costs to base not included. By completing an entry form, participant agrees that Goodyear may send them product information, surveys and special offers, unless they select to opt-out.

www.goodyearaviation.com Š 2013 The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company. All rights reserved. Sponsored by The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company, 200 Innovation Way, Akron, OH 44316-0001.

Bring this completed entry form to booth B2131 for a chance to win! Name Address City

State

Todays Date Phone Number To Notify Email Address No thanks. I do not wish to receive product information, surveys, or special offers from Goodyear. To view the Goodyear privacy policy, go to http://www.goodyear.com/legal/privacy.html.

ZIP

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Void where prohibited. Open only to legal U.S. residents 18 years of age or older. Subject to all federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and ordinances. To Submit entries and view complete rules and eligibility requirements, visit booth B2131 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. CST, 7/29/13 to 8/4/13. Odds of winning the prize depend on the number of eligible entries received. One (1) Winner will be selected by random drawing each day of Sweepstakes on or about 8 p.m. Limit one (1) Entry per person each day of the Sweepstakes. Limit one (1) prize per household. Rides take place at Goodyear Blimp bases in OH, FL, or CA. Transportation costs to base not included. By completing an entry form, participant agrees that Goodyear may send them product information, surveys and special offers, unless they select to opt-out.


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AirVenture Today

Camp Clutter cultivated by re-enactors Story and photos by Frederick A. Johnsen

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hey nickname it Camp Clutter. Ammunition crates, bomb fins, parts and pieces for a gun turret, engine cowl panels, and bits of military debris. And they cherish it. This stuff is not for the dump; it’s for effect. The EAA Warbirds Living History Group sets up camp each year in the Warbirds area at EAA Oshkosh, using vintage tents, mess equipment, uniforms, and gear to depict life for World War II fliers and ground troops. Similar to Civil War re-enactment groups, the Warbirds re-enactors animate the pages of history as they go about life at Miller Field, their base on the fly-in site. Miller Field is named with a tip of the 50-mission-crush hat to 90-yearold Joe Miller, a WWII veteran who comes to Oshkosh from Pennsylvania to support the camp. “I’m their mentor,” explains Joe, wearing a rugged Army Air Forces A-2 flying jacket. He helps with providing

meals during the week, and is not shy about hitting people up for support of the Living History Group. Whenever Joe is at the encampment, it is clear he is the revered grand old man of the site. He flew B-25 Mitchell medium bombers in the Pacific under the auspices of the Thirteenth Air Force. There, B-25s were adapted for strafing, becoming deadly gunships with as many as 14 forward-firing .50-caliber machine guns. “We had little parabombs we dropped,” Joe explains. These “little parabombs” were fragmentation bombs whose travel to the ground was delayed by a small parachute, allowing the Mitchells to drop them from minimum altitude and still speed safely away before the bombs detonated. Doug Anderson from Wisconsin Rapids serves as acting camp commander when the official commander is absent—the re-enactors adhere to a realistic military hierarchy as they flesh out WWII life. But he’s not stuffy about rank. “We’ve got a good group,” Doug says.

Invasion stripes demo Warbird re-enactors created a realistic living history tableau Monday as they painted black and white stripes on a World War II C-53 transport. Their hurried and sometimes blotchy efforts deliberately mimicked the hasty stripes given to combat planes just before strategic invasions.

“Everybody works well together.” Some of the reenactors bring their own equipment to add realism to the scene. Doug quickly identifies the camp’s tents based on their vintage and intended use. He says the group could use more pyramidstyle tents. And that could happen; visitors often donate items to the group to embellish the camp. “Most of this stuff was donated to us,” Doug explains. It is carefully stored until needed for re-creations like Miller Field, he says. People come from many states, Canada, and even England to participate in the living history encampment at AirVenture, not unlike the melting pot of

Allied nations during the war. Their presence invigorates this living tribute to a time that is becoming increasingly remote—and with a shrinking population of veteran participants. Bringing that era alive motivates the re-enactors even as it educates and fascinates visitors from the world of 2013. AVT

See more photos of this unique demonstration at www.AirVenture.org/live.

Friendly forces mistakenly opened fire on American transport aircraft and gliders during the invasion of Sicily in 1943. In an effort to prevent more friendly fire incidents, aircraft involved in the invasions of Normandy and southern France in 1944 wore temporary invasion stripes.

Initially wrapping around the fuselage and wings, the stripes were later diminished to the undersurfaces, just to remind gunners looking up from below. The aircraft receiving the invasion treatment is a Douglas C-53 flown to Oshkosh by members of the Texas Flying Legends Museum.


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*Certain restrictions apply. Exchange engine core requirements will be dependent upon the selected offer. Contact your distributor or visit lycoming.com for more details. Offer subject to change or end at any time. Š 2013 Avco Corporation. All rights reserved.


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AirVenture Today

Bonanza arrival included a mutant

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aturday’s mass arrival of Bonanzas included a normal flock of V-tail models, straight-tail models, and twin-engined Baron cousins. Plus one “mutant.” That mutant belongs to Mike and Mary Friedman of Chantilly, Virginia. Starting out as a Beechcraft 58P pressurized Baron twin, their airplane, after a multiple-year modification project, has become a very impressivelooking single. “The engines were removed, the nose was removed, and we’ve replaced the nose area with a Walter 601D,” Mike said. “It depends on who you ask, but it is about 725 hp.” With a long turbine nose and a fivebladed Avia propeller up front, the craft readily stands out in a line of Barons parked in the North 40. Original Baron 58P power came from two 350-hp piston engines. The Friedman airplane is lighter and, with the additional power, is a bit spryer. “It handles like a Baron, but you don’t have any twin-engine issues,” Mike said. “The torque is manageable. You have beta so stopping is no issue. The rate of climb is 2,000 fpm. It can probably do better than that I just haven’t pushed it.”

“It is a blast to fly.” The couple felt the need for speed. “The performance goal was 241 knots. If I really push it, I can get it. Cruise seems to be about 235. “It’s a blast to fly.” Mike regularly flies on business about 150 hours yearly, so comfort was a key goal. “We kept the pressurization,” he said. “And we’ve got air conditioning.” Although the Friedmans have been involved since the project initiated, Dick Bayles completed the actual construction. It is now known as a Baylescraft Lightning both in honor of Bayles and in honor of two similar prototypes Beechcraft created in the 1980s called “Lightnings.” Since the craft went from two engines to one, it dodged an issue common to many turbine conversions: range. “Fuel consumption at cruise is about 42 gallons per hour,” Mike said. “It compares pretty closely to a regular configured P Baron. “We have 196 gallons usable, which really makes this a three-hour airplane. Depending on how quickly we can get up high, it could be three and a half.

Bendix/King announces products and updates By Gary Flick

Bendix/King kicked off the convention by unveiling a number of new products at its brand new pavilion yesterday morning. Kevin Gould, president of Bendix/ King, spoke first on the grand scale of the company’s mission. “We want our products to demonstrate the revitalization of Bendix/ King,” he said. “These new products are affordable, easy to use, and innovative.” Gould then handed the microphone to GAMA President Pete Bunce, who explained why the new Bendix/King products were important to aviation in regard to safety.

“Loss of control is one of the problems that causes accidents, but it is a problem we can fix,” Bunce said. He explained that angle of attack indicators were one of the easiest ways to do so, and applauded Bendix/King on making this technology affordable. “We will save lives with this technology,” Bunce explained before handing the reins to Bendix/King’s Roger Jollis, vice president of marketing. Jollis introduced the new KLR 10 AOA indicator, explaining, “The best way to know if you’re getting to be dangerously slow is an AOA indicator.” The KLR can be installed on an aircraft glare shield (which is recom-

Story and photo by Randy Dufault

No questions of balance Another common turbine conversion issue is weight and balance. A number of ballasting features were engineered into the airframe, though no additional

weight, at least so far, has been required. “Because of the overall weight loss I can fill all the seats, fill all the fuel, and be within the original 58P weight and balance,” Mike said. “So it is a real six-place, or four plus bags, airplane. “Being experimental we are not limited to the Beech weight and balance, but we saw no reason to go beyond that. I spent an afternoon after we got the weights and discovered I cannot mis-load this airplane. “If I can put it in it, it will take it.” Mike closed with, “It is just efficient personal transportation.” AVT

mended) or integrated into the panel. It not only has an LED array to show the pilot’s AOA, but also alerts the pilot via radio when speed is dangerously slow. The KLR 10 is currently only available for experimental aircraft, but Bendix/King is confident the FAA will allow its use in certified aircraft very soon. Jollis also introduced the KT 74 ADS-B ready Mode S transponder. According to Jollis, “When you hook this up you are covered by the 2020 ADS-B mandate.” The company also introduced the updated KSN 765 integrated safety navigator, “little brother” to the KSN 770 that was shown at AirVenture last year. The only difference between the 770 and 765 is the latter does not have comm/nav capability.

Both navigators have been equipped with touch screens as well as hard keys because “we listen to our customers’ feedback and some liked the touch screen and some did not,” Jollis said. The new navigators also have split screen capabilities so the pilot can view traffic, maps, and storms at the same time. Finally, Bendix/King introduced upgrades to the MyWingman planning and navigation app. Version 1.3 offers enhanced “smart routing” that can be updated in flight, alerts pilots when they are approaching different airspaces, and also has a terrain awareness function to inform pilots when landforms are approaching. All the new and improved products are available for viewing and demonstration throughout the week at the Bendix/King pavilion located directly outside of Hangar B. AVT

“It’s a turbine so it’s using 20 an hour just sitting on the ground, and range depends a lot on how low they keep you. My guess is that if I can get up to 25,000, I will have a four-hour airplane. That will require oxygen in addition to the pressurization, and it just hasn’t been worth it to try. “I will try it sometime when I’m by myself. But Mary prefers not to use oxygen.”


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AirVenture Today Sometimes we all need some wingtips. When circumstances challenge our dreams the cold reality of life can be discouraging, even to the point of causing us to question what we pursue. But a savvy mentor, experienced in overcoming similar obstacles, can make the difference between disappointment and fulfillment, as the character Dusty learns from his mentor Skipper Riley in Disney’s Planes. Skipper’s a reclusive old Navy Corsair, an ace flier, and top instructor of the Jolly Wrenches squadron until a combat incident grounded him for life. As voiced by Stacy Keach, he finds his life upended when an ambitious and persistent Dusty (Dane Cook) seeks out the old veteran’s wisdom and expertise—helping the young ag plane and would-be champion along the way learning a few new life lessons of his own. Disney’s Planes debuts Friday night at the EAA Fly-In Theater.

AirVenture Cup draws 48 racers

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he AirVenture Cup Race was delayed until Monday, but when the numbers were tabulated, the overall winner in the 48-plane race was Marty Abbott in his Turbine Legend, with an average speed of 354.3 mph. You can see the race planes parked in the Homebuilts area on the flightline. Here are the results for the 16 race classes. AVT

Turbine: first place: Turbine Legend, C-GUTT, Marty Abbott, 354.30 mph; second place, Turbine Legend, N95007, Rene Dugas, 307.36 mph Unlimited: first place: GP-5, N501GP, Lee Behel, 324.9 mph Sport: SX-300, N301E, Harry Hinkley, 314.54 mph; second place (tie), SX-300, N53SX, Keith Phillips, Lancair Legacy, and N550AC, Alan Crawford, 277.96 mph; third place, Lancair Legacy, N550BL, Charles Bracken and Ernie Chauvin, 277.44 mph Sport FX: first place: F-1 Rocket, N39EJ, John Andersen, 220.11 mph Sea Sport: first place: Seawind 3000, N80CC, Keith Walljasper, 166.7 mph Formula RG Blue: first place: Lancair 360, N3QU, Mark Quinn, 242.55 mph; Berkut,

N97TX, James and Sandy Redmon, 239.32 mph; Lancair 360, N73S, Craig Schulze, 239.01 mph Formula RG Red: first place: Lancair 320, N324C, Robert James, 216.91 mph Formula FX Blue: first place: Glasair I TD, N91LH, Bruce Hammer, 258.2 mph; Long-EZ, N360KS, Klaus Savier and Jenny Tackabury, 253.92 mph; Glasair I TD, N73SH, Steve Hammer, 242.97 mph Formula FX Red: first place: Cozy Mk. III, N46WM, Jeff Mallia, 221.64 mph; LongEZ, N893LT, Rich Lamb and Heather Lamb, 210.62 mph; Glasair II TD, N251RB, Neil Newton, 206.86 mph RV Blue: first place: RV-8, N207RV, Jon Ross, 216.24 mph; RV-6, N790DW, Jeff Barnes, 215.56 mph; RV-8, N12AC, Alan

PHOTO BY PHIL WESTON

Marty Abbott with his AirVenture Cup-winning Turbine Legend, C-GUTT. Carroll, 208.39 mph RV Red: first place RV-4, N624DG, Tony Crawford, 204.3 mph Sprint: first place: Long-EZ, N83DT, David Adams, 205.48 mph; Quickie Q-200, N202SH, Sam Hoskins, 171.94 mph; Midget Mustang, N825J, John Keich and Amanda Lance, 169.45 mph Vintage: first place: Taylorcraft BC-12, N43955, Carri Hoagland, 84.2 mph

FAC1RG: first place: Beech S35, N193Q, Bob and AnnElise Bennett, 212.54 mph; Mooney M20J, N4262H, Henry Punzi, 201.82 mph; third place: PA-24-400, N88WB, Colin Hogan and Robby Browder, 187.01 mph FAC6FX: first place: Diamond DA-20, N402AM, Steve Applebaum, 146.38 mph Heavy Metal: first place: CJ-6, N285CJ, Craig Payne, 187.56 mph


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AirVenture Today

Oshkosh presents life opportunities for youth, young adults By Barbara A. Schmitz

Stephen Knudson gets information from Southern Illinois University representatives James Libuszowski and Andrew Ross in the College Park facility.

PHOTO BY PHIL WESTON

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handful of planes and fewer than 150 people, mainly adults, attended EAA’s first gathering of aviation enthusiasts in September 1953 at what is now Timmerman Field in Milwaukee. Throughout the decades, the EAA convention and fly-in has transformed into something that is literally for everyone. But with the age of pilots inching up—the average age was 48.3 in 2012 according to the GAMA databook—more emphasis has been put on introducing children, teens, and young adults to the opportunities and excitement that aviation can present. EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2013 is no exception. KidVenture KidVenture began in 1999 out of a need for things that families could do at the fly-in and convention, explains KidVenture Chairman Dan Majka. It first targeted youth ages 10-14, but soon expanded to include ages 5-17. It also doubled in size and number of booths. Today, KidVenture, located on Pioneer Airport across from the AirVenture Museum, allows youth to receive loggable flight instruction on a simu-

lator, earn FAA credit toward an A&P certificate through hands-on building projects, learn how to fly a radiocontrolled airplane, modify a wing on a computer then find out how well it flies, see what it’s like to land on Mars, and much more. KidVenture not only gets children’s imaginations soaring, Majka says, but also helps youth gain pride and confidence in their abilities. It’s an area where kids are encouraged to touch. However, they occasionally get parents who want to do the project themselves. “But I remind them that there are adult forums for that,” Majka says. “This is just for the kids. “For families, it’s become the destination they go to first, and then they go to the show,” Majka says. “In the past, I’ve had people tell me they’ve been at the show for 2 1/2 days and that they still haven’t been to the flightline because their kid won’t let them leave KidVenture.” Education & Interactive Zone featuring College Park It’s a one-stop shopping spot. The new Education & Interactive Zone provides a place for high school

and college students to network with prospective colleges and employers in a relaxed setting. “The pilot population is aging, and this is a great way to encourage youth to get into the aviation field,” says Ann Gentz, College Park chairwoman. “For those who don’t know how to do it or what is out there, it’s a great place to start.” Sponsored by American Airlines, the area includes representatives from colleges and industry leaders, Gentz says. While certain areas are only open to students, other areas are open to anyone looking to learn. Located just west and a little north of Waukau Avenue and Knapp Street, the area includes daily forum presentations from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. where speakers tell their story of how they got into aviation, Gentz says. In addition, visitors can enjoy interactive exhibits including flight simulators or video games like World of Warplanes, a job fair, college mixer, and more. “The job fair includes industries that are looking to hire,” she says. “There are so many qualified people who come to AirVenture, so this is a perfect fit. But the job fair also pro-

vides an opportunity for young people to see what qualifications they will need once they graduate.” Gentz says the area will become an AirVenture staple, and likely expand. “I’m a mother of four children, but if one of my kids was passionate about aviation, this is the place I would be going,” she says. “It’s a win-win for kids and adults wanting to know what’s out there for colleges or companies.” Central Florida Aerospace Academy Current students and graduates of the Central Florida Aerospace Academy in Lakeland, Florida, are at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh to spread the word about aviation and inspire other students. Lori Bradner, executive director of education, says the students are volunteering at KidVenture, working at the Sun ’n Fun booth, and visiting aviation exhibits. Billed as the future of aviation offered through Sun ’n Fun, CFAA is a workforce academy of Polk County schools that believes in a brighter future through aviation, Bradner says. “We serve as a ground floor STEM resource for public and private schools and universities,” she says. “There is Cont. p16


Hybrid touch IFD540 & IFD440 FMS/GPS/NAV/COMs Featuring ‘Hybrid-Touch’

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AirVenture Today Cont. FROM p14

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no better way to teach STEM subjects than through airplanes.” CFAA provides curriculum for teachers, and brings in hands-on activities for the students. Since beginning in November 2012, the academy has reached more than 11,000 students, 800 teachers, and 52 schools, Bradner says. They have also reached 168 students and eight teachers in Trinidad, and have had calls from five other countries to provide STEM assistance. Alejandro Aybar-Mota, 18 and a CFAA graduate, says the academy gave him a jump-start on his career, and that is what he hopes to help others do here. “We’re here to educate others and really get them interested in aviation and what that is all about.” Women Soar You Soar In its 10th year, Women Soar You Soar will introduce 75 girls in grades 9 through 12 to 21 female mentors working in a variety of aviation and aerospace fields. “The main purpose of the program is to empower the girls and to educate them about what is available in the aviation field,” says Debby RihnHarvey, an aerobatic pilot who is the chairwoman of Women Soar. “It helps to build their confidence, and empowers them…

“We mentor, encourage, and educate the girls, while they make new friends and get excited about aviation,” Rihn-Harvey adds. “We really stress that they can do everything they want to do, and that ‘can’t’ shouldn’t be in their vocabulary.” The program also includes a variety of activities, including flight simulation, workshops, mentor sessions, career exploration, and a chance to hear from top women in the field, such as retired astronaut Linda Godwin, Thunderbird pilot Caroline Jensen, NASA engineer Nagin Cox who will talk about her role in the Mars Curiosity rover mission, and others. The program, which runs from Thursday through Sunday, also provides scholarships to help girls achieve their goals, Rihn-Harvey says. EAA Air Academy The EAA Air Academy is celebrating 30 years of aviation camps in 2013. But those who have graduated from the program often say they still celebrate the friendships they formed there. “Aviation may have brought these kids together, but it wasn’t just aviation that holds them together,” says Scott Cameron, Air Academy camp supervisor. EAA currently offers eight camps

each summer for youth ages 12 to 18, he says. That’s quite a change from when they started; then they offered only one 21-day camp. All the camps offer hands-on activities in workshops and classrooms and include a flight. Each camp builds up on skills where the previous camp ended, Cameron says. More than 5,000 youths have attended Air Academy camps since the program began. Many of the earlier campers have gone on to get jobs in the military, with NASA, and with other groups, Cameron says. And many of the alumni keep coming back. Cameron knows the bond that keeps the youth together since he has been with the program since its inception in 1984. In fact, this year they have 16 staff members; more than half of those first came to Oshkosh as campers. Megan Simoneaux, of Green Valley, Arizona, is one of those. She came to the Air Academy for one year as a student, and has now been working at the camp for 10 years. “The Air Academy is really more about the community,” she explains. “You’re here for so many hours with people who you share a common passion. You’re just not meeting new people; you’re joining a family.” AVT

Lightspeed releases Zulu PFX headset

A

t an AirVenture press conference Monday morning, Lightspeed announced the production of its new Zulu PFX headset. PFX stands for Personal Flying Experience, and the headset boasts a number of technological advances in noise cancellation. “Zulu PFX is the result of over two years of development and we are excited about the improvements,” Lightspeed President Allan Schrader said. “We look forward to sharing this with all of the attendees here at AirVenture this week.”

PHOTO BY PHIL WESTON

A headset sale draws a crowd at the Lightspeed exhibit.

The PFX aspect of the headset focuses on new innovations that allow it to adapt to the user and the cockpit environment. Acoustic response mapping measures the user’s ear size and shape and adapts to each pilot, ensuring the most direct auditory path. The core of the headset is made

of Kevlar, ensuring flexibility and strength, and the headset can be programmed with other personal preferences via Lightspeed’s FlightLink app for the iPad and iPhone. The Zulu PFX and an entire product guide from Lightspeed can be seen throughout the week at Booth 259. AVT


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18

AirVenture Today

It’s…complicated

D

espite the wide variety of innovative aircraft at EAA Oshkosh 2013, most share one thing: They consume fuel. Of the three basic fuels commonly used by general aviation—100LL aviation gasoline, Jet A and unleaded gasoline—only one of them contains tetraethyl lead (TEL), a toxic substance long ago removed from automotive gasoline. That fuel is, of course, 100LL, and its lead content is an ongoing health, environment, and economic issue, which means it eventually will be replaced.

PHOTO BY PHIL WESTON

By Joseph E. (Jeb) Burnside

But with what? There simply isn’t a current substitute for 100LL that works for the existing fleet of GA aircraft. A large number of certificated and experimental aircraft are operating just fine on unleaded automotive gasoline—for 30 years. For a significant portion of the fleet, however, mogas as it’s called simply doesn’t have sufficient anti-knock characteristics—among other issues— to allow safe, efficient operation. And given the sorry state of new piston-aircraft sales—at least compared to 10 or

so years ago—the existing fleet is the market for 100LL and its successor. Although industry and the FAA have known for some time that 100LL’s days are numbered, when and how the fuel is replaced, and with what, remain unanswered questions. Those questions also mean there’s significant uncertainty on the potential impact replacing 100LL could have on the future of general aviation. After some not-so-gentle prodding from health and environment groups, plus the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the FAA and industry are working together to find the answers. Most recently, acting on industry recommendations, the FAA initiated an unleaded avgas program and created a new office to manage all fuels-related testing and certification issues, among other challenges. But the basic problem remains: Coming up with a replacement for 100LL isn’t as simple as just removing TEL. Consider: If lead is removed from 100LL, something has to take its place. Many substances are available with high octane qualities, but there’s no free lunch: Altering one component of the 100LL “recipe”—

also known as ASTM D910—to eliminate lead easily can impact the fuel’s other characteristics, perhaps increasing its ability to absorb water, promote corrosion in fuel systems, or dissolve rubber fuel bladders. And from a consumer perspective, one of the most important characteristics a 100LL replacement should have is reasonable cost. Removing TEL and replacing it with some exotic substances could mean avgas’s already too-high cost could climb further. No one wants that. Another issue is certification. Many non-experimental aircraft are certificated to operate on 100LL. If 100LL isn’t available, what then? Put another way, what’s the legality of operating an aircraft certificated to use 100LL on an unleaded 100 octane fuel? At a minimum, it may require securing from the FAA an expensive and time-consuming STC for each and every make/model airframe and engine. The testing necessary to obtain an STC may result in new limitations or require component replacement, further increasing the cost. There needs to be an efficient and effective means for FAA fleetwide


TUESday, JULY 30, 2013 certification approval for a replacement unleaded fuel that meets all the necessary safety requirements. These are just a handful of the challenges facing industry and the FAA as the search for a 100LL replacement gets better organized. Resolving them is one result of ongoing efforts by industry’s alphabet soup, including the EAA, to ensure general aviation’s future. Those efforts follow a monthslong effort by industry known as the Unleaded Avgas Transition Aviation Rulemaking Committee, or UAT ARC, which the FAA chartered in January 2011. In addition to EAA and various FAA offices, UAT ARC’s membership included the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA), the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA), the National Air Transportation Association (NATA), Cessna, Cirrus, Continental, Lycoming, the American Petroleum Institute, the EPA, ExxonMobil, Shell, Swift Fuels, and General Aviation Modifications Inc. (GAMI). Thirteen months later, in February 2013, the UAT ARC produced a 99-page report to the FAA, noting the

many challenges the agency and industry face before a 100LL substitute can be in wide use. In addition to the issues discussed above, the UAT ARC’s report also identified as major obstacles the lack of a program leading to fleetwide evaluation, certification, and deployment of a 100LL replacement; inadequate market forces, a product of general aviation’s relatively small size; and no standardized policy or test procedures enabling fleetwide assessment and certification. Additionally, the UAT ARC made five key recommendations to the FAA. They include: develop a roadmap and identify milestones for a 100LL replacement development process; establish centralized and standardized testing of candidate fuels, including generation of fleetwide certification data; create a solicitation and selection process for candidate fuels; establish the Piston Aviation Fuels Initiative (PAFI)—a collaborative industry-government initiative—to implement the UAT ARC recommendations with minimal impact on the existing piston-engine aircraft fleet; and an FAA centralized certification office for all fuel-related programs.

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And the FAA has reacted. Most recently, the FAA announced it would begin laboratory tests of candidate fuels in 2014, and asked producers to submit appropriate samples. The agency’s goal is to have at least identified the most viable replacements for 100LL by 2018. In addition to establishing a test program, the agency established its Fuels Program Office, AIR-20, to provide focus and consolidate resources and expertise. Also in response to the UAT ARC’s recommendations, the FAA and the General Aviation Avgas Coalition, an industry group, formed the PAFI Steering Group (PSG) and are working together to implement the recommendations. “We believe that the FAA’s program is by far the most effective process to not only evaluate the fuels but give the industry the data it requires to actually bring a fuel to market and implement it across the entire GA fleet,” EAA Chairman Jack Pelton said in June when the FAA’s testing program was announced. “We are excited to see what fuels are brought forward for consideration and look forward to FAA being able to evaluate them in such a way that all

19

interested parties in the industry can collectively and knowledgeably determine the best long-term outcome for general aviation.” AOPA President Craig Fuller also voiced his organization’s support for these efforts. “We are pleased that the FAA is continuing to take concrete steps to help the aviation industry move forward with the testing and evaluation of promising avgas alternatives. We understand the complexities of this search, and we are confident that diligent work will help us find an acceptable fuel source that is safe for pilots, the public, and the environment,” Fuller added. Throughout the week at AirVenture 2013, several scheduled presentations will update attendees on various aspects of the search for a 100LL replacement. The important takeaway? Unlike in previous years, there’s finally a workable plan to which the FAA and industry have agreed, one designed to consider the technical, operational, and economic challenges ahead with a program aimed at identifying the most viable replacements for 100LL by 2018. AVT


20

AirVenture Today

PHOTO BY TYSON RININGER

Like a shining star, the B-25 Lady Luck, bears the inscription, “Dedicated to the men of the 51st Bomb Wing.”

Edson Grindeland and Jim Thompson from Hatton, North Dakota, talk in the North 40 shortly after flying their Pitts into Oshkosh on Saturday.

EAA Chairman Jack Pelton gives the go ahead while EAA Vice President of Human Resources Janine Diana cuts the ribbon dedicating Volunteer Park. PHOTO BY PHIL WESTON

PHOTO BY BRADY LANE


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22

AirVenture Today

Not your usual flying farmers

PHOTO BY PHIL WESTON

By Randy Dufault

This is the first time that (L-R) Jim Thompson, Keith Thorsgard, Kevin Solberg, and Edson Grindeland brought all four Pitts Specials composing the Hatton Flying Circus to AirVenture.

F

or many the words flying farmer conjure up visions of a bright yellow Cub floating slowly over a gently rolling landscape of green fields. But over the croplands of northeastern North Dakota that vision may turn out to be one, two, three, or four brightly painted Pitts Special biplanes doing a few aggressive maneuvers while out checking on the cows.

The four little planes are part of what Edson Grindeland and his friends call the Hatton Flying Circus. Edson flies his experimental Pitts S-1C, Kevin Solberg flies an experimental S-1S, Keith Thorsgard flies a factory-built S-1S, and Roger Thompson, along with his son Jim, fly a factory-built S-2B. They fly off of a grass strip on Edson’s brother Ethan’s farm

outside of Hatton, North Dakota. “We grew up around airplanes, Ethan and me,” Edson said. “Our grandpa and dad flew all the time, so we’ve been around airplanes our whole life. Over time we’ve had Champs and Bonanzas and the like. “But Roger Thompson bought [a Pitts] a few years back and I’m not sure what spurred him to get one.” Eventually Roger offered to let Edson fly the biplane if he first got some training. After a round of instruction in Arizona, Edson and Roger spent time in the airplane just enjoying the sprightly performance of the aerobatic Pitts. The sheer fun of it all brought Edson to consider the purchase of an S-1C located in Montana. A deal was made and although he had considered using parts off the plane for an RV-8 project, the flight back to North Dakota convinced him otherwise. “I flew it home and had way too much fun in it to take it apart,” he said. One thing led to another. Kevin purchased his Pitts to replace a Bonanza lost in a tornado and, four years ago, Keith purchased number four in the group. This is the first time they have all

been here, although they regularly fly together at events throughout eastern North Dakota and western Minnesota. As Oshkosh veterans the pilots had managed to develop a cache of gear that they store in Oshkosh from year to year. Ultimately it became practical to come with just a duffel bag small enough to fit into what little luggage space the Pitts provides. None of the planes have heaters. and this year that required a drive into town for warmer clothing on one of the two fuel stops. Although they all started out from the same basic Curtis Pitts design, there are differences. Each tail has different dimensions; the aileron configurations are all dissimilar; and modifications done on the two experimental one-seaters departed a bit from the plans. Kevin’s is the fastest as it includes several speed mods a prior owner installed to race at Reno. Any aerobatics beyond the loops and rolls they occasionally do now? “I’m too old for that, Edson said. “But one day if Keith and Jimmy want to do it, they have the airplanes to do it in.” AVT

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AirVenture Today

PBOR the focus of continuing legal education session for attorneys

E

AA and AOPA will present “Continuing Legal Education for Attorneys: Applying the Pilot’s Bill of Rights to FAA Enforcement Cases” on Friday, August 2, at 10:30 a.m. in the Heritage Gallery. The seminar is hosted by the EAA Legal Advisory Council, along with John and Kathy Yodice on behalf of the AOPA Legal Services Plan.

Col. Stephen Woody, NTSB administrative law judge, is expected to attend and participate as well. The one-hour seminar complies with continuing legal education (CLE) requirements in most states. Among the topics covered: Provision of the PBOR notice Access to ATC data Application of rules of evidence

Application of rules of procedure New appellate options Status of the NOTAM project Status of the medical application revisions Revised medical qualification standards

“The Pilot’s Bill of Rights has changed the landscape for FAA enforcement cases, and this is a great opportunity to tap into the shared

experiences of the LAC and the other attorneys who attend AirVenture,” said Alan L. Farkas, chairman of the EAA Legal Advisory Council. “We’re thrilled that John and Kathy Yodice will be joining us again.” The seminar is free of charge to those attending AirVenture. Interested attorneys can still register via email at govt@eaa.org AVT.

Learn what EAA insurance plans can offer

APPLY AT

Join us at the EAA AirVenture 2013 Job Fair at College Park - July 31, 12 pm - 3 pm

Feel a little intimidated when it comes to your aircraft insurance? The EAA Aircraft Insurance Plan will be covered in a series of forum presentations this week that can help you become savvier on this sometimes confusing subject. All presentations will be held in Forum Building 11 and conducted by Bob Mackey, senior vice president of Falcon Insurance Agency, one of the largest independent aviation insurance agencies, and the official administrator for EAA’s insurance plans. Wednesday, 10-11:15 a.m. - “Aircraft Insurance Mumbo-Jumbo” will be

an entertaining session teaching the basics of insurance, after which you will discover that airplane insurance isn’t that complicated. Thursday, 11:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m. – “Save $$ on Airplane Insurance” covers the various ways airplane owners can determine what they do and do not need when buying airplane insurance. Friday, 10-11:15 a.m. – “Fill the GAP: AD&D Insurance” shows how to ensure your family’s financial security when traditional life insurance excludes aviation activities through EAA’s new accidental death and dismemberment plan. AVT

Flying Musicians return to Oshkosh To some, the rumbling of a radial engine, the smooth staccato of a V-12, and even the popping power of a flat four are the music they love most; to others nothing beats the intimacy of an acoustic-driven jam session of Gibson and Seagull guitars. And then there’s the Flying Musicians Association (FMA) with their hearts in both camps. FMA members once again plan to land at EAA Oshkosh and strum and sing for a campfire jam in Camp Scholler on Tuesday night; performances, open mic, and jam on Thursday evening next to the Ultralights Barn; and special performances at the Annual Seaplane Pilots

Association’s corn roast. The Flying Musicians Association Inc. is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization founded in 2009 consisting of pilots who are musicians, spanning the globe, proficiency levels, and genres. Like so many organizations these days, maintaining their mission has been a challenge, said John Zapp, president/CEO of FMA: “Under sequestration, we too had to cut back this year, but will push onward and upward to continue to share our passions—aviation and music.” You can learn more about the FMA and its Oshkosh schedule at www. FlyingMuscians.org. AVT


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AirVenture Today

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Tuesday, July 30 7:00 AM - 9:00 AM Powered Parachutes (Performance), Ultralight Runway 7:00 AM - 10:00 AM EAA Board Meeting (Meeting), Leadership Classroom 7:15 AM - 7:45 AM Fellowship of the Wing (Special Event), Fergus Chapel 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM Aerobics (Activity), Michael Toft, Theater in the Woods 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM Craft Activity (Art & Crafts), Craft Tent 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM Vintage Type Clubs (Forum), Vintage Hangar 8:15 AM - 8:30 AM Daily Weather Briefing (Forum), EAA Welcome Center 8:30 AM - 9:30 AM Eagle Flights Overview (Forum), Trevor Janz, Chapters & Young Eagles 8:30 AM - 9:45 AM Pilot Professionalism (Forum), Jason Blair, College Park Savvy Entrepreneur (Forum), Esther Dyson, Innovations Pavilion Aviation Oils 101 (Forum), Steven Strollo, Pavilion 1 Aircraft Sales & Use Tax (Forum), Ashley Forte, Pavilion 2 GAMA Strip Flying New Zealand (Forum), Matt and Jo McCaughan, Pavilion 3 Sennheiser How to Host an Air Tour (Forum), Philip Seizinger, Pavilion 4 Modern Electrical Systems (Forum), Marc Ausman, Pavilion 5 HAI Electronic Ignitions (Forum), Michael Kobylik, Pavilion 6 JP Instruments Aviation Challenges (Forum), Dick Rutan, Pavilion 7 Honda Aircraft Alternative Aviation Fuel (Forum), Dr. Elaine Croft McKenzie, Pavilion 8 NATCA Cub Club (Forum), Paul Osmanski, Dana Osmanski, Pavilion 9 Honda Gen Fabric Covering 101 (Workshop), Pavilion 10 Poly-Fiber Basic Spray Painting (Forum), Ron Alexander, Pavilion 11 BRP/Rotax Sheet Metal 101 (Workshop), Sheet Met-Aircraft Spruce TIG Welding 101 (Workshop), TIG Weld Lincoln Elec Electrical System Install (Demo), Robert McLaughlin, Aeroplane Factory Composite 101 (Workshop), Composite Workshop 3M Fuel/Metal Sealing (Forum), Steve Falteisek, Workshop Class 1 Gas Welding 101 (Workshop), Gas Welding Workshop Corvair Flight Engines (Forum), William Wynne, Workshop Class 2 Incursions and Signage (Forum), Jack Vandeventer, FAA Aviation Safety Ctr History of Radial Engines (Forum), Steve Curry, Jerry Brown, EAA Welcome Center Duxford’s WWII History (Forum), David Lee, Vette Theater Spirit of Aviation (Movie), Skyscape Theater 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM Carbon Fiber & Peel Ply (Hints for HB), Scott VanderVeen, HB Hangar Aircraft Spruce 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM Wood Construction 101 (Workshop), Wood Workshop 8:30 AM - 12:30 PM Metal Shaping (Workshop), Dave Wenglarz, Vintage Hangar 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM Timeless Voices (Interview), Timeless Voices Theater Aircraft Restoration (Demo), Aeroplane Factory 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM WWI Aviation (Movie), Flying Cinema 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM Ultralight & Light Planes (Performance), Ultralight Runway 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM Replica Fighters Forums (Forum), Replica Fighters HQ 9:30 AM - 9:45 AM Flight Gear (Showcase), Warbirds in Review 9:45 AM - 10:00 AM Singer Theresa Eaman (Special Event), Warbirds in Review 9:45 AM - 10:45 AM Avoid Being Intercepted (Forum), Kevin Roethe, Federal Pavilion 10:00 AM - 10:30 AM Legends and Guests at KidVenture, Kermit Weeks - Fantasy of Flight, KidVenture Legends & Guests 10:00 AM - 10:45 AM Becoming an Aerobatics Performer, Rob Holland, Bendix/King Pavilion ADS-B Academy: iPad (Forum), Garmin, Garmin Hangar Tent 1 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Eagle Flights in Canada (Forum), Jill Oakes, Pam McKenzie, et al., Chapters & Young Eagles Keep ‘Em Flying (Movie), Flying Cinema Hand Prop Your AC (Forum), Vintage Red Barn Meet Skip Stewart (Autograph), EAA Welcome Center


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Mobile FliteDeck v2.1. New. Improved.

Visit jeppesen.com/mobile29 to learn more. iPad® is a trademark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc.

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28

AirVenture Today

Enjoy AirVenture from the Sky! Take one of EAA’s Flight Experiences.

B-17 mission flights Ford Tri-Motor flights Bell 47 Helicopter flights Schweizer 333 Turbine Helicopter Premier Flights

Tickets for all flights can be purchased at the Welcome Center, Main Gate and kiosk near the Vintage Area. Book your flight today!

PRESENTATION SCHEDULE Meet Melissa Pemberton (Autograph), EAA Welcome Center Corsair, TBM & L-5 (Forum), Texas Flying Legends Museum, Warbirds in Review Return of Champions (Activity), Phillips 66 Plaza Vintage (Workshop), Vintage Hangar 10:00 AM - 11:15 AM Commercial Pilot Career (Forum), Jaimie Jameson, Will Dismukes, et al., College Park Beyond the Startup (Forum), Gretchen Jahn, Innovations Pavilion Canada - Fuel Flow Test (Forum), Jack Dueck, EAA Canada 2nd Golden Age of Aviation (Forum), General Ron Stafford, Pavilion 1 Mechanics and the Law (Forum), Patrick Phillips, Michael Pangia, Pavilion 2 GAMA Aviation Venture Capital (Forum), Maurice Gunderson, Pavilion 3 Sennheiser Aerial Photography (Forum), David Rodwell, Pavilion 4 Flying to the Bahamas (Forum), Rick Gardner, Pavilion 5 HAI Turbocharging Systems (Forum), Timothy Gauntt, Pavilion 6 JP Instruments Leaning 101: Fundamentals (Forum), Mike Busch, Pavilion 7 Honda Aircraft iPad GPS ADS-B Solutions (Forum), Ryan Deck, Pavilion 9 Honda Gen Restoring Fabric Pipers (Forum), Clyde Smith, Pavilion 10 Poly-Fiber Rediscover DUATS (Forum), Leon Thomas, Pavilion 11 BRP/Rotax UL Power Engines (Forum), Robert Helms, Workshop Class 1 Wittman Buttercup (Forum), Earl Luce, Workshop Class 2 Ditching & Water Survival (Forum), Robert Shafer, FAA Aviation Safety Ctr Vietnam: Inside and Out (Forum), James Zitzelsberger, Vette Theater Chase Airplanes of Boeing (Forum), Doug Benjamin, Hilton Theater The Restorers-10th Anniv. (Forum), Adam White, Skyscape Theater Homebuilts in Review- RV-10 , Bob Lefler, HB Hangar Aircraft Spruce 10:30 AM - 11:15 AM Weather in the Cockpit (Forum), Garmin, Garmin Hangar Tent 2 10:45 AM - 11:15 AM AWOS & ASOS (Forum), Rich Mamrosh, Federal Pavilion 11:00 AM - 11:30 AM Vintage in Review (Forum), Ray Johnson, Vintage Red Barn 11:00 AM - 11:45 AM A-6 Intruder Navigator (Forum), CDR James Zanino USNR, Bendix/King Pavilion Aera Portables (Forum), Garmin, Garmin Hangar Tent 1 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM EAA Ultimate Flights #6 (Movie), Flying Cinema 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM 1/3 Scale B-17, Mark Bauer, RFA Clubhouse 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM Wood Construction 101 (Workshop), Wood Workshop 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM Stewart System (Demo), UL Tech Tentw Featured Aircraft Display (Plane Talk), Phillips 66 Plaza 11:00 AM - 3:00 PM Life Is a School/Lindy (Author’s Corner), Kermit Weeks, EAA Wearhouse 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM Flying to National Parks (Forum), Cliff Chetwin, Federal Pavilion 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM Dream Big & Learn to Fly (Forum), Ted Sanders, Chapters & Young Eagles 11:30 AM - 12:45 PM Dealing With Emergencies (Forum), Larry Bothe, College Park Innovation & Entrepreneur (Forum), Jonathon Hartman, Innovations Pavilion NAV Canada - Operating (Forum), Paul Dyck, EAA Canada Flying Beech Airplanes (Forum), American Bonzanza Society, Pavilion 1 Maintaining Grumman AC (Forum), Gregg Erikson, Pavilion 2 GAMA Design of HP Aircraft (Forum), Dr. Peter Gall, Pavilion 3 Sennheiser Open Source Aviation (Forum), John Nicol, Pavilion 4 Helicopter Careers (Forum), Matthew Zuccaro, Pavilion 5 HAI Special Issuance Medicals (Forum), Dr. Brent Blue, Pavilion 6 JP Instruments iPad 101: Tips and Tricks (Forum), John Zimmerman, Pavilion 7 Honda Aircraft Why Have a Pre-buy (Forum), Scott “Sky” Smith, Pavilion 8 NATCA Two Weeks to Taxi (Forum), Chris Strachan, Pavilion 9 Honda Gen WACO Cootie Replica (Forum), Brian Meyer, Pavilion 10 Poly-Fiber Stewart Systems (Forum), Jason Gerard, Pavilion 11 BRP/Rotax RV Aircraft - Fiberglass (Forum), Sam James, Composite Workshop Registering a Homebuilt (Forum), Timm Bogenhagen, Workshop Class 2


30

AIRVENTURE TODAY

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Mountain Flying Tips (Forum), Bill Standerfer, FAA Aviation Safety Ctr The VTOL Flying Car (Forum), Russell Solheim, Ultralight Forums Tent Discover the SR-71 (Forum), Maj. Gen. Patrick Halloran, EAA Welcome Center Wittman’s Designs (Forum), Red Hamilton, Vette Theater P-38 Glacier Girl (Speaker), Dick Campbell, Skyscape Theater Metal Shaping (Forum), Mark Lynn, HB Hangar Aircraft Spruce 11:30 AM - 12:15 PM Fast Track ADS-B Academy (Forum), Garmin, Garmin Hangar Tent 2 12:00 PM - 12:30 PM Flying the B-17 (Movie), Flying Cinema Legends and Guests at KidVenture, Steve and Suzanne Asbury-Oliver, KidVenture Legends & Guests 12:00 PM - 12:45 PM Practical ADS-B (Forum), Jeff Simon, Bendix/King Pavilion, Flying Upgrade Avionics (Forum), Garmin, Garmin Hangar Tent 1 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM To Fly and Fight (Author’s Corner), C.E. Bud Anderson, EAA Wearhouse 12:00 PM - 2:30 PM Rotorcraft (Performance), Ultralight Runway 12:30 PM - 12:45 PM Flight Gear (Showcase), Warbirds in Review 12:30 PM - 1:15 PM Garmin Pilot With an iPad (Forum), Garmin, Garmin Hangar Tent 2 12:30 PM - 2:15 PM Sky King - Volume 13 (Movie), Flying Cinema 12:45 PM - 1:00 PM Singer Theresa Eaman (Special Event), Warbirds in Review 1:00 PM - 1:45 PM Civil Air Patrol (Forum), TJ Spitzmiller, Bendix/King Pavilion G3X System (Forum), Garmin, Garmin Hangar Tent 1 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM Eagle Flight Promotion (Forum), Duane Huff, Chapters & Young Eagles Canadian AC Insurance (Forum), Sandy Odebunmi, EAA Canada Hand Prop Your AC (Forum), Vintage Red Barn Wasp Stearman (Forum), Mike & Andy Porter, Warbirds in Review NTSB GA Safety Alert (Forum), NTSB, Federal Pavilion Robert Baslee and Gereral Info on His Designs, Robert Baslee, Replica Fighter Association Clubhouse 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM Tell Your Business Idea (Forum), Bill Joos, Innovations Pavilion CFIT - Avoid Sudden Stop (Forum), Doug Stewart, College Park Owning a Twin Cessna (Forum), Bob Thomason, Pavilion 1 Cessna 170 Association (Forum), Captain Joe Scoles, Pavilion 2 GAMA Pilot Incapacitation (Forum), Charles Crinnian, Pavilion 3 Sennheiser Yearly Cessna 195 Seminar (Forum), John Barron, Pavilion 4 Hatz Biplane (Forum), Kevin Conner, Pavilion 5 HAI Through the Fence (Forum), Dr. Brent Blue, Pavilion 6 JP Instruments Breakdowns Away From Home (Forum), Mike Busch, Pavilion 7 Honda Aircraft Taylorcraft Airplane Care (Forum), Paul Osmanski, Dana Osmanski, Pavilion 8 NATCA AeroVee / AeroInjector (Forum), John Monnett, Pavilion 9 Honda Gen Fabric Covering 101 (Workshop), Pavilion 10 Poly-Fiber Fuel System Testing (Forum), David Prizio, Pavilion 11 BRP/Rotax Sheet Metal 101 (Workshop), Sheet Met-Aircraft Spruce TIG Welding 101 (Workshop), TIG Weld Lincoln Elec Composite 101 (Workshop), Composite Workshop Auto Engines Conversions (Forum), Patrick Panzera, Workshop Class 1 Gas Welding 101 (Workshop), Gas Welding Workshop Steel Tube Construction (Forum), Earl Luce, Workshop Class 2 Life of Bessie Coleman, Gigi Coleman, Hilton Theater Approach and Landings (Forum), Jeffery Taylor, FAA Aviation Safety Ctr Whats Powered Paragliding (Forum), Mike Robinson, Ultralight Forums Tent Chairman’s Award (Awards), Jack Pelton, EAA Welcome Center Stronger Together (Forum), EAA Welcome Center Oral History of Aviation (Forum), Tracy Miller, Vette Theater Wright Hydro-Aeroplanes (Forum), Robert Luken, Wright Flyer - Museum The World’s Longest Flight (Forum), Dick Rutan, SpaceShipOne / Voyager 1:30 PM - 2:15 PM GTN: Flying Hands On (Forum), Garmin, Garmin Hangar Tent 2 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM Safety Using an iPad (Forum), Devan Shepherd, Seaplane Base 1:30 PM - 2:45 PM Composite Talks (Forum), Sam James, Aeroplane Factory


TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013 1:30 PM - 3:30 PM Wood Construction 101 (Workshop), Wood Workshop 2:00 PM - 2:30 PM ADDS (Forum), Liam Lynam, Federal Pavilion 2:00 PM - 2:45 PM GPS Risks and Mitigation (Forum), Sean D’Arcy, Bendix/King Pavilion, 2:00 PM - 2:45 PM ADS-B Academy: GDL 88/GTX (Forum), Garmin, Garmin Hangar Tent 1 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM Vintage (Workshop), Vintage Hangar 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM Homebuilts in Review-‘Quickie,’ Roy Shannon, HB Hangar Aircraft Spruce 2:15 PM - 2:45 PM Historic Comedy (Movie), Flying Cinema 2:30 PM - 3:15 PM Aircraft Fabric Repair (Forum), Jon Goldenbaum, Pavilion 10 Poly-Fiber 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM Experimental Interiors (Forum), Dennis Wolter, Pavilion 1 Touring Alaska on Floats (Forum), David Larson, Pavilion 2 GAMA Fundraising/Friendraising (Forum), Cara Russell, Pavilion 3 Sennheiser Bolt-on Horsepower for AC (Forum), Darren Tilman, Pavilion 4 Intl. Flying Procedures (Forum), Rick Gardner, Pavilion 5 HAI Cirrus Maintenance & Ops (Forum), Gary Poelma, Pavilion 6 JP Instruments The Kings on Risk Control (Forum), John and Martha King, Pavilion 7 Honda Aircraft Should You Buy an A/C (Forum), Scott “Sky” Smith, Pavilion 8 NATCA Sonex Flying Qualities (Forum), Kerry Fores, Pavilion 9 Honda Gen Tips/Tricks for RV Kits (Forum), Wally Anderson, Pavilion 11 BRP/Rotax Engine Blueprinting (Forum), Archie Frangoudis, Workshop Class 1 3M Erosion Prevention (Forum), Steve Falteisek, Workshop Class 2 A/C Upset: Serial Killer (Forum), John Dye, FAA Aviation Safety Ctr ROTAX 2-Stroke Upkeep (Forum), Bret Lawton, Ultralight Forums Tent Records and Awards of NAA (Forum), Jonathan Gaffney, Vette Theater Ladies Love Taildraggers (Forum), Judy Birchler, Hilton Theater 2:30 PM - 4:00 PM Annealing .063 Aluminum (Hints for HB), Mark Lynn, HB Hangar Aircraft Spruce 2:30 PM - 6:30 PM Tuesday Air Show, Air Show 2:45 PM - 3:30 PM B-24 Liberator (Movie), Flying Cinema 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM Aluminum Gas Welding (Workshop), Joe Maj, Gas Welding Workshop 3:15 PM - 3:45 PM Flying LSAs to Bahamas (Forum), Mike Zidziunas, Federal Pavilion 4:00 PM - 4:45 PM Airspace, Airmanship (Forum), Wanda Zuege, FAA Aviation Safety Ctr 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM New ADS-B In & Out (Forum), Randy Sanders and Sid Siddiqi, Pavilion 1 Flying Beechcraft A/C (Forum), Michael Kaufman, Pavilion 2 GAMA iPad in the Cockpit (Forum), Jason Miller, Pavilion 4 Buying & Selling Aircraft (Forum), Robert McKenzie, Pavilion 5 HAI Pilot/ATC Communications (Forum), Steve Hansen, Pavilion 8 NATCA Strong Bonds (Forum), Timothy Anderson, Pavilion 10 Poly-Fiber 5:15 PM - 6:30 PM AeroInnovate Roundtable (Forum), Innovations Pavilion 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM First Wing Dinner (Banquet), Eagle Hangar Mainstage 6:30 PM - 7:30 PM Ultralight & Light Planes (Performance), Ultralight Runway 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM Vic Ferrari (Concert), Phillips 66 Plaza 7:00 PM - 8:15 PM AeroInnovate Pitch/Mingle (Forum), Innovations Pavilion 7:30 PM - 8:00 PM Powered Parachutes (Performance), Ultralight Runway 8:00 PM - 8:30 PM Bill Barber Award (Awards), Theater in the Woods 8:30 PM - 10:00 PM Space Night (Evening Program), Theater in the Woods

DAILY AIR SHOW LINEUP Performers listed in tentative order of appearance (subject to change)

Tuesday, July 30 - 2:30 p.m. Misty Blues Parachute Team, Texas Flying Legends (C-53 and P-51), Art Nalls (Sea Harrier), Michael Goulian (Extra 330SC), Cirrus Jet, Tinstix - Melissa Pemberton & Skip Stewart (Pitts & Edge), Bob Carlton (Sub Sonex), Terry Humphrey (Thrush 510G), Young Eagles, Kevin Coleman (Extra 300 SHP), Jerry Kerby (RV-8), The 4ce, Yves “Jetman” Rossy, Sean Tucker (Oracle Challenger III), Scott Yoak (P-51 Mustang), Texas Flying Legends, Warbirds

31

TECHNOLOGY YOU CONTROL, NOT THE OTHER WAY AROUND.

KSN 770 WAAS-Enabled MultiFunction Display Get your fingers on the 770’s hybrid interface; the perfect blend of touch screen and hard buttons. Easily control your GPS navigation, NAV/ COMM, weather, traffic and terrain in any flight condition. Helping you navigate in the soup with confidence. Visit us at Pavilion #292 for a demo. your old avionics and save. See website for details.

KSN770.com


32

AIRVENTURE TODAY

Airwolf STCs expand remote-filter & oil/air separator availability

I

ndustry leader Airwolf Filter Corp. returned to Oshkosh with an expanded range of STCs that allow installation of its remotely mounted oil-filter systems on virtually every piston aircraft engine flying— from Continentals and Lycomings to Jacobs,

Designed by a pilot, for pilots, as the most comfortable sunglasses to wear with a headset. Come try them on!

Booth 816-817 Located inside the main gate to the right, on Mulva Way

Look for the Meyers 200D!

Bifocals & Prescription Lenses available

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Curtiss-Wright, Franklin, Pratt & Whitney, Housai, Kinner, Warner, Ranger, or WSK PZL Kalisz engine. Jonny Quest, Airwolf operations director, said this new schedule is unique in aviation. “Now, every piston aero engine is approved for our lifeprolonging oil filter system without the need for local field approval from the FAA, EASA, or Transport Canada.” The STCs “take all the regulatory work off the shoulders of owners and operators,” he explained. “All they have to do is install it.” In a similar move, Airwolf ’s STCs for its oil/air separators, standard and minisized, now cover the same broad spec-

trum of aircraft piston engines, the company revealed. Air-oil separators recycle oil mist generated by air pressure in the engine crankcase, remove condensed water and humid air into the slipstream, and return pure, separated oil to the crankcase, resulting in lower oil consumption and reduced corrosionproducing humidity in the engine, as well as eliminating oil stains on the bottom of fuselages. With two distinct capacity models, Air-Sep and Mini-Sep, Airwolf can meet the demands of aircraft owners of all piston-powered aircraft. Pilots who want to trade in their M20 air oil separator for Airwolf ’s superior Air-Sep or Mini-Sep qualify for a $50 trade-in against a new purchase. The offer is limited to one per customer, and the trade-in must have been removed from a certified aircraft and must be accompanied by the original 337 form. See Airwolf in Exhibit 287.

Cessna offers heat-ref lecting paint for Turbo Stationair Cessna now offers a limitededition paint scheme for its Turbo Stationair—the Night Sky edition. This finish features a black and red design topped with a new surface coating that reflects most infrared solar heat. Cessna decided to offer the Night Sky option after input from customers who wanted the aircraft to look sleeker. “This is an attention-grabbing product that reflects an owner’s personality and preference,” said Jeff Umscheid, Cessna business leader of the Turbo Stationair. Learn more about the Turbo Stationair and the other Cessna innovations by visiting one of Cessna’s booths.

Reflecting infrared radiant heat, the new Night Sky finish on Cessna’s Turbo Stationair helps the bird look and feel cooler—a goal espoused by many of the company’s customers.


TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

Fly-In Theater Sunday, July 28 – Saturday, August 3 Enjoy the night like never before. Bring your blankets and lawn chairs and join us for an evening of exciting aviation films, shown under the stars.

Presented by Ford Motor Company

Sunday, July 28th

Octopussy

Monday, July 29th

Iron Man 2

Tuesday, July 30th

Skyfall

Wednesday, July 31st

The Terminal

Thursday, August 1st

The Avengers

Friday, August 2nd

Planes

Saturday, August 3rd

Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines

Special pre-premiere screening of Disney’s epic air adventure

Movies and dates subject to change due to scheduling conflicts. Free shows begin at 8:30 p.m. daily, 9:30 p.m. on Wednesday and Saturday. Located at the north end of Doolittle Drive behind the Camp Store. Come and experience new movies as well as aviation classics. The popcorn is on us – enjoy!

33


34

AIRVENTURE TODAY

Stemme relaunches in the U.S. with new CEO and S10 features By Marino Boric, EAA European Correspondent

G

erman’s high-end motorglider manufacturer Stemme is relaunching its brand at EAA Oshkosh 2013 with a fresh design, new management team, and new features on the well-established S10, known for its unique fold-

away propeller. New CEO Paul Masschelein is also highlighting the latest updates to the S6-RT model. “Stemme is pushing especially for the North American market,” Masschelein said. New dealer and service partnerships are being established throughout the U.S. close to its customer base. The company plans to offer demo flight opportunities in the motorgliders just after AirVenture in Oshkosh; demos are also any time at Stemme USA headquarStemme is relaunching the brand at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2013 ters in San Diego, with new design and management. California.

S10 upgrades Stemme’s flagship S10 motorglider boasts a 50:1 glide ratio, retractable fold-away variable pitch propeller, and power from a turbocharged Rotax 914 engine. With side-by-side seating and an electrically retractable gear, the S10 also boasts a reconfigured glass panel with engine management system (EMS) and new Butterfly variometer, a new hydraulic brake system and four-point automatic seat belts. Inside, the S10 sports a fresh “technical” interior design in light green and graphite. S6-RT The Stemme S6-RT, for retractable/turbo, is a new concept of a travel motorglider with a high maximum takeoff weight of 1,980 pounds, fully retractable tricycle landing gear (with trailing links on the mains), and the reliable Rotax 914 turbocharged engine.

Stemme engineers placed the engine mid-fuselage, where it is barely audible in cruise. Thrust comes via a carbon fiber drive shaft turning a fully feathering threeblade prop. The S6-RT also features sideby-side seating, making for comfortable cruising at 140 knots on about 5 gph to go places fast or soaring at a 36:1 glide ratio. And flying Stemme’s S6 and S10 requires only a glider certificate with a motorglider endorsement. Stemme’s new management was appointed in November 2012 after two long-term shareholders and passionate Stemme pilots increased their investment to own 70 percent of the company’s stock, which was founded in 1984. “Stemme is here to stay,” Masschelein said. “I am convinced that we have great prospects with our exceptional motorgliders—the S10 and S6. We are creating a future.”

FILL IT UP. GO THE DISTANCE.

Photo: Chris Rose

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TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

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Lawns plus determination equals a powered parachute By Barbara A. Schmitz

L

andon Clipp has mowed hundreds of lawns, all for one reason: to earn enough money to buy a powered parachute. It took 2-1/2 years for Landon to mow nearly 300 lawns—or about 225 acres— and earn the $7,000 needed to purchase a used modified Buckeye Millennium. He is camping by his powered parachute near the Ultralights Barn this week. Landon says he has been excited about aviation since he was 7 when he started flying RC airplanes. Then, in 2008, he came to EAA AirVenture Oshkosh with his Boy Scout troop. “Once I came to the Ultralights area and saw how relatively cheap powered parachutes were, I knew I could do that.” Landon, of Champaign, Illinois, says he began lessons when he was 13 or 14, and soloed at 15 in the powered parachute he would buy later that year.

No pilot certificate is needed to fly a powered parachute since it falls within the limitations prescribed in FAR Part 103. Now 17, Landon has logged about 40 hours in powered parachutes, and he hopes to add to that time while in Oshkosh. “I want to look at all the airplanes here,” he says, “but I really hope to get in some good flying days.” He is also volunteering with a friend and his father, Larry Clipp, parking airplanes at AirVenture. What is it about powered parachutes that he likes? “It’s just very fun,” he says. “It’s so serene and no one bothers you. It’s just you and the machine and it is very relaxing.” But the aviation community is half the fun, he adds. “There are so many people who are passionate about flying, and you can learn so much from them.”

Landon, who will be a senior this fall at Mahomet-Seymour High School, says he plans to get his sport pilot certificate— although he ran out of time and money this summer.

In his free time, Landon says he enjoys operating a ham radio or playing guitar and piano. “And mowing lawns,” he adds, with a laugh.

Visit Us Here at the HAI HELI‑CENTER

• See helicopters on display

July 29 – Aug. 4, 2013 Booth #427-436

• View the air show from the HELI‑CENTER observation deck (HAI members only)

• Learn how to transition from fixed‑wing to helicopter

• Talk to helicopter industry experts

• Have fun at the HAI HELI‑CENTER

HAI HELI-CENTER

HELICOPTER DISPLAY AND PARKING AREA

New This Year! Fly in and park in the new helicopter display and parking area.

Visit our participating companies:

John & Martha King on Flying Helicopters Today, July 30, 1–2 pm

American Helicopter Society, International

Helimission International

Hazebuster Optics

Midwest Helicopter Association

Helicopter Specialties, Inc.

Hillsboro Aviation, Inc.


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AIRVENTURE TODAY

AIRCRAFT COVERS

Hybrid doesn’t necessarily mean batteries By Randy Dufault

O

ver the course of a long career with the likes of Mooney and Beechcraft, aeronautical engineer Joe Hutterer became convinced there was a better way to build a business aircraft. His concept is a hybrid propulsion system, though not the typical hybrid-gas system seen in today’s automobiles and in some experimental airplanes. Hutterer explains that hybrid simply means two different propulsion systems on a single vehicle. In the case of his concept, the two systems are a pusher turboprop engine in the back of the airplane, and a retractable fanjet engine in the nose. “My initial concept was to lower the noise level and improve safety,” Hutterer said. “I knew it would be more efficient and went through the numbers, and the number was 40 percent.” “My thing is to get the prop [off the wing],” Hutterer said. “But then you end up with a single-engine airplane, and what happens when the engine quits? Usually the answer to that question is another engine. “I’m saying okay, we can put in a backup engine. A cheap jet, if there is such a thing. “I started modeling this on the computer, and I started noticing that as a pilot, if you use both of these together for takeoff you get about 40 percent more power. The back engine is sized for cruise anyway. That is the main engine…so when you put on this other engine, it is only used for about five minutes. With all that extra power you can get up to 10,000 or 12,000 feet in about three minutes.” With the configuration Hutterer believes he achieves four goals: better safety since there is no asymmetric thrust; better aerodynamics since the wing design is not compromised with engine

installations; better performance since each engine is sized specifically for its role; and substantially lower noise levels in the cabin of the airplane. Overall he projects a 40 percent savings in fuel over conventionally configured aircraft, a corresponding 40 percent reduction in exhaust emissions, and he also believes the concept easily scales from aircraft seating as few as six, to ones that seat 50. The concept is patented. “I was kind of surprised when I got the patent,” he said. “Over the years everything has been done before. We’ve had retractable engines in sailplanes. “This particular combination I would compare to when in 1988 a Northwest airline captain took a suitcase, added wheels and a retractable folding handle. He invented the [roll-aboard]. There was no new technology. The wheel had been invented long ago, and he just put it together. Now I don’t think you can buy a suitcase that doesn’t have wheels.” Hutterer is seeking investors to help fund development of a flying prototype. He acquired a Cessna 421 to use as a base and is partnering with Air Plains Services of Wellington, Kansas, for the modifications. The changes include moving the wing, constructing a new tail section to house the turboprop engine, building a new tail, and modifying the nose to house a retracting surplus jet engine. Assuming work begins soon, the somewhat strangely configured aircraft could be flying in 2015. Hutterer is manning a booth in the Innovations Pavilion at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2013. He hopes to attract enough interest so what he believes is a far better way to build business airplanes can become a reality.

PHOTO BY RANDY DUFAULT

Aeronautical engineer Joe Hutterer received a patent for his hybrid-powered aircraft concept. Propulsion for the craft comes from a turboprop pusher engine and retractable jet in the nose.


TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

What makes a LEGEND? It starts with an idea, it grows with the PURPOSE to delight CUSTOMERS, and it’s born from VICTORY. But the only legends that are truly worth celebrating are those that carry on long after the first victory lap, where VISION, purpose and success are ongoing. This is the legend of the PT6 engine, and now it’s time for us to CELEBRATE 50 inspiring years of turboprop INNOVATION. The celebration is under way at Booth #2132 in Hangar B

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AIRVENTURE TODAY

Return of Champions on Main Plaza Stage See special presentations from 10 to 11 a.m. on the Plaza Main Stage today featuring the following Gold and Silver Lindy winners in EAA’s Return of Champions program. Homebuilt: Craig Schulze, EAA 839869, Burbank, California, 2007 Lancair 360 N73S, 2008 Grand Champion.

Ultralight: Richard Mullins, EAA 724581, New Richmond, Ohio, 2008 Just Aircraft Highlander, N853RM, 2009 Grand Champion. Vintage: George Chaffey, EAA 149233, Lafayette, California, 1948 Luscombe Silvaire 8F, NC1373B, Reserve Grand Champion-Classic 1983.

Find Chicken Wings 2: Full Throttle in the EAA Wearhouse.


TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

Rotax receives August Raspet award By Marino Boric, EAA European Correspondent

BRP Rotax Engines was presented with the Dr. August Raspet Memorial Award by the EAA for its outstanding contributions to the advancement of light aircraft design. The award was presented to Christian Mundigler, manager of Rotax Aircraft Engines, who heads product management and engine lineup. The Raspet Award, presented every year since 1960 to a person or organization making an outstanding contribution to the advancement of light aircraft design, is named for the late Dr. August Raspet, a professor at Mississippi State University and avid light aircraft enthusiast. “It is an honor for BRP to be awarded the Dr. August Raspet Memorial Award,” said Francois Tremblay, marketing director for Rotax aircraft engines. “BRP’s history of innovation and excellence, as demonstrated by such products as the Rotax 912 iS aircraft engine, is a good fit with Dr. Raspet’s passion for the latest

and greatest technology in light aircraft.” The Rotax 912 iS fuel-injected engine is among the most fuel-efficient aircraft engines in the LSA, ultralight aircraft, and the general aviation industry. Recently Rotax unveiled that real-life flight tests are showing a fuel economy improvement of up to 36 percent compared to the carbureted Rotax 912 ULS engine. The digital engine control unit (ECU) system and the redundant electronic fuel injection system ensure optimal fuel and air mixture at any altitude for a longer flight range, fewer carbon dioxide emissions, and lower operating costs. The 912 iS engine works with throttle settings below 97 percent in an ECO mode with a Lambda 1.05 setting, which results in low fuel consumption. In a power mode above 97 percent throttle up to WOT the Lambda is 0.88. The Rotax 912 iS engine is currently available on 26 different aircraft types, with 24 other OEM installations in progress.

PHOTO BY MARINO BORIC

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AIRVENTURE TODAY

Continental acquires Thielert Aircraft, returns to air racing By Marino Boric, EAA European Correspondent

C

ontinental Motors opened its EAA Oshkosh announcements with three items of news: the recent acquisition of assets of Thielert Aircraft, a strategic partnership with Italian manufacturer Vulcanair, and Continental’s return to air racing.

Continental’s owner AVIC International Holding Corporation announced last week its acquisition of the diesel aircraft engine and manufacturing assets of the former Thielert Aircraft Engines GmbH through its subsidiary, Technify Motors GmbH. The acquisition rounds out the highly

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successful and popular Continental Motors line of gasoline engines acquired by AVIC in 2011, according to Mr. Yu Yimin, senior vice president of AVIC International, and chairman and CEO of Continental. Monday’s second announcement regarded Vulcanair and Continental’s strategic partnership, established based on their shared belief that conventional engines are not suitable anymore in many countries. The ever-rising cost of avgas, when available at all, is a serious roadblock for profitable operations and for development of general aviation growth in regions such as Southeast Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and Europe. “We have been analyzing and testing diesel engines for over 13 years,” said Remo De Feo, Vulcanair’s CEO. “However we have not offered a dieselpowered aircraft to the market yet in order to maintain reliability standards and ethical value approach to our customers. “We believe that Jet A-1 is the only viable alternative to avgas in many parts of

the world. We have carefully monitored the alternative fuel situation and share Continental Motors’ belief that in the next five years, 25 percent of the engines operated in general aviation, in the regions where avgas is difficult to obtain, will be using Jet A-1.” Vulcanair announced that it would introduce the V1.0, a new four-seat, highwing, single-engine, basic-aerobatic aircraft offering a choice of gas or diesel engine. The third big announcement was that Continental is returning to the world of air racing. This was explained by Franck Doyen from Mas Events from France. The company has already attracted huge interest with its Nemesis Big Frog, powered by the SMA diesel engine. The French company will use the Continental diesel in the Nemesis NXT airframe recently shown during the Paris Air Show. This carbon fiber kit aircraft was specifically designed for the Reno Air Races and is accordingly enhanced and modified for extreme use.

Eagle Flights

Take your first step into the exciting world of flight

Discover the fun, freedom, and excitement of flying with EAA Eagle Flights. It’s a FREE introductory flight experience for adults who have always wanted to fly, but didn’t know how or where to take that first step. To learn how you can participate, come visit the new EAA Chapters / Young Eagles Pavilion located just west of the EAA Welcome Center on Celebration Way.

The EAA Eagles Flights™ program is made possible through the generous support of


TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

Your adventure awaits. Meet the GA8 Airvan. Designed and built in Australia for the rugged outback, the Airvan excels in STOL situations and boasts a full-fuel payload of over 1,300 lbs. Eight seats, multiple configurations, and an unparalleled safety record make it the perfect solution for countless applications. Visit us at booth # 237 today.

www.ga8airvan.com

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ou e of y g a p . our nEAA e on a r v u r t i c i A p # post a A, tagging ad Mini. iPad n e n h a t For t EA ok, w iP W in acebo ans here a o win a ne ugust 7th. F n o s A ir v et Like u our A r a chanc ebook, on ay. f o e n tod Fac d fo and o ntere otified via our booth e e b l n it You’l will be t rules, vis s r e n s n Wi onte lete c p m o c

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AIRVENTURE TODAY

Around the Field

Sunday in the park with Don...and Greg and Cindy

252  Kts  

By Jack Hodgson

I

t’s Sunday afternoon in the Vintage parking area, south of Phillips 66 Plaza. And although the sky is still a bit gray, the temps are very comfortable and the rain is holding off. A steady stream of beautifully restored and maintained vintage aircraft are taxiing into the grass down here. Lots of EAAers are already wandering up and down the rows enjoying the stunning planes.

150  Kts               005534_EAA_Daily_Teaser_mech 1,150   Useful       Revision: 0 Created: 7/16/13 Printed @ 100% 42  Kt  Stall             Client: P66 Creative Director: josh okun 4  Seats   Art Director: josePh PAnCho

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Don Dixon is sitting in a low camp chair under the wing of his bright yellow Piper Cub. Don and the Cub are from Aurora Municipal Airport (ARR), near Chicago. They flew into AirVenture 2013 that morning. He made the trip in one day. “It’s not that far. It was slow with a bit of a headwind. It was a little bumpy, and the ceiling was low. It was difficult to stay high enough off the ground and still below the clouds to make it through. But it wasn’t that bad.” Back home in Illinois he flies the Cub about 50 hours a year. “I do what you do in Cubs, which is you fly low and slow, and find grass strips.” This 65-hp, no-electrical-system

adventure 8 .1 .1 3

On Thursday, August 1st, recreational pilots get a new travel partner. Enjoy prizes and free popsicles every day from 1–2 p.m. (while supplies last). Plus, get a chance to win 20,000 WingPoints® and one of eight collectible die-cast miniature airplanes. Young Eagles Pilots — Win a breathtaking ride with the Aerostars! Register at the Phillips 66® Aviation Tent by end of day Tuesday, July 30. WingPoints® Rewards Program is administered by Kickback Rewards Systems on behalf of Phillips 66 Company. Phillips 66,® Phillips 66 Wings® Logo, WingPoints® and Rewards With Altitude® are trademarks of Phillips 66 Company or one of its subsidiaries. Other trademarks mentioned herein may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Don Dixon and his 1944 Piper Cub.

Cub has an interesting history. “It was built in 1944,” Don says. “Like all Cubs that year it was built as an L-4. But it missed the war. It was sent to an Army Air Corp base in Alabama, and never got out of the crate. It was finally purchased in 1951 by the Minneapolis Civil Air Patrol, and flew as a CAP plane for a number of years. It got sold to somebody and ended up as a classic ‘barn aircraft.’ It was rediscovered in ’97, rebuilt completely. The engine was zerotimed. And I got it nine years ago and have had it since.” The Cub has its pros and cons. “It’s a very disappointing transport aircraft, but it’s a wonderful fun aircraft.” This is Don’s 12th trip to the fly-in. What changes has he seen over those years? “I’m more impressed by how the same it is. It’s just the same, wonderful place to be. “Where else would a pilot want to be?” He’s pretty relaxed about his plans for the week. “I don’t even know what’s on the schedule. I just come up and spend a few days. I have a friend who’s bringing his Piper PA-12 up tomorrow. We’ll spend some time together.” Don and company love checking out the warbirds. “We tend to take the same


TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013 pictures of the warbirds every year. I’ve got lots of pictures of the warbirds,” he says with a smile. “It’s hard not the take a photo of them.” Which one is his favorite? “It’s hard

not to love the Corsairs. They’re just so beautiful.” Greg and Cindy Heckman are from Polo, Illinois. They flew to Oshkosh this year in

Greg and Cindy Heckman with their newly restored 1946 Funk B-85-C.

their very beautiful 1946 Funk B-85-C. They got here early in the day Sunday. By coming in early they managed to avoid the rough air that so many others encountered later in the day. “It was real smooth,” Greg says. “Not a bump or a burble.” His home airport is Ogle County Airport (C55) in Mount Morris, Illinois. Greg has just finished a 1,700-hour, five-year restoration project on the Funk. “It was a basket case when I got it. It was just a bare fuselage, boxes full of parts.” He’s restored the old plane to pristine condition, and has submitted it for judging at this year’s flyin. Fingers crossed. Cindy is not a pilot, though she describes herself as

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an aviation enthusiast. She volunteers in the Vintage store, and enjoys attending some of the general interest forums and session. Greg has been coming to the flyin for 30 years, and he’s seen a lot of changes over the years. Some he thinks are good, some not so much. He’s troubled about the lack of a suitable grass runway for vintage aircraft that keeps more vintage aircraft from coming to the fly-in; so far the FAA has refused to approve a grass strip built to resolve that issue. Greg also expressed concerns about the amount of commercialization and sponsorships that have grown over those years. But nevertheless he still loves the fly-in. “This is still the best thing going. There’s nothing that compares to it. You’re not gonna find a perfect event anywhere. And in spite of some of the things that maybe we don’t like, it’s still the best thing going.” Enjoy Around the Field all year long at www.AroundTheField.net.

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AIRVENTURE TODAY

AOA goes mainstream By Joseph E. (Jeb) Burnside

M

any military aircraft have them. They’re often used in certification testing. And now, they are available from name brand aviation manufacturers, including Bendix/King. “They” are angle of attack (AOA) indicators, a cockpit instrument displaying

the relative wind’s angle as it encounters a wing. Importantly, AOA is not the same as pitch angle. Long recognized as the most accurate way to establish and maintain desired airplane performance—especially in low-speed situations as when landing,

See you at

Booth #210

taking off, or maneuvering—AOA indicators give pilots a much more accurate presentation of how close a wing may be to its critical AOA. Exceeding the critical AOA usually leads to a stall if recovery isn’t initiated. This week at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2013, Advanced Flight Systems Inc. is introducing its AOA Pro III, a new probe-based system derived from the company’s existing AOA system, which has seen more than 2,000 installations. The new AOA Pro III system uses what the company calls a super-bright custom LCD with 26 colored segments, giving the pilot superior resolution. The AFS AOA Pro III uses separate calibration data for flight with flaps up and down, for a more accurate solution, according to the company. The system includes a machined aluminum AOA display, AOA CPU module, push buttons, flap switch, wiring harness, AOA probe, 25 feet of tubing, and a detailed instruction manual. An optional glare shield mounting bracket and heated probe are available. The AOA Pro III is available for certified airplanes. To learn more about the AOA Pro III, visit the company’s booth, 4139, in Exhibit Hangar D. The other news in AOA indicators is Bendix/King’s entry into the market with the KLR 10 Lift Reserve Indicator. According to the company, the new offering provides at-a-glance awareness and au-

dible cues of remaining lift “in an easy-toinstall, easy-to-read device.” Other features include light weight, low power consumption, and easy installation. Visual and audible cues provide an alert of decaying lift much earlier than traditional warning systems, helping ensure quick and timely correction. The KLR 10 is independent of pitot-static systems, so it can be used even if the existing air data system is compromised by ice, water, or other contaminants. The KLR 10 is being marketed for experimental aircraft. An optional heated probe is available. To learn more about the KLR 10, visit Bendix/King’s booths, 289-292, in the Main Aircraft Display, and Booth 2162 in Exhibit Hangar B.

Attend the EAA annual member meeting Wednesday To allow more EAA members to attend their annual membership meeting at AirVenture, the meeting has been moved from its traditional Saturday morning time slot to Wednesday morning, July 31, 8:30 a.m. at the Theater in the Woods. “We’d heard from numerous members that the Saturday morning meeting was too late in the week for them to attend. Thus, most years that annual meeting attendance was quite sparse,” said Jack Pelton, EAA chairman of the board. “We also want to see more members at their annual meeting, have

them meet and talk with our board members, and also update them on their organization’s current status and future direction.” The annual meeting will continue to include the election of EAA board members, business and financial reports, a period for questions to the board from members, and this year a vote on restated EAA Articles of Incorporation. In order to vote for EAA board members at the annual meeting, EAA members must bring their current, valid membership card.


TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

Š2013 FedEx. All rights reserved.

When it comes to the aerospace and aviation industry, we’re big fans. FedEx admires and supports EAA AirVenture for their contributions to pushing boundaries, and therefore, pushing us towards the future.

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AIRVENTURE TODAY

What’s happening in Vintage Here’s what’s happening in the Vintage area today. Round Engine Rodeo Steve Curry, Radial Engines Ltd., has five display engines on hand for all to see. The engine display is located just inside the main entrance of the Vintage Hangar. Tips for restorers in hands-on workshop Each day the Vintage Aircraft Associ-

ation (VAA) hosts a hands-on workshop in the Vintage Hangar next to the VAA Red Barn. These daily workshops will cover a variety of topics to help owners maintain their vintage aircraft. VAA metal workshop Workshop conducted by Roger James, D & D Classic, Covington, Ohio, on unique metalwork such as making compound curves for cowling, wing root

Are You seeking a new career? 2013 AirVenture Job Fair Noon to 3 p.m. | Wednesday, July 31 College Park, presented by American Airlines Meet with notable aviation companies and other interested employers searching for potential candidates.

fairing strips, and instrument panels. Southwest corner of the Vintage Hangar, 9 to 5 daily. Hand propping demonstration Each day at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., see a detailed hand propping demonstration in front of the Vintage Hangar. Vintage in Review Tuesday, 11 a.m., features Ray Johnson with Dave and Jeanne Allen, of El-

bert, Colorado, and their 1934 Waco YKC with a Jacobs 275-hp engine. The Allens completed the restoration on June 18. Sarah Wilson, owner/pilot of the 1929 Stearman 4E Junior Speedmail, will then answer questions about her beautifully restored airplane and detail some of the historic roles this aircraft has contributed to aviation history.

Hilton Software delivers WingX Pro7 advanced weather app Hilton Software LLC’s WingX Pro7 is a mobile app that allows users to graphically visualize and predict weather with aid from Baron Services’ weather reports. The app won “Best iPad App of 2012” by Aviation Consumer Magazine and is available via the Apple App Store and Version 7 is available as a free upgrade to current users of WingX Pro. The app allows users access to Baron’s weather information, including NEXRAD, Visible and IR Satellite, Echo Tops, Surface Analysis, and Contoured

Surface Wind Speed, as well as others. “Pilots deserve the most advanced aviation technology and weather graphics at their fingertips,” said Dr. Hilton Goldstein, founder of Hilton Software. “By working closely with Baron Services, we have combined two best-of-breed products to create an unbelievable aviation platform.” Hilton will have all of their software on display at booths 2095 and 2096 and will be periodically demonstrating their capabilities on iPad, iPhone, and iPad mini mediums.

STC granted for external GoPro camera mount Airborne Sensor LLC received approval of its Eagle360 camera pod for 52 GA aircraft types. Designed and priced for GA pilots, the pod can hold up to four GoPro cameras to cover all angles of flight. The Eagle360 will be on display in Hangar C at Airborne Sensor’s booth, 3139. If you order an Eagle360 during AirVenture, you will receive a free GoPro Hero3 Silver Edition camera. The company also has demonstration videos of Eagle360-equipped aircraft fly-

ing by popular destinations like New York City and the Grand Canyon, and air-to-air videos with other equipped aircraft. “It’s like having your own personal U-2,” said CEO Dave Tenenbaum, who is a former photojournalist and a pilot of 30 years. The company states that the Eagle360 “was designed to be affordable for any pilot, and still deliver quality that satisfies people with unlimited budgets.” The unit costs about $1,600 and GoPro cameras normally retail between $300-$400.

EAA AirVenture 2013 security contact information In the event of an emergency situation, call 911, or contact the 24-hour EAA Security service at 920-234-7754. Both the

EAA and Camp Scholler Security stations are located just west of the Red Barn Camp Store in Camp Scholler.


TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

Introducing the X700 Signature Series — innovation at its finest What does a tractor have to do to earn the John Deere signature? It has to go through rigorous testing. It has to mow flawlessly—even in knee-high grass—in every weather condition. With full-time 4-wheel drive, 4-wheel steering and a drive-over mower deck with AutoConnect,™ the new X700 Signature Series Tractor is a fully loaded mowing machine. We call it our Signature Series for a reason. John Deere is the official Utility Vehicle provider of the EAA for 2013. John Deere’s green and yellow color scheme, the leaping deer symbol and JOHN DEERE are trademarks of Deere & Company. 13-56302

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AIRVENTURE TODAY

Bearhawk develops two new kits Bearhawk Aircraft has announced the development of two new kit planes. Bob Barrows, designer of the fourplace Bearhawk and two-seat tandem Patrol, has designed a Bearhawk LSA kit, following many requests from consumers. Delivery on the quick-build kits has already begun, and the first

AEROSHELL PILOTS

group of kits has already all been sold. The second kit is a Patrol SP (seaplane) that was designed following customer requests to have two doors on their Patrols, as well as factory-built rear float attach fittings. Visit Bearhawk Aircraft at Booth 630, or call 877-528-4776 or e-mail info@bearhawkaircraft.com. PHOTO BY PHIL HIGH

TELL US WHAT YOU THINK OF THE AEROSHELL BRAND We’re looking for pilots who currently use AeroShell products. Come by booth C 3072 between 12:00 and 14:00 on July 29–31 to let us know what you think of the AeroShell brand. We look forward to receiving your feedback.

Shell Aviation

Av_Today_4.75x5.25.indd 1

12/07/2013 09:38

Concorde Battery discontinues CB battery line A decline in flooded battery demand, and an associated rise in its manufacturing costs, has led to the cancellation of Concorde Battery’s CB product line, the company announced today. Concorde’s sealed lead acid battery technology provides more efficiency, more power, and more convenience than traditional flooded battery technology, and customers in droves shifted to the sealed RG(r) series battery over the CB flooded battery. So well-received is Concorde’s RG(r) sealed lead acid batteries that in 2012 Aviation Consumer awarded the design its “Gear of the Year” award for best aircraft battery. Still, out of respect to loyal flooded battery customers, Concorde continued

to manufacture CB batteries for years despite the conflicting decreased demand against the increased costs. After serious and lengthy consideration, Concorde decided it was in its customers’ best interests to discontinue the CB flooded battery line. Concorde designs and manufactures over 90 models of original equipment and direct replacement batteries for fixed-wing and rotary aircraft. The company also has an excellent reputation for designing applicationspecific solutions. Concorde batteries are installed as original equipment by the majority of aircraft manufacturers and adopted by military aircraft operators worldwide. See Concorde in exhibits 2053, 2054.


TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

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AIRVENTURE TODAY

NEW EDITION 2013/2014 Eng Lish EDition £5.99

World directory of

l ight aviation 2013-

2014

World Directory of Light Aviation 2013-2014 Over1000 aircrafts...

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World Directory of Light Aviation Available at all EAA-Sales Outlets during AirVenture 2013 for only $ 16.50. (ask for EAA member discount) Or order online: - www.shopeaa.org - www.widola.com also in selected bookstores. Available in English, and also in German, French and Chinese language editions.

Get around Oshkosh with GO Transit GO Transit buses run Sunday through Sunday, providing an inexpensive way to get around the city. Single one-way rides are available for $1.50 each, or get a weeklong pass for just $20. They are available at the Gruenhagen Conference Center (UW Oshkosh dorms area). The route starts at Gruenhagen to the EAA main gate and back, with stops at Wittman Regional Airport and the Oshkosh Transit Center during the return trip. The schedule is as follows: • Monday-Thursday, July 29-August 1: 6:30 a.m.-10 p.m. • Friday, August 2: 6:30 a.m.-11 p.m. • Saturday, August 3: 6:30 a.m.- 11:30 p.m. • Sunday, August 4: 6 a.m.-3 p.m. At least two buses will run each hour, with more frequency during peak travel times. Stops at Wittman

Regional Airport will not be made after 3:40 p.m., but there is still an EAA shuttle service for anyone needing to get to the terminal building after that time. Inclement weather may cause delays, and when traffic is reversed at 5 p.m. the buses may use the campground route to access the main gate if traffic gets too bad. Questions? Call 920-232-5340 or v i s it t h e G O Tr a n s it w e b s it e , www.RideGoTransit.com.

RUNWAY

EAA AIRVENTURE OSHKOSH

A Charity R Oshko un/Walk p sh Ar ea Un roceeds benefit ited W ay

Your next career could be right here in Oshkosh! EAA has the following positions available: Director of Information Technology Director of Strategic Commercial Relationships Manager of Membership Marketing Volunteer Coordinator Web Developer/Project Manager Learn more by logging on to www.EAA.org/careers Or, see us at the AirVenture Job Fair on Wednesday, July 31, 12 - 3 p.m. in College Park. Ask us about future internship opportunities! College Park is presented by American Airlines.

Saturday, August 3, 2013 EAA AirVenture Grounds, 7 a.m.

Run or walk the NEW unique aircraft-lined route around EAA’s AirVenture grounds. Participants will receive Saturday admission to EAA AirVenture, which includes concerts, Rockwell Collins Night Air Show, and fireworks capped off by the “Wall of Fire”, special event t-shirt and complimentary post-race snacks and water.

Visit AirVenture.org/run or call 920-426-5912 to register. Supported by:


TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

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In defense of ICON and the FAA By J. Mac McClellan

S

ome people are upset that the FAA granted the ICON aircraft petition to increase the maximum takeoff weight of the A5 LSA amphib above the 1,420-pound certification limit. But the FAA has followed well-settled precedent in granting the exemption to ICON. The FAA found that the spin-resistant flying qualities of the A5 deliver the equivalent safety level of the lighter maximum weight in the standard LSA rules. That is

the very logical rules flexibility that most of us want to see from the FAA. And this type of significant certification rule adjustment is nothing new. One of the biggest previous examples of such a rules change came back in the 1980s when the FAA created the commuter category of the FAR Part 23 light airplane rules. Several turboprop regional airliners were limited in payload and usefulness by the maximum takeoff weight of 12,500

pounds for Part 23 airplanes. Clearly airplanes like the Beech 99 and Merlin Metro could carry more weight. But the 12,500 rule forced any heavier airplane into the much more restrictive FAR 25 transport category that includes huge jets such as the Boeing 747. The FAA decided that if an airplane could demonstrate safe engine-out performance, has good redundancy of systems, and the pilot has a type rating, it could move into a new commuter category and fly at weights greater than 12,500 pounds. The commuter category worked. Several turboprop regional airliners qualified, but more importantly, newly designed light business jets could also qualify. Several models of the Cessna CJ family, Embraer Phenom 300, and others are certified under those commuter rules. So ICON is the first airplane to get relief from the LSA weight cap. And to companies that have struggled to keep their LSA under the weight limits that may seem unfair. But the reality is that somebody had to go first, and then others can point to that precedent and seek their own exemptions from the rules. The FAA actually operates much like the courts in the United States. There are

laws, of course, but those laws must be interpreted and that’s what courts do. And judges look back at previous decisions to find precedent for a case before them. The FAA considered the significant safety value of an airplane that won’t spin even though full pro-spin controls are applied and held. It then looked back and found many precedents where imposing different safety standards achieved the objective of the rule in the book, but in a different way. Just as the added requirements of the commuter category more than made up for the slight risk of a heavier airplane. ICON spent the time and lots of money to develop and demonstrate its spinresistant A5 without any assurance the FAA would grant the necessary weight increase exemption to account for the larger and heavier wing needed. It was a gamble. And now it has paid off. Instead of gaining an unfair advantage over other LSA makers, ICON has actually paid the initial cost for any who want to follow. For other LSA designers and builders the route forward is clear. You, Mr. FAA, let ICON do it, and if I meet the same standard, you must allow me to weigh more, too. That’s how progress is made.

AirVenture Week of Celebration July 28, 2013 K i c k- O ff P arty Doors Open - 2:30pm Kitty Hawk Observation Deck Featuring The Mason Street Band

July 31, 2013 L i v e M u si c Doors Open - 5:00pm Lindbergh Lounge Featuring Randi Fay

August 3, 2013 N i gh t A i r- S h ow Pa r t y Doors Open - 5:00pm Kitty Hawk Observation Deck Admission: $10.00/Per Person $50.00/Reserve Tables (Seats 8) Featuring The Big Scuba Band

1355 West 20th Avenue • Oshkosh, WI 54902 Call (920) 966-1300 for more information • www.oshkosh.hgi.com


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AIRVENTURE TODAY www.eagle-creek.com 800.487.3331

LEADING THE GARMIN

G1000 REVOLUTION FOR THE TWIN COMMANDER FLEET

CHECK OUT THE AMAZING G1000 COMMANDER AIRVENTURE BOOTH #382 ECAS 2012 Platinum Twin Commander Service Center

Updates from Glasair By Gary Flick

G

lasair announced the progress of a diesel Sportsman and congratulated a group of high school builders on Monday. Glasair continues to move forward with partner DeltaHawk diesel engines as they work to produce a diesel Sportsman as a build option for the Two Weeks to Taxi program. Dennis Webb, president/CEO of the Wisconsin-based DeltaHawk, spoke confidently about the progression and hopes, along with Glasair, to have the diesel model in the program by late next year. Nigel Mott, Glasair president, was very excited to introduce the group of students who successfully completed a Sportsman in Glasair’s Two Weeks to Taxi program. The students were sponsored in part by General Aviation Manufacturers Association’s (GAMA) Build A Plane program, and everyone involved consid-

ered the program a great success. “We at Glasair are very proud to get young people involved in aviation,” Mott said. “And we are honored to be working with GAMA and their Build A Plane program.” GAMA President Pete Bunce returned praise to Glasair saying, “We knew the Glasair staff were great plane builders, but we had no idea how great they were at mentoring and teaching these young people.” The students came from two different schools, one in Michigan and one in Minnesota, and were given the opportunity after winning GAMA’s planedesign competition. “These kids are rock stars this week,” Bunce said. “And I’m proud of each and every one of them.” Visit Glasair in exhibits 253-254, right off Celebration Way, and Delta Hawk at Exhibit 257.

High school students’ work on a Sportsman wing completed the construction of two Sportsman aircraft in Glasair’s Two Weeks to Taxi program.


TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

Aircraft Insurance

Can I Get Aircraft Insurance? Forum by: Bob Mackey Monday (7/29), 10:00 - 11:15 A.M. Forum Pavilion 11 BRP/Rotax Aircraft Insurance Mumbo-Jumbo Forum by: Bob Mackey Wednesday (7/31), 10:00 - 11:15 A.M. Forum Pavilion 11 BRP/Rotax

Better coverage. Better rates.

Save Money on Airplane Insurance Forum by: Bob Mackey Thursday (8/1), 11:30 A.M. - 12:45 P.M. Forum Pavilion 11 BRP/Rotax Fill The GAP: AD&D Insurance Forum by: Bob Mackey Friday (8/2), 10:00 - 11:15 A.M. Forum Pavilion 11 BRP/Rotax

Visit the NEW EAA Insurance tent (Booth #310) and get a FREE HAT with your quote today. Visit EAALowerRates.com or call us toll-free at 866-647-4322. Standard Category | Vintage | Aerobatics | LSA | Homebuilts | Warbirds | Seaplanes | Powered Parachutes & Trikes | Gliders | Helicopters | Personal Insurance

Administered by Falcon Insurance Agency, Inc.

Š 2013 Experimental Aircraft Assoc., Inc.

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AIRVENTURE TODAY

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Mooney Aviation Company is celebrating 60 years of manufacturing aircraft for the general aviation community. “This is a historic time for Mooney, and being present at AirVenture is an opportunity to celebrate with our loyal Mooney owners,” said CFO Barry Hodkin. “There are over 7,000 airplanes in service…so customer support is our top priority.” Mooney is not currently manufacturing aircraft, but says there is reason for optimism as the company weighs investment opportunities. As part of the celebration, Mooney is giving away commemorative T-Shirts to

Mooney owners at their exhibit booths, 174 and 175. You must bring a copy of Mooney registration. In addition to the shirts, Mooney is happy to welcome Jack Wiegand to their booth as well. Wiegand recently became the youngest person to fly solo around the world, and he did so in a Mooney Ovation 2 GX. Lee White, racing pilot and head of Toyota Racing, will also be part of the celebration, as he broke world records in 2000 in a Mooney 231. An original 1955 M20 will also be on display during the week.

A Mooney Ovation 2 GX.

Zodiac OBOGS on display at Oshkosh The Oxygen Division of Zodiac Aerospace is displaying its new on-board oxygen generating system (OBOGS), in a Cessna Turbo 206 at Zodiac’s booths, 127-128, outside of Hangar D. The OBOGS, which was featured in e-Hotline, utilizes the company’s INFIN-

IOX system to supply a continuous flow of oxygen to four people, up to an elevation of 25,000 feet. The system can be used in existing glass cockpit avionics, or as a standalone retrofit in an integrated display panel.

Correction: Departure Briefings Monday’s story about the new Departure Briefing process noted restrictions to taxiing before 7 a.m. That may not be true for

all aircraft parking areas. In all cases pilots must follow the times and procedures noted in the NOTAM.


TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

WELDING or CUTTING? LEARN FROM OUR EXPERTS

» » »

DAILY WELDING WORKSHOPS ON A FUSELAGE PROVIDED BY TITAN AIRCRAFT SPECIAL SHOW PRICING WELDING AND CUTTING DEMOS

Visit us at Booth #468-470 AirVenture 2013 Oshkosh, Wisconsin

AR13-65 ©The Lincoln Electric Co. All Rights Reserved. www.lincolnelectric.com

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AIRVENTURE TODAY

I like to stay ahead of my aircraft. So if I’m 40 miles out with weather rolling in, I’m listening to what’s happening in front of me. AWOS. Pilot chatter. A quick check with flight service. Sometimes, there’s a lot to decipher. But I need to hear it clearly. Because when I do, I feel confident. Prepared. In the moment. And that allows me to just

focus on what matters,

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Better sound can make all the difference, especially where you go. Which is why, with 30% greater noise reduction than conventional noise reducing aviation headsets, the A20 headset lets you hear more of what you need to hear. While proprietary cushions and minimal clamping force let you fly comfortably for hours. Meets or exceeds TSO standards. Made in U.S.A.

Learn more at Bose.com/A20_11

©2013 Bose Corporation. Delivery is subject to product availability. Offers not to be combined with other offers or applied to previous purchases, and subject to change without notice. Free headset and flight bag offers valid 7/29/13 – 8/9/13. To qualify for 10% off, additional headsets must be part of the initial purchase. If A20 headset is returned, the flight bag must be returned for a full refund. Purchases must be made from a Bose authorized dealer to qualify for offers. Offer valid in the U.S. and Canada only, and a U.S. or Canada shipping address is required. CC012206


EAA AirVenture Today, Tuesday, July 30, 2013