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HONORING OUR VETERANS

SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2019 EAA.ORG/AIRVENTURE

PAGE 6

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF EAA AIRVENTURE OSHKOSH

WARBIRDS

PHOTO BY SCOTT SLOCUM

Wooden Wonder wows in Warbirds BY FREDERICK A. JOHNSEN

AIRVENTURE TODAY STAFF

IT GAINED THE nickname Wooden Wonder

for its extensive use of formed plywood, and its phenomenal speed. Some variants were unarmed — they could outrun their adversaries. The d e Hav i l l a n d Mosquito earned a respected place in the history of World War II aviation. But the wood that made it light and fast was never meant for the ages. Mosquitoes slipped out of military service after the war as jets took over for speed and altitude. A few found work in the civilian world, but their numbers dwindled.

MOLDED MOSQUITO

MARVEL

MOSQUITO / PAGE 3

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SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2019

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MOSQUITO / PAGE 1 The reborn de Havilland Mosquito at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2019 is the result of a massive restoration in New Zealand by Avspecs for American warbird collector Rod Lewis. Lewis continues to grow his group of rare machines in Texas, taking them out for public air shows like AirVenture. Some of the yellow birch used in the Mosquitoes’ wartime plywood sandwich came from mills in Wisconsin, shipped to England to meet the critical need. The Wooden Wonder had 454 square feet of wing area; for comparison, the P-38 Lightning had only 327.5 square feet. The Mosquito stretched a tape measure several feet more in length and wingspan than did the American P-38 fighter, but in at least some models, the Mosquito’s empty weight was only 1,500 pounds more than the P-38. And as a fast bomber, the Mosquito edged out the P-38L by one mile an hour, topping out at 415 mph at 28,000 feet. The Mosquito was no slouch in the speed department. The world of warbirds sees aircraft move in and out of flying status. The number of flyable Mosquitoes globally is about three or four, with a few other projects in the works. A special Warbirds in Review session on Friday afternoon featured Rod Lewis’ immaculate example.

Warren Denholm of Avspecs told the crowd that de Havilland Aircraft had already developed a plywood sandwich process for construction when the British government issued a specification for a warplane that de Havilland chose to answer. The Mosquito was not immediately embraced; other manufacturers were touting the virtues of aluminum structure, Denholm said. Using wood “was like turning back the hands of the clock,” he added. The process for pressing the plywood in huge fuselage molds is generally a dry layup process, according to Denholm. Other wooden subassemblies could be made by British cabinet makers in small shops. This decentralized production in war-torn England and employed skilled craftspeople. This Mosquito entered service with the Royal Air Force in March 1945. It went first to an operational training unit. By 1948 it was one of about 80 Mosquitoes purchased from England by New Zealand. Some records indicate only about 20 of the Royal New Zealand Air Force Mosquitoes were flown. This aircraft may have been part of the 60 held in storage. Denholm told the audience that a California company bought about six of the New Zealand Mosquitoes for use in survey work in the early 1950s. But the purchase ran afoul of import issues after only one — this one — had been ferried to the U.S. The Mosquito eventually was impounded and parked outdoors at the old Whiteman airport in the greater Los Angeles area. Vandals and the weather took their toll for the next two decades. By 1971, a new owner bought the remains of the Mosquito and stored most of the carcass inside, Denholm said. In 2014, negotiations with the owner resulted in the sale of the Mosquito so Avspecs could begin its resurrection. Surprisingly, the original Merlin engines were still with the aircraft, and these were delegated to the Vintage V-12s company for rebuilding in Tehachapi, California. The rest of the airframe, such as it was, made its way to New Zealand in a shipping conPHOTOS BY FREDERICK A. JOHNSEN tainer. This is the third Mosquito Rivetless streamlined wooden fuselage imparted great speed to the Mosquito. project undertaken by Avspecs since

THE OFFICIAL DAILY NEWSPAPER OF EAA AIRVENTURE OSHKOSH VOL. 20, NO. 8

The Mosquito’s Merlin engines have only five exhaust stacks per side, with two cylinders sharing a stack. British rocket rails carry dummy air-to-ground weapons on this restoration.

The business end of this attack variant of the Mosquito featured four machine guns in the upper nose and four 20mm cannons below.

2005. Denholm told the audience the first one required seven years to complete; the second one was done in five years. And this example rolled out of the shop in four years, the result of increased understanding and those vital fuselage molds made for the first airplane. The Wooden Wonder (other nicknames include Timber Terror and Loping Lumberyard) conceals a lot of copper inside. Denholm explained, “It’s full of literally miles of copper bonding strip” to bond metal parts to each other for electrical safety. The de Havilland Mosquito earned a place in World War II history for its speed, versatility, and smooth wooden construction. The Mosquito at AirVenture 2019 demonstrates those traits.

PUBLISHER: Jack J. Pelton

SENIOR COPY EDITOR: Colleen Walsh

AirVenture Today is published during EAA AirVenture

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Oshkosh 2019, July 21-28, 2019. It is distributed free on the

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AIRVENTURE TODAY

OSHKOSH MOMENTS

Building Airplanes and Character Aviation Nation brings students to AirVenture BY BARBARA A. SCHMITZ

AIRVENTURE TODAY STAFF

SINCE 2011, Bob Kelly has brought nearly

150 high school students to EAA AirVenture Oshkosh as part of teen airplane-building projects. But as much as those groups are helping students build airplanes, their volunteers are helping to build students’ character. Bob started and ran Eagle’s Nest from 2010 to 2014 before founding Aviation Nation in 2015. Both organizations allow high school students to build and fly airplanes. Aviation Nation is currently located in five states — Indiana, Iowa, Nebraska, Tennessee, and Texas — but hopes to expand. As of Friday, 24 people had signed up for information on how to start programs in their communities at the Aviation Nation booth in Exhibit Hangar B, presented by Collins Aerospace. Aviation Nation students build RV-12s and have seven planes finished or in progress. Some of the finished planes will be sold to provide funding for more build projects, while others may be used for students’ flight training, said Bob, who previously taught college and built his own plane. Aviation Nation likes to do build projects with schools because of their permanence and their visibility in communities, he said. But it also will partner with churches and other groups. “Every person is a volunteer from me on down,” Bob said, estimating that about 30 volunteers are involved in projects. “But you cannot believe how well paid I am.” That payment comes with each student success. “To see students grow and gain confidence is rewarding,” he said.

PHOTO BY BARBARA A. SCHMITZ

Students and mentors from Aviation Nation brought their student-built RV-12 to EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2019. The group hopes to expand its presence beyond five states in 2020.

“TO SEE STUDENTS GROW AND GAIN CONFIDENCE IS REWARDING. AND TO SEE THEIR FACES WHEN THEIR AIRPLANE FLIES IS EXCITING.” BOB KELLY

“And to see their faces when their airplane flies is exciting.” Although the build projects are longterm commitments, it doesn’t take much time for the students to realize the seriousness of what they are doing.

“The responsibility really kicks in about three weeks into the build,” Bob said. “They realize that they’re not only going to build this, but that at some point, they’re going to put their butt in it, too.”

Eighteen Aviation Nation youths are attending the 2019 Oshkosh convention, and students are expected to attend daily at least one workshop or forum, or work in the Aviation Nation booth, as well as other sessions or programs. Madison Malcomb, 18, of North Vernon, Indiana, just earned her private pilot certificate a month ago and was able to fly Aviation Nation’s first completed RV-12 into Oshkosh this week.

AVIATION NATION / PAGE 44


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AIRVENTURE TODAY

OSHKOSH MOMENTS

A DESERVING SALUTE The warbirds around the grounds aren’t alone in having served their country. While airplanes usually take center stage at AirVenture, EAA makes it a priority to take a moment to recognize all of the veterans in attendance each year on Friday through the Salute to Veterans parade and group photo in the afternoon. Additionally, Old Glory Honor Flight held its sixth annual Yellow Ribbon Honor Flight that day, taking more than 100 Vietnam-era war veterans to Washington, D.C., to tour historic sites and then give them the welcome they deserve upon returning Friday evening. These powerful events are a poignant salute to all who fight for freedom. PHOTOS BY LAURIE GOOSSENS, MARIANO ROSALES, ANDREW ZABACK


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AIRVENTURE TODAY PHOTO BY CRYSTAL PEREZ

OSHKOSH MOMENTS

FROM THE MOON TO OSHKOSH Collins, Engle riff on Apollo experiences BY BARBARA A. SCHMITZ

AIRVENTURE TODAY STAFF

EVEN THOUGH MAN had walked on the moon and U.S. astro-

nauts had returned home safely, the success of Apollo 11 rested on many small things: dozens of white mice. Michael Collins, command module pilot for Apollo 11, said the crew was quarantined with the mice for 14 days upon their return. “Some of our scientists thought Neal [Armstrong] and Buzz [Aldrin] were exposed on the lunar surface to deadly pathogens that would kill all mankind,” he said. “The chances were extremely small, but the consequences, if true, would have been impossibly large.” So they locked up the three with 30-40 white mice and watched; Collins said the final outlook of their flight depended on what happened. “It would be a wonderful success or terrible tragedy, depending on the health of those mice.” As the world now knows, the mission was a success. EAA celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission at its 2019 fly-in convention when Collins and Joe Engle, the X-15 test pilot turned astronaut, spoke Friday in Theater in the Woods.

Collins said he was most concerned about the rendezvous and docking maneuvers on Apollo 11, despite exhaustive training. Meanwhile, Engle was at Edwards and had applied to the astronaut program. He recalled being summoned to the general’s office and being told to sit down. The general said he wasn’t going to approve his application, and then tore it up. “I didn’t know why at the time,” Engel said. “I just thought I didn’t qualify.” He later learned he would be flying the X-15 instead, and in 1966, he finally joined the Apollo program. Collins recalled the rigor of the medical and psychological testing astronauts went through. One psychiatric test included looking at ink blots and telling what they saw. One page was completely blank. “I said I saw 11 polar bears fornicating in a snowbank,” Collins said. “I thought that was mildly amusing, but I could see my interrogator scowl and I flunked.” But he was a quick learner. The next year when asked, he said he saw his parents on that blank page. “And low and behold, I passed.” Collins said there was a lot of pressure on the Apollo 11 program to beat the Russians to the moon. But thanks to NASA leaders, the Apollo missions advanced quickly. “George Low was not one of the most senior guys on the planning staff, yet he convinced NASA administrators to send Apollo 8 all the way to the moon,” Collins said. “It was a very gutsy decision, but it turned out to be up a very good one. It really sped up the process.”

As they got closer to reaching their goal, Collins was sometimes surprised that their achievements seemed matter of fact. Take Apollo 8, for instance. He was capsule communicator, or capcom, the astronaut in mission control who spoke directly to the crew during launch. “We were about to have people leave Earth’s orbit, to go into hypervelocity, for the first time in history,” he said. “I thought surely the president would be there on my right side … the pope would send a message and Frank Sinatra would dedicate a song to this. “But instead, [Commander] Frank Borman and I had a verbose conversation, and with all my dramatic ability, I said, ‘Apollo 8, you are go for TLI.’ Frank said, ‘Roger, Houston.’ And that was it.” Collins said Apollo 8 was an important mission, and in some ways, even more important than Apollo 11. “Apollo 8 was about leaving, and Apollo 11 was about returning. Which is more important? It’s not for me to say … but both are pretty good.” Current plans to go to Mars include a gateway on the moon, but Collins said he thinks we need to go directly to Mars. “When John F. Kennedy gave us our instructions to go to the moon, it was a masterpiece of simplicity: Get a man on the moon by the end of the decade,” he said. “That was of immeasurable help to us and galvanized the whole country. On a smaller scale, it gave us a wonderful argument to get people to do what we wanted on a schedule. I think that galvanization of effort would be immensely helpful on a mission to Mars.”


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AIRVENTURE TODAY

2019 AIRVENTURE AIRCRAFT AWARDS ANNOUNCED HUNDREDS OF GORGEOUS, striking airplanes arrive at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh

each and every year in hopes of winning a Lindy Award. Few aircraft, in comparison to the field, come away with any sort of award. Fewer still come away with a Lindy. Awards are given out across six categories: Homebuilts, Warbirds, Vintage, Ultralights, Seaplanes, and Rotorcraft. Entrants can only be considered for one

category in a given year, and are not eligible for the same or any lower-tier awards if they have won in the past. Looks are considered in award judging, but the quality of craftsmanship inherent in the aircraft is a crucial factor as well. Careful construction and/or restoration, as well as tireless maintenance, is essential in winning a Lindy. With all of that said, congratulations to all of the 2019 award winners!

HOMEBUILTS

PHOTO BY JACK FLEETWOOD

KIT OUTSTANDING WORKMANSHIP - PLAQUES

Paul Dye Dayton, Nevada 2019 SubSonex, N958PD

Bill Anton Satanta, Kansas 2018 Bearhawk, N47NL

James Folsom Longwood, Florida 2018 Van’s RV-7, N438DD

KIT CHAMPION - BRONZE LINDY

Kevin Johnson Hubbardston, Massachusetts 2016 Van’s RV-7, N45GJ Richard Thompson Berryville, Virginia 2018 Van’s RV-14, N327RT Donald Eisele West Chester, Pennsylvania 2018 Van’s RV-14, N1477M Jerry Sheppard El Paso, Texas 2018 PA-18-Titan 370, N242N Bernie Hartnell Grand Junction, Colorado 2018 Van’s RV-14A, N114AB Kurt Larson Solon Springs, Wisconsin 2019 RANS S-20 Raven, N826KK

David McKnight Mooresville, North Carolina 2016 Lancair ES, N881DM Alan Archer Houston, Texas 2018 Van’s RV-10, N309WW Douglas Taylor Fairfield, California 2017 Van’s RV-8, N610TW Jared Shipman Bismarck, Missouri 2005 Van’s RV-8, N148X Bill Kervaski Trussville, Alabama 2018 Van’s RV-14A, N196

N64LT

Robert Anderson Stillwater, Oklahoma 2015 Van’s RV-8, N184GC

James Bowie Greenwood, Mississippi 2005 Midget Mustang 1B, N30VF

James Carey Naperville, Illinois 2016 Van’s RV-10, N415JS

RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION KITBUILT - SILVER LINDY

PLANS CHAMPION - BRONZE LINDY

David Hunstad Alden, Michigan 2019 CubCrafters EX, N986KD

A. Hutson Griffin, Georgia 2018 Hatz CB-1, N89AC

Stephen Walsh Boca Raton, Florida 2019 Kitfox S-7 Super Sport, N344V

Roger Baalman Owasso, Oklahoma 2017 KR-2S, N738EM

Tobias Burch San Diego, California 2019 Cub Trekking CCK-1865, N745TB

Thomas Meyer Double Oak, Texas 2018 Meyers Special Big Toot, N64LT

PLANS OUTSTANDING WORKMANSHIP - PLAQUES

Keith Welsh Marshall, Illinois 1989 Quickie, N494K

John Janovetz Colleyville, Texas 2017 Team Rocket F1 Evo, N265AJ RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION PLANSBUILT SILVER LINDY

Georges Valtz Warwick, Rhode Island 2019 Pitts Model 12, N327DZ PAUL POBEREZNY FOUNDER’S AWARD FOR BEST CLASSIC HOMEBUILT

Steven Miller Naperville, Illinois 1969 Bücker, N716L


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AIRVENTURE TODAY

2019 AIRVENTURE AIRCRAFT AWARDS STAN DZIK MEMORIAL AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING DESIGN CONTRIBUTION

SILVER AGE (1928-1936) OUTSTANDING CLOSEDCOCKPIT MONOPLANE

WORLD WAR II ERA (1942-1945) CHAMPION BRONZE LINDY

CLASSIC (SEPTEMBER 1945-1955)

Allen Floyd Erie, Colorado 2006 Long-EZ, N82EZ

Harry Ballance Atlanta, Georgia 1934 Stinson SR-5, NC14572

Granger Haugh Scottsdale, Arizona 1944 Beech D17S, N582

OUTSTANDING CESSNA 170 - SMALL PLAQUE

GRAND CHAMPION KITBUILT - GOLD LINDY

SILVER AGE (1928-1936) RUNNER-UP

John Garred Whiting, Iowa 2016 Pitts 12, N171JG

Michael Maniatis Milton, New York 1928 de Havilland Gipsy Moth, NC431

BRONZE AGE (1937-1941) CHAMPION BRONZE LINDY

GRAND CHAMPION PLANSBUILT - GOLD LINDY

WORLD WAR II MILITARY TRAINER/LIAISON AIRCRAFT CHAMPION - BRONZE LINDY

SILVER AGE (1928-1936) CHAMPION - BRONZE LINDY

John Parish Tullahoma, Tennessee 1941 Boeing A75N1, N44JP

David Lunsford Bayfield, Colorado 1936 Stinson SR-8B, N81E

TRANSPORT CATEGORY CHAMPION - BRONZE LINDY

ANTIQUE RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION SILVER LINDY

OUTSTANDING STINSON - SMALL PLAQUE

James Savage Gibsonia, Pennsylvania 1939 Spartan 7W, NC17634

Dennis Sparks Poulsbo, Washington 1948 Stinson 108-3, N616C

CUSTOMIZED AIRCRAFT CHAMPION BRONZE LINDY

ANTIQUE GRAND CHAMPION - GOLD LINDY

OUTSTANDING SWIFT - SMALL PLAQUE

Christine Stoecklein Stanwood, Washington 1941 Waco UPF-7, NC32157

James Kreutzfeld Castle Rock, Colorado 1943 Howard DGA-15P, NC1785H

Jeffrey Smith Asheboro, North Carolina 1948 Temco GC-1B, N3849K

Allen Floyd Erie, Colorado 2006 Long-EZ, N82EZ

VINTAGE ANTIQUE (THROUGH AUGUST 1945) WORLD WAR II MILITARY TRAINER/LIAISON AIRCRAFT - OUTSTANDING

Robert Swint Geneseo, Illinois 1943 Boeing A75N1, N63806

Scott Glover Mount Pleasant, Texas 1936 Stinson A, N15165

WORLD WAR II MILITARY TRAINER/LIAISON AIRCRAFT - RUNNER-UP

Thomas Murray Poplar Grove, Illinois 1942 Ryan Aeronautical ST3KR, N48608

NC431

TRANSPORT CATEGORY - RUNNER-UP

H.S. Wright Seattle, Washington 1929 Travel Air S-6000-B, N9084 CUSTOMIZED AIRCRAFT - RUNNER-UP

Mark Holt Clear Lake, Iowa 1941 Waco UPF-7, N32049 BRONZE AGE (1937-1941) OUTSTANDING CLOSEDCOCKPIT MONOPLANE

Lonnie Autry Hollister, California 1940 Spartan Executive, NC17665 BRONZE AGE (1937-1941) RUNNER-UP

Buck Korol High River, Alberta, Canada 1938 Luscombe Model 4, N1337

PHOTO BY MARIANO ROSALES

Steve Givens Pendleton, Indiana 1941 Fleet 16B, N39622

Keith Eisberg Keytesville, Missouri 1952 Cessna 170B, N2455D OUTSTANDING ERCOUPE - SMALL PLAQUE

Derk Kingrey Brookville, Ohio 1946 Ercoupe 415C, N2853H OUTSTANDING NAVION - SMALL PLAQUE

Phil Cook Zeeland, Michigan 1948 Ryan Navion A, N4210K


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AIRVENTURE TODAY

2019 AIRVENTURE AIRCRAFT AWARDS OUTSTANDING TAYLORCRAFT - SMALL PLAQUE

CLASS II (86-150 HP) - BRONZE LINDY

Timothy Newell Beach City, Ohio 1946 Taylorcraft BC-12D, N43754

Brian Crull Noblesville, Indiana 1947 Piper PA-12, N4122M

OUTSTANDING LIMITED PRODUCTION SMALL PLAQUE

CLASS III (151-235 HP) - BRONZE LINDY

Ryan Newell Canton, Ohio 1953 Taylorcraft 15A, N23JW

William Addison Colorado Springs, Colorado 1955 Cessna 180, N9916

PRESERVATION - SMALL PLAQUE

CHAMPION CUSTOMIZED CLASSIC BRONZE LINDY

Michael Larson Erie, Colorado 1949 Cessna 195A, N9857A

Kyle Hook Petaluma, California 1946 Globe GC-1A, N90383

MOST UNIQUE CLASSIC - SMALL PLAQUE

RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION SILVER LINDY

Charles Ross Cross Plains, Texas 1954 Helio H-391B, N100HC

Mark Sell Woodbury, Pennsylvania 1946 Aeronca 7AC, N2388E

OUTSTANDING PIPER PA-24 COMANCHE OUTSTANDING IN TYPE John Gowins

New Philadelphia, Ohio 1961 Piper PA-24-250, N7321P

RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION - SILVER LINDY

Edward Maxwell Louisville, Kentucky 1967 Piper PA-28-140, N7369J GRAND CHAMPION - GOLD LINDY

OUTSTANDING PIPER PA-28/PA-32 CHEROKEE OUTSTANDING IN TYPE James Reagan

Hockessin, Delaware 1965 Piper PA-28-180, N8887J OUTSTANDING PIPER PA-30 TWIN COMANCHE OUTSTANDING IN TYPE

Ric Burnette Pompano, Florida 1967 Piper PA-30, N30XT PRESERVATION AWARD OUTSTANDING IN TYPE

Dennis Ozment Quincy, Illinois 1968 Cessna 150H, N23232

WARBIRDS PRESERVATION AWARD

Kevin Miller Addison, Texas Cessna O-1E/L-19 Bird Dog, N3946K Steve Buchelt & Jim Reed Crown Point, Indiana de Havilland DHC-1 Chipmunk, N26JH

GRAND CHAMPION - GOLD LINDY

Lee Hussey Martinsville, Virginia 1964 Piper PA-24-400, N8455P

Scott McFadden Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada 1946 Taylorcraft BC-12D, CFCLR

CLASS II SINGLE-ENGINE (161-230 HP) BRONZE LINDY

CONTEMPORARY (1956-1970)

John Breda Needham, Massachusetts 1968 Mooney M20F, N954N

OUTSTANDING BEECH SINGLE-ENGINE OUTSTANDING IN TYPE

CLASS III SINGLE-ENGINE (231-PLUS HP) BRONZE LINDY

David Nazem Carrollton, Texas 1966 Beech V35, N5724V

Barry Payne Taupo, New Zealand 1962 Comanche 250, ZKBAZ

OUTSTANDING BEECH MULTIENGINE OUTSTANDING IN TYPE

DEAN RICHARDSON MEMORIAL AWARD BRONZE LINDY

Bill Schutzller Applegate, Michigan 1961 Beech D50E, N1961

Dennis Ozment Quincy, Illinois 1955 Cessna 172, N5000A

OUTSTANDING CESSNA 180/182/185/210 OUTSTANDING IN TYPE

OUTSTANDING CUSTOMIZED BRONZE LINDY

Nicholas Howell Englewood, Colorado 1967 Cessna A185E, N3373L

Bruce Mayes Honolulu, Hawaii 1962 Meyers Industries Inc. 200B, N34393

CLASS I (0-85 HP) - BRONZE LINDY

OUTSTANDING CESSNA MULTIENGINE OUTSTANDING IN TYPE

RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION CUSTOMIZED SILVER LINDY

JUDGES’ CHOICE: L-BIRD

Robert Stegman St. Peters, Missouri 1946 Luscombe 8A, N45896

Arlen Stauffer New Smyrna Beach, Florida 1964 Cessna 310I, N4AS

Joseph Weaver Flower Mound, Texas 1957 Beech H35, N64JW

Blake Bosley Richmond, Texas Cessna O-1E Bird Dog, N60591

CUSTOM CLASS A (0-85 HP) - SMALL PLAQUE

Brent Hohman Fulton, South Dakota 1946 Taylorcraft BC-12D, N96841 CUSTOM CLASS B (86-150 HP) - SMALL PLAQUE

Gary Hess Dexter, Michigan 1955 Piper PA-22-150, N2748P CUSTOM CLASS C (151-235 HP) SMALL PLAQUE

Carl Geisert Chandler, Arizona 1953 Cessna 180, N1564C CUSTOM CLASS D (236-PLUS HP) SMALL PLAQUE

Alan Sickinger New Philadelphia, Ohio 1947 North American Navion A, N285TC BEST CUSTOMIZED RUNNER-UP LARGE PLAQUE

George Stanley Richland, Washington 1946 Globe GC-1B, N78104

Lou Feldvary Smith Mountain Lake, Virginia North American T-6D Texan, N757LF Barry Hammerback River Falls, Wisconsin Bell UH-1H Huey, N145D Mike Reirdon El Cajon, California Bell T-34A Mentor, N4982N Mark Howard Edmond, Oklahoma Fairchild PT-26A Cornell, N9279H JUDGES’ CHOICE: JET

Bill Culbersoal Mobile, Alabama Canadair CT-133 Silver Star (T-33), N133CN JUDGES’ CHOICE: HELICOPTER

Peter Q. Bales Janesville, Wisconsin Hughes OH-6A, N67PB


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16

AIRVENTURE TODAY

2019 AIRVENTURE AIRCRAFT AWARDS PHOTO BY SCOTT SLOCUM

Silver Wrench

Kenneth Schmitt Springfield, Oregon RETURNING BEST OF CLASS

Doc’s Friends Inc. Wichita, Kansas Boeing B-29 Superfortress, N69972 RETURNING GRAND CHAMPION

Keith & Kathy Brunquist Wasilla, Alaska Boeing YL-15 Scout, N4770C KEEP ’EM FLYING AWARD

Gerard Ricciotti Annapolis, Maryland Beechcraft T-34A Mentor, N256GR Silver Wrench

Blackwell Aviation Belle Vernon, Pennsylvania KEEP ’EM FLYING AWARD

Mark Dilullo Chino, California North American SNJ-2, N415NJ N887XP

Silver Wrench

Navion Custom Chino, California JUDGES’ CHOICE: PRIMARY TRAINER

Silver Wrench

Silver Wrench

Daniel Van Buskirk Bismarck, North Dakota Boeing VN2S-2 Stearman, N22FK

Dennis Hallman Mooresville, North Carolina

Robert Coon & James Chybicki Bolingbrook, Illinois

BEST C-47

BEST JET

Dynamic Aviation Bridgewater, Virginia Douglas C-47 Skytrain, N47E

Pacific Aero Ventures LLC Ontario, Oregon Douglas TA-4 Skyhawk, N518TA

Silver Wrench

Silver Wrench

Dynamic Aviation Bridgewater, Virginia

Mike McDougall - Fighting Classics Marana, Arizona

BEST P-51

BEST PRIMARY TRAINER

Carl Patrick Louisville, Colorado North American P-51D Mustang, N51ZW

Dan Garyfalakis Mono, Ontario, Canada de Havilland DHC-1 Chipmunk, C-FLBT

USAF 924th Air Refueling Squadron McConnell Air Force Base, Kansas Boeing KC-46A Pegasus, 76035

Silver Wrench

Silver Wrench

Midwest Aero Restorations Danville, Illinois

Dan Garyfalakis Mono, Ontario, Canada

BEST T-34

BEST TRANSPORT

BEST L-BIRD

James Blasingame Kalispell, Montana Beechcraft T-34A Mentor, N3789G

Robert Coon Warrenville, Illinois Fairchild UC-61K Forwarder, N24FM

Kenneth Schmitt Springfield, Oregon Piper L-4J Grasshopper, NC68925

JUDGES’ CHOICE: TRAINER

George Madok Evergreen, Colorado Boeing Stearman PT-17, N58219 JUDGES’ CHOICE: MUSTANG Rod Lewis

San Antonio, Texas North American TF-51D Mustang, NL50FS BEST FLYING GAS STATION

PHOENIX AWARD

Rod Lewis San Antonio, Texas de Havilland FB VI Mosquito, N474PZ Gold Wrench

Avspecs Ltd. Ardmore, Auckland, New Zealand PHOENIX AWARD

Tom Reilly Douglas, Georgia North American XP-82 Twin Mustang, N887XP Gold Wrench

Tom Reilly Douglas, Georgia RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION: POST-WORLD WAR II

Eddie Kurdziel Del Mar, California Fairey Firefly AS-6, N518WB Gold Wrench

Q.G. Aviation of America Fort Collins, Colorado


18

AIRVENTURE TODAY

2019 AIRVENTURE AIRCRAFT AWARDS RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION: WORLD WAR II

Collings Foundation Stow, Massachusetts Grumman F6F Hellcat, N41476 Gold Wrench

American Aero Services New Smyrna Beach, Florida N49RC

GRAND CHAMPION: POST-WORLD WAR II

Tom Reilly Douglas, Georgia North American XP-82 Twin Mustang, N887XP Gold Wrench

Tom Reilly Douglas, Georgia GRAND CHAMPION: WORLD WAR II

Rod Lewis San Antonio, Texas de Havilland FB VI Mosquito, N474PZ Gold Wrench

Avspecs Ltd. Ardmore, Auckland, New Zealand

CELEBRATING W O R L D ’ S

N6710

ROTORCRAFT HELICOPTER - BRONZE LINDY

HELICOPTER - GOLD LINDY

GYROPLANE - SILVER LINDY

James Hardy Valley View, Texas RotorWay A600T Talon, N660JH

Josh Svenningsen & Eli Svenningsen Menomonie, Wisconsin Safari 400, N6710

Mark Loertscher St. George, Utah AutoGyro Cavalon, N502TT

HELICOPTER - SILVER LINDY

GYROPLANE - BRONZE LINDY

GYROPLANE - GOLD LINDY

Jeff Krall Mitchell, South Dakota Safari 400, N770JK

Norman Surplus Larne, Antrim, Northern Ireland AutoGyro MT-03, G-YROX

Russell Croman Buda, Texas American Ranger, N49RC

G R E AT E S T

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SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2019

19

2019 AIRVENTURE AIRCRAFT AWARDS OUTSTANDING FABRIC (ALTERNATE) - PLAQUE

Mark Wrasse Green Bay, Wisconsin Maule, N49MW OUTSTANDING AMPHIBIAN - PLAQUE

Karl Neiders Seattle, Washington Beaver, N620N N142PF

N220M JUDGES’ CHOICE - PLAQUE

ULTRALIGHT & LSA LIGHT-SPORT AIRCRAFT HONORABLE MENTION

Mike Rickets Westerville, Ohio Kitfox Model IV

LIGHT-SPORT AIRCRAFT RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION

SEAPLANES

Alex Vickroy Ashland, Wisconsin Howard, N68189

OUTSTANDING METAL - PLAQUE

CHAMPION - BRONZE LINDY

Steve Henry Nampa, Idaho Just Highlander, N642SC

Ron Bekkers Oakville, Ontario, Canada Cessna 180, C-FGDQ

Samaritan Aviation Mesa, Arizona Cessna 206, N8447Q

LIGHT-SPORT AIRCRAFT - GRAND CHAMPION

OUTSTANDING FABRIC - PLAQUE

GRAND CHAMPION - GOLD LINDY

John Bobcik Charlotte, Michigan Kitfox S7 Super Sport, N142PF

Paul Wild Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada PA-18, C-FIXA

Mike Shannon Duluth, Minnesota S-7 RANS, N220M

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20

AIRVENTURE TODAY INNOVATION

NASA Tests Megawatt-Scale Electric Aircraft Power Systems With NEAT BY JIMI RUSSELL, NASA’S GLENN RESEARCH CENTER

NASA IS BUILDING and testing portions of

a concept aircraft’s power systems with an eye toward the future. NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland recently repurposed its Hypersonic Tunnel Facility to create the NASA Electric Aircraft Test bed (NEAT) to help make that future possible. NEAT is a world-class, reconfigurable facility that can accommodate power systems for large passenger airplanes like a Boeing 737, with megawatts of power. This test bed, which recently

conducted its first megawatt-scale test, takes advantage of the facility’s massive amounts of available power to carry out research and technology development of aircraft electrical powertrains. “We can lay out an entire electric powertrain, not including the engines, in NEAT and test all of the key electrical systems for an electrified aircraft,” said Dr. Rodger Dyson, principal investigator. NEAT also includes a vacuum chamber, which can currently simulate altitudes of up to 40,000 feet to test

PHOTO COURTESY OF NASA

Subscale testing of the 500 kilowatt, 600 volt partially distributed turboelectric powertrain in the NASA Electric Aircraft Test bed, NEAT.


SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2019

high-voltage power electronics, electric motors, and controls. Within the year, NASA plans to increase the altitude capability to more than 50,000 feet. “NEAT can make a difference in aviation because it has the power and size to investigate the full power capabilities of the next generation of hybrid and turboelectric aircraft,” Dyson said. Meanwhile, NASA prepares to explore electric-powered flight  with the X-57 Maxwell, featuring an all-electric propulsion system that includes 14 propellers along its wings. Twelve of those leading edge propellers will be high-lift motors, which create a distributed electric propuls i o n . T h e e l e c t r i c a l l y p owe re d high-lift motors, along with the two wingtip cruise motors, will be able to generate enough lift for the X-57 to take off at standard P2006T speeds even with the thinner, high aspect ratio experimental wing. Those very small yet highly efficient motors will produce a tremendous amount of power, but with increased power comes increased heat, and too much heat can cause issues for an aircraft. Given the X-57’s size, its narrow wings, and the limited space along the

leading edge, adding a cooling system to the X-57’s sleek design would add bulk and require design changes that could negatively impact the aircraft’s performance. To deal with the heat challenge, engineers at NASA Glenn devised an innovative, custom-designed “skin,” or nacelle, around the aircraft’s motor electronics to significantly cool them without changing the aircraft’s shape or design. This new cooling nacelle design was proven during a recent wind tunnel test where engineers subjected one of the X-57’s motors to various simulated flight conditions.  With testing now complete, the design information will be sent to engineers at  NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, where they continue to work toward the X-57’s first flight. Ultimately, NASA believes the X-57 will allow the agency to demonstrate a 500-percent increase in high-speed cruise efficiency, zero in-flight carbon emissions, and flight that is much quieter for the community on the ground. NASA’s X-57 project is featured at the NASA Pavilion in Aviation Gateway Park during AirVenture 2019.

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22

AIRVENTURE TODAY

WHAT ABOUT THESE OTHER AIRPLANES? A spotter’s guide to the EAA Aviation Museum aircraft around the grounds BY HAL BRYAN

AIRVENTURE TODAY STAFF

EVERY YEAR, MORE than 10,000 aircraft fly

to Wisconsin for EAA AirVenture Oshkosh. Of those, nearly 3,000 are showplanes — vintage aircraft, warbirds, homebuilts, aerobatic airplanes, etc. — that are displayed around the grounds. But some visitors may notice other airplanes parked here and there that didn’t fly in at all, because they’re part of the EAA Aviation Museum collection. Because our museum exhibits rotate, many of these aircraft are only viewable by the public during AirVenture, spending the rest of the year in long-term storage on the convention grounds. Here’s a guide to some of these airplanes that you’ll see as you wander the neighborhoods of AirVenture.

PHOTO BY CRYSTAL PEREZ

NORTH AMERICAN P-64 LOCATION: WARBIRDS

The only surviving example of its type, the P-64 was one of six intended for the Royal Thai Air Force but pressed into service as a USAAF trainer in 1941. It was used in a variety

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SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2019

23

PHOTO BY CRYSTAL PEREZ

NORTH AMERICAN/CANADAIR F-86 SABRE MK.VI LOCATION: WARBIRDS AREA

This Canadian built example of the venerable F-86 is one of two in our collection, the other one being the lighted “gate guard” that sits in front of EAA headquarters on Poberezny Road. This Sabre is painted to represent the one flown by famed Apollo flight director Gene Kranz during his deployment to Korea in the mid-1950s.

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24

AIRVENTURE TODAY

Today’s SCHEDULE TIME PRESENTATION 6:30 AM - 9:30 AM 7:00 AM - 3:00 PM 8:15 AM - 9:15 AM 8:30 AM - 9:00 AM 8:30 AM - 9:45 AM 8:30 AM - 9:45 AM 8:30 AM - 9:45 AM 8:30 AM - 9:45 AM 8:30 AM - 9:45 AM 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM 8:30 AM - 3:45 PM 9:00 AM - 9:30 AM 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM 9:15 AM - 10:00 AM 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM 9:30 AM - 10:00 AM 9:45 AM - 10:30 AM 10:00 AM - 10:30 AM 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM 10:00 AM - 11:15 AM 10:00 AM - 11:15 AM 10:00 AM - 11:15 AM 10:00 AM - 11:15 AM 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM 10:15 AM - 11:00 AM 10:15 AM - 11:15 AM 10:30 AM - 11:00 AM 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 11:00 AM - 11:30 AM 11:00 AM - 11:30 AM 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM 11:00 AM - 3:00 PM 11:15 AM - 12:00 PM 11:30 AM - 12:00 PM 11:30 AM - 12:45 PM 12:00 PM - 12:30 PM 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM 12:30 PM - 1:00 PM 1:00 PM - 1:30 PM 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM 1:00 PM - 4:30 PM 1:30 PM - 2:00 PM 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM 2:00 PM - 2:30 PM 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM 2:30 PM - 3:00 PM 3:00 PM - 3:30 PM 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

SPEAKER

12 Step Recovery Meeting Ford Tri-Motor Flights Fly-In to the Boonies/Walter Bob Allen Nondenominational Service Cam Martin Fabric Covering Poly Fiber Sheet Metal 101 EAA SportAir Workshops TIG Welding 101 Lincoln Electric Composite 101 Gas Welding 101 Wood Construction 101 George Donaldson Zenith Kit Assembly Demonstration Zenith Aircraft Company Drone Demo (M2Pro) and Q&A Andrew Baker EAA SOLIDWORKS U - Self-Guided SOLIDWORKS University B-17 Aluminum Overcast Flights Protestant Service Bush & Mountain Flying 3rd Edition CC Milne Pocock DJI Drone Demo, Various Aircraft Drone Media Group Drone Collisions: Myths and Reality Michael Bauer DJI Drone Demo, Various Aircraft Drone Media Group EAA SOLIDWORKS U - Self-Guided SOLIDWORKS University Memorial Wall Induction Ceremony Cam Martin Aircraft Parts & Machining Services Aircraft Specialties Services Aircraft Building Aeroplane Workshop Volunteers Heroes on Deck: WWII on Lake Michigan John Davies The World’s Longest Flight Dick Rutan Mosaic Glass Workshop EAA Flight Test Manual EAA Advocacy Team Touching the Face of God Ray Haas Catholic Mass Introduction to DJI Mavic 2 Pro Chris Knight Rotax Aircraft Engine Info Session Ronnie Smith Aerial Photography Basics Chris Knight Make and Take Essential Oils EAA SOLIDWORKS U - Self-Guided SOLIDWORKS University Bell Helicopter Rides General Aviation Safety Trends Loren Groff Aerial Video With Inspire 2 Chris Knight A City at War: Chicago John Davies Aerial Cinematography 101 Drone Media Group EAA SOLIDWORKS U - Self-Guided SOLIDWORKS University DJI Inspire 2 Demo Chris Knight Aerial Photography 101 Drone Media Group EAA SOLIDWORKS U - Self-Guided SOLIDWORKS University Ask Us Anything About EAA Advocacy EAA Advocacy Team Sunday Air Show How to Choose Your First Drone Drone Media Group Rotax Fuel-Injected Install Info Nino Tavio Search and Rescue With Drones Drone Media Group EAA SOLIDWORKS U - Self-Guided SOLIDWORKS University Thermal Imaging With Drones Drone Media Group Young Eagles Drawing Using Drones - Sell Real Estate Drone Media Group

LOCATION Nature Center - Tent 3 Tri-Motor & B-17 Ops EAA Wearhouse Fergus Chapel Forum Stage 10 Poly Fiber Sheet Metal Workshop Aircraft Spruce TIG Welding Workshop Lincoln Electric Composite Workshop Gas Welding Workshop Wood Workshop Aeroplane Workshop Stage 2 Drone Cage EAA Innovation Showcase Tri-Motor & B-17 Ops Theater in the Woods EAA Wearhouse Drone Cage Federal Pavilion Drone Cage EAA Innovation Showcase Memorial Wall Forum Stage 11 Aircraft Specialties Services Aeroplane Workshop Skyscape Theater SpaceShip One Voyager Activities Center EAA AirVenture Welcome Center EAA Wearhouse Theater in the Woods Drone Cage Rotax Aircraft Engines Booth Drone Cage Activities Center EAA Innovation Showcase Pioneer Airport Federal Pavilion Drone Cage Skyscape Theater Drone Cage EAA Innovation Showcase Drone Cage Drone Cage EAA Innovation Showcase EAA AirVenture Welcome Center Flightline Drone Cage Rotax Aircraft Engines Booth Drone Cage EAA Innovation Showcase Drone Cage Boeing Plaza Drone Cage

MAP F08 L07 J12 E08 K09 J10 K10 K10 K10 K10 K10 I10 I10 L07 K15 J12 I10 L09/10 I10 I10 D08 K09 K10 B08 B08 H14 J12 J12 K15 I10 J12 I10 H14 I10 D06 L09/10 I10 B08 I10 I10 I10 I10 I10 J12 L10 I10 J12 I10 I10 I10 K12 I10


EAA AirVenture Oshkosh

Thank you!

is only possible because of the passion and dedication EAA AirVenture Oshkosh is only possible because of the of nearly passion and dedication 6,000 volunteers. of nearly 6,000 volunteers.


26

AIRVENTURE TODAY OSHKOSH MOMENTS

Is it Over Already? A look back at another terrific week of Oshkosh BY JACK J. PELTON, EAA CEO AND CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD

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that I can talk about already. We had a rough start to the week, but when you look at the number of people camping and the people coming in through the gate, we believe we’re on track for a record year. Airport airplane counts are down from the prior year, which is really attributed to airplane arrivals that were lost Saturday, Sunday, and Monday, those who could not come in because we didn’t have available surface that was adequate. There was too much rain on the ground. We do know those airplanes instead went to Fond du Lac and Appleton — they’re packed. I’ve been getting comments from friends who have been texting me saying those airports have massive numbers of airplanes, so the people are here. That’s good news. I really, really appreciate the patience of the members in light of us having to park and camp people in places all over Oshkosh’s green acres, if you will. EAA members have been very, very supportive of what we had to do. The Wednesday night air show again continued to be a fan favorite. The Michael Collins event in Theater in the Woods Friday night, probably other than the general Apollo astronaut one in 2017, was one of the most crowded ever. It was packed. There were probably 6,000 people who showed up to hear Michael Collins. They were all the way down the vintage flightline. We always find a way to bring something here that’s of great interest and truly unique, as we say, only in Oshkosh. The number of show airplanes and the quality of them have been phenomenal. You go down to the Warbirds area and you’re seeing probably the largest lineup of P-51 Mustangs that we’ve had in many, many years. Same within the Vintage area. There are just some truly, truly unique and special airplanes.

It was a real pleasure to be able to greet Burt Rutan when he arrived. Burt is an icon to the homebuilding industry, and to have him show up and actually act apologetic for not being here the past couple of years was really a sign of how important EAA AirVenture Oshkosh is to the aviation industry, which is an honor we take very seriously. The Monday night concert was another success. The Fray brought in a big crowd and it was great to see such a young audience here. In fact, I’m noticing more and more young families on the grounds, which is really encouraging for the future. I think we’ve at least been accommodating enough to where families want to come out and enjoy what’s going on. Finally, 50 years of Oshkosh doesn’t happen without the volunteers, and it’s been another banner year for volunteerism. I can’t think of any other organization out there that pulls together as early as we do to pull off an event like this. And it’s been generations of families who do this. I think the experience is one that they enjoy, so they keep coming back, but this cannot happen without the volunteers. So again, hats off to the loyal volunteers that we have. Thank you all for another unforgettable year.


SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2019

27

OSHKOSH MOMENTS

LONGTIME AIRVENTURE VOLUNTEER INSPIRES YOUTHS WITH ‘KIDDIE HAWK’ BY SAM OLESON

AIRVENTURE TODAY STAFF

BILL MARCY, EAA 54844, is a World War II veteran, an aero-

nautical engineer, and was part of a team that originally worked to develop the space shuttle. But despite that resume, one of his proudest accomplishments over the past two decades is his volunteer service at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh — specifically what he does at KidVenture. An EAA volunteer for 42 years, Bill has focused much of his efforts since the 1990s on inspiring youth to pursue aviation, doing it with his “Kiddie Hawk” — a miniature cockpit simulator that he built himself. “At Young Eagles events, I noticed younger brothers and sisters that were too young to be Young Eagles. I had been thinking about some sort of backyard toy for my kids for upwards of 30 years, so I finally worked out an idea, built a model, and it worked,” Bill said. “What it ended up as was the Kiddie Hawk. The idea was to entertain the little brothers and sisters who were too small for Young Eagles. It’s a pretty neat simulator.”

PHOTO BY CRYSTAL PEREZ

Bill Marcy

Originally showcasing his simulator in the Vintage area, Bill moved it down to KidVenture when that came about in the late 1990s and has been there ever since, giving youths a taste of what an airplane cockpit is like.

“First I explain to them that this is a control stick that controls what the airplanes does. When they pull back on the stick, the nose goes up. The airplane moves in the direction that stick moves. I let them find that out for themselves. Mostly I just explain to them what they’re doing and what’s happening. One of the important things to me, I remember from my very first flight in an airplane, suddenly the world stopped moving and that still impresses me. I try to impress on the kids that when they’re up in the air and they look down, it looks like they’re hardly moving, just the way they are right now in the Kiddie Hawk.” While of course Bill comes back to Oshkosh year after year for the airplanes and the camaraderie, his main priority is inspiring kids to learn about aviation and getting that initial spark that could lead to them becoming pilots themselves. “I gave up flying my airplane here so I could bring the Kiddie Hawk. Yes, I could sit around shooting the breeze with old friends all day for six days, but that’s kind of a waste of time. It’s better to be passing on the enthusiasm.”

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AIRVENTURE TODAY

Stories of Oshkosh – Jordan Ashley

OSHKOSH MOMENTS

BY CHRISTINA BASKEN

AIRVENTURE TODAY STAFF

TO CELEBRATE 50 consecutive years of fly-

PHOTO COURTESY OF JORDAN ASHLEY

in conventions in Oshkosh, we’re featuring stories of Oshkosh told by attendees remembering their special moments at EAA’s long-standing home. Jordan Ashley, EAA 864471, took his first airplane ride when he was less than a year old and started attending EAA Oshkosh at just 5 years old. He has attended EAA’s convention for 24 consecutive years. Growing up, I knew that many families took yearly vacations to certain special places. My family attended EAA AirVenture Oshkosh, and there were just so many people in one place that I assumed

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the special vacation place for the whole world was Wittman Regional Airport. I was less than a year old when I took my first airplane ride, so you might say I grew up in an airplane. It is something that stuck with me through my early years, starting in 1995 when I made my first trek to AirVenture with my parents. This will be my 10th year camping (six with an airplane and four without), 11th year volunteering, and 24th consecutive year making the pilgrimage to Oshkosh. I often run into people who have been attending AirVenture since it began, and I enjoy reminiscing with them and hearing about the old days. I am just now hitting the point where I am the one who is remembering and sharing memories with first-timers such as visits by


Concorde, the SR-71, Sean D. Tucker flying the 1-800-Collect Pitts, and being allowed “behind the ropes” to look at SpaceShipOne up close. 2005 marked my 10th year going to AirVenture and my freshman year of high school. At that age, I was getting bored and looking for opportunities to become more involved in aviation. I spent my high school years learning from the old sages that frequented the daily gathering of the minds at the airport for their morning coffee and social hour. Working as often as I could and saving my pennies, I soloed the day before I flew into AirVenture in an Aeronca Chief in 2008 with Vintage in Review Chairman Ray Johnson. In 2009, I flew into AirVenture in a friend’s Mooney and camped for the first time. That was also the year I met Paul Poberezny as he stopped in for a visit at a campsite that I was in one evening. I only had a few minutes with Paul, but I remember him showing as much interest in me, as a young person, that I saw him take with figures who had much more to offer than a 19-year-old.

“FOR MY FAMILY AND ME, EAA AIRVENTURE HAS GONE FROM A JUST A FAMILY VACATION TO A PLACE WHERE WE HAVE FOUND BELONGING, FELLOWSHIP, AND FRIENDSHIP. IT IS A REUNION OF FRIENDS AND A TIME OF MAKING NEW FRIENDS EACH YEAR. WHEN THE WEEK IS OVER, I AM WORN OUT FROM VOLUNTEERING, BUT IT ALSO MEANS THAT I GET TO START THE COUNTDOWN TO NEXT YEAR ALL OVER AGAIN.” JORDAN ASHLEY

Also in 2009, I wandered down from the Vintage  area to the  International Aerobatic Club building where I met Jim and Jean Taylor. Jim was the IAC parking chairman and Jean was the IAC Pavilion chairman at the time. They welcomed me with open arms and invited me to volunteer with the IAC. In 2011, I was asked to co-chair parking for the IAC during AirVenture. In 2012, Jim turned over the chairmanship to me. Since that time, I have walked many, many miles around the small area that IAC oversees, parked several hundred aerobatic airplanes, and met many hundreds more IAC/ EAA members, pilots, and those just interested in seeing what we enjoy doing. It has been an extremely enjoyable and rewarding few years and a position that I am happy to say I will continue to serve in for the foreseeable future. Jim has since died, but he and Jean have had a great impact on my life and helped me see what has kept so many returning to AirVenture year after year all over again. These days, I don’t go to AirVenture for the air show, though I still enjoy it. I go to AirVenture for the people. In 2013, I married my wife, Rachel, and she gracefully tolerated my continued treks to AirVenture while she stayed home. I’ve always explained AirVenture to nonpilots as a type of aviation mecca — a trek with a level of importance that I don’t think Rachel understood until 2015 when she surprised me by coming up for a few days. That year I was finally able to share AirVenture with my own family as my parents did with me during my childhood. Last year, Rachel was able to attend again but this time to volunteer her time gathering stories for the IAC. For my family and me, EAA AirVenture has gone from a just a family vacation to a place where we have found belonging, fellowship, and friendship. It is a reunion of friends and a time of making new friends each year. When the week is over, I am worn out from volunteering, but it also means that I get to start the countdown to next year all over again.

SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2019

Earn Rewards and Support EAA

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with the EAA Cash Rewards Visa Signature® Card! Stop by any EAA Visa location at AirVenture to learn more. Plus, get a FREE gift for applying!1 EAA Cardmembers, stop by for your FREE gift!1 Use your EAA Visa Card while at AirVenture 2019 and bring your EAA Visa Card, along with your receipt(s), to any EAA Visa location on the AirVenture grounds. 1. Non-cardmembers will receive one free gift for each completed application, while supplies last. Cardmembers must present their U.S. Bank EAA Visa Card and AirVenture 2019 receipts at the U.S. Bank table in order to claim their free gift. Limit one free gift per Cardmember while supplies last. Offer valid 7/22/2019– 7/28/2019. The creditor and issuer of the EAA Cash Rewards Visa Signature Card is U.S. Bank National Association, pursuant to a license from Visa U.S.A. Inc. © 2019 U.S. Bank National Association


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AIRVENTURE TODAY

WARBIRDS

PHOTOS BY ANDREW ZABACK

Suiting Up

C-53 painted with D-Day invasion stripes BY CHRISTINA BASKEN

AIRVENTURE TODAY STAFF

IN RECOGNITION OF the 75th anniversary

of D-Day, the Dakota Territory Air Museum of Minot, North Dakota, participated with its fleet of aircraft in the air show yesterday. In addition to its air show performance, along with the Warbird Living History Group, the Dakota Territory Air Museum participated in a reenactment of the D-Day invasion stripe painting on the Duchess of Dakota, a Douglas C-53 Skytrooper that is best known for its vital role in cargo and paratrooper transport on D-Day.

The C-53 is a specialized version of the C-47 that more closely resembled the DC-3 airliner. The Skytrooper lacked the cargo door, hoist attachment, and reinforced floor found in the Skytrain, and only 380 were produced in total.

Col. Ed Shames shared his D-Day experiences at AirVenture.

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EAA would like to thank its partners for their support in making your convention special

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The 75th anniversary of D-Day was commemorated at Saturday’s air show.

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Airbus H BendixKing H Epic Aircraft H Honda Aircraft Company H Lycoming H Mars Wrigley Confectionery H Phillips 66 H Redbird Flight Simulations H H H H S I L V E R L E V E L S P O N S O R S H H H H AeroLEDs H AeroShell H Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) H Aspen Avionics H Collins Aerospace H DS SolidWorks H Embraer Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University H GE Aviation H Icom America H John Deere H Lightspeed Aviation H ModTruss H Motorola Solutions/Northway Communications NATCA H Piper Aircraft, Inc. H Poly Fiber Aircraft Coatings H Pratt & Whitney Canada H Quest Aircraft Company H Wipaire, Inc. H H H H B R O N Z E L E V E L S P O N S O R S H H H H Aircraft Specialties Services H Appareo Aviation H ASA (Aviation Supplies & Academics, Inc) H Bose Aviation H Cirrus Aircraft H Cleveland Wheels & Brakes/Stratoflex/Parker Continental Aerospace Technologies H Covington Aircraft H Dynon H Electroair Electronic Ignition Systems H ForeFlight H GoPro, Inc. H Hartzell Engine Technologies H Hartzell Propeller H Honda Generators / Honda Marine H JP Instruments H Lincoln Electric H Mooney International Corporation H Nikon Inc. H Pepsi H Piedmont Airlines H Pilatus Business Aircraft H Priceless Aviation Products H Rotax Independent Service and Training Centres H Stemme USA H Superior Air Parts, Inc. H SureFly H Tempest H Texas Aircraft Manufacturing H TQ-Aircraft Electronics H TruTrak H Van’s Aircraft H WACO Aircraft Corp H Williams International H Women in Aviation International H H H H P A T R O N L E V E L S P O N S O R S H H H H Air Wisconsin Airlines H AkzoNobel Aerospace Coatings H American Airlines H B & C Specialty Products Inc. H Best Tugs H David Clark Company H DeltaHawk Engines Gill Aircraft Batteries H Glasair Aviation H L3 Commercial Aviation H Mid-Continent Instrument & Avionics H Riesterer & Schnell H Softie Parachutes H Starr Aviation Titan Aviation Fuels H TKM Avionics H uAvionix H H H H S U P P O R T E R L E V E L S P O N S O R S H H H H 4imprint H Airframes Alaska H Arena Americas H Cruiser Aircraft H Empire ATM Group H Endeavor Air H Etched Memory H General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA) GES H Goodyear Aviation H Greater Oshkosh Economic Development Corporation H Higher Power Hydraulic Doors H MCPGSE H Meijer H Northrop Grumman Oshkosh Corporation H Outlet Shoppes at Oshkosh (The) H PerfectChoice Furniture H Quietaire Cooling Inc H TransportUp H United Airlines H University of North Dakota (The) VFW-Veterans of Foreign Wars H Wisconsin Imaging, LLC


SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2019

“THE INVASION STRIPES WERE PAINTED ON ALLIED AIRCRAFT TO HELP IDENTIFY THEM AS FRIENDLY AIRCRAFT SO THAT OUR NAVAL AND GROUND PERSONNEL WOULDN’T BE SHOOTING AT THEM.” BILL FISCHER

EAA Executive Director of Warbirds of America Bill Fischer said the painting was a significant and accurate part of the D-Day commemoration. “The invasion stripes were painted on allied aircraft to help identify them as friendly aircraft so that our naval and ground personnel wouldn’t be shooting at them.” Bill said. One of few remaining World War II veterans who jumped on D-Day from C-53s and C-47s, Col. Ed Shames, was also present at the event to share his experiences.

“He was with the final six parachute infantry regiments of the 101st Airborne Division, better known as the Band of Brothers,” Bill said. “Personally, it’s an honor to have Col. Ed Shames with us, and this is his second time to AirVenture. He recognizes and was there; he was jumping out of the C-47s and fought the battles from June to the end of the war in May of 1945. The personal connection with him is something that I’ll treasure for the rest of my life, and I know that Col. Shames is very proud and honored to be here sharing his experiences with the AirVenture attendees.” Bill said the goal of the event was to honor the past generations, to educate, and to inspire the leaders of tomorrow through active display of WWII flying warbirds. “Thousands of sailors, Army, and Air Force personnel participated and it was the first time that Americans had set foot on continental Europe [during the war],” Bill said. “Seventy-five years ago, on June 6, that battle took place and, in my opinion, it was the most significant battle in the history of the world. It was a huge undertaking, thousands of airplanes, thousands of ships, and it really marked the beginning of ending WWII.”

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PHOTOS BY ANDREW ZABACK

The Dakota Territory Air Museum and Warbird Living History Group reenacted invasion stripe painting on the Duchess of Dakota.

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AIRVENTURE TODAY

OSHKOSH MOMENTS

P-3: ON THE HUNT FOR A HURRICANE Hurricane Hunter Makes First Oshkosh Appearance BY KAYLA FLOYD

AIRVENTURE TODAY STAFF

PHOTOS BY CONNOR MADISON, ANDREW ZABACK

THE NATIONAL OCEANIC and Atmospheric

Administration (NOAA) Hurricane Hunter made its first Oshkosh appearance this year, as the Lockheed WP-3D Orion aircraft made its way to Boeing Plaza. NOAA aircraft are a key part of hurricane forecasting by collecting data from the storm while flying into it. The work of the crew of the hurricane-hunting aircraft alerts areas of incoming storm threats and saves lives through the information they are able to provide. The information includes how intense a storm is or will be, and also where it will hit land. Flying into a hurricane is an intimidating experience for the average onlooker, but for these crews flying through a hurricane surrounded by wind from all directions, rain beating down, and violent bursts of drafts, it’s just a typical flight. Lt. Cmdr. John Rossi, pilot of the P-3 and also in charge of flying the P-3 into Oshkosh this year, described learning to fly the hurricane hunter as “trying to take a drink from a fire hose; you’ve got to learn it quickly and there is a lot of information coming at you fast. “It takes planning to fly into Oshkosh,” he continued. “About a month ago we started our planning to get all the details and instructions.” Rossi has been working for NOAA for 12 years, and started flying 10 years ago. “I flew light aircraft for five years. Then I got selected to fly the P-3 for NOAA, and I’ve been doing the hurricane research flights for three years now. I am going into my third season.” NOAA’s goal is to collect data that goes into weather warnings as well as information to learn more about tropical storms and hurricanes. “I’ve flown everything from tropical storms, all the way to category 5

“THE BETTER WE GET AT THAT, THE MORE LIVES WE CAN POTENTIALLY SAVE. THE IDEA IS THAT WE CAN TELL A CITY LIKE MIAMI TO EVACUATE, AS OPPOSED TO THE ENTIRE STATE OF FLORIDA.” LT. CMDR. JOHN ROSSI

hurricanes,” Rossi said. “Everything we do is done very deliberately and very intentionally. We have a plan in place before we go in to minimize risk and keep everyone safe. The goal of the research is


SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2019

to collect data inside the storm, and then use that data to learn about the storm and improve the forecast in terms of intensity and track-wise. So that is our goal. The better we get at that, the more lives we can potentially save. The idea is that we can tell a city like Miami to evacuate, as opposed to the entire state of Florida.” Safety is a major part of NOAA and especially the hurricane-hunting units, both in a macro and micro sense. “There is big scale and small scale,” Rossi said. “Big scale is that we start planning for every mission we do months before hurricane season, and we do it on an annual basis to review our plan of attack when we go into hurricanes. … On a small scale, when we are actually flying into a storm, we create a very tight pocket that we operate the aircraft in, meaning we fly track lines that are defined with our meteorologists, using the radars to help guide us through the storm and pick a safe path through it.”

It takes practiced skill to maneuver the P-3 into hurricanes. Although Rossi is now in his third hurricane season, he said his first one was a lot to handle. “I remember my first storm flight, the first time I flew into the hurricane eyewall and flew out of it,” Rossi said. “I did a great job of keeping the wings level, which I was pretty proud of, but I remember I looked down at the altimeter and realized I had lost about 800 feet in less than five seconds. We get caught in these massive up and down drafts, and you have to keep a tight scan on all the gauges at one time, otherwise things like that can happen.” NOAA P-3’s work does not stop at tropical storm research. It also offers support to many national and international research programs that look to collect data for meteorological and oceanographic purposes. Some of the research can include weather satellite data verification missions, air quality studies, and tornado research. While the work may seem risky, Rossi said the end goal makes it all worthwhile. “It sounds crazy from an outside perspective, but we do it very deliberately and very intentionally,” Rossi said. “The big-scale goal is to save lives. The more that we learn about the storms, the better the forecast can be, the more lives we can save. So that is the driving factor that keeps me doing what I’m doing.”

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AIRVENTURE TODAY

AN RV-7 LOVE STORY Douglas Taylor’s N610TW “It’s painted by John Stahr. I provided the canvas, the bodywork, and my life with my wife, Nan Wu, provided the inspiration,” Douglas Taylor said. “It’s based on our past 20 years of marriage. We call it East meets West. She was born in China and came to the U.S. later in life, fell in love with it, and later found me. The west side of the airplane is all about America, our adventures as a couple in America, including our favorite place of hiking around the Grand Canyon. The eastern side of the airplane of course is dedicated to her ‘hometown’ of China and the Great Wall. The graphic on the bottom of the plane is inspired by the old traditional Chinese love story, their equivalent of Romeo and Juliet, which is the story of the butterfly lovers.” PHOTOS AND CAPTION BY CHRISTINA BASKEN

START A DREAM. START AN EDUCATION. START A CAREER SEE THE FUTURE.

Discover the Next Wave of Experimental Aviation! Add EAA Aviation Gateway Park to your AirVenture 2019 itinerary. EAA Aviation Gateway Park is presented by


SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2019

35

TOP LEFT: Walking the warbirds flightline is a visceral hike through history. TOP RIGHT: The U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds were in the neighborhood, and just couldn’t resist making a few passes. BOTTOM LEFT: EAA founder Paul Poberezny’s P-51 Paul I had a position of honor in a parade of taxiing Mustangs. BOTTOM RIGHT: The brutish Douglas Skyraider defined the concept of close air support during the Vietnam War. PHOTO BY ANDREW ZABACK

PHOTO BY MARIANO ROSALES

PHOTO BY RYAN TYKOSH

PHOTO BY ANDREW ZABACK


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SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2019

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NEWS & INFO

FLYING MUSICIANS HIT DECADE MILESTONE BY BARBARA A. SCHMITZ

PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN ZAPP

       

        

AIRVENTURE TODAY STAFF

      

FLYING MUSICIANS IS celebrating its 10th anniversary in 2019, all

while singing the praises of pilots who perform. John Zapp, president and CEO, said the idea for Flying Musicians was borne out of a chance meeting with country music musician Roy Clark, who was also a pilot, in 2008. “We talked about how cool it would be for musician pilots to fly into his place in Oklahoma and sit around and play their guitars, harmonicas, and so on,� he said. They never did that, but it started John and a few others thinking about how many musicians are pilots, and the Flying Musicians Association, or FMA, officially began in 2009. John said FMA was immediately embraced by the aviation community, and AOPA became its first corporate sponsor. But the music community also came on board quickly, and the association was selected to be a foundation partner of the National Association of Music Merchants, or NAMM, giving the FMA access to music merchants. One of its first events was a fly-in music fest in Fort Worth, Texas, which included 115 musicians performing. Today, the FMA has more than 700 members from around the world, from fighter pilots to corporate pilots, student pilots to commercial pilots. Some members have become ambassadors for the group, like Aaron Tippin, country music artist; Louise Vickerman, principal harpist with the Utah Symphony; and Greg Knowles, record producer and professor at the Juilliard School, to name a few. The 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation is for pilot/musicians and spans the globe, proficiency levels, and genres. John said FMA has two passions and one goal: to bring aviation and music together. It inspires, educates, and encourages through performances, presentations, scholarships, and networking. “At AirVenture, we talk about music, but at music events, we talk about aviation,� John said. “We feel like we are ambassadors wearing two hats.� Since beginning their scholarship program five years ago, the FMA has given out 11 learn-to-fly scholarships. “It’s a great way to introduce student musicians to aviation,� John said. Each award, valued at about $5,000, includes roughly 15 hours of dual instruction, or getting a student from 0 hours to soloing, online ground school, training materials, a headset, and additional products from sponsors. High school musicians must be nominated by their music director to be eligible, and nominations for 2020 will open in fall. “We help scholarship recipients find a CFI and navigate the whole system, and then stay in touch to see if there is anything else we can do,� John said. “We want to make sure they have a positive experience.�



                         

   John Zapp performing.

And they also want to ensure the student musician/pilots succeed and pay it forward, he said. The scholarship is funded mainly by FMA professionals volunteering their time and talents to perform at various events, or through corporate donations, John said. Throughout the remainder of AirVenture, the Flying Musicians can be found sharing music and aviation stories around the campsite tonight, performing at a private party on Saturday, and playing taps at the Memorial Wall on Sunday. FMA members pay a nominal fee to join but receive a shirt and swag from sponsors, John said. “This isn’t about the money; we’re just happy to have them in the network if they are passionate about music and aviation.� They also sponsor student memberships for those not able to pay the $15 fee, he said. For more information or to join, go to FlyingMusicians.org or email John at john@flyingmusicians.org.

    


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AIRVENTURE TODAY

NEWS & INFO

CHAMPIONSHIP DRONE RACER From learning RC at Oshkosh to professional drone racing

PHOTOS COURTESY OF DRL

BY CHRISTINA BASKEN

AIRVENTURE TODAY STAFF

19-YEAR-OLD ALEX VANOVER got his start in

RC here at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh and is now winning world championships racing drones. “It’s a dream come true [to come to Oshkosh]. I’ve been here for nine years straight now. The year that I got really serious about flying, my mom brought me up here when I was 10 years old, and that’s actually how I got my start in RC,” Alex said. “I bought my very first airplane in Hangar A from these guys [Horizon Hobby/Hobby Town] and now I’m here working for them [this year at their booth], so it’s crazy that I got my whole start in RC, which led to drone racing.” Alex first got into aviation and drones when he was 8 years old and came across Flight Simulator X. One day, Alex’s mom decided to take him to a local airport for breakfast, where he met a gentleman who was gracious enough to give Alex his first airplane ride. And from there, Alex was hooked.

Alex Vanover accepting the Allianz trophy.

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SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2019

39

LIVE

“I SAW THAT DRONE RACING WAS NOT JUST A HOBBY; IT WAS AN ACTUAL SPORT THAT WAS GROWING. SO I DID MY BEST FOR YEARS TO GET ON, AND I FINALLY GOT ON HERE FOR THE 2019 SEASON.” ALEX VANOVER

“I got my private pilot’s license when I was 17 in 2017,” Alex said. “Honestly, when I was doing the drones, I was super motivated to fly fast and to practice hard. Quite honestly without that [drones], I wouldn’t have had that final discipline to finish out my pilot’s license and to make that final push, because I was 17 years old and sitting down and hitting the books and preparing for an oral and checkride, and everything is not fun, especially juggling high school. That discipline in drone racing to push harder and to go faster, that translated over and motivated me to do the same thing when it comes to real airplanes, and that helped me so much when it came to getting my pilot’s license.” Alex has since then raced drones professionally all across the world. When he was 17 years old in 2017, he won his first national championship at the Reno Air Races. Just this last fall, Alex won his first world championship in Korea. Alex’s dream came true this year, as he joined the Drone Racing League. “I had been waiting to get on DRL for a very long time and when I saw drone racing appear

it was because of DRL,” Alex said. “I saw that drone racing was not just a hobby; it was an actual sport that was growing. So I did my best for years to get on, and I finally got on here for the 2019 season.” DRL is the global, professional drone racing circuit for elite pilots. “With custom-built racing drones traveling at speeds above 90 mph, pilots race FPV (first person view) through the most insane three-dimensional courses ever created outside of a video game.” Alex said he looks forward to coming to EAA AirVenture every year to watch the air show and seeing guys like Sean P. Tucker perform. “To be here at EAA is kind of a reminder that, in a sense, without being here I wouldn’t have really gotten into drones,” Alex said. “This is where I got my start … and just kind of breathing in aviation; anyone who is into flying just loves the smell of avgas and loves the sound of props and jet engines, and for me it just never gets old.” Alex is currently preparing for a live race in front of 7,000 audience members in Phoenix, Arizona, with DRL.

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AIRVENTURE TODAY

Highlights

HALF - CENTURY OF

BELOW: A North American B-25 Mitchell thunders overhead during the warbirds show in 1980.

ABOVE: This WAR Aircraft Replicas 50-percent scale Corsair was built by Fred Bauer, and drew a lot of interested onlookers in 1979.

ABOVE: A full workshop is a happy workshop.

LEFT: A group of virtual pilots taking desktop flight simulators for a spin in 1979.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF EAA ARCHIVES

ABOVE: The cockpit of Burt Rutan’s Long-EZ, on display at Oshkosh in 1979.


SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2019

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ABOVE: Many of the world’s finest aviators and designers, such as Jimmy Doolittle (second from left) and Matty Laird (second from right), have participated in EAA’s Interview Circle.

Can’t Get Enough?

RIGHT: Wayne Pierce in his Super Stearman carries a wing walker over the top during one of the afternoon air shows in 1979.

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LEFT: A Grumman F4F/ FM-2 Wildcat on short final to Oshkosh in 1980.

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AIRVENTURE TODAY

WARBIRDS

PLACID LASSIE, AND MUCH MORE Normandy veteran captures crowd with his stories BY FREDERICK A. JOHNSEN

PHOTO BY FREDERICK A. JOHNSEN

AIRVENTURE TODAY STAFF

IT WAS BILLED as a program about the C-47 Placid Lassie

and the recent 75th anniversary of D-Day. But Normandy veteran Ed Shames quickly captured the hearts of the audience with his sometimes salty, sometimes sweet, first-person account of parachuting into Normandy in 1944. He was spontaneously applauded several times by the crowd of several hundred who gathered for a Friday Warbirds in Review session. Ed told the crowd, “I was responsible for the sand tables for the whole battalion,” explaining that sand tables were recreations of French drop zones to give the paratroopers a preview of where they were assigned to land. But, he added, the C-47s carrying his outfit scattered the troops over a wide area. Just before the C-47s took off from their English bases, Ed was told to switch aircraft to make room for a war correspondent. The last-minute change meant Ed was not carried on a manifest. “Today I still don’t know what plane I was on,” he said. About the flight, Ed said, “I was nervous.” Distant flak over the English Channel was ineffectual, he recalled, but once the C-47s reached the continent, “all hell broke loose.” Ed likened the scene to a fireworks show in an amusement park. On the green light signal in the back of the C-47, the men jumped, their static lines automatically deploying their parachutes as the men stepped into the slipstream. Ed said they carried extra ammunition and supplies because they would initially be on their own. “It took me about 90 seconds to come down,” Ed said. “It felt like three hours.” He told the AirVenture crowd that he could hear bullets and shrapnel tearing through his parachute as he descended in the Normandy night. He said he landed amongst cows. “We were scattered all over the place,” Ed said, “but that wasn’t such a bad thing.” He said the Germans mistakenly believed the far-flung Allied paratroopers represented a much larger invasion force than their numbers actually meant. “It scared the hell out of them and they ran … they ran fast,” he told his appreciative audience. Ed, then a staff sergeant, rounded up about 18 paratroopers and began moving to the northwest according to prearranged plans. But they did not know where they

Theresa Eaman performed wartime songs amid equipment including military vehicles and the C-47 Placid Lassie.

were, so he said he figured a local farmer would know the lay of the land. “I knocked on the door like it was Sunday morning.” Surrounded by his troops, some in blacked-out face camouflage and all of them looking ferocious, Ed waited as the French farm couple answered the door. The wife screamed at the sight of the armed warriors, and Ed tried to quickly quiet her while he asked for directions.

As he called out the names of French towns, Ed watched as the Frenchman pointed to where they were. When Ed said “Carentan,” the French farmer tapped the ground, signaling they were standing in Carentan. “Oh my God,” Ed said as he recounted the discovery, which was a shock to him and his men because they were told a strong German garrison occupied Carentan. “Let’s get the hell over the hill right now,” Ed said he told his troops.


43

Enter to Win at Booth #3047 in Hangar C.

PHOTOS BY MARIANO ROSALES

Ed Shames

He said it took an hour and a half for his team to walk from Carentan to the bridge they were told to hold. Ed jumped into Normandy as a staff sergeant. Not long after, he told the AirVenture crowd, “I was made a second lieutenant on the spot.” Sharing the panel discussion with Ed were three pilots of C-47s that participated in the 75th anniversary flyover and airdrop sorties this June. Eric Zipkin, who flew the Normandy veteran C-47 Placid Lassie, said the modern-day crossing of the North Atlantic was less challenging than that faced by World War II aviators. “Our job was made a whole lot easier by 75 years of technology,” he told the crowd. Doug Rozendaal, one of the pilots of the celebrated C-47 That’s All, Brother for the 75th anniversary events, said, “What we did had nothing to do with what they did,” because today’s crews had the benefit of more experience and avionics. The young WWII C-47 pilots had more courage to do their tasks, he said. Eric quoted one of the crew members on the 75th anniversary flights, who said, “We’re flying with ghosts.” “Especially when you’re flying across the Channel,” he added. Fifteen C-47s departed the United States for Europe in May to participate

SUNDAY, JULY 28, 2019

in Normandy flyover activities. They were joined by eight more C-47s from foreign countries. After the D-Day commemorations, some of the C-47s flew to Berlin for commemorations honoring the completion of the Berlin Airlift in 1949. The C-47 looming large over the discussion panel was Placid Lassie, a genuine D-Day veteran with subsequent history with companies like West Coast Airlines and Aerodyne in Washington state. PHOTO BY FREDERICK A. JOHNSEN

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The storied C-47 Placid Lassie returned to Normandy last month.

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44

AIRVENTURE TODAY

AVIATION NATION / PAGE 4

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Madison said she was introduced to aviation by her grandfather, who would take her flying in his Cessna 172. So when Bob Kelly came to her school to tell students about Aviation Nation, she knew the program was right for her. She joined as a freshman and spent four years helping to build the plane. Coincidentally, Madison’s brother helped build the first teen-built plane for Eagle’s Nest, which her father has since purchased. And her brother, now a CFII and first officer at Endeavor Air, instructed her in that same plane that he earned his certificate in. This fall, Madison said she will head to Indiana State University for its professional flight school. But she hopes to come back and mentor Aviation Nation students as her schedule allows. Aviation Nation teaches students more than how to build an airplane, said Mehul Dhillon, 16, of Columbus, Indiana. “I’ve learned about the mechanical aspect of building a plane,” he said. “But because of Aviation Nation and going to events like this, I’ve gotten so much better in talking to people. It’s really helped me in that social aspect.” Attending events like AirVenture also helps to expand his knowledge. This year he’s attended workshops on composites, TIG welding, and woodworking, as well as several informational forums, he said. Mehul said he became involved in Aviation Nation as a freshman, thinking it would be cool to build a plane. After going to the airport the first time for the build, he knew he had to be involved.

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DO THE WORK, WHILE THE MENTORS JUST GIVE INSTRUCTIONS.

He’s been helping build the Columbus RV-12 for two years, which should be completed by the year’s end. In the future, Mehul said he plans to work on his private pilot certificate and become an aeronautical engineer. No one flies in Scott and Tyler Swanson’s family. But they’re changing that. The two 17-year-olds from Omaha, Nebraska, plan on becoming professional pilots — airline or cargo — and both are working on their private pilot certificates. Scott has already soloed and has 15 hours logged, while Tyler should solo as soon as he returns home from AirVenture. The Swansons said they heard about Aviation Nation at their school, Burke High School, which has an air and space academy, and thought it was something that would interest them. “I took a Young Eagles flight and really enjoyed that,” Scott said. “But in Aviation Nation, you learn the components behind flying, why they fly and how the parts of an airplane work. I thought that would help us in getting our private.” They have been working on the build for two and a half years, mainly the fuselage and wings. Their RV-12 should be done in time to fly to Oshkosh in 2020, they said. Both said they learned a lot from the Aviation Nation mentors, like how to work on fiberglass, sheet metal, and plexiglass. Tyler said one important part of the program is that the teens do the work, while the mentors just give instructions. And that is what makes the program so successful, Madison said. “It gives the students an opportunity to put forth their ideas, while the mentors are just there to help. They really do let you do everything.”


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46

AIRVENTURE TODAY ADVOCACY

INHOFE REQUESTS COMMUNITY FEEDBACK

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Legislation would create a National Center for the Advancement of Aviation SEN. JIM INHOFE (R-Oklahoma) is request-

with the EAA Cash Rewards Visa Signature Card! ®

Stop by any EAA Visa location at AirVenture to learn more. Plus, get a FREE gift for applying!1 EAA Cardmembers, stop by for your FREE gift!1 Use your EAA Visa Card while at AirVenture 2019 and bring your EAA Visa Card, along with your receipt(s), to any EAA Visa location on the AirVenture grounds. 1. Non-cardmembers will receive one free gift for each completed application, while supplies last. Cardmembers must present their U.S. Bank EAA Visa Card and AirVenture 2019 receipts at the U.S. Bank table in order to claim their free gift. Limit one free gift per Cardmember while supplies last. Offer valid 7/22/2019– 7/28/2019. The creditor and issuer of the EAA Cash Rewards Visa Signature Card is U.S. Bank National Association, pursuant to a license from Visa U.S.A. Inc. © 2019 U.S. Bank National Association

ing comments and feedback from the general aviation community on the establishment of a National Center for the Advancement of Aviation. “My legislation would form an independent, nongovernment center tasked with four key goals to support the future of American aviation: foster a diverse and reinvigorated aviation workforce, facilitate new and expanded STEM educational opportunities for high school students interested in aviation, serve as a central repository of safety and economic data, and support research and collaborate on training methods and new technologies,” Inhofe said. Inhofe went on to say that the legislation would be good not just for the

aviation sector, but for the entire country. “Standing up a national center to advance aviation by facilitating ideas and cooperation would help us address the demands and opportunities associated with a safe and vibrant national aviation system and would foster the collaborative partnership across all stakeholders to maintain our nation’s leadership and comparative advantage in aviation,” Inhofe said. Inhofe is requesting feedback from the aviation community on how this legislation can best meet their needs as a pilot or other aviation enthusiast, and ensure a safe and innovative industry that is free of heavy-handed bureaucracy. Please submit feedback by August 31 through this link: bit.ly/InhofeNCAA.

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EAA AirVenture Today - Sunday, July 28, 2019  

News and Photos from EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2019

EAA AirVenture Today - Sunday, July 28, 2019  

News and Photos from EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2019

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