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SENIOR CARE r e s o u r c e s

R P.E. FREE

WINTER-SPRING 2015

The ultimate guide for seniors, caregivers and case managers

LEGAL MATTERS | FINANCIAL PLANNING | ACTIVE LIFESTYLES


Protect Your Family Dennie B. Mayhone, Jr., J.D.

Mayhone Elder Law, PLLC Serving Seniors and Those with Disabilities, and Their Families

Mayhone Elder Law, PLLC is here to help your family overcome the obstacles that come along with the elder care continuum. We help you integrate legal, financial, and personal care needs to allow you to find, coordinate, and pay for good, quality assistance. Our goal is to create a plan to allow you to stay at home as long as possible, and have a plan to protect you and your family if that is not possible.

We assist you in answering the following questions:

happens if one of us gets sick and has to go to a nursing home? • What I protect my assets for my family? • Can can I qualify for nursing home Medicaid? • How can I avoid wiping out my life savings on a Medicaid spend-down? • How it too late if one of us is already in a nursing home? • IsWhat steps do I need to take to protect myself and my family? • How can legal, financial, and personal care needs be integrated to • provide formyquality of care when I need it? will my family be able to provide for the cost of long term care if • How my memory, health, or mobility decline?

You do not have to face these questions alone. We can help!

Call now: (228) 215-1223

Responsive. Knowledgeable. Caring.

www.southmselderlaw.com

Protection for the Second Half of Life

Free background Information 2 FALL-SPRING Available Upon2014-2015 Request


akers • Companions/Sitters m e m • Bat Ho h Ai des •

Caring for your needs in the comfort of your own home!

1-888-782-3316 228-385-2603 www.prnhomecareservices.com

prnstaf@aol.com

Nur sing Aides • LPN

and RN

Providing quality senior assistance


Our priority is to assist you in retiring with the independence and security you desire. Retirement | Income | Planning

Lee Rogers

Kathy Rogers Kate Lawler

Join an upcoming webinar or set up an appointment today! lee@marstonrogers.com

kathy@marstonrogers.com

kate@marstonrogers.com

15429 O’Neal Road, Gulfport, MS 39503 • (228) 832-9313

www.marstonrogers.com

SECURITIES AND INVESTMENT ADVISORY SERVICES ARE OFFERED SOLELY THROUGH AMERITAS INVESTMENT CORP. (AIC) MEMBER FINRA/SIPC. AIC AND MARSTON ROGERS GROUP ARE NOT AFFILIATED. ADDITIONAL PRODUCTS AND SERVICES MAY BE AVAILABLE THROUGH LEE ROGERS AND MARSTON ROGERS GROUP THAT ARE NOT OFFERED THROUGH AIC.


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R P.E.

SENIOR CARE

r e s o u r c e s

PUBLISHERS Kearn Cherry Dorothy P. Wilson

EDITOR

Dana Sleger

LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHERS

Welcome to the first edition of Ripe Senior Care Resources Guide This is your personal planning assistant for senior care services. It is designed to make it easier to plan care for those 55 and older. Inside you’ll find information about active lifestyles, medical care providers, tips for staying active, care at home and away from home and much more. We look forward to hearing your feedback so that each issue of R.I.P.E. Senior Care Resources is the most comprehensive guide of its type in South Mississippi. This book was inspired by the annual Resources, Information, Planning for the Elderly conference and expo held at the Biloxi Civic Center on Howard Avenue. The Resources Guide is intended to be an extension of the conference, which has been very successfully held for five years. We hope to see you at the next conference on May 8 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Social worker and CEUs for other disciplines will be available. Find more information at www.ripeconference.com. All the best, Kearn Cherry & Dorothy Wilson

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WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Cheryl Fishman Jon Chambers

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Lisa Monti Colleen McAdams Kearn Cherry Vicki Hensley Amy Levner Carol Marak Randolph Robbins Angelyn T. Zeringue Kath van Zupthen

HOW TO REACH US

228. 239.1867 ripeconference.com 15431 O’Neal Rd Ste B Gulfport, MS 39503

© 2015 Ripe Senior Care Resources


Contents

HEALTH TRENDS & TREATMENTS Alzheimer’s on rise............................................... 12 Cataract surgeries common.............................. 14 Managing neck and back pain......................... 16 LIFE STAGES 5 things to know when turning 65........................ 19 Keep going, stay healthy..................................... 20 Volunteering.......................................................... 21 Adopt your new best friend................................. 22 Golf courses.......................................................... 24 Parks & recreation................................................ 26 Community centers.............................................. 27 Sitter services........................................................ 28 Choosing a caregiver........................................... 30 Handling dimentia behavior................................ 32 Nursing homes A to Z............................................ 33 Nursing home checklist........................................ 35 Nursing homes....................................................... 38 Retirement communities...................................... 43 Choosing a nursing home.................................... 45 When a person is no longer safe at home.......... 47 Housing options..................................................... 49 Definitions you need to know.............................. 51 Home health services........................................... 53 Terminal diagnoses............................................... 54 Hospice services................................................... 54 Personal care homes............................................ 56 Caregivers need care, too.................................. 59 FINANCIAL PLANNING Finding the money for care.................................. 61 When to talk.......................................................... 62 Social Security....................................................... 64 Medicare/Medicaid............................................. 65

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Worst time to plan a funeral................................. 66 Funeral planning checklist................................... 67 Selecting insurance.............................................. 68

LEGAL MATTERS Power of attorney................................................. 71 Steps to involuntary commitment........................ 72 RESOURCES Tips to reduce winter power bills.......................... 75 Utilities/Transportation........................................... 77 Education.............................................................. 78 WIN Job Centers................................................... 78 Food/meals........................................................... 79 Blood banks........................................................... 80 Mental health services......................................... 82 Hospitals................................................................ 81 Senior centers/ senior services............................. 83 Substance abuse/addition services.................... 84 Clinics.................................................................... 84 Support groups..................................................... 86 Utilities/ Taxes......................................................... 86 Veterans affairs..................................................... 87 Durable Medical Equipment................................ 88 IMPORTANT INFO AND DOCUMENTS Current medications............................................. 90 Living will declaration........................................... 91 Important contacts.............................................. 92 Emergency numbers............................................. 94 Hurricane shelters................................................. 81


Gar ens Pharmacy & Compounding

1019 Government St. * Ocean Springs, MS * 39564

Phone (228) 818-5111 * Fax (228) 818-5113

We offer FREE DELIVERY and accept all major insurances! Save your time and get your prescriptions delivered straight to your door. TRANSFER TODAY! Stop by the Gardens Pharmacy for all your medical equipment needs! Introducing: Walkers - Walkers with Wheels - Canes - Quad Canes - Nebulizer & Supplies - Crutches - Bed Pans - Diabetic Supplies - Bedside Commodes And More!

If you have any questions, contact Wanda, your medical equipment needs specialist at (228) 818-5111.


Southern Mississippi Heart Center, P.A. Southern Mississippi Heart Center provides the highest level of comprehensive cardiac care available. Our physicians and staff are dedicated to preventing, diagnosing and treating heart disease.

Russell Reed

LOCATIONS 3704 Bienville Blvd., Ste B Ocean Springs, MS 228.872.4040 4300 Hospital St., Ste 102 Pascagoula, MS 228.762.1002

Sati Adlakha

Hugo Quintana

William O. Passarelli, III

Mahmoud H. Zayed

Christopher M. Malozzi

1721 Medical Park Dr., Ste 101 Biloxi, MS 228.872.4040 7001 Hwy 614 Hurley, MS 228.762.1002

MAHMOUD H. ZAYED, M.D., F.A.C.C., F.S.C.A.I. Dr. Zayed graduated with honors from Cairo University Medical School. He completed his Internal Medicine Internship and residency at Muhlenberg Regional Center, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in New Jersey. There he was awarded “Intern of the Year” by his peers. In 1990, he began a 3-year Cardiology Fellowship at Norwalk Hospital, Yale University Medical School. He completed a Fellowship in Interventional Cardiology at Baystate Medical Center/Tufts University. He is board certified in Cardiovascular Computer Tomography and Interventional Cardiology. He is a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology and the Society of Cardiac Angiography and Interventions. He is a member of The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography and The American College of Phlebology.

WILLIAM O. PASSARELLI, III, M.D., F.A.C.C.

Dr. Passarelli went to medical school at Cornell University and New York Medical College. He was the first recipient of the Enrico Fermi/Grace Liotta Medical School Scholarship. He completed his residency at CedarsSinai Medical Center in Los Angeles and his Cardiology Fellowship at Strong Memorial and Staff Physician for the Los Angeles Dodgers. He was clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine. He is Board Certified in Cardiovascular Disease and is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology.

HUGO QUINTANA, M.D., F.A.C.C., F.S.C.A.I.

Dr. Quintana is a graduate of the Escuela de Medicina, Universidad de Costa Rica. He completed his internship in Internal Medicine and Residency at East TN State University, James H. Quillen College of Medicine. He completed a Fellowship in Cardiology and Interventional Cardiology at Ochsner’s Clinic Foundation, Heart and Vascular Institute. He is Board Certified in Cardiovascular diseases and Interventional Cardiology. He is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology and the Society of Cardiac Angiography and Interventions. His areas of interest include: Preventative Cardiology (Hypertension, and High Cholesterol Treatment), Cardiac ICD and Pacing, Peripheral Vascular Disease Diagnosis and Management, Coronary Artery Disease Interventions.

SATI ADLAKHA, D.O., F.A.C.C., F.S.C.A.I

Dr. Adlakha is a graduate of the Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Vallejo, CA. He completed his residency at The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City, IA. He also completed Fellowships in Cardiology and Interventional Cardiology at The University of Toledo Medical Center in Toledo, Ohio. He is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Cardiology, and Interventional Cardiology. Dr. Adlakha was born in Canada. He is a member of the American College of Cardiology. He is also a fellow of the American College of Cardiology and the Society of Cardiac Angiography and Interventions.

CHRISTOPHER M. MALOZZI, D.O.

Dr. Malozzi is a graduate of Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in Philadelphia, PA. He completed his Internship and Residency in General Internal Medicine at The University of South Alabama Medical Center in Mobile, AL. During his time in residency he was named Chief Resident in Internal Medicine and served as a member of the clinical teaching faculty. He then completed his Cardiology Fellowship at USA Medical Center, he also served as Chief Cardiology Fellow. He is Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Cardiovascular Disease.

RUSSELL REED, M.D.

Dr. Reed is a graduate of the University of Mississippi (UM) Medical Center. He completed his Internal Medicine and residency at the UM Medical Center. He then completed a Fellowship in Cardiology and Interventional Cardiology at the UM Medical Center. He is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Disease and is Board Eligible in Interventional Cardiology. He is a member of The American College of Cardiology and The American Association of Cardiology.


HEALTH TRENDS & TREATMENTS

Alzheimer’s on rise

12

Cataract surgeries

14

Managing back pain 16

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 11


HEALTH TRENDS & TREATMENTS

Alzheimer’s disease on the rise The Alzheimer’s Association reports that there are more than 5 million people with Alzheimer’s disease in the United States and about 35 million worldwide. The number is expected to rise to as many as 16 million in the U.S. and 115 million people worldwide by the midcentury. Alzheimer’s costs $203 billion and will increase to $1.2 trillion by 2050, according to the association, which is working on ways to prevent, treat or delay the disease. The quality of care for Alzheimer’s patients is rising as well, thanks to new medical treatment options as well as more choices for living arrangements and home care. There are five drugs approved by the Federal Drug Administration to mask the symptoms of Alzheimer’s such as temporarily aiding with memory loss, confusion and thinking problems in some patients. None of the drugs delays or treats the causes of the disease but there are promising new drugs being development that are expected to change the disease process itself, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. As far as trends for prevention of the disease, the association said certain lifestyle choices may help to prevent Alzheimer’s by supporting brain health. Physical activity and diet have been shown to lower heart disease and diabetes among other diseases which have been linked to Alzheimer’s. Exercise and heart-healthy eating such as a Mediterranean-style diets may help the brain, according to some research findings. The traditional senior housing options — assisted and independent living communities, retirement communities and skilled nursing facilities — are planning to accommodate Alzheimer’s patients by adding

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such elements as memory care units with special safety features for those in residence. Memory care has been called the fastest growing segment of senior care in the country, bolstered by the aging baby boomer generation. The units also employ technology to improve quality of life for patients. Tablets with puzzles, games and activities help improve alertness and dexterity. Other techniques include storytelling, art and music therapy to provide soothing activities. More new treatments are expected to result from clinical trials. There are at least 50,000 volunteers participating in more than 100 clinical trials looking at Alzheimer’s and other dementias.


Digestive Health Center, P.A.

“Relieving the problems that take the joy out of life”

ULCERS • DIARRHEA • STOMACH PAIN • COLOR DISEASE HEMORRHOIDS • BLEEDING • HEARTBURN • LIVER DISEASE CHILDREN’S STOMACH PROBLEMS • OVERWEIGHT

Available to care for all your adult GI needs

John D. McKee, III, M.D. Alva Dillon Jr., M.D. Alfred E. McNair, Jr., M.D. Michael J. Loebenberg, M.D. Richard Chernecky, M.D. John Zielinski, M.D. Gracia Hudson, PA-C Angela Dauro, PA-C Laresa Victoria Newton, CRNP

Matthew Dykes, PA-C

OFFICE LOCATIONS 3890 Bienville Blvd. Ocean Springs, MS 39564

3616 Hospital Rd., Ste. A Pascagoula, MS 39581

228.872.6291

228.769.1035

147 Reynoir St., Ste. 301 Biloxi, MS 39530

15190 Community Rd., Ste. 100 Gulfport, MS 39503

228.374.7949 228.328.4341 APPOINTMENT SCHEDULING 228.872.7620 SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 13


We’re Here to Help You Hear Hearing Testing l Hearing Aids l Maintenance & Programming of Aids

Charlene Taylor Karen Slater Jade Garrard

Doctors of Audiology

Coastal Hearing Center Professional Audiology and Hearing Care Services, Hearing Aid Fitting & Tinnitus Treatment in Biloxi, Mississippi. We specialize in... diagnostic hearing evaluations, hearing aid selection and fitting, tinnitus treatment, hearing aid repair, custom hearing protection, assistive listening devices and more for both adults and children.

(228) 207-7102 970 Tommy Munro Drive ~ Suite A Biloxi, MS 39532 Karen Slater, AuD and Jason Smith, MD - Owners

Schedule Your No-Obligation Appointment. Office Hours: Monday - Friday • 8am - 5pm, extended hours by request

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Cataract surgeries one of most common Visual impairments, including blindness, increase with age. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified the four main causes of visual impairment as cataracts, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy Cataracts cause the eye lens to become cloudy and are a leading cause of sight impairment in the elderly, especially among older women. According to the CDC, cataract surgery is one of the most common surgeries performed in America and it is generally an outpatient procedure. there are approximately 1.5 million surgeries performed each year with 90 percent of patients having improved vision after recovering from their surgery. Laser assisted cataract surgery adds more precision by using a computer guided laser to remove small amounts of protein that form in the lens and cause it to become cloudy. It is considered the most advanced method of cataract surgery and astigmatic correction. It also may help with faster recovery. However, private insurance or Medicare don’t cover the procedure so ask your doctor about payment. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) was the leading cause of irreversible visual impairment in the elderly and it is more common than either glaucoma or diabetic retinopathy. Macular degeneration is the result of damage to the macula, a tiny area of the retina that gives us close up vision. There is no cure for AMD but AARP reports a small clinical trial using transplanted human embryonic stem cells to treat patients. Larger trails are planned, according to AARP. Glaucoma is irreversible damage to the optic nerve caused by increased pressure in the eye. The slowprogressing disease can cause irreversible blindness if left untreated. The most common treatment for the early stages of glaucoma is eyedrops that lower pressure. An option is surgery to improve the flow of fluid out of the eye and control pressure. Research is being conducted on damage to retinal cells that connect the eyes to the brain, according to AARP. Clinical trials are under way looking at the effective of medications that slow down the death of the cells and protect healthy cells. The medication can be applied as eyedrops or it can be injected into the eye or with slowrelease implants surgically placed in the eye.


My dialysis options.

To get to the bottom of it, I started at the T.O.P. Our innovative Treatment Options Program. It offers you answers to your questions and helps you choose a dialysis option to match your needs. Fresenius Medical Care, the nation’s leader in dialysis care, is here to offer education and guidance. For information or to find a Treatment Options Program (TOPs)TM near you today, call (877) TOPS-LIFE, or visit us at www.UltraCare-Dialysis.com/TOPS.

(877) TOPS-LIFE | www.UltraCare-Dialysis.com


HEALTH TRENDS & TREATMENTS

New treatments available to aid back pain Back and neck pain are among the top reasons that people seek medical treatment. Their options include various forms of medications, therapy and surgical procedures. Often the most common neck and back pain cases can be treated at home with over-the-counter pain medication or stronger prescriptions such as muscle relaxants to ease the suffering. In some cases, drug pumps can be used to inject painkillers into the nerve root. Therapies such as neck exercises and stretching, traction and short-term immobilization are outlined by the Mayo Clinic’s staff. A physical therapist can teach patients exercises that may help pain by restoring the muscle function, improving posture to help avoid straining the muscle and building strength in the muscles. Traction can help if the pain is caused by nerve root irritation, according to the Mayo Clinic staff. The weights and pulleys can stretch the neck and that sometimes gives the patient fast relief from the pain. Immobilizing the neck with a soft collar can provide needed support to take the pressure off the neck and relieve the pain as well. For some patients, relief may come from some long established practices. For example, acupuncture has been shown to provide some relief for chronic low back and massage is another option for alleviating neck pain. Spinal manipulation by a chiropractor also is an option for some pain sufferers. Back and neck pain also may be relieved by steroid injections administered by a doctor usually in an outpatient facility. The infections are aimed at the nerve roots, into

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bone joints or muscles. In some cases more than one injection may be needed. According to the website WebMD, a new procedure called radiofrequency discal nucleoplasty uses a radio frequency probe to disintegrate a small portion of the central disc material. That results in a partial partial decompression of the disc, which may help with pain caused by bulging discs pressing on spinal nerve roots, according to WebMD. There are several types of back surgery and they all have benefits as well as risks. The most common is spinal fusion which joins vertebrae. A laminectomy relieves pressure on spinal nerves by the removal of bone parts, spurs or ligaments. A foraminotomy opens up the space where nerve roots exit the spine, relieving nerve pressure. In a discectomy, a surgeon removes some or all of a bulging disc to relive spinal nerve pressure. Surgeons can also perform disc replacement surgery by removing a damaged disc and inserting an artificial one.


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LIFE STAGES

5 Things to know when turning 65....................... 19 Keep going; stay healthy..................................... 20 Volunteer.............................................................. 21 Adopt your new best friend................................. 22 Golf courses.......................................................... 24 Parks & recreation................................................ 26 Community centers.............................................. 27 Sitter services........................................................ 28 Choosing a caregiver.......................................... 30 Handling dementia behavior.............................. 32 Nursing homes A to Z............................................ 33 Senior living options.............................................. 36 Nursing homes ..................................................... 38 Retirement communities...................................... 43 Choosing a nursing home.................................... 45 When you are no longer safe at home............... 47 Housing options.................................................... 49 Definitions you need to know.............................. 51 Home health services.......................................... 53 Terminal diagnosis................................................ 54 Hospice services................................................... 54 Personal care/assisted living............................... 56 Caregivers need care, too!................................. 59 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015 2014-2015 18 SPRING-WINTER


5 things to know when turning 65

3

1

How do I enroll in Medicare?

Plan your Social Security benefits claim.

Medicare is a federal health insurance program for those 65 and older. It can be your only health insurance coverage or as a backup to insurance you have through your current or previous job, spouse or union. To enroll, most people need to contact Social Security directly, according to the National Council on Aging. To avoid a lapse in health coverage, you should enroll before your 65th birthday.

2

When do I enroll in Medicare?

4

NCOA says there is a 7-month window around your 65th birthday to enroll called the Initial Enrollment Period. You can still enroll in Medicare if you miss the window but you have to wait for the designated special or general enrollment period. Some early retirees receiving Social Security and those with Social Security disability or Railroad Retirement benefits are automatically enrolled in Medicare when they become eligible. You can enroll online, at your local Social Security office, or by calling 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-3250778).

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES

If you haven’t signed up to receive Social Security benefits, consider waiting another year. If you were born in 1943 to 1954 your full retirement age is 66 and that’s when you can claim full retirement benefits without any penalty for continuing to earn a paycheck. If you want to increase your Social Security payouts even more, wait until you’re 70 to claim them.

Get your legal documents in order. Most 65-year-olds can look forward to many more years but everyone is advised to get their legal documents in order so that your wishes can be carried out in case of a sudden illness or serious accident. Documents include a will, power of attorney and a living will.

5

Plan your retirement budget. Spending down your assets requires careful consideration and a good strategy to make the money last in your retirement years. Get professional advice on your individual tax situation and to examine your assets for potential problems that might arise.

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STAYING ACTIVE

Keep going, stay healthy Want to feel and look better? Sleep like a baby? Improve your mental well being? Live longer? Who doesn’t want the many health benefits that come from being physically active. It doesn’t matter what your age or abilities are, everyone can benefit from regular physical activity. If you don’t move, you’re more likely to get heart disease and type 2 diabetes, have high blood pressure and high cholesterol and suffer a stroke. As people age, their metabolism slows down so it’s important to move more and eat less to keep a good energy level. So what is physical activity and how much do you need? According to the choosemyplate.gov website, physical activity is simply movement of the body that uses energy. Some common activities include walking, gardening, briskly pushing a baby stroller, climbing the stairs or dancing. To get health benefits you need, health experts say your physical activity should be of moderate or vigorous intensity. For moderate physical activities, you can choose to walk briskly, bike under 10 miles per hour, rake or trim shrubs, carry your golf clubs and walk the course and play tennis doubles. Activities that give you vigorous intensity include running or jogging 5 miles per hour, walking very fast, biking more than 10 miles per hour, aerobics, freestyle swimming laps, competitive basketball and singles tennis. Easy activities such as light housework and walking while grocery shopping are considered light intensity because the movement doesn’t increase your heart rate. Only the moderate and vigorous activities make you breathe harder and get your heart rate up enough to provide health benefits. You can choose moderate or vigorous workouts or mix up them up to keep things interesting. When you do vigorous activities you get similar health benefits in half the time it takes you with moderate ones. How much movement do you need? For those ages 18 to 64, choosemyplate.gov experts advise doing at least

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2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate aerobic physical activity or 1 hour and 15 minutes of vigorous aerobic physical activity each week. For even more health benefits, be active 5 or more hours each week. It’s best to spread aerobic activity out over at least 3 days a week. Be sure to do at least 10 minutes of each activity at a time. Adults should add muscle-strengthening activities like lifting weights and doing sit ups and pushups, at least 2 days a week.


VOLUNTEERING

United Way: An online matchmaker

The best way to find yourself, is to lose yourself in the service of others. — Ghandi

United Way of South Mississippi’s online Volunteer Center is bringing a lot of love to South Mississippi by playing matchmaker for agencies seeking volunteers and vice versa. By the numbers, it seems overwhelming. More than 160 agencies, thousands of opportunities to search through, more than 1,400 volunteers signed up and more than $3 million worth of volunteer impact went back into the community in 2012. And this is all done through a database that lives online. Nonprofits rely heavily on volunteers to accomplish their mission and introduce individuals more closely to their goals and missions. Beyond the numbers and dollars are the people: the people whose lives are changed, thanks to their volunteerism. But it isn’t just the people who are on the receiving end of the volunteers’ work who benefit; it is the volunteers themselves. Ariana, a college student who gave a week of service with United Way’s Alternative Spring Break, says, “(Volunteering) has been a life-changing experience.” In addition to playing matchmaker, the Volunteer Center shines a focus on volunteerism at events throughout the year. United Way of South Mississippi hosts Days of Caring, Days of Service and Alternative Spring Break, encouraging people from across the Coast and the nation to give back to our community. Individuals, families, groups and companies all participate by giving their time to help make an impact on the Gulf Coast. Whether you are looking for an opportunity to feed the hungry or read to children, the Volunteer Center provides opportunities to serve others. Consider giving an hour of your time and maybe even a piece of your heart.

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES

GET INVOLVED

If you are interested in diving deeper into the volunteering world, visit United Way of South Mississippi’s website to view volunteer opportunities: www.unitedwaysm.org.

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ANIMAL SHELTERS

Adopt your new best friend

ANIMAL SHELTERS HANCOCK COUNTY ANIMAL SHELTER 322 Gulfside St. Waveland, MS 39576

(228) 467-0230 Having a dog, cat or other companion animal can be rewarding for the owner and the pet, especially if you adopt an animal from a shelter and give it a second chance. Having a pet in your home and your life can bring health benefits including lower levels of stress and high blood pressure. Pets also can increase your physical activity when you take them for walks or play fetch with them. Pet owners often find that they have more social interaction through their pets, too, by meeting other people on walks or in parks. But the main benefit can be in the companionship a pet offers, along with its unconditional love. Research has shown that a pet can help its owner avoid feelings of loneliness and even depression. There are abundant resources to help with your decision on which type of animal you should pick. First, experts advise, is to know yourself. Are you active and willing to handle a pet that needs walks and play time? Are you able to change your schedule to provide those activities? Are you flexible enough in your routine to get up earlier if needed? And can you afford the expenses that

pet ownership brings, for food, toys, boarding, medical care and grooming? By one estimate, a puppy’s first year could cost more than $800. Pets come in all sizes and temperaments, so choosing your pet may take time. Think about the pet’s age, size, energy level and healthy characteristics. What will work best for your living accommodations, budget, schedule and other personal considerations. Do you have a fenced yard? Where will the litter box go? Are there other people or pets at home that have to be taken into consideration? The Humane Society of the United States encourages people to choose a shelter or rescue group to find your companion pet because 6 million to 8 million pets end up in shelters each year and only about half of those will be adopted. Pets adopted from shelters and rescue groups typically cost less than those bought from breeders. When you adopt a pet from a shelter or a rescue group, the staff can help you find the best companion for you. They know the animal’s personality and behavior and can improve the chances that you and your new pet will make a good match.

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HUMANE SOCIETY OF SOUTH MISSISSIPPI 2615 25th Ave. Gulfport, MS 39501

(228) 863-3354 www.hssm.org

ANIMAL PROTECTION EDUCATION 13481 Seaman Road Vancleave, MS 39565

(228) 826-1435 HANCOCK COUNTY ANIMAL SHELTER 7175 Texas Flat Road Kiln, MS 39556

(228) 466-4516 STONE COUNTY SPCA 1989 Highway 26, Wiggins, MS 39577

(601) 928-1930


Harrison County Board of Supervisors

Back Row L-R: Kim Savant - District 2 William Martin - District 4 - President W.S. “Windy” Swetman - District 1

Front Row L-R: Marlin Ladner - District 3 - Vice President Connie Rockco - District 5


GOLF COURSES The Mississippi Gulf Coast is a special place for golf enthusiasts. It offers courses for players of every skill level, including ones designed by Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer and Davis Love III.

BAYOU VISTA GOLF COURSE 13756 Washington Ave., Gulfport, MS 39503

(228) 868-9953

Bayou Vista Golf Course boasts neatly landscaped terrain, with dogleg fairways that provide a fun challenge to golfers of different handicap levels.

DIAMONDHEAD COUNTRY CLUB 7600 Country Club Circle, Diamondhead, MS 39525 www.diamondheadms.org

(228) 255-3910

Diamondhead’s two 18-hole courses offer players of all abilities a great golf experience. The layout is designed by Earl Stone and John Lefoy. The major challenges for both courses are their tree-lined fairways.

DOGWOOD HILLS GOLF COURSE

17476 Dogwood Hills Drive, Biloxi, MS 39532 www.dogwoodhillsgolfclub.com

(228) 392-9805

GRAND BEAR GOLF CLUB

12040 Grand Way Blvd, Saucier, MS 39574 www.grandcasinobiloxi.com

(228) 539-7806

This 18-hole Jack Nicklaus Signature Golf Course is among the South’s most spectacular. Beautiful and challenging, the course navigates through natural cypress wetlands and towering pines, with packed pine needle rough, championship greens and deep bunkers set over 650 acres of rolling land in the piney woods of the DeSoto National Forest.

GREAT SOUTHERN GOLF CLUB 2000 Beach Drive, Gulfport, MS 39507

(228) 896-3536

The 18-hole Great Southern Golf Club is a semi-private golf course that opened in 1908. The course features three sets of tees for different skill levels.

The 18-hole Dogwood Hills Golf Course is a public golf course that opened in 1993. Designed by Brent Williams, the course features three sets of tees for different skill levels.

GULF HILLS COUNTRY CLUB RESORT

FALLEN OAK GOLF COURSE

Over hill and dale, through forests and streams, Jack Daray carved this 18-hole golf course. The 17th hole was once regarded by Golf Digest as one of the top 5 most beautiful and challenging in the Southeast.

24400 Highway 15 North, Saucier, MS 39574 www.fallenoak.com

(228) 386-7015

Sitting on the edge of the DeSoto National Forest, Fallen Oak Golf Course has a lush landscape of more than 4,000 oaks, pines, and several other types of hardwood trees. The golf course, which was built exclusively for guests of Beau Rivage Resort & Casino, is also dotted with colorful magnolias and dramatic elevation changes.

13701 Paso Road, Ocean Springs, MS 39564 www.gulfhillsgolf.com

(228) 872-9663

HICKORY HILL COUNTRY CLUB 900 Hickory Hill Drive, Gautier, MS 39553 www.mississippinational.com

(228) 497-2372

For more than 30 years, golfers have enjoyed the layout of a traditional yet challenging course at Hickory Hill. A 6,983-yard, par-72 layout is scenic with blossoming magnolias, radiant dogwoods, Spanish-moss-draped

24 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015

oaks and wildlife. Water comes into play on 10 holes, demanding strategy and strict shot placement. The course was designed by Earl Stone.

PASCAGOULA COUNTRY CLUB 2703 Washington Ave., Pascagoula, MS 39567

(228) 762-1466

The 9-hole Pascagoula Country is a semi-private golf course that opened in 1940.

PASS CHRISTIAN ISLES GOLF CLUB

150 Country Club Drive, Pass Christian, MS 39571 www.pci-golf.com

(228) 452-4851

The Isles is a classic Tom Bendelow course built in 1914 and located in historic Pass Christian. It is nestled in the quiet Timber Ridge neighborhood just yards from the Bay of St. Louis. The Isles offers golfers of all levels a challenge with its tree-lined fairways and small greens.

SHELL LANDING GOLF CLUB 3499 Shell Landing Blvd, Gautier, MS 39553 www.shelllandinggolf.com

(228) 497-5683

Golf Digest named Shell Landing among America’s Best New Courses of 2002. The January 2003 issue ranked the Davis Love III championship design No. 5 in America in the Best New Upscale Public category, and the only one in the top 5 located in the South. In 2007 Shell Landing was recognized by Golf Digest when it was presented the “Architecture Award’ in recognition of our outstanding design and was named among the Best Golf Courses in the State.


ST. ANDREWS GOLF CLUB

2 Golfing Green Drive, Ocean Springs, MS 39564

(228) 875-7730

This semi-private course offers a view of the Gulf of Mexico and barrier islands from the 13th fairway. Built in 1968, the golf course winds through the St. Andrews Subdivision.

SUNKIST COUNTRY CLUB

generous fairways. Wild, wiry grasses disperse texture and color against the smooth, rolling greens. The uniquely Southern cypress swamps, marshy wetlands and pitcher plant bogs scatter the area, adding diversity to the landscape and challenge to the game.

2381 Sunkist Country Club Rd, Biloxi, MS 39532 www.sunkistcc.com

THE OAKS GOLF CLUB

Established in 1953, Sunkist Country Club has one of the best lesson and improvement programs in the Biloxi area, featuring both private and group lessons, junior camps and specialized programs for women and seniors.

(228) 452-0909

(228) 388-3961

THE BRIDGES AT HOLLYWOOD CASINO 711 Hollywood Blvd, Bay St Louis, MS 39520 www.thebridgesgolf.com

(228) 463-4047

This 18-hole Arnold Palmer masterpiece is ranked among the Top 40 casino courses in the country and Top 10 courses in the state by Golf Digest and Golfweek. It is consistently rated among the top golf course architects in the country, and features 21 bridges. The Bridges is the first resort golf course in the world to obtain Audubon International’s Certified Silver Signature status.

24384 Club House Drive, Pass Christian, MS 39571 www.theoaksgolfclub.com The Oaks Golf Club boasts 18 holes of golf and a complete practice facility. Professionally managed by Scottsdale-based, OB Sports, The Oaks Golf Club offers group services.

WINDANCE COUNTRY CLUB 19385 Champion Circle, Gulfport, MS 39503 www.windancecc.com

(228) 832-4871

Designed by Mark McCumber in 1986, this 18-hole championship course features more than 6,600 yards of challenging golf complete with rolling hills and lush greens. Purchased by Island View Casino Resort in 2007 and named Golfweek magazine’s Best Places You Can Play for three consecutive years, Windance has a 4-star rating by Golf Digest magazine and has been host to both the Ben Hogan and Nike tours.

THE PRESERVE GOLF CLUB 8901 Mississippi 57, Vancleave, MS 39565 www.preservegc.com

(228) 386-2500

Jerry Pate, U.S. Open champion and award winning golf course designer, designed the Preserve Golf Club. Mossy, majestic Live oaks reach out over the course and tall, slender long leaf pines line the

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 25


PARKS, RECREATION CENTERS

BUCCANEER STATE PARK

1150 S Beach Blvd. Waveland, MS 39576

MCLEOD PARK

8100 Texas Flat Road Kiln, MS 39556

WAR MEMORIAL PARK Pass Christian, MS 39571

JONES PARK

2250 Jones Park Drive Gulfport, MS

(228) 868-5881

GULF ISLANDS NATIONAL SEASHORE 3500 Park Road Ocean Springs, MS 39564

GRAND BAY NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE

6005 Bayou Heron Rd Moss Point, MS 39562

PASCAGOULA BEACH PARK AND RECREATION AREA

Pascagoula, MS 39567

GULF ISLANDS WATER PARK

17200 16th St Gulfport, MS 39503

(228) 328-1266 CAMP WILKES

2109 Camp Wilkes Rd Biloxi, MS 39532

(228) 388-3736

O’MALLEY PARK SOUTHERN OAKS MOBILE HOME AND RV COMMUNITY

500 E Second St Long Beach, MS 39560

(228) 868-7159

10530 Three Rivers Rd Gulfport, MS 39503

HILLER PARK

(228) 832-5528

380 HILLER DRIVE BILOXI, MS 39531

RIVERCHASE PARK

JOHN HENRY BECK PARK

11111 Highland Ave Gulfport, MS 39503

(228) 832-0990

SHEPARD STATE PARK 1034 Graveline Road Gautier, MS 39553

26 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015

671 DIVISION ST.

BILOXI, MS 39530


COMMUNITY CENTERS A.J. HOLLOWAY SPORTS COMPLEX

765 WELLS DRIVE BILOXI, MS 39532

(228) 396-5092 BACOT PARK COMMUNITY CENTER 2300 LADNIER ROAD GAUTIER, MS 39553

(228) 497-8030

BILOXI PARKS AND RECREATIONS 377 HILLER DRIVE BILOXI, MS 39533

(228) 388-7170

CEDAR GROVE COMMUNITY CENTER 7216 MELROSE DRIVE BILOXI, MS 39532

(228) 396-1519

DONAL M. SNYDER COMMUNITY CENTER 2520 PASS ROAD BILOXI, MS 39531 (228) 388-1340 – OFFICE (228) 388-1760 – AQUATICS *HAS SENIOR PROGRAM

GOOD DEEDS COMMUNITY CENTER 15101 MADISON ST. GULFPORT, MS 39501

386 BEACH BLVD. BILOXI, MS 39530

(228) 865-4204

HANCOCK COUNTY SENIOR CENTER 601 BOOKTER ST. BAY ST LOUIS, MS 39520

(228) 467-9292

HANDSBORO COMMUNITY CENTER 1890 SWITZER ROAD GULFPORT, MS 39507

(228) 896-4909

ISIAH FREDRICKS COMMUNITY CENTER 3312 MARTIN LUTHER KING BLVD. GULFPORT, MS 39501

(228) 868-1268

LATIMER COMMUNITY CENTER 10908 TUCKER ROAD OCEAN SPRINGS, MS 39565

OHR-O’KEEFE MUSEUM/CITY OF BILOXI (228) 435-4192 (228) 388-7170

*HAS SENIOR PROGRAM

ORANGE GROVE COMMUNITY CENTER 14416 DEDEAUX ROAD GULFPORT, MS 39503 (228) 539-8618

POPP’S FERRY RECREATIONAL AREA 2150 POPPS FERRY ROAD BILOXI, MS 39531

ST. MARTIN COMMUNITY CENTER 15008 LEMOYNE BLVD. BILOXI, MS 39532

(228) 392-7361

(228) 392-8878

LONGFELLOW CIVIC CENTER 122 1/2 COURT ST. BAY ST. LOUIS, MS 39520

DR. FRANK GRUICH SR. COMMUNITY CENTER 591 HOWARD AVE. BILOXI, MS 39530 (228) 374-2853 *HAS SENIOR PROGRAM

EAST CENTRAL COMMUNITY CENTER 4300 HWY. 614 HURLEY, MS 39555 (228) 588-3373

EAST JACKSON COUNTY/ORANGE GROVE COMMUNITY CENTER 9313 OLD STAGE ROAD MOSS POINT, MS 39562

(228) 475-0235

FOUNTAINBLEAU COMMUNITY CENTER HIGHWAY 57 SOUTH OCEAN SPRINGS, MS 39564

(228) 497-9610

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 27


SITTER SERVICES Let me help you make an INFORMED care decision! Assessment to include:

Needs, issues, referrals, information on Aid and Attendance, elder life, long term care insurance and a plan of action

Plans: A & B

A) Review financial, medical and legal needs. Offer referrals to specialists to avoid future problems and conserve assets. • Offer list of options and costs • Make calls to proper agencies • Set up tours • List of questions to be asked when touring • Advocacy and Education

B) Monitors move in for client to Assisted Living, Personal Care Home, Rehab, or Nursing Home. • Includes all of the above • Coordinate move and execute • Will monitor with client for 30 days to make sure move and adjustment is progressing smoothly.

Call Vicki today to get your assessment!

PRN HOME CARE 600 B East Pass Road Gulfport, MS 39507 (228) 385-2603 (888) 782-3316

www.prnhomecareservices.com

A HELP FOR MOM (228) 897-7977

Senior Care Advocate

228.355.4459

vicki@prnhomecareservices.com

• Homemakers • Companions/Sitters • Bath Aides • Nursing Aides • LPN and RN

1-888-782-3316 228-385-2603

www.prnhomecareservices.com • prnstaf@aol.com

Gulf Coast's trusted quality in-home senior care provider! (228) 255-9225

6340 Kiln Delisle Rd, Ste. A • Pass Christian, MS 39571 28 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015

(228) 314-1290

RIGHT AT HOME

6340 Kiln Delisle Rd, Ste. A Pass Christian, MS 39571

(228) 255-9225

COMFORT KEEPERS

www.rightathome.net

(228) 867-9700

TENDER HANDS HOME CARE

1505 East Pass Road Gulfport, MS 39507

www.comfortkeepers.com

HEALING TOUCH

419 Security Square Gulfport, MS 39507

(228) 863-6002

HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE

1716 Government St., Ste. B Ocean Springs, MS 39564

Vicki Hensley

PRAETORIAN HEALTH SERVICES (formerly Spiritas) 1285 Spring St., Ste. B Gulfport, MS 39507

(228) 818-6110

www.homeinstead.com

NURSING MANAGEMENT, INC 925 Tommy Munro Drive Biloxi, MS 39532

9819 Pokai Way Diamondhead, MS 39525 (228) 216-0441

VISITING ANGELS

12261 Highway 49, Ste. 14 Gulfport, MS 39503 (228) 206-6212 www.visitingangels.com

COMFORT KEEPERS 1505 East Pass Road Gulfport, MS 39507

(228) 867-9700

www.comfortkeepers.com

HEALING TOUCH

(228) 385-9196

419 Security Square Gulfport, MS 39507 (228) 863-6002

OXFORD HEALTH CARE

HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CARE

www.nminursingmgt.COM 14231 Seaway Road, Ste. 3003 Gulfport, MS 39503

1716 Government St., Ste. B Ocean Springs, MS 39564

(228) 896-8117

(228) 818-6110

www.helpathome.com

www.homeinstead.com

PDN INC

NURSING MANAGEMENT

(228) 604-4550

(228) 385-9196

10278 Corporate Drive Gulfport, MS 39503

925 Tommy Munro Drive Biloxi, MS 39532

www.kareinhome.com

www.nminursingmgt.com

OXFORD HEALTH CARE

14231 Seaway Road, Ste. 3003 Gulfport, MS 39503

(228) 896-8117

www.helpathome.com


Providing quality senior assistance

Serving Mississippi, Mobile/Baldwin, AL and the New Orleans, LA areas. 1-888-782-3316 228-385-2603 www.prnhomecareservices.com prnstaf@aol.com

What We Offer • Transportation / Errands (to appointments, shopping, etc.)

• Housekeeping (Tidy Team) • Companion / Adult Sitter • Cooking / Prepare Meals • Handy Dandy Moving (Full Service Moving company)

• Medications Reminder • Assist with Bathing • Nursing Assistant • Alzheimer’s Care • Veteran Care • Homemaker

GET HELP

4 MOM “ADULT SITTER SERVICE”

PRN Home Care’s goal is to assist individuals in remaining in their chosen living environment, whether it’s home or assisted living. We do this by providing transportation, cooking, cleaning and more. We also have our S.A.F.E.(Senior Advocate for the Elderly) program which assist families and caregivers in choosing the appropriate service(s) for their loved ones. As a very community oriented organization, we are involved in many non-profits such as Rebekah’s House, American Heart Association, BLESSED GYRLS ROCK!, Mental Health Association, and more. We also help create the RIPE (Resources, Information and Planning for the Elderly) Conference. Visit our website at www.ripeconference.com. Our sister company - Handy Dandy Moving Services (www. handydandymoving.com) - is a national full service company created to assist caregivers and seniors in moving loved ones’ items to facilities, storage units, or across the nation. WE ARE NOW PROUD TO BE INVOLVED IN BRINGING YOU THE R.I.P.E. SENIOR RESOURCE GUIDE.

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 29


Choosing a caregiver By KEARN CHERRY

Many factors must be considered when choosing a caregiver and/or agency for your loved one. Here are some questions to ask and advice to keep top of mind as you make this very important decision.

DOES THE PROVIDER (CAREGIVER AGENCY/PRIVATEDUTY CAREGIVER) HAVE SUFFICIENT STAFF TO COVER IN CASE OF EMERGENCY ABSENCE BY THE REGULAR CAREGIVER? A caregiver agency should be able to provide replacement/fill-in personnel. Be sure the caregiver agency can provide your loved one with the same level of care.

DOES YOUR PROVIDER OFFER SKILLED CAREGIVERS?

Be sure the caregiver service has trained nurse aides and employees who can help with baths, restroom duties or Hoyer lifting if required. All agencies should require their caregivers to have at least one year of professional experience.

CAN THE CAREGIVER COMPANY (PRIVATE-DUTY SERVICE) PROVIDE CONTACTS AND REFERRALS FOR OTHER KEY RESOURCES AND REFERRAL SOURCES?

Oftentimes situations arise in which additional care and/or a continuum of care are required. A caregiver company/agency should be willing to provide viable resources, referrals and contact information.

DOES THE CAREGIVER COMPANY PERFORM BACKGROUND CHECKS ON EVERY CAREGIVER?

Ask specifically if the service checks every caregiver. This significantly cuts down on the chances that you or your loved one will be taken advantage of. However, it is best not leave valuables out or on the premises this includes checkbooks, jewelry, cash and other valuable items. If you are ever uncomfortable with your caregiver, call the agency and ask for a replacement.

DOES THE PROVIDER PERFORM FOLLOW-UP CALLS AND/OR UNANNOUNCED VISITS TO CHECK ON CARE BEING PROVIDED FOR YOUR LOVED ONE? From time to time, the provider should follow up with a phone call or a drop-in visit to ensure standards of care are met consistently.

30 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015

DOES THE PROVIDER CARRY INSURANCE?

Your loved ones may have worked hard for what they have. It’s important to keep them and their assets protected.

IS THE PROVIDER ABLE TO ASSIST WITH COORDINATING LONG-TERM CARE INSURANCE AND/OR VETERANS ADMINISTRATION AIDE AND ATTENDANCE BENEFITS?

Your caregiver agency should be willing to assist you with getting reimbursed for these benefits. It also should have resources to refer to in order to complete this process. This may help you get reimbursed faster. While health insurance does not generally cover private-duty care, having someone willing to assist with this process is helpful.

DOES THE PROVIDER SERVICE MAKE AN EFFORT TO MATCH THE CAREGIVER’S PERSONALITY WITH THE CLIENT’S PREFERENCES?

It is important that your loved one feel comfortable with the caregiver. Finding caregivers who can relate to your loved one goes a long way in providing a happy and trusting relationship.

DOES THE PROVIDER GIVE BACK TO THE COMMUNITY EVEN WHEN IT DOESN’T PROFIT THEM?

If an owner of they agency is willing to provide time and money for improving or developing their community, then this may be a good signal that the owner is a caring provider. This likely will reflect on the types of professional caregivers hired by that agency/company. Kearn Cherr y is operations manager for PRN Homecare, and Angela Wicker is marketing coordinator for PRN Home Care. Reach them at (228) 385-8503 or (888) 782-3316.


SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 31


Handling troubling dementia behavior BY FAMILY CAREGIVER ALLIANCE

Some of the greatest challenges of caring for a loved one with dementia are the personality and behavior changes that often occur. You can best meet these challenges by using creativity, flexibility, patience and compassion. It also helps to not take things personally and maintain your sense of humor.

TO START, CONSIDER THESE GROUND RULES:

We cannot change the person. The person you are caring for has a brain disorder that shapes who she has become. When you try to control or change his behavior, you’ll most likely be unsuccessful or be met with resistance. IT’S IMPORTANT TO: w Try to accommodate the behavior, not control the behavior. For example, if the person insists on sleeping on the floor, place a mattress on the floor to make him more comfortable. w Remember that we can change our behavior or the physical environment. Changing our own behavior will often result in a change in our loved one’s behavior. Check with the doctor first. Behavioral problems may have an underlying medical reason: perhaps the person is in pain or experiencing an adverse side effect from medications. In some cases, like incontinence or hallucinations, there may be some medication or treatment that can assist in managing the problem.

why. It is very likely that the person is fulfilling a need to be busy and productive. Always consider what need the person might be trying to meet with their behavior — and, when possible, try to accommodate them. w Behavior is triggered. It is important to understand that all behavior is triggered—it doesn’t occur out of the blue. Try a different approach, or try a different consequence. w What works today, may not tomorrow. The key to managing difficult behaviors is being creative and flexible in your strategies to address a given issue.

w Get support from others. You are not alone; w Behavior has a purpose. People with dementia there are many others caring for someone with typically cannot tell us what they want or need. dementia. Call the local Area Agency on Aging or They might do something, like take all the clothes other support group or service provider out of the closet on a daily basis, and we wonder

32 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015


A to Z

on Nursing Homes BASIC FACTS & INFORMATION

Nursing homes have changed dramatically over the past several decades. These changes have been driven by government regulations and consumer pressures. Today’s nursing homes are highly regulated, highquality institutions for the care and treatment of older adults who have severe physical health and/or mental disabilities.

IS A NURSING HOME RIGHT FOR YOU?

Almost half of all people who live in nursing homes are 85 years or older. Relatively few residents are younger than 65 years. Most are women (72%), many of whom are without a spouse (almost 70% are widowed, divorced or never married) and with only a small group of family members and friends for support.

THE MOST COMMON REASON FOR LIVING IN A NURSING HOME

Some type of disability with activities of daily living (ADLs) is the most common reason that older people live in nursing homes. Not surprisingly, people living in nursing homes generally have more disability than people living at home. About 25% of nursing-home residents need help with one or two activities of daily living (for example, walking and bathing), and 75% need help with three or more. More than half of residents have incontinence (either bowel or bladder), and more than a third have difficulty with hearing or seeing. In addition to physical problems, mental conditions are common in nursing home residents. In fact, dementia remains the most common problem, and affects an estimated 50-70% of residents. More than three fourths of nursing-home residents have problems making daily decisions, and two thirds have problems with memory or knowing where they are from time to time. At least one-third of nursing home residents with

33 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015

dementia also have problematic behaviors. These behaviors may include verbal and physical abuse, acting inappropriately in public, resisting necessary care, and wandering. Communication problems are also common—almost half of nursing home residents have difficulty both being understood and understanding others. Depression is another condition that affects nursing home residents. Research has shown it may occur more in nursing home residents than in individuals living in the community.

LENGTH OF STAY

Although disability is common among nursing home residents, the length of stay varies greatly. Twenty-five percent of people admitted stay only a short time (3 months or less). Many of the people who stay for a short time are admitted for rehabilitation or for terminal (ie, end-of-life) care. About half of residents spend at least 1 year in the nursing home, and 21% live there for almost 5 years. Interestingly, function often improves in many of the residents who stay for a longer time.


ADULT DAY CARE CENTERS ADULT DAY CARE CENTERS DUNBAR VILLAGE TERRACE

725 Dunbar Avenue Bay Saint Louis, MS 39520

228) 466-3099

LYMAN SENIOR CITIZEN CENTER 14592 County Farm Rd Gulfport, MS

(228) 832-2606

CHAPMAN OAKS INC 210 Roberts Ave Long Beach, MS

(228) 868-7199

GULF SHORES ADULT DAYCARE 2301 Atkinson Rd Biloxi, MS

(228) 388-1723

www.gulfshoresadc.com

Welcome to Coastal Women For Change To make a difference in the lives of families and help develop a vibrant community through youth mentoring, senior advancement and community gardening.

Upcoming events July 25th |10:00-2:00 p.m. Backpack school supply give away 571 Howard Ave. Biloxi, MS 39530 We donate over 1000 book bags to the surrounding community children in need. Nov. 15th Sunday evening 2:00 -5:00 p.m Senior Appreciation Luncheon Program All seniors are invited. Free meal and special gifts for all. Raffle tickets and door prizes.

To become of a member of CWC, please contact us by email at cwcbiloxi@gmail.com. Reviewing for Board of Director for 2015-2017 Please apply by email to cwcbiloxi@gmail.com

1708 James Buchanan Dr. • Biloxi, MS 39531

228.297.4849

For more information on how to support or co-sponsor our events, please contact our office at 228.297.4849. Visit our web-site www.cwcbiloxi.org

34 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015


RISK FACTORS FOR ADMISSION

There are several risk factors for admission to a nursing home, including the following: • Age. The chance of being admitted to a nursing home goes up rapidly with age. For example, about 20% of people 85 years and older live in nursing homes, compared with just 1.1% of people 65-74 years of age.

• Low income.

• Poor family support. Especially in cases where the older adult lacks a spouse or children.

• Low social activity. • Functional or mental difficulties.

CHARACTERISTICS OF NURSING HOMES

Nursing homes increasingly offer medical services similar to those offered in hospitals after surgery, illness, or other sudden medical problems. Older adults need a higher level of care, and hospital stays are shorter than they used to be. Medical services vary a lot among nursing homes, but include: • kidney dialysis • orthopedic care (care for muscle, joint, and bone problems), breathing treatments • support after surgery • rehabilitation • intravenous therapy and antibiotics

NURSING HOME CHECKLIST q Is the nursing home clean? Are there any unpleasant smells? q Is it well maintained? q Do the residents look well cared for? q Are the rooms adequate? q What recreational and private space is available? q Are there safety features, such as railings and grab bars? q Is the home licensed by the state and certified by Medicaid? q How many nurses and nursing assistants are there compared with how many residents? q Do the administrators and medical professionals have special training in geriatrics or long-term care? q Are key professionals full-time or part-time? q How long have the managers and medical professionals been with the nursing home? q What type of medical coverage is provided? q How close is the nursing home to family members? How close is it to the nearest hospital? q What is the food like? q How much do basic services cost? What services are covered?

• and wound care.

q What additional services are available? How much do they cost?

Traditionally, these services have been available only in hospitals and rehabilitation centers.

q What happens if a person runs out of money and needs medical aid?

CHOOSING A NURSING HOME

Your family doctor or other healthcare professional (such as, home health nurses and social workers) can provide recommendations for nursing homes. Older adults and/or family members should try to visit as many places as possible to get a sense of what the place is like, including the overall feeling and quality of care. Using a checklist can help you evaluate quality, the range of services, convenience, and costs. Your visit may last an hour or two so that you can meet and talk with the admissions officer, nursing home administrator, head nurse, and social worker. Remember that no nursing home is perfect, and all will likely be very different from the current living situation. www.healthinaging.org/aging-and-health-a-to-z/topic:nursing-homes/

Nursing homes may often seem scary and depressing, and moving into one can fill people with a sense of betrayal and failure. Family involvement is important in helping the older person make the transition to a new living arrangement. Contrary to the stereotype, families do not abandon their loved ones by placing them in a nursing home. In fact, only a few nursing home residents are truly without any family. Family members are encouraged to visit residents regularly and to be involved in the total care of their older relative. Family members can offer company and help with the basic activities of daily living, and they may be better able to communicate the needs of the resident.

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 35


Senior Living Best Option?

When is the

As our parents, grandparents or loved ones age, many will need a helping hand-perhaps managing multiple medications, preparing meals, or sometimes it’s being in a safer place. Deciding whether or not to move from a home to a senior living community is never easy. It’s a decision usually based on the individual’s needs and family or friend’s availability to help with the care needed. If you’re finding that you, or a loved one, are becoming increasingly dependent on others for support, it may be time to see if senior living can help.

ASK YOURSELF THESE QUESTIONS Do you or a loved one…

Spend most of your/their times alone? No longer socialize or are showing signs of depression?

“YES”

If you answered to any of these questions, it may be time to see if senior living can help. Senior living can offer an individual or a couple, a rich, rewarding and independent life.

SOME BENEFITS TO SENIOR LIVING INCLUDE:

• Three nutritious, delicious meals prepared each day

• A comfortable apartment in a “senior friendly” atmosphere

Forget to take medications?

• Medication management

Have difficulty doing household chores such as laundry, cleaning and shopping?

• House keeping and laundry

Need help with dressing, bathing, or other personal needs? Express fear of falling or have a history of several falls? Have difficulty cooking meals or have no desire to prepare meals any longer? Have a history of numerous hospital stays in the past year? Require regular assistance from a family member or caregiver?

36 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015

• Transportation to shopping, doctor’s appointments, banking and outings • Social, recreation, and educational activities


«««««

Top R aTed FaciliT y We have the only Certified Alzheimer’s Dementia Unit on the Coast and have 2 out of the 6 in the state of Mississippi. Our supportive environment, highly-trained staff and our commitment to quality senior care have gained us national recognition and respect. Assisted Living/Personal Home Care Beds ■ Rehabilitation Care ~ Physical Therapy ~ Occupational Therapy ~ Speech Therapy ■ Respiratory Therapy ■ Smoke Free Facilities ■ Tracheostomy Care ■

228.255.4832 woodlandvillagems.com

IV Therapy Wound Care ■ Dialysis Care ■ Skilled Nursing Care ■ Individualized Activities ■ Therapeutic Diets ■ Social Services ■ Family/Resident Education ■ Pastoral Care

End of Life /Hospice Care 24 Hour Admission Services ■ Continuous Care Retirement Community ■ Certified Alzheimer’s Dementia Unit

601.928.1889 stoneconursing.com

601.394.2331 leakesvillerehab.com


NURSING HOMES

TRANSPORTATION

ACTIVITIES

HOUSEKEEPING

PETS

MEALS

BEDROOM

AZALEA GARDENS NURSING CENTER 530 Hall St. Wiggins, MS 39577

PRIVATE

(601) 928-5281

SEMI-PRIVATE

www.azaleagardensnursingcenter.com

BILOXI COMMUNITY LIVING CENTER 2279 Atkinson Road Biloxi, MS 39531

VISITS ONLY

PRIVATE

SEMI-PRIVATE

PRIVATE

SEMI-PRIVATE

(228) 388-1805

THE BOYINGTON

1530 Broad Ave. Gulfport, MS 39501

(228) 864-6544

1 BEDROOM

www.gulfcoasthealthcare.com

COVENANT HEALTH & REHAB 1620 Read Road Picayune, MS 39466

(601) 798-1811

www.covenantdove.com

DIXIE WHITE HOUSE NURSING HOME

538 Menge Ave. Pass Christian, MS 39571

(228) 452-4344

www.gulfcoasthealthcare.com

38 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015

1 BEDROOM


E

NURSING HOMES

TRANSPORTATION

ACTIVITIES

HOUSEKEEPING

PETS

MEALS

BEDROOM

DRIFTWOOD NURSING CENTER 1500 Broad Ave. Gulfport, MS 39501

(228) 868-1314

1-2 BEDROOM

www.dwnc.org

DUNBAR VILLAGE TERRACE 725 Dunbar Ave. Bay Saint Louis, MS 39520 (228) 466-3099 www.dunbarvillagems.com

1 -2 BEDROOM

PRIVATE ROOMS

PRIVATE

SEMI-PRIVATE

GREENBRIAR NURSING CENTER 4347 West Gay Road D’Iberville, MS 39540

(228) 392-8484

www.greenbriarnursingcenter.com

GULFPORT CARE CENTER 11240 Canal Road Gulfport, MS 39503

(228) 701-1500

PRIVATE

SEMI-PRIVATE

www.gulfportcarecenter.com

LAKEVIEW NURSING CENTER 16411 Robinson Road Gulfport, MS 39503

(228) 831-3001

1 BEDROOM

PRIVATE

www.lakeviewnursingcenter.com

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 39


NURSING NURSING HOME HOMES- ASSISTED LIVING LIST

TRANSPORTATION

ACTIVITIES

HOUSEKEEPING

PETS

MEALS

BEDROOM

LEAKESVILLE REHABILITATION & NURSING CENTER 1300 Melody Lane

2 BEDROOM

Leakesville, MS 39451

(601) 394-2331

www.leakesvillerehab.com

OCEAN SPRINGS HEALTH & REHABILITATION 1199 Ocean Springs Road Ocean Springs, MS 39564

PRIVATE

SEMI-PRIVATE

(228) 875-9363

www.gchc.com

PEARL RIVER COUNTY NURSING HOME

PRIVATE

305 West Moody Street Poplarville, MS 39470

SEMI-PRIVATE

(601) 795‑4543

PLAZA COMMUNITY LIVING CENTER

PRIVATE

4403 Hospital St. Pascagoula, MS 39581

(228) 762-8960

RIVER CHASE VILLAGE

5090 Gautier Vancleave Road Gautier, MS 39553

(228) 522-6700

www.riverchasevillagems.com

40 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015

PRIVATE

SEMI-PRIVATE

SEMI-PRIVATE


TRANSPORTATION

ACTIVITIES

HOUSEKEEPING

PETS

MEALS

BEDROOM

SINGING RIVER REHAB & NURSING CENTER 3401 Main Street Moss Point, MS 39563

PRIVATE

SEMI-PRIVATE

(228) 762-7451

www.gulfcoasthealthcare.com

STONE COUNTY NURSING & REHABILITATION CENTER 1436 East Central Ave. Wiggins, MS 39577

PRIVATE

SEMI-PRIVATE

PRIVATE

SEMI-PRIVATE

PRIVATE

SEMI-PRIVATE

(601) 928-1889

www.stoneconursing.com

SUNPLEX SUBACUTE CENTER 6520 Sunscope Drive Ocean Springs, MS 39564

(228) 875-1177

WOODLAND VILLAGE NURSING CENTER

5427 Gex Road Diamondhead, MS 39525

(228) 255-4832

www.woodlandvillagems.com

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 41


E V A S 5.7.15 THE DATE

R P.E. 6th Annual

O P X E & E C N CONFERE th May 7 , 2015

Social Worker e and other disciplin e CEU will be availabl for $30.

WWW.RIPECONFERENCE.COM

Call or email for information!

Kearn Cherry

(228) 239-1867

Kearn@prnhomecareservices.com 42 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015

Vicki Hensley

(228) 355-4459

Vicki@prnhomecareservices.com


RETIREMENT & LIFE CARE COMMUNITIES BILOXI COMMUNITY LIVING CENTER

SHERWOOD VILLAGE MOBILE HOME

2279 Atkinson Rd Biloxi, MS 39531-2209

1501 Popps Ferry Rd Lot Ofc Biloxi, MS 39532-2283Map

CENTURY OAKS RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

VILLA MARIA RETIREMENT APARTMENTS

(228) 435-0055

(228) 875-8811

(228) 388-1805

1718 Pass Rd Biloxi, MS 39531-3300

EMERITUS AT BILOXI

2120 Enterprise Dr Biloxi, MS 39531-4039

(228) 388-0946

GABRIEL MANOR RETIREMENT APARTMENTS 2321 Atkinson Rd Biloxi, MS 39531-2240

(228) 392-2975

921 Porter Ave Ocean Springs, MS 39564-4658

SEASHORE CAMPGROUND RETIRE HM 12170 Highland Way Gulfport, MS 39503-3666

5090 Gautier Vancleave Rd Gautier, MS 39553-4803

(228) 522-6700

10203 Highway 603 Waveland, MS 39520-8711

12170 Highland Way Gulfport, MS 39503-3666

(228) 831-7000

SARALAND MANOR RETIREMENT APARTMENTS 8010 Highway 49 Gulfport, MS 39501-7013

ALPHA PERSONAL CARE HOME

DRIFTWOOD NURSING CENTER

(228) 868-1041

RIVER CHASE VILLAGE

(228) 832-6563

(228) 432-8779

60 51st St Gulfport, MS 39507-4436

(228) 467-2885

(228) 467-4200

SEASHORE HIGHLANDS

1440 Beach Blvd Biloxi, MS 39530-3556

292 Highway 90 Apt 412 Bay St Louis, MS 39520-3549

SEASHORE CAMPGROUND RETIRE INC

RETIREMENT & WEALTH PROTECTION CO

SEASHORE RETIREMENT

NOTRE DAME DE LA MER APTS

SEA SONG

12211 Ollie Rd Gulfport, MS 39503-3950

(228) 388-1408

(228) 466-3099

(228) 832-6552

(228) 388-1013

2410 Bonne Terre Blvd Biloxi, MS 39531-2280

DUNBAR VILLAGE

725 Dunbar Ave Bay Saint Louis, MS 39520-2920

(228) 863-0350

1500 Broad Ave Gulfport, MS 39501-3601

(228) 868-1314

CARLOW MANOR RETIREMENT COMMUNITY 15195 Barbara Dr Gulfport, MS 39503-2820

(228) 539-0707

SAMARITAN HOUSE RETIREMENT APT

642 Jackson Ave Ocean Springs, MS 39564-4663

(228) 875-1087

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 43


Professional Senior Moving Services Friendly & Professional Staff • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Smooth & Structured System Simplified and Seamless Paperwork Process Uniformed Movers Licensed/Insured Direct Point of Contact Customized Rate Schedule Base Hours (Beneficial to customers that hesitate about movers “milking the clock”) No Charge for Waiting Time No Trip Fees 1-10 Movers (Team Leader On Site and Oversees Every Move) Loading/Long Carry/Unloading (Carrying furniture items from one end of building to other at no extra fee) Load + Truck (if truck is necessary) FREE Shrink Wrap/Furniture Breakdown/ Assembly/Disconnects/Hookups/ Disconnects Pro-Rate Additional Hourly Fees (to the nearest 15 minutes) Same-Day, Next Day, Holiday Availability at NO EXTRA FEE 24/7 Customer Service Line

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44 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015


Choosing a nursing home For many caregivers, there comes a point when they are no longer able to take care of their loved one at home. Choosing a residential care facility—a group home, assisted living facility, or nursing home—is a big decision, and it can be hard to know where to start. The National Institute on Aging offers this advice to help with making the right choice.

PLAN AHEAD

It’s helpful to gather information about services and options before the need actually arises. This gives you time to explore fully all the possibilities before making a decision.

DO YOUR HOMEWORK

Determine what facilities are in your area. Doctors, friends and relatives, hospital social workers, and religious organizations may be able to help you identify specific facilities.

MAKE A LIST OF WHAT’S IMPORTANT Make a list of questions you would like to ask the staff. Think about what is important to you, such as activity programs, transportation, or special units for people with Alzheimer’s disease. Find out what kinds of programs and services are offered. Ask about staff training in dementia care, and check to see what the policy is about family participation in planning patient care.

VISIT SEVERAL PLACES

BE OBSERVANT

Observe the way the facility runs and how residents are treated. You may want to drop by again unannounced to see if your impressions are the same.

CHECK AVAILABILITY

Check on room availability, cost and method of payment, and participation in Medicare or Medicaid. You may want to place your name on a waiting list even if you are not ready to make an immediate decision about long-term care.

ASK QUESTIONS

Once you have made a decision, be sure you understand the terms of the contract and financial agreement. You may want to have a lawyer review the documents with you before signing.

GET SUPPORT

Moving is a big change for both the ailing relative and the caregiver. A social worker or senior care advocate may be able to help you plan for and adjust to the move. It is important to have support during this difficult transition.

Contact the places that interest you and make an appointment to visit. Talk to the administration, nursing staff and residents.

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 45


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When it’s no longer safe at home By VICKI HENSLEY

This scenario may be familiar to you. Ella Smith is 83 years old and lives by herself. Her health is beginning to deteriorate, so she often needs help with managing her medications, preparing meals and running errands. She may need to go in a nursing home at some point. Ella has one daughter, Janice, living locally, but the rest of her children live much further away. For Janice, who works full time and has some health issues of her own, helping to take care of her mom has become almost a full-time job. There seems to be a never-ending stream of medical issues and trips to the doctors. On the days when Janice cannot come by to check on Ella and visit with her, Janice feels really guilty. And she knows her mother is lonely on those days. So when is the right time for Janice to start looking for services for her mother? Well, the right answer is before something happens. We don’t always have that

opportunity though, because senior health issues can arise in an instant, and now we have a lot of emotion tied to a care decision.

Realizing your parent or loved one is no longer safe at home alone can be an emotional experience. Not knowing what services are available can add to an already emotional state. To help you make the best decision, get help answering these questions: • DO I NEED SOMEONE IN THE HOME TO HELP WITH THE ACTIVITIES OF DAILY LIVING? If so, a home health service can offer answers.

• WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A NURSING HOME AND ASSISTED LIVING?

Be sure you know the difference and the costs involved.

• WHAT DO HOME HEALTH SERVICES AND HOSPICE PROVIDE? There are major differences, so ask questions so you are fully informed. • WHAT DOES MEDICARE COVER? Medicare guidelines are strict, but on the other hand, there may be coverage you’re not aware of. Explore your options and be informed. • WHAT ARE THE COSTS AND WHERE DO I BEGIN TO LOOK? If you’re not sure what you can afford, schedule a consultation with a senior care specialist. Taking the time to become fully informed can make this a stress-free life transition for both the senior and the caregiver. Knowledge can be liberating! Vicki Hensley is a senior care advocate with PRN Home Care and S.A.F.E. (Senior Advocate For The Elderly). Reach her at (228) 355-4459 orVicki@prnhomecareser vices.com.

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 47


DON’T MISS OUT ON OUR NEXT ISSUE OF R.I.P.E. SENIOR CARE Resources The Ultimate Tool for Seniors, Caregivers and Case Managers

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SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 48


CAREGIVER’S GUIDE

6 creative housing options By AMY LEVNER

The choices for how and where to live as an older adult are growing. In her book With a Little Help From Our Friends: Creating Community As We Grow Older, author and journalist Beth Baker observes that, as roughly 10 million baby boomers a day are turning 65, “a significant cultural shift is underway.” The current and coming generation of older adults is realizing, says Baker, “that they can make other choices about where and how to live. With intention and planning, people around the nation are creating ways to live in community, alternatives that give them more control, more companionship, more dignity and choice than generations past.” Here, adapted from Baker’s book is a brief guide to what some of these creative options are called and how they work.

CO-HOUSING

In a cohousing situation each person or family purchases a residence — be it an apartment, townhouse or even a single-family house — which contains everything a typical home would have (i.e., a kitchen, bathroom, bedroom and living room). However, the residences are linked to a shared space, such as a yard and gardens, and a large common room, dining area and kitchen that can accommodate group meals or gatherings. The point of cohousing is community and being able to live independently without living entirely alone. Cohousing setups are typically intergenerational and don’t involve staff-provided services, but they can be age-specific. A few “senior cohousing communities” have been built, and some allow residents to hire household and care services as needed.

HOUSE SHARING

In these arrangements a person who has a home may invite a friend or family member, or even a tenant, to move in and help with expenses and chores. The setup might involve people of the same age or generation and the arrangement is one of peers residing together for companionship and cost efficiency. Sometimes two or more friends actually purchase or rent a residence together and become housemates. Another house sharing scenario can revolve around the needs of an elderly property owner who doesn’t want to relocate but can no longer care for herself or a large home entirely on her own. A younger person (and younger can even mean someone who’s 60 or older) may be willing to provide some caregiving and

transportation assistance in exchange for affordable or flexible housing. If so, the two can make for wellmatched housemates.

HOUSING COOPERATIVES

These types of member-owned, resident-governed nonprofit communities are common in certain cities (New York for one) and are generally not age-specific. A co-op can be made up of housing that ranges from apartments to single-family houses to mobile homes. The co-op board, typically consisting of elected residents, decides what shared services the co-op will provide (such as social activities and maintaining the grounds) and often has approval rights over potential home buyers. Mobile home cooperatives are spreading in rural areas, and senior housing cooperatives have taken root, particularly in the Midwest. Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities (also referred to by the acronym NORC) Neighborhoods or locations that just happen to have a significant number of older people (hence, the community’s commonality is naturally occurring or organic) create a network of shared support services, such as helping one another — or sharing hired help — for grocery store runs, transportation to medical appointments, or lawn-mowing. By working together, each person is enabled to safely and comfortably “age in place.”

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 49


TIDY TEAM NICHE RETIREMENT COMMUNITIES (ALSO CALLED AFFINITY RETIREMENT COMMUNITIES) A traditional retirement community is an age-restricted, usually 55-plus community that enables older adults to live independently but with access to social activities and community amenities, such as yard maintenance services or fitness and recreation facilities. (Retirement destinations such as Florida and Arizona have many such places.) A “niche” or “affinity” retirement community is one where residents share a common interest, religion or identity. The link may revolve around, for example, shared ethnicity, sexual orientation, occupation or hobby.

Housekeeping and Janitorial

CLEANING SERVICES We Can Do Your... VACUUMING, SWIPING, MOPPING, DUSTING ALL SURFACES, POLISHING ALL WOOD SURFACES, CLEANING BATHROOM, BEDROOMS, KITCHENS, DENS, LIVING ROOMS and so on!

VILLAGES

Founded in the Beacon Hill neighborhood of Boston in 2002, the Village model of “neighbors-helping-neighbors” provides a way for older adults to stay in their homes and community. There are upwards of 125 Village communities throughout the nation today, with 100 more getting started, most operating via a mix of paid staff and volunteers who assist older residents with everything from transportation and technology training to home repairs and grocery shopping. Villages frequently provide social activities and classes as well. Members pay annual dues and are encouraged to volunteer themselves. You can read a longer version of this article at aarp.org/livable-communities/info-2014/creative-age-friendly-housing-options. For more about Beth Baker’s book, “With a Little Help From Our Friends: Creating Community As We Grow Older” (Vanderbilt University Press, 2014), visit bethbaker.net. To learn more about livable communities, visit aarp.org/livable or email AARP at livable@aarp.org. Amy Levner is the manager of the Livable Communities team at AARP, where she leads educational and outreach efforts to create agefriendly communities for people of all ages. She can be reached at alevner@aarp.org.

50 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015

We can also... REMOVAL OF GARBAGE, EMPTY

ASHTRAYS, CLEANING MIRRORS, POLISHING CHROME SURFACES, SANITIZING ALL SURFACES, CLEANING MICROWAVE-INSIDE/OUTSIDE OVEN CLEANING, CLEAN AND DEFROST REFRIDGATOR, WASHING BACKSPLASHES, CLEANING RANGE TOPS, WASHING TILES AND VANITIES, CLEANING SINKS, TUBS, COUNTERTOPS, WIPING DOWN CHAIRS AND APPLIANCES, CLEANING OF BASEBOARDS, DEODORIZE ROOMS, CHANGING BED LINENS, LAUNDRY, IRONING, AND MORE WE PROVIDE CLEANING SERVICES FOR HOMES, OFFICES, PARTIES, AND SO ON. YOU WILL BE ABLE TO CUSTOMIZE YOUR CLEANING NEEDS.

CALL 228-385-8503 or 888-782-3316.


HOME HEALTH SERVICES

Definitions you need to know By CAROL MARAK

HOME HEALTH

Home health is care given to patients at home by medically trained and licensed professionals. Care offers the services of home health, prescribed by a physician, and administered by a nurse, home health aide, certified nurse assistant, licensed vocational nurse, or a doctor. Payment options are private medical insurance or Medicare. Services include: • Catheter care, injections, IV infusions, tracheotomy care, ventilator patient care, and teaching diabetes management • Post-op rehab: physical (mobility training), occupational and speech therapies • Administer medication • Pain management • Discharge planning, skilled assessments and training, facilitating support groups, grief counseling, child or elder abuse investigations and reporting • Education on disease management • Wound care • Teaching medication management • Durable medical equipment

Who uses home health-care services?

People of all ages: 65 and older, newborns, centenarians, but mostly it’s used by those age 65 and older • Ones discharged from a hospital or nursing home, but need additional care • Those terminally ill and want to live their final days at home • Individuals with short-term health needs • Those needing assistance, due to age or disability, to remain at home

Non-medical home care sitter/ homemaker services

Non-medical home care services offered by caregivers perform only non-medical care tasks. Payment options are out-of-pocket private pay or long-term care insurance. Medicare does not pay for in-home care because Medicare only covers medical expenses and in-home care is non-medical.

In-home care is not home health and it offers

• Assistance with Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) and personal care such as feeding, bathing, toileting, dressing, ambulation and transferring • Assistance with Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs) such as light housekeeping, laundry, grocery shopping, errands, meal preparation, medication reminders and companionship • Personal Assistant Services (PAS) that include any hands on assistance, incontinent care and bathing • Companionship services that include social outings, playing cards, visiting and conversation, reading books, activities and hobbies, recreational activities and travel • Caregivers provide reminders to clients to take medication • Light transportation • Respite Care that gives caregivers a much needed break

Who uses non-medical home care services?

People of all ages, but mostly older adults who need some help to remain at home safely and independently. • Need some help with meal preparation • Need some help with bathing and dressing • Need some help with toileting and transferring • Need some help with transportation • Want companionship and company • Need some help with housecleaning and laundry

When is home care needed for seniors?

• A history of falls • Weight loss, diminished appetite or willingness to prepare meals, spoiled food in the refrigerator • Problems with walking or balance, getting up or down, or transferring in and out of bed • Lessened driving skills or recent car accidents • Changes in personal grooming or hygiene such as uncombed hair, body odor, infrequent bathing or shaving, or wearing unclean or stained clothing •Not remembering to take medication or getting prescriptions refilled, difficulty managing multiple prescriptions • Home has become cluttered or unclean • Paperwork is piling up or bills are not paid

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 51


• A loss of interest in socializing or in activities that were once enjoyed • Confusion, memory loss, difficulty concentrating and changes in personality, which are signs of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease Since the client or family member are paying for services, staff is normally scheduled anywhere from three to 24 hours.

HOSPICE

Hospice care is available to individuals at the end-of-life stage to receive care at home, in a hospital, nursing home, or a private hospice facility. Where someone receives hospice depends on the individual’s physical and mental conditions, which will determine the best place for care. When patients and family members consciously choose an active part of the dying process, the home is the best place. Most family members say they are grateful for the time spent with a loved one. It’s the final days that are the sweetest and can change a family member’s level of compassion, forever. When family takes an active role in hospice care at home, understand that you’re signing up for a tougher transition. If you’ve been the primary caregiver for a loved one all along, you’ve experienced a lot of transitions. Maybe your husband, wife, or parent(s) have been in and out of the hospital and nursing home a number of times. Maybe you’ve hired a professional caregiver to give care at home. These transitions with a loved one have prepared a family for the final journey.

4. Assign a hospice nurse. The team may include therapists and a part-time aide. 5. The hospice team regularly reviews the patient’s care — monitors changes in medical conditions and prognosis. 6. Give special attention to religious, cultural, or other practices important to patient. 7. You are given a 24-hour hospice number and they help you know what to do in a medical emergency. 8. Hospice nurse pays close attention to patient health changes and determine if one needs admittance to the hospital for symptom management.

How to choose a hospice Remember the individual or family has a right to choose the company. You also have a right to stop services at any time or restart service because it is a voluntary program. Questions to help select the right hospice agency: • Is the hospice Medicare certified? (They follow the state and federal guidelines.) • Can I speak with hospice staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week? • Will a nurse or case manager be assigned to us? • How does the hospice manage medical emergencies? • How does the hospice manage complaints? • How much and what kind of equipment will the hospice provide?

What’s the process of hospice?

Carol Marak specializes in writing about senior living and healthcare topics. Find her work on assistedlivingfacilities. org, skillednursingfacilities.org and homehealthcareagencies.com. Contact her at carol@seniorcarequest.com

1. Hospice staff meets with patient and family, and you ask questions to decide if it’s the next step in care.

Hospice care comes with its own set of new caregiving tasks and routines. These are harder.

2. Sign consent forms. Within a few days, the hospice team begins the work. You can keep working with other aides or helpers you pay for on your own. 3. Modify furniture in the home to make room for medical equipment.

52 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015


HOME HEALTH SERVICES ADDUS HEALTH CARE 12337 Ashley Drive, Ste. C Gulfport, 39503

(228) 896-4020

www.addus.com

DEACONESS HOME CARE 3452 Pascagoula St., Ste. 3 Pascagoula, MS 39567

(228) 769-1683

www.deaconesshomecare. com

NURSING MANAGEMENT INC 925 Tommy Munro Drive Biloxi, MS 39532

(228) 385-9196

www.nminursingmgt.com

GRACE AND MERCY PERSONAL CARE AND RESPITE 3224 Avenue D, Ste. A-8 Gulfport, MS 39507

OXFORD HEALTH CARE 14231 Seaway Road, Ste. 3003 Gulfport, MS 39503

www.amedisys.com

(228) 214-9950

CAMELLIA HEALTH CARE 11703 Highland Circle Gulfport, MS 39503

KARE-IN-HOME HEALTH SERVICE 10281 Corporate Drive Gulfport, MS 39503

PRN HOME CARE 600 B East Pass Road Gulfport, MS 39507

www.kareinhome.com

www.prnhomecareservices. com

AMEDISYS HOME HEALTH CARE 925 Tommy Munro Drive Biloxi, MS 39532

(228) 388-4144

(228) 374-2273

www.camellia.com CANON HOSPICE 1520 Broad Ave. Gulfport, MS 39501

(228) 206-5979

www.canonhospice.com DEACONESS HOME CARE 15487 Oak Lane Gulfport, MS 39503

(228) 539-3636

www.deaconesshomecare. com DEACONESS HOME CARE 993 Tommy Munro Drive Biloxi, MS 39532

(228) 388-7707

www.deaconesshomecare. com

(228) 896-8117

www.helpathome.com

(228) 604-2155

(228) 385-2603 (888) 782-3316

MISSISSIPPI HOMECARE OF GULFPORT 12392 Hwy. 49 Gulfport, MS 39503

RIGHT AT HOME 6340 Kiln Delisle Road Pass Christian, MS 39571

(228) 539-4069

(228) 255-9225

MISSISSIPPI HOMECARE OF WIGGINS 1111 East Frontage Drive Wiggins, MS 39577

SAAD’S HEALTH CARE 10598 D’Iberville Blvd. D’Iberville, MS 39540

www.lhcgroup.com

(601) 528-8615

www.lhcgroup.com

www.rahgulfcoast.com

(228) 432-8855

www.saadhealthcare.com

MISSISSIPPI HOMECARE OF BAY ST. LOUIS 12083 Highway 603 Bay St. Louis, MS 39520

(228) 466-5870

www.lhcgroup.com

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 53


Terminal diagnosis

HOSPICE SERVICES

What does this mean? By RANDOLPH ROBBINS

This is a very normal response in many situations when this potentially life-shattering news is first announced. So ... what does this mean? This means that our loved ones have received a terminal diagnosis… that “if” the condition continues to progress the way it is currently progressing, our loved ones have a maximum life expectancy of six months. Important to remember: Legally and medically speaking, this description/explanation of terminal diagnosis is necessary for our loved ones to enter hospice care and receive the benefits of hospice. These benefits are at least three-fold: Meaningful relationships, Team availability and support 24/7, and Comfort care/Quality of life (our loved ones/families to be as comfortable and secure as possible). Our doctors speak from medical expertise, and they are trusted professionals, but they do not have the final word on such things, nor do they claim to. Only the Lord knows the number of our days.

IMPORTANT TO CONSIDER:

Many doctors and families do not fully understand the nature and benefit of hospice care. Whenever we are at the threshold of terminal diagnosis/hospice care, we will wrestle with difficult and delicate decisions:

• Will we face the reality of terminal diagnosis (aggressive curative treatment is no longer beneficial), or will we press on ... doing our very best, hoping that “all this” is best for our loved ones? • Will we choose hospice care (changing from aggressive curative treatment to comfort care/quality of life) as soon as possible to receive the full benefit, or will we wait until the final days because this is our understanding of hospice? • Will we choose hospice care at all?

IMPORTANT TO KNOW: Our doctors and families are encouraged to be

informed… to more fully understand the nature and benefit of hospice care, so that each of us may be better equipped to make the best decisions. Of course, every situation is unique. Again, our doctors do not really know the amount of time our loved ones have left ... remember that important word “if.” It is not their intention to deflate our loved ones and families. It is not their intention to discourage or weaken our faith and hope as any of us fight this very difficult battle. They are speaking from their expertise and judgment in an attempt to do all that is best for us. Certainly, in such times as these, this kind of wisdom and leadership is what we expect and need from our medical professionals.

Robbins is a chaplain with Southern Care Hospice. Reach him at moandrandy@aol.com. Information from the booklet “Crossing The Creek” by Michael Holmes was used in writing this article.

54 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015

CAMELLIA HOSPICE 11703 Highland Circle Gulfport, MS 39503 (228) 374-4434 www.camellia.com CANON HOSPICE 1520 Broad Ave. Gulfport, MS 39501 (228) 206-5979 www.canonhospice.com DEACONESS HOSPICE 951 Howard Ave. Biloxi, MS 39530 (228) 435-2265 FORREST GENERAL HOSPICE 1414 South 28th Ave. Hattiesburg, MS 39402 (601) 288-2500 GENTIVA HEALTH CARE 962 Tommy Munro Drive, Ste. E Biloxi, MS 39532 (228) 385-7845 www.gentiva.com HOSPICE COMPASSUS 12261 Highway 49, Ste. 5 Gulfport, MS 39503 (228) 467-2796 www.hospicecompassus. com HOSPICE OF LIGHT 3535 Bienville Blvd. Ocean Springs, MS 39564 (228) 497-2400 www.mysrhs.com KARE-IN-HOME HOSPICE 10281 Corporate Drive Gulfport, MS 39503 (228) 604-2155 www.kareinhome.com MORNING GLORY HOSPICE 123 Pine Ave., Ste. E Wiggins, MS 39577 (601) 928-5300


NOTRE DAME HOSPICE OF MS 5407 Indian Hill Blvd. Diamondhead, MS 39525 (228) 687-1385 PINNACLE HOSPICE 10532 Auto Mall Parkway Diberville, MS 39540 (228) 207-0390 SAAD’S HEALTH CARE 10598 D’Iberville Blvd. D’Iberville, MS 39540 (228) 432-8855 www.saadhealthcare. com SENTRY CARE 725 Dunbar Ave. Bay Saint Louis, MS 39520 (228) 466-0843 www.sentrycare.com

SOUTHERN CARE 8195 A Woolmarket Road Biloxi, MS 39532 (228) 396-4756 southerncarehospice. com ST. JOSEPH HOSPICE 971 Tommy Munro Drive Biloxi, MS 39532 (228) 594-3455 www.stjosephhospice. com

CALL NOW to reserve space in the next Senior Care Resources Guide

R P.E.

(228) 239-1867

More info / www.ripeconference.com

WE CARE HOSPICE 3725 Main St. Moss Point, MS 39563 (228) 474-2030

MISSISSIPPI GULF COAST

1520 Broad Avenue, Suite 500 • Gulfport, MS 39501 (228) 575-6251-office • (228) 575-8225-fax

The Professionals at

SouthernCare, Inc.

are available to talk with you about hospice care.

WHEN LIFE MATTERS MOST

Tuscaloosa • 205.469.0273 Huntsville • 256.881.2782 Southerncareinc.com SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 55


CAREGIVER’S GUIDE PERSONAL CARE HOMES / ASSISTED LIVING / APARTMENTS ALPHA PERSONAL CARE HOME 60 51st St. Gulfport, MS 39507

(228) 868-1041

ANTEBELLUM SENIOR LIVING LLC

16224 Sweet Carolyn Road Biloxi, MS 39532

(228) 860-4341

www.antebellumseniorliving.com

ARMED FORCES RETIREMENT HOME 1800 Beach Drive Gulfport, MS 39507

(228) 897-4418

BAY TOWER SENIORS APARTMENT HOMES

1203 Market St. Pascagoula, MS 39567

EMERITUS AT BILOXI / BROOKDALE COMMUNITY

PASS OAKS PERSONAL CARE HOME

(228) 388-0946

(228) 255-9445

2120 Enterprise Drive Biloxi, MS 39531 www.emeritus.com

PRECIOUS CARE HOME

(601) 945-5053

(228) 324-4244

258 Vestry Road Perkinston, MS 39573

GABRIEL MANOR RETIREMENT APARTMENTS 2321 Atkinson Road Biloxi, MS 39531

(228) 388-1013

THE GARDENS ASSISTED LIVING

1260 Ocean Springs Road Ocean Springs, MS 39564

(228) 818-0650

www.thegardenseniorliving. com

CARLOW MANOR

JOHNSON HOUSE

15195 Barbara Drive Gulfport, Mississippi 39503

6708 Elder Ferry Road Moss Point, MS 39563

CEDAR POINT SENIOR VILLAGE

KAREMED ASSISTED LIVING

(228) 436-7767

(228) 872-7790

200 Maple St. Biloxi, Mississippi 39530

CENTURY OAKS RETIREMENT COMMUNITY 1718 Pass Road Biloxi, Mississippi 39531

(228) 435-0055

www.centuryoaksadultcommunity.com

www.passoaks.com

EVA’S PLACE

(228) 312-0470

(228) 539-0707

13410 Edwin Ladner Road Pass Christian, MS 39571

(228) 285-1825

2701 Catherine Drive Ocean Springs, MS 39564

904 Camp Four Jack Road Biloxi, MS 39532

THE PRENTISS HOUSE

15930 Waits Road Ocean Springs, MS 39565

(228) 219-3206

RESIDENCE AT BAY COVE 680 Bay Cove Drive Biloxi, MS 39532

(228) 702-0142

12420 Lamey Bridge Road D’Iberville MS 39540

(228) 396-2722

SAMARITAN HOUSE RETIREMENT APARTMENTS

642 Jackson Ave. Ocean Springs, Mississippi 39564

(228) 875-1087

(228) 388-2495

1788 Medical Park Drive Biloxi, MS 39532

NOTRE DAME DE LA MER APARTMENTS

SARALAND MANOR RETIREMENT APARTMENTS

(228) 467-2885

(228) 863-7297

292 Highway 90 Bay St. Louis, MS 39520

(228) 868-7199

ONE MAGNOLIA PLACE

SEASHORE HIGHLANDS

(228) 832-8400

(228) 831-7000

(228) 831-4242

www.onemagnoliaplace. net

16116 Vick Road Gulfport, MS 39503

56 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015

725 Dunbar Ave. Bay Saint Louis, MS 39520

(228) 466-0843

www.sentrycare.com

SERENITY SPRINGS 9405 Tucker Road Biloxi, MS 39532 (228) 872-3373

(228) 396-8828

(228) 396-1998

CONNECTED HEART

SENTRY CARE

RIVERSIDE

SANTA MARIA DEL MAR RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

16391 Robinson Road Gulfport, MS 39503

Assisted Living

SETTLERS COVE

CHAPMAN OAKS INC 210 Roberts Ave. Long Beach, MS 39560

(228) 207-5225

www.residenceatbaycove. com

LEMOYNE PLACE

14306 Lemoyne Blvd. Biloxi, MS 39532

SEASHORE OAKS

1450-A Beach Blvd. Biloxi, MS 39531 (228) 374-7771

8010 Hwy. 49 Gulfport, MS 39501

12170 Highland Way Gulfport, MS 39503

6716 Neshoba Ave. Biloxi, MS 39532 Settler’s Pointe Personal Care Home 13625 Wilfred Seymour Road Ocean Springs, MS 39565

(228) 872-1746

Villa Maria Retirement Apartments 921 Porter Ave. Ocean Springs, MS 39564

(228) 875-8811


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SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 57


What will it be like when the end of life nears? By THOMAS RANDOLPH ROBBINS

As a loved one nears the end of life, a caregiver can become overwhelmed by fear and insecurity. What the loved one needs most during this time is for the caregiver to “be there.” Your presence and your love is everything to the dying person. When you are ready (sad, yet accepting), it’s important to give your loved one permission “to go,” assuring him or her that you will be alright. This will help them to “let go” when it is time. What will it be like as the end nears for a terminally ill person? Every situation is unique, but these are some things you will most likely see in the patient. As you do, you will know that the end is near. As a caregiver, know also that you are not alone. Draw near to God, and He will draw near to you. Also, know that your hospice team will be with you to encourage, to support, to help the patient and the family be as comfortable and secure as possible. • Appetite for food and fluids will progressively decrease and eventually disappear. This usually is uncomfortable for the caregiver, whose normal caregiving instincts cause them to want to feed their loved one. Caregivers must learn to accept the truth that the kind and loving response is to resist trying to force food and fluid intake upon the patient. The patient’s body is shutting down and cannot handle the food and fluid. If forced, the food just sits and causes discomfort. • Bowel activity and urine output will slow down/change. Urine output is more unpredictable because of the presence of fluid in different parts of the body. • The possibility of bedsores and wounds will most likely require greater vigilance to avoid unwanted complications. The goal of palliative care is comfort — to prevent any situation that the patient may face from becoming a serious threat to comfort. The hospice team works with the patient and family to accomplish this goal.

• Breathing patterns will change. Irregular patterns will develop. Pauses between breaths can become quite long as the end draws near. This is all normal to the dying process, a part of the process of the body winding down. • Sleep/dream patterns change as the patient sleeps more. • Confusion/disorientation will mostly likely increase. The patient will review life experiences (the good, the bad, the ugly) in an attempt to resolve life issues and prepare for death. • Pain levels may increase. Medications may need to be adjusted to allow the patient to be at a good comfort level. This helps so the patient can more successfully resolve life issues and find closure and completion. Otherwise, uncontrolled pain captures their attention and focus. • Other issues might be: a sense of loss of energy, fear and other emotions, more of the patient spending more time “on the other side,” possibly seeing people who have passed on before.

Robbins is a chaplain with SouthernCare Hospice. Reach him at moandrandy@aol.com. Information from the booklet “Crossing The Creek” by Michael Holmes was used in writing this article.

58 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015


Caregivers need care, too! It’s just as important for a caregiver to take care of her own needs as it is for her to give attention and focus to a loved one she is caring for. There are many online and local sources to help caregivers succeed. One website, www.helpguide.org, offers some specific tips for caregivers in this area. Here’s an excerpt. Pablo Casals, the world-renowned cellist, said, “The capacity to care is the thing that gives life its deepest significance and meaning.” It’s essential that you receive the support you need, so you don’t lose that capacity. While you’re caring for your loved one, don’t forget about your own needs. Caregivers need care, too. Emotional needs of family caregivers. m Take time to relax daily and learn how to regulate yourself and de-stress when you start to feel overwhelmed. m Keep a journal. Write down your thoughts and feelings. This will give you perspective and serve as a way to release strong feelings. m Talk with someone to make sense of your situation and your feelings. m Feed your spirit. Pray, meditate, or do another activity that makes you feel part of something greater. Try to find meaning in your life and in your role as a caregiver. m Watch out for signs of depression and anxiety, and get professional help if needed.

Social and recreational needs of family caregivers m

Stay social. Make it a priority to visit regularly with other people. Nurture your closerelationships. Don’t let yourself become isolated.

m Do things you enjoy. Laughter and joy can help keep you going when you face trials, stress, and pain. m Maintain balance in your life. Don’t give up activities that are important to you, such as your work or your hobbies. m Give yourself a break. Take regular breaks from caregiving and give yourself an extended break at least once a week.

m

Find a community. Join or re-establish your connection to a religious group, social club or civic organization. The broader your support network, the better.

Physical needs of family caregivers m

Exercise regularly. Try to get in at least 30 minutes of exercise three times per week. Exercise is one of the best ways to relieve stress and boost your energy. So get moving, even if you’re tired.

m

Eat right. Well-nourished bodies are better prepared to cope with stress and get through busy days. Keep your energy up and your mind clear by eating nutritious meals at regular times throughout the day.

m Avoid alcohol and drugs. It can be tempting to turn to substances for escape when life feels overwhelming, but they can easily compromise the quality of your caregiving. Instead, try dealing with problems head on and with a clear mind. m

Get enough sleep. Aim for an average of eight hours of solid, uninterrupted sleep every night. Otherwise, your energy level, productivity, and ability to handle stress will suffer.

m

Keep up with your own health care. Go to the doctor and dentist on schedule, and keep up with your own prescriptions or medical therapy. As a caregiver, you need to stay as strong and healthy as possible.

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 59


FINANCIAL PLANNING

Finding the money for care ...............................61 When to talk.......................................................62 Social Security....................................................64 Medicare/Medicaid..........................................65 Worst time to plan a funeral................................66 Funeral planning checklist................................67 Know about insurance......................................68


Finding the money for care The population of American seniors is expected to double in size within the next 25 years according to the National Institute on Aging and the U.S. Census Bureau. As our aging population continues to grow, so does the demand for both in-home care and residential care facilities. In fact, U.S. News & World Report reported in 2013 that for the next 20 years, about 10,000 baby boomers will turn 65 each day. This means that elder care and retirement planning are crucial to help support an aging population. Three options for seniors and their families to consider are in-home care agencies, nursing homes, and assisted living communities. It makes sense to most people that nursing homes, with their more intensive levels of care, cost more than assisted living communities. What many don’t realize is the elder care costs associated with home care can quickly outpace the costs of assisted living as well. Because home care agencies typically charge by the hour, it will depend on how much care is needed, but the expenses can add up quickly for anyone who needs extensive help. Seniors and their families often opt for independent caregivers because of the cost saving, but it’s important to factor in the value an in-home care agency and understand what they have to offer as screened and bonded trained professionals. Many states require accreditation and licensing for in-home care agencies, whereas there are no such standards for independent workers. Paying for care requires understanding options through research and careful planning. Here are some things to consider:

LONG-TERM CARE INSURANCE

Long-term care insurance (LTCI) helps pay for costs not covered by private medical insurance. This type of plan can help minimize the financial impact of longterm health care needs. In general, long-term care insurance will cover the cost of home care, assisted living, adult daycare, respite care, hospice care, nursing home, and Alzheimer’s care facilities. Most companies will not insure people with preexisting conditions, so it’s easier to buy LTCI before health issues arise.

LIFE INSURANCE POLICY CONVERSIONS

Instead of allowing a life insurance policy to lapse or be surrendered, the owner can convert their policy into

a Long Term Care Benefit Plan. Any type of in-force life insurance policy (Term, Universal, Whole and Group) with a death benefit of $50,000 to one million can be quickly and easily converted into a Long Term Care Benefit Plan that will start covering immediate costs of any form of senior care the policy owner chooses. It is a unique financial option for seniors because it pays for immediate care needs, all health conditions are accepted, there are no wait periods, no care limitations, no costs or obligations to apply, no requirement to be terminally ill, and there are no premium payments. Policy owners have the legal right to convert an in-force life insurance policy to enroll in the benefit plan, and are able to immediately direct tax-exempt payments to cover their senior housing and long term care costs.

KNOW HOW MEDICARE WORKS

Many U.S. citizens are surprised to learn that Medicare is not universal health care for people over 65 and does not cover long-term care costs for seniors. For example, Medicare can cover short-term rehab stays at a nursing home after a hospitalization. It also can pay for rehab and therapy at home for a limited period of time and when prescribed by a doctor. However, it’s vitally important to recognize that Medicare does not pay for custodial care. Medicare should primarily be considered health insurance. This means Medicare does not pay for the following types of senior care: assisted living, long term care at a nursing home, residential care homes, and any long term care.

REVERSE MORTGAGES

A reverse mortgage, also called a Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM), is a type of loan for homeowners over the age of 62 that turns equity saved in a home into cash. When someone secures a reverse mortgage, they are then able to use the money from their home equity while also living in and retaining ownership of their home. There are no restrictions on how you can use the money from a reverse mortgage. Traditionally, the disadvantages of a reverse mortgage are the relatively high closing costs, but if you need money for any purpose, and are concerned about not being able to make the payments on a normal loan, then a reverse mortgage may be right for you. Source: www.aplaceformom.com

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 61


Role reversal

When children should talk to parents about money BY WEALTH MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS, INC.

As Baby Boomers grow older — and presumably wiser about economic matters — more are finding themselves in a position of caretaker for elderly parents. Raising the topic of money with parents can be difficult. But with the right choice of words, timing, and tone, you can open the door to a meaningful conversation.

SELECT A REPRESENTATIVE

An initial conversation about finances should be done one-on-one. Involving too many people can be overwhelming and appear threatening. If you have siblings, select one — perhaps the oldest, most financially knowledgeable, or one with whom your parent(s) may feel most comfortable — to lead the way. Remember, this is about your parent’s money, not about yours or your children’s.

BE SENSITIVE

To some extent, our financial lives influence how we view ourselves as independent human beings. For many, old age is a time of coping with a series of physical and emotional losses: hearing, eyesight, mobility, memory, as well as friendships. With any conversation about money, be sensitive to the fears and concerns your parents may harbor about their possible loss of control or independence.

BREAK THE ICE SKILLFULLY

A subtle opening could involve an anecdotal story about a person you know in common, a news article found in the daily paper, or even about yourself. • • • •

I need help with my will. Who did you use? How’s Aunt Mary doing since Uncle Joe passed away? What was it like for your parents during the Great Depression? Did you watch that TV special on hospitals last week?

62 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015

START SLOWLY

Don’t commence a dialogue during a crisis situation or try to resolve all details in one meeting. Raise questions that your parents can consider for a followup conversation. You could try something like: “I’ll stop by for coffee next week, and we can continue our talk. Maybe you’ll have those papers by then?” Your parents may actually enjoy the attention. After several informal conversations, you may want to consider the help of a financial professional. For more information, contact the National Council on Aging (www.ncoa.org) and AARP (www.aarp.org). If you’d like to learn more, please contact Brenda Whitwell, Financial Advisor, Morgan Stanley at 251-470-2310. Article by Wealth Management Systems, Inc. and provided courtesy of Morgan Stanley Financial Advisor. The author(s) are not employees of Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC (“Morgan Stanley”). The opinions expressed by the authors are solely their own and do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and data in the article or publication has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Neither the information provided nor any opinion expressed constitutes a solicitation by Morgan Stanley with respect to the purchase or sale of any security, investment, strategy or product that may be mentioned. Morgan Stanley Financial Advisor(s) engaged R.I.P.E. and DWilson and Associates Publishing and Marketing Solutions to feature this article. Brenda Whitwell may only transact business in states where she is registered or excluded or exempted from registration (FINRA Broker Check http://brokercheck. finra.org/Search/Search.aspx). Transacting business, follow-up and individualized responses involving either effecting or attempting to effect transactions in securities, or the rendering of personalized investment advice for compensation, will not be made to persons in states where Brenda Whitwell is not registered or excluded or exempt from registration.


Our priority is to assist you in retiring with the independence and security you desire. Retirement | Income | Planning

Lee Rogers

Kathy Rogers Kate Lawler

Join an upcoming webinar or set up an appointment today! lee@marstonrogers.com

kathy@marstonrogers.com

kate@marstonrogers.com

15429 O’Neal Road, Gulfport, MS 39503 • (228) 832-9313

www.marstonrogers.com

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 63

SECURITIES AND INVESTMENT ADVISORY SERVICES ARE OFFERED SOLELY THROUGH AMERITAS INVESTMENT CORP. (AIC) MEMBER FINRA/SIPC. AIC AND MARSTON ROGERS GROUP ARE NOT AFFILIATED. ADDITIONAL PRODUCTS AND SERVICES MAY BE AVAILABLE THROUGH LEE ROGERS AND MARSTON ROGERS GROUP THAT ARE NOT OFFERED THROUGH AIC.


SOCIAL SECURITY What you need to know An estimated 165 million people work and pay Social Security taxes and about 58 million people receive monthly Social Security benefits, including some 41 million retirees and their families. Social Security beneficiaries also include disabled workers and families in which a spouse or parent has died. Social Security replaces about 40 percent of an average wage earner’s income in retirement, so to live comfortably, individuals also need additional income from pensions, savings and investments for their retirement years. The amount of Social Security payments is based on how much you earned during your career. While you work and pay taxes, you are earning Social Security “credits.” In 2014, workers earn one credit for each $1,200 in earnings, up to a maximum of four credits per year. Social Security says most people need 40 credits (or 10 years of work) to qualify for benefits. Benefits also are based on what age you start receiving Social Security. If you choose to get benefits before the full retirement age, you will receive reduced payments. If you were born from 1943 to 1960, the age at which full retirement benefits are payable increases gradually to age 67. If you were born in 1947 or earlier, you already are eligible for your full Social Security benefit. You can keep working while you receive retirement benefits but there are rules about when and how much you can earn. But once you reach your full retirement age, you can keep working and your Social Security benefit will not be reduced, no matter how much you earn. Social Security advises you to apply for benefits about three months before the date you want your benefits to start. If you are not quite ready to retire, but are thinking about doing so in the near future, visit Social Security’s website to use the comprehensive retirement planner. The website www.socialsecurity.gov has information about all of Social Security’s programs. You can apply for benefits, review your statement, locate the local Social Security office, request a

64 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015

replacement Medicare card and more. You can also call toll free 1-800-772-1213 to speak with someone confidentially. If you are deaf or hard of hearing, call the TTY number, 1-800-325-0778

SOCIAL SECURITY OFFICE Address: 9394 Three Rivers Rd., Gulfport, MS 39503 Website: ssa.gov Phone: 877.897.0609 TTY: 228.864.9463 Hours: Monday - Friday, 8:30 - 3:30 p.m. Documents Required: Birth Certificate, W-2, Tax Return, DD214, Marriage Certificate, Divorce Decree, Death Certificate, Verification of Income and Resources. Services: SS cards, supplemental security income, cash benefits to limited-income individuals, seniors, survivors of deceased workers, and individuals with disabilities.


Medicare and Medicaid: Do you know the difference? From www.360financialliteracy.org

Medicare and Medicaid were signed into law to protect older and poorer Americans against the high cost of health care. Ironically, it’s the high cost of providing health care through these programs that now threatens federal and state budgets, leading to calls for Medicare and Medicaid reform. Although these programs are often lumped together, they function quite differently. Here’s a look at the coverage each provides.

WHAT IS MEDICARE?

Medicare is a health insurance program funded and run by the federal government that guarantees health coverage to older Americans. Medicare is not income-based. People who have paid Medicare taxes on their earnings are automatically eligible at age 65, but some people with disabilities qualify for Medicare coverage earlier than age 65, and people with end-stage renal disease qualify at any age. Medicare offers three main types of coverage. Part A covers inpatient hospital care, as well as short-term skilled nursing care, hospice care, and home health care under certain conditions. Part B covers medical services such as doctor’s visits, outpatient care, and laboratory tests. Part D covers prescription drugs. If you or your spouse has paid Medicare taxes while working, you generally won’t pay a premium for Medicare Part A coverage, but you’ll pay a premium if you want to enroll in Part B or in some (but not

all) Part D plans. You’ll also need to pay certain out-of-pocket costs such as deductibles, co-payments, or coinsurance costs, depending on the types of coverage you have.

WHAT IS MEDICAID?

Medicaid is a health insurance program funded by both the federal government and state governments to provide coverage to Americans of all ages who have low incomes and no health insurance. States administer their own Medicaid programs under federal guidelines. They must cover individuals on public assistance, but they may also opt to cover other groups and establish eligibility requirements. Children, families, people with disabilities, and older individuals may all receive Medicaid. If you’re eligible for Medicaid, you may have to pay a small co-payment when receiving medical services, but most of your health-care costs will be covered. Medicaid, not Medicare, is the primary payer of nursing home care in the United States. Although Medicare pays for short-term skilled nursing or rehabilitative care in a skilled nursing facility, it does not pay for extended care in a nursing home or for other custodial long-term care. Custodial care is help with daily activities such as eating, bathing, dressing, CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

MEDICARE OR MEDICAID PRIMARILY AGE-BASED; INDIVIDUALS AGE 65 AND OLDER QUALIFY, ALONG WITH SOME INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES Primarily means-based; individuals of any age with low incomes who meet eligibility requirements may qualify THE FEDERALGOVERNMENT RUNS MEDICARE, AND THE PROGRAM IS THE SAME FOR ALL AMERICANS State governments run programs under federal guidelines, so programs vary from state to state

care, prescription drugs, laboratory costs, family planning, and nursing home care (types of coverage may vary from state to state)

FINANCING COMES FROM FEDERAL FUNDS; PARTLY FINANCED THROUGH PAYROLL TAXES AND PREMIUMS Financing comes from federal, state, and local revenue MEDICARE PART A PROVIDES COVERAGE FOR HOSPITAL STAYS; MEDICARE PART B COVERS THE COST OF DOCTOR’S BILLS, LABORATORY COSTS, AND SOME OUTPATIENT COSTS; MEDICARE PART D COVERS SOME PRESCRIPTION DRUG COSTS Broader coverage of health costs than Medicare, including inpatient and outpatient

MEDICARE BENEFICIARIES MAY PAY DEDUCTIBLES, CO-PAYMENTS, COINSURANCE COSTS, AND PREMIUMS Medicaid generally pays all approved charges, though a small deductible or copayment may be required

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 65


Think ahead The worst time to plan a funeral is when you need one By VERONICA ROMANO

Simply put, planning a funeral is one of the hardest things we have to do. We don’t want to think about something bad happening to our loved ones or ourselves. However, thinking about it now is a lot easier on remaining family members than them not knowing what to do after a death. In general, women like to make sure our families and our affairs are taken care of. That should be the same approach taken in end-of-life decisions.

ASK YOURSELF THESE QUESTIONS: • • • •

What will happen to my family? My property? My money and investments? Who is going to carry the financial burden? • Do I want traditional funeral services or something else? • Where would I like to be laid to rest? These questions are just some that will need to be considered before the time comes.

There are steps you can take now to ensure your wishes are known. First, sit down with an attorney and discuss your will. Situations often arise over personal wishes and financial assets within family groups unless those decisions have been made ahead of time. Next, discuss your advance health-care directives, also known as a living will. This is a set of written instructions that a person gives to specify what care actions should be taken if he or she is no longer able to make decisions because of an illness or mental incapacity. And third, find a trusted funeral home and make prearrangements. Mississippi state laws are designed to protect your wishes when prearranged and paid in full. Prearranging can freeze the price, while saving your family stress, time and the painful decisions that must be made when arranging funerals. Finally, make your wishes known to key family members. Planning ahead today provides peace of mind tomorrow. Romano is community outreach director for Riemann Family Funeral Homes. You may reach her at vromano@riemannfamily.com or (228) 539-9800.

MEDICARE OR MEDICAID CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE and using the bathroom. Some individuals need both short-term and long-term care; for example, someone who has suffered a stroke may receive rehabilitation services in a skilled nursing facility, but may later be admitted to a nursing home in order to receive custodial long-term care services.

CAN YOU BE ELIGIBLE FOR BOTH MEDICARE & MEDICAID?

Yes--if you’re eligible for both programs, you’re known as a “dual eligible” beneficiary. Generally, individuals who are eligible for both programs are older or disabled

66 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015

(or both) and need help paying their Medicare costs because they have very low incomes. Medicaid covers premiums, deductibles, co-payments, coinsurance, and other Medicare costs and provides some health benefits that Medicare does not. Individuals in nursing homes are often dual eligible beneficiaries, and that’s partly behind the misconception that Medicare pays for nursing home or other long-term care (it does not--see sidebar); instead, Medicaid is the primary payer of nursing home bills. Because many older individuals cannot afford the high cost of nursing home care and exhaust their savings, they eventually become eligible for Medicaid. Review and compare Medicare plans, www.medicare.gov. For more info on Medicaid eligibility, go to www.medicaid. gov.


Funeral planning checklist A LIST OF ALL OF THE ISSUES TO CONSIDER WHEN PLANNING A FUNERAL Planning a funeral is a complicated process, which is made even more difficult by the emotional stress that accompanies the death of a loved one. Fortunately, many of the arrangements can be made ahead of time, which will decrease the burden on those left behind. Use the checklist below when discussing funeral plans with your loved one, to make sure that his or her final wishes are carried out.

PARTICIPANTS

PRE-PLANNING

CEMETERY SELECTIONS

All of these items can be arranged in advance of a person’s death.

GENERAL PREPARATIONS • • • •

Assemble personal information for obituary Choose a charity to direct donations to Decide if jewelry is to remain or be returned Choose a funeral home

FUNERAL HOME SERVICES • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Choose burial or cremation Select a casket or cremation container Select a burial vault or cremation urn Choose the location/type of service Choose family viewing or visitation Choose a floral arrangement Select a photograph to be displayed Decide which religious or fraternal items are to be displayed Decide what the deceased will wear Select music, hymns, and solos Select scripture or literature to be read Select a memorial register Select memorial folders and acknowledgement cards

TRANSPORTATION

• Funeral coach Clergy car • Family limousine • Pallbearer limousine • Flower car

• • • •

Choose clergy or officiator Choose organist or other musical participants Select pallbearers Select family member or friend to perform the eulogy • Select family member or friend to read scripture or literature • • • •

Choose a cemetery Select a burial or cremation plot Decide whether above or below ground Select a memorial or grave marker and inscription

FINAL ARRANGEMENTS • • • • • • • •

The following items cannot be arranged beforehand. Ambulance transfer from place of death Apply for death certificates Apply for a burial permit Set a time and date for the service Request preparation and embalming Compose and submit obituary Arrange location and food for the reception

For additional tools for caregiving or aging, visit www.CaregiversLibrar y.org

Helping to make the toughest times of your life a little easier. Call us at 228.374.5650

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 67


What you need to know about insurance

INSURANCE

By ANGELYN TREUTEL ZERINGUE

At this time in life, the last thing anyone wants to think about is insurance, however, now is a critical time to review coverages and pricing. Be certain you have a trustworthy insurance agent/ advisor who will assist you with the complexities of insurance. Involve family members who are willing to ensure coverages are paid for and are willing to follow up on any claims made. Keep all of your insurance paperwork together to make it easier for reviews.

MEDICARE SUPPLEMENTS

Medicare supplements are a good value, and Plan F provides the most comprehensive coverage. Plan F covers the excess costs, such as deductibles or Medicare limitations which are not included or covered by your basic Medicare plan. Having Plan F means that you will have NO out-of-pocket expenses when you visit the doctor or have to go to the hospital. Plan F also covers care at a skilled nursing facility and medical emergency help when traveling abroad. You will still need to have a separate coverage for your medications.

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE

As long as you still own a vehicle, you should retain an auto policy with liability coverage, even if you are no longer driving the vehicle. You can reduce the cost of the insurance by increasing deductibles on comprehensive and collision coverage, or even eliminating these coverages, even though they are helpful coverages to have. Comprehensive and collision coverage provides for repair or replacement of your vehicle in the event of an at-fault accident or theft or “act of God�. The liability coverage is what protects another party if there is an at-fault accident. If someone else is driving your vehicle on a regular basis, or someone else is living in your household, you should request to have that person added to your auto insurance. You should keep your liability coverages high enough to protect the total level of your assets. If you own a home, your auto limits should be at least $300k or higher. Umbrella insurance is very affordable and can increase your protection by $1 million or more. Talk to your your insurance advisor.

RESIDENTIAL INSURANCE

If you are still occupying your home, shop around at least every 3 years to ensure you have the best available rate. You want to have a replacement cost policy which will pay to rebuild your home up to your policy limits without any deduction for depreciation. To keep the best rates, be sure that your home remains attractive to the insurance companies. You can achieve this by keeping your home well maintained and updated and keeping the yard nice-looking and free of liability hazards and/or tripping hazards. Higher deductibles will lower your premium. This will make you responsible for repairing any small problems, but will keep you from receiving surcharges for putting in too many claims. Save your insurance for the big claims. Insurance companies often review the properties for issues or potential problems, such as trees or shrubs overhanging your roof or brushing up against the side of the home. The trees and shrubs can damage the roof and side of the home which will allow water leaks or holes in the siding that are ripe for rodent or insect intrusion. Keep your yard well-maintained, and keep your trees and shrubs back away from the home to be eligible for the best insurance companies who offer the lowest rates. Mitigation and retrofits on your home are also beneficial to your insurance rates in many cases. If you are no longer occupying your home, your insurance may not be protecting you! Check with your agent if you are out of your home for more than 60 days, because there may be a vacancy clause in your policy, which would void some of your coverages, and would require a different policy to be written. Also, if you move out of the home, and someone else is staying there, then the nature of the coverage would need to be changed from owner-occupied to tenantoccupied, even if the occupant is a relative and is not paying any rent, since they are not listed on the Deed of ownership. Again, your Trusted Choice Insurance Advisor can assist you and your family to ensure you have the proper coverages for your protection. Another issue that is frequently raised is who is authorized to make changes to your policy. No one is allowed to make changes without your


permission if you are the policy holder, so please let your Insurance Agent know who you have authorized to assist you with your insurance coverages. There is definitely a lot to think about, so get with your Insurance Advisor right away!

Angelyn Treutel Zeringue, CPA is president of SouthGroup Insurance-Gulf Coast, a Trusted Choice and Best Practices Agency, with offices in Bay St Louis, Biloxi, and Diamondhead. We are local agents representing hundreds of different carriers for Personal (including home with wind coverage), Business, Life and Health coverages. www. southgroupgulfcoast.com (228) 466-4498

Experience the SouthGroup Difference

• Risk Management Solutions & Customized • •

BAY ST. LOUIS 412 Hwy 90, Suite 6 Bay St. Louis, MS 39520 P. 228-466-4498 F. 888-415-8922

Business Insurance Protection Tailored Personal Insurance Services for You and Your Family Statewide Agency with Local Service

BILOXI 2505 Pass Road Biloxi, MS 39531 P. 228-385-1177 F. 888-415-8922

DIAMONDHEAD 5400 Indian Hill Diamondhead, MS 39525 P. 228-467-2282 F. 888-415-8922

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 69


LEGAL MATTERS

Power of attorney...................................................71 Steps to involuntary commitment.......................................................72

70 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015


KNOW WHAT POWER OF ATTORNEY MEANS By KATHY BROWN VAN ZUTPHEN

People often request a legal document called a “power of attorney” where they name someone else to act on their behalf or they put someone else’s name on their financial accounts. An attorney can draft a power of attorney, but I want to warn of a couple of dangers associated with putting someone’s name on your financial accounts or a POA document. First, if you put someone’s name on your account or give them the power to control your financial accounts in a POA, it is the same as giving that person ownership of the account. That person can do anything that you can do with your assets, including withdraw all of your money. Second, more banks are refusing to accept or honor power of attorney documents; therefore, if that is the only document that you have executed, you may not have an effective document to allow someone to help you with your finances when you need it. I recommend, therefore, that elderly people use safer alternatives such as a trust, conservatorship, guardianship, or even a family limited liability company to handle their assets. These legal mechanisms can limit the potential for loss of your assets and help you to keep maximum assets. Further, such legal mechanisms allow you to maintain control in that they allow you to provide for a plan of action if you become disabled. Also, what you must remember is that if the person already has dementia, that person no longer has legal capacity to sign a Power of Attorney, so you would need to establish a Conservatorship in order to help that person.

CONSERVATORSHIP

If you have an older loved one, you should watch out for signs that your loved one has diminished mental capacity and may need a conservatorship established or has physical disabilities and would benefit by having a guardianship established for them to protect and care for their well-being.

• Look out for their best interest, which may include making medical decisions for them. • The early warning signs that your loved one needs help include, but are not limited to, the following: • The older loved one can no longer drive himself or herself in the car without getting lost. • The older loved one gets stopped by the police for traffic violations such as going the wrong way down oneway streets. • The older loved one has diminished mental capacity beyond just temporary forgetfulness. • The older loved one can no longer prepare meals unassisted. • The older loved one fails to take his or her medication as it is prescribed. • The older loved one becomes unable to pay bills on time resulting in loss of electricity, etc. • Or the older loved one makes bad financial decisions, such asfalling prey to sweepstake scams described above or otherunwise gifts, purchases, or investments. • Conservatorships/guardianships are legal proceedings where another person is appointed as a conservator or guardian over the person to help, usually by controlling their assets and/or medical decisions. If you notice any of the above signs, please contact us to discuss how you can help and protect your loved one with a conservatorship or guardianship proceeding. Van Zupthen is an attorney at law with AL-MS Coastal Law, LLC. She is located at 1115 B Cowan Road, Gulfport, MS 39507. Reach her at (228) 357-5227. For more information, go to www.al-mscoastallaw.com.

In general, a conservator or guardian has the responsibility to do the following: • Collect the assets of the ward and take an inventory. • Protect their property and make financial decisions for their benefit. • Make necessary payments to provide for their care.

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 71


Steps to involuntarily commiting a loved one By CORI WALKER, MS, LMSW

Watching someone you love suffer from mental illness can be a gut-wrenching and overwhelming experience. Individuals whose mental health conditions are more chronic may require in-patient treatment; but, sometimes, they are too ill to realize that they need help. In these situations, it may be necessary for family members or friends to consider an involuntary commitment. An involuntary commitment is the process of admitting a person to a psychiatric hospital against his or her will by means of a court order. The Crisis Stabilization Unit in Gulfport, a program of Gulf Coast Mental Health Center, provides psychiatric treatment for involuntarily committed adult residents of Harrison, Hancock, Pearl River, and Stone Counties. To begin the commitment process, a concerned individual must visit CSU in person. There, they will complete an affidavit citing specific examples of behavior indicating the person in question is an imminent risk to themselves or others, or is otherwise gravely disabled. The behavior must have occurred within two weeks to this filing. Except in certain legal instances, a person will not be committed for actions that are anticipated or symptoms that have yet to appear. In addition to an affidavit, the affiant must be able to provide the person’s social security number and date of birth, and pay a $143 chancery court fee. Once completed, a judge will immediately be notified and review the affidavit. If after that review, the judge agrees psychiatric evaluation is necessary, a writ will be issued for the sheriff’s department in the respective county to pick the person up and transport him or her to CSU. A person is held at CSU for a minimum of 48 hours, during which time three professionals will evaluate the person. Upon completion of the evaluation process, they may be held for further treatment. The average length of stay for those who do require treatment is 14 days.

72 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015

Many of us have family members who struggle with mental illness. It is important to be aware of relapse symptoms early in the hope of having the person voluntarily receive treatment. Some relapse symptoms may include withdrawal, depressed mood, and appetite and sleep disturbances. Oftentimes, these behaviors may be atypical for the person but perhaps are not glaringly obvious enough to sound alarms. Other behaviors that may indicate a person is getting sick is if they have stopped taking their psychiatric medications as prescribed, is exhibiting unusual behaviors such as extreme isolation, paranoia, hallucinations or delusions, or is showing signs of suicidal tendencies, threatening suicide or homicide, and refuses or is unable to seek voluntary help. It may be time to seek emergency treatment or an involuntary commitment. This brief outline serves only as a generalized guide. Involuntary commitment is a complex, impassioned, and controversial issue. For more information, contact CSU (228) 868-6524. If you or a loved one is in crisis after hours, call GCMH (228) 863-1132.


ATTORNEYS

I

COUNSELORS

I

ADVOCATES

Let me help with your legal woes during your family’s time of need.

kathy brown van zutphen ATTORNEY AT LAW AL-MS Coastal Law, LLC 1115 B Cowan Road Gulfport, MS 39507

(228) 357-5227

Legal Services that I provide include:

WWW.AL-MSCOASTALLAW.COM

ESTATE PLANNING | ELDER LAW | FAMILY LAW | DRUG COMMITMENTS LITIGATION | CORPORATE LAW FOR SMALL BUSINESSES

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 73


RESOURCES

Tips to reduce winter power bill..................................... 75 Utilities/transportation..................................................... 77 Education........................................................................ 78 Food/meals...................................................................... 79 Hospitals/hotlines............................................................. 81 Mental health/disease info & foundations ................... 82 Senior centers/senior service.......................................... 83 Substance abuse services.............................................. 84 Support groups................................................................ 85 Utilities/taxes.................................................................... 86 Veterans info/victim services.......................................... 87 Durable medical equipment providers......................... 88

74 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015


Simple tips to reduce your winter power bills Whether we like it or not, winter is coming, and it’s time to get prepared. This part of the country does not experience the storms and blizzards that some states face, but Mississippi winters can still pack a punch. Mississippi Power knows that many seniors are living on a tight budget, and we want to help you stretch your household budget. We’ve provided some energy-saving tips to help you prepare for the colder months and save money on your monthly power bill.

MAINTAIN YOUR HEATING SYSTEM

Now is a good time to schedule a service appointment for your heating system to ensure that it is running properly and determine any problems so they can be fixed before the coldest weather hits. Find out how often your heating system’s filter should be replaced and schedule this on your calendar so you won’t forget. Most system filters need to be replaced every month or so.

LOWER YOUR WATER HEATING COSTS Water heating can account for up to 25% of the energy consumed in your home. If you have an electric water heater, lowering your temperature setting to Warm (about 120° F) can make a noticeable difference in your power bill. This also reduces the chance that you will scald your hands when washing your hands or dishes.

USE THE SUN’S NATURAL ENERGY

Often, seniors find themselves staying inside more in the winter. Let a little sunshine in – it will brighten your day and reduce your electric bill. During the day, open the curtains and blinds on south-facing windows and allow sunlight to heat your home naturally. Be sure and close them at night to keep your home snug.

REDUCE HEAT LOSS FROM FIREPLACE

There are several things that can be done around the fireplace to combat heat loss. Consider installing tempered glass doors and a heat-air exchange system that blows warmed air back into the room. Add caulking around the fireplace hearth, and check the seal on the flue damper to make sure it fits tightly. Always keep the fireplace damper closed when a fire is not burning. If you never use the fireplace, plug and seal the chimney flue to keep cold air from seeping into your home.

ADJUST THE TEMPERATURE

It seems obvious, but many of us forget to turn our thermostats down during the day. When you are moving around the house your body stays warmer than when you are sleeping, so turn your thermostat down to the lowest comfortable setting, then raise it as needed at night. Even with money-saving tips, you might find yourself facing financial difficulties that leave you unable to meet your electric payment. If you are going through a tough time financially and need help paying one month’s power bill, Mississippi Power offers a customer assistance program called Project SHARE. To find out if you are eligible, call 1-888-847-0555. You will speak with a representative from Catholic Charities who can help you determine whether you qualify to receive assistance from this program. To find more energy-saving tips or learn more about our customer assistance programs, visit mississippipower.com.

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 75


The Power to Live in Comfort

Mississippi Power CARES Energy keeps our lights on, our ice cold and our families comfortable. And no one wants their power to go out. That’s why we have programs to assist our customers with their billing and energy needs – like our Project SHARE, Bill Discount, Budget Billing and Bill Extender programs. We want to help you keep the lights on. To find out more about our customer assistance programs, visit mississippipower.com.

Follow us online:

76 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015


MEDICAL ALERT SERVICES

TRANSPORTATION B & M TRANSPORT SOLUTIONS LLC 1634 W Central Ave Wiggins, MS

(601) 528-505

COAST TRANSIT AUTHORITY coasttransit.com 333 Debuys Rd Gulfport, MS

(228) 896-8080

GROVE TRANSIT

1721 Hardy Street

HATTIESBURG, MS 39402

ACADIAN ON CALL (877) 477-6507

LIFESTATION (866) 286-5518

ADT (800) 489-9020

MEDICAL ALERT (800) 800-2537

BAY ALARM MEDICAL (877) 895-3552

MEDICAL GUARDIAN (800) 224-6400

CARE INNOVATIONS (888) 227-3301

MOBILEHELP (800) 992-0616

LIFE ALERT (800) 920-3410

PHILIPS LIFELINE (800) 380-3111

LIFEFONE (877) 857-2836

RESCUE ALERT (855) 268-8779

WWW.ACADIANONCALL.COM

WWW1.LIFESTATION.COM

WWW.ADT.COM

WWW.MEDICALALERT.COM

WWW.BAYALARMMEDICAL.COM

WWW.LINKMEDICALALERT.COM

WWW.LIFEALERT.COM

WWW.LIFEFONE.COM

WWW.MEDICALGUARDIAN.COM

WWW.MOBILEHELPNOW.COM

WWW.LIFELINESYS.COM

WWW.RESCUEALERT.COM

Specializing in Senior Citizen and Special Needs Transportation

(601) 544-5403 • 1721 Hardy St. • Hattiesburg, MS 39402 E-mail: danny@grovetransit.com • www.grovetransit.com SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 77


EDUCATION MISSISSIPPI GULF COAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE PERKINSTON CAMPUS Main campus Old Highway 49 Perkinston, MS 39573

(601) 928-5211

MISSISSIPPI GULF COAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE Naval Construction Battalion Center 1800 Dong Xoai Avenue, Moreell Building 60, Room 227, Gulfport, MS 39501

MISSISSIPPI GULF COAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE Jefferson Davis Campus 2226 Switzer Rd. Gulfport, MS 39507

(228) 896-3355

MISSISSIPPI GULF COAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE 10298 Express Dr Gulfport, MS 39503

Gautier PO Box 100 (ground address 2300 Highway 90) Gautier, MS 39553 Telephone: 228-497-9602

West Harrison County Center 21500 B St. Long Beach, MS 39560

USM MAIN CAMPUS

WEST HARRISON COUNTY CENTER

JACKSON COUNTY CAMPUS

MISSISSIPPI GULF COAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE

MILLER-MOTTE TECHNICAL COLLEGE

APPLIED TECHNOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER, GULFPORT

George County Center PO Box 77 Lucedale, MS 39452 Telephone: 601-947-4201 Security: 601-766-6447

(228) 432-7198

(228) 868-6057

(228) 865-0675

GEORGE COUNTY CENTER, LUCEDALE

Keesler Air Force Base500 Fisher St, Biloxi, MS 39534

(228) 897-4360

Gulfport 12121 U.S. 49 Gulfport, MS 39503

10298 Express Dr. Gulfport, MS 39503 228-897-4360

KEESLER CENTER

(228) 273-3400

Long Beach West Harrison County 21500 B St. Long Beach, MS 39560

228-897-4360

ANTONELLI COLLEGEHATTIESBURG 1500 North 31st Ave. Hattiesburg, MS 39401

601-583-4100 Fax: 601-583-0839

118 College Drive Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001

601.266.1000

THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI Gulf Coast 730 E. Beach Blvd. Long Beach, MS

(228) 865-4500 www.usm.edu

TULANE UNIVERSITY

MISSISSIPPI GULF COAST COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Keesler Center 500 Fisher St. Keesler AFB Biloxi, MS 39534

(228) 432-7198 WILLIAM CAREY UNIVERSITYTRADITION CAMPUS

19640 Highway 67 Biloxi, Mississippi 39532 Phone (228) 702-1775 Main Fax (228) 702-1830

WILLIAM CAREY UNIVERSITY HATTIESBURG CAMPUS 498 Tuscan Avenue Hattiesburg, Mississippi 39401

(601) 318-6051 (601) 318-6454 Fax (800) 962-5991

Edgewater Mall 2600 Beach Boulevard Suite 18 Biloxi, MS 39531

PEARL RIVER COMMUNITY COLLEGE

www.scs.tulane.edu

(601) 403-1000

(228) 388-5769 (228) 702-1775

101 Highway 11 North, Poplarville, Mississippi 39470.

VIRGINIA COLLEGE

BLUE CLIFF COLLEGE

920 Cedar Lake Rd. Biloxi, MS 39532

12251 Bernard Pkwy Gulfport, MS

(228) 546-9100

(228) 896-9727

www.bluecliffcollege.com

WIN JOB CENTERS FORREST COUNTY HATTIESBURG WIN JOB CENTER

1911 Arcadia Street Hattiesburg, MS 39401

GEORGE COUNTY PASCAGOULA WIN JOB CENTER

1604 Denny Avenue Pascagoula, MS 39567

78 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015

HARRISON COUNTY BILOXI WIN JOB CENTER 2306 Pass Road Biloxi, MS 39531

HARRISON COUNTY GULFPORT WIN JOB CENTER 10162 Southpark Drive Gulfport, MS 39503


FOOD / MEALS CATHOLIC SOCIAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICES

Administrative Office 1790 Popps Ferry Rd., Biloxi, MS 39532 cscs.biloxidiocese.org

(228) 701.0555

Details: Call first for an appointment

FEED MY SHEEP

2615 19th St., Gulfport, MS 39501 feedmysheepgulfport.org

228.864.2701

Hours: Mon-Fri, 12:00-1:00p.m. Services: Provides lunch.

GULF COAST COMMUNITY MINISTRIES 3914 15th St., Gulfport, MS 39501 gulfcoastministry.net gccm07@bellsouth.net

228.868.8202 Fax: 228.868.8201

Hours: Mon-Thur, 9:0012:00p.m. Food Pantry: Tue & Thur, 9:00-11:30a.m. Eligibility Requirements: Gulfport resident. Documents Required: Picture ID and and proof of income for entire household. Services: Provides food pantry, free clinic, and other services to individuals experiencing homelessness. Provides information and referrals to all other clients. All services are free.

HANCOCK COUNTY FOOD PANTRY

9972 Hwy. 603, Bay St. Louis, MS 39520 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 4313, Bay St. Louis, MS 39521

228.467.2790

Hours: Mon-Fri, 9:00-12:00 p.m. Eligibility Requirements:

Financial need, low income, or disability Documents Required: SS card and picture I.D. for every member of the family. Services: Provides food items and personal hygiene products to families living in Hancock County

disabled, homebound, or other unable to prepare lunch. Services: Delivery of lunches Monday through Friday to shut-ins located in Gautier, Pascagoula, and Moss Point.

LOAVES AND FISHES 228.436.6172 Fax: 228.436.6174

1978 Washington St., Bay St. Louis, MS 39520 www.phdministries.com

610 Water St., Biloxi MS, 39530 Email: kitchendirlf@yahoo.com Hours: DeMiller Hall Mon-Sat, 7:45-8:30a.m. (breakfast) Mon-Sat, 11:30-12:30 p.m. (lunch) Bethel Lutheran Church 2521 Pass Rd., Biloxi 39531 Mon, Wed, Fri 11:30-12:30 p.m. Services: Offers free meals

POWERHOUSE OF DELIVERANCE MINISTRIES

228.469.9070 228.466.3841

Hours: Mon-Fri, 9:00-5:00pm Eligibility Requirements: Age 60+ and resident of Hancock County Documents Required: Proof of income, ID, and proof of residency Services: Provides seniors with food.

SEASHORE MISSION Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1279, Biloxi, MS 39533-1279 seashoremission.org

228.219.0100

Services: Provides food, day shelters, and computer access to individuals experiencing homelessness. Serves breakfast and lunch on Monday, Thursday and Sunday.

TWELVE BASKETS FOOD BANK OF CATHOLIC SERVICES 333 Cowan Rd., Gulfport, MS 39507

228.822.0836

catholiccharitiesbiloxi.org twelvebaskets biloxidiocese.org Services: Provides food at low cost to qualifying agencies located in the southern most eight counties.

MEALS ON WHEELS 9229 Hwy. 49, Gulfport, MS 39503 www.smpdd.com

800.444.8014

Hours: Mon-Fri, 8:30-5:00p.m. Eligibility Requirements: 60+ and Homebound Documents Required: Last 4 digits of SSN. Services: Provides free meals to elderly and disabled individuals in lower 15 counties.

OUR DAILY BREAD SOUP KITCHEN 3502 Old Mobile Hwy., Pascagoula, MS 39581

228.769.7510

Hours: Mon-Sat, 11:30-12:30p.m. Sun, 2:30-3:30 p.m. Documents Required: Doctors signed release confirming status as elderly,

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 79


BLOOD CENTERS/ DISEASE INFORMATION THE BLOOD CENTER

BLOOD CENTER SINGING RIVER

(228) 539-8077

(228) 872-7713

14283B Dedeaux Rd Gulfport, MS 39503

1599 Bienville Blvd Ste C. Ocean Springs, MS 39564

C S L PLASMA

BLOOD CENTER

(228) 214-9878

(228) 497-7159

9245 Highway 49 Gulfport, MS 39503

1408 Highway 90 Gautier, MS 39553

BLOOD CENTER OF PASCAGOULA

2216 Market St. Pascagoula, MS 39567

(228) 934-1840

BLOOD CENTER OF PICAYUNE 318 Memorial Blvd Picayune, MS 39466

(601) 798-9693

DISEASE INFORMATION & FOUNDATIONS NATIONAL DIGESTIVE DISEASES INFORMATION

Clearinghouse 2 Information Way Bethesda, MD 20892–3570

(800) 891-5389

ALZHEIMER’S FOUNDATION OF AMERICA 322 Eighth Avenue, 7th Floor New York, NY 10001

(866) AFA-8484 (866) 232- 8484 (toll free) www.alzfdn.org

AMERICAN PARKINSON DISEASE ASSOCIATION Mississippi Chapter P.O. Box 4091 Brandon, MS 39047

(601) 566-1938

www.msapda.org

CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

1600 Clifton Road Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, USA

(800) 232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348

Contact CDC–INFO

ALZHEIMER’S DIVISION MS DEPT OF MENTAL HEALTH

1170 W. Railroad St., Long Beach, MS 39560 www.dmh.state.ms.us/alzheimers.htm

(228) 214-5557

Services: Offers educational programs, training programs for caregivers and referrals.

AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY COAST DISTRICT

417 Security Sq., Gulfport, MS 39507 www.cancer.org

(228) 896-7024 / (800) 227-2345

Hours: Mon-Fri, 8:30-1:00p.m., 2:00-4:30p.m. Offers durable medical equipment loan closet, rehabilitation programs, financial assistance, visitation, volunteers, and wig bank. Provides limited assistance to cancer patients with pain or nausea prescriptions.

AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION 440 E. Pass Rd., Gulfport, MS 39507 www.heart.org

(228) 604-5300

Hours: Mon-Fri, 8:30-5:00p.m. Services: Provides speakers for civic clubs and schools, blood pressure screenings, CPR instruction and demonstrations, literature, research, diet assistance, and information.

AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATION OF MISSISSIPPI www.lungs.org

(800) 586-4872

Hours: Mon-Fri, 8:00-4:30p.m. Services: Offers patient services, education, and assistance with prescriptions and oxygen. Gautier - 2707 Hwy. 90 Gautier, MS 39553

(228) 282-5378

Kiln - 17304 Hwy. 603 Kiln, MS 39556

(228) 255-6257

Ocean Springs 1599D Bienville Blvd., Ste.D, Ocean Springs, MS 39564

(678) 478-0314 80 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015

ASSOCIATION FOR SICKLE CELL DISEASE www.sicklecelldisease.org

(228) 769-6516

Services: Provides newborn screenings and educational materials.

JACKSON COUNTY ASSOCIATION FOR SICKLE CELL DISEASE 3712 Old Mobile Ave., Pascagoula, MS 39581 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 2517, Pascagoula, MS 39569 www.sicklecelldisease.org/

(228) 769-6516

Services: Provides counseling, emergency financial assistance for individuals with sickle cell, and peer support groups for adults and children

BRAIN INJURY ASSOCIATION OF MISSISSIPPI www.msbia.org

(800) 444-6443 / (800) 641.6442

Services: Local organizations for people with brain and spinal chord injury including advocacy, information and resources, as well as prevention education.

DIVISION OF ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE & OTHER DEMENTIADIVISION OF ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE & OTHER DEMENTIA MS Department of Mental Health South Mississippi Regional Center 1170 W. Railroad Street Long Beach, MS 39560

(228) 214-5556

www.dmh.ms.gov


DISEASE INFORMATION & FOUNDATIONS PULMONARY HYPERTENSION ASSOCIATION

PULMONARY HYPERTENSION ASSOCIATION

PINK HEART FUNDS

(301) 565-3004

(301) 565-3004

(228) 575.8299

801 Roeder Road, Ste. 1000 Silver Spring, MD 20910 www.phassociation.org

801 Roeder Road, Ste. 1000 Silver Spring, MD 20910 www.phassociation.org

MISSISSIPPI ARTHRITIS FOUNDATION

MISSISSIPPI ARTHRITIS FOUNDATION

(205) 979-5700

(205) 979-5700

500 Office Park Drive, Ste. 200 Birmingham, AL 35223 www.arthritis.org/mississippi

MS DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL HEALTH

South Mississippi Regional Center 1170 W. Railroad Street Long Beach, MS 39560

(228) 214-5556

www.dmh.ms.gov

AMERICAN PARKINSON DISEASE ASSOCIATION Mississippi Chapter P.O. Box 4091 Brandon, MS 39047

(601) 566-1938

www.msapda.org

500 Office Park Drive, Ste. 200 Birmingham, AL 35223 www.arthritis.org/mississippi

MISSISSIPPI CENTER FOR AUTISM 4061 Suzanne Dr., D’Iberville, MS 39532

(228) 396-4434

MISSISSIPPI DEAF-BLIND PROJECT 118 College Dr., #5115, Hattiesburg, MS 39406 www.usm.edu/msdb deaf-blind@usm.edu

(601) 266-5135 (800) 264-5135

MISSISSIPPI GULF COAST MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS SOCIETY 146 St. Charles Ave., Biloxi, MS 39530 www.aisp.net

(228) 374.7403

5095 Beatline Rd., Long Beach, MS 39560 www.pinkheartfunds.org pinkheartfunds@gmail.com Services: Provides wigs to individuals who have undergone chemotherapy, or who experience Alopecia or other hair loss diseases. Also provides breast prostheses and lymphedema sleeves to those who have had lumpectomies or mastectomies.

SOUTH MISSISSIPPI REGIONAL CENTER (MENTAL HEALTH)

1170 W. Railroad St., Long Beach, MS 39560 www.smrc.state.ms.us

(228) 868-2923 (228) 86701321 service/

intake Hours: 24/7 Services: Serves individuals with intellectual disabilities.

SOUTH MISSISSIPPI AIDS TASK FORCE

Address: 2756 Fernwood Rd., Biloxi, MS 39531 www.smatf.com

(228) 385-1214 (800) 826-2961, 24/7 HIV/

AIDS hotline Hours: Mon-Fri, 8:30-5:00p.m. Eligibility Requirements: Proof of HIV status. Services: Provides prevention education, free HIV testing, casemanagement, community outreach, transitional housing for HIV positive individuals, support groups, and direct one-time emergency assistance for housing and utilities.

Services: Provides patient services and direct assistance to individuals with MS.

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 81


MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES CRISIS STABILIZATION UNIT 15120 County Barn Rd, Gulfport, MS 39503

(228) 868-6524

GULF COAST MENTAL HEALTH CENTER 15094 County Barn Rd, Gulfport, MS 39503

MEMORIAL BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

GULF COAST MENTAL HEALTH CENTER

(228) 867-5202

(228) 896-9395

1340 Broad Ave, Gulfport, MS 39501

MENTAL HEALTH ASSOC. OF SOUTH MISSISSIPPI

(228) 248-0125

4803 Harrison Cir, Gulfport, MS 39507

PINE GROVE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

GULF OAKS HOSPITAL

14231 Seaway Rd, Gulfport, MS 39503

(228) 871-5344

(228) 864-6274

554 Loposser Ave, Gulfport, MS 39507

SENIORS HARBOR

1600 Broad Ave, Gulfport, MS 39501

(228) 863-1132

150 Reynoir St, Biloxi, MS 39530

(228) 436-1477 GULF COAST FAMILY COUNSELING

(228) 388-0600

Mental Health Service 509 Jackson Ave, Ocean Springs, MS 39564

HANCOCK MEDICAL

Family Advocacy:

180 Debuys Rd, Biloxi, MS 39531

(228) 875-6113 GULF COAST MENTAL HEALTH CENTER

HOSPITALS BILOXI REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

www.biloxiregional.net 150 Reynoir St, Biloxi, MS

(228) 432-1571

FORREST GENERAL HOSPITAL

6051 Highway 49 Hattiesburg, MS 39404 www.forrestgeneral.com

(601) 288-7000

GARDEN PARK MEDICAL CENTER

gardenparkmedical.com 15200 Community Rd Gulfport, MS

Diamondhead, MS

(228) 586-0014

HIGHLAND COMMUNITY HOSPITAL

130 Highland Parkway Picayune, MS 39466 (601) 358-9400 www.highlandch.com

KEESLER MEDICAL CENTER 301 Fisher St. Keesler AFB, MS 39534 www.keesler.af.mil units/81stmedicalgroup.asp

(228) 376-2550

(228) 467-8600

Laboratory:

(228) 376-4460

Emergency Services: 911 or (228) 376-0500 Appointment Line:

(800) 700-8603

24-Hour Nurse Advice Line: 1-800-Tricare

(1-800-874-2273) Pharmacy:

(228) 376-4955

Dental Clinic:

GULF OAKS HOSPITAL

www.hmc.org 149 Drinkwater Rd Bay St Louis, MS

(800) 444-5445

Appointment Line:

(800) 700-8603

HANCOCK MEDICAL CENTER

TRICARE:

Refill Line:

(228) 376-0500

(228) 388-0600

Customer Relations:

(228) 376-3092

Emergency Services: 911 or

(228) 575-7000

www.gulfoaks.com 180 Debuys Rd Biloxi, MS

(228) 376-3457

24-Hour Nurse Advice Line1800-Tricare

1-800-874-2273 Pharmacy:

(228) 376-4955 Refill Line:

(228) 376-1000

Dental Clinic:

(228) 376-0511 Mental Health:

(228) 376-0385

82 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015

(228) 376-1000 (228) 376-0511 Mental Health:

(228) 376-0385

Family Advocacy:

(228) 376-3457

Customer Relations:

(228) 376-3092 TRICARE:

(800) 444-5445

Laboratory:

(228) 376-4460

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL AT GULFPORT

www.gulfportmemorial.com 4500 13th St Gulfport, MS

(228) 867-4000

HANCOCK MEDICAL KEESLER MEDICAL CENTER 301 Fisher St., Keesler AFB, MS 39534

(228) 377.6550 / 800.700.8603

VA GULF COAST VETERANS HEALTH CARE SYSTEM www.biloxi.va.gov 400 Veterans Ave Biloxi, MS

(228) 523-5000 OCEAN SPRINGS HOSPITAL www.mysrhs.com 3109 Bienville Blvd Ocean Springs, MS

(228) 818-1111

SINGING RIVER HOSPITAL 2809 Denny Avenue, Pascagoula, MS 39581

(228) 809-5000


SENIOR CENTERS D’IBERVILLE SENIOR CENTER (RED BARNETT SENIOR CENTER)

10450 Lamey Bridge Rd., D’Iberville, MS 39540

228.392.9988 Fax: 228.392.8162

Hours: Mon-Thur, 7:006:00p.m. Fri, 7:00-5:00 p.m.

FRANCES FREDERICKS SENIOR CITIZEN COMPLEX

North Gulfport Senior Center 3312 M.L.K. Jr. Blvd., Gulfport, MS 39501 frederickscenter@co.harrison.ms.us

228.868.1268 Fax: 228.864.2026

Hours: Mon-Fri, 7:30-4:30p.m.

Congregate Meals: Mon, Wed, Fri (must preregister) Eligibility Requirements: Age 55+. Services: Offers activities for seniors. Free services include recreational opportunities, arts/crafts, exercise programs, field trips, and hot lunches, with transportation provided.

LONG BEACH SENIOR CITIZEN ACTIVITY CENTER

20257 Daugherty Rd., Long Beach, MS 39560 www.cityoflongbeachms.com

228.868.7517

Hours: Mon-Fri, 7:30-3:00p.m. Services: Provides recreation for seniors.

LYMAN SENIOR CENTER

14592 County Farm Rd., Gulfport, MS 39503 lymancenter@co.harrison. ms.us

228.832.2606 Fax: 228.831.3369

Hours: Mon-Fri, 7:00-3:30p.m. Day Care: 9:00-2:00p.m. Congregate Meals: Mon, Tues, and Thur (must preregister)

PRIME OF LIFE SENIOR CENTER

Hours: Mon-Fri, 8:00-5:00p.m. Congregate Meals: Tues, Wed, Thur (must preregister).

SAUCIER SENIOR CENTER 24014 Church Ave., Saucier, MS 39574 sauciercenter@co.harrison. ms.us

228.832.5835 Fax: 228.831.9638

Hours: Mon-Thur, 7:30-4:00 p.m. Fri, 9:00 - 3:00 p.m.

16320 Old Woolmarket Rd., Biloxi, MS 39532 woolmarketcenter@ co.harrison.ms.us

228.396.3228 Fax: 228.392.7363

SENIOR SERVICES Alcohol/Drug Hotline - 800.252.6465 American Council of the Blind 800.424.8666 American Society for the Deaf Children 800.942.2732 Brain Center for Neuro Skills (Brain Trauma) - 800.592.1117 Cleft Palate Foundation - 800.242.5338 Cystic Fibrosis - 800.344.4823 Epilepsy Foundation - 800.332.1000 Hearing Aid Help Line - 800.222.3277 Infant Death – SIDS - 800.221.7437 Natl AIDS Hotline - 800.342.2437 Natl Center for Learning Disabilities 888.575.7373 Natl Center for Sight - 800.221.2483 Natl Center for Stuttering - 800.221.2483

Natl Child Abuse Hotline - 800.422.4453 Natl Council for the Blind - 800.424.8666 Natl Down Syndrome Society 800.221.4602 Natl Easter Seal Society - 800.221.6827 Natl Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped - 800.424.8567 Natl Multiple Sclerosis Society 800.344.4867 Natl Neurofibromatosis Foundation 800.323.7938 Orphan Drugs and Rare Diseases 240.453.8280 Shriner’s International - 800.237.5055 Spina Bifida Hotline - 800.621.3141

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 83


SUBSTANCE ABUSE/ ADDICTIONS ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS www.aa.org

228.575.9225 Harrison Co.

Services: Provides 24 hour crisis line and referrals to treatment groups in the community.

www.aa-mississippi.org (662) 280.3435 Jackson Co.

COCAINE ABUSE (800) 203.3602 CROSSROADS RECOVERY CENTER 15094 County Barn Rd., Gulfport, MS 39503

(228) 863-0091 (228) 248-0125

For admission’s information, call the Substance Abuse Outpatient Unit at

(228) 248-0125

Hours: Mon-Fri, 8:00-5:00p.m. Eligibility Requirements: Diagnosis and completed

administrative assessment by Gulf Coast Mental Health. Adults only. Documents Required: Picture ID or birth certificate.

GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS (888) 777.9696

www.gamblersanonymous.org

GULF COAST SUBSTANCE ABUSE TASK FORCE

19148 Commission Rd., Long Beach, MS 39560 www.gcdrugfree.org/

228.864.1146 Fax: 228.863.3196

Services: Offers programs for children and parents, community outreach, counseling services, and drug awareness.

HOME OF GRACE FOR MEN 14200 Jericho Rd., Vancleave, MS 39565 www.homeofgrace.org

228.826.5283

Hours: Mon-Thur, 8:00-4:30p.m. Fri, 8:00-4:00p.m. Eligibility Requirements: Fee $4,200.00 or can apply for funding if available. Men must have TB and HIV tests. Services: Offers a three month residential program for addiction recovery.

HOME OF GRACE FOR WOMEN (THE HAVEN)

Address: 7112 Home of Grace Dr., Gautier, MS 39553 www.homeofgrace.org/ womens-admissions

228.497.1312

Hours: Mon-Thur, 8:00-4:30p.m. Fri, 8:00-4:00p.m. Eligibility Requirements: Fee $4,200 or can apply for funding if available. Women must have TB, HIV, and pregnancy tests. Services: Offers a three

month residential program for addiction recovery.

JACOB’S WELL RECOVERY CENTER Address: 45 Buford Ln., Poplarville, MS 39470 http://www. jacobswellrecoverycenter. com/wp/ Phone: 601.916.4944 /

601.463.0022

Services: Offers a faithbased addictions recovery program for women.

NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS www.na.org

OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS www.oa.org

SUBSTANCE ABUSE 800.662.4357

CLINICS BETHEL FREE HEALTH CLINIC

Address: 1650 Carrol Dr., Biloxi, MS 39531 Web: http://bethelfreeclinic.org/ E-mail: bethelkatclinic@gmail.com Phone: 228.594.3640 Hours: Mon-Fri, 8:30-5:00p.m. Services: Offers medical assistance. Physician on site.

CATHOLIC SOCIAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICES

Administrative Office Address: 1450 N. St., Gulfport, MS 39503 Web: catholiccharitiesbiloxi.org

BETHESDA FREE HEALTH CLINIC OF D’IBERVILLE Address: 3409 Big Ridge Rd., D’Iberville, MS 39540 Web: http://bfhcd.com/ www.freemedicalcamps.com

228.396.5876

Clinic Hours: Mon & Wed, 9:00-12:00, 2:00-4:00p.m. Eligibility Requirements: Lack insurance coverage and in need of medical treatment. Services: Provides free medical treatment and prescription drugs.

228.701.0555 855.847.0555

84 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015

GULF COAST COMMUNITY MINISTRIES

3914 15th St., Gulfport MS 39501 http://gulfcoastministry.net/ gccm07@bellsouth.net

228.868.8202

Hours: Mon–Thur, 9:00-12:00 p.m. Free Clinic: Wed, 1:00-4:00p.m. 3rd Thur, 9:00-12:00p.m. 2nd & 4th Sat, 8:00-12:00p.m. Free Clinic: Uninsured adults only. Walk-ins accepted. Documents Required: Picture ID and and proof of income for entire household. Services: Provides food pantry, free clinic, and other services to individuals experiencing homelessness. Provides information and referrals to all other clients. All services are free.


SUPPORT GROUPS SMOKING CESSATION

Host: Lou Anna Claveau, MS, LPC “These classes meet weekly. I am certified by the American Lung Association to be a smoking cessation counselor. Classes are closed groups. “

(228) 222-5858

Group meets in: Long Beach, MS 39560

WOMEN’S ISSUES

Host: Integrative Therapy and Coaching, LLC “This group is structured as a support group, a space for women to discuss gender related concerns and problems. You will be able to process your concerns with others who can understand how you feel while also receiving therapeutic guidance. “

(769) 486-2177

Group meets in: Gulfport, MS 39507

ANGER MANAGEMENT

Host: Lou Anna Claveau, MS, LPC “Meets once a week. Certificate Awarded. If court ordered then contact as described in court order will be followed. “

(228) 222-5858

Group meets in: Long Beach, MS 39560

INTERPERSONAL SKILLS

Host: Integrative Therapy and Coaching, LLC “Perhaps you are struggling at school or work with peers or coworkers and want to improve your interactions with others. This group can be great if you have trouble reading social cues, struggle to maintain relationships, or fear and dislike ...”

(769) 486-2177

Group meets in: Gulfport, MS 39507

SCREAM FREE MARRIAGE Host: Lou Anna Claveau, MS, LPC “Learn if you are screaming silently in your marriage. Learn how to NOT scream in your marriage. Not married but committed? That’s okay too!”

(228) 222-5858

Group meets in: Long Beach, MS 39560

ANGER MANAGEMENT

Host: Integrative Therapy and Coaching, LLC “Is your teen experiencing anger at school? Anger can lead to academic problems, interfere with socializing and put a strain on your family unit. This is a great group for teens to feel safe expressing their anger and to find ...”

(769) 486-2177

Group meets in: Gulfport, MS 39507

ANGER MANAGEMENT

Host: Conrad A. Anderson, PhD, LCSW, JD, MSW, MEd “Conducted in accordance with court-mandated guidelines to ensure that all prerequisite components for full judicial compliance are fulfilled. Offered on an ongoing/as-needed basis during hours convenient to group members. Upon completion, graduates will be provided with certificates of completion and ...”

CELEBRATE RECOVERY (HURTS, HANG-UPS & HABITS)

Bayou Talla Fellowship Church 18555 Hwy. 43, Kiln, MS 39556 Web: http://bayoutalla.com/ E-mail: adultlearning@ bayoutalla.com

228.255.1118 EXT. 210 MOSAIC CHURCH

2226 Bienville Blvd., Ocean Springs, MS 39565 http://mosaicgc.com/ connect/recovery-groups/

(228) 875.3500

OASIS CHURCH

4007 Pascagoula St., Pascagoula, MS 39567 http://www.oasisonline.tv/ ministries/celebrate_recovery office@OasisOnline.tv

(228) 762.5639

OLD SPANISH TRAIL BAPTIST CHURCH

5078 Hwy. 90, Bay St. Louis, MS 39520

228.467.4562

For more locations see: www.celebraterecovery.com/

CHEMICAL ABUSE AND PREVENTION SERVICES (CHAMPS) 3207 Magnolia St., #309, Pascagoula, MS 39567

(228) 762.6540

(228) 222-5431

Group meets in: Biloxi, Mississippi 39532

Services: Offers community education, crisis support for adults, technical assistance for other prevention programs.

RELAPSE PREVENTION

DIVORCE CARE

Host: Marie Ganschow, LPC, CAADC

(228) 273-2969

Biloxi, Mississippi 39531

www.divorcecare.org/ Divorce Recovery Workshop First United Methodist Church 2301 15th St., Gulfport, MS 39501 Web: www.fumcgulfport.org

MENTAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION OF SOUTH MISSISSIPPI

4803 Harrison Cir., Gulfport, MS 39507 Web: www.msmentalhealth.org info@msmentalhealth.org Phone: 228.864.6274

NA - NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS

www.na.org http://mgcana.org National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) www.nami.org NAMI Gulf Coast

228.233.9294

namigulfcoast@gmail.com

NAMI MISSISSIPPI

411 Briarwood Dr., Ste. 401, Jackson, MS 39206 www.namims.org

stateoffice@namims.org

800.357.0388 601.899.9058 Fax: 601.956.6380

SOBER24: HAZELDEN FOUNDATION

www.sober24.com

866.220.3089

Services: Offers online fellowship for people sharing the journey of recovery.

ST. PAUL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH GRIEF COUNSELING CLASS

Address: 800 Porter Ave., Ocean Springs, MS 39564 Website: http://stpaulos.org/

228.875.5701

(228) 863.0047

Services: Helps people deal with divorce

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 85


UTILITIES JACKSON COUNTY Phone: Bell South 888-757-6500 Cable: Cable One 228-769-1221 Blossman Gas: 888-256-77626 Centerpoint Energy: 800-371-5417 OCEAN SPRINGS Mississippi Power: 800-532-1502 Singing River EPA: 228-497-1313 Ocean Springs Utilities: 228-875-4176 TESI: 228-875-3561 PASCAGOULA

Pascagoula Utilities: 228-938-6633 Mississippi Power: 800-532-1502 Singing River EPA: 228-497-1313

GAUTIER

Gautier Utility District: 228-497-2276 Singing River EPA: 228-497-1313

MOSS POINT

Mississippi Power: 800-532-1502 Singing River EPA: 228-497-1313 Moss Point Utilities: 228-475-1151 Harrison County Phone: BellSouth 888-757-6500 Cable: Cable One 228-374-5900 Blossman Gas: 888-256-77626 Centerpoint Energy: 800-371-5417

PASS CHRISTIAN Utilities Dept.: 228-452-3312 Pass Christian Isles Water Co: 228-4523103 Mississippi Power: 800-532-1502 Coast Electric Power Assoc.: 877-7692372

Biloxi Water: 1-228-435-6271 Mississippi Power: 800-532-1502 Coast Electric Power Assoc. 877-769-2372 Singing River EPA: 228-392-0041

Hancock County Phone: BellSouth 888-757-6500 Cable: Mediacom 800-239-8411 Centerpoint Energy: 800-371-5417 Bay St. Louis Utilities: 228-467-9094 Waveland Gas & Water: 228-467-9248 Mississippi Power: 800-532-1502 Coast Electric Power Assoc.: 877-769-2372

GULFPORT

STONE COUNTY

BILOXI

Gulfport Water Sewer: 228-868-5720 Orange Grove Utilities: 228-832-2313 Dedeaux Utilities: 228-832-1045 Mississippi Power: 800-532-1502 Coast Electric Power Assoc.: 877-769-2372

Stone County Utility Authority 614 E McHenry Rd, Perkinston, MS 39573

(601) 928-2224

LONG BEACH

Long Beach Water Dept.: 228-864-8531 Mississippi Power: 800-532-1502

TAX COLLECTOR OFFICES HARRISON COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR BILOXI Court House, Biloxi, MS 39530

HANCOCK COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR

(228) 435-8241

16603 Highway 603 Kiln, MS 39556

HANCOCK COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR

HANCOCK COUNTY TAX OFFICE

122 Court St, Bay Saint Louis, MS 39520

(228) 467-4425

(228) 255-0312

3068 Longfellow Rd Ste 3 Bay Saint Louis, MS 39520

(228) 467-0172

86 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015

WAVELAND TAX COLLECTOR 407 Highway 90 Waveland, MS 39576

(228) 467-6301


VETERANS AFFAIRS VETERANS AFFAIRS GULF COAST HEALTH CARE SYSTEM 400 Veterans Avenue Biloxi, MS 39531 228-523-5000 | 800-296-8872

AIR FORCE AID SOCIETY

500 Fisher St., Ste. 110, Keesler AFB, MS 39534 www.afas.org/location/state_ mississippi.cfm

228.376.8728

Hours: Mon-Fri, 8:00-4:00p.m. Eligibility Requirements: Active duty, retired Air Force members, Air National Guard, Reservists on active duty for more than 30 days, military spouses and children with member’s approval. Documents Required: A letter from 1st Sgt, documentation of need, and current leave and earning statement. Services: Provides financial assistance, interest free loans, and grants. Provides assistance with rent, food, utilities, emergency travel, and car repair for Air Force personnel.

ARMED FORCE RETIREMENT HOME 1800 Beach Dr., Gulfport, MS 39507 www.afrh.gov

228.897.4401

Services: Provides a retirement community for veterans.

BENEFITS WEB LINKS

www.ssa.gov www.ssa.gov/retire2 www.vba.va.gov/VBA/ www.1010ez.med.va.gov/sec/www. vha/1010ez/Form/1010ez.pdf www.oefoif.va.gov www.caregiver.va.gov www.veteranaffairs.com www.benefitscheckup.org www.medicaid.ms.gov www.gibill.va.govw

BILOXI VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL CENTER

FISHER HOUSE OF MISSISSIPPI

Address: 400 Veterans Ave., Biloxi, MS 39531 Web: http://www.biloxi.va.gov/ Regional Office: 800.827.1000 Phone: 228.523.5000, Biloxi 800.296.8872, Pensacola 800.949.1009, Jackson 601.296.3530, Hattiesburg Hours: Mon-Fri, 8:00-4:30p.m. Eligibility Requirements: Veteran, referred by veteran’s assistance. Documents Required: Insurance Card and/or Medicare. Services: Provides hospitalization for general medical, surgical, illness, and out-patient treatment.

BILOXI VETERAN CENTER

Address: 288 Veterans Ave., Biloxi, MS 39531 www.vetcenter.va.gov

228.388.9938

Hours: Mon-Fri, 8:00-4:30p.m. Eligibility Requirements: Veterans and their families. Documents Required: DD214 Services: Offers counseling services for war veterans and their families focusing on readjustment issues and sexual trauma.

DISABLED AMERICAN VETERANS www.dav.org

228.871.5463

509 Fisher St., Keesler AFB, MS 39534 www.fisherhouse.org

228.377.8264 800.732.2984 ext. 8264

Services: Offers short-term lodging for families of Wounded Warriors.

MENTAL HEALTH AND ADDICTIONS WEB LINKS www.mentalhealth.va.gov www.ptsd.va.gov www.afterdeployment.org www.dvbic.org www.militarymentalhealth.org www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org www.msgambler.org www.smokefree.gov www.becomeanex.org www.realwarriors.net

VICTIM SERVICES GULF COAST WOMEN’S CENTER www.gcwcfn.org/ PO Box 333, Biloxi, MS 39533

(228) 435-1968

DHS FAMILY & CHILDREN SERVICES REGION VI - SOUTH 1141 Bayview Avenue, 5th Floor Biloxi, MS 39530 Office: 228.452.0225

Services: Provides transportation to VA SALVATION ARMY appointments (where applicable) and DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SHELTER VA claims assistance. Patient lodging P. O. Drawer 630 available at Keesler Air Force Base. Pascagoula, MS 39568 Office: 228.762.1943 EMPLOYMENT WEB LINKS FOR Crisis Line: 228.762.8267 VETERANS Toll Free: 800.382.7649 www.fedshirevets.gov www.abilityjobs.com AARP www.americasheroesatwork.gov 135 Jefferson Davis Avenue www.hirevetsfirst.gov Biloxi, MS 39530 www.usajobs.com/ USA jobs 228.436.9425 Office: (government positions) www.va.gov/jobs SOUTHERN MS AREA AGENCY ON AGING www.vacareers.va.gov 2015A 15th Street www.wallstreetwarfighters.org Gulfport, MS 39501 www.warriorgateway.org www.return2work.org Office: 228.868.2311 Toll Free: 800.444.8014

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 87


DURABLE MEDICAL EQUIPMENT ACME MEDICAL SUPPLY

EXPRESS MEDICAL

KWIK KARE

PATIENT’S CHOICE, INC

(228) 872-4089

(228) 875-3828

(228) 463-1880

1804 25TH AVE. GULFPORT, MS 39501

2331 GOVERNMENT ST. OCEAN SPRINGS, MS 39564

WWW.ACMEMEDICALSUPPLY.COM

GRACE HEALTHCARE

(228) 206-3637

ADVANCED MEDICAL SYSTEMS INC 12257 ASHLEY DRIVE GULFPORT, MS 39503

(228) 831-0430

APRIA HEALTHCARE 2198 PASS ROAD BILOXI, MS 39531

(228) 385-2200

WWW.APRIA.COM

CARE PLUS HOME MEDICAL 969 HOWARD AVE. BILOXI, MS 39530

1120 BROAD AVE. GULFPORT, MS 39501

(228) 863-3331 (228) 396-3332 – BILOXI (228) 258-2050 –

PASCAGOULA WWW.GRACEHCMS.COM

3004 BIENVILLE BLVD, STE. 1 OCEAN SPRINGS, MS 39564

LINCARE

14231 SEAWAY ROAD, STE. D2 & D3 GULFPORT, MS 39503 (228) 865-9547 WWW.LINCARE.COM

MEDLOGIC

GULF COAST LIMB & BRACE

16175 LANDON ROAD GULFPORT, MS 39503 (228) 832-1126

(228) 864-4512

NATCHEZ MEDICAL DBA INTEGRITY MEDICAL

4420 15TH ST. GULFPORT, MS 39501

HANGER CLINIC

5703 GULF TECH DRIVE, STE. H OCEAN SPRINGS, MS 39564

(228) 435-8370

9034 CARL LEGGETT ROAD, STE. B GULFPORT, MS 39503

(228) 872-5848

CAREMED

WWW.HANGERCLINIC.COM

13221 HUGH SEYMOUR LANE OCEAN SPRINGS, MS 39564

(228) 604-0818

14231 SEAWAY ROAD, ST. E5 GULFPORT, MS 39503

(228) 897-1834

Mississippi State Department of Mental Health

South MS Regional Center 1170 W. Railroad St. Long Beach, MS 39560-4199

Dedicated to improvement of the quality of life for Mississippians affected by Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia • Education and training for caregivers • Information and referral • Annual education conferences

Melora Jackson, MS, CMHT Melora.Jackson@dmh.state.ms.us

228.214.5556 2014-2015 88 WINTER-SPRING

OXYPRO, INC

(228) 875-7950

WWW.OXYPROMEDICAL. COM

703 DUNBAR AVE. BAY SAINT LOUIS, MS 39520

PREMIER MEDICAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES

4211 HOSPITAL ST. PASCAGOULA, MS 39581

(228) 762-7776

QUEST MEDICAL

11010 HIGHWAY 49, STE. 3 GULFPORT, MS 39503

(228) 539-0034

WWW.QUESTMEDICAL.NET

TEAM ADAPTIVE MEDICAL 978 TOMMY MUNRO DRIVE BILOXI, MS 39532

(228) 388-5700

WWW.TEAMADAPTIVE.COM


IMPORTANT INFO & DOCUMENTS

Physician’s certificate for disability............................................. 90 Living will declaration.................................................................. 91 My important contacts ............................................................... 92 Emergency numbers.................................................................... 94

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 89


CURRENT MEDICATIONS The medications you take are a very important part of your health information. Please fill out this medication list (or have your caregiver complete it) and discuss it with your medical provider. Also, bring this list with you to doctor appointments and when you go to the hospital. If you need more space to list your medications, copy this form or use a blank piece of paper. PATIENT NAME: ___________________________ ALLERGY (drug name or food)

PRIMARY CARE DOCTOR: ____________________________ ALLERGY (drug name or food)

Type of reaction (e.g., rash)

Type of reaction (e.g., rash)

If a medication is stopped, draw a single line through it and write in the date the medication was stopped PRESCRIPTION DRUG STRENGTH DIRECTIONS PRESCRIBING REASON FOR DATE NAME DOCTOR MEDICATION MEDICATION (e.g., 50 mg) (e.g., Atenolol) (e.g., 1 tablet each AM) (e.g., Dr. John Doe) (e.g., blood STOPPED pressure) Date

OVER THE COUNTER MEDICATIONS

STRENGTH

DIRECTIONS

(e.g., Aspirin)

(e.g., 325 mg)

(e.g., 1 tablet daily)

HERBALS, VITAMINS, MINERALS, ETC.

STRENGTH

DIRECTIONS

(e.g., 300 mg)

(e.g., 1 capsule daily)

(e.g., St. John’s Wort)

PRESCRIBING DOCTOR – if

REASON FOR MEDICATION

DATE MEDICATION STOPPED

PRESCRIBING PROVIDER – if

REASON FOR MEDICATION

DATE MEDICATION STOPPED

prescribed

prescribed

(e.g., prevent heart attack)

(e.g., depression)

Pharmacy Name and Phone Number:_________________________________________________________________ Last Pneumonia Vaccine (Pneumovax): Last Flu Shot (influenza vaccine):

Immunization and Vaccines Last Tetanus Immunization: Other:

PATIENT CURRENT MEDICATION LIST Form ID RX 320 Approved: 11/07

APPLY PATIENT LABEL HERE Original – Medical Record

Photocopy – Patient


LIVING WILL DECLARATION LIVING WILL OF _____________________________________ I, __________________________________________________, a resident of the City of ___________________, ________________ County, State of _____________, being of sound and disposing mind, memory and understanding, do hereby willfully and voluntarily make, publish and declare this to be my LIVING WILL, making known my desire that my life shall not be artificially prolonged under the circumstances set forth below, and do hereby declare: l. This instrument is directed to my family, my physician(s), my attorney, my clergyman, any medical facility in whose care I happen to be, and to any individual who may become responsible for my health, welfare or affairs. 2. Death is as much a reality as birth, growth, maturity and old age. It is the one certainty of life. Let this statement stand as an expression of my wishes now that I am still of sound mind, for the time when I may no longer take part in decisions for my own future. 3. If at any time I should have a terminal condition and my attending physician has determined that there can be no recovery from such condition and my death is imminent, where the application of life-prolonging procedures and “heroic measures� would serve only to artificially prolong the dying process, I direct that such procedures be withheld or withdrawn, and that I be permitted to die naturally. I do not fear death itself as much as the indignities of deterioration, dependence and hopeless pain. I therefore ask that medication be mercifully administered to me and that any medical procedures be performed on me which are deemed necessary to provide me with comfort, care or to alleviate pain. 4. In the absence of my ability to give directions regarding the use of such life-prolonging procedures, it is my intention that this declaration shall be honored by my family and physician as the final expression of my legal right to refuse medical or surgical treatment and accept the consequences for such refusal. 5. In the event that I am diagnosed as comatose, incompetent, or otherwise mentally or physically incapable of communication, I appoint ______________________________ to make binding decisions concerning my medical treatment. 6. If I have been diagnosed as pregnant and that diagnosis is known to my physician, this declaration shall have no force or effect during the course of my pregnancy. 7. I understand the full import of this declaration and I am emotionally and mentally competent to make this declaration. I hope you, who care for me, will feel morally bound to follow its mandate. I recognize that this appears to place a heavy responsibility upon you, but it is with the intention of relieving you of such responsibility and of placing it upon myself, in accordance with my strong convictions, that this statement is made. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto subscribed my name and affixed my seal at _______________, _______________, this _____ day of ____________, 20____, in the presence of the subscribing witnesses whom I have requested to become attesting witnesses hereto. ___________________________ Declarant The declarant is known to me and I believe him/her to be of sound mind. ____________________________ _____________________________ Witness Address ____________________________ _____________________________ Witness Address

Subscribed and acknowledged, before me by___________________ __________________________, and subscribed and sworn to before the witnesses, on the _______day of ____________________, 20___.

____________________________ (SEAL) NOTARY PUBLIC State of ___________________ My Commission Expires: ____________________________

Copies of this instrument have been given to: __________________________________________________ Receipt and acknowledged & date: ___________________________________________________________

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 91


IMPORTANT CONTACTS NAME__________________________________________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________


Let us help you with your Commemorative programs Psalm 23 A Psalm of King David

The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want. He maketh me to lie down in green pastures: he leadeth me beside the still waters. He restoreth my soul: he leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his name’s sake. Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me. Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of mine enemies: thou anointest my head with oil; my cup runneth over. Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life: and I will dwell in the house of the LORD forever.

A Day of

Remembrance J.T. Leggett Memorial United Methodist Church November 16, 2014

Presented by

SouthernCare

U y l i nity m a F

SouthernCare

ce-

Remembra n n I

Lillie Kath Decemb

er 20, 19

erine Wilso

27 - Dec ember 1

HOMEG OING S 11 a.m ERV

ICE . Dec Crawford ember 19, 2014 Baptist C hurch 957 Flore n Augusta, ce Street Ga. 3090 1 Rev. Ton y Allen, officiatin g

July 11 - 13, 2014 Pass Christian, MS Bowser Family Reunion final cover.indd 1

n

1, 2014

7/8/2014 7:00:05 PM

DWilson & Associates Publishing and Marketing Solutions

(228) 539-2422

www.dwilsonandassociates.com

15431 O’Neal Road, Suite B • Gulfport, MS 39503 SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 93


IMPORTANT CONTACTS NAME__________________________________________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

94

WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015


NAME__________________________________________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

NAME__________________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

STREET ADDRESS________________________________________________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

CITY:______________________STATE:_________ZIP CODE:_____________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

HOME PHONE:___________________ CELL:_________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

WORK PHONE:___________________ EMAIL:________________________

SENIOR CARE RESOURCES 95


EMERGENCY NUMBERS AMBULANCE SERVICES AMERICAN MEDICAL RESPONSE Bay St Louis, MS

STONE COUNTY HOSPITAL

AMBULANCE

(228) 467-9880

1434 E Central Ave, Wiggins, MS 39577

GULFPORT CITY AMBULANCE

ACADIAN AMBULANCE SERVICE

www.amr.net Biloxi, MS

Moss Point, MS 39562 (228) 762-6266

(601) 928-6600

(228) 897-1196

Biloxi, MS 39533 (800) 259-1111

AMERICAN MEDICAL RESPONSE

ACADIAN AMBULANCE & AIR MED

12020 Intraplex Pkwy Gulfport, MS

(228) 897-1191 www.amr.net

AMERICAN MEDICAL RESPONSE 12020 Intraplex Pkwy, Gulfport, MS 39503

(228) 896-8387

Pascagoula, MS 39567

(228) 762-0911

AMERICAN AMBULANCE SERVICE 1434 Central Ave E, Wiggins, MS 39577

(601) 928-2151

EMERGENCY/DISASTER RELIEF & RECOVERY AMERICAN RED CROSS

www.redcross.org/mississippi/about/ chapters/southmississippi/offices

228.896.4511

FEMA - FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY Website: www.fema.gov

800.621.3362

DISASTER RELIEF AND RECOVERY DIVISION OF CATHOLIC SOCIAL SERVICES Address: 1450 N. St., Gulfport, MS 39501

228.701.0555 855.847.0555

Services: Provides disaster case management and assistance. Serves lower 17 counties of MS.

WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015

96

SALVATION ARMY GULF COAST AREA COMMAND www.salvationarmymscoast.org

228.374.8301


EMERGENCY NUMBERS HANCOCK COUNTY

HARRISON COUNTY

INFORMATION DESK...............................(228) 467-0172

INFORMATION DESK...............................(228) 865-4000

CRISIS HOTLINE......................................1-888-936-7116

ALCOHOL/DRUG TREATMENT TWELVE OAKS........................................1-850-591-1750

AMBULANCE................................911 / (228) 467-9880 ANIMAL SHELTER....................................(228) 466-4516

AMBULANCE................................911 / (228) 897-1191

LIBRARY (BAY ST. LOUIS)..................................(228) 467-5282 (KILN).................................................(228) 255-1724

MUSEUMS BEAUVOIR.........................................(228) 388-4400 OHR OKEEFE MUSEUM.....................(228) 374-5547

MUSEUMS ALICE MOSELEY FOLK ART & ANTIQUE MUSEUM........................(228) 467-9223

ASSISTED LIVING FACILITIES LEMOYNE PLACE............................ (228)-396-1998 EMIRITUS-BILOXI............................... (228)-233-3278 CHAPMAN OAKS............................ (228)-868-7199

THE ARTS OF HANCOCK COUNTY........................(228) 467-9048 ASSISTED LIVING FACILIES BAY ST. LOUIS....................................1-877-920-6057 1-855-284-5883 DIAMOND HEAD..............................1-866-336-6185 BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU/ CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.............(228) 467-9048 TAX COLLECTOR....................................(228) 255-8746

LIBRARIES WEST BILOXI......................................(228) 388-5696 BILOXI................................................(288) 436-3095 DIBERVILLE........................................(228) 392-2279 GULFPORT.........................................(228) 871-7171 BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU/ CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.............(228) 604-0014 *BBB-RANKIN COUNTY......................(601) 398-1700 TAX COLLECTOR GULFPORT.........................................(228) 865-4039 BILOXI................................................(228) 435-8241

HURRICANE AND EMERGENCY SHELTERS COUNTY FARM ROAD 361

HARRISON CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL

Shelter (Pets Allowed) 15038 County Farm Road Gulfport, MS 39503

(Pets Allowed) 15600 School Road Gulfport, MS 39503

D’IBERVILLE CIVIC CENTER

LOBOUY ROAD 361 SHELTER

Multi Purpose Building 10395 Auto Mall Parkway D’Iberville, MS 39540

D’IBERVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 15625 Lamey Bridge Road Biloxi, MS 39532

GULFPORT CENTRAL ELEMENTARY

9509 Lobouy Road Pass Christian, MS 39571

NORTH BAY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 1825 Popp’s Ferry Road Biloxi, MS 39532

SALVATION ARMY BUILDING

1043 Pass Road 2019 22nd Street Gulfport, MS 39501 Gulfport, MS 39501 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015 97

SAUCIER LIZANA ROAD 361 SHELTER 23771 Saucier Lizana Road Saucier, MS 39574

WEST HARRISON HIGH SCHOOL

10399 County Farm Road Gulfport, MS 39503

EAST JACKSON COUNTY 18413 Highway 613 Hurley, MS 39555

CENTRAL JACKSON COUNTY

5500 Ballpark Rd. Vancleave, MS 39565

WEST JACKSON COUNTY

13000 Walker Road Ocean Springs, MS 39564

KILN SHELTER

18320 Highway 43 Kiln, MS 39556

DEDEAUX SHELTER 1095 Road 350 Kiln, MS 39556

STONE COUNTY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 1652A East Central Ave Wiggins, MS 39577


NOTES

98 WINTER-SPRING 2014-2015


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