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T H E I N D E P E N D E N T D A I LY AT D U K E U N I V E R S I T Y

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Divinity School faculty disagree on potential UMC split

ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTEENTH YEAR, ISSUE 34

JUUL-funded researcher pushes pro-vaping stance By Isabella Caracta Contributing Reporter

By Anna Zolotor Staff Reporter

Divinity School faculty are conflicted about the planned split of the United Methodist Church. In early January, reports suggested that the United Methodist Church will likely separate into two or more factions because of disagreements over LGBTQ+ rights. Divinity School administrators and faculty have conflicting opinions about whether the likelihood of the split has been exaggerated. One faculty member suggested that the schism could harm the school’s funding, but several others added that reports of a split were overstated. Will Willimon, professor of the practice of Christian ministry, speculated that the Divinity School could lose $3 million per year—the money it receives from the Ministerial Education Fund which is nearly 10% of the Divinity School’s budget—as a result of the division. At the UMC General Conference in February 2019, worldwide delegates from the UMC voted to uphold and strengthen its ban on the ordination and marriage of LGBTQ+ people. In response to the turmoil caused by this vote, 16 bishops and other church leaders created a committee to research and consider the best path forward for the church. This group of leaders determined that the Church should be split into at least two factions: one “traditionalist” body that excludes LGBTQ+ members, and one that is openly inclusive and affirming. Under this proposed plan, individual churches would decide with the help of their congregations and leadership See DIVINITY on Page 5

Jake Satisky | Editor-in-Chief The Methodist Church is bracing for a split.

As Duke officials consider adding vaping to its smoking ban, one prominent smoking researcher has been a proponent of allowing vaping on campus. His industry relationships, however, have raised some doubts. Jed Rose, director of the Duke Center for Smoking Cessation and professor in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, is pushing a pro-vaping point of view. He accepts research funding from the tobacco and e-cigarette industries, which has raised concerns about potential conflicts of interest. Rose, a longtime smoking-cessation researcher, says the benefits of vaping outweigh the risks. “There’s virtually no plausible scenario where e-cigarettes can have a negative public health impact,” Rose said in an October 2019 Law School event titled “Vaping: Crisis or Lost Opportunity.” As of now, Duke’s Smoke-Free Campus initiative that takes effect July 1, 2020, remains consistent with Rose’s stance that e-cigarettes are a healthier alternative to smoking combustible cigarettes and should be allowed on campus. Yet, his views are at odds with some faculty, public health experts and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Who is Jed Rose?

In the early 1980s, Rose co-invented the nicotine patch, and his research on treatments for smoking helped with the development of the smoking-cessation drug varenicline, or Chantix. Rose said he has accepted research grants from the tobacco industry since around 2000, when he first collaborated with Vector Tobacco Company. In 2011, Rose sold a patent for a device he developed in the 2000s at Duke that eliminates combustion of tobacco while still delivering nicotine. He sold this patent to Philip Morris International, the leading tobacco company worldwide in 2018, for an amount he said he is contractually obliged not to disclose. In addition to his role as director of the Duke Center for Smoking Cessation and president and CEO of the Rose Research Center, he works as a consultant for the same company that bought his patent, Philip Morris. Rose also has outside financial interests with companies such as JUUL Labs Inc., the leader in e-cigarettes, and Altria Group Inc., which owns Philip Morris USA.

Special to The Chronicle As Duke’s smoking ban is slated to go into effect July 1, Jed Rose is working to make sure that rule will not curtail e-cigarettes.

As Duke prepares for the upcoming Not all faculty agree with Rose on smoking ban, Rose has been highly vocal on vaping the issue, pushing back against the faculty who Eight Duke professors urged the are urging the University University to impose a to include e-cigarettes in ban in a letter There’s virtually no plausible vaping the ban. to The Chronicle, “What we do scenario where e-cigarettes published in October know is that in the can have a negative public 2019. Almost 2,000 United States alone, U.S. campuses have there are 540,000 health impact. already done the same, premature deaths from they said. jed rose combustible cigarette “Our university and DIRECTOR OF THE DUKE CENTER FOR smoking and the its host city Durham SMOKING CESSATION related diseases every have navigated a single year,” Rose told long and fraught The Chronicle. “There is no solid evidence relationship with tobacco, and we now that nicotine acting on an adolescent brain face a new opportunity to impact the causes any significant impairment.” tobacco industry’s threats to local and However, his stance is not in line with world public health,” the letter read. “Vape CDC recommendations, which say that manufacturers and marketers have made e-cigarettes are unsafe for kids, teens and excessive claims of benefit in smoking young adults. Exposure to nicotine can harm cessation while targeting youth, who are brain development by changing the ways especially vulnerable to addiction.” synapses linked to memory form, a CDC Associate Professor in Anesthesiology Svenwarning states. Eric Jordt was one of the eight signatories. The warning also notes that young Jordt said by allowing vaping on campus, e-cigarette users may also be more likely to See JUUL on Page 16 smoke cigarettes in the future.

Meet Cosmos Lyles, founder of Cosmic Cantina

Duke defense cracks under Tiger pressure

New Years resolutions from the CEB

Lyles is not only a restauranteur, but he’s also a triplemajoring Duke alum and an inventor. PAGE 2

The normally stout men’s basketball defense did not fare well against Clemson’s big men in Tuesday’s loss. PAGE 6

What does the Community aim to do better in 2020?

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Meet Duke alum Cosmos Lyles, founder of Cosmic Cantina By Chris Kuo

laughing together—can order and watch their food being prepared. A bearded man wearing a Nike hat ladles cheese and rice on to two overlapping tortillas. Behind him, another worker flips hunks of sizzling meat. Latino music bumps in the background. It’s a “funky, homegrown flavor,” as Lyles put it. Bald with a sharp jawline and a scintillating smile, Lyles is seated at a wooden table close to the entrance, with three red wicker chairs. He speaks in a casual, almost languid, tone, gazing into the distance as he recollects past experiences. “[This restaurant’s] been around for more of my life than it hasn’t,” he said. The restaurant first opened more than 24 years ago, on Sept. 1, 1995, but he still feels a “personal connection” to the Cantina. Before coming to Duke, Lyles attended a college prep school in San Francisco, and he embraced music early on, especially piano. When picking universities to attend, he

Staff Reporter

Charlie Zong Contributing Reporter

As a kid growing up in San Francisco, Cosmos Lyles, Pratt ‘95, loved to frequent the local burrito restaurants. When he eventually moved across the country to enroll at Duke in 1991, the dearth of California burritos in Durham hit him especially hard. “There was nothing here,” he said. “There wasn’t even Chipotle back then.” The culinary landscape needed fresh flavors, Lyles decided. Returning to the burrito haven of San Francisco was out of the question. The only alternative? Bringing the burrito—an “autonomous entity,” as he puts it—to Durham. In the fall of 1995, he and a couple of other friends began selling burritos from a small establishment on Ninth Street called Cosmic Cantina. Since then, Cosmic Cantina has become a staple of the Duke experience. Countless students have tasted the cheap, aluminum-wrapped burritos, often late at night after a party. As Cosmic Cantina’s influence has expanded, so have Lyles’s ambitions. After founding Cosmic Cantina in Durham, he established another Cosmic Cantina in Manhattan’s East Side, drawing many students from New York University, which eventually closed in 2010 when the lease expired. In 2010, Lyles also invented EverTune, a guitar bridge designed to maintain the instrument in tune indefinitely. The device has garnered approval from musicians as influential as Joe Satriani, as it was showcased on the Consumer Electronics Show, featured in The New York Times Magazine’s 10th Annual Year in Ideas and awarded an invention prize from Popular Science Magazine. With hobbies ranging from physics and engineering to burritos and bass guitars, Lyles innovates in his business ventures by integrating his disparate interests. EverTune combines his long-standing appreciation for guitar music with his grasp of mechanical physics: the device incorporates spring technology to keep guitars in tune. Lyles has also introduced EverTune technology to the furniture business, chopping wood from his 6-acre property and equipping it with EverTune

contemplated enrolling at Stanford University, but he decided he wanted to attend school further from home. Duke’s flexible curriculum offered Lyles the opportunity to explore a wide array of interests. He expanded his passion for music by regularly strumming his guitar in his dorm room, and he also triple majored in electrical engineering, physics, and literature, relishing the intense academics. “I could have easily been an academic my whole life,” he said. Besides intellectual pursuits, he indulged in a number of escapades. Back in the 1990s, he recalled, there used to be “big, open kegs” on East Campus. “It was quite the draw,” he said, chuckling. He also grinned as he recounted the times he snuck in at halftime instead of tenting for Duke basketball games or the intoxicated See COSMOS on Page 5

Special to The Chronicle Cosmos Lyles founded Cosmic Cantina on Ninth Street in 1995 as a Duke student before inventing Evertune in 2010.

springs to create foldable beds. He’s “always innovating,” said Brad Lionheart, a technology entrepreneur and friend of Lyles who first met him at the Cantina’s Manhattan location. “That’s just his nature.”

Cosmic Cantina, a ‘funky, homegrown flavor’

At first glance, Durham’s Cosmic Cantina appears unassuming. It’s housed on the second floor of a white brick building, nestled between the Ninth Street Dance Studio and Pincho Loco Ice Cream. A passerby might easily breeze past the narrow, arched entrance, adorned on either side by electrical boxes and power lines. Inside the doorway, fluorescent bulbs illuminate the layers of graffiti accumulating on the walls of a staircase leading to the Cantina. The restaurant itself contains a blue-tiled counter at which tonight’s customers—a woman with a Grub Hub box, two girls

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find housing

at The Chronicle’s online guide to living near Duke.


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Duke may split independent Duke to swiftly raise rates for house to name dorm after donor 300 Swift apartments By Stefanie Pousoulides News Editor

Jake Satisky Editor-In-Chief

Special to The Chronicle Avalon House may be breaking in two after a donation to rename a portion of the dorm.

By Stefanie Pousoulides News Editor

Jake Satisky Editor-In-Chief

Could Duke name a new dorm after a donor? During a January training, resident assistants were told that one half of Avalon, an independent house in Kilgo Quad, would be renamed after a donor, while the other half would keep the name. Multiple RAs independently confirmed the details to The Chronicle. The Chronicle emailed Gonzalez to confirm that Avalon would be splitting in two and that there would be a dorm named for a donor and to ask who the donor is. Gonzalez replied Sunday that “no changes are occurring for next year.” “One of the university’s priorities is raising

money to enhance the residential experience at Duke which would include opportunities to recognize donors, as is done with other buildings on campus,” he followed up in an email Monday. “As that happens, we are going to take special care to ensure that existing house names are preserved, and that any future namings are done in consultation with members of the house community.” The Chronicle asked Gonzalez again whether Avalon will split in two, but he did not respond in time for publication. Various on-campus buildings are named after donors, such as the Karsh Alumni and Visitors Center and the French Family Science Center. While it does not house students, McClendon Tower is attached to the 4D building in Keohane Quad and was built thanks to a 2002 donation from Kathleen Byrns McClendon and Aubrey K. McClendon.

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Those who lived in a flea-infested dorm and wondered why they paid the same price as those living in apartments in 300 Swift will probably be pleased about a new Duke housing policy that will come into effect next year. Those who live in 300 Swift—or want to live there next year—may not be so happy. Joe Gonzalez, assistant vice president of student affairs and dean for residential life, confirmed that rates for 300 Swift will go up next year to reflect the nicer accommodations, which include a full kitchen, living room and balcony. For those living in a shared bedroom in a Swift apartment, the rate will be the same as a single room on West Campus—currently $5,750—and financial aid will cover it as such.

Currently, Swift residents in a shared bedroom pay $4,353 per semester, the same as students living in a residence hall double on West. “The double room residence hall rate was used for the first two years because 300 Swift was housing students from quads/houses displaced by renovations at Crowell and then Craven,” Gonzalez wrote. “Now that this work is complete, the more appropriate rate will be used starting in the fall.” Duke purchased 300 Swift three years ago, and during renovations to Crowell and Craven Quads, students were temporarily assigned to live in the apartments. Construction finished in time for students to move back into Crowell in Fall 2018 and Craven in Fall 2019. The University hopes to eventually have two new dorms on West Campus so it doesn’t need to house undergraduates in Swift anymore, but administrators are still looking for spots to put new dorms.

Chronicle File Photo Now that 300 Swift is no longer swing space for renovations, rates are slated to go up.

Students interested in running for Editor of The Chronicle (2020-21 school year) should submit a resumé and a two-page essay on goals for the organization to the Board of Directors of the Duke Student Publishing Co., Inc. Applications should be submitted to: Jake Satisky Editor, The Chronicle jacob.satisky@duke.edu Deadline for application is Friday, January 17, 2020 at 5 p.m.


4 | THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2020

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Trustees open forum ponders sophomore slump, Durham, faculty By Ashwin Kulshrestha

and county. “We spent a little time with city and county leaders, sort of mulling around in this issue with them, and what was I think was useful was that they heard what we were interested in, and they talked to us about some of their priorities as well, which weren’t always exactly down centerline with what the trustees were proposing,” said Richard Riddell, senior vice president and secretary to the Board of Trustees.

Senior News Reporter

Duke administration and people representing the Board of Trustees discussed a number of topics at the Board’s open forum Wednesday, from changes in the undergraduate experience to the hiring of new faculty and Duke’s relationship with the Durham community.

Undergraduate experience shakeup

Ian MacMullen, assistant vice provost for undergraduate education, summarized the recent proceedings of the Next Generation Living and Learning Experience Task Force, the group examining aspects of undergraduate life at Duke. “There is a general consensus among the task force, and more broadly, I think, that the West Campus experience lags a little bit behind the East Campus experience,” MacMullen said, describing the committee’s specific focus on West Campus. A program to remedy this by targeting sophomore students is currently in the works. MacMullen said that the group is aware of a “sophomore slump” among Duke students—when second-year students traditionally experience a dip in performance from their first year. MacMullen emphasized that this is an issue at other universities as well, but the task force is working to address it. Hallie Davis-Penders, senior program coordinator for the office of undergraduate education, highlighted difficulties with housing selectivity and the difficulty of upper-level courses as possible causes. Another potential stressor is the relative decrease in resources available for helping upperclass students in comparison to first-years, she said. Davis-Penders also discussed the lack of a sense of community and belonging that sophomore students may face, given the more cohesive nature of the East Campus housing system.

Other key takeaways Sujal Manohar | Associate Photography Editor Task force leaders presented their recent work at the open forum Wednesday evening.

MacMullen described some potential solutions the task force is exploring, including a program to link East and West Campus communities to help create cohesive neighborhoods of upperclass students. The details of this program, however, have not yet been fleshed out. The group is also considering a program to increase faculty engagement in the West Campus housing experience. This would be similar to the faculty-in-residence program on East Campus, but with faculty possibly taking on nonresidential roles in neighborhoods on West.

will really just up our overall game in the sciences and technology,” Kornbluth said. To assist in this, new interdisciplinary hiring committees have been formed, jumpstarted by a $50 million grant from the Duke Endowment. Deans and department chairs on the committees can nominate individuals they are considering hiring, and the committees have already begun the hiring process. An audience member asked Kornbluth what this means for the fate of early-career academics who are not yet established in their respective fields. Kornbluth said the new hiring scheme is Hiring new faculty meant to supplement regular department hiring Speaking on behalf of the Advancing Duke by bringing in individuals who stand out from the Science and Technology Task Force, Provost pack, citing Vice President for Research Lawrence Sally Kornbluth discussed how the group has Carin in describing this sort of individual as a been working with trustees and faculty to “singularity,” or a leader in a field. identify the current strengths of the University and find opportunities to “become leaders in Relationship with the community and certain areas of science.” beyond She described a push to hire exceptional A recurring theme throughout the panel was an new faculty in areas such as material science interest in continuing to grow Duke’s relationship and data science, specifically in the intersection with the Durham, the city and county. of artificial science and health. At their last meeting, the trustees met with “We’re really focusing on luminaries who community officials representing both the city

Executive Vice President Tallman Trask is leading a committee tasked with planning the future of Central Campus. Riddell summarized the committee’s proceedings in Trask’s absence, noting that the demolition of Central Campus has progressed as expected. The committee is searching for interesting ideas for what to do with the expanse of land sitting between East and West Campuses. Riddell said the land might be used as a site for future advances in research and commercial investment and highlighted the possibility of working with community partners to put the land to good use. Stelfanie Williams, vice president of Durham affairs, discussed Duke’s approaching deadline to achieve carbon neutrality and emphasized that the Board is aware of this goal in their decision-making. Her discussion of neutrality came in response to a question posed by Jason Elliot, assistant director of Sustainable Duke, who raised the issue of sustainable transportation. Williams explained that, although the Board did not explicitly discuss this, the University is working closely with Durham. Margaret Epps, special assistant to the president, noted that with six members of the Board of Trustees set to retire in 2021, the Governance Committee has begun to explore the future identity of the Board.


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COSMOS

Relinquishing everyday oversight of the Cantina has enabled Lyles to explore other pursuits. After all, he said, he originally established the restaurant with the goal of moment at Myrtle Beach when he resolved to buying time and earning money in order to become vegetarian. He’s stuck to it. eventually begin following his true passion. Lyles established the Cantina in Fall 1995, “My dream was always to be an inventor,” which was his last semester at Duke because he says. he took an extra semester to finish his three majors. Initially, both the employees and EverTune: innovation, individuality Lyles launched EverTune, his all-mechanical customers derived entirely from the student body, with most of the regulars being personal bridge system for guitars, in 2011, in partnership friends from Duke. He had walked on the with co-inventor Paul Dowd. In a Youtube football team in his last year, so football and video produced by the company, Lyles appears in a light yellow polo, framed against a white lacrosse players would often come to eat. The challenge of academics at Duke paled backdrop. Speaking in a slow, measured tone, he in comparison to the hurdle of starting a explained the mechanics behind EverTune. restaurant business, Lyles said. The essence of the device is the “saddle “You got a million fires to put out,” he module,” which consists of a series of springs, explained. “At least at Duke it’s codified, one for each string. Each spring attaches to a and there’s no unknowns. With restaurants lever, which then pulls on one of the guitar everything is unknown, and sometimes you feel strings. These springs maintain the proper like you have to do the impossible.” tension so that the guitar remains in tune even During its first two years, the Cantina was when the strings loosen due to temperature a business failure. It opened irregularly, often changes or everyday strumming from a three times a week at 10 p.m. Sometimes, the guitarist. “Ask any engineer how to flatten a tension restaurant would draw large groups of 200 people, but the restaurant lacked the manpower curve, which is what EverTune does,” he told to serve so many, often turning away customers The New York Times Magazine, “and 9 out of 10 of them will say you should use a springempty-handed. Eventually, Lyles shifted away from and-lever system like the one I designed.” Synthesizing Lyles’s interests in music and hiring students and began employing local Durhamites, a choice that crucially altered engineering, EverTune embodies his eclectic the restaurant’s cultural flavor. The Cantina interests. But his work with EverTune also became a gathering spot for a more diverse reveals the innovative and individualistic array of people—late night partiers and hungry personality of a man who frequently wears students, but also young professionals and different colored shoes and who has taught other long-time Durham locals. himself how to play Beethoven Sonatas. “He’s an individualist,” said Marshall Since that day, Lyles has maintained much of the original batch of employees. Most of Stroscio, a Durham native who worked on them have worked at Cosmic Cantina for social media marketing for EverTune. “He’s such an original thinker. He always figures out more than 20 years. Lyles gestures at one of the workers behind his own way of doing things.” In a similar vein, Lyles does not foresee the counter in the process of blanketing a himself starting a family. “I’m not really the burrito in aluminum foil. “The guy doing burritos has been here since kind of guy that needs to slow down to teach somebody else how to be a human,” he says. maybe [1997],” he said. He and the employees are family in a way, Stroscio first met Lyles in 2002 at a Lyles said, who is unmarried. Back in the day, restaurant in Durham called Another Thyme. the group would often take trips to Wilmington Although the two are now close friends, Stroscio remembered Lyles being somewhat Beach to mark the end of a Duke semester. Now that Lyles has branched out to new aloof during their first interactions. locations and has become involved in his “He’s not somebody who goes out of his EverTune business, he has largely handed off way to be sociable or follow conventional rules the responsibility of the Durham Cantina to for meeting people,” Stroscio said. Eventually, Stroscio began playing guitar local employees. The restaurant has taken on a life of its own, he said, his voice taking on the at the first floor underneath Cosmic Cantina, wistful tones of a parent who has sent their which Lyles had outfitted as a bar with a live music venue. Lyles himself would sometimes child off to college. FROM PAGE 2

join in, incorporating unconventional time signatures into the melody, Stroscio recalled. Lyles almost always requested that musicians improvise when at his venue, Stroscio said. Everything would happen from the ground up, in the moment, with the musicians bouncing melodies off each other. It was messy business with constant opportunity for mistakes. But, done right, it dazzled.

His ‘stamp of idiosyncrasy’

Toward the end of our conversation at Cosmic Cantina, Lyles points up at the Cosmic Cantina logo, fixed near the top of a blackboard containing the drinks menu. The logo consists of the black and white yin and yang symbol surrounded by two circular lines resembling the rings of Saturn, or the path of electron orbits around an atom. As Lyles explains, the yin and yang image— the complementary union of disparate ideas— symbolizes a philosophy that he has readily embraced. He is conscious of how divergent some of his interests are, from physics and engineering to tortillas and guitar tuning. But, ultimately, it’s his own “stamp of idiosyncrasy,” the quirkiness and ingenuity he brings to each pursuit, that unites this motley of interests, he said. This explains why he steadfastly resists turning the Cantina into a corporate chain, and why he admits he could never see himself working for a large engineering firm. To do so would nullify the driving force behind each of these ventures, that element that wraps all the rest together, or, as he puts it, imparts each one with “flavor.” “There’s always a Cosmos,” he said.

DIVINITY FROM PAGE 1 whether they want to join the traditionalist faction or remain in the main United Methodist Church. These decisions would be due by 2024. Leaders from the traditionalist and more progressive factions alike have expressed their approval of the plan, which has led to some sources to claim that the division is likely to occur. A delegate to the UMC General Conference since 2012, Edgardo ColónEmeric, Irene and William McCutchen associate professor of reconciliation and

THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2020 | 5

theology, argued that the proposal has been taken out of context by the media. In reality, he said, it’s too early to tell how or even whether the church will split. L. Gregory Jones, dean of the Divinity School, agreed with Colón-Emeric, writing in an email that “the ‘news’ from [early January] was the latest proposal that has been floated for a path forward.” “It is premature to assess what might happen at the General Conference in May,” Jones said. Colón-Emeric, who is one of 16 delegates to the UMC General Conference elected by the North Carolina Annual Conference of the UMC, said that he does not yet know how he will use his vote. He said he’s still in the stage of reading, thinking, praying and listening to his constituents. “At one level, of course, the division is something to be cried and lamented. At another level, some of the divisions have already taken place in practice if not in law,” Colón-Emeric said. Laceye Warner, Royce and Jane Reynolds Associate Professor of the Practice of Evangelism and Methodist Studies, is a member of Texas’s Annual Conference of the UMC and will also be a delegate at this year’s UMC General Conference. “It is still very early to discern what will happen related to the UMC. There are numerous proposals and ongoing conversations,” she wrote in an email to The Chronicle. Warner did not answer The Chronicle’s question regarding her opinion on the potential division. A UMC bishop and former dean of Duke Chapel, Will Willimon expressed a starkly different sentiment than Warner, ColónEmeric and Jones, explaining that he “[wishes] the media had misrepresented it.” Willimon conceded that the recentlyfloated plan is only a proposal and not a decision by the UMC General Conference. He thinks that the church will split, but that it isn’t clear to him how many factions will emerge from the division. There are currently 13 United Methodist seminaries, many of which are already struggling to remain afloat, Willimon said. No more than four would survive a split, he estimated. “Part of being in a church is to be with people that you don’t agree with and many of whom you don’t like,” Willimon said. “As a bishop, I should be the person saying, ‘I’m See DIVINITY on Page 16

Duke in pictures: Campus springs into the new decade

Bre Bradham | Associate Photography Editor The Blue Zone has been converted to undergraduate parking, accommodating students returning from study abroad. Graduate students and faculty must now park in the Science Drive Garage.

Rebecca Schneid | Associate Photography Editor Groggy students emerge from their tents after a restless night, as an unseasonably warm tenting season in Krzyzewskiville is upon us yet again.


6 | THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2020

Sports The Chronicle

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THE BLUE ZONE

BEYOND THE ARC: CLEMSON STUNS DUKE dukechronicle.com

THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2020

MEN’S BASKETBALL

SIMMS’ CITY

Clemson hands Duke first ACC loss behind Aamir Simms’ heroic effort By Evan Kolin Assistant Blue Zone Editor

CLEMSON, S.C.— Clemson may have lost in the College Football Playoff national championship Monday night, but the school’s men’s basketball team gave its fans a nice consolation prize less than 24 hours later. Exactly one year after the Blue Devils lost to an unranked Syracuse at Cameron Indoor Stadium, the unranked Tigers defeated No. 3 Duke 79-72 Tuesday night in Littlejohn Coliseum, gifting Duke its first ACC loss of the season. “I think it just comes down to us,” sophomore point guard Tre Jones said. “There’s nothing they did. They didn’t do anything special. They weren’t different from any other team. They weren’t better than any of these teams we’ve beat. It was on us. We didn’t come to play.” Down 62-59 with six minutes left, Clemson proceeded to go on a 20-10 run to finish the game. Guard Curran Scott started DUKE 72 the run with two made free throws, but it was junior forward Aamir CLEM 79 Simms who would give the Tigers the lead for good with a layup, putting the home team up 63-62 with five minutes remaining in the contest. Simms finished the game with 25 points on 10-of-15 shooting from the floor, adding nine rebounds and five assists. Graduate senior Tevin Mack—who finished with 22 points of his own on 10-of-14 shooting—followed up Simms’ lay-in with a jumper, extending Clemson’s edge to 65-62. Duke remained close as time wore down, but Simms and Mack would combine to score all of the Tigers’ next eight points as well to put the game to bed. With just under 11 minutes remaining in the contest, the

Charles York | Photography Editor

Clemson overcame a late Duke scoring run to upset the Blue Devils and defeat a North Carolinian overdog once again. Blue Devils looked like they were starting to take control. Jones began the run by finding his way to the rim and laying it in to cut Duke’s deficit to 52-50. Vernon Carey Jr. would poke the ball away for a steal on the other end, with the ball naturally finding Jones for a fast break opportunity.

But the sophomore captain decided against taking it all the way to the rim, instead pulling up from three to try to put the Blue Devils ahead. The shot hit nothing but net, and Duke had See SIMMS’ CITY on Page 12

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Blue Devils’ normally stellar defense cracks Tuesday By Riley Pfaff Associate Sports Editor

CLEMSON, S.C.—For its prior seven games, Duke treated its fans to a study in defensive prowess. Dating back to Dec. 6, only three of Duke’s opponents had managed more than 60 points—and none more than 64 points—against the No. 4 team in KenPom’s defensive efficiency rankings. And most recently, the Blue Devils had forced Wake Forest to commit 17 turnovers in their lopsided win Saturday night in Durham. All streaks must come to an end, however, and this sevengame run was no different. Clemson breezed past 65 points on the strength of an unusually prolific 3-point shooting night and a ferocious offensive strategy driven through the Tigers’ standout bigs, Aamir Simms and Tevin Mack. Thanks to a 79-point night on a 56.6 percent clip from the field, Clemson toppled the mighty Blue Devils, handing No. 3 Duke its first ACC loss in impressive fashion in Littlejohn Coliseum Tuesday night. “We knew coming into the game that the four and the five See DEFENSE on Page 13

Charles York | Photography Editor

John Newman III, who finished with 14 points, had a poster slam over Javin DeLaurier in Clemson’s upset victory.


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WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Duke to welcome slumping Notre Dame to Cameron By Em Adler Staff Writer

The Blue Devils are coming off of their biggest win of the year, an overtime win against a Virginia Tech team that would be in the NCAA tournament if the season ended today. They will follow up that key win by welcoming Notre Dame to Cameron Notre Indoor Stadium at Dame 8 p.m. Thursday. In vs. any other year, that’d Duke be a nightmare for a good-but-not-great THURSDAY, 8 p.m. Duke squad. But the Cameron Indoor Stadium Fighting Irish have spent the 2019-2020 season enduring worse

and worse losses, their most recent a 34-point drubbing at the hands of a North Carolina State team that just lost to a middling North Carolina squad. With Notre Dame’s inferior resume, the Blue Devils have a shot to start building a winning streak. What’s different about this year’s Fighting Irish team? It takes an enormous combination of factors for a team to tumble from back-to-back NCAA tournament championship game appearances to ACC cellar-dweller status. Injuries to key players, including a knee sprain that sidelined standout center Mikayla Vaughn for over a month, have forced bench players and freshmen to play extended minutes for Notre Dame. Those

Eric Wei | Sports Photography Editor

Haley Gorecki has been Duke’s leader thus far this season as a ball handler and shooter.

are minutes that would’ve gone to more heralded backups in the past, except many of those heralded backups have transferred to other programs. Players like Erin Boley and Ali Patberg would be much-needed starters for the Fighting Irish (6-11, 1-4 in the ACC), but are instead starting on ranked teams elsewhere. In the meanwhile, Notre Dame coach Muffet McGraw is trying to develop freshmen and graduate students with limited prior experience on the fly. That’s led to poor rebounding and erratic defense, both of which are important against a team like Duke (8-8, 2-3) that often struggles to create its own offense. But after the Blue Devils introduced screens into their offense against the Hokies, the Fighting Irish

defense could bleed points to Duke on pickand-pop plays. What’s stopping a Duke blowout? Looking at the talent and schemes on the court Thursday, it is not hard to imagine the Blue Devils racing out to a first-quarter lead and never looking back. But it’d be foolhardy to count out a team coached by McGraw, especially one playing a Duke team that only last week choked away a late lead to Virginia. The good news for the Blue Devil defense is that Notre Dame doesn’t have a plethora of off-ball shooters like Virginia or FGCU, so it is likely the Duke defense can See W. BASKETBALL on Page 13

Eric Wei | Sports Photography Editor

Miela Goodchild is Duke’s most lethal scorer from deep, spreading the floor on every possession.


12 | THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2020

SIMMS’ CITY FROM PAGE 6 its first lead of the second half. Jones finished with 17 points, five rebounds and four assists in 36 minutes. “He’s done that—not to bring us back as much, as just to lead us,” head coach Mike Krzyzewski said of Jones. “And he’s one of the best players in the country. But, not having—one reason we’ve been good is we had depth, and we got two kids out now on the perimeter. And I saw it a little bit in the last game. And tonight, you definitely saw that we’re not as good without that depth, but that’s basketball.” On the Blue Devils’ next offensive possession, it was Carey’s turn to shine. The freshman big man finished through the foul to stretch Duke’s lead to 55-52 but missed the ensuing free throw, leaving the door open for the Tigers. Clemson (9-7, 3-3 in the ACC) would fight its way back, tying the game at 59

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following a Simms three. Duke (15-2, 5-1) finished 10-of-20 from the line in the game, continuing a rough month from the charity stripe for the Blue Devils. Turnovers were the story for Duke’s offense to start off the contest, with the Blue Devils coughing up the ball nine times in the first half, including five times over the first six minutes. Nevertheless, an 8-of-10 start from the field had Duke up 17-16 with 12 minutes remaining in the half. But then, the Blue Devils went ice cold. Duke hit just four of its next 16 shot attempts, its deficit extending to 40-33 by the end of the first half. The final miss—a wide-open, breakaway Jordan Goldwire layup attempt—summed up the first 20 minutes nicely for the visiting squad. “When you’re in conference, all these games, people are hungry,” Krzyzewski said. “And if you win a lot, sometimes you’re not as much as the other team. And I thought that’s how the game started.” The highlight of the first half came with about eight

The Chronicle minutes remaining, when Clemson guard John Newman III completed perhaps the ACC’s most vicious poster dunk of the year thus far. The sophomore jumped over and slammed it right on Blue Devil forward Javin DeLaurier to break a 22-22 tie, hitting the free throw to convert the and-one and putting Clemson up three. Newman finished the game with 14 points on 5-of-7 shooting from the floor. Carey led Duke with 20 points and seven rebounds. Sophomore forward Joey Baker missed the game with a sprained right ankle, but is hopeful to return in the Blue Devils’ next contest. “I hope [it’s not a long-term injury],” Krzyzewski said regarding Baker’s injury. “We’ll see, I hope he’s ready for Saturday. He would have been—all these little things, his was a kind of freaky little accident.” Duke will have a chance to rebound Saturday night, as No. 11 Louisville will come to Cameron Indoor Stadium for a top-15 clash.

Charles York | Photography Editor

Tre Jones finished with 17 points, five rebounds and four assists against Clemson, but his efforts were for naught.

Charles York | Photography Editor

Vernon Carey’s 20-point, seven-rebound performance against Clemson did not stop the Tigers from coming away victorious.


The Chronicle

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2020 | 13

DEFENSE

W. BASKETBALL

FROM PAGE 6

FROM PAGE 11

were the positions that we had to defend. In our last game, we didn’t do a good job at the four and the five and we didn’t do a good job tonight,” head coach Mike Krzyzewski said. “Simms and Mack were terrific. It’s a different offense to defend but [they were] simply spectacular tonight.” As he did against North Carolina last Saturday, Simms proved to be invaluable for the Tigers, especially on the offensive end of the floor. He finished with a game-high 25 points and nine rebounds and thoroughly impressed Krzyzewski. Mack, his counterpart in the post, added 22 points himself and matched Simms with nine rebounds. Simms and Mack each were also part of the 3-point barrage that helped put Clemson ahead in the first half. The Tigers made five of their first seven attempts from beyond the arc in the first half to help key a run to put Clemson up five at the half. Simms and Mack each finished with two triples, as did teammates Hunter Tyson and John Newman III, to round out a balanced attack from deep for Clemson. Entering Tuesday’s game, the Tigers were shooting just over 30 percent from downtown, and the Blue Devils had allowed opponents to shoot below 30 percent from deep. But despite cooling off a bit in the second half, Clemson still shot 42.1 percent from deep against the Blue Devils. The ability of Simms and Mack to step out was vital for the rest of the Tigers offense to click, as Vernon Carey Jr. and Javin DeLaurier were forced out of the lane to guard their men on the perimeter. As a result, Duke couldn’t command the paint on defense as it normally does, getting outscored in the lane 38-34. “You have to give credit to Simms and Mack tonight. They were extremely good. Extremely good,” Krzyzewski said. Making Duke’s task on defense all the more difficult against the Tigers was the fact that a handful of Blue Devils were in foul trouble in the second half, most notably Cassius Stanley, who picked up his fourth foul with more than 16 minutes to go in the game. The freshman guard was forced to play a more limited game from that point forward. “Honestly it feels like me getting four fouls is the whole reason we lost the game. I take responsibility for that,” Stanley said. “I could have done some better things. It’s tough to play with four, it was tough to watch from the bench. I tried to do my best to cheer everybody on.” In addition to Joey Baker and Wendell Moore Jr., both of whom missed the game with injuries, Duke also seemed to largely be missing another player, Matthew Hurt, who played only 15 minutes as he struggled to slow down Clemson’s forwards. The defensive struggles might have gone unnoticed were it not for the errors on the other end of the floor, where turnovers and missed free throws continued to be a thorn in Duke’s side. The Blue Devils have struggled all year from the free throw line, and Tuesday’s 10for-20 performance did nothing to instill confidence in their ability to convert from the charity stripe. Duke was able to cut down on its turnovers in the second half, but had to play from behind due to its mistakes with the ball in the first period. Saturday, the Blue Devils will have their hands full with another versatile forward, Jordan Nwora, as No. 11 Louisville will visit Durham for a highly anticipated matchup. To avoid dropping their second conference game in a row, Duke will need to be more effective against Nwora than it was against Simms and Mack, cutting back on the small mistakes that let Tuesday’s game slip away.

hold its own. The biggest challenge for the Blue Devils is Vaughn, a promising scorer in the paint and the post, two places where Duke tends to rely on team defense more than individual defense. She flashed upside last year and is still adjusting to a featured role, but if everything clicks, she’ll be hard for this team to stop. On the other end of the court, the Blue Devils need to continue to develop the sets they ran last week to really be able to take advantage of the Fighting Irish. Haley Gorecki’s drives and Mikayla Boykin’s crossovers will be necessary if it comes down to crunch time, but taking control of this game will necessitate forcing Notre Dame’s greener players into and out of switches that they still haven’t mastered. If Duke can manage that, there’s not much preventing it from getting back above .500.

Eric Wei | Sports Photography Editor

Mikayla Boykin has been a spark in her return to the hardwood.

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Fighting fire with action

F

ires are blazing across the globe. From Alaska to the Amazon Rainforest, millions of acres rich with people, plants, and wildlife are burning. In recent months, Australia has been devastated by some of the worst wildfires in the continent’s history. It is now estimated that over 1 billion animals have been killed due to the

and more severe. Rather than promoting forest renewal, the immense strength of these fires are driving entire species toward the brink of extinction. The bushfires in Australia are also believed to have spewed as much as two-thirds of the nation’s annual carbon dioxide emissions in just the past three months. Absent significant decarbonization

climate action platform called UCapture. By going to ucapture.com and downloading the browser extension, you will be funding carbon offset projects just by going about your normal online shopping. UCapture is partnered with over 25,000 online stores such as Target, Walmart, Vistaprint, Fandango, and Enterprise, meaning that when you purchase

efforts to mitigate the effects of climate change, the devastation being experienced in Australia will occur more frequently in many locations across the globe,. ironically “spreading like wildfire.” As an animal lover and environmental enthusiast, I have felt an awful sense of helplessness these past couple weeks. It feels as if all I could do was read news articles as the death toll skyrocketed and habitats burned. I became really frustrated as people would discuss the fires, convinced that there was nothing I could do being thousands of miles away and started to disengage. However, I quickly realized that ignorance is not bliss. While American citizens were putting their lives on the line to fight fires in Australia, I was doing absolutely nothing in the face of one of the most tragic environmental disasters in recent history. I knew that I needed to take action. But, I wondered what I could really do to help. Fortunately, upon searching this question online, I came across many answers. From a financial standpoint, there are dozens of organizations working to assist victims of the bush fires. For example, Australia’s largest wildlife organization, WIRES (New South Wales Wildlife Information, Rescue, and Education Service Inc.) is seeking emergency support to increase its capacity to help affected animals; the organization is receiving between 600 to 1,000 calls every day for assistance rescuing or caring for sick, injured, or orphaned animals. There have been lists compiled by CNN, Animals Australia, Charity Navigator, and a variety of other sources which includes organizations in need of donations to help in the face of the Australian fires. However, there are many other ways you can protect forests and wildlife more generally. With just a free click at therainforestsite.com, you will preserve part of the Amazon Rainforest, another ecosystem which has been devastated by recent fires. Administered by the organization Greater Good, the program helps to fund 130 charities across the country. In addition to rainforest protection, your clicks can help provide food for people in poverty, veterans, and animals in need and fight diseases such as breast cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s. Another way you can help is by offsetting your carbon footprint—reducing your contribution to climate change. To help achieve Duke’s goal of being carbon neutral by 2024, the university has partnered with a

items on any of these websites with the browser extension, a portion of the proceeds will fund forest preservation, renewable energy, and landfill gas capture projects in the United States and across the globe. Through the 300 new users I registered as a former UCapture Brand Ambassador, I facilitated the offset of over 45,000 pounds of carbon dioxide. You have the ability to combat the impacts of climate change right from your computer. Amazon Smile provides a similar opportunity to support important causes through your Amazon shopping. You have the opportunity to choose from over one million charities for a small percentage of your purchases to help fund. For example, my family’s account contributes to the Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center, a sanctuary dedicated to preserving Alaska’s wildlife through conservation, research, education, and quality animal care. Whether you choose a choose an organization dedicated to forest preservation, wildlife conservation, or an issue outside of the environmental realm, this is an easy way to give back without any added costs. Furthermore, you can show your elected officials you care. The United States Department of the Interior and the Forest Service have been sending wildfire personnel to assist with ongoing wildfire suppression efforts in Australia. According to the National Interagency Fire Center, there are 142 U.S. personnel currently assigned to Australia. In addition to calling your Congressional Representative and Senators to support taking action on climate change and promoting wildlife conservation domestically, you should ask for their continued support of these collaborative cross-border fire management efforts. It may feel like the world is on fire, because unfortunately, far too much of it is. It is truly tragic. Yet, things will only get worse when as we project hopelessness, stagnation, and despair. One billion animal lives have already been lost as the bushfires rage on. Instead, we must act. Now is the time to stand up for those who don’t have a voice. Fortunately, we can make a difference right here from Duke’s campus. The question is, will we?

Elliott Davis GUEST COLUMN devastating fires. In New South Wales and Victoria, Australia’s two most popular states, nearly two dozen people have died and 1,500 homes have been destroyed. As of January 7, 32,400 square miles had burned since the blazes began. Bushfires in Australia are not new. In fact, they have been occurring for thousands of years— small-scale natural burns can be healthy for forest ecosystems by clearing excess fuel and making room for growing plants. However, climate change has created significantly more hot and dry conditions, making the fire season much longer

hot take of the week “We hate sports here in the opinion section.”

—Leah Abrams, Editorial Page Editor, on January 15, 2020.

LETTERS POLICY

Direct submissions to:

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E-mail: chronicleletters@duke.edu Editorial Page Department The Chronicle Box 90858, Durham, NC 27708 Phone: (919) 684-2663 Fax: (919) 684-4696

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BEN LEONARD, Towerview Editor CARTER FORINASH, Towerview Managing Editor WILL ATKINSON, Recess Managing Editor MIRANDA GERSHONI, Recess Managing Editor JAEWON MOON, Editorial Board Chair OLIVIA SIMPSON, Editorial Board Chair BRE BRADHAM, Investigations Editor BEN LEONARD, Investigations Editor SHAGUN VASHISTH, Investigations Editor BRE BRADHAM, Recruitment Chair SHAGUN VASHISTH, Recruitment Chair JOHN MARKIS, Senior News Reporter ASHWIN KULSHRESTHA, Senior News Reporter TREY FOWLER, Advertising Director JULIE MOORE, Creative Director

The Chronicle is published by the Duke Student Publishing Company, Inc., a non-profit corporation independent of Duke University. The opinions expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of Duke University, its students, faculty, staff, administration or trustees. Unsigned editorials represent the majority view of the editorial board. Columns, letters and cartoons represent the views of the authors. To reach the Editorial Office at 301 Flowers Building, call 684-2663 or fax 684-4696. To reach the Business Office at 1517 Hull Avenue call 684-3811. To reach the Advertising Office at 2022 Campus Drive call 684-3811. One copy per person; additional copies may be purchased for .25 at The Chronicle Business office at the address above. @ 2020 Duke Student Publishing Company

Elliott Davis is a Trinity senior and a former Chronicle columnist. He is the Duke Lead for Citizens’ Climate Lobby.

Have an opinion? Want to make your voice heard? Send a letter to chronicleletters@duke.edu. Please keep letters between 200 to 400 words.


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2020 | 15

When Shooters becomes Resolutions for a new year a substitute for therapy

T

o uninvolved onlookers, the troupes of students lining up by Shooters are there for a good time. In several ways, they inspire empowerment. The same, huddled students walking around campus in sweats and yoga pants by day now radiate confidence en

fear. There, I could allay all my unvoiced concerns. I found that my goal in Shooters becomes experiencing colors and sounds in their full intensity, to taste the world in its raw, unadulterated form. As long as there is no immediate danger surrounding me, there’s a strange release

Carrie Wang within chaos, the eye of a hurricane, when faced with more immediate and arguably pettier dangers—things such as “oh no, that guy next to me doesn’t look stable so I should move before he spills his drink all over me” or “that tall kid wants to get to the middle so I should get out of his way before aggressive shoving ensues.” The string of temporary annoyances, basking in their two seconds of fame, keep overarching concerns, like existential dread or homesickness, at bay. It’s the same kind of thrill I get when riding a rollercoaster. The essence of life boils down to base, physical conditions rather than the bigger picture. Besides running off to Shooters, avoiding fear can manifest in other forms that range in healthiness. Since last year, I have found less dramatic avenues for it. It can be stress baking, or stress gaming. It can be lying in bed, unable to figure out where productivity starts. It was during my first year, due to the novelty of the college experience, that I experienced these emotions—stemming from situations like my first finals season, the influx of unfamiliar social situations and fear of drifting away from high school friends. Psychologists have identified several defense mechanisms against negative emotions. My Shooters escapade, for example, falls under compartmentalization. These mechanisms also include denial, a process by which some people convince themselves that there is in fact nothing wrong, and rationalization, a generally healthier process that occurs when people make valid excuses for having fears. It is my opinion that the University itself should take more initiative to promote students’ mental health, especially for first years. At the cusp of every final’s season—this one included— there is a heightened sense of anxiety in the people around me. But the stress of finals is only one symptom of the overall fear that the first-year experience entails. It lies in stark contrast to the ecstatic, glimmering O-week events that Duke showcases at the beginning. During my O-week, I learned a lot about Duke’s academic resources through countless panels and convocations, but didn’t know about CAPS until later in the semester by word of mouth. Perhaps one small step that Duke can take to promote mental health can start in O-week, where in lieu of some of the spectacle, the University could provide information sessions detailing mental health resources, such as CAPS, or student groups like NAMI that sponsor mental health awareness initiatives. Frankly, Duke can be a very stressful place, and it’s easier to cultivate support networks when vulnerability seems normal. Carrie Wang is a Trinity sophomore. Her column, “meritable mediocrity,” typically runs on alternate Thursdays.

Kamala Harris, and van-driving Beto. Clearly, we were prophetic. For now, we are steering clear of whatever bloodbath might unfold between the whiter-than-a-picket-fence of a field of candidates that is left, but we make no long term promises. At the very least, we promise to bring you well-reasoned, thoughtful endorsement pieces as the local (read: campus) politics scene kicks

Community Editorial Board

T

MERITABLE MEDIOCRITY

masse, dressed in flattering clothing and encircled by seemingly supportive friends. Despite the happy scene, there is copious negative discourse on clubbing culture. After all, such giddiness is usually inorganic and alcohol-induced. Various thinkpieces decry the fact that this environment is a breeding ground for emotionless hookups and sexual assault. Despite the cynicism in intellectual spheres shrouding the party scene, every Saturday I hear about grand plans to “get lit” at Shooters. Every Wednesday, when I am despondently returning from a stressful Perkins grind, I encounter alreadyinebriated groups in transit. I’ve only gone to Shooters twice since my first semester of Duke, but based purely on how often I went during the first two weeks of college, a stranger might mistake me as a hardcore partygoer. For someone who has avoided Shooters for so long, I can remember my experiences there all too well. The Saturday after my first week of classes, in particular, stands out to me. On a whim, I made the questionable decision to go, with every logical reason not to. Now, I realize that during that phase of my life, I was not in my emotional prime. Already, I felt at odds with my academic pathway, as I was considering dropping half of my classes. Along with that, there were the seemingly noncommunicable pressures to find a niche at college and to keep up with the unprecedented amount of work—common fears that few firstyears vocalize. As I shoved my way into the building swimming with indistinct faces and cavorting bodies, I knew that I’d regret this outing come morning. Last year, after taking Mark Leary’s personality psychology course, I began to dissect my reasons for going to Shooters in the first place. During one of the lectures, we looked at the psychological mechanisms behind motivation. One prevailing theory outlines two independent systems that inspire the motivation behind behavior. The behavioral activation system describes behavior motivated by reward, fun and ambition. On the other hand, the behavioral inhibition system stems from the desire to avoid negative consequences or emotions. Even if two people exhibit similar behaviors, they may not be acting on the same system. Consider two high-school students, both at the top of their class. The one acting on his BAS may study hard because he wants success and praise; the other, riding on BIS may do so because he fears the shame of failure or criticism from high-strung parents. Commonly, students in high-achieving schools, such as Duke, tend to display higher-than-average levels of BAS. Personally, however, when we calculated the relative influences of our individual BIS and BAS levels in class, my behavioral inhibition system was much stronger. In retrospect, my rash Shooters voyage was a very BIS-influenced decision, a shirking not only of responsibility but of

The Community Editorial Board is made up of 12 undergraduate students from across the University. The Board’s members are independent, and they do not speak for The Chronicle’s newsroom staff. They meet once a week to discuss issues and topics at Duke. A member of the Board will write the editorial, which is then edited by other members and the chairs before being reviewed by the opinion editor.

he Community Editorial Board would like to welcome everyone back to campus with a series of reflections from our winter hiatus. After reading through your Facebook comments and Stumble App Store reviews, we feel ready to offer some of our own thoughts on the previous semester and intentions for the second half of Vol. 115. 1. No think pieces on rush. We gave it our best shot, but at this point, even we have to admit, the horse is dead! If you’re cruel enough to want it beaten yet again, you could click here, here, here or here. And those are just the ones the Board has published over the last few years. This new decade, we’ll leave it to the professional Opinion Columnists to remind us that community is important and friends shouldn’t be bought. In the meantime, we will sit back and watch troves of intoxicated young adult men—once condemned to Central but now among us—in jerseys inundate our common areas and young adult women frolic in mandatory outfits for the next week or so. 2. Many think pieces on politics. Last year, we hoped the Democratic primary would turn into something more than a performative, career-advancing stunt dominated by Spartacus moment Cory Booker, Snoop-Dogg listening and weed smoking

into high gear this semester. Believe it or not, Young Trustee season is right around the corner and DSG elections will follow soon after. Stay tuned for the Chronicle’s official endorsement rules—coming to an Opinion Page near you! 3. Increasing our audience engagement. While we might not be on Twitter officially, if we’ve learned one thing this past decade, it’s that memes really boost our clicks times Googleplex. Though we’ll be laying “OK, Boomer” to rest for the new year, we hope our two favorite bots will continue to blow up the Facebook comment section. Reader feedback is very important to us—just not quite as important as our commitment to writing about capitalism. 4. More Marxism. Speaking of which, the planet is burning and it’s profit’s fault! Nothing new here, and we might even ratchet it up a bit. For as long as corporate interest continues it’s outsized influence on our society, we’ll be writing weekly rebuttals. Collective action, unionization, denouncing meritocracy, forced labor, reparations, oppression and violence. It’s the anthem of us true bleeding hearts. Next week we’ll be back with our regularly scheduled programming. Until then, Happy Spring Semester from the Board!


JUUL

that they will cite an unknown effect and weigh it as heavily as what we do know,” Rose said to The Chronicle. Duke would in effect give students who have The CDC, the FDA and state and local never used e-cigarettes or smoked before a health departments are investigating more than green light to start. 2,602 cases of a newly observed lung injury “I’m not sure if I’d send my kids to Duke associated with vaping. So far, e-cigarettes necessarily if they start vaping like two weeks designed or altered to give users doses of THC later,” said Jordt, whose research is funded by are the prime suspects in the outbreak, though the Food and Drug Administration Center for not all cases involved THC. Tobacco Products and the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Disclosing industry ties There has been a marked increase in Some faculty have also questioned whether vaping among high school seniors. About Rose adequately discloses his tobacco and 37% of 12th graders in America reported e-cigarette industry ties when he promotes vaping in 2018, compared to 28% in 2017, his position. according to the National Institutes of Rose has been unapologetic about taking Health’s annual survey on drug, alcohol and research money from the tobacco industry. cigarette use. In 2018, he co-wrote an article for the According to Healthy Duke, vaping is journal Addiction, titled “Why we work with “considered important in order to provide the tobacco industry.” The piece defends an avenue for individuals who are unable to his and other researchers’ ties with major quit smoking.” Many of those still smoking tobacco corporations such as Philip Morris, combustible cigarettes are faculty and staff, and Altria and Juul. the policy hopes to provide assistance to this “[W]e believe that scientists should assist already-addicted population. the development and testing of reduced risk Cynthia Kuhn, professor of pharmacology products, regardless of who makes a profit and cancer biology, also signed the letter from such products,” Rose and co-authors urging Duke to expand the ban to include wrote. e-cigarettes. Kuhn studies addiction in the Rose did not explicitly disclose these adolescent brain and considers herself a industry relationships in his letter urging the “knowledgeable observer” in part because administration not to ban e-cigarettes, outside she is not funded by any tobacco or vaping of linking to a video of a talk he gave in which companies. he mentions his conflicts. While experts agree that e-cigarettes reduce Theodore Slotkin, professor of exposure to fewer carcinogens than tobacco- pharmacology and cancer biology, commented burning cigarettes, they worry that young on Rose’s letter in The Chronicle that he should people might be of greater risk than others have disclosed his industry funding in the letter to become addicted to nicotine when using he co-authored in the newspaper. e-cigarettes, Kuhn said. “It is disingenuous to publish a letter of this Four days after the letter calling for a Duke type without any disclosures of his conflicts vaping ban, Rose and more than a dozen other of interest and personal gain from vapes. Dr. e-cigarette supporters wrote their own letter Jed Rose fails to disclose that he has received to The Chronicle opposing it. Rose was listed funding from Juul Labs, Philip Morris, and first among the signatories, most of whom are Altria, all of whom directly profit from vapes,” not Duke faculty and many of whom are based Slotkin wrote. outside the U.S. Rose said that the label of “disingenuous” That pro-vaping letter criticized is unfair. Jordt, Kuhn and others for suggesting all “Perhaps because there were no disclosures e-cigarette products may contribute to the noted on the other side by the original letter recent outbreak of lung diseases that federal with Dr. Jordt, so honestly I didn’t think of it in investigators have linked to a subset of vaping that context,” he said. products containing tetrahydrocannabinol Academic journals frequently require The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation (THC), the intoxicant in marijuana. researchers to fully disclose any industry ties 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 For Information 1-800-972-3550 “It’s all so typical of the anti-vaping forcesCall:when publishing research papers. There is FROM PAGE 1

For Release Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Crossword ACROSS 1 Go ___ over 5 Appends 9 Recessed area in a church 13 Radiate 14 Dishonest sort 15 Recessed area in a kitchen 16 At the big brawl, the jazz musician … 19 “___ Possible,” 2000s kids’ TV show 20 Jimmy of the Daily Planet 21 Chicago transports 22 In dire need of fuel 24 Radiate 28 Battleship letters 29 Bottom, to a Brit 30 Born, abroad

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The Chronicle

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Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay.

DIVINITY FROM PAGE 5 going to make it as hard as I can for [this division to occur].’” Jones, Warner and Colón-Emeric expressed that, because this spit would be uncharted territory, they were unable to comment on how this division would hypothetically affect the Divinity School. Willimon, however, said that the possibility of a division is already affecting Divinity School students. For pastors-in-training, their future might entail helping churches decide whether to remain Methodist. “Imagine what it’s like to be a 25-yearold seminarian, thinking about giving your life to this, and wondering, ‘Where are we going to be now?’” he said. “Students are just terrified.” Willimon also expressed his appreciation for Jones’s determination in the face of potential loss of funds and lower numbers of students. “We want to be the Divinity School that trains the leaders of the future,” he said.

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little guidance, however, on how and when to mention disclosures in opinion pieces, such as letters to the editor. In two recent talks in support of allowing e-cigarette use on campus, Rose showed a slide summarizing his financial ties to the industry. Slotkin said to The Chronicle that he believes Rose is “obligated to always disclose all conflicts of interest.” “It’s inappropriate because it leads the reader to believe he is a dispassionate reporter on the science or policy, when in fact he has a personal stake in promoting these products,” Slotkin said. Some public health researchers oppose accepting money from the tobacco industry, especially given its history of manipulation and marketing to push a product that is implicated in 480,000 deaths from smoking per year in the U.S. Rose said he is not at all personally conflicted. “The only work that I’m doing with the industry is completely to help people stop using combustible cigarettes in favor of less harmful ways of getting nicotine,” Rose said.

ACROSS Swear 1 Last name of two the friends on 5 of “America” begins “Friends” and ends with this 7 January 10 birthstone Greeting card text, often 13 Northern ___ 14 Islands, Mother of Castor U.S. and Pollux commonwealth 15 Rigel’s 14 Lubricated constellation 16 manière de 16 ___ Tolstoy heroine (in the manner 17 of: Australian wind Fr.) instrument 17 of the 19 Staple Old story Burning Man 20 festival Commencement 21 Brief Pinochle plays 19 address 23 It may be 20 See 34-Across checked at a station 21 Contemporaries of the Sadducees 24 Decorative garden element 22 See 34-Across 27 Prime Build up charges 23 business 30 Impolite onlooker 26 Russian fighter 31 jet ___ interface 32 Past [Likethe magic!] 27 sell-by 35 date, Dot follower say

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