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MONDAY, APRIL 12, 2021 ONLINE DAILY AT DUKECHRONICLE.COM

ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTEENTH YEAR, ISSUE 28

STILL CHASING THE DREAM

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DACA students cautiously hopeful after House bill By Parker Harris Staff Reporter

Duke students who are protected by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program are cautiously hopeful over a bill designed to open up citizenship to many undocumented United States residents. On March 18, the United States House of Representatives passed legislation which would provide a legal pathway to citizenship to around four million undocumented residents who are currently protected by the DACA program, as well as around one million undocumented agricultural workers. The bill marked the first step in the Biden administration’s ambitious plan to overhaul the current immigration status quo and is still awaiting a vote by the Senate. Many members of the Duke community have advocated for such reform in the past and now look towards the future with a degree of optimism. “It was very inspiring,” said senior Salvador Chavero Arellano, a DACA recipient. However, Chavero was not surprised by the House vote and noted that the fight is not over, particularly in the Senate. “In the past few years, I’ve seen the House pass many versions of the Dream Act, but it’s always stalled up in the Senate,” Chavero said. Chavero has lobbied in Washington, D.C. for the past two summers and said that the pending Senate vote seems a bit of a wild card due to the Senate being evenly split by party. As he got to know various congressmen and congresswomen, he gained a greater understanding of how this sort of vote may play out. “I’ve gotten to know that many things just have to line up very well politically in order for things to happen,” he said. If the bill were to pass, Chavero’s path to citizenship “would be pretty much sped up,” he said. He would be able to qualify for automatic permanent residency upon graduating from a four-year institution such as Duke.

“I can’t get my hopes up too high because there’s been many times that there’s been so many opportunities for Dreamers to be legalized, even during the Obama administration,” he said. Although his DACA status has afforded some degree of stability, Chavero looks forward to not having to reapply for its conditional permanent residency every two years. He also hopes that the potential changes to the system would allow him to visit his family in Mexico, whom he has not seen in some time.

I can’t get my hopes up too high because there’s been many times that there’s been so many opportunities for Dreamers to be legalized, even during the Obama administration.

signed into law,” Ramirez said. In the meantime, she is cautiously optimistic about the future but believes the pressure for change needs to continue. “Always worrying about what will or won’t happen next, especially during the Trump administration was pretty tiresome,” Ramirez said. “This is a good first step.” Ramirez co-founded Define American, Duke’s student immigrant advocacy group, during her time as an undergraduate. She believes that citizenship would afford her fellow DACA students a more holistic Duke experience without the worries of a constantly expiring residency permit. “It would be awesome to go study abroad, just little things like that,” she said. Chris Simmons, associate vice president for government relations, hopes that the Senate passes the bill sooner rather than later. See DACA on Page 12

salvador chavero arellano SENIOR AND DACA RECIPIENT

“We can’t leave the country unless we ask for permission, which is what it is, but it’s just ironic,” Arellano said. Ana Ramirez, Trinity ’20 and a DACA recipient, agreed that reform appears possible but that the fight is not over. “I think the House passing this is a testament to the hard work and leadership of immigrant activists across the nation,” Ramirez said. “It shows just how important elections are, for starters. I also believe it’s a great symbol of hope for young immigrants.” Still, Ramirez recognized that similar legislation is passed by the House almost every year, with the text of this year’s bill being essentially identical to one from 2019. “We’ve been here before, I personally don’t take it as a huge accomplishment until it’s passed by the Senate and

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INSIDE ‘A future of inclusivity’ Blue Devils United is pushing administration to add more gender-neutral bathrooms to campus dorms. PAGE 2

Redefining education What opportunities exist for those who don’t want to pursue the typical college route? PAGE 6

Update the community standard now The Community Editorial Board calls on Duke to update its hate and bias policy. PAGE 10

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Student group pushes for more gender-neutral bathrooms By Tri Truong Staff Reporter

Blue Devils United, a student LGBTQ+ support and advocacy organization on campus, is pushing administration to add more gender-neutral bathrooms to campus dorms. Although some dorms have gender-neutral bathrooms, they are often voted on by the residents of the hall, putting the needs of LGBTQ+ students in the hands of their peers. BDU President Grace O’Connor, a junior, noted that the organization is passionate about the initiative because many LGBTQ+ identifying students have expressed concerns about the lack of gender-neutral bathrooms on campus. “Even in dorms where there are gender-neutral bathrooms, or inclusive shower-bathrooms, they can be taken away when one student in the hall votes that they do not want a genderneutral inclusive bathroom,” O’Connor said. “That can be extremely harmful where your space is only safe if every single person in the hall agrees that you should have that space.” Many students have also expressed their discomfort of using the communal bathroom, citing that gendered showers and bathrooms are often the environment where sexual misconduct and harassment happens. O’Connor also noted that the bathroom and locker-room space has led to anxiety for non-binary students. BDU discussed the project with Duke Student Government during winter break. The two organizations are hoping to move forward quickly. “Our hope is this problem will be addressed as soon as possible,” O’Connor said, adding that they hope to see change in the next academic year, a goal she recognizes as ambitious but noting that “this is what we want.” Since last semester, BDU has been working on a survey about the issue for students, staff members and campus groups. During the process of sending out the survey, O’Connor said the organization has received numerous testimonies that support BDU’s initiatives. She added that although some students mentioned that they want to keep single-gender bathrooms, most students want to have gender-neutral bathrooms. “We had most people say, ‘Yes, we want gender-neutral bathrooms.’ Some people specifically said that they wanted single-stall bathrooms to be all-gender bathrooms. Some

Professors take on cheating spike

wanted both single-stall and multiple-stall bathrooms to be allgender bathrooms. We did have a few people respond that they did not want more gender-neutral bathrooms because they feel uncomfortable,” she said. O’Connor pointed out that BDU is not trying to get rid of all gender bathrooms because they recognize the need for them. “However, we want more gender-neutral bathrooms that are accessible for all students no matter where they live on campus,” she said. BDU brought the survey to Housing and Residence Life to demonstrate the community’s support for adding genderneutral bathrooms in every hall. “We emailed the Dean and some other people in the administration about what our concerns are. In the meeting [with the administration], we were given the opportunity to really rethink first-year housing and make it more LGBTQ+ friendly,” O’Connor said. “We would love to add more gender-neutral bathrooms and change how people are roomed together. We want to look out for the most vulnerable members in our community.” Interim Dean for Residence Life Deb LoBiondo wrote in an email that she and Shruti Desai, associate vice president of student affairs for campus life, are currently reviewing the proposal developed by BDU and DSG. “I am very open to adding all- gendered bathrooms in our residence halls—both on East and West Campus,” LoBiondo wrote. “Representatives from both BDU and DSG are aware of our commitment to creating a more inclusive environment in all our residential communities.” She added that the architecture of Duke’s residential buildings may pose some challenges, but she is “sure there are ways to improve what is already in place.” O’Connor said that so far, there has not been any problem working with HRL on this issue. The organization and DSG has sent a broader housing proposal to the Duke administration in late March, which included the issue of gender-neutral bathrooms. “We are still waiting. The administration said they are reading the proposal, so we are anxious to see what they will adopt from the proposal,” she said. “We are very hopeful that the administration will implement some of the changes, See BATHROOMS on Page 12

Regular Decision admit rate hits record low

By Gautam Sirdeshmukh Staff Reporter

Some professors are rethinking their approaches to academic misconduct in a year where cheating has increased sharply. Duke’s transition to virtual courses over the past year has been marked by a spike in academic misconduct cases across several departments. Some professors think that reducing student stress is essential for reversing the trend. Over the course of fall 2019, the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards received 89 reports of academic misconduct, but a year later, the total for fall 2020 has jumped to 243, administrators told students last month. Despite this rise in misconduct cases, the office’s first priority remains unchanged: providing students with the resources they need to succeed, OSC Director Jeanna McCullers wrote in an email. However, McCullers wrote that cases of misconduct that reach the office are met with substantial consequences, especially those involving repeat offenders. “The vast majority of students pursue their academic studies with integrity, but we will continue to address academic misconduct cases and keep the campus community aware of any noticeable trends,” McCullers wrote. “I hope that students who are experiencing challenges in their coursework will reach out to their respective faculty members as soon as possible to seek assistance.” McCullers added that the OSC plans to spend a portion of the coming summer analyzing more nuanced misconduct data, such as specific courses associated with higher case totals and related statistics. Owen Astrachan, associate director of undergraduate studies in the Department of Computer Science, is committed to lowering misconduct case numbers by putting students first. Astrachan taught Computer Science 201, Data Structures and Algorithms, during the fall 2020 semester. The class is one of the department’s largest and more fast-paced courses. As a way to reduce the load on their students, Astrachan and his colleagues opted to move away from traditional three-hour midterms in favor of a less daunting format. Exams are now broken up into short online quizzes to be taken over the course of the semester, with opportunities for retakes. “I’m hopeful that showing that we want students to have less stress will make a difference,” Astrachan said. “There are definitely students taking advantage of being able to take exams in their rooms, but it’s easier to check for similarities online because handwritten tests look so different.” Several universities across the country, including Harvard, utilize a “regret clause” for certain assignments. Harvard students have a 72-hour window to retract their assignment and take a zero as a grade if they feel they have acted improperly, avoiding an honor code case entirely. Astrachan noted that this policy gives students the opportunity to take responsibility for their actions. He prefers the regret clause to the practice of emailing a class and saying that students cheated on an exam or assignment, which “can make [students] overthink what they had done, even if they

ON DUKECHRONICLE.COM Numbers from a story by Mona Tong | News Editor

Graphic by Matthew Griffin | Contributing graphic designer

See MISCONDUCT on Page 12

Duke to require COVID-19 vaccination for 2021-22 school year BY MATTHEW GRIFFIN | 04/09/2021 Students will have to present proof of their vaccination to Student Health before enrolling. Duke will accommodate documented medical and religious exemptions.

Duke allowing seniors to bring two guests each to graduation BY LEAH BOYD| 04/08/2021 The in-person commencement ceremony will be held Sunday, May 2 from 9 to 11 a.m. in Wallace Wade Stadium.


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This week in photos

Simran Prakash | Photography Editor Students were sent home before April last year, but now they have the opportunity to enjoy a beautiful spring in Durham.

Katie Tan | Contributing Photographer While Marketplace was closed due to a COVID-19 outbreak among staff, first-years were provided food trucks and other catering services.

Courtesy of Anna Storti and Calvin Cheung-Miaw Duke hired two new faculty members in the Asian American and Diaspora Studies program, Anna Storti and Calvin Cheung-Miaw.

Courtesy of Tyler Meier During the spring semester, senior Tyler Meier decided to foster three puppies at once.

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‘medea’

Student project lands on Duke theater studies’ mainstage, page 6

alternative education Community-run schools provide another option for higher learning, page 6


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recess What is your indie band called?:

Sarah Derris .......... hey champ!

Stephen Atkinson .......boy fieri

Sydny Long ............quiet tooth

Skyler Graham ...............recess

Kerry Rork ......... moosehunter

Jonathan Pertile .... velvet elvis

Tessa Delgo ..........gerald fjord

Eva Hong ...contraception kids

on the cover:

Artwork by Cameron Oglesby from Duke EnviroArt Gallery Courtesy of Duke Arts

staff note My favorite books are mysteries. My mom bought me one of my first mysteries when I was six or seven from a used bookstore near our house — “The Secret of the Old Clock” by Carolyn Keene. I absolutely devoured it. Yet, what started as a small Nancy Drew obsession has morphed into a collection of hundreds of mystery classics. Truman Capote, Agatha Christie, Carolyn Keene,

Arthur Conan Doyle, Gordan McAlphine, Anthony Horowitz, John le Carré — each one of these writers has become foundational in my literary catalog. I find comfort in the mysteries that have a bit of a formula, perhaps not a predictable conclusion, but at the very least, the mystery is solved by more-or-less predictable means at the end of the book. Poirot will discover the killer. Drew will connect the dots. Miss Marple will find the missing clue. There is a certain peace to a conclusion wrapped up

MONDAY, APRIL 12, 2021 | 5

with a bow. Yes, evil exists but at least, you know there is a fictional restorative justice to right all wrongs and provide the victims with some sense of closure. I often find myself wishing for a similar formula in life. Bad things happen to good people but ultimately, there is worldly redemption. Perhaps, it is a rather punitive mindset in which evil people are forever damned but there is a comfort to the safety or familiarity of such a formula. You know what will happen even when everything seems to be falling apart. In just the past year, we have seen horrible acts of violence coupled with everincreasing death tolls around our country. From the recent shootings in Atlanta, York County, Orange County and Boulder to the instances of police brutality that continue to affect communities of color to the unjust responses to the COVID-19 pandemic that has destroyed so many families, it has started to feel rather hopeless. I wake up everyday to glance at my phone and see another shooting somewhere around this country. And, despite the popular myth that gun violence decreased during the pandemic, the reality is it went up. Violence in this country is rooted in our foundation. We were built on a system of exploitative forced labor. We grew at the hands of enslaved populations and stolen goods that underdeveloped regions of the world. We continue to incriminate communities of color at disproportionate rates and rip apart families at our border. We promote an ideology of personal freedom for all yet only grant it to a few. As an individual within this system, I find myself struggling to find any solutions. What

is the efficacy of me trying to recycle, shop from ethical businesses, donate money to nonprofits and advocacy organizations, commit to little acts of change when the blame is on the shoulders of corporate America? Not to be existential, but it is hard to remain optimistic. Our world is not a mystery novel. There is no worldly source of objective justice to reign down on the criminals of our day. What then is asked of us? How do we find any hope in an unjust, racist, and exploitative capitalist system that permeates into all aspects of our daily life? What can we possibly do? I am not here to say I have any answers. In fact, oftentimes, asking myself these questions simply leads to more questions and more frustration than really anything else. But, I find hope when I see the passion of my generation for change. I find hope when people commit themselves to building up and advocating for their local communities. And, I find hope when those around me productively and fervently combat the status quo in all the different spaces they occupy. Perhaps, there is no one person — no Poirot, no Drew, no Miss Marple, no detective from any novel — to know what the missing piece of our society is. But, as the cliche goes, there is power in numbers. I will leave you the best way I know how. Political activist and Marxist Angela Davis once said, “You have to act as if it were possible to radically transform the world. And you have to do it all the time.” While this is not the solution that we are seeking, it is perhaps a way to at least begin to understand our world. —Kerry Rork, campus arts editor

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find housing at The Chronicle’s online guide to living near Duke.

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Student project ‘Medea’ lands on Duke theater studies mainstage By Devinne Moses Staff Columnist

Murder. Mythology. Mainstage. For anyone who isn’t aware, “Medea,” an ancient Greek tragedy written by Euripedes. Here’s a behindthe-scenes look into the joint senior distinction project that made its way to a Duke Theater Studies Spring Mainstage production. The play will be performed live and live streamed to virtual audiences in Reynolds Industries Theater April 15 and 17 at 7:30 p.m. and April 18 at 2:00 p.m. The production is a culmination of months of hard work from the cast and production crew. Audiences next week will have two seniors to thank for the show’s idea and design. María Zurita Ontiveros, senior and director for “Medea,” and Ash Jeffers, senior and designer for the play, both desired to pursue distinction projects within the Theater Studies Department. Having a class together their junior year sparked conversations around working together, and they haven’t looked back since. “I knew I wanted to direct ‘Medea’ since the end of my sophomore year, and that I’d probably present it as a thesis project to the Theater Studies Department,” Zurita Ontiveros wrote in an email. “Ash and I were in a class together junior spring, and they told me they wanted to do a distinction project on design. The idea sort of came around of ‘what if we do this together,’ and the department thought it was a great idea.” Within Theater Studies, the distinction program works with students interested in

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completing a project in writing, directing, design, acting, literature, history or theory. As with several previous distinction projects, “Medea” was set to be a Duke Players show, which would have been almost entirely student-produced. “We applied for a joint distinction project operating under that assumption [that it would be a Duke Players show],” Jeffers wrote in an email. “[A]nd it was only after COVID happened that the show transformed into a Mainstage thanks to Theater Studies’ schedule rearrangements and advocacy for our project from within the department.” As with many activities and events at Duke, the COVID-19 pandemic has significantly changed how we interact with one another. Fortunately, the production team was able to not only collaborate virtually through Zoom calls, emails and texts, but also incorporate the production’s virtual aspect into the performance. “Everything the audience sees in the livestream is being captured by the actors in the Chorus onstage, and it’s required an immense amount of work from Austin, our video designer, Anya, my assistant director, and all our camera operators,” Zurita Ontiveros wrote. “We went from ‘we need someone to film the staging to show it to an audience’ to making it a core aspect of the concept, which I’m very excited by.” For Jeffers, the design process also followed social distancing protocols, which meant that

most of the early design collaboration occurred online by sending 3D model drafts and several versions of the set. This semester, Jeffers worked in person at the Bryan Center with the build team to construct the set, and they found “Medea” to be one of their most collaborative show experiences. “‘Medea’ is the first show that I have seen all the way through as a designer from first concept to completion.” Jeffers wrote. “As such, I had never collaborated with a director, other designers or a technical director so closely before.” Zurita Ontiveros hopes to share a message that is relatable to many people, especially during the COVID pandemic. Injustice, grief and loss are themes felt by everyone, and “Medea” will tackle these experiences in ways challenging yet rewarding. “Medea shows a story of someone who is pushed to the very edge because of her circumstances — she has destroyed her family and chance to go back to her home country for a man who then abandons her,” Zurita Ontiveros wrote. “There is something captivating about her story, and so I hope that ‘Medea’ reminds us all that we aren’t alone in feeling these things.” Student-led projects like “Medea” showcase the talent and creativity of students as well as the countless opportunities found in Theater Studies. Whether it’s designing, directing or getting involved in any part of production and performance, Theater Studies is a department filled with students and faculty willing to

offer advice and guidance for students at any experience level. “I do think it’s [‘Medea’] reviving a thrilling tradition,” Zurita Ontiveros wrote. “I hope more students in the future feel comfortable pitching their ideas to the department because directing a Mainstage is an opportunity like no other.” For students thinking about doing a similar senior project of their own, it’s important to note that it’s not an isolating process. There is bound to be some doubt and confusion, but reaching out, asking for help and working with other people make distinction projects rewarding. “Find a partner and/or mentor that you are excited to work with, that challenge you and make you think about things in a way that you haven’t before,” Jeffers wrote. “Theater is a fundamentally collaborative artform, so naturally, having collaborators you trust and respect is a great first step.” Both students noted how crucial Theater Operations staff were to making “Medea,” and how resilient their entire team was since the pandemic shut down much of Duke. They agreed that this production wouldn’t be possible without the people dedicated to helping students make art while keeping everyone safe. “They are the unsung heroes of the performing arts at Duke,” Jeffers wrote. “Theater Operations’ dedication to students, the performing arts and arts education is a gift to Duke, to the student body and to me.”

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Durham’s community-run schools break rules and redefine education By Tess Redman

changes what we can talk about in the classroom because there’s just more lived experience to As college students, our lives revolve bring to the table,” Dahiya said. “And I think that around studying. Most of us are pursuing is something that all the students enjoy, but I an undergraduate or graduate degree with think particularly [the] undergrads.” ambitious dreams for our future careers Dahiya’s undergraduate students tend to and lives. But what alternative educational gravitate towards courses about Black studies opportunities exist for anyone who ever feels or race studies in general, with a number that a typical college education is not for them registering for her four-week seminar on or quite enough? feminist philosopher Angela Davis. Durham’s Night School Bar and Since 4 Eva This month, Dahiya is teaching a theory (S4E) School each offer unique and inexpensive seminar Black Feminism & the Human arts and humanities classes for adults. Unlike seminar will feature several works by theorists traditional schooling, there are no grades, no specializing in Black studies, including Davis. prerequisites and no degrees, simply offering Despite their counter-institutional learning for its own sake. The “community” stance, S4E and Night School Bar are run by school model is perfect for anyone eager to experienced educators. Andrews and Dahiya explore niche interests in the arts and humanities have experience teaching at universities, so they but who don’t have room in their regular are intimately aware of the difference between schedules to spare. college education and a community-run school To Kym Register, who runs The Pinhook education. They published a scathing critique (one of S4E’s parent organizations, along with of the traditional university model, presenting Northstar Church of the Arts) expressed the Night School as “one alternative model to higher importance of community centered education. education, creating a more equitable space to “A community school is taught by the study together.” community for the community,” they said in Both Andrews and Dahiya earned their an email. “S4E’s mission is deconstructing the doctorates at Duke. Andrews first began falsehood that academia is the only valid form of questioning the value of the university as a Duke expertise or education. People also need to learn graduate student, when she began working from each other!” with poet-theorist Fred Moten, known for Lindsey Andrews, Ph.D., director of Night his critique of the university in his book “The School Bar, first got the idea for Night School Undercommons.” Bar while interacting with customers at her “Both Moten and the students who were downtown Durham bar, Arcana. working on the special issue [of Polygraph, a “It just really occurred to me that there is a journal from Duke’s Literature department] huge intellectual and artistic community here were really posing the question of whether or that is jonesing for a chance to get to study not the university even has a space for students together,” Andrews said. anymore, if study is really what people go to the Assistant director Annu Dahiya, Ph.D. university to do,” Andrews said. “The role of the has students in their 20s, senior citizens and university and what it means to be a student in everyone in between. The community school it is changing.” model allows for anyone to participate, no So what exactly do these schools have to matter their background. offer? Night School is offering five courses “Students come from all walks of life. They this month, including Black Feminism & the work in many different career fields… It really Human, and a whole new slew of classes in May Contributing Writer

Courtesy of Night School Bar

Durham’s Night School Bar and Since 4 Eva School each offer unique arts and humanities classes. and June. These courses are all taught online, last either four or six weeks for about two hours each week and are pay-what-you-can. “Part of the mission of Night School is to not be exploitative, to not be expensive and to make study accessible to all,” Andrews said. S4E is not offering courses right now, but courses offered in March 2021 included Drag Make Up 101 and Creative Psychiatric Advanced Directives, two classes Register recommended. All S4E courses cost a minimum of $25 — very reasonable considering Duke tuition. In addition to established classes, both schools accept proposals for course ideas — either to teach or to take. Both Night School and S4E are currently virtual. Night School was originally intended to be a school-bar hybrid, but COVID-19 forced Andrews and her team to postpone plans to open a brick-and-mortar location. However, the online platform may have been a blessing

in disguise. “One major benefit of [online classes] is that we have people from not just all over the country but all over the world,” Andrews said “Currently, I’m teaching a class that has people calling in from Oakland, Australia and Durham.” They hope to open the physical location this year, but online classes will likely continue. Unlike Night School, S4E was actually inspired by the pandemic. “We wanted to find a way to pay artists and keep each other connected,” Register wrote. They hope to offer more online classes soon. “Education doesn’t have to be a mere step on the ladder to whatever lofty life plans you may have. School is more than institutionalized education,” Register wrote. Learning through Night School orS4E gives you the freedom to engage with material that you care about — to learn for the sake of learning.


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MONDAY, APRIL 12, 2021 | 7

sportswrap COURTESY OF NAT LEDONNE/DUKE ATHLETICS

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sports

BETWEEN THE PIPES MEN’S LACROSSE: FALLS IN SOUTH BEND • MEN’S GOLF: SIEBERS MAKES HISTORY


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FIELD HOCKEY

Duke takes down No. 3 Louisville in shootout By Jake C. Piazza Blue Zone Editor

It was the kind of ending that sophomore Hannah Miller will never forget. After still being 3 tied after two UL periods 4 overtime DUKE Saturday afternoon, No. 15 Duke and No. 3 Louisville went into a shootout at Jack Katz Stadium, and Miller decided it was time to end the contest. She dribbled the ball toward the left side of the goal, but instead of flicking a backhander, Miller busted out a 360 spin and rifled the shot into the net to win the game 4-3. “It was amazing,” head coach Pam Bustin said. “I think the way we’ve been competing lately and the way that we’ve been really

putting ourselves under pressure at practice, at some point it was gonna turn that way and we took it to the wire and I’m really proud of the team for staying so engaged and staying so on task with what they had to do to earn that win today.” The frenzy of celebration that erupted in the ensuing seconds after the game-winning goal was all the more rewarding, considering the Blue Devils (4-11, 2-3 in the ACC) have fallen on the wrong side of five of their earlier overtime games this season. Miller’s triumphant fist pump seemed to signify the culmination of a year’s worth of hard work. “We have a young team as far as that’s concerned,” Bustin said in reference to the other overtimes losses. “Many of them haven’t experienced this over time and our leadership is still developing and we just kept working on it. We practiced it, we watched video. You just try to get better at different game scenarios and try to increase our hockey IQ.” One of the Blue Devils who exemplifies exactly the kind of growth Bustin is speaking of is freshman goalkeeper Piper Hampsch. To start off the fall season, the Hopedale, Mass., native had a string of games with a sub .600 save percentage, but slowly started to find her way and eventually recorded two shutouts by the end of the fall. As the calendar continued on to spring, Hampsch continued to improve, with her two season-defining moments coming April 2—with her 19 saves against North Carolina—and Saturday against Louisville (12-5, 2-3)—with her seven saves in regulation and overtime and game-saving stops in the shootout.

Courtesy of Nat LeDonne/Duke Athletics

Sophomore forward Hannah Miller ended Saturday’s thriller with her shootout score.

“[Hampsch] does continue to develop,” Bustin said. “I just was joking with her that her heart rate is like zero. It’s so low. She’s got a good open mind about what she’s gotta do and she just stays present in it and I think that is one of her strongest qualities.” Hampsch’s composure under pressure was in full light Saturday. Although Miller may get all the glory for actually delivering the game-winning goal, it was Hampsch’s acrobatic save against Mercedes Pastor’s shootout attempt that set Miller up to seal the deal. Pastor had already bested Hampsch earlier in the shootout, but on her second attempt, Hampsch would not be fooled again. As Pastor approached the goal, Hampsch pressured the Louisville forward, forcing an errant shot.

sports

Courtesy of Nat LeDonne/Duke Athletics

Goalie Piper Hampsch notched seven saves.

MEN’S LACROSSE

While Hampsch and a slew of other freshmen have been the key story of the 2020-21 season, Saturday’s victory would not have been possible without the veteran presences of Noor van de Laar, Libby Thompson and Eva Nunnink, who each tallied a goal. The Blue Devils only have one regular season game left against Boston College this upcoming Saturday, and are still very much in play for an at-large bid into the NCAA tournament. And while the future may be unclear, Bustin has plans for how to use this game for the future. “We’re not done. This process is continuing. This is about the long game for us so there are still things that we’ve got to look at, evaluate and get better from today.”

MEN’S GOLF

Siebers sets Duke freshman Blue Devils lose perfect scoring record season at No. 4 Notre Dame By Evan Kolin Sports Editor

Coming off two miraculous one-goal victories, it was clear that the Blue Devils beatable, DUKE 8 were especially going into 13 a matchup against ND yet another top-five opponent. But few could have predicted the beatdown that occurred Saturday afternoon in South Bend, Ind., as No. 1 Duke trailed for the entire second half before eventually falling 13-8 to No. 4 Notre Dame, ending the Blue Devils’ perfect season. Now, there’s not too much shame in a five-goal loss on the road to the fourth-

Courtesy of Rachel Pincus/Notre Dame Athletics

Jake Naso’s dominance at the X wasn’t enough.

ranked team in the country, but it’s how Duke lost that was most alarming. The Blue Devils won 16-of-23 faceoffs yet were somehow outshot 44-36, in large part thanks to a dreadful clearing game. Head coach John Danowski’s squad finished 21-of-29 on clears, amassing 22 turnovers compared to the Fighting Irish’s 12. “I think we were scared,” Danowski said. “I think we played scared.... I think overall we were timid and afraid to make plays and afraid to fail. And I think that was part of it. And also part of it was Notre Dame—part of it’s your opponent. “But for us, I think that we were just a little bit timid with the ball and making decisions and wanting to make the perfect pass and wanting to make the perfect play instead of just throwing it with confidence and running the ball out with confidence.” This was always a concern with this year’s Blue Devils. It’s hard to play with fire when you’re the undefeated No. 1 team in the country, one that entered the season among the most hyped teams in recent memory. As much as Danowski and his players say they don’t pay attention to the rankings, that kind of pressure undoubtedly makes its way into the locker room. On the other hand, Notre Dame entered the year as an afterthought. The Fighting Irish have been a top-10 team all season, but were ranked last in the Preseason ACC Coaches See M. LACROSSE on Page 9

By Matthew Hawkins Staff Writer

Ian Siebers once again found himself as the leading Duke freshman this past weekend. In this case, however, he was leading all freshmen in Duke history, as he broke the three-round program freshman scoring record. The Blue Devils traveled just up the road to Cary, N.C., for the Stitch Intercollegiate at the MacGregor Downs Country Club. Although the team finished a mediocre sixth in the 12-team field, Siebers’ recordbreaking weekend was a bright spot. “It feels great to set the Duke freshman 54-hole scoring record, as it is the result of a lot of hard work and patience throughout the semester,” Siebers told GoDuke. com. “This is certainly a step in the right direction for me, and I look forward to continuing my strong play with the team in ACCs and beyond.” The freshman opened up the weekend with a one-under par 71 in the first round Friday before catching fire for the remainder of the tournament. In the second round, Siebers carded a bogey-free 66, including a 32 on the front nine, to pace the Blue Devils. And in the final round of the tournament, Siebers kept his momentum going with six birdies and an eagle en route to another sixunder 66, sealing his tie for third overall at a 13-under 203 for the weekend.

Courtesy of Duke Athletics

Ian Siebers had a record-breaking weekend. Siebers joined the Blue Devils after a very successful junior golf career. After being named the Pacific Northwest Junior of the Year in both 2018 and 2019, the Bellevue, Wash., native signed his letter of intent as the No. 22 ranked player in the Golfweek junior rankings. Naturally, with all of these accolades from his high school career, Siebers garnered high expectations coming into his collegiate career. And no one had higher expectations than Blue Devil head coach Jamie Green. “I’ve heard a lot about Ian [Siebers] exceeding expectations, but I don’t think he has,” Green said. “We knew coming in See SIEBERS on Page 9


The Chronicle

dukechronicle.com

COLUMN

What we can learn from UNC’s coaching search

M. LACROSSE FROM PAGE 8

Poll. When the ACC made up the entire top four of Inside Lacrosse’s national rankings after the first week of the season, Notre Dame sat back at a distant seventh. The Fighting Irish proved themselves with a statement 1811 win against then-No. 4 Syracuse April 3, but still headed into their home stadium this past weekend as underdogs. It’s hard to imagine Duke men’s basketball It’s clear now that Notre Dame would without Mike Krzyzewski at the helm, but that have none of that. bizarre reality feels “We talked a little bit about being even more inevitable fundamentally sound, which I don’t believe by the day, as North we were,” Danowski said of what he told Carolina head coach his team after the contest. “We talked about Roy Williams’ recent playing to win, and not playing not to lose.” retirement indicates. But Saturday’s outcome wasn’t just the Before the latter’s result of a difference in fire. Like Danowski Derek Saul retirement, Krzyzewski, said, part of it is the performance of your 74, and Williams, 70, were already two of the five opponent, too, and Notre Dame entered the oldest coaches in ACC men’s basketball history. game as the No. 4 team in the country for a Next February, Krzyzewski will turn 75, and would reason. The Fighting Irish boast the secondbecome just the second-ever person to coach at ranked defense in all of college lacrosse, and that age, following in the footsteps of 76-year-old that defense showed up against the Blue Syracuse head coach Jim Boeheim. Devils. Coach K is no stranger to making history, but Star transfer Michael Sowers finished the question now looms larger for the Blue Devils: with just one assist and no goals, and Duke’s What’s next after his inevitable retirement? And offense struggled to create separation for all what can we learn about the sudden retirement 60 minutes. of Williams and the Tar Heels’ subsequent hiring “We couldn’t beat anybody,” Danowski of former star player and longtime assistant coach said. “Not just Michael—Notre Dame locked Hubert Davis? us down.... Notre Dame did a terrific job, The decision on who will succeed Krzyzewski one-on-one defense. All over the field, they will be monumental not just for the future of the did a terrific job. We had some opportunities. men’s basketball team, but also for the University I don’t think we shot as smart as we could as a whole. With current athletic director Kevin have. But you know, got to tip your cap to White set to retire, it is clear that Duke Athletics your opponent.” is at a crossroads. As our Evan Kolin pointed out On the other end of the field, the Blue when White announced his retirement, Duke’s Devil defense actually performed well in next athletic director will largely be defined by their own right. Sophomore Kenny Brower who they select to replace Krzyzewski. Luckily somewhat surprisingly received the matchup for that person, there are a plethora of potential against the Fighting Irish’s Pat Kavanagh, options to take over, but trying to fill the shoes of limiting the sophomore star to just one assist the winningest coach in college basketball history and one goal (a highlight-reel behind-theis a tall task. back snipe early in the first quarter). Let’s take a step back and look again at the It was this defensive performance that timeline of what occurred a few miles down the kept Duke (10-1, 2-1 in the ACC) in the game road in Chapel Hill over the last week. On Thursday for so long. The visitors trailed just 7-6 with morning, the Tar Heels announced that Williams five minutes remaining in the third period, just aSales couple of pinpoint Sowers passes The New York Times Syndication Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, York, N.Y. 10018 and Brennan O’Neill flamethrowers from See COACHING SEARCH on Page 12 New

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Crossword ACROSS 1 Minute bits of water 6 What to do on the Sabbath, per the Bible 10 Fake 14 Large Starbucks order 15 Opera solo 16 Jay formerly of late-night 17 “Don’t worry, everything will be fine!” 18 ___ pickle 19 Brainstorm 20 Heavens 21 Kind of economics, disparagingly 24 Restaurant handout 25 Team pulling a plow 26 Make more aerodynamic 30 “Ugh!” 33 Oktoberfest vessel

34 Nice poker holdings 35 “Thar ___ blows!” 36 Goofs up 37 Despises 39 “Enough already!” 40 Mindless card game for two 41 Room with a sink and medicine cabinet 42 Raise with ropes and pulleys 43 “Me day” destination 44 Theatrical show featuring traditional Irish music 47 Pre-Communist Russian ruler 49 Very long stretches of time 50 Ballpark illuminators 54 “Now I’ve got it!” 57 Regarding 58 Vegetable in Creole cooking

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regaining the lead. But it was the Blue Devils’ continued struggles in transition and defending everyone not named Kavanagh that put the game to bed. Notre Dame (6-1, 2-1) rattled off three straight scores to end the third, including a Wheaton Jackoboice rifle just 0.6 seconds before the buzzer. The Fighting Irish then opened with the first two goals of the fourth quarter as well, and the limited capacity crowd at Alumni Stadium was buzzing. “We felt overall in the box, it was a solid performance, but we gave up goals in other ways,” Danowski said. “And certainly, because we were so poor in the clearing game, with our fundamentals and our decision-making, that we gave the ball back way too many times. And when you give the ball back, the other team has more chances to play offense and you have less.” Of course, one loss doesn’t end Duke’s national title chances, especially under a head coach in Danowski whose goal is always to have his teams playing their best lacrosse in May. During the Blue Devils’ first national championship run in 2010, the team started off the season 2-3. When they won their second national championship three years later, they started 2-4. But Duke will have to respond to this defeat with a fire, something that was clearly missing this past weekend. It’ll get its first shot to do that this Thursday at No. 6 Virginia. “It’s gonna be interesting. I have no idea how we’re going to respond,” Danowski said. “All I know is that Virginia beat Notre Dame here a couple weeks ago. So based on the transitive property, we’ll have our work cut out for us Thursday night.”

52 International retailer founded in Sweden 53 Mardi ___ 54 Helper 55 Luau performance 56 “You said it!” 60 Source of campaign funds, for short

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SIEBERS FROM PAGE 8 that he could compete with the best in college golf.” Competing with the best in college golf is exactly what Siebers has done, and what he did again this past weekend. Perhaps more impressive than Siebers’ frequent birdies in the tournament was his general lack of mistakes. He managed to play three full rounds with just one bogey and one double-bogey. Siebers’ performance broke the previous freshman 54-hole record of nine-under 204 set by Michael Schachner in 2005. In fact, Siebers’ tournament score falls behind only two other scores in Duke history, a pair of 16-under scores by Adrien Pendaries and Alex Smalley from the 2018-19 season. Siebers’ weekend also marked his third top10 finish of the season, contributing to a teamleading 71.24 scoring average. He entered the tournament as the 93rd-ranked player in the country, and his performance will only improve his national reputation. “I think my finish is going to do a lot for my confidence going forward, and I think the rest of the team is going to be able to perform really well too,” Siebers said of the upcoming schedule. Siebers and the Blue Devils will look to carry the momentum from this past weekend over into the ACC Championship April 23-26.

The Chronicle What hit an all-time low for us this year: My work ethic:������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ mattyg My desire to work at The Chronicle: ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� leah girld My sex life: �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� emulator My sleep schedule: ������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� tothemax

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Crossword ACROSS 1 Spanish house 5 Italian fashion giant 11 Blithering fool 14 Appearance of a comet, to some 15 Capital on the eastern Mediterranean 16 Word after Doctor or guess 17 Like hallucinogenic drugs 19 Unaccounted for, briefly 20 Opening remarks 21 Uplifting verse 22 Netflix crime drama starring Jason Bateman 24 Preserved, as pastrami 25 Society’s woes 27 Targets for exterminators 28 Retirement benefits org.

29 Long ago 31 Easy as ___ 33 One crying “Yer out!” 34 Nordic capital 36 “Hamilton” creator ___-Manuel Miranda 39 Subtly suggests 42 Sport one’s biceps 43 N.Y.S.E. debut 44 Needs a rubdown, say 45 ___ safe distance 46 Dog collar attachment 48 Post-O.R. stop 49 Something to behold 51 “Untrue!” 52 The piper’s son, in a nursery rhyme 53 Drink in a red, white and blue cup

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10 | MONDAY, APRIL 12, 2021

opinion dukechronicle.com

The Chronicle

Update the community standard now Editor’s Note: This piece discusses racist incidents and racial violence.

bulletin board. Pictures of the bigoted flier of the Office of Student Conduct and circled through student group chats and Community Standards told students that a student conduct investigation is underway, but the response has been dismissive and lackluster. The members of the Community COLUMN Editorial Board stand with the Duke student community in condemning this graphic form n Saturday, March 20, residents social media spaces. This printout rightfully of hate speech as the racially motivated act of of Brown residence hall found led to a wave of anger and disgust among ignorance it is. George Floyd was murdered a printout of George Floyd’s Duke students. It even garnered attention by the police. As the murder trial of Derek toxicology report with annotations that from the national media. Chauvin plays out in the courts, anyone displaced blame for Floyd’s murder hung on On March 20, Dean of Students John who watched the horrific video from last a Black History Month “Victims of Violence” Blackshear and Jeanna McCullers, Director spring understands there is no other valid interpretation besides what was depicted: officers using racially motivated force that hot take of the week led to the death of a Black man. Discussions of free speech are important and welcome on university campuses, but “What happens when you check out of being checked out?” when applied to acts of hate speech like the —Mihir Bellamkonda, Opinion Editor, on April 11, 2021 printout, they neglect the pain that such incidents cause. Since the beginning of their investigation, Blackshear and McCullers never went beyond calling this graphic an “anonymous [act] of bias” in their correspondence with students. By not adequately defining this racist incident, the administration is failing to acknowledge and address the specific impact that incidents of bigotry and hate Direct submissions to: speech have on POC students. By refusing The Chronicle welcomes submissions in the form of letters to the editor E-mail: to acknowledge how racism manifests or guest columns. Submissions must include the author’s name, signature, chronicleletters@duke.edu department or class, and for purposes of identification, phone number and local into these incidents, the administration address. Letters should not exceed 325 words; contact the editorial department ultimately emboldens perpetrators to Editorial Page Department for information regarding guest columns. The Chronicle continue terrorizing communities of color The Chronicle will not publish anonymous or form letters or letters that are Box 90858, on campus. promotional in nature. The Chronicle reserves the right to edit letters and guest Durham, NC 27708 The incident in Brown is disgusting columns for length, clarity and style and the right to withhold letters based on but is certainly not a rare occurrence. It Phone: (919) 684-2663 the discretion of the editorial page editor. follows in a long line of recent acts of hateFax: (919) 684-4696 motivated by race and identity on Duke’s campus. In 2018 alone, racial slurs were found at the Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture and at Swift Apartments. Est. 1905 Inc. 1993 Additionally, an incident involving a sophomore using racial slurs in a Snapchat MATTHEW GRIFFIN, Editor post was also made public in 2018. In 2015, EVAN KOLIN, Sports Editor a noose was found in the BC Plaza, causing MARIA MORRISON, Managing Editor an uproar in the student body. There have MONA TONG, News Editor also been a number of incidents involving CARTER FORINASH, Editor-at-Large ROSE WONG, Senior Editor swastikas found across Duke’s campus over JAKE SATISKY, Digital Strategy Director the years, and in 2018, flyers proclaiming SIMRAN PRAKASH, Photography Editor “It’s okay to be white” were found on East MIHIR BELLAMKONDA, Opinion Editor campus. Most recently, Asian members of SARAH DERRIS, Recess Editor the Duke community have felt ostracized by CHRISSY BECK, General Manager Duke’s insufficient response to nationwide anti-Asian racism. SHANE SMITH, Sports Managing Editor REBECCA SCHNEID, Sports Photography Editor Despite recurrent instances of racism MASON BERGER, Video Editor JACKSON MURAIKA, News Photography Editor within the student body, administrators MARY HELEN WOOD, Audio Editor AARON ZHAO, Features Photography Editor have failed time and time again to respond NADIA BEY, University News Editor BELLA BANN, Photography Social Media Editor adequately to such acts. Although Duke LEAH BOYD, University News Editor MARGOT ARMBRUSTER, Opinion Managing Editor renewed its commitments to anti-racism PRIYA PARKASH, University News Editor NICHOLAS CHRAPLIWY, Opinion Managing Editor and anti-bias within the last year, it has PREETHA RAMACHANDRAN, University News Editor VICTORIA PRIESTER, Opinion Managing Editor been reluctant to adopt a clear definition YUEXUAN CHEN, Local and National News Editor SYDNY LONG, Recess Managing Editor of hate speech, bigotry, or acts of white ANNA ZOLOTOR, Local and National News Editor BEN WALLACE, Community Editorial Board Chair supremacy in the Community Standard ASHWIN KULSHRESTHA, Health and Science News Editor RYAN WILLIAMS, Community Editorial Board Chair despite repeated calls from students for over MICHAEL LEE, Health and Science News Editor SHANNON FANG, Equity and Outreach Coordinator STEFANIE POUSOULIDES, Investigations Editor 6 years to include such provisions. NADIA BEY, Recruitment Chair JAKE SHERIDAN, Features Editor JAKE SATISKY, Recruitment Chair Recently, after the murders of Xiaojie CHRIS KUO, Features Managing Editor TREY FOWLER, Advertising Director Tan, Delaina Ashley Yaun, Paul Andre JULIE MOORE, Creative Director Michels, Daoyou Feng, Hyun Jung Grant, Soon Chung Park, Suncha Kim, and Yong The Chronicle is published by the Duke Student Publishing Company, Inc., a non-profit corporation independent of Duke University. The opinions Yue, seven Asian student groups created expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of Duke University, its students, faculty, staff, administration or trustees. Unsigned editorials represent a list of demands including one to expand the majority view of the editorial board. Columns, letters and cartoons represent the views of the authors. To reach the Editorial Office at 301 Flowers Building, call 684-2663 or fax 684-4696. To reach the Business Office at 1517 Hull Avenue call 684-3811. To Duke’s definitions of racial violence and reach the Advertising Office at 2022 Campus Drive call 684-3811. discrimination in its Community Standard. One copy per person; additional copies may be purchased for .25 at The Chronicle Business office at the address above. Today, there are approximately two full @ 2021 Duke Student Publishing Company pages in the manual dedicated to the

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acceptable forms of bridge painting, three pages about hazing and its different levels of severity, but only two paragraphs which discuss harassment and Title IX, which discusses harassment on characteristics like age, gender identity, and race, but falls short of addressing how racism tangibly manifests on campus. Last fall, Duke began a concerted effort to expand anti-racism initiatives, including $16 million in additional grant funding dedicated to these programs. On the Duke anti-racism website, students can see a list of different anti-racism initiatives along with a progress bar accompanying each initiative. While these actions are welcome, we believe that these initiatives don’t address how Duke should respond to inevitable forms of explicit form of racism on campus. While the hiring of a more diverse faculty and the implementation of racial awareness trainings are admirable goals, Duke cannot ignore inevitable future racist and bigoted attacks on members of its community. By refusing to accept this reality, administrators predetermined their lackluster response to the George Floyd graphic. Their generalized condemnation of the flyer as an “[act] of bias” is reflective of the way Duke administrators have failed to truly reckon with Duke’s history of white supremacy, the acts of hate which continue on campus, and the specific and targeted impact these incidents have on students from marginalized communities. The university cannot confine its legacy of white supremacy and racism to the names of its buildings or the implicit biases of its staff and students; it must also acknowledge that explicit racism is vehemently alive among a minority of its students. The outrage about this incident is not an example of political correctness or an attempt to “cancel free speech” on campus. Rather it is students doing what the administration has consistently failed to do on issues of discrimination and bigotry on campus: condemn this incident as an act of racism and acknowledge how it endangers and alienates our Black community. The impact that this disgusting act has had on the mental health and well-being of the entire Duke community is palpable. While the most urgent step is to hold the individual accountable who made this infographic, this incident should act as proof that the Duke administration still has a long way to go in how they address issues of racism, hate speech, and bigotry on campus. The Community Editorial Board is independent from the editorial staff of the Chronicle and aims to offer thoughtful opinions on a variety of issues; to hold students, faculty and administrators publicly accountable for their statements and actions; and to help students sharpen their journalistic and writing skills.Their column runs on alternate Mondays. The unsigned editorials are written anonymously by one voting member and based on the consensus of all voting members. Published editorials reflect only the views and opinions of the Board. In an effort to be transparent, the names and brief biographies of the CEB chairs and current members are available on the Chronicle website.


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dukechronicle.com

MONDAY, APRIL 12, 2021 | 11

Duke’s future:

Less fun, more woke, more careerist

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eact, Lockdown and Repeat. For the anniversary of the Coronavirus lockdowns, Duke trotted out the same old playbook and imposed a mandatory shelterin-place lockdown for all undergraduates. In the aftermath, accusations flew wildly. Many blamed Greek Life for the lockdown, and not without reason. Duke itself claimed that most of the recent increase in cases was accounted for by

I substitute oat milk… thanks”). She posted the black square on her Instagram last summer and has links to the Minnesota Freedom Fund in her bio. Her father, the one who paid for her German SUV, is a major Republican donor. She will apologize profusely, real water pouring forth, when confronted about attending the KA party last weekend. She also regrets that she simply must attend the upcoming SNU dayger. Social

Reiss Becker COLUMN “first-year male students in the Class of 2024,” the group most likely to be rushing. Moreover, it is widely known that Greek organizations have been conducting off-campus rush and are now hosting in-person parties. Just peruse Duke Confessions, Greek Rank or Duke Memes for Gothicc Teens for a bit and you will observe a war of words between furious independents and jeering frat boys. Putting aside that these exchanges are hilarious, they also paint a vivid picture of Duke’s social dynamics. If the unflattering stereotypes painted online are to be believed, then there are two broad phyla of students at Duke. On one side you have the Greeks. They are rich troglodytes who dwell in luxurious off campus apartments. They tend to believe in outdated notions like the difference between men and women, even daring to segregate themselves accordingly. The affiliated female is typically observed sporting a white tube top in the evenings and a skinny caramel macchiato during the days (“can

reputations don’t maintain themselves! The male variety is equally curious. On campus, he projects faux dominance, strutting about with furrowed brow. His pants are a tad too tight and he wears Vineyard Vines with nauseating consistency. He doesn’t live on campus, but he occasionally shows up just to glare at Geeds playing spikeball. On weekday afternoons, when he is on his fourth Whiteclaw, he crawls out of his shell, cracks open the laptop and unleashes the brave keyboard warrior within. Only on the anonymous e-forums, far from the woke censors, does he feel truly free. There he can act like he attends the University of Alabama, a school where Greek Life is the supreme arbiter of social life, and not Duke, where Greek Life is a dwindling rump on the wrong side of history. That is one side of Duke’s social taxonomy. The other side is much larger, and thus more diverse, but nonetheless certain commonalities define Duke’s population of independent students.

Unlike the Greeks, the independent does not define themselves by their gender or by their organizational affiliation. Their social identity is loose and formless, much like the drab sweatpants they wear daily. They treat Duke’s COVID rules like their Bible and Dean Blackshear’s emails like the revelations of a prophet. When thrill-seeking, they remove their mask in a restroom stall (it’s fun because no one knows!). Unlike the Greeks, who live for their weekly ritual of Friday night debauchery, the independent lives for those small, delicious moments of moral outrage. Life would be less sweet if they could not briefly feel superior to the latest befuddled administrator found guilty of a faux pas. These are the shock troops of the Dukethat-is-to-be, a university where RA events are the mainstay of social life and anonymously reporting fellow students is more popular than basketball. These characterizations are not my personal opinions. I am merely picking up and articulating what legions of students have been setting down online. “I am completely detached from these proceedings,” just “[a] spirit haunting the wires,” a humble stenographer of the Discourse as it unfolds before me. My observations reveal that these two populations hold irreconcilable conceptions of Duke. The Greeks generally subscribe to the traditional view of Duke as the “work hard, play hard” school, a place filled with driven, sociable students who get As on tests and tequila shots at Shooters. That Duke is dying. It’s obvious. The Cameron Crazies are really not that crazy anymore; they should be called the “Cameron Avid Fans” by this point. But that just doesn’t brand well. Consider that the Crazies used to throw toilet paper at the refs for “shitty” calls and hurl empty pizza boxes at

the opposing bench for mockery’s sake. Today they just wave posters and wear face paint. More evidence that the “play” side of Duke’s culture has declined–you used to be able to host massive parties in KVille and on Central Campus and now we have school-sponsored cornhole games and a six-beers-per-person limit on LDOC. Bench burning after big victories was once spontaneous and passionate. Now it requires a permit and strict supervision. All the time-honored traditions are fading away–first-years can’t even blackout at O-Week parties anymore. So what’s the point of O-Week? If the “work hard, play hard” Duke is ending then what will take its place? In its place will be the independent’s conception of Duke, a school where students work hard, pause for online moral preening and then work harder. It will be a more woke Duke and a more careerist Duke. After all, there is no better career prep than being a studious adherent of the reigning ideology. Of course, students in the future will still have some time for fun. It’s just that some of Duke’s more problematic, less inclusive customs will have to be abolished to appease the shifting mores of each passing year. Wednesday night Shooters will become “Wednesday night restorative justice circling.” Instead of a déclassé barn party, the McKinsey info session will be that week’s must-attend event. We aren’t there yet. But we all see the signs of what is to come. The terminus will be when Duke is completely filled with shibboleth-spouting drones. And we will call that Progress.

edit pages You aren’t detached from your words:

H

ere’s a strange concept: writing that has a clear meaning but remains baffling. A piece where everything makes sense, but you’re still confused, and when all is said and done, the question remains: what did you hope to accomplish? This was my thought coming out of a recent column in the Chronicle titled “Duke’s future: Less fun, more woke, more careerist.” The author comes out swinging with a description of Duke’s lockdown as “trotting out the same old playbook.” This characterization of a

A response to ‘Duke’s future’

one to explore. It’s easy enough to prove that the author is not an impartial reporter. We can start with his description of the “Discourse” as he sees it: “a war of words between furious independents and jeering frat boys.” Anyone reading the same sources (confession pages and the like) would have seen plenty of frat boys painting themselves as victims. Obviously this column is in denial, but it is important to recognize that it is impossible for a column to be an impartial account of anything.

Dan Reznichenko COLUMN sleepy, uninspired Duke leaves me wondering what he thought the ‘high-energy’ response would be. At another point, we see an indignant, thinly veiled attack at people who reject “the difference between men and women.” Before we can even process this comment, they have moved on; the only insight we get on the “gender difference” debate is that a) there is one, and b) our author dislikes that. It’s a comment as useful as a “Donald Trump bad” joke, which is to say that it isn’t useful. This is the general pattern of the column: the author will throw a weak rhetorical punch before running away. In the end, all we come away with is knowledge of the things he dislikes—a boring read made confusing by its lack of purposeful moves. This, on its own, is fine; I’m used to weak opinion writing. What I find interesting, however, is his insistence that he is “a humble stenographer of the Discourse (sic) as it unfolds before [him].” Beyond the funny observation that this sentence seems to be pulled straight out of thesaurus.com—a stenographer deals in direct reproduction, while this column only quotes an unrelated copypasta, for example—the claim that he could be “totally detached from the proceedings” is an interesting

Reiss Becker is a Trinity senior. His column “roused rabble” typically runs on alternate Wednesdays.

This starts and ends with the fact that an exhaustive account is unachievable. Given that that is true, we recognize that an author has to make choices about what they include and how they include it. If you’re depicting some dispute, whose account comes first? What context is relevant? These questions, along with plenty of others, have no objective answer: we use our own judgement. Because of that, our biases leak into even the most banal, ‘objective’ retellings of a story. An interesting example of this is the author’s (inexplicable) pride in announcing that his sources for this column include Greekranked and a Facebook confession page. This reflects something about both him and his portrayal of events. By ostensibly basing all of his analysis on these sources, he has signalled a belief that anonymous forums for venting and trolling are a solid indicator of the mood on campus. I would respond that it only offers insight into what conservatives wish they could say. After all, for better or for worse, liberal students don’t need anonymous forums to broadcast their beliefs, and so the opinions they post on these forums are generally responses to offensive content, or a hyperbolic rant. Neither of these give

a solid glimpse into what liberals or independents think. They are self-inflicted caricatures.Hence, the column is informing its opinions from places where most sincere comments come from conservatives and greeks, along with the occasional liberal who self-selected into that space. When the author jokes about “geeds” and “double masking,” it becomes obvious how much the source colours the reporting. It’s analogous to visiting 4chan or Parler to investigate a political controversy, saying that the two horrified liberals on the platform are representative of everyone, then throwing around words like “cuck” in your article. Note, however, that this happens no matter who an author cites: reporting is characterized by its sources. It just so happens that this choice of source is particularly telling. In fact, when the author links his copypasta, ostensibly to say that ‘nothing I said means anything, don’t read into it,’ it becomes obvious that all communication is defined by its origin— it never means nothing. Though he is right to imply that his column fails to prove any point, that doesn’t mean that his quips say nothing about what he believes. He is not “totally detached,” and here I refer to his conclusion: “Of course, students in the future will still have some time for fun. It’s just that some of Duke’s more problematic, less inclusive customs will have to be abolished to appease the shifting mores of each passing year. Wednesday night Shooters will become “Wednesday night restorative justice circling.” Instead of a déclassé barn party, the McKinsey info session will be that week’s mustattend event. ”It’s not a strong argument, and the jokes aren’t that funny. However, what this bit communicates to us, quite clearly, is that its author believes fun and inclusivity are opposites. That people asking for respect comes at the expense of everyone’s enjoyment, and—as a direct corollary—that minorities and their allies are to blame for things not being fun anymore. This is

not an objective statement, and he never makes the connection between “inclusion” and a square’s conception of fun. At best, he cites a blog post complaining about how much cooler things were in the 90’s. However, the fact that the author makes this comment, and takes these ideas for granted, is still illustrative of his worldview. This, more than anything, is why I decided to write a response to this column. It helps to frame a discussion on the impulse to treat humour as devoid of meaning: if you don’t want to be criticized, say you were only joking. If that doesn’t work, we now have claims of “irony,” which is what is being employed here. The logic goes that something said insincerely must be detached from the speaker’s own views. In both cases, I would argue that jokes and ironic statements are born from a context—much like a column is—and that this context unmasks the speaker. In order for a joke to work, it needs a premise. Intuitively, the joke maker must accept, or at least empathize with, that premise. When someone makes a homophobic joke, I think it is reasonable, then, to say that they have some sympathy for homophobia. If they think it can elicit a laugh, they are telling on themselves and their audience. In an age where people deflect criticism by saying “it’s just a joke,” or “I was being ironic” the best response is “how is that funny?” When people defend the latent bigotry on Greekranked as “shitposting,” it doesn’t change the fact that the community found those jokes funny. Our author’s attempts at irony and “detached commentary” hide a strange idolization of Greek life, a distaste for inclusivity and a litany of other hang-ups which I decided not to mention. It would have been better for everyone if, instead of hiding behind ‘irony’, he just owned his words. Dan Reznichenko is a Trinity first-year. His column runs on alternate Tuesdays.


dukechronicle.com

12 | MONDAY, APRIL 12, 2021

MISCONDUCT FROM PAGE 2 had just texted a friend and asked if a test was hard.” “In almost every misconduct case, [the student] says that they messed up and that it was due to stress about grades,” Astrachan said. “Dialogue still has to happen with student affairs, but [the regret clause] could be useful.” Instructor of Romance Studies Ken Stewart has implemented a few minor changes to his course, Spanish 301, Advanced Spanish Writing, in order to lessen students’ stress and hopefully decrease misconduct as well. “Quizzes this year are open-note, which hopefully cuts down on stress and reduces the need to ‘cheat’ since students can use their resources,” Stewart said. “If you depend on those resources, you’ll run out of time, since the quizzes are timed. Students still have their own moral compass to follow, of course, but the line is pretty much drawn at peer collaboration.” Throughout the pandemic, Stewart has focused on promoting open communication between himself and his students despite the obstacles posed by virtual learning. This mindset carries over to his strategy for handling student misconduct cases. “I would start by asking questions, not to be accusatory but to let the student take ownership of the situation,” Stewart explained. “The students know that I know [what they have done], but I still try to give them leeway to try to find the source of the problem. You need that sort of human interaction.” While Astrachan, McCullers and Stewart think that lowering student stress is useful in lowering misconduct case numbers, they also believe that discouraging cheating will benefit students themselves in the long run. “We want students to learn the material themselves in order to have that mastery of the subject which will help them down the road,” Astrachan said. “If you don’t succeed now, you won’t succeed later at an interview or on a job. You have to know how to do stuff on your own.” McCullers mentioned resources such as the Academic Resource Center and the Thompson Writing Center as havens for stressed-out students. These organizations were also mentioned in the March 17 email.

DACA FROM PAGE 1 “Duke is 100 percent behind it. It’s something we’ve worked hard on for a number of years,” Simmons said. He thinks that what remains is for some of the more controversial details to be sorted out by Senators but is optimistic this will occur. “Whenever we talk to members of Congress—and when I say we, me, the president, people that are representing the institution—immigration is one of our very top issues,” Simmons said. Many Duke students and employees currently hold DACA status. “We’ve provided resources to those employees and students, we’ve given them referrals for legal aid and we’ve been supportive of them financially for the students who are enrolled,” Simmons said. Simmons cited recent statements by President Vincent Price alongside Governor Roy Cooper

BATHROOMS FROM PAGE 2 ideally all of them, to make the Duke living experience more fruitful, safer, and more comfortable for the members of the LGBTQ+ community.” In addition, O’Connor said that BDU is conducting research on the issue to explore the history of the exclusivity of binary bathrooms. They are reaching out to other colleges in North Carolina and looking for similar initiatives that have been implemented to recommend them to the Duke administration. According to O’Connor, BDU is also working on a variety of other projects. These include trying to get students to add their pronouns to their DukeHub 2.0 profile and conducting a survey on whether faculty and staff are making students feel comfortable in the classroom. O’Connor added that as the University is transitioning into more in-person classes, BDU hopes to teach students and professors how to deal with microaggressions inside classrooms. “We are hopeful, we are excited, and we look forward to a future of inclusivity,” O’Connor said.

on a panel hosted by the American Business Immigration Coalition, further emphasizing Duke’s mission to fully include all members of its community, regardless of documentation. “One of our core values is to protect the rights of our students and employees,” Simmons said. “This includes ensuring equitable access to available resources. If they’re in this citizenship status limbo, it’s hard for them to have access to those things.”

COACHING SEARCH FROM PAGE 9 was retiring effective immediately. Though there had been some rumblings about the longstanding leader of the Tar Heels’ future, this was a major shock throughout the college basketball world. North Carolina quickly went to work in finding a replacement, reportedly interviewing assistants Davis and Steve Robinson as well as former Tar Heel players turned head coaches Wes Miller and Jerry Stackhouse, who lead UNC-Greensboro and Vanderbilt, respectively. Despite having no head coaching experience, Davis quickly emerged as the logical choice to carry on Williams’ legacy. Already a legend for his playing days in Chapel Hill, the 50-year-old spent the last nine years learning under Williams, gaining a reputation as a great recruiter. To act like Duke will blindly follow North Carolina’s model on how to replace its own legendary coach is silly, but we can certainly learn a lot from Davis’ hiring. For one, hiring somebody who is already on staff is certainly ideal, as returning players and incoming recruits’ familiarity with the replacement should prevent a flurry of transfers and decommits. So, if the Blue Devils were to directly follow the Tar Heels, we should first consider the assistant coaches currently on staff in Durham: Chris Carrawell, Jon Scheyer and Nolan Smith. Like Davis, all three of these coaches starred on the court at Duke before returning for a role on the coaching staff. At this point, Scheyer seems like the only viable candidate—the 33-year-old is the only one of the trio with the associate head coach title, Carrawell has only been on Duke’s staff since 2018 and Smith has yet to even be named an official assistant coach, currently holding the position of director of operations and player development. Scheyer’s resume for the Duke job is very similar to Davis’ for the North Carolina position. After a standout Blue Devil career as a player,

The Chronicle Scheyer has spent the last seven seasons learning under Krzyzewski and has proven himself to be an elite recruiter. But Scheyer is no slam dunk of a candidate. He has never served as a head coach, and, combined with his age, he may be considered too green to take over the Duke job. The Blue Devils will most likely look at options beyond those currently on staff as well, and fortunately for them there are still a wide variety of choices with strong Durham ties. A whopping nine men who coached or played under Krzyzewski at Duke are currently Division I head coaches: UCF’s Johnny Dawkins, Harvard’s Tommy Amaker, Notre Dame’s Mike Brey, Arizona State’s Bobby Hurley, Howard’s Kenny Blakeney, Northwestern’s Chris Collins, Pittsburgh’s Jeff Capel, Niagara’s Greg Paulus and most recently Austin Peay’s Nate James. In addition to those names, former Marquette head coach Steve Wojciechowski and current Utah Jazz head coach Quin Snyder both played and coached under Krzyzewski. That gives us 14 coaches with strong Duke ties that have a chance to succeed Krzyzewski. Sure, it’s fun to act like revered coaches such as Villanova’s Jay Wright or the Boston Celtics’ Brad Stevens will leave their current posts for the Cameron Indoor Stadium sidelines, but both of them have shown little interest in other attractive openings, namely the Philadelphia 76ers for Wright and Indiana University for Stevens. A lot can change between now and whenever Krzyzewski announces his retirement, but I feel like we can easily whittle our list of 14 down. Snyder’s Jazz team has the best record in the NBA this season, and it feels silly to act like he would leave one of the most appealing NBA jobs for a college position. James, Paulus and Blakeney have a combined four seasons as head coaches under their belt at smaller programs, making them all extremely unlikely to win the Duke job. As I said before, Carrawell and Smith are also longshots to leapfrog Scheyer or a more established option. So, we are down to eight names now: Dawkins, Amaker, Brey, Hurley, Collins, Capel, Wojciechowski and Scheyer. You could certainly make an argument for any of these guys to take over the Blue Devils, as, with the exception of Scheyer, each coach has achieved legitimate success at major programs. Still, it’s hard for me to shake the similarities between Davis and Scheyer. If a long-time assistant with on-court pedigree known for his leadership and recruiting prowess is good enough for North Carolina, why wouldn’t it be good enough for Duke?

Profile for Duke Chronicle

April 12, 2021  

April 12, 2021  

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