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Janie long talks time with cSGd

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ONE ONE HUNDRED HUNDRED AND AND EIGHTH TENTHYEAR, YEAR,Issue Issuexxx s4

Carin to succeed New Science Drive garage to reduce parking waitlist Siedow as vice provost of research by Grace Wang The chronicle

Lawrence Carin, chair of electrical and computer engineering, has been selected as the next vice provost for research. Carin will replace James Siedow, who is stepping down this year after 12 years in the position. The job’s main features include facilitating funding for research—both from the government and from industry sources—as well as managing regulations and issues with compliance. Carin was selected for his breadth of experience and commitment to interdisciplinary research, colleagues noted. “I want Duke to be a place where you can be extraordinarily successful in your research, and I don’t believe that there are very many fundamental barriers of success here, ” Carin said. “My job is to go find whatever obstacles exist and try to move them.” The decision to appoint Carin was made by a committee of Duke faculty. One of the many things the committee looked for in a candidate was “a strong advocate for the University’s research mission in the context of the University’s strategic commitment to internationalization, interdisciplinarity and knowledge in the service of society,” committee member Michael Therien, William R. Kenan, Jr. professor of Chemistry, wrote in an email Wednesday. During Carin’s twenty years as a professor at Duke, he has brought in millions of dollars of research funding and founded a successful company—Signal Innovations Group in Research Triangle Park—Therien noted. See Research, page 8

darbi griffith/The Chronicle

Construction has caused students, faculty and staff to raise complaints about parking. A new parking garage on Science Drive will offer space for staff and graduate students by 2016. by Rachel Chason The Chronicle

Responding to increased demand for parking spaces, the Board of Trustees approved plans to build a new parking garage in their meeting last month. The Board approved funding for the planning and design of the 2,000-space garage in response to complaints from

students, faculty and staff about the availability of convenient parking on West Campus. Although the plans will not address undergraduate parking concerns, they will ease overflow for faculty and graduate students. The garage—which will be built on the northwest corner of Cameron and Science Drives in the space occupied by the 751 lot—will provide

relief to the more than 2,200 graduate students and staff currently on the waitlist for parking on West Campus. The project is still in its initial design phase, but construction is scheduled to begin in August 2014 and to be completed by April 2016. See parking, page 8

Downtown Durham apartments see unprecedented growth by Aleena Karediya The Chronicle

Downtown Durham saw significant growth in apartment buildings this year—and more is on the way. Of all new apartment buildings in North Carolina, 17 percent are being built in the space between downtown Durham and Duke, said Scott Selig, associate vice president of capital assets and real estate. This growth is a reflection of Durham’s evolution as a city, and it can lead to the betterment of downtown as a whole, he said. “The apartment development community has realized that people want to

live in Durham now,” Selig said. “They used to want to live in Cary, northwest Raleigh and Briar Creek. Duke is such a large employer that people can live, work and play in Durham at equal and lesser cost than other locations, since they already come here to play.” Selig noted that the target residential populations are most likely graduate students and workers in the Triangle, because undergraduate students have a three year on-campus residence requirement. He said that undergraduates nonetheless have much to gain from this growth, despite their lack of direct benefits.

“The developments that have been taking place now have spurred other developments across the downtown area, such as shops, restaurants and nightclubs,” he said. “Durham is quickly becoming a place that millennials want to live in.” Shonda Jenson, who lives in a newlyconstructed apartment building downtown, recently moved to Durham as a consultant and has enjoyed the city as an employee and resident. “We all want a good time while making a living. Durham offers that at a low cost, plain and simple,” she said. These benefits have caused many to

see Durham as a city that can be compared to large metropolitan areas of the United States. Selig referenced “The New Geography of Jobs” by Enrico Moretti—a book he recently pulled out at a meeting with the Durham Rotary Club—which says that Durham, San Francisco and Boston are “brain hubs, with workers that are the most productive on the planet.” Selig added that this quote highlights the growth in culture that Durham has undertaken over the past few years. He said that by sheer size, downtown DurSee Construction, page 8


Q & A

The Chronicle

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2 | THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014

Long talks work with cSgD and plans for new position in undergrad education Janie Long, currently the director of the Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity, was recently appointed associate vice provost of undergraduate education. Long, Divinity ‘81, will replace Donna Lisker in the role when Lisker leaves to become Dean of Smith College in Northampton, Mass. July 1. The Chronicle’s Emma Baccellieri sat down with Long to discuss her work with CSGD and her goals for her new position The Chronicle: What appeals to you about the new position? Janie Long: i think it gives me a broader exposure to students than i’m able to have working in one center. even though i’ve been fairly successful in reaching out beyond the Center [for Sexual and Gender Diversity], it does allow me the ability to perhaps touch the lives of more students than i have thus far. The other thing that really appeals to me about it is that it gives me the chance to wed two parts of myself, if you will. Before this, i was a fulltime faculty member, and so i will bring that experience with me—now having for the past almost eight years living on the student affairs side, i get to sort of bring the two together. TC: The associate vice provost position involves so many different components of student life— is there anything in particular you’re looking forward to? JL: Much of what the job is about is whatever is going on in the lives of undergraduates.... So one of the things i really look forward to is the variety of things that will come my way, the variety of issues, the variety of people that i’ll have a chance to work with. TC: What does your departure mean for the position of CGSD director moving forward? JL: There will be a national search, and that’s yet dayou Zhuo/The ChroniCle to unfold. But i feel like we’re in a good place During Janie Long’s tenure as director of CSGD, the LGBTQ community became more visible—with and i really look forward to what new ideas and the opening of a new space in the Bryan Center and an increase in the scope of celebrations such as energy a new person will bring to the position. National Coming Out Day, which included the display of flags such as these. TC: how do you feel about what the Center’s been able to do in your tenure as director? JL: oh, my goodness, how to summarize that in a few words! i think what i’m most proud of is the positive influence on the lives of so many of our students—and certainly i’m talking about lGBTQ students, but i’m talking about students across the campus and i feel like there are so many students that people will never guess.... i would say what i feel the best about is the ability of the center to reach so many students in a positive way. i know lives have been changed for the better. You couldn’t ask for anything more, really.

TC: Do you have any particular goals for moving over to an administrative role in the Allen Building? JL: A lot during the first year will be to listen and get to know as many people possible and to learn. A part of what i do will be dictated by what the goals of the provost and the vice provost will be, but there will also be goals that we develop together.... People always want you to say, “i’m going to do this,” or “i’m going to do this,” but that’s not up to you in isolation. i’m really looking forward to what the next chapters will be, and it is kind of exciting that i don’t exactly know what those will hold.

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Pearsons donate $30 million to advance science and engineering education Staff Reports The Chronicle

J. Michael and Christine Pearson have given $30 million to the Pratt School of Engineering in order to advance science and engineering education. The gift is the sixth largest of Duke Forward, the current capital campaign, and goes toward Pratt’s goal of $161.5 million. Both Mr. and Mrs. Pearson are Duke alumni—

Pratt ‘81 and Nursing ‘84, respectively. Interest in Pratt is currently at a record high, with a 20 percent increase in undergraduate applications to the school, a Duke News release noted. “Over the past five years, Pratt has been one of the fastest-rising engineering schools in the nation, and this landmark gift will provide critical fuel for our continued ascent,”

Tom Katsouleas, dean of Pratt, said in the release. “As an alumnus of Duke Engineering, Mike Pearson deeply understands the key role engineers will play in solving some of the great societal challenges of the 21st century -- from making solar energy economical to engineering new medicines to providing regular access to clean water for the billion people on this planet who need it.” The donation is intended for

interdisciplinary programs, research and courses. Laurie Patton, dean of Trinity College of Arts and Sciences, said in the release that the gift will be used to strengthen the ties between Trinity and Pratt. The Pearsons are now the fourth largest contributors to Duke Forward, with other gifts including $15 million to the School of Nursing and $7.5 million to the Fuqua School of Business.

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CIEMAS, pictured here, houses facilities for the Pratt School of Engineering, which was the recipient of a a $30 million donation, as part of the Duke Forward capital campaign, earlier this week.

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Track and field

Bottorff looks to complete comeback with second title by Nick Martin The ChroniCle

As a long distance runner, Juliet Bottorff’s career has followed the same pattern as the races she runs—start out strong, persevere through the trying halfway point and finish with everything left in the tank. Bottorff will look to complete the final part of the sequence when she competes for her second national title in the 10,000 meters Thursday night at the nCAA outdoor Track & Field Championships at hayward Field in eugene, ore. But three years separate Bottorff from her last title, and climbing her way back atop the podium has not been an easy task. As a sophomore, Bottorff exceeded all expectations as she took the national championship in the 10,000 meters, surprising the field and coaches alike. With a national title in just her second year of collegiate competition, a repeat seemed to be in the cards. But sometimes, as Bottorff found out, one’s body has other plans. “i got injured right after i won nationals in the 10k my sophomore year,” she said. “i went home for the summer, took some time off and started building up for the next year and got injured in the end of July, beginning of August going into my junior year.... That injury just got out-of-hand and it was really hard to pinpoint what was going to make it better. So i rehabbed for months and i’ve never gone through something so miserable in my life.” The injury forced her to miss both the cross country and indoor track seasons of her junior year, meaning any training for a repeat in the outdoor title would have to wait. Though she

sports

Than-ha nGUYEnn/ChroniCle file photo

After winning the 10,000-meter title as a sophomore, suffering a debilitating knee injury and redshirting her senior season, graduate student Juliet Bottorff will look to capture her second national title in the same race at the NCAA Track & Field Outdoor Championships. did race during the outdoor season, Bottorff said it was more of an opportunity to get back in shape than a competitive effort to win races. if one was looking to trace the arc of her comeback, this would be the starting point. For the next two years, all Bottorff could think about was getting back to the top of the podium. She would eventually make the decision to redshirt her senior outdoor season in order

to prepare for one final chance at recapturing her title. But this time, she would do so as a graduate student. “Stopping [before the outdoor season] was just not an option for me,” Bottorff said. “i knew i wanted to use that extra eligibility. i felt like i hadn’t accomplished everything i wanted to during my time at Duke. i love the program here, i love the coaches, my

teammates, the school and Durham, so i was really happy to stick around.” running as a graduate student proved to be a fruitful decision for Bottorff, who has only gotten better in her fifth year of competition as a Blue Devil. The hard work paid off at the Payton Jordan Cardinal invitational See bottorff, page 5

women’s golf

Liu to forgo remaining collegiate eligibility and go pro by Amrith Ramkumar The ChroniCle

Jabari Parker is not the only “oneand-done” athlete that will be missed in Durham next year. in an unprecedented move, Yu liu recently became the first Blue Devil in head coach Dan Brooks’ 30 seasons to leave after one season and turn professional. The Beijing native, who was an integral part of Duke’s national Championship squad, tied for 12th last weekend in her professional debut at the Beijing Challenge at the Beijing orient Pearl Golf Course. liu has already earned two professional wins on China’s lPGA Tour, and will likely try to qualify for the U.S. lPGA Tour as soon as possible. The ACC rookie of the Year, liu finished in the top 10 in her first eight starts of the season, taking advantage of the massive driving distance that gave her an advantage against most of her

competitors. She was only the third Blue Devil ever to finish in the top 10 in her first eight tournaments, and won the 54-hole Darius rucker intercollegiate at the long Cove Club in hilton head, S.C. Although she had a dominant regular season, liu struggled in postseason play. The second-team All-American was done in by a second-round 81 at the nCAA east regional at SouthWood Golf Club in Tallahassee, Fla., finishing tied for 89th in early May, the first time she had ever finished outside the top 10 at a collegiate event. in her effort to bounce back at the nCAA Championship at the Tulsa Country Club in Tulsa, okla., liu struggled for the second consecutive tournament. Although her scores helped Duke’s team score, she was never in contention individually, and had to card two birdies in her final six holes to climb into a tie for 43rd place at 11-over-par 291

after 72 holes. liu’s departure is very surprising considering her struggles at the end of the season and the prowess of Duke’s program led by Brooks, the winningest coach in the sport and a six-time national champion. The Blue Devils return WGCA Player of the Year Celine Boutier—who finished second individually at the nCAA Championship—and Sandy Choi, who finished in the top 25 of all 3 postseason tournaments. Boutier will be a junior and Choi will be a sophomore. Boutier, like liu, has plenty of professional experience after playing in her native France and competing at the 2013 riCoh British Women’s open at St. Andrews. She will also compete in this year’s U.S. Women’s open June 19-22 at the Pinehurst resort & Country Club Course no. 2 in the Village of See Liu, page 5

Jack whiTE/ChroniCle file photo

Freshman Yu Liu has decided to skip her remaining three years of college in order to compete at the professional level.


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Bottorff

from page 4

May 4, where Bottorff did something no Duke runner had accomplished since 1986. For the past 28 years, ellen reynolds had owned the 10,000-meter school record with a time of 32:40.70. That was before Bottorff—who has been running the race since she stepped onto Duke’s campus—shattered the mark by more than 15 seconds, posting a 32:25.69. Although it was not the second national championship she craves, Bottorff was still very excited about running her way into the Duke record books. “i’ve been eyeing that record for quite a while now,” Bottorff said. “[Breaking it] was very nice. really, since my sophomore year, after i won the national title, i’ve seen that record and wanted it. it’s hard to get in a really fast 10k, just because with championship races, like nationals and ACCs, the races just aren’t usually that fast.” But the good news did not stop there. Just days after breaking the record, Bottorff was notified that she, along with teammate Tanner Anderson and former football player Perry Simmons, would all receive nCAA postgrad scholarships to fund any form of graduate-level education of their choosing. Bottorff called the scholarship “a little extra motivation to go back to school.” But a sixth year of college education will have to wait, as she will fulfill her dream of running at the professional level following the nCAA Championships. “i’m in a pretty good place right now,” she said. “i am thinking about running professionally next year. i’ve been talking to a lot of different coaches and agents. That process obviously will pick up after nCAAs because i can’t do anything big before nCAAs are over or i lose my eligibility.sudoku_425B But that’s that plan right now. After that, i want to get a Ph.D.”

Despite the seemingly unlimited options Bottorff has as a national champion runner with numerous All-ACC and All-American honors, an undergraduate degree in neuroscience and now an MBA, she has not lost track of the main reason she went through so much trouble to redshirt her senior season. Bottorff wants another national championship before she calls it quits as a Blue Devil. “i want to win nationals. i want that more than any goal i’ve had so far here,” she said. “i’m extremely grateful for all that i’ve accomplished and i’m very proud of that, but i’ve had this on my mind since i won my sophomore year. At this point, i’ve proven that that wasn’t a fluke.... i’ve had some ups-and-downs since then, especially getting injured right after that, but i really, really want to win.”

Liu

THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 2014 | 5

from page 4

Pinehurst, n.C., but has never indicated that she would consider leaving the Blue Devils early like liu to become a full-time professional. liu’s decision opens a third spot in the Duke lineup after seniors Alejandra Cangrejo and laetitia Beck recently graduated. rising sophomore esther lee, rising junior Yi Xiao and rising senior irene Jung all saw limited tournament action last season, but will likely compete to replace the departed Blue Devils. Duke also brings in another international recruiting class, with decorated irish twins leona and lisa Maguire and Gurbani Singh expected to join the team in the fall to help fill the massive void in the lineup

sports

Than-ha nGYUEnn/ChroniCle file photo

Than-ha nGY/ChroniCle file photo

Liu will look to continue the success she had at the collegiate level as a professional.

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Bottorff has a chance to capture her second 10,000-meter national title next week at the NCAA championships.

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T h e i n d e p e n d e n T d a i ly aT d u k e u n i v e r s i T y

The Chronicle

A cornucopia of classes With 50 majors, 47 minors, 24 interdisciplinary certificates and hundreds of classes offered at Duke—that’s 437,989 unique academic combinations, according to the Duke website— choosing a path for the next four years may seem

First, though subject matter is a seminal factor disciplines. Perhaps, in high school, you were the in choosing a course, getting the most out of a math whiz, the next Nobel Prize physicist or the class often transcends the chemical reactions to be Shakespeare reincarnate, and you have already memorized or the papers to be written. Professors, decided which major to pursue. To prematurely for example, can greatly alter the close off potential paths or to experience of a course. Some choose classes simply for an easy professors rely on lectures and A would be to miss the value powerpoints and others focus of a liberal arts education. A on discussions. Some pose more documentary studies course questions than they answer and may stoke new passion, a math others provide facts and reactions course may reverse the post-high to memorize. Finding a professor school “never again” mentality whose teaching style resonates and a decision to enroll in a with you and whose enthusiasm neuroscience class might provide for the subject slowly infects you of majors, minors and certificates students a new perspective on your interest is important not only for engaging may choose from in economics. Exploring new with the material in the classroom disciplines through classes can but also for developing mentors and friendships reinvigorate preexisting passions or change an beyond the classroom walls. Online tools such as undergraduate trajectory altogether. RateMyProfessor and talking to upperclassmen can With hundreds of courses to choose from, the provide initial starting points for finding professors, challenge will be whittling the class roster to just but going to office hours, even for professors you four or five, rather than struggling to find classes have never met before, can be invaluable. to fill the day. For those who have yet to declare their majors— Editor’s Note: This editorial was written by members in particular the incoming class of 2018—the first of staff rather than The Chronicle’s independent editorial years are an opportunity to explore different board.

BYTHENUMBERS

Editorial rather daunting. As freshmen gear up to register for classes and begin to plan the next four years, we thought it worthwhile to reflect on navigating the myriad academic offerings at Duke and how to choose the “right” courses—if indeed they exist. A brief perusal of the course catalog on ACES might yield curiosity piquing courses like “Anime: Forms and Mutations,” “Drugs and the Law,” particularly relevant to those Northwestern states, or “Nuclear Weapons” for those interested in international relations. With unexpected courses like these, perusing the course catalog is not unlike shopping on your favorite online sites—there is even a “bookbag” option to add more classes to your wish-list than is physically possible to take. As you first amass your list and then begin to whittle it down, here are some thoughts to keep in mind:

437,989 unique academic combinations

The irony

onlinecomment If you truly want to have a “healthy discussion”, one where you can convince someone like Maggie to see the world in a more informed way, maybe the first step is to put down your torches and pitchforks and try and understand where she’s coming from. —“Anonymous” commenting on the letter “Offense taken.”

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I’ll stay me.” –Luke Bryan My name is Maggie. I’m different, but I’m a fellow human being. Upon my arrival at Duke, I was extremely overwhelmed. I had never met people with beliefs so different from mine, but I had expected and wanted this change, this diversity of opinion and culture. I wanted to know the world, not just the small town where I grew up. What I did not expect was how out of place I would feel. People at Duke appeared to be open-minded, so when the opportunity arose, I told people that I was a Christian. I told them

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that their background and experiences are inherently better than mine? What entitles them to make the ultimate decision about right versus wrong, acceptable versus unacceptable? What innately discounts my experiences and deems them insufficient to draw intellectual conclusions from? Where I come from deserves attention and respect too. It is not okay to disregard my views without giving me a chance. When I came to Duke and experienced the shock of such diverse beliefs, I did exactly that—gave everyone a chance. And I made great friends, despite the fact that

Maggie Hammerle A unique view

that I came from a small southern town with very conservative beliefs. I told them that I believed these things that are so foreign to many at Duke. The response—“Aw, she’s adorable.” I was not considered a fellow intellectual anymore. I was instead treated as a cute, mindless puppy. I was the sweet little girl who did not understand what the world was really like. I often cried myself to sleep, feeling like I had made a huge mistake stepping so far out of my comfort zone. Instead of letting the judgments affect my character, I listened. I stayed silent because I wanted to learn about these people and hear what they had to say. I kept my beliefs in the background, though, for two years now, in order to listen to others. I admit that two years is not enough time to completely understand other people, where they come from and what they believe. But neither is one article. Because the very thing they accuse me of is being narrow-minded, judgmental and intolerant, maybe it’s time for them to reconsider their preconceived notions and first look at how they responded to an opinion unlike their own. Everyone was kind and loving—when I kept my opinions to myself—so I made friends, accepting each person as they were. We could find similarities in our different beliefs. I compared opposing beliefs to my own. I considered where my opinions came from and if they were valid. I studied. I thought. I talked to people. I tried to find the right answers and my place at Duke. Contrary to what many at Duke expected, my initial beliefs were strengthened. No, I have not experienced the same life as anyone at Duke, but no one at Duke has experienced my life either. Who is to say

I disagreed with their entire belief systems and ways of life and despite the fact that they would not take what I had to say seriously. When many people experienced the shock of my beliefs, they attacked. I was terrified to publish my beliefs for fear of losing friends, being hated by those who have never met me and even being kept from positions or jobs due to my political, religious and moral views. Is that the Duke way—tolerance and acceptance for all, unless someone believes something that other people dislike and stands up for those opinions? Through my last column, I initially hoped to show Duke a different outlook and to challenge my classmates to consider another side. I hoped we could discuss these matters as mature adults and still be friends through our differences. I hoped to be able to come out with my beliefs and still be accepted. Many of my classmates have showed me that these hopes are just dreams. Although I listen to my classmates and accept them, they will not accept me or even give me the courtesy of hearing what I have to say and getting to know me as a person. To make friends with these people at Duke—we get it—those who believe as I do have to stay silent. Well, I will not stay silent anymore. I shouldn’t have to. I will continue to show Duke a different side to current issues, but I no longer expect open-mindedness in those who claim to be so tolerant. I expect to be attacked and criticized for being different and expressing my individuality. Thanks to those who attack at the first sign of deviation from the norm at Duke. Maggie Hammerle is a Trinity junior. This is her second column in a biweekly series during the summer.


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A different type of busy

ometimes I reminisce on days when summer was the pinnacle of relaxation and a time to embrace an unabashedly sloth-like lifestyle. That was the norm when I was a child. Then I got to high school and realized that colleges would not be impressed to know I spent my free days lounging around all day in my pajamas, eating ice cream and watching The Maury Show or whatever movie was playing on HBO. Then I got to college, and the pressure to spend my summer being a productive member of society while also developing myself professionally increased tenfold. For many of us, summer is anything but a

school work and not at all by extracurriculars, but instead by program-required weekend trips and after-class cultural excursions. When I’m not doing homework, I am visiting historical sites, wandering through never-ending cities and museums and listening to my host parents talk so fast in Spanish that, sometimes, I simply feign understanding because I’m too ashamed to admit I actually don’t know what they’re saying. “Busy” in this program is not so much an active state, but a passive one, and I think it’s designed that way. We’re not here to change other people’s lives, to teach someone else something, to accomplish some sort of feat so we

I

An insider’s guide to Duke

was sold on my first visit to Duke. I fell in love with the scenic campus and the magnificent Gothic architecture. I imagined myself passing by the Chapel, the gardens and the Nasher Museum of Art on a daily basis and attending the numerous performances and events advertised on the flyers in the Bryan Center. It seemed like there would always be something exciting to do. It was so different—so collegiate. But it wasn’t really Duke. You never truly get the authentic experience when you’re a

Michelle Menchaca

Pallavi Shankar

A work in progress

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time to relax. Indeed, each time around, the busyness of the school year bleeds into summer and we face this intense pressure to accomplish something undeniably impressive—to volunteer (traditionally abroad with lots of small children to snap pictures with), do important research, land that coveted internship or, at the very least, take some summer classes. Since I have no shame in succumbing to societal (or at least Duke) norms, I chose the latter option. I decided to enroll in summer school and add some Latin flare by taking my classes in Alicante, Spain, where we essentially cover in six weeks what is normally covered over the course of an entire school year. Me gusta Español. Because I’m taking classes I actually have to care about, this doesn’t feel all that different from when I’m studying at Duke. I still agonize over the state of my GPA. I still worry I will not meet the expectations I set for myself. I still stuffer from the same crippling pre-test anxiety. In essence, many of the standard school-year stresses remain. And, yet, the fact that I’ve been thrust into a foreign country where I don’t know the language and don’t understand the culture has made the experience distinctly different. At Duke, I am always busy doing “something,” whatever that something may be. I am studying for a test. I am attending to my duties at The Chronicle. I am working on an outside project. My notion of “busy” is defined by my actively engaging in tasks with specific end goals in mind. And, in Alicante, I would say that I am probably just as busy in the sense that I regularly feel like my unstructured free time has escaped me. We are always doing something here, but, in Spain, busy is defined not only by

can go back home and say, “Look! Look at what I did!” Rather, as Americans in a foreign country, we are here to learn and absorb the knowledge that the experience, in and of itself, and not some sort of tangible outcome is what ultimately holds value. I can’t impress someone with the first time I was able to hold a full conversation in Spanish, a dialogue void of awkward pauses and incorrectly conjugated verbs and filled with once foreign words that now erupted with meaning. No one will be amazed to hear about my newfound appreciation for 16th century Spanish art, about how I could have wandered that museum for hours and gotten blissfully lost in those paintings and the narratives they conveyed. And I doubt there will be much interest in the way I felt when I climbed to the top of a castle and witnessed the beauty of the world below me, in the way the sunlight reflected off the water and the buildings blurred along the horizon. To listen, to appreciate, to feel—we don’t always qualify these acts as important nor do they really get much outside recognition. But I have spent now a significant amount of time doing all of these things, and, while I may not be able to fully articulate why they matter, I can say with certainty that the magnitude of their importance should not be dismissed. Yes, summer is a time to be busy. It is a time to explore, to engage, to take action. But it is also a time to reflect, to listen, to marvel at the beauty that surrounds us every single day. So sit back, relax and look at the world around you.

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Michelle Menchaca is the Editorial Pages Managing Editor and a Trinity junior. This is her second column in a biweekly series during the summer.

tourist, and college campuses are no exception. We all start out with more or less the same image of Duke—the one presented in campus visits and orientation programs. Over time, the shiny tourist experience, brimming with the promise of new opportunities, gives way to reality—relearning how to navigate campus every few months thanks to constant construction projects, missing those interesting shows you swore you’d go to in favor of coffee-fueled all-nighters and realizing that some of those great opportunities don’t want you as badly as you want them. The places you frequent aren’t as glamorous as you imagined. The Duke experience isn’t shiny, but it is, above all, uniquely yours. So, incoming freshmen, future applicants and prospective visitors, toss out your glossy pamphlets. Here’s the truth. Duke Chapel. The most recognizable landmark of the University, the Chapel is a magnificent Gothic structure towering 210 meters over West Campus. It mainly serves as an invaluable Instagram opportunity to remind others how lucky you are to live in the vicinity of such a beautiful sight. (Even though you’ll usually rush past it without so much as a second glance on your way to a class that started two minutes ago.) Perkins Library. The library is busy on weekday nights, crowded on weekends and absolutely packed during exams. You’ll spend more time trying to find a seat than you’ll spend time actually working. The second and fourth floors are quiet areas with soft couches by the windows that are perfect for both studying and napping between classes. The Link, in Perkins’ basement, has a more laid-back atmosphere. It accommodates group-study with booths and classrooms that are always occupied unless you get there before sunrise to claim your territory. Duke Hospital. Easily accessible to students from West Campus, the Duke Hospital is a veritable maze. If you learn to successfully navigate it, you can reach the Holy Grail: Chik-fil-A. Sarah P. Duke Gardens. One of my personal favorite places on campus, the gardens offer a diverse collection of plants and many peaceful grassy areas for relaxing or studying. Occasional sights include wedding ceremonies, photo shoots and Duke students aspiring to fulfill their unofficial graduation requirements. Unless you routinely walk through the gardens to travel between Central Campus and West Campus, you likely won’t go too often, considering they’re inconveniently far from most campus housing and, for half the year, it’s way too cold to lay outside—not to mention, winter is not kind to the plant life. Cameron Indoor Stadium. The energy of a Duke basketball game is unbelievable! No tour or description can do justice to how insane this place is during games. It makes camping out in cold, muddy K-ville and dealing with wet socks totally worth it. Shooters. While it’s technically not on campus, Shooters is an undeniably important facet of Duke culture. It’s a dimly lit Westernthemed club with a mechanical bull you can ride, a hanging cage in which you can dance and a mirrored wall on the dance floor where you can see yourself making bad decisions. Shooters is a blast the first few times, but then the novelty of it fades. You’ll soon find yourself complaining about how nasty it is, yet still returning on Wednesdays and Saturdays to a haze of alcohol, sweat and regret. This short guide of Duke’s most frequented locations is far from a complete list of what the University has to offer, because there is no guide to a unique experience. Duke means something different to each and every person. When I think of Duke, I think of turkey club sandwiches at Twinnie’s and traversing Science Drive, which somehow turns into an uphill trek no matter which way I walk. I think of friends’ dorm rooms and Cosmic Cantina, while others might recall the hallowed halls of the Chapel or long nights in the Teer Building. Duke, like any college, is what you make of it. The places that mean the most to me are not necessarily the same places that would fill a brochure, but they are the ones that define my college experience— and you know what? Although I’ve learned that the Duke experience is far from picture-perfect, I’m still sold. Pallavi Shankar is a Trinity sophomore. This is her second column in a biweekly series during the summer.


Parking

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the spaces will be unusable during the construction period. “[Facilities Management] has worked with PTS on a temporary relocation plan during construction,” said Vice President for Facilities John Noonan. “Part of the plan maintains about 120 existing spaces on the site during construction. Other lots will be utilized to handle the customers.” Harden said that alternative parking will be provided in proximity to the construction site—including at the Faculty Club, Jogger’s lot and inside the Blue Zone. Harden noted that although the

new garage will provide “needed relief” from current parking dilemma, the construction of new buildings and expansion of the University will inevitably increase the number of parking spaces requested. The renovation of Gross Hall increased demand by an additional 300 spaces, and the Athletic Precinct Master Plan—which is currently in its planning phase—will continue to increase demand for parking, according to the 2014 Facilities Management Project Summary. The Project Summary reports that the site for the parking garage will be located at the campus perimeter, as is consistent with Duke’s master planning principles,

and will be accessible via Duke and Durham Bus Networks. Designs for the project, spearheaded by consulting firm Walker Parking and Ratio Architects, call for sustainable practices to be incorporated in construction, such as minimizing energy consumption through LED fixtures and reducing storm water impact through the use of rain gardens. The project was one of several discussed by the Board, which also approved funding for the reconstruction of West Duke Building and the planning and design of a completely new Engineering and Physics Building and Arts Center.

research has always been a strength of the University and will continue to be a focus “It’s a great choice,” Siedow said. “[Ca- for him. rin is] widely regarded as a very thought“I find that a lot of opportunities for ful and intelligent person. He will bring collaboration and joint efforts may be some changes around, and these changes very exciting for faculty who haven’t been are probably good and probably needed.” here for long and might not know about Carin said his experience as a research- them,” Carin said. “I am hoping that it er will help him make the research faculty will be a real hallmark of what we do.” more effective as Siedow said an administrator. that one of the “[Carin] will bring some He noted that facmany important ulty do research in changes around, and these roles played by the vice provost fields far beyond changes are probably good for research is the natural sciences and engineerleading the Ofand probably needed.” ing, including the fice of Research — James Siedow Support, overseehumanities and social sciences—exing the submisperience that Casion of grants rin has garnered as a researcher himself. from all agencies. The vice provost of “Over the last twenty years, I’ve done research ensures that the rules and reguresearch across the entire campus,” said lations of how to spend this funding are Carin. “I’ve published paper on analysis met, including common concerns of reand music and even political science. I searchers in academia such as addressing think I really understand Duke and Duke conflicts of interest and examining the research.” ethicality of human subjects testing. The Carin also noted that interdisciplinary position also requires that Siedow sit on

the board of North Carolina Biotechnolgy Center, Research Triangle Institute International and many other research enterprises. “In many ways, the vice provost is the

Duke representative of research entities,” Siedow said. Duke is currently a top-ranked research institution with more than a billion dollars of research funding, Carin said. The funding environment, however, is getting increasingly competitive—particularly in regard to decreasing federal investments and the unpredictable nature of federal budgeting. Regardless, Carin noted that Duke receives funding from research grants beyond that of many peer institutions. “While we are doing well, we can always do better,” Carin said.

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Melissa Harden, interim director of Parking and Transportation Services, said many who are currently on the waitlist must head to Smith Warehouse or Central and East Campuses to find parking. “The garage is being built now to respond to growing parking demand, to coincide with Thomas Center construction and to address game day parking needs for football and basketball,” Harden said. The 751 lot contains 375 spaces that are assigned by the Fuqua School of Business. More than two-thirds of

research

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Construction

Dayou Zhuo/The Chronicle

James Siedow, current vice provost for research, pictured above, calls the selection of Lawrence Carin as his successor “a great choice.”

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ham has become a bigger place with more people per square inch—a factor that can lead to growth and safety downtown. This growth, however, all comes back to the people who move here. “There are exceedingly creative people moving to Durham, because of culture and education,” Segil said. “It’s amazing that we are on [Moretti’s] list. The list is three [cities] long, and Durham three years ago wouldn’t have made that list.”

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