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The Chronicle

XXXDAY, MONTH MONDAY, APRIL 15, XX,2013 2013

ONE ONE HUNDRED HUNDRED AND AND EIGHTH EIGHTH YEAR, YEAR, ISSUE ISSUE 136 X

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Smash Mouth singer talks band life, music Classic ’90s band Smash Mouth performed Friday at Keohane Amphitheater for the Duke University Union Joe College committee’s annual Old Duke event. Smash Mouth, originally formed in 1994, rose to stardom with their hit song “All-Star” and cover of the Monkees’ “I’m a Believer,” both of which were featured in the original “Shrek” soundtrack. The Chronicle’s Georgia Parke, Julian Spector and Jisoo Yoon talked to lead singer Steve Harwell before the show about the band’s evolution, how they have stayed together for nearly 20 years and what he really thinks about Justin Bieber.

Q&A

The Chronicle: How has the music scene changed since the ’90s? Steve Harwell: I think it changed for the worse, to be honest with you. I am not a big fan of what’s been coming out in the past 10 years. More recently there’s been some good stuff and kids today are going out and wearing Led Zepplin shirts and listening to classic rock and it’s making a full change. And the ’90s scene is making a full change too. It’s on its way back. We just put together a big summer tour—with us, Sugar Ray, Gin Blossoms, Vertical Horizon—a 40date U.S. tour starting on July 4. SYLVIE SPEWAK/THE CHRONICLE

Smash Mouth performs at Old Duke Friday. The concert is organized annually by the Joe College committee.

TC: You said the music scene is going downhill, but are there any current artists you are a fan of?

SH: I’m a huge Justin Bieber fan. I touch myself every day [listening]. TC: Really? SH: No, just kidding... [but] I have respect for all artists. I’m a big Kings of Leon fan... the Fray, I like the Fray. But because this is what we do everyday for a living, you don’t want to hear music. I hate concerts. I used to love them, and now we do it all the time. Why do I want to watch what I do for a living? It’s not really my thing.... I have to come in and catch up once in a while on what’s really going on. That’s probably one of my downsides. Everybody else in my band, they go home and it’s music. They wake up, it’s music. For me, I get off stage, and I get back to see the world. I don’t bring my work home with me. If I’m in a studio making a record, I’m working on my projects, producing music. But I’m totally not that guy and I get s--t for it sometimes. I just want to go lay on the couch, with no underwear. TC: Why are you called Smash Mouth? SH: When we started we were a local [ska punk] band. I’m a huge sports fanatic, and there was a football coach and he came up with the name “smashmouth football.” I was just watching TV one day and we were making our first SEE SMASH MOUTH ON PAGE 4

Break-in details emerge Cowan reflects on 50th by Georgia Parke by Elizabeth Djinis THE CHRONICLE

Two Central Campus apartments were entered illegally between the hours of 11 p.m. and 3 a.m. on Sunday morning. The first occurred at 11 p.m., when the robber entered a third-floor apartment through a sliding glass door, said junior Traci King, the apartment’s resident. The suspect was described as a “male with a medium, dark complexion wearing a gray t-shirt and denim shorts,” according to a Duke Alert sent at around 3 a.m. Sunday. The suspect then rummaged around the kitchen and living room before entering the dark bedroom, where King was lying in bed. The man fumbled with multiple light switches before turning on one of the bedside lamps and seeing the apartment’s owner. Upon seeing the resident, the suspect apologized and left the apartment. “I think he wasn’t expecting someone to be in here, he just wanted to grab stuff quickly and leave. He saw me and he didn’t really want to be there,” King said. “He didn’t pull anything on me. I think I

almost startled him by being there.” Although the suspect did leave once he encountered King, Caitlin Plaut, King’s roommate who was not present at the time of the robbery, said the man took two pairs of sunglasses and King’s wallet. She noted that three incidents of robbery happened on the same night. Aside from King and Plaut’s apartment, another Central Campus apartment was entered by an unknown man and, according to Plaut, a house off-campus was robbed as well. “It’s possible that there were a group of people working together. It happens exactly at the time when people should be out,” King said. “It was too early for him to really expect me to be asleep because I normally wouldn’t be on a Saturday night at that time.” King said that she called the police immediately after the robbery, and they arrived within minutes. She also said the police took fingerprints of the entire SEE CENTRAL ON PAGE 12

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Mo Cowan gives speech Saturday about the 50th anniversary of integration at Duke.

Sen. Mo Cowan, D-Mass, gave the keynote address for the 50th anniversary celebration of integration at Duke, lauding the social progress that Duke has made since it accepted its first five black undergraduates in 1963. Cowan, Trinity ’91 and other speakers such as Hardy Vieux, Trinity ’93, a member of Duke Alumni Association’s Board of Directors, and senior Alex Swain, outgoing president of Duke Student Government addressed an audience of alumni, students, professors and community members at Page Auditorium, repeatedly honoring these five students: Gene Kendall, Mary Mitchell Harris, Wilhelmina ReubenCooke, Cassandra Smith Rush and Nathaniel White, Jr. Kendall, Reuben-Cooke and White attended the event Saturday, and Harris and Rush, who passed away in 2002 and 1996, respectively, were represented by their loved ones and family members. “[The first five] had to not only adjust to SEE COWAN ON PAGE 4

ONTHERECORD

Brodhead speaks during alum reunion weekend, Page 3

“Reject the status quo, and refuse entrance into the real world altogether. We make the real world into Duke..” —Monday, Monday in “It doesn’t get better”. See column page 12

Spring football, Sports Page 1


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Relive the weekend in photos .....................................................................................................................................................a photo essay by Tony Shan, Sylvie Spewak, Jenny Xu, Jisoo Yoon.

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1. Students ring in the weekend at DUU’s foam party Friday.

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2.Alexander McCall Smith accepts the LEAF award Friday. 3. Native Americans hold a powwow on the Main Quad Saturday.

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4. Student dancers perform at the annual Defmo showcase Saturday.

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Brodhead lauds alum gifts by Carleigh Stiehm THE CHRONICLE

The value of a Duke education will never be matched by online alternatives, President Richard Brodhead told alumni. During his Reunion Weekend speech, Brodhead said generous donations from alumni are vital in keeping the Duke community fun and innovative. The combined Annual Fund gifts of the 10 returning classes totaled more than $14.7 million. In his speech, Brodhead also addressed the recent trend towards online course offerings. “As you return to Duke, I would like to say welcome home,” Brodhead said. “Nice people, when they go back home, they bring a little gift.” Over 4,000 alums returned to Duke this weekend, said Jeff Howard, Trinity ’76 who is president of the Duke Alumni Association board. Although many things—like construction on campus and the addition of programs like DukeEngage—are different from when the alumni graduated, the fundamental campus environment remains unchanged, Brodhead said. He added that campus culture is a mix of work and play. “Where the education begins and leaves off, who knows,” Brodhead said. “On this campus, the spirit of fun and discovery are all linked together.” Among recent changes is the University’s move toward providing

JISOO YOON/THE CHRONICLE

Brodhead speaks to alumni about changes to the University. an online curriculum—this spring, Duke offered 11 courses through Coursera, an online education platform that provides the global community with free access to video lectures, assessments and discussion boards from notable institutions. In response to concerns about the role that an expensive university will play in a world increasingly turning to inexpensive and convenient online classes, Brodhead said the value of a Duke education extends beyond what is learned within the classroom. “There are things that you will never be able to learn online,” he said. For example, online classes do not offer the opportunities to participate in extracurricular activities or

interact with classmates who are the most valuable learning resources, he added. Without contributions from alumni, the Duke experience would not be possible, Brodhead said. “Sometimes it seems that universities raise money as if raising money is our goal,” he said. Although at times universities seem to raise money solely for the sake of raising money, funds raised at the University allow for a 100 percent need-blind admissions process and provide students with an experience unique to Duke, Brodhead noted. Currently, the University spends more than $120 million each year to provide more than 50 percent of undergraduate students some form of financial aid. Duke’s reputation continues to build and attract more applicants every year, Brodhead said. He added that alumni are responsible for ensuring future Duke students have the opportunity to experience Duke the same way that previous classes have. The Class of 1983 raised the most with over $3.1 million, said Sterly Wilder, Trinity ’83, who is associate vice president of alumni affairs. The Class of 2008, back for their fifth reunion, was the most represented class with 631 alumni returning to campus. “If you have the capacity to be better, then you have the obligation to be better,” Brodhead concluded, quoting men’s basketball head coach Mike Krzyzewski.

Alumni sound-off Hundreds of alumni descended on the campus this weekend to connect with old friends and reminisce about their time at Duke. The Chronicle’s YunChu Huang and Aubrey Temple spoke with several alumni—some who were students as far back as 1953—to ask about their most memorable moments in college and how the University has changed since they were last here. “I got a degree and a wife out of it.” —Carr McClain, Trinity ’88 “When my father lived in Epworth, the squirrels would come in through the windows and steal his socks.” “[1968] was a real activist year, and it was the year that Martin Luther King got killed, and there was a big vigil on the quadrangle.” —Tom Harris, Trinity ’68, Law ’71 “We decided on a prank that would be non-destructive and ultimate. So what we did is we turned the [Crowell] clock tower… into a Mickey Mouse clock.” —John Tyson, School of Engineering ’81 “I called on [former football head coach] Wallace Wade… and he presented to me a trophy to auction. [It] was auctioned off by Phi Kappa Psi fraternity and raised $10,000 for children’s cancer research.”— Alan Talpalar, Trinity ’83 “I used to sit outside around the corner of the [Duke] Chapel with friends talking about existentialism and philosophy and the meaning of life… The seeds of what I have done in the past 40 years were planted here.” —Stephen Conover, Trinity ’73 “I lived right here in House C [on West Campus]… and when we moved to East campus, I was highly upset.” —Reid Lewis, Trinity ’84 “We had a curfew at 9:30 every night.” —Bernice Larson, Woman’s College ’53 “One of the biggest values of Duke is the building of everlasting relationships” —Eskinder Zewdu, Pratt ’11 “One of the most important things to do here at Duke is to form relationships with faculty members.” —Gabriella Fitzgerald, Trinity ’93 “East Campus is much more developed and the Nasher museum is amazing.... When I was in school, we just had the Loop” Walter Pye, Trinity ’88


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SMASH MOUTH from page 1 record and we had a list on the wall at the studio of [band] names and... I was like “F-k that’s it, we’re Smash Mouth.” He never trademarked [the name] so we got away with it. Even today, when you’re watching SportsCenter, you’ll see smashmouth football. TC: What is your secret to success for staying together so long? SH: My original band, we got together as a garage band and separated after high school. Then I got into the hip-hop scene... [but] I wanted to be in a rock band. I scouted a couple guys locally, cover bands in bars.... We turned out and did our thing and we were successful. Being around each other every damn day, it’s like a marriage. Some day you’re going to get divorced and maybe get back together. That’s what happened with us. You have to say, ‘I’m not breaking up, I’m not stopping.’ Throughout [everything]... people are getting married, people are having kids, people are getting divorced. What really kept us together is keeping our spouses out.... Friends, wives, girlfriends, they make you crazy, and you start buying into certain things. [Then] when you’re on the road, you start dissing each other. At the end of the day, I think the biggest thing about a band being together is [to not] let it become about the money. That’s the biggest thing. It’s the money. Our original guitar player, his ex-wife, she absolutely tried to ruin my relationship with him. She wanted him to be the star. She had her own aspirations, and that’s where it all went to s--t. We’ve gotten into lawsuits, and now we hate each other. I could name 100 bands where once it became that, it’s not fun anymore.

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It’s not easy. Marriage isn’t easy. Boyfriend and girlfriend isn’t easy. TC: What’s the biggest challenge about life on tour? SH: Being in a band together, you’ve got to figure it out when you’re on a tour bus together. Tour buses, they look really big, but they get really small really quick. You need the space. You’ll be on the bus and everybody’s up front so I’ll go in the back. Then they go to the back and I go to the middle. I’m like, ‘I don’t want to see anybody right now.’ The way Smash Mouth feels right now is the way it felt back in 1997. It feels young and fresh, and we get along to the point that it feels like the fame’s not there, that the money is not there. It still feels like we are so hungry to go get it. It feels like all that stuff is not in the way, and knowing that changes the attitude. At this point in my career I can pick and choose when I want to go on the road. I’m kind of back in a relationship and it’s already hard.... You’re gone for six months at a time—I’m getting text messages like, ‘What the f--k are you doing, when are you coming home.’ Relationships are the hardest part—there’s got to be a trust level and there’s got to be a communication level too. That’s a really hard part of this band. When you don’t have communication with each other, that’s when it all goes to s--t.... The worst thing you can say to someone is ‘I’m turning my phone off.’ That’s the worst f—ing thing. TC: Do you ever get tired of playing “All Star”? SH: Never. I never get sick of playing any of those songs. You go to each show and this is what people want to hear and I love doing it. I love a cool crowd. If I didn’t play it, you’d be f—ing pissed.

COWAN from page 1 [Duke’s] rigorous academic climate, but they also had to adjust to the social climate,” Swain said. “Duke has since grown in diversity, activism and leadership.” Also recognized at the event were the first black graduate students to attend Duke, including School of Medicine graduates Jean Spaulding and Delano Meriwether, School of Law graduate David Robinson and School of Nursing alumna Donna Harris. In his speech, Cowan described the original progress that was made by “the first five” and the continued growth of Duke as an innovative school despite the actions of national political figures who supported segregation at the time. The first five, all of whom were southerners, grew up in the midst of the violent civil rights movement as the South became the catalyst for the struggle. “It is necessary to recognize that the time is always right to do right for Duke University—that time was 1963, and it brought us the first five,” Cowan said. While introducing Cowan, President Richard Brodhead specifically cited the Divinity School as an early supporter of integration in Duke’s history. The Divinity School lobbied for integration at Duke more than 13 years before Duke’s graduate and professional schools became officially integrated in 1961 and its undergraduate school in 1963, Brodhead said. “Duke was not on a trajectory course of progress,” he said. “It took actual young men and women to walk through those doors. That act made us what we are now—a place of equal progress.” In addition to the problem of physical segregation in the United States until the ’60s, Cowan noted that many students of

color, especially those from urban areas, have lacked and still lack the resources necessary to attend top schools, receive a solid education and thrive in the current economy. He recounted his own experiences as a middle and high school student on an advanced track, while the other black students in his school were placed on tracks that limited their future opportunities. “Still one-fifth of African-American high school students will not graduate from high school like our first five did and follow in their footsteps,” Cowan said. When noting the challenges that still exist on Duke’s campus today, Cowan implicitly cited the controversial party in February that led to widespread media attention. “What does this say about Duke’s evolution that a few student groups still throw parties with offensive ethnic and racial themes?” Cowan asked. “Are we where we should be as a university? And what is the deal with black student weekend?” Despite the questions brought up by these instances of cultural tension that prevail on campus, Cowan said Duke has, in fact, progressed a noteworthy amount. “We are here today at a place and time where we are able to debate those very questions... something that was not the case for our first five,” Cowan said. In keeping with the theme of the event, titled “Celebrating the Past, Charting the Future,” Cowan concluded by evaluating what advancements Duke still needs to make based on the progress it has seen in its history. “Events like today’s allow us to discuss where we are and where we still need to go,” he said. “The time is now to ensure that future generations and many more will have the opportunity to follow the pathway blazed by the first five, our trailblazers.”


Sports

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With Andre Dawkins returning to Duke next year, we’ll be counting down his topfive performances this week on the sports blog. sports.chronicleblogs.com

April 15, 2013 www.dukechroniclesports.com

Boone shines in Duke football’s Spring Game by Daniel Carp THE CHRONICLE

Four months removed from its first bowl appearance in 18 years, Duke took a glimpse into the future at the team’s annual Spring Game. The split-squad scrimmage took place Saturday at Wallace Wade Stadium and was the first public showcase of the Blue Devils’ 2013 squad. The Spring Game pitted the Blue team—comprised of Duke’s first-team offense and second-team defense—against a White squad that was made up of the team’s second-team offense and first-team defense. The Blue team prevailed 27-12 behind big afternoons from starting quarterback Anthony Boone and wide receiver Jamison Crowder. “One of the things you see is that this team has a lot of playmakers on offense,” head coach David Cutcliffe said. “We lost playmakers in Conner [Vernon], Desmond [Scott] and Sean [Renfree], but I think we have a large number of people who can make plays on offense.” Making his first start as the Blue Devils’ new fulltime quarterback, Boone recovered from a rocky start to turn in a solid performance at the Spring Game. Despite throwing two interceptions in the first quarter, one of which came from a poor read and one from an unfortunate tipped ball, the redshirt junior recovered to finish with 273 yards on 18-of-30 passing and two touchdowns to go along with the two picks. Overthrowing some deep patterns and struggling with fade routes in the red zone, Boone showed that he still has considerable work left to do this summer, but his connection with Crowder

was spot on from the opening kickoff. Crowder only participated in his team’s first few possessions before yielding to younger receivers, but he made an impact in his short time on the field, reeling in four catches for 71 yards and two touchdowns. “I felt like I had a couple more touchdowns in me, but the coaches were telling me I was done pretty early,” Crowder said. “Boone and I already have a connection coming from the same area, so it felt good to go out there and show the fans that we had a great connection throwing and catching. It’s something to look forward to heading into the season.” Following Crowder’s early exit, sophomore Max McCaffrey took over for the Blue team at receiver. Displaying the strides that earned him the team’s Most Improved award on offense this offseason, McCaffrey was a reliable target for Boone over the middle, grabbing four catches for 50 yards and navigating through defensive traffic with relative ease. “Max McCaffrey has had one hell of a spring. He’s stepped up and made plays and has really shined,” Boone said. “It just shows you that these guys are on scholarship for a reason, and they can make great plays.” The game’s second half focused largely on the ground attack, which featured Boone as a threat in Duke’s new zone-read running scheme. Boone was unable to finish most of his runs because quarterbacks aren’t allowed to be hit in the Spring Game, but the offense looked in sync in the rushing attack. Josh Snead was the Blue squad’s most effective back on the afternoon, gaining 67 yards on 11 carries and scoring a touchdown. SEE FOOTBALL ON PAGE 2

BASEBALL

MEN’S TENNIS

Duke doesn’t yield a set to Miami FSU bats dominate by Jackie Klauberg THE CHRONICLE

Matching the Durham weather all week, the Blue Devils came out ablaze against Miami Sunday, not allowing the Hurricanes to win a single set in the match. No. 9 Duke (19-4, 4-1 in the ACC) squashed Miami 7-0 to bring its win streak to five in a row. “Overall, it was a really solid effort, especially in singles,” Blue Devil head coach Ramsey Smith said. “We didn’t lose a set, didn’t really come close to losing a set. Miami is a solid team and I am really happy with our performance.” Jason Tahir paced the Blue Dev0 MIA ils on the singles side DUKE 7 against Miami (1310, 2-6). The sophomore was the first to finish off his opponent, allowing Victor Mauz to take just one game in the match for a 6-0, 6-1 victory. “He just didn’t really have a great game plan of how to win points, and it just boiled over [causing him to hit balls at the wall],” Tahir said. “And when you see your opponent doing that, it definitely makes you more confident.” Tahir, who has lost just one singles match this season, has been extremely consistent and reliable at the sixth spot. “Sometimes it’s a little lonely down there on court six, but [Jason’s] been doing it all

by Ryan Hoerger THE CHRONICLE

record of 21-6 on the season when playing together and were again victorious Sunday with an 8-5 win. “I haven’t played with a partner this long in a really long time,” Tahir said. “We have been playing together since the summer. It’s been good to have a consistent partner. We

Duke entered this weekend’s series as heavy underdogs to a No. 7 Florida State squad that had lost just six times all year. Unable to contain the Seminoles’ potent offense, the Blue Devils were dispatched in all three games, losing 16-2, 8-5 and 8-3. “I give a lot of credDUKE 2 it to Florida State,” 16 Duke head coach FSU Chris Pollard said. DUKE 5 “They came into the weekend [ranked No. 8 7] in the country, and FSU they played like it.” DUKE 3 In game one of the series, Florida State 8 FSU scored early, pushing across two runs in the bottom of the first inning. Duke (21-17, 8-10 in the ACC) responded right away, as redshirt sophomore Chris Marconcini launched his eighth home run of the season in the top of the second to cut the deficit to 2-1. But the Seminoles (30-6, 13-5) seized control of the game with four runs in the fourth inning and broke it open with four more in the fifth. Duke starter Trent Swart was

SEE M. TENNIS ON PAGE 4

SEE BASEBALL ON PAGE 4

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Jason Tahir’s consistency has been an asset for the Blue Devils at the bottom of the singles ladder. year and has been dominating all year,” Smith said. “This match was particularly good. A lot of times that six spot can be tough, but he has been unbelievable. A lot of times, he’s that first guy off and he gives us that jump start of momentum. He’s been awesome.” Tahir and freshman Michael Redlicki have been a force to reckon with at the number two spot in doubles. The underclassmen boast a


2 | MONDAY, APRIL 15, 2013

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MEN’S LACROSSE

Blue Devils beat UVA in a shootout by Daniel Carp THE CHRONICLE

When senior David Lawson scored the game’s opening goal to give Duke a 1-0 lead against rival Virginia just 49 seconds into the contest, the Blue Devil bench erupted into celebration. Little did they know, Lawson’s strike opened the floodgates for an offensive barrage for both teams. Thanks to a seven-goal run in the fourth quarter, the No. 8 16 Blue Devils (10-4, 2-1 UVA the ACC) came DUKE 19 in away with a 19-16 comeback victory Friday night at Koskinen Stadium to extend their winning streak to eight games. The game was the highest-scoring contest between the two teams in their 77 meetings since 1938. When the dust settled, the Blue Devils and Virginia combined for 35 goals and 95 shots on the evening. “Not only ACC games, but especially Virginia, it’s one of those kind of things where everything else in the world goes out the window,” junior attack Josh Dionne said. “At the end of the day—our records, their records—nothing really matters when we play them. It’s just like a war, and at the end of the 60 minutes, you look at the board and see what happened.” The first half had no shortage of action. Seemingly every time a player wound up to take a shot, it found the back of the net, and each time Duke scored a goal the Cavaliers had an answer. The Blue Devils held the upper hand throughout the first half but could only extend their lead to three goals before a Virginia (5-7, 0-3) run to end the half sent both teams into the locker room with the score tied at 9-9.

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Junior Josh Dionne’s five goals led the Blue Devils to victory in a high-scoring contest. When the teams emerged for the second half, the Cavaliers seized the momentum with an early goal from junior attacker Mark Cockerton—who led all scorers with six goals on the evening—less than a minute into the third quarter. Virginia’s shift to a zone defensive scheme held the Blue Devil offense silent for the first time all evening, and the Cavaliers added three more goals, including two from Cockerton, to take a 13-9 lead. When Duke head coach John Danowski called a timeout to rally his troops, his team’s six-week winning streak hung dangerously in the balance. “We recognized that we needed to talk to the guys a little bit and take a deep breath,” Danowski said. “I give Virginia a lot of credit because they played a little differently conceptually than we saw on film. We were so concerned with winning battles this week that we didn’t play great off the ball.” But when the Blue Devils emerged from

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the timeout the team’s offensive spark was rekindled. Jordan Wolf found freshman Case Matheis for a crucial score as Duke tallied three consecutive goals to draw within one. In the closing seconds of the third quarter, Virginia’s Rob Emery found a hole in the Blue Devil defense and took advantage, sending the Cavaliers into the fourth quarter with a 14-12 lead. The whistle blew for the final period, and Duke never looked back. Midfielder Jake Tripucka sniped a shot from the top of the box to pull the Blue Devils back within one before assisting on Duke’s next two goals, finding Josh Offit for another shot from long range and Dionne in the middle of the Cavalier zone to give Duke its first lead of the second half. Tripucka finished the game with seven points on three goals and four assists. Dionne led the team with five goals, including three in the Blue Devils’ 7-0 fourth-quarter run to put the game away. “Josh [Dionne] has been tremendously consistent from day one, and he is incredibly coachable. He’s a sponge, and he’s just gaining confidence each week,” Danowski said. “Jake is one of our best overall athletes on this team. There is really nothing he can’t do.” Duke’s run was sparked by the tenacious play of midfielder Brendan Fowler at the faceoff X. Despite struggling throughout the third quarter against Virginia’s Mick Parks, Fowler recovered in the fourth quarter and went a perfect 9-for-9 on draws, giving the Blue Devils crucial possession during their decisive run. The key for Fowler at the faceoff X was his intensity in the ground-ball battle. Squaring off with the top ground-ball team in the SEE M. LACROSSE ON PAGE 4

Run-first offe FOOTBALL TBALL from page 1 Sophomore more Shaquille Powell also shined in the running game, gaining 46 yards ards on five carries, including a 30-yard scamper that was one of the highhe afternoon. lights of the For the White squad, man quartertrue freshman ker Boehme back Parker art. Boehme got the start. ery shortly had surgery rolling at after enrolling Duke in January and was just cleared to return to practice last week with h significant restrictions. Given the amount of time and on he had for Saturday’s preparation ame, Boehme’s final stat Spring Game, line of 1288 yards and a touchdown on 11-of-13 13 passing should be a huge confidence fidence boost for Duke ng backup quarterback after losing Thomas Sirk irk with a ruptured achilme’s poise in the pockles. Boehme’s uracy were indicative et and accuracy oung quarterback’s of the young maturity. “Parker came into this game knowing probably robably three plays, and he executed those three plays and did very one said. well,” Boone d fast “He played and executed cuted his reads very well and made plays like we expect our quarter-


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MONDAY, APRIL 15, 2013 | 3

WOMEN’S TENNIS

ense debuts backs to do w when they come in here.” On the th defensive side of the th afternoon belonged ball, the to redshirt redsh sophomore Jeremy Cash. T The safety played his first live action acti for Duke since transferri from Ohio State folferring l lowing the 2011 season and sitting out all of last year. He made up for lost time, recording five tackles, a tackle for a loss and an interception. Cash’s physicality and athleticism at will be key for a Blue Devil secondary th struggled last seathat son so and graduated three starters. st “It feels really great to b be back out here after a year away from the game,” Cash said. “With “W a year of practice under my be belt, I understand the 4-25 scheme a lot l better and really feel I have ways tto contribute now.” With spr spring practice for Duke now in the rearview re mirror, the team will focus on preparing for summer workouts without wit the coaching staff before reconvening reco for training camp later this th summer. The team’s team’ next challenge is its season-opener against N.C. Central. “We need tto just be efficient and make sure we’re w working hard and ready for August 31st,” Boone said.

Short-handed Duke falls again by Sarah Elsakr THE CHRONICLE

The No. 9 Blue Devils left the courts with mixed results this weekend—after showing their determination with a comeback win against Florida State, they fell the next day to No. 10 Miami. For the second consecutive weekend, the team headed into both its matches at DUKE 4 a disadvantage with just five healthy play3 FSU ers and was forced to forfeit a singles 0 DUKE and doubles match. 4 MIA Despite this, Duke (14-6, 5-3 in the ACC) did not fold under pressure and went into the weekend’s play ready to handle the challenge. “They’re all good players, and they all believe in themselves and believe in each other,” head coach Jamie Ashworth said. “We talked a lot about playing with pride and playing with character because at the end of the day tennis is an individual sport, so whether they’re out there with six players or ten players or three players they still have to perform.” Although they left Tallahassee with a win, Duke got off to a rough start against the Seminoles (12-6, 4-3). After forfeiting the first doubles match, the Blue Devils lost the doubles point after Florida State’s Amy Sargeant and Mia Vriens defeated Duke duo junior Marianne Jodoin and sophomore Annie Mulholland 8-2. With the exception of senior Nicole Lipp’s 6-0, 6-2 loss, however, the Blue Devil women were able to rally during singles play. Jodoin came back from her doubles loss to take an early lead in her first set and eventually close

SAM JACTEL/CHRONICLE FILE PHOTO

Annie Mulholland took the decisive match against the Seminoles, but Duke fell short against Miami. a 6-2, 6-4 victory while Mary Clayton held off Segarelli on court two for a 7-6 (8-6), 6-1 win. No. 23 Hanna Mar also staved off a tough opponent in the top singles spot. It came down to Mulholland’s match with Sargeant on court three which had gotten off to a rocky start for the Blue Devil when she secured only a single game in the first set. Despite here initial struggles, Mulholland was able to take the second and third sets 6-4, 6-4, to end the match. “When it came down to it, I thought that we were better in pressure situations than they

were,” Ashworth said. “We lost some first sets and we just kept fighting and kept playing all the way through the end of the matches.” The Blue Devils were unable to keep up their momentum when they faced off with the Hurricanes (16-4, 7-2), losing 4-0. “In Miami we got down quickly, very quickly, on all courts,” Mar said. “As a team, they were playing very, very well. Personally, in my match, I was struggling and my opponent was not giving me anything.” SEE W. TENNIS ON PAGE 4

THE ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE IS PROUD TO CONGRATULATE

THIS YEAR’S POSTGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS BOSTON COLLEGE

MIAMI

Ina Kauppila W-Tennis Jillian King W-Cross Country / T&F Marty Long M-Swim & Dive

Brandon McGee Football Nrithya Sundararaman Volleyball Stefanie Yderstrom W-Basketball

CLEMSON

NORTH CAROLINA

Rashard Hall Football Natalie Patzin Volleyball Alexa Rand Volleyball

Rebecca Brooks W-Swim & Dive Jonathan Cooper Football Scott Goodwin M-Soccer Pete Mangum Football

DUKE

TARA CAMPBELL

ABBY JOHNSTON WOMEN’S DIVING

MEN’S BASKETBALL

WOMEN’S CROSS COUNTRY / T&F

Tara Campbell was a two-time All-ACC Second-Team selection for the Blue Devil women’s soccer team. She closed her Duke career as one of the top goalkeepers in school history with 30 shutouts, a 0.91 goals against average and 302 saves. Campbell, who was a two-time team captain, led Duke to the NCAA College Cup in 2011 which marked the Blue Devils first appearance in the semifinals since 1992. She totaled a school-record 13 shutouts as a junior and helped lead Duke to 54 career wins in the net. Campbell was a finalist for the 2011 Shutout Central Women’s NCAA Goalkeeper of the Year award.

An Olympic silver medalist and threetime All-American, Abby Johnston has been a standout on the collegiate, national and international diving circuits. She claimed the first national title for the Duke Women’s Swimming & Diving program in 2011 on the 3-meter springboard and has won five ACC titles during her career. Equally dedicated in the classroom, Johnston is also a threetime member of the All-ACC Academic Team and ACC Academic Honor Roll, a participant in the Collegiate Athlete Premedical Experience program and will graduate from Duke in May with a degree in psychology.

A two-time team captain, Ryan Kelly is one of the winningest players in Duke basketball history. A two-time member of the All-ACC Academic Team and three-time ACC Academic Honor Roll selection, Kelly is a career .393 shooter from three-point range. In 2012-13, he started Duke’s first 15 games before suffering a foot injury, leading Duke to a 15-0 record while averaging career highs in points (13.4), rebounds (5.4), assists (1.5), and blocks per game (1.7). Kelly is active in community service efforts in Read with the Blue Devils, the Duke Children’s Hospital and The Monday Life.

Cydney Ross, a two-time All-America honoree, serves as a Duke track & field team captain and is a three-time NCAA championship qualifier. The St. Louis, Mo., native was also a member of the 2011 Penn Relays 4x800 Championship team. A four-time All-ACC Academic honoree, Ross has earned her B.A. in public policy and a minor in African American Studies. She is currently pursuing a Master of Management Studies and has served as a First Year A.C.T.I.O.N. mentor, a Read with the Blue Devils volunteer and participated in a variety of other community service activities during her tenure at Duke.

WOMEN’S SOCCER

RYAN KELLY

CYDNEY ROSS

A Tradition of Excellence . . . Then, Now and Always

Tara Campbell W-Soccer Abby Johnston W-Swim & Dive Ryan Kelly M-Basketball Cydney Ross W-Cross Country / T&F

FLORIDA STATE Tiana Brockway W-Soccer Kristine Polley W-Swim & Dive Andres Bucaro M-Tennis

GEORGIA TECH Perron Jones M-Track & Field Elizabeth Kilborn W-Tennis Kate Riley W-Swim & Dive

MARYLAND Owen Blye M-Lacrosse A.J. Francis Football Katie Schwarzmann W-Lacrosse

NC STATE Patrick Campbell M-Cross Country / T&F Megan Cyr Volleyball Mike Glennon Football Marissa Kastanek W-Basketball

VIRGINIA Ari Dimas M-Soccer Simone Egwu W-Basketball Lauren Perdue W-Swim & Dive Matt Snyder Wrestling

VIRGINIA TECH Laura Simon W-Swim & Dive Matthias Treff M-Track & Field Alexander Ziegler M-Track & Field

WAKE FOREST Andrea Beck Volleyball Evan Beck M-Golf Jackie Logue W-Soccer Lizzie Rae Field Hockey

theACC.com


4 | MONDAY, APRIL 15, 2013

THE CHRONICLE

M. TENNIS from page 1

W. TENNIS from page 3

BASEBALL from page 1

bring a lot of energy and when we are playing aggressively, we are pretty tough to beat.” In addition to the Tahir-Redlicki tandem, Duke also has a powerful duo playing on court one. The nation’s No. 1 doubles team of senior Henrique Cunha and sophomore Raphael Hemmeler are 30-3 on the season. “[Tahir and Redlicki’s] styles match pretty well, and they are both big guys,” Smith said. “They play really big-boy aggressive tennis and they could even win at the one position.” Cunha also continued his dominant singles season with another win on court one, defeating Miami’s Diego Soto 6-1, 6-1. The Jau, Brazil native is currently undefeated in spring play. Hemmeler was also successful in singles, cruising to a 6-3, 6-3 decision against Marco Stancati. On court four, junior Chris Mengel routed Hurricane Omar Aly in an impressive 6-2, 6-0 victory. On court two, Fred Saba downed Miami’s Gabriel Flores. And finally, Redlicki closed out the match with a 6-4, 6-3 victory at the third singles spot. The Blue Devils will return to the court this weekend to take on Boston College Friday and N.C. State Sunday at Ambler Tennis Stadium in Duke’s last matches of the regular season.

Duke dropped the doubles point again, with Mar and Clayton falling 8-5 to Miami’s Clementina Riohueno and Monique Albuquerque. Mar followed that up with a 6-4, 6-2 loss to No. 79 Stephani Wagner. In singles the losses continued to roll in as Lipp was unable to secure a win on court fivee while Clayton lost to Kelsey Laurente in thee No. 2 spot. Jodoin was also defeated, breakingg h her streak of 21 consecutive singles wins with her loss against Riohueno on court three. Mar mentioned the forfeits as part of thee reason the Blue Devils found themselvess down early but with injuries incapacitatingg the rest of the team for the remainder of thee season, Ashworth stressed the importance off focusing on the subtleties that win matches,, such as a high first-serve percentage. o “It’s something that we’re stressing to them every day, go out and compete and fightt and let the results take care of themselves,”” Ashworth said. “We’ve lost tough matches,, but I think we’ve done those little things thatt we’ve talked about. Our serving percentagee and returns and the first ball in the rally— — those are just little things that good teams do o well…. It’s something that we’re all going to o be working on.”

roughed up, allowing eight earned runs in 4.1 innings on the mound. Blue Devil relievers also struggled against the dynamic Florida State offense, allowing two runs in the sixth, seventh and eighth innings. “We pitched p up p in the zone too much [all weekend],” Pollard said. “Florida State laid off some pitcher’s pitches early in the count, so we had to pitch from behind in the count a lot, which gave them good opportunities to hit.” The Blue Devils weren’t sharp defensively Friday, as two Duke errors led to two Seminole runs. Florida State spread the offense around with four Seminoles picking up three hits apiece. The Seminoles notched 16 hits while Duke managed eight against Florida State starter Luke Weaver and the Seminole bullpen. The series was originally scheduled to go through Sunday, but the threat of severe thunderstorms forced the teams into playing two games Saturday. In game one of the day-night doubleheader, the Seminole offense was again too much for Duke to handle. Leading 1-0 in the third inning, Florida State strung together three singles and a groundout to push the score to 3-0 against Duke starter Drew Van Orden. Catcher Stephen McGee continued the rally with a tworun homer to bring the score to 5-0. The blast was followed by a second dinger by Jose Brizuela, who went 3-for-3 at the plate. Van Orden was tagged for seven runs on 12 hits in seven innings while striking out eight. The Blue Devils had 12 hits of their own, but couldn’t break through on the scoreboard

Want more sports news? Visit sports.chronicleblogs.com

M. LACROSSE from page 2 country, Duke emerged triumphant with a 4437 advantage on the ground, including 13-3 in the fourth quarter. “It just felt like we never had the ball. They’re a very dangerous offensive lacrosse team,” Cavalier head coach Dom Starsia said. “I thought if you tracked the last 20 minutes of

the game, they probably had the ball about 166 or 17 of those minutes. I thought we could gett opportunities when we had the ball, it just feltt like we never had it at the end.” Following a wild win against a confer-ence rival, Duke will focus on keeping itss winning streak alive when the team travelss to face Rutgers next weekend before set-n ting its sights on the ACC Tournament in nearby Chapel Hill.

Slow down. Take it easy. Explore. Focus. Immerse.

until the eighth inning, when Grant McCabe singled home David Perkins. “We didn’t do a good job stringing hits together,” Pollard said. “We spaced them out.” The Blue Devils put a scare into the Seminoles at the end of Saturday’s first g g Trailingg 8-1 entering the game, though. ma a bid for a top of the ninth, Duke made thrilling rally, scoring four runs with two outs. After Perkins singled home a run, p Andy Perez was hit by a pitch to load outfielde Jeff Kremer the bases. Senior outfielder th right field then drove a ball down the d line for a bases-clearing double before Florida State could finally shut the door on an 8-5 win. d The nightcap of the doubleheader was more of the same: the unrelenting aw early from Seminole offense pulled away Dev the Blue Devils, who once again were inefficient at the plate. le fielder Mark Junior left colle Lumpa collected two hits B for the Blue Devils, extendin his hitting tending stre streak to nine g games. “He’s cont tinued to have go good at-bats and continued to provid a spark on ofprovide Po fense,” Pollard said. Although the weekend offen was an offensive showcase oth side, Duke for the other chance in all three had chances games and ultimately fell t to a better team. “It wasn’t so much about po us playing poorly as it was about them playing really well,” Pollard said.

TERM 1 (MAY 18 - JUNE 30) Summer Course Offerings

from the

Program in Literature Summer Term I : (MAY 15 - JUNE 27) LIT 390S.02: Novel Sexualities Katherine Costello / MTuTh: 3:30pm-5:35pm / ALP, CZ, CCI, EI, W

LIT 390S.03: Communism-- 20th Century Karim Wissa / MTuWThF: 12:30pm-1:45pm / ALP, SS, EI, R, W

LIT 390S.04: Augmenting Realities: Technoscience, Digit Digital Art, & Electronic Literature Amanda Gould / MTuTh: 12:30pm-2:35pm / ALP, EI, STS

LIT 390S-07M: 390S 07M Chinese Middle Class & C Culture lt re Ka Man Calvin Hui / MTuWThF: 10:00am-12:05pm / ALP, CZ, CCI, W

Discover a diīerent Duke this summer.

LIT 390S-08M: Fashion, Media, Consumption Ka Man Calvin Hui / MTuWThF: 2:00pm-4:05pm / ALP, CZ, CCI, W

Summer Term II : (JULY 1 - AUGUST 11) LIT 110.01: History & Concepts of Cinema China Medel / MTuTh: 6:00pm-8:05pm / ALP

LIT 390S-01: Gothic Hauntings Carolyn Laubender / MTuWThF: 11:00am-12:15pm / ALP

LIT 390S-02: Countering Culture in the US Jessica Jones / MTuTh: 2:00pm-4:05pm / ALP, EI

LIT 390SA-01: Literature, Science & The Sea (offered at the Duke Marine Lab)

summersession.duke.edu summer@duke.edu

Melody Jue / T, Fri: each day--9:30am-11:30am & 1:00pm-4:00pm / ALP, EI

Summer (4-Week) Intensive Term II: (July 1-July 25) LIT 390S-03M: What is Woman? Sex, Mind & All Dangerous Things Clarissa Lee/ MTuWThF: 10:00am-12:05pm / ALP, CZ, CCI, EI, STS

LIT 390S-4-01M: Psychedelic Cinema Laura Jaramillo / MTuWThF: 2:00pm-4:05pm / ALP, CCI, EI, W


THE CHRONICLE

MONDAY, APRIL 15, 2013 | 9

Diversions Shoe Chris Cassatt and Gary Brookins

Dilbert Scott Adams

Doonesbury Garry Trudeau

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Sudoku

Duke Symphony Orchestra Harry Davidson, music director featuring excerpts from Verdi’s Otello, La Traviata, and Aida with sopranos Catheryne Shuman & Heather Engebretson

April 17 @ 8 pm Page Auditorium

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Free n issio Adm

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. (No number is repeated in any column, row or box.)

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The Independent Daily at Duke University

The Chronicle

10 | MONDAY, APRIL 15, 2013

Rethink online courses At last week’s Arts and Sci- to better address the growing ences Council meeting, fac- popularity of online courses. ulty members voiced concerns In the meeting, faculty about Duke’s proposed Se- members questioned Duke’s mester Online—a consortium need to become a leader in program with other universi- online education, challenged ties in which stuthe wisdom of dents can take partnering with editorial online courses less prestigious for credit. Although the issues universities and pondered identified by faculty members the consequences of allowing reflect legitimate anxieties students to receive additional about the future of higher credit from other institutions. education, the discussion reMaintaining academic capitulated a familiar debate quality and determining what about whether a prestigious constitutes a Duke degree university should offer online remain important tasks as incourses for credit. Given the tercollegiate collaboration berapid propagation of online comes more widespread. But courses, we are no longer con- if the University forgoes an opvinced that considering the portunity to lead in online edissue in this way makes sense ucation, then the online landand believe the Duke commu- scape will grow and change nity ought to rethink the de- without our input. Companies bate about online education and universities without Duke’s

Please, let us be comfortable with the idea that we might need to accept some chaos and disorder in order to foster flexible and creative mindsets. This article seems to shy so much away from that concept. —“Tomek Brzezinski” commenting on the editorial “Small steps.” See more at www.dukechronicle.com.

LETTERS POLICY The Chronicle welcomes submissions in the form of letters to the editor or guest columns. Submissions must include the author’s name, signature, department or class, and for purposes of identification, phone number and local address. Letters should not exceed 325 words; contact the editorial department for information regarding guest columns. The Chronicle will not publish anonymous or form letters or letters that are promotional in nature. The Chronicle reserves the right to edit letters and guest columns for length, clarity and style and the right to withhold letters based on the discretion of the editorial page editor.

Direct submissions to:

E-mail: chronicleletters@duke.edu Editorial Page Department The Chronicle Box 90858, Durham, NC 27708 Phone: (919) 684-2663 Fax: (919) 684-4696

The Chronicle

Inc. 1993

YESHWANTH KANDIMALLA, Editor LAUREN CARROLL, Managing Editor JULIAN SPECTOR, News Editor ANDREW BEATON, Sports Editor CHRIS DALL, Photography Editor MAGGIE LAFALCE, Editorial Page Editor KATHERINE ZHANG, Editorial Board Chair JIM POSEN, Director of Online Operations CHRISSY BECK, General Manager KRISTIE KIM, University Editor TIFFANY LIEU, Local & National Editor ANDREW LUO, Health & Science Editor CAROLINE RODRIGUEZ, News Photography Editor PHOEBE LONG, Design Editor MICHAELA DWYER, Recess Editor SOPHIA DURAND, Recess Photography Editor SCOTT BRIGGS, Editorial Page Managing Editor MATTHEW CHASE, Towerview Editor ADDISON CORRIHER, Towerview Photography Editor ANNA KOELSCH, Social Media Editor SAMANTHA BROOKS, Senior Editor REBECCA DICKENSON, Advertising Director MARY WEAVER, Operations Manager DAVID RICE, Director of External Relations

best interests in mind will set the standard for online education. Instead of stalling, Duke should confront the issue squarely and work to produce a model for online education that incorporates the benefits of an online platform without compromising academic quality. To this end, we need to reimagine the framework of the debate. The discussion should not revolve around whether or not Duke ought to offer credit for online courses. Instead, we should ask, “what kind of online experience is one that would be worthy of credit?” In our opinion, the experience offered by the proposed Semester Online is inadequate. The model, which supplements recorded lectures with discussions led by teaching assistants, will likely

not work for seminar classes that depend on sustained interaction with professors and other students. Although many in the humanities fear that online courses are fundamentally incompatible with an interactive seminar model, the inadequacy of the Semester Online model does not preclude the possibility that a different platform could offer ways for humanities courses to thrive in an online format. If deployed thoughtfully, online courses could enhance collaboration in the humanities, bringing professors and students from institutions across the world together to debate and discuss. Although professors and students have a number of different reasons for opposing online education, many

of their concerns reflect a fear that an educational model they believe to have intrinsic value will be replaced by online courses. There may also be a fear that the incremental addition of online courses will lead the University down a slippery slope to offering degrees only through online courses. Although we share many of those fears, online courses are quickly becoming a fixture of higher education that, sooner or later, we will have to address. If the University finds the Semester Online model lacking, it should take care not to reject online education entirely, but to seek out new implementation models that better reflect Duke’s academic commitments, strengths and priorities.

Gruesome Gosnell

onlinecomment

Est. 1905

THE CHRONICLE

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MARGOT TUCHLER, University Editor JACK MERCOLA, Local & National Editor DANIELLE MUOIO, Health & Science Editor ELYSIA SU, Sports Photography Editor ELIZA STRONG, Design Editor HOLLY HILLIARD, Recess Managing Editor CHELSEA PIERONI, Online Photo Editor ASHLEY MOONEY, Sports Managing Editor SONIA HAVELE, Towerview Editor MELISSA YEO, Towerview Creative Director NICOLE KYLE, Special Projects Editor MAGGIE SPINI, Senior Editor MICHAEL SHAMMAS, Recruitment Chair BARBARA STARBUCK, Creative Director MEGAN MCGINITY, Digital Sales Manager

The Chronicle is published by the Duke Student Publishing Company, Inc., a non-profit corporation independent of Duke University. The opinions expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of Duke University, its students, faculty, staff, administration or trustees. Unsigned editorials represent the majority view of the editorial board. Columns, letters and cartoons represent the views of the authors. To reach the Editorial Office at 301 Flowers Building, call 684-2663 or fax 684-4696. To reach the Business Office at 103 West Union Building, call 684-3811. To reach the Advertising Office at 101 West Union Building call 684-3811 or fax 684-8295. Visit The Chronicle Online at http://www.dukechronicle.com. © 2012 The Chronicle, Box 90858, Durham, N.C. 27708. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the prior, written permission of the Business Office. Each individual is entitled to one free copy.

O

n Feb. 18, 2010, the FBI raided the Women’s the life of the mothers). Medical Society, with the aim of collecting eviSecond, Gosnell’s clinic seems like it should be dence that it was illegally selling prescription in “The Walking Dead.” It appears that Gosnell’s drugs. What they found was something patients probably ended up at the much worse. A flea-infested cat walked Women’s Medical Society because of across a blood-covered floor. SemiMedicaid’s refusal to cover most aborconscious women sat in waiting and tions, the paucity of abortion providrecovery rooms on filthy recliners with ers in Pennsylvania and the fear of blood-stained blankets. Public officials facing abortion protesters at Planned inspected the surgery rooms, and Parenthood clinics. found rusty, outdated equipment, corDue to the political rhetoric of the roded suction tubing that was used for joline doedens abortion debate, the women who acabortion procedures and for breathtually get abortions are relegated to wait a minute ing assistance, as well as a single blood the shadows. The definition of aborpressure cuff. Throughout the clinic, tion as a legal, medical procedure is in paper bags, cat-food containers and orange juice drowned out by the raging debate over the consticartons, officials found fetal remains. tutionality and (im)morality of a woman’s right to These conditions would be outrageous for a medi- choose whether to terminate her pregnancy. As a recal clinic in a post-apocalyptic television drama, or a sult, complaints about the inhumane practices at Goscountry ravaged by a decade of civil war. But this clinic nell’s clinic remained filed away and uninvestigated. was in Philadelphia. Dr. Kermit Gosnell, the director I have a sneaking suspicion that reports of back-alley of the clinic, employed a 15-year-old, high school stu- appendectomies would have prompted a full-scale indent and administrative staff to sedate primarily poor, vestigation much earlier than the complaints filed by black women. Gosnell admitted that at least 10 to 20 Gosnell’s patients and former employees. percent of the fetuses he aborted were probably older Pro-life advocates may read the grand jury report than 24 weeks, even though Pennsylvania state law in this case and cite the atrocities to support overrulprohibits abortions after 24 weeks. According to one ing Roe v. Wade and its progeny. But Gosnell’s clinic is former employee’s testimony, Gosnell performed at reminiscent of the back-alley abortions that occurred least four or five illegal abortions each week. before 1973. Before Roe v. Wade, approximately 1.2 Although the grand jury believes the death toll at million illegal abortions were performed every year. Gosnell’s office was “literally incalculable,” the Dis- Many women died or suffered serious complications trict Attorney’s Office only has sufficient evidence to after undergoing primitive abortion procedures in charge Gosnell with eight counts of murder: seven ba- unsanitary conditions. By excluding abortion from bies and one pregnant refugee. Evidence presented Medicaid and with the likely prohibition on aborto the grand jury indicates that the babies were born tion coverage in health insurance policies sold in the and may have lived up to 20 minutes before Gosnell health care exchange under the Affordable Care Act, or one of his assistants cut their spinal cord. The evi- Pennsylvania has effectively made safe, sanitary abordence also indicates that Karnamaya Mongar died tions impossible to obtain for poor women. when Gosnell’s unlicensed employees doped her up If anything, Gosnell’s clinic should encourage with Demerol. When employees discovered she had Pennsylvania, other states and the federal governstopped breathing, Gosnell briefly attempted CPR. ment to focus on segregating legal abortion proceInstead, Mrs. Mongar’s body was rearranged to make dures from the political debate to ensure that women it look like she was the victim of a routine complica- of all segments of society can, if they choose, have an tion of a safe abortion procedure. Paramedics were abortion in a safe and sanitary clinic before the fetus is able to get a weak pulse, but it took them 20 minutes viable. At the same time, it is essential to provide supto get through the cluttered hallways. port, resources and education for women who cannot Superficially, this is a case about abortion. But this legally get an abortion but do not wish to or are not is more than the latest installment in the epic pro-life able to care for a child. versus pro-choice battle. First, Gosnell was not just Politicians and lobbyists can work within the conperforming abortions; he was performing them ille- fines of constitutional law to wage the war over aborgally. In the seminal case of Roe v. Wade, Justice Black- tion. In the meantime, we need to make sure that inmun premised the state’s ability to prohibit abortions dividual women don’t disappear into the shadows of on the viability of the fetus, around 24 to 28 weeks. clinics like Gosnell’s. In other words, under both state law and under the language of the case that established a woman’s right Joline Doedens is a first-year law student. Her column to choose, Gosnell was performing illegal procedures runs every other Monday. You can follow Joline on Twitter (assuming he did not perform these abortions to save @jydoedens.


THE CHRONICLE

MONDAY, APRIL 15, 2013 | 11

commentaries

It doesn’t get better

New kid, old threats

D

ear Dookie, even LIKE what they say. How can we have constant, It’s spring now and I’m suddenly realizing heady discussions about the unrelatable conundrums that this “graduating” thing is actually happen- of the innards of liberalism if NOT EVERYONE IS LIBing. These have been the best four years of my life, and I ERAL?! To avoid answering this question, we must kill don’t know what I’m going to do living in the real world. all conservatives. On campus, we have succeeded in inIs there any help you can give me? timidating them into silence, but their mere presence —Gloomy Graduate reminds us of their tainted morals. As guns are out Dear Sad Sack Senior, (gross), we need to get inventive. I’d sugI guess spring really has arrived. If blindgest poisoning Maker’s Mark or trying to ing white-boy thighs peeking out of dock make red the new pink. No Republicans shorts and tree jizz all over everything will remain. Should this method prove didn’t give it away, the newly self-absorbed effective, we start with Texas and move senior class was certainly going to remind our way around the South and the Midme eventually. I hold this worry near and west, effectively eliminating all the unimdear to my heart because, alas, the Dookie portant people in the country. is graduating as well. Yes, after that Mayday monday monday 3. Promote polygamy. I will take my skills as Duke’s best advice-ifiOver the years, we’ve grown to know dear dookie er to where every Duke student with vagueand love something we call the “hookup ly marketable talents goes: consulting. culture.” When we leave Duke behind, we If we’re thinking of life in rank-orders, as we almost- enter a world where you are expected to get to know Ivy Leaguers are wont to do, these will certainly be our someone before you hide your salami in them. To avoid most fulfilling years. Obviously, now that we’re leaving this unnecessary and monotonous endeavor, we should the best time of our lives, there’s not much to look for- take the next logical step beyond promoting gay marward to in the future. With a world full of taxes, careers, riage: promoting polygamy. Its legalization will create marriage and children ahead of us, some may wonder a beautiful, harmonious world community much like if life is even worth living past college. Yet never fear, the one that already exists at Duke. We will share everyfor the Dookie is here. I’ve thought of the perfect way thing—resources, lovers and herpes simplex. That’s it, to avoid post-Duke depression. The answer? Reject the I’m converting to Mormonism. status quo, and refuse entrance into the real world alto4. Freak out. gether. We make the real world into Duke. Logistically, At Duke, we’ve become accustomed to the media carthis might be difficult, but I’ve got a few steps that I think ing about the injustices in our lives. When we can no lonwill get the job done. ger rely on Jezebel to solve our problems for us, how will 1. Go greek. we react if someone tells us that Asians are intelligent or After an entire college career, I don’t know what life black people have different hair than white people or would be like without frats. Frats (well, GOOD frats) are that Hispanics love jokes about airplane food? Without basically the Plastics of Duke—they’re made up of cam- a news outlet to report it to, we will have to resort to the pus’s rich, dumb and slutty. We’re all jealous of them, next most mature gesture: temper tantrums. It’s a timebut we can’t hate them because they’re popular. Asso- vetted strategy. Why, when Susan B. Anthony fought for ciate with them, and suddenly everyone will know your women’s suffrage, she didn’t rely on eloquent speeches name, every rumor ever said about you and your entire or critical argument. She just started crying, and all the sexual history. Without these pinnacles of campus hav- men in the room were so uncomfortable that they granting complete rule over our social lives, whom would we ed women the vote right then and there. turn to for parties or social validation? The answer is to Well, there you have it. As we graduates leave Duke, give all people the chance to join a fraternity (given a we have the opportunity to create the world that we want good chill to pull ratio, of course). The only challenging for ourselves. Why not make it exactly like the one we just step will be to find a group of rich, white men who want graduated from? And if you’re still deciding whether you to preside over an entire society. If given the opportu- want to leave Duke culture behind, I’d encourage you nity, I believe that this demographic of John Boehners, to think back and reflect. Just remember how much you Carrot Tops and Larry Monetas will inspire world peace loved and praised Duke’s intellectual climate, hookup and, more importantly, end the global shortage of good culture and social scene over the years, and accept that craft beers. those were the best years of your life. After this, there is 2. Kill the conservatives. absolutely nothing better to look forward to. Over the past four years, we have been blessed with a bubble. Nothing with the word “equality” stamped The Dookie credits all advice to Vitamin C, who taught me on it could ever be challenged, despite logical or even all about the implications of graduation and the importance ethical shortcomings. But outside of colleges, people of avoiding scurvy. See y’all on the flip side, muthaf*****s. actually LISTEN to conservatives, and (gasp) some Dookz out.

lettertotheeditor A call for conversation: sustainable food at Duke For years, students have celebrated Bon Appetit’s patronage of local vendors through its Farm-to-Fork program in the Marketplace and Great Hall. Consequently, many of us were surprised and disappointed upon reading the April 4 article, “Duke dining puts local vendors on hiatus.” This sudden “pause” on local purchasing reveals a larger issue: a lack of consistency and transparency in Duke Dining’s approach to sustainability. We believe Duke Dining understands the social and environmental benefits of purchasing local food. As concerned consumers, we seek a more complete explanation for the change in purchasing behavior. The sudden hiatus reveals a disconnect between our University’s food operations and the realities of agricultural production. Curtailing orders so abruptly presents challenges to producers and reflects poorly on the sincerity of Duke Dining’s relationships with its vendors. Recent events also highlight a discrepancy between Duke’s mission-driven commitment to sustainability and its current dining practices. Duke’s environmental policy, signed by President Brodhead in 2005, commits the University to demonstrate leadership in both “environmentally responsible

operations” and “environmental stewardship in the community.” However, Duke still lacks a sustainability framework to guide its 33 campus eateries, which range from small, locally-owned ventures to opaque corporate franchises. While Duke Dining engages in some sustainable practices—composting food waste, for example—it lags behind well-established sustainability programs like the Duke Carbon Offset Initiative. On behalf of student groups Food4Thought and the Duke Food Project, we invite Rick Johnson and his colleagues to an open conversation about Duke Dining and sustainability. We invite students, faculty, staff and vendors to join us in learning more about Duke Dining’s purchasing priorities and policies. We hope this meeting will open a productive dialogue between Duke Dining and its stakeholders about how to maintain an environmentally sound and ethical dining system while satisfying the needs of all parties. This conversation will be held on Wednesday, April 17 at 3p.m. in the Center for LGBT Life. All interested parties are encouraged to attend. Hannah Colton, Trinity ‘13 Emily McGinty, Trinity ‘13

T

he pariah state of North Korea has been on the minds of many international observers for the last couple weeks. Kim Jong Un’s increased belligerency and threats have become more and more difficult to ignore. The North Korean Central News Agency has threatened “an all-out [nuclear] war” and has warned South Korea that the peninsula is entering a state of conflict. The New York Times recently reported, “North colin scott Korea warned foreigners on the view from carr Tuesday that they might want to leave South Korea because the peninsula was on the brink of nuclear war.” On April 9, former Vice President Dick Cheney warned House Republicans, “We’re in deep doo doo” over North Korea. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel stated that North Korea is “skating very close to a dangerous line.” Defense officials, according to NBC, are “‘highly confident’ that North Korea is planning the imminent launch of a medium-range missile.” Tensions seem to be at an all-time high, and the threat of armed conflict seems very likely, if not imminent. In response to these threats America has moved some its missile defense systems toward the West Coast, and Japan has deployed similar units in Tokyo. As dangerous as this situation seems, we have been here before with North Korea and likely will be again before this decrepit state breathes its last threat. The regime in Pyongyang has a storied tradition of instigating conflict with South Korea. On March 28, 2008, North Korea tested a series of short-range missiles and threatened the stability of international relations. In July 2003, North Korea fired a machine gun at a South Korean guard post, prompting increased tensions on both sides of the DMZ. On June 29, 2002, North Korean patrol boats sunk a South Korean frigate, triggering worldwide alarm. In July 2007, North Korea promised to shut down their nuclear reactors, only to renounce that commitment and kick out the International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors in 2009. In March 2010, North Korea likely sunk a South Korean warship with a torpedo. Going back even further in time, North Korea sanctioned a commando raid into Seoul aimed at killing the South Korean president in 1968. The list goes on and on with examples of the warmongering and seemingly irrational behavior of this totalitarian regime. In fact, the Wilson Center’s “International History Declassified” archive has over 72 documents in the collection titled “North Korean Military Adventurism.” To say the least, North Korea has a history of erratic behavior. This latest spasm of rhetoric shouldn’t cause alarm. The peninsula has been in a constant state of conflict since the end of the Korean War. The question, then, is why North Korea continually subscribes to this pattern of hostile and frankly uncomfortable behavior. The absolute control of this police state is horrifying and helps to explain the country’s behavior in recent weeks. Refugees and laborers who escape the clutches of this backwards country have harrowing tales of the lives they used to live. This system is clearly only kept together by force. Threatening the West creates an external adversary that allows Kim Jong Un to divert attention from his horrid domestic policies. This international blustering is nothing but a tactic, and not a particularly original one at that. Kim Jong Un’s father, Kim Jong Il, previously used this tactic to solicit humanitarian aid and supplies from the international community. It would not be surprising to see his son attempt such a move in the near future. North Korea is in dire economic straits. Aid from the West is necessary to keep the regime from collapsing. Thankfully, The New York Times reports that White House officials have “settled on a strategy of refusing to make concessions to the North.” This is a good policy and one that can hopefully break the cycle of provocation that North Korea has traditionally relied upon. Once Kim Jong Un realizes that scaring the world into providing humanitarian aid will not work, then maybe he will move toward a more constructive form of engagement. Considering the regime’s past history, this seems highly unlikely—but anything is better than appeasing this dysfunctional, bellicose nation. The rhetoric from Pyongyang might become even more hostile in the days to come, but it is highly unlikely that it will be backed up by action. Colin Scott is a Trinity junior. His column runs every other Monday.


THE CHRONICLE

MONDAY, APRIL 15, 2013 | 11

commentaries

It doesn’t get better

New kid, old threats

D

ear Dookie, even LIKE what they say. How can we have constant, It’s spring now and I’m suddenly realizing heady discussions about the unrelatable conundrums that this “graduating” thing is actually happen- of the innards of liberalism if NOT EVERYONE IS LIBing. These have been the best four years of my life, and I ERAL?! To avoid answering this question, we must kill don’t know what I’m going to do living in the real world. all conservatives. On campus, we have succeeded in inIs there any help you can give me? timidating them into silence, but their mere presence —Gloomy Graduate reminds us of their tainted morals. As guns are out Dear Sad Sack Senior, (gross), we need to get inventive. I’d sugI guess spring really has arrived. If blindgest poisoning Maker’s Mark or trying to ing white-boy thighs peeking out of dock make red the new pink. No Republicans shorts and tree jizz all over everything will remain. Should this method prove didn’t give it away, the newly self-absorbed effective, we start with Texas and move senior class was certainly going to remind our way around the South and the Midme eventually. I hold this worry near and west, effectively eliminating all the unimdear to my heart because, alas, the Dookie portant people in the country. is graduating as well. Yes, after that Mayday monday monday 3. Promote polygamy. I will take my skills as Duke’s best advice-ifiOver the years, we’ve grown to know dear dookie er to where every Duke student with vagueand love something we call the “hookup ly marketable talents goes: consulting. culture.” When we leave Duke behind, we If we’re thinking of life in rank-orders, as we almost- enter a world where you are expected to get to know Ivy Leaguers are wont to do, these will certainly be our someone before you hide your salami in them. To avoid most fulfilling years. Obviously, now that we’re leaving this unnecessary and monotonous endeavor, we should the best time of our lives, there’s not much to look for- take the next logical step beyond promoting gay marward to in the future. With a world full of taxes, careers, riage: promoting polygamy. Its legalization will create marriage and children ahead of us, some may wonder a beautiful, harmonious world community much like if life is even worth living past college. Yet never fear, the one that already exists at Duke. We will share everyfor the Dookie is here. I’ve thought of the perfect way thing—resources, lovers and herpes simplex. That’s it, to avoid post-Duke depression. The answer? Reject the I’m converting to Mormonism. status quo, and refuse entrance into the real world alto4. Freak out. gether. We make the real world into Duke. Logistically, At Duke, we’ve become accustomed to the media carthis might be difficult, but I’ve got a few steps that I think ing about the injustices in our lives. When we can no lonwill get the job done. ger rely on Jezebel to solve our problems for us, how will 1. Go greek. we react if someone tells us that Asians are intelligent or After an entire college career, I don’t know what life black people have different hair than white people or would be like without frats. Frats (well, GOOD frats) are that Hispanics love jokes about airplane food? Without basically the Plastics of Duke—they’re made up of cam- a news outlet to report it to, we will have to resort to the pus’s rich, dumb and slutty. We’re all jealous of them, next most mature gesture: temper tantrums. It’s a timebut we can’t hate them because they’re popular. Asso- vetted strategy. Why, when Susan B. Anthony fought for ciate with them, and suddenly everyone will know your women’s suffrage, she didn’t rely on eloquent speeches name, every rumor ever said about you and your entire or critical argument. She just started crying, and all the sexual history. Without these pinnacles of campus hav- men in the room were so uncomfortable that they granting complete rule over our social lives, whom would we ed women the vote right then and there. turn to for parties or social validation? The answer is to Well, there you have it. As we graduates leave Duke, give all people the chance to join a fraternity (given a we have the opportunity to create the world that we want good chill to pull ratio, of course). The only challenging for ourselves. Why not make it exactly like the one we just step will be to find a group of rich, white men who want graduated from? And if you’re still deciding whether you to preside over an entire society. If given the opportu- want to leave Duke culture behind, I’d encourage you nity, I believe that this demographic of John Boehners, to think back and reflect. Just remember how much you Carrot Tops and Larry Monetas will inspire world peace loved and praised Duke’s intellectual climate, hookup and, more importantly, end the global shortage of good culture and social scene over the years, and accept that craft beers. those were the best years of your life. After this, there is 2. Kill the conservatives. absolutely nothing better to look forward to. Over the past four years, we have been blessed with a bubble. Nothing with the word “equality” stamped The Dookie credits all advice to Vitamin C, who taught me on it could ever be challenged, despite logical or even all about the implications of graduation and the importance ethical shortcomings. But outside of colleges, people of avoiding scurvy. See y’all on the flip side, muthaf*****s. actually LISTEN to conservatives, and (gasp) some Dookz out.

lettertotheeditor A call for conversation: sustainable food at Duke For years, students have celebrated Bon Appetit’s patronage of local vendors through its Farm-to-Fork program in the Marketplace and Great Hall. Consequently, many of us were surprised and disappointed upon reading the April 4 article, “Duke dining puts local vendors on hiatus.” This sudden “pause” on local purchasing reveals a larger issue: a lack of consistency and transparency in Duke Dining’s approach to sustainability. We believe Duke Dining understands the social and environmental benefits of purchasing local food. As concerned consumers, we seek a more complete explanation for the change in purchasing behavior. The sudden hiatus reveals a disconnect between our University’s food operations and the realities of agricultural production. Curtailing orders so abruptly presents challenges to producers and reflects poorly on the sincerity of Duke Dining’s relationships with its vendors. Recent events also highlight a discrepancy between Duke’s mission-driven commitment to sustainability and its current dining practices. Duke’s environmental policy, signed by President Brodhead in 2005, commits the University to demonstrate leadership in both “environmentally responsible

operations” and “environmental stewardship in the community.” However, Duke still lacks a sustainability framework to guide its 33 campus eateries, which range from small, locally-owned ventures to opaque corporate franchises. While Duke Dining engages in some sustainable practices—composting food waste, for example—it lags behind well-established sustainability programs like the Duke Carbon Offset Initiative. On behalf of student groups Food4Thought and the Duke Food Project, we invite Rick Johnson and his colleagues to an open conversation about Duke Dining and sustainability. We invite students, faculty, staff and vendors to join us in learning more about Duke Dining’s purchasing priorities and policies. We hope this meeting will open a productive dialogue between Duke Dining and its stakeholders about how to maintain an environmentally sound and ethical dining system while satisfying the needs of all parties. This conversation will be held on Wednesday, April 17 at 3p.m. in the Center for LGBT Life. All interested parties are encouraged to attend. Hannah Colton, Trinity ‘13 Emily McGinty, Trinity ‘13

T

he pariah state of North Korea has been on the minds of many international observers for the last couple weeks. Kim Jong Un’s increased belligerency and threats have become more and more difficult to ignore. The North Korean Central News Agency has threatened “an all-out [nuclear] war” and has warned South Korea that the peninsula is entering a state of conflict. The New York Times recently reported, “North colin scott Korea warned foreigners on the view from carr Tuesday that they might want to leave South Korea because the peninsula was on the brink of nuclear war.” On April 9, former Vice President Dick Cheney warned House Republicans, “We’re in deep doo doo” over North Korea. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel stated that North Korea is “skating very close to a dangerous line.” Defense officials, according to NBC, are “‘highly confident’ that North Korea is planning the imminent launch of a medium-range missile.” Tensions seem to be at an all-time high, and the threat of armed conflict seems very likely, if not imminent. In response to these threats America has moved some its missile defense systems toward the West Coast, and Japan has deployed similar units in Tokyo. As dangerous as this situation seems, we have been here before with North Korea and likely will be again before this decrepit state breathes its last threat. The regime in Pyongyang has a storied tradition of instigating conflict with South Korea. On March 28, 2008, North Korea tested a series of short-range missiles and threatened the stability of international relations. In July 2003, North Korea fired a machine gun at a South Korean guard post, prompting increased tensions on both sides of the DMZ. On June 29, 2002, North Korean patrol boats sunk a South Korean frigate, triggering worldwide alarm. In July 2007, North Korea promised to shut down their nuclear reactors, only to renounce that commitment and kick out the International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors in 2009. In March 2010, North Korea likely sunk a South Korean warship with a torpedo. Going back even further in time, North Korea sanctioned a commando raid into Seoul aimed at killing the South Korean president in 1968. The list goes on and on with examples of the warmongering and seemingly irrational behavior of this totalitarian regime. In fact, the Wilson Center’s “International History Declassified” archive has over 72 documents in the collection titled “North Korean Military Adventurism.” To say the least, North Korea has a history of erratic behavior. This latest spasm of rhetoric shouldn’t cause alarm. The peninsula has been in a constant state of conflict since the end of the Korean War. The question, then, is why North Korea continually subscribes to this pattern of hostile and frankly uncomfortable behavior. The absolute control of this police state is horrifying and helps to explain the country’s behavior in recent weeks. Refugees and laborers who escape the clutches of this backwards country have harrowing tales of the lives they used to live. This system is clearly only kept together by force. Threatening the West creates an external adversary that allows Kim Jong Un to divert attention from his horrid domestic policies. This international blustering is nothing but a tactic, and not a particularly original one at that. Kim Jong Un’s father, Kim Jong Il, previously used this tactic to solicit humanitarian aid and supplies from the international community. It would not be surprising to see his son attempt such a move in the near future. North Korea is in dire economic straits. Aid from the West is necessary to keep the regime from collapsing. Thankfully, The New York Times reports that White House officials have “settled on a strategy of refusing to make concessions to the North.” This is a good policy and one that can hopefully break the cycle of provocation that North Korea has traditionally relied upon. Once Kim Jong Un realizes that scaring the world into providing humanitarian aid will not work, then maybe he will move toward a more constructive form of engagement. Considering the regime’s past history, this seems highly unlikely—but anything is better than appeasing this dysfunctional, bellicose nation. The rhetoric from Pyongyang might become even more hostile in the days to come, but it is highly unlikely that it will be backed up by action. Colin Scott is a Trinity junior. His column runs every other Monday.


12 | MONDAY, APRIL 15, 2013

CENTRAL from page1 apartment, pictures of the bedroom where the interaction occurred and then stayed with King until everything had been sorted out. John Dailey, chief of the Duke University Police Department, could not be reached for comment in time for publication. The resident coordinator checked in and asked how her parents would react, King noted. “Central Campus’ resident coordinator…specifically asked me, ‘How do you think your parents are going to react—are they going to be mad? Are they going to freak out?’” King said. The police told King that Duke’s campus is an “easy target” because students leave various items lying around their living spaces, she said. Joe Gonzalez, associate dean for Housing, Dining and

THE CHRONICLE

Residence Life, wrote in an email Monday that the two incidents were similar in that the suspects gained access through unlocked doors.” The Duke Alert reported the same information, but King noted that she was unsure if her door was, in fact, unlocked. Although the police questioned King directly after the incident, the residents noted that several pieces of information stated in the Duke Alert were incorrect or vague. The alert stated that an “unknown male came into their apartments” but did not mention any details of a robbery, though some of Plaut and King’s items were taken. Plaut noted that the most surprising part of the incident was that she never expected it to happen to her. “You don’t expect to wake up with somebody in your room. When I first moved in, where our building is, it’s really sketchy,” Plaut said. “Since freshman year, we would always see emails saying there’s an incident on Central Campus… but I didn’t think we’d get broken into.”

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April 15 2013