Issuu on Google+

T H E I N D E P E N D E N T D A I LY AT D U K E U N I V E R S I T Y

The Chronicle

XXXDAY, MONTH WEDNESDAY, APRIL XX,10, 2013 2013

ONE ONE HUNDRED HUNDRED AND AND EIGHTH EIGHTH YEAR, YEAR, ISSUE ISSUE 133 X

WWW.DUKECHRONICLE.COM

Durham named tastiest city by Carleigh Stiehm THE CHRONICLE

Durham foodies can take pride in their hometown’s recent win of “The Tastiest Town in the South.” Southern Living magazine placed Durham in their “Top 10 Tastiest Towns in the South” list alongside other notable destinations, such as Miami and New Orleans, in January. After a six-week long national voting process, Durham earned the title of “The Tastiest Town in the South” over Memphis, who was also a close contestant for the win. The honor shows how Durham’s burgeoning food scene has garnered mass attention. “It is an exciting but not unexpected validation of the real growth of the food scene in Durham,” said Michael Schoenfeld, vice president of public affairs and government relations and chairman of the Durham Chamber of Commerce. “We are certainly proud, but we are not surprised.” Durham’s rise to the number one spot is a testament to how much the people of Durham care about good food, Schoenfeld said. He added that there has been a lot of emphasis on solidifying Durham as a city known for good food in recent years. For example, Bon Appetit magazine named Durham-Chapel Hill America’s Foodiest

Divinity, law student will deliver grad remarks by Emma Baccellieri THE CHRONICLE

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY THANH-HA NGUYEN

SEE FOOD ON PAGE 5

Many Durham eateries contributed to the city’s recent recognition as tastiest city.

RECESS

‘A Composer with a capital C’ Robert Ward remembered for significant contributions to music by Thomas Kavanagh THE CHRONICLE

Composer and music professor emeritus Robert Ward, who died last week at the age of 95, created award-winning operas, symphonies and instrumental pieces and enriched the world of music as an avid educator, administrator, jazz band leader, publisher and musician. Ward is perhaps best remembered for his Pulitzer Prize-winning opera “The Crucible,” adapted from the Arthur Miller play dramatizing the Salem Witch Trials as an allegorical critique of American McCarthyism and the anti-communist Red Scare of the 1950’s. Ward’s 1961 opera remains one of the most frequently performed American operas, consistently produced in the U.S. and in international opera houses. “Robert Ward was a significant, vibrant force in American music,” Anthony Kelley, Trinity ’91 and associate professor of the practice of music, wrote in an email Monday.

New low-cost housing available to employees, Page 5

Barnhill selected to speak

Ward found his passion for composition at a young age, when he began singing and playing piano. Soon after graduating from high school in Cleveland, he left for New York to study at both the Eastman School of Music and the JuilRobert Ward liard School, with a summer at the Berkshire Music Center in Massachusetts where he studied composition with Aaron Copland. Ward’s playing and writing continued as he enlisted in the Army in 1942, when he attended the Army Music School at Fort Myer in Virginia. Throughout his service he composed several works for the army marching band and jazz band. During the war, Ward met Red Cross worker Mary Benedict, whom he mar-

ried in 1944. She passed away in 2006. His perseverance to his art brought him recognition—Ward has been honored on numerous occasions for his operatic, symphonic and instrumental works. Ward was awarded three separate Guggenheim Fellowships during the ’50s and ’60s to continue composing, and he was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1967. He received the Old North State Award for dedication to the arts in North Carolina in 2007 and the Opera Honors from the National Endowment for the Arts— one of the highest national distinctions for operatic composition— in 2011. Ward’s ability to channel the emotion of the time made his work moving. Stephen Jaffe, Mary and James Semans professor of music composition, noted that the success of “The Crucible” was instrumental in reviving faith in the American opera, which struggled to SEE WARD ON PAGE 6

ONTHERECORD

“...We can show the North Carolinians who support backwards social policies how those policies affect them...” —Dan Pellegrino in “An open invitation to move.” See letter page 11

Although the student commencement speaker is always a graduating student, it is not often a graduate student. This year, however, will be different. On Tuesday, the University announced that Andrew Barnhill, a masters candidate in the Divinity School, will give the student commencement speech. Graduating students are annually given the opportunity to submit speeches to a selection committee, but they are chosen infrequently—Barnhill will be one of fewer than 10 graduate and professional school students to deliver this speech in the past four decades. “It was almost hard to tell from his speech which school he was graduating from,” said selection committee head Sterly Wilder, Trinity ’83 and associate vice president for alumni affairs. “It really appeals to the whole audience.” In his three years at Duke, Barnhill has focused his studies on religion and law. He has served as a graduate resident on Central Campus, a graduate assistant in the Office of Undergraduate Admissions and an instructor of a house course on religion and American politics. He will complete a law degree at Duke Law next semester. “One of the things I’ve tried to do in my time at Duke is to bridge the gaps between the undergraduate and graduate communities,” said Barnhill, a native of Wilmington, N.C. who received his undergraduate degree from Furman University. “The speaker is generally an undergraduate senior, which is wonderful… but I’d like to address both the graduate and undergraduate experience.” Barnhill described his speech as discussing two facets of Duke life that often oppose each other, ambition and reflection. “Ambition, drive—that’s something that is very strong in Duke campus culture. But there’s also what we are taught in a liberal arts college—to reflect, to look back. The speech wrestles between the two,” Barnhill said. He noted that it was important to think of his speech being read alongside that of Melinda Gates, Trinity ’86 and Fuqua ’87, who will be delivering the main commencement address. “There’s a desire to have some continuity between the two speeches,” Barnhill said. Of the several dozen speeches submitted, SEE SPEAKER ON PAGE 12

New app launched by Duke alum, Page 3


2 | WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 2013

THE CHRONICLE

Goldwater scholars discuss research

PHOTO COURTESY OF DUKE NEWS

Juniors Kushal Seetharam and Yaohua Xue were recently named Goldwater Scholars.

Q&A Two Duke juniors, Kushal Seetharam and Yaohua Xue, have been selected to receive the 2013 Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship. The award is given to selected scholars based on academic merit in mathematics, science and engineering. Seetharam is an Angier B. Duke scholar studying electrical and computer engineering, and Xue is a chemistry and economics double major. The Chronicle spoke with both scholars about receiving the award and about their research. Kushal Seetharam was interviewed by The Chronicle’s Tony Shan The Chronicle: What does it take to be a Goldwater Scholar? Kushal Seetharam: Primarily two things. One is you have to be really interested in the work you’re doing. You have to be really passionate about it. It should be something you would procrastinate doing other homework to work on this. The second thing is great mentorship. Without the professors I worked with taking an interest in me, I could not have progressed as much as I have. TC: What kind of research do you do? KS: I’ve worked in a few different fields of research. In high school I did biochemistry research on nerve agents. At Duke, I started out doing computer architecture research with [electrical and computer engineering professor] Dr. Daniel Sorin. I then started getting more interested in physics and I began working with [ECE professor] Dr. David Smith on applications of metamaterials in invisibility cloaking and wireless energy transfer. TC: How did you first get started doing this kind of research? KS: I started getting more interested in physics after I got to college. I especially liked electromagnetics because it was very visual and clean. I had a previous interest in wireless energy transfer and I read an article that one of the researchers in Dr. Smith’s lab had recently published in a paper about metamaterials and wireless energy transfer. I contacted him and got involved in that project and have been working with him for about a year now.

TC: What was the hardest problem you faced during your time doing research? KS: The hardest problem was getting over the misconception that I need to take classes to learn more before I do research. The truth is, no matter how many classes you take, you’re never going to learn enough. The only way to get better at something is to start doing it. You pick stuff up as you go along while trying, failing and eventually succeeding. TC: What was your most defining or accomplished moment in your research experience? KS: About a month ago, one of the projects I was working on, they had designed the metamaterial before I started working on the project, fabricated it and tested it in an experiment for what it was meant to do, and the simulation that they designed for it and the experiment weren’t fully matching. So I used a different approach to the simulation that I had been working on before to investigate the same thing. I was able to show some of the characteristics that matched better with the experiment. That was really cool for me. Being able to do something used to see those two match was really rewarding. TC: What do you plan to do in the future? KS: I plan to get a Ph.D. in applied physics. After that, I’m not quite sure. I could either see myself going into industry to work on novel applications and inventions or going into academia. I’ll figure that out when I’m doing my Ph.D.

Yaohua Xue was interviewed by The Chronicle’s Georgia Parke The Chronicle: What does it take to be a Goldwater Scholar? Yaohua Xue: To me, it’s just people who are very passionate about research in general, I guess more specifically in the science, engineering or math fields. That’s one of the main criteria—having a passion for research. TC: How would you describe the research they took into consideration when they gave you this award? YX: I’m working in a biochemistry lab, and the past project I’ve been working on is involved with the DNA repair pathway. What we are looking to do is the first part of the process where we solved several structures of several proteins of those pathways, and right now we are trying to find an inhibitor of this pathway that’s been implicated in the research. We are looking for inhibitors of this pathway to enhance the effects of current chemotheraputics to treat cancer. TC: How did you get started with that research? What brought you into that particular field? YX: Sophomore year I was looking to do work in a biochemistry lab, and I specifically contacted [Pei Zhou, associate professor of biochemistry], and he paired me up

with this graduate student who was working on his project so that’s how I ended up working on this project. TC: What was the hardest problem you faced while doing your research? YX: Some of the most difficult parts for me is that sometimes I get frustrated that things don’t work out or that you don’t get the data you expect. But I guess the important thing is to always figure out a new way to approach the problem and try to figure out what went wrong and try to go forward from there. We had to figure out how to fix it and just go. TC: What was your most defining or accomplished moment in your research experience? What was a big turning point for you? YX: When I got to work on pieces of the project on my own and contributed to the overall project. I was really proud that I made the experiment work and got really good data. TC: What do you plan to do in the future? YX: I will be applying to an M.D./Ph.D. program, and I’m looking to do research in pharmacology, designing molecules that target each pathway to help treat diseases.

Make qduke.com your homepage!


THE CHRONICLE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 2013 | 3

Alum launches app to showcase artists’ work by Margot Tuchler THE CHRONICLE

Phil Haus, Trinity ’08, is a founding team member of a new social media app that may give Twitter and Instagram a run for their money. Pheed, a Los Angeles-based company that initially launched online last October, seeks to streamline several networks that young media consumers already use, such as Twitter, Instagram, SoundCloud and Vine, said Pheed Communications Director Chrysta Olson. The app garnered a million subscribers in its first 30 days of operation and spent six weeks atop Apple’s free apps chart. Haus, who serves as Community Director for Pheed, noted that whereas Twitter was founded in a Blackberry-dominated area that was conducive to text content, more advanced smartphones have created a demand for more interactive content, which Pheed can provide. “As digital becomes the playing ground, we need some platform that can kind of take people into that new world,” Haus said. “Now the digital experience is very visual.” Haus became involved in the Pheed project after having spent time in Los Angeles working in the music and entertainment industries. There he met current Chief Cultural Officer Tony DeNiro, a friend of internet entrepreneur O.D. Kobo, Pheed founder and CEO, and the business took shape. Haus noted that he is “not a tech person”—rather, his contribution to Pheed comes from his ability to accumulate followers that coalesce into the network’s community. During his time at Duke as a sociol-

ogy major and a theater minor, Haus also served for three years as the recruitment chair for Sigma Nu fraternity, which gave him experience with networking. “This is a big game of rush—reaching mass amounts of people and introducing them to something great that you want them to be a part of,” Haus said. “So that’s definitely something that stuck with me. I would definitely say the process of in-

Photo special to The Chronicle

troducing Pheed to the world was a lot like rush.” The team noted that entertainers did not have a way to monetize their content through social media, and thus the Pheed business model was born. Pheed operates without advertisements and allows users to sign up for

Join us for two events as part of the GG&D workshop: “Governance in a Global Value Chain World”

free. The business operates by letting users—such as high school bands or professional musicians like David Guetta or Miley Cyrus, both of whom are Pheed users—charge followers whatever they want to view certain content, whether it be a photo or a live performance. Pheed then takes a fraction of the profits, Olson said. “Platforms like Twitter and Instagram have multi-billion dollar valuations but the content creators that make those platforms so interesting don’t necessarily have a way to capitalize off of that,” Olson said. “On the other side these platforms then have to figure out a way to make money.” It is not just celebrities that can tap into this model, Haus said. “If someone wants to do a broadcast, whether they be a high school band that wants to raise money for an album or Miley Cyrus who wants to go through Pheed and say [for example] ‘Next Friday at 3 o’clock I’m going to sing two songs from my living room,’ she can make seven figures in 15 minutes,” Haus said. “We’re expanding the audience potentials by connecting them through this digital platform.” Olson noted that the platform can also benefit fundraising efforts—charities can set up accounts for themselves, or organizations and individuals can donate their profits to any charity. Social media expert Brian Uzzi, Richard L. Thomas distinguished professor of leadership at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, said he believes the potential to make money is a unique feature that is likely fueling Pheed’s business. He noted, however, that

he believes this feature will likely appeal more to niche artists who gain dedicated followings on other networks, as opposed to already established celebrities. “People already making enough money in their day jobs, like celebrities, aren’t going to care about making a few cents off of Pheed,” Uzzi said. He noted that those types of media users would be better served reaching a large, heterogeneous population through Twitter and Instagram. The process of developing the network was achieved from the ground up, by talking to members of the entertainment industry and growing the community independently, Haus said. “We started going around L.A. meeting with different people—celebrities, producers and pacemakers—who had audiences to see what they thought about the idea and what they thought was missing [from social media],” Haus said. “Everybody was frustrated there was no real way to control content as well as monetize it.” Pheed has seen significant growth over the past few months, especially with users between the ages of 15 and 25, and experienced a membership boom in December, Olson noted. This was around the time that Instagram faced criticism for its temporary terms of use change, an alteration that gave Instagram the right to sell users’ content without their consent. A large contingent then migrated to Pheed, ownership of their content. A feature of the app allows users to SEE PHEED ON PAGE 5

Together, we can make a difference. Choose to Reuse with the Duke University Stores recycled/reusable shopping bag.

Raphael Kaplinsky, Open University “The Governance of Dynamic Rents, Inclusion and Exclusion: Power in Global Value Chains” Thursday, April 11, 2013 5:30 to 7:00 pm Social Science Research Institute, Room A103 A brief reception will follow and

Stephanie Barrientos, Manchester University Gary Gereffi, Duke University Dev Nathan, Institute for Human Development

“Promoting Economic and Social Upgrading in GVCs: Evidence from the Capturing the Gains Program” Friday, April 13, 2013 12:15 to 1:30 pm Social Science Research Institute, Room A103 Lunch will be provided. For more information: dan.smith@duke.edu

dukeinternational.org

Don’t forget your bag!

Receive a 10¢ discount on your total purchase each time you shop with us when using this reusable shopping bag in any of our stores instead of using one of our plastic bags. 100% Recycled Non-Woven Polypropylene | Bag Dimensions: 16” x 12” x 6”


4 | WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 2013

THE CHRONICLE

Employees can apply for low-cost housing by Michelle Menchaca THE CHRONICLE

Duke employees can soon help revitalize the Southside neighborhood, known for its high level of crime, in Durham. Duke is fostering the school’s relationship with the Durham community through the Southside Housing Incentive program that offers housing loans and incentives to interested Duke employees. The location was chosen because the Southside neighborhood is underdeveloped, said Phail Wynn, vice president for Durham and regional affairs. Employees can now begin submitting their applications. “This is just a great way to help low to moderateincome employees who want to purchase a home but don’t have enough money saved yet for a down payment,” Wynn said. “Southside is the last sort of depopulated area that needs to be repopulated... so we are helping to rebuild a neighborhood that was essentially deserted.” As part of the initial project development, qualified employees can purchase one of the 10 homes available in the Southside neighborhood. Wynn noted that this program is unique to Duke, as other universities do not offer direct assistance with housing for faculty. The initiatives include a $10,000 forgivable loan, with additional subsidies and assistance covering costs up to $50,000. To qualify, applicants must have worked at Duke for

at least five years and make no more than 115 percent of the median income, or $79,000 for a family of four. Since the program is aimed at low to middle income families, the maximum income level was derived by Duke to target this demographic. Applicants are also required to complete a home-

“Once construction is complete, it will be a new neighborhood and give families the opportunity to own a home.” — Phail Wynn, VP for Durham and regional affairs

buyer education workshop and pre-purchase housing counseling. This education requirement aims to teach these families how to manage their finances and become responsible homeowners, Wynn said. Despite the perceived danger of the Southside area, the neighborhood has positive aspects for residents,

and the new development will make it more appealing, Wynn added. “The physical area of Southside is a short walk from downtown Durham and has easy access to public transportation,” he said. “Once construction is complete, it will be a new neighborhood and give families the opportunity to own a home.” LaVonda Roberson, a Duke food service worker and Durham native, said that not all Duke employees approve of the location of the initiative, however. She noted that while the program seems like a great idea, Southside is too dangerous for her to consider moving there, even with additional assistance offered from Duke. Brad Brown, a manager at The Dillo, does not see the Southside location as a deterrent despite its negative reputation. Brown said that he is currently in the market for a house and thinks that initiative is an incredible opportunity for Duke employees and that he plans on sharing the information with his fellow workers. But Roberson noted that she hopes that the construction of homes will help revitalize the struggling Southside neighborhood. Wynn said he predicts the incentive program will continue strengthening ties between Duke and Durham. Duke has a lot of stake in the success of Durham, he added, and has been working to revitalize the downtown Durham neighborhood for several years.

Remember to pick up Recess, on stands tomorrow

TERM 1 (MAY 18 - JUNE 30) Summer Course Offerings

from the

Program in Literature Summer Term I : (MAY 15 - JUNE 27) LIT 390S.02: Novel Sexualities Katherine Costello / MTuTh: 3:30pm-5:35pm / ALP, CZ, CCI, EI, W

T H E I N D E P E N D E N T D A I LY AT D U K E U N I V E R S I T Y

4HE¬#HRONICLE There’s an app for that.

LIT 390S.03: Communism-- 20th Century Karim Wissa / MTuWThF: 12:30pm-1:45pm / ALP, SS, EI, R, W

LIT 390S.04: Augmenting Realities: Technoscience, Digital Art, & Electronic Literature Amanda Gould / MTuTh: 12:30pm-2:35pm / ALP, EI, STS

LIT 390S-07M: Chinese Middle Class & Culture Ka Man Calvin Hui / MTuWThF: 10:00am-12:05pm / ALP, CZ, CCI, W LIT 390S-08M: Fashion, Media, Consumption Ka Man Calvin Hui / MTuWThF: 2:00pm-4:05pm / ALP, CZ, CCI, W

Summer Term II : (JULY 1 - AUGUST 11) LIT 110.01: History & Concepts of Cinema China Medel / MTuTh: 6:00pm-8:05pm / ALP

LIT 390S-01: Gothic Hauntings Carolyn Laubender / MTuWThF: 11:00am-12:15pm / ALP

LIT 390S-02: Countering Culture in the US Jessica Jones / MTuTh: 2:00pm-4:05pm / ALP, EI

LIT 390SA-01: Literature, Science & The Sea (offered at the Duke Marine Lab) Melody Jue / T, Fri: each day--9:30am-11:30am & 1:00pm-4:00pm / ALP, EI

Summer (4-Week) Intensive Term II: (July 1-July 25)

SCAN HERE

LIT 390S-03M: What is Woman? Sex, Mind & All Dangerous Things Clarissa Lee/ MTuWThF: 10:00am-12:05pm / ALP, CZ, CCI, EI, STS

LIT 390S-4-01M: Psychedelic Cinema Laura Jaramillo / MTuWThF: 2:00pm-4:05pm / ALP, CCI, EI, W

TO DOWNLOAD

Search “duke chronicle” in the app store

Duke’s latest news, sports and opinions plus easy mobile access to qDuke, Sakai, ACES & the Duke Map


THE CHRONICLE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 2013 | 5

FOOD from page 1 Small Town in 2008. Such titles have attracted people to Durham who are interested in the city’s diverse food scene, Schoenfeld said. “Our unique food culture has become a great driver for tourism,” he said. “It adds a very special and certainly tasty component to an already wonderful city.” Leon Grodski Barrera, owner of local coffee shop Cocoa Cinnamon, said the Durham food culture is very conducive to supporting new and unique restaurants. Cocoa Cinnamon—which features coffee, chocolate, a tea lounge and a mobile coffee-serving bike unit—is very different from the typical coffee shop, Grodski Barrera said. He added that it takes a specific type of city to support restaurants like his. “It really shows how much Durhamites support their community by how hard they voted to get us the number one spot,” Grodski Barrera said. “We have options in this city that you wouldn’t get anywhere else in the country.” Senior Ashley Alman, an intern in the INDY Week Food section, said that she has used her time living offcampus to explore many of the local restaurants that Durham has to offer. Although Durham’s small-town feel might not have the breadth of options that many larger cities have, the city’s “hidden treasures” made it a clear winner for Southern Living’s top spot, she said. “Durham is totally deserving of the recognition,” Alman said. “It has so much to offer. I am so grateful that I have really branched out to experience more of it in the past year.” The recognition will also further the support local businesses already receive from the Durham community, said Alan Phillips, manager of Amelia Café. “This recognition is awesome,” Phillips said. “It can’t be anything but good for all of the restaurants in Durham.”

PHEED from page 3 include a copyright watermark with their name on content they upload, Olson said. This feature is one of Pheed’s main draws, Uzzi said. “People who are uploading really unique things or artistic creations or great insights will always be able to claim those contributions as their own,” Uzzi said. “That’s very valuable and unique.” Uzzi added that Pheed appears to draw users who may be disillusioned with more mainstream social media, noting that Pheed’s homepage features an edgy photo of a heavily tattooed man with short, punky hair, allowing it to appeal to “people on the fringe,” he said. The process of giving talented artists a new way to share their content has been a rewarding part of the growth of Pheed, Haus said. “People that can harness [their] great capabilities that aren’t limited by just photo or just audio,” Haus said. “They have an even playing ground where content is king. That is a bit cool.”

Connect with The Chronicle through social media for all the latest campus news updates Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter @DukeChronicle www.dukechronicle.com

ELIZA BRAY/THE CHRONICLE

Members of Delta Gamma sorority and Pi Kappa Phi fraternity gathered Wednesday for a barbecue to raise money for a philanthropy.

THE DUKE COLLOQUIUM INTELLECTUAL CURIOSITY AND THE PROFESSIONAL LIFE

M E A C U L PA : A PROFESSIONAL AND PERSONAL REFLECTION O N M E D I C A L M I S TA K E S A KEYNOTE PRESENTATION BY BRIAN GOLDMAN, M.D.

TUES, APRIL 16, 6–7:30 PM KEOHANE GLASS ATRIUM (K4) Dinner provided for registrants. Register via colloquium@duke.edu. Visit colloquium.duke.edu for more information.

EVERYONE M A K E S M I S TA K E S : TRANSFORMING O U R FA I L U R E S I N T O PROFESSIONAL SUCCESS MULTIDISCIPLINARY PANEL DISCUSSION ON OUR REPONSES TO HUMAN ERROR

WED, APRIL 17, 6–7:30 PM 0016 WESTBROOK DIVINITY SCHOOL Dinner provided for registrants. Register via colloquium@duke.edu. Visit colloquium.duke.edu for more information.


6 | WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 2013

WARD from page 1 gain popularity in the 1950s and ’60s. “It was very rare for an [American] opera to become so well-liked that everybody wants to do it,� said Jaffe. “And yet, there must have been a professional production [of The Crucible] running every year since its premiere.� In addition to his compositions, Ward’s involvement with arts education, administration and publication made him a versatile contributor to the music world, especially in North Carolina. When the founder of the North Carolina School of the Arts passed away just a few years into the school’s development, Ward was

THE CHRONICLE

called on to serve as chancellor. His dedication to the school was crucial to its development. Jaffe characterized Ward’s instruction style as one that emphasized practicality and accessibility in composition. Jaffe noted that Ward’s take on teaching was borne out of his years of experience writing and directing works. After serving ten years as chancellor of the NCSA, he came to Duke as a visiting professor and later became a Mary Duke Biddle professor of music. Ward also served as an executive for the classical music publisher Galaxy Music Corporation and as a member on countless other arts councils and boards. “He was a real composer, a Composer with a capital C,� said Jaffe.

“And he was my colleague, Colleague with a capital C.� Ward is survived by his five children—Melinda, Jonathon, Mark, Johanna and Tim—as well as 11 grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren. “What’s hard about it is that he was a dear friend,� said Jaffe. “I’ll miss him.�

@dukechronicle

JEFF KOWALSKY/BLOOMBERG

The Ford Focus was the best-selling car in the world in 2012.

sign up. Be the first to know about new arrivals, special collections, the latest in technology, sales events, textbook buyback and more. For more information, visit our website at www.dukestores.duke.edu and click on the BTFTK icon on the left.

2 DAYS ONLY!! APRIL 11-12

60%

CAN'T CA CAN C A AN N''T T MAKE MA MAK M AKE IT IT TO TO T THE HE ES SA SAL SALE? A E E? ? VIISIIT T SOCCER.COM/SALE SOCC SO CCER R..COM/ OM/ OM M/SAL SA AL A LE VISIT FO FOR F O OR R GREAT GR G REA RE R EA E AT SAVINGS! SAVIN SA ING NGS!

off retail

Our Privacy Policy: We respect your right to personal privacy. We promise to use this subscription service for the express purpose of keeping you informed of only those services that you have requested. Your personal information will not be disclosed to any third parties. We hope you will find our e-mails of benefit. We promise to keep them informative and to-the-point. You will have the option of unsubscribing from this service with each e-mail campaign.

THURSDAY 4/11 & FRIDAY 4/12: 11AM - 9PM SPORTS ENDEAVORS INC. 64)8:"&"45r HILLSBOROUGH, NC 27278 1-800-934-3876

SALE at SEI warehouse: r&YJUPGG*PS&YJUPGG* r(P/PSUIPO/$ r5VSOMFGUPOUP)8:"BUTUPQMJHIU r5VSOMFGUJOUPUIFGJSTU4QPSUT&OEFBWPSTESJWFXBZ

CAN'T MAKE IT TO THE SALE? VISIT SOCCER.COM/SALE FOR GREAT SAVINGS!


Sports

>> THE BLUE ZONE

The Chronicle

WEDNESDAY April 10, 2013

Check out the sports blog as we count down the top five men’s basketball performances of the year, with Seth Curry against Michigan State at No. 3.

www.dukechroniclesports.com

FOOTBALL

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Duke rebuilds receiving corps

Kelly has successful foot surgery

by Daniel Carp THE CHRONICLE

Duke’s passing offense was far more than successful last season—it was prolific. The Blue Devils were the only team in the FBS with three receivers that recorded 65 catches or more last season, and the team’s top tandem of Conner Vernon and Jamison Crowder set the ACC record for most receptions by a pair of receivers on the same team in one season. But as Duke heads toward its 2013 campaign, some major changes are coming to the team’s receiving corps. Vernon—the conference’s all-time leader in receiving yards and receptions—has graduated and will test the NFL Draft waters. The Blue Devils will also be without graduated slot threat Desmond Scott, who was incredibly productive in his first and only season as a Duke wide receiver. Now all that remains is Crowder and a younger, less-experienced group of receivers to carry on the legacy of the Blue Devils’ high-powered passing attack. Although Duke’s young receivers have received a baptism by fire this spring, the corps’ lone new addition brings years of experience. Widerecever coach Scottie Montgomery returns to the team after a three-year stint with the Pittsburgh Steelers at the same position. “That’s a huge challenge to replace Conner and Desmond’s production,” Montgomery said. “We do feel the challenge, but the challenge goes to the young men who sit in my room right now. They’re getting challenged every day, and we’re not trying to replace those guys, because we can’t. What we will do is go in as a team and try to replace the production.” Senior Brandon Braxton and Crowder are the only receivers on Duke’s roster with significant game experience. But

from Staff Reports THE CHRONICLE

tapped brilliance last season for Duke on both offense and special teams. McCaffrey appeared sparingly for the Blue Devils during his freshman season, but first-year starting quarterback Anthony Boone said the son of former Denver Bronco wideout Ed McCaffrey may be having the best spring of any receiver. “He has blossomed before our eyes and showed the coaches that he can be a reliable force,” Boone said. “He can win one-on-one battles, he can read coverages and he can help out in the run game

After missing 13 ACC games with a right foot injury, Ryan Kelly toughed it out and played the end of the season. But the senior forward was not fully healed and underwent successful surgery on his foot Tuesday. Kelly will be sidelined for approximately 12 weeks, according to a statement released by the team. The 12-week recovery period should have Kelly returning right around the time of June 27’s NBA Draft, though that means Kelly will likely miss all of the predraft workouts. “Ryan has been a terrific member of the Duke program throughout his career and has a bright professional future,” head coach Mike Krzyzewski said in the press release. “He showed amazing courage playing during the last part of our season leading us to the Eight Eight. With this surgery Ryan is expected to return to 100 percent and pursue his dream of playing in the NBA.” The operation took place at Duke Ambulatory Surgery Center and was performed by Dr. James Nunley, the department chair of orthopaedic surgery. According to Nunley’s DukeHealth profile, his clinical interests are, “Foot and ankle surgery, arthritis and sports injuries of the foot and ankle, ankle replacement.”

SEE FOOTBALL ON PAGE 8

SEE KELLY ON PAGE 8

ELYSIA SU/ CHRONICLE FILE PHOTO

Without Conner Vernon and Desmond Scott, Jamison Crowder must lead an inexperienced receiving corps this fall. Braxton has not suited up at wideout for the Blue Devils since his sophomore season. Head coach David Cutcliffe tried Braxton out on the other side of the ball last season, and he started most of Duke’s games at safety in 2012. Redshirt junior Isaac Blakeney, sophomore Max McCaffrey and redshirt freshman Anthony Nash will compete for the other snaps in the receiving corps. Blakeney is considered to be one of the most athletic players on this Blue Devil squad. Standing at 6-foot-6 with a 235-pound frame and blazing speed to match, Blakeney showed flashes of un-

MEN’S TENNIS

BASEBALL

Smith hits 100-win mark as head coach

Blue Devils look to continue hot streak

by Matt Pun THE CHRONICLE

With Duke’s 7-0 win over No. 19 Clemson Saturday, Ramsey Smith earned his 100th win as the team’s head coach in just his fifth year on the job. A former standout player for the Blue Devils from 1997-2001, Smith also became the first person in program history to win 100 singles matches and 100 doubles matches, as well as 100 matches as a coach. But Smith’s win totals as a player and coach reflect only part of his impact on the Duke tennis program. “I just feel really fortunate,” Smith said of the accomplishment. “I just feel really lucky to have been able to play tennis at Duke and to be the head coach at my alma mater.” Deciding to play for the Blue Devils in 1997, Smith joined the recruiting class of Marko Cerenko, Andres Pedroso and Ted Rueger. The group would finish their four years without losing a single ACC match, and three of the four—

Cerenko, Pedroso and Smith—recorded 100 singles wins in their careers. “By far the best tennis experience I ever had was at Duke [as a player],” Smith said. “I fell in love with the team concept, and it’s something a little foreign to tennis.” Smith left Duke with 118 career singles wins—then a program record—and 103 career doubles wins. “[Smith is] a fantastically charismatic guy and just a great athlete,” said Doug Root, Smith’s doubles partner for 31 of the 103 wins. “He’s one of the most competitive guys I know so having him as a partner and a teammate was great.” After graduation, Smith competed on the pro circuit for a year, but a torn shoulder labrum and two surgeries ended his playing career. He tried his hand as a fly-fishing guide, got his real estate license and considered a banking career following his decision SEE SMITH ON PAGE 8

by Andy Margius THE CHRONICLE

Duke looks to continue its mid-season momentum Wednesday as the Blue Devils host cross-town rival N.C. Central at Jack Coombs Field. Winning eight of its last nine games— including a pair over No. 15 Georgia Tech this past weekend—Duke has come into its own over the past two weeks. The Blue Devils have outscored opponents over the stretch by a combined 73–12 while posting an impressive four shutouts. Its most recent victim from Tuesday evening, UNC-Greensboro, was blown out by a score of 17-2. “The key has continued to be the pitching and defense that’s been consistent throughout,” head coach Chris Pollard said. “We’ve started to have bigger innings where we put runs on the board… and it’s been nice to have some games where we score big, but the pitching has been the consistent factor.” Despite the recent successes for the

Blue Devils (20-14) both on the mound and in the batter’s box, taking down the visiting Eagles will not be an easy feat. N.C. Central (21-14) will start junior lefthander Jordan Quinn against Duke for the second time this season. Quinn currently maintains an ERA of 1.61—second best among starters in the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference—and holds a record of 5-0. In his first start against the Blue Devils on March 12, Quinn surrendered just one earned run in seven innings on the mound while striking out five in a no decision. “He’s a fastball-changeup guy that’ll throw a changeup in any count to keep guys off balance,” Pollard said. “He gave us fits for seven innings last time around…. He’s very tough and very good at what he does.” On top of facing the challenging Quinn, the Blue Devils also have a minor question mark on the pitching front. SEE BASEBALL ON PAGE 8


8 | WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 2013

FOOTBALL from page 7 and stick his nose in there.” After redshirting his freshman season, Nash’s hands are quickly catching up to the young receiver’s lanky, 6-foot-5 frame, but Montgomery added that both his running and leaping abilities are impressive. In addition to these three young targets, Boone will also have tight end Braxton Deaver at his disposal. Deaver was set to become a crucial part of Duke’s offense last season, but missed the entire year with a foot injury. As many of Duke’s young receivers prepare to see consistent playing time for the first time in their collegiate ca-

BASEBALL from page 7 Freshman James Marvel traditionally starts at this point in the rotation but is injured with a sore elbow and not expected to pitch. Coaches are therefore planning on a split-staff game tomorrow, but are still uncertain about exactly who will open the game on the mound. With the uncertainty on the pitching front, Duke will need to continue its recent offensive productivity if it is to pull off the win against Quinn and the Eagles. Freshman Kenny Koplove— who leads the team with eight hits in the past five games—will need to continue to provide a spark for the Blue Devils. Although he didn’t play in the last outing against N.C. Central, Pollard is confident in his young shortstop’s abilities. “Kenny is a great example of taking advantage of your opportunities,” Pollard said. “He didn’t start early [in the

KELLY from page 7 Kelly won the ACC Player off the Week award twice this season but ut aggravated an existing foot injury Jan. 8 against Clemson. He subsequentlyy sat out until the team’s home game against ainst then-No. 5 Miami March 2, when n he scored a career-high 36 points on of-9 10-of-14 shooting, including 7-of-9 3-pointers. Kelly finished the season averagag-

THE CHRONICLE

reers, they also must adjust to Boone’s playing style. Unlike sure-handed starter Sean Renfree, who excelled throughout his career with his accuracy in the shortyardage passing game, Boone does not possess the same pinpoint precision. Rather, the redshirt junior has ample armstrength and is more than capable of letting the deep ball fly. If there’s anything the Blue Devils’ young receivers may have to practice this summer, it might just be catching up. “Those guys will come out and make plays,” Crowder said. “If we all get together and get our mentalities right, those guys have the potential to come out and be a very dynamic force this year.” year], but when he got in there he played well. It’s just been hard to get him out of there as he just continues to make things happen.” On the pitching front, sophomore closer Andrew Istler must bounce back from his loss on Saturday if Duke is to come away with the victory. Istler has had a strong season thus far with seven saves. Although he is responsible for the lone blemish over the last nine games in the form of a loss to the Yellow Jackets, the Blue Devils will need his strength in the bullpen. With the patchwork pitching planned for tomorrow and the challenge of taking on Quinn a second time, Pollard knows that the Eagles present a test. “We recognize that we’re going to see [Quinn, who is] a different pitcher than most of the guys you see in conference,” Pollard said. “I told our guys to expect a close ball game tomorrow because they know how well that guy throws.”

ing 12.9 points per game but struggled gle late in the season while playing through thr his injury. In the NCAA Tournament, Tou Kelly averaged just 6.3 points poin per game and made only 1-of3 13 3-pointers. In Kelly’s four years, he helped win two ACC Championships and was a fresh freshman on the 2010 national champions pionship team. He ranks fourth in Duke history with a 111-1 111-15 record on the floor, good for a .881 w winning percentage.

SMITH from page 7 to stop playing professionally. “I was pretty close to taking a [banking] job up in New York, but something always pulled me back to tennis, and specifically back to college tennis,” Smith said. Smith found that opportunity when an assistant coaching position opened up under his former coach at Duke, Jay Lapidus. Smith worked as an assistant coach and then an associate head coach under Lapidus until 2008, when he succeeded Lapidus as the team’s head coach. Inheriting a team that was coming off its first losing season since 1970, Smith coached Duke to a 16-9 record in his first year and has only improved since. “He won’t say it himself, but getting 100 [wins] in your first five years, that’s pretty damn good, especially considering the schedule we play,” assistant coach Jonathan Stokke said. “We’re in a pretty tough conference.” One key to Smith’s success has been his ability to promote the team mentality and work ethic that had guided his four years as a player. “He has become very good at reading the team and recruiting players that want to work as hard as he did when he prepared to compete himself,” Stan Smith, Ramsey’s father and former world No.1 tennis player, wrote in an email. “He has had to be tough sometimes to instill the ‘Duke tradition’ that he had when playing there when Duke didn’t lose any ACC matches.” In addition to the value of having experience on a successful college team, Smith can also relate to his players as a former student. “With tennis, everyone sees things differently,” Smith said. “I knew if I coached everyone how I wanted to be coached, I wasn’t going to be successful.... The biggest thing is really getting to know your players and getting to know what makes them tick. I feel like I have a really huge advantage having been at Duke, having taken the same classes, the same professors, knowing the social life, knowing the pressures on the academic side.” That knowledge of what his athletes’ lives are like off the court has helped en-

sure strong chemistry between the players and the coaching staff. “He has a good pulse of the team, and having been here and gone through the same stuff can only help,” Stokke said. “He’s not guessing what they’re going through. He knows what they’re going through.” Duke senior Henrique Cunha, the nation’s third ranked player and Smith’s first recruit as a head coach, found great appeal in playing for a coach who knew the program from both sides. The Brazil native said Smith helped him adjust to the culture, the food and the academics at Duke. “What most people don’t know is that he’s a 10-times better person than he is a coach,” Cunha said. “He really helps out the players when we need help.” In addition to helping new players acclimate to the college tennis experience, Smith has established a better relationship with the program’s alumni—a project he’s worked on since joining the coaching staff. Root, who now works with Greystar Real Estate Partners, has mentored several players. “[Smith has] realized that he’s getting to prepare these guys for the next step of their lives, whether it’s professional tennis or the business world, or just being a mentor to them and instilling good values and helping them just be successful in life,” Root said. “It’s certainly a strength of his—being a mentor.” Regarding his goals on the court, Smith has some unfinished business. As a player, Smith’s teams fell in the round of eight in the national tournament each of his last three seasons. As a coach, Smith’s team made its first round of eight appearance last season, following two years of dropping out in the round of 16. At 18-4 so far this season, Duke ranks ninth in the country and has the opportunity to go one step further and make its first national semifinals appearance. “He’s done a fantastic job in terms of taking the team back to top five,” Lapidus said. “I’m thinking in the next several years, they will have a chance to win the whole thing.”

CLASSIFIEDS ANNOUNCEMENTS

SPECIAL TUITION RATE FOR DUKE EMPLOYEES

GYMNASTICS INSTRUCTORS WANTED

HOLTON PRIZE IN EDUCATION Three cash prizes of $500 will be awarded for outstanding, innovative, or investigative research in education related fields. Application deadline is April 19, 2013. Open to Duke undergraduates. For more information, www.duke.edu/web/ education/scholarships/holtonprize.html

Enroll in a summer or fall undergraduate course for academic credit for $975. Audit a course for $100. Course schedules now available. Certain limits and deadlines apply. For application/registration details contact 919/684-6259 or summer@duke.edu

Bull City Gymnastics is hiring! We have positions available for energetic, enthusiastic instructors. BCG offers competitive salary rates and flexible schedules for year-round or summer-only positions. Experience is preferred, but not required. To apply, send your resume to jobs@ bullcitygymnastics.com

HELP WANTED

DUKE SENIORS & ALUMNI

BARTENDERS ARE IN DEMAND!

Duke alumni enrolled in Summer Session receive a tuition grant of $1,447.50 per undergraduate course. Application required. Certain limits and deadlines apply. Questions? Contact summer@duke.edu or visit http://summersession.duke. edu/tuition

Earn $20-$35/hr. in a recessionproof job. 1 or 2 week classes & weekend classes. 100% job placement assistance. Raleigh’s Bartending School. HAVE FUN! MAKE MONEY! MEET PEOPLE! CALL NOW!!! 919-676-0774, ww.cocktailmixer.com/bartending-course-overview.html

LOOKING FOR PHYSICALLY FIT, MORALLY STRONG leaders who are interested in the Marine Corps Officer Programs including law and aviation opportunities. For more information contact the officer selection team at (919)856-4170 or www. facebook.com/MCRSROST

The Chronicle classified advertising

www.dukechronicle.com/classifieds


THE CHRONICLE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 2013 | 9

Diversions Shoe Chris Cassatt and Gary Brookins

Dilbert Scott Adams

Doonesbury Garry Trudeau

The Chronicle Shorter than expected: House ads: ................................................................durand durand House ads: .......................................................................... Mr.Teeth House ads: .............................................................................. Jewels House ads: ........................................................King of Duke Crush: House ads .......................................................... Shmooney, Pooney House ads ............................................................. Jsy, Bri, Thanh-ha House ads ................................................................ Chronline rulez House ads ............................................................................. Swanth Barb Starbuck is the best: ......................................................... Barb

The Duplex Glenn McCoy

Student Advertising Manager: .................................. Allison Rhyne Account Representatives: ..................... Jen Bahadur, Sarah Burgart Courtney Clower, Peter Chapin, Claire Gilhuly, Sterling Lambert Liz Lash, Dori Levy, Gini Li, Ina Li, Parker Masselink, Cliff Simmons, James Sinclair, Olivia Wax Creative Services Student Manager: ................. Marcela Heywood Creative Services: ..........................................Allison Eisen, Mao Hu Rachel Kiner, Rita Lo, Izzy Xu Business Office ..............................Susanna Booth, Emily McKelvey

Sudoku

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 through 9. (No number is repeated in any column, row or box.)

Daily

MT. FUJI ASIAN BISTRO SUSHI & BAR SPECIALS

3D ŽŶĚĂLJ͗ 3ΨϮ3ĚŽŵĞƐƚŝĐ 3d ƵĞƐĚĂLJ͗3 3d ŚƵƌƐĚĂLJ͗33ϭͬϮ3ŽĨĨ3ƐƵƐŚŝ3ĂĨƚĞƌ3ϱƉŵ3ĂŶĚ3ϭͬϮ3ŽĨĨ3 3ϭͬϮ3ŽĨĨ3ƐƵƐŚŝ3ĂĨƚĞƌ3 3ƐƉĞĐŝĂůƚLJ3ŵĂƌƚŝŶŝƐ3ĂŶĚ3ĐŽĐŬƚĂŝůƐ 3ϱƉŵ3ĂŶĚ3ϭͬϮ3ŽĨĨ3 3& ƌŝĚĂLJ͗33ϭͬϮ3ŽĨĨ3ŚŽƚ3ƐĂŬĞ3ϮϮŽnj3ĂŶĚ3Ψϯ3,ŝŐŚďĂůů 3ďŽƚƚůĞƐ3ŽĨ3ǁŝŶĞ 3^ ĂƚƵƌĚĂLJ͗333Ψϱ3^ĂƉƉŽƌŽ3ϮϮŽnj 3t ĞĚŶĞƐĚĂLJ͗ 3^ ƵŶĚĂLJ͗33ϭͬϮ3ŽĨĨ3ďŽƚƚůĞƐ3ŽĨ3ǁŝŶĞ 3Ψϯ3ĚƌĂĨƚ 3ϵϬϱ3t͘3DĂŝŶ3^ƚ3ͻ3ƌŝŐŚƚůĞĂĨ3^ƋƵĂƌĞ3ͻ3ϲϴϬͲϰϵϲϴ3ͻ3ǁǁǁ͘ŵƚĨƵũŝŶĐ͘ĐŽŵ

Answer to puzzle www.sudoku.com


THE CHRONICLE

XXXDAY, MONTH XX, 2009 | 1


The Independent Daily at Duke University

The Chronicle

10 | WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 2013

Vote Li, Tobia Academics are the epicen- senator for academic affairs, he ter of a university. From advis- has had extensive exposure to ing to intellectual climate, the the structure of DSG and the Duke Student Government operations of the committee. committee for academic af- His two-fold platform, pushing fairs addresses a broad range of policies that address specific important policoncerns and cies that have bolstering the editorial significant convibrancy of acasequences for all students at demic life with targeted proDuke. Therefore, the vice pres- gramming, exhibits a focused ident for academic affairs must understanding of issues parnot only have a firm grasp on ticularly important to students’ the educational issues that are academic experiences. important to students and facWhile Ciryam is a knowlulty, but also possess a broader edgeable candidate who emconceptual understanding of phasizes open communication the relationship between aca- with the student body, his indemic policy and the liberal experience and narrow conarts institution. ception of concrete proposals Between the two candi- make him the weaker candidates—freshman Prashanth date. Ciryam and sophomore Ray Unfortunately, both candiLi—Li is the candidate who dates lack a robust, complete best meets these criteria. As a vision for the role of academics

Ms. Lachman, stay a while. I’ll take you out shooting and you can become an American and join the Republic. —“Gertrude Higgins” commenting on the column “A home that wasn’t.” See more at www.dukechronicle.com.

LETTERS POLICY The Chronicle welcomes submissions in the form of letters to the editor or guest columns. Submissions must include the author’s name, signature, department or class, and for purposes of identification, phone number and local address. Letters should not exceed 325 words; contact the editorial department for information regarding guest columns. The Chronicle will not publish anonymous or form letters or letters that are promotional in nature. The Chronicle reserves the right to edit letters and guest columns for length, clarity and style and the right to withhold letters based on the discretion of the editorial page editor.

Direct submissions to:

E-mail: chronicleletters@duke.edu Editorial Page Department The Chronicle Box 90858, Durham, NC 27708 Phone: (919) 684-2663 Fax: (919) 684-4696

The Chronicle

Inc. 1993

YESHWANTH KANDIMALLA, Editor LAUREN CARROLL, Managing Editor JULIAN SPECTOR, News Editor ANDREW BEATON, Sports Editor CHRIS DALL, Photography Editor MAGGIE LAFALCE, Editorial Page Editor KATHERINE ZHANG, Editorial Board Chair JIM POSEN, Director of Online Operations CHRISSY BECK, General Manager KRISTIE KIM, University Editor TIFFANY LIEU, Local & National Editor ANDREW LUO, Health & Science Editor CAROLINE RODRIGUEZ, News Photography Editor PHOEBE LONG, Design Editor MICHAELA DWYER, Recess Editor SOPHIA DURAND, Recess Photography Editor SCOTT BRIGGS, Editorial Page Managing Editor MATTHEW CHASE, Towerview Editor ADDISON CORRIHER, Towerview Photography Editor ANNA KOELSCH, Social Media Editor SAMANTHA BROOKS, Senior Editor REBECCA DICKENSON, Advertising Director MARY WEAVER, Operations Manager DAVID RICE, Director of External Relations

at a liberal arts institution. Li’s platform relies on specific, recycled ideas, which are important, but constitute relatively small reforms. Ciryam’s platform relies on continuous student input without clear direction. We encourage the winner to be more thoughtful as they attempt to integrate a broad conception of liberal arts education into the proposals drafted by their committee. For DSG vice president for equity and outreach, Caroline Hall and Jacob Tobia, both juniors, are qualified and competent candidates, but they present diverging approaches to addressing equity concerns. Hall’s action-driven proposals for structuring her committee exhibit thoughtfulness and a thorough understanding of DSG operations. The majority

of her platform, however, is not specific, and her administrative approach to addressing controversial campus issues reveals a degree of naivete. We therefore endorse Tobia for vice president for equity and outreach. He boasts an impressive record of effective advocacy. He has spearheaded successful equity initiatives on campus, including securing gender-neutral housing, opposing Amendment One, advocating for coverage of sexual reassignment and achieving other various accomplishments. The diversity of his involvement in these initiatives demonstrates his dynamic leadership skills and the depth of his concern for all groups on campus. These qualities, paired with his concrete proposals for improvement, make Tobia the

better candidate. Given the recent campus controversies surrounding equity issues, the vice president for equity and outreach will play a vital role in exercising leadership not only in reacting to such cases but also in preventing them from erupting in the first place. This will require a commitment to fostering understanding between students. Therefore, we hope that, instead of pursuing an antagonistic or authority-driven approach, the winner will be tactful in making this understanding a priority. Sam Davis, Thomas Prebble and Martin Shores recused themselves from the academic affairs endorsement due to personal ties. Casey Williams recused himself from the equity and outreach endorsement due to personal ties.

The modern celebrity pantheon

onlinecomment

Est. 1905

THE CHRONICLE

commentaries

MARGOT TUCHLER, University Editor JACK MERCOLA, Local & National Editor DANIELLE MUOIO, Health & Science Editor ELYSIA SU, Sports Photography Editor ELIZA STRONG, Design Editor HOLLY HILLIARD, Recess Managing Editor CHELSEA PIERONI, Online Photo Editor ASHLEY MOONEY, Sports Managing Editor SONIA HAVELE, Towerview Editor MELISSA YEO, Towerview Creative Director NICOLE KYLE, Special Projects Editor MAGGIE SPINI, Senior Editor MICHAEL SHAMMAS, Recruitment Chair BARBARA STARBUCK, Creative Director MEGAN MCGINITY, Digital Sales Manager

The Chronicle is published by the Duke Student Publishing Company, Inc., a non-profit corporation independent of Duke University. The opinions expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of Duke University, its students, faculty, staff, administration or trustees. Unsigned editorials represent the majority view of the editorial board. Columns, letters and cartoons represent the views of the authors. To reach the Editorial Office at 301 Flowers Building, call 684-2663 or fax 684-4696. To reach the Business Office at 103 West Union Building, call 684-3811. To reach the Advertising Office at 101 West Union Building call 684-3811 or fax 684-8295. Visit The Chronicle Online at http://www.dukechronicle.com. © 2012 The Chronicle, Box 90858, Durham, N.C. 27708. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the prior, written permission of the Business Office. Each individual is entitled to one free copy.

O

ne of the most interesting things about is much of the history of the human race. But the Greco-Roman gods is how very hu- a woman who can sell herself possesses a useman they are. They are petty and licen- ful talent. This also helps explain the outsized tious, quick to anger and prone (no pun intended) furor over Kim to tantrums. They murder, rape, Kardashian’s pregnant body. She steal and prank with the impunity has created a career out of selling of the omnipotent. They behave, a certain version of herself. The in short, as any moral person public now feels it has not gotten would hope not to behave if given what it paid for. endless power and eternal youth. The nature of the exchange is And yet they were worshiped and perhaps the most interesting part celebrated. of our relationship with modern mia lehrer There are several parts to the celebrity. We lament the extraordino bino concept of a deity. One role is to dinary amounts of money that be a stand-in for the unknown. In Lindsay, Kim and Paris rake in for the case of the Greeks, lightning happened when living their lives. We lament it even as we conZeus was angry. Apollo’s chariot was responsible tinue to pour it into their pockets by consuming for the rising and setting of the sun. Winter set in their media. We hate Lindsay, Kim and Paris. We when Demeter mourned the loss of her daugh- hate them and we pity them, yet we still watch ter. But questions of morality are also meant to them. And when they make the same mistakes be answered by the deities. Judeo-Christianity that we make, but on the grand scale permitted addresses this with direct commands. The Greek them by their wealth and their exposure, we are gods showed the Greeks how one should be by pleased. It is what we have paid for. exemplifying how one should not be. Endowing This is the difference between Meryl Streep, a mythical character with unlimited power and who is famous for having a talent, and Kim Karunlimited vices produces a powerful source of dashian, who is famous for being famous. Kim, both warning and entertainment. having no talent beyond her watchability, must We (who is “we” here? “La gente.” The people. continue to be watchable or lose her audience, Feel free to exempt yourself in the comments be- which is the source of her power. She has other cause you are above this. Exclaim that you do not sources of income; she sells clothing, perfumes, know who Kim Kardashian is. You are Wise and and jewelry with her name on it. So does Kate Not Like Us.) are not the ancient Greeks. Ac- Spade. But Kate Spade is selling her purses. Kim cording to a Pew forum poll, the vast majority of is selling her body. religious people in the United States identify as We have made a minor goddess of Kim KarChristian, followed by Jewish and Buddhist. We dashian. When Kim sneezes, it is tabloid fodder. are, on paper, a nation of morality prescribed by It is tabloid fodder because we read it. We read edicts—and rarely taken as directed. Yet I would it because it is tabloid fodder. When Kim releasargue we have our own minor deities, our love es a perfume, she makes millions of dollars. She goddesses and trickster gods, who exist in an makes millions of dollars because we buy it. We uneasy equilibrium with us: We lend them the buy it because she has millions of dollars. Unpower, and they provide the story. like the Greek gods, we do not fear her because What does it mean to be famous for being she lacks the power to harm us. If anything, we famous? There are few historical examples of believe we own her. To withdraw our support this. This question seems to have arisen during would be to crush her as we know her. the rise of mass media; the term that was coined And there it is: We have our gods to give us sometime in the 1960s applies now to a whole stories. They have power and they have money. class of people who have enough brand-new But we have bought them and they work for us. money to buy them indemnity from the kind of Mass media have given us the ability to build our indiscretions that would get mortals arrested. own pantheon, and we have chosen wisely. They Ten years ago you would have thought of Paris are draped in Juicy Couture and garlanded in Hilton. Now you think of the Kardashians. cheap perfume. These are not gods to be worInterestingly, almost all members of this class shiped, but to be watched, derided and, ultiare women; notable exceptions, such as Spen- mately, consumed. cer Pratt, usually marry in. Perhaps this is because women’s bodies are already objects, so it is Mia Lehrer, Trinity ’12, is currently a graduate easier to parlay this commodification into a ca- student in geology at the University of Wisconsin, reer. Any woman can be bought and sold. That Madison. Her column runs every other Wednesday.


THE CHRONICLE

XXXDAY, MONTH XX, 2009 | 1


The Independent Daily at Duke University

The Chronicle

10 | WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 2013

Vote Li, Tobia Academics are the epicen- senator for academic affairs, he ter of a university. From advis- has had extensive exposure to ing to intellectual climate, the the structure of DSG and the Duke Student Government operations of the committee. committee for academic af- His two-fold platform, pushing fairs addresses a broad range of policies that address specific important policoncerns and cies that have bolstering the editorial significant convibrancy of acasequences for all students at demic life with targeted proDuke. Therefore, the vice pres- gramming, exhibits a focused ident for academic affairs must understanding of issues parnot only have a firm grasp on ticularly important to students’ the educational issues that are academic experiences. important to students and facWhile Ciryam is a knowlulty, but also possess a broader edgeable candidate who emconceptual understanding of phasizes open communication the relationship between aca- with the student body, his indemic policy and the liberal experience and narrow conarts institution. ception of concrete proposals Between the two candi- make him the weaker candidates—freshman Prashanth date. Ciryam and sophomore Ray Unfortunately, both candiLi—Li is the candidate who dates lack a robust, complete best meets these criteria. As a vision for the role of academics

Ms. Lachman, stay a while. I’ll take you out shooting and you can become an American and join the Republic. —“Gertrude Higgins” commenting on the column “A home that wasn’t.” See more at www.dukechronicle.com.

LETTERS POLICY The Chronicle welcomes submissions in the form of letters to the editor or guest columns. Submissions must include the author’s name, signature, department or class, and for purposes of identification, phone number and local address. Letters should not exceed 325 words; contact the editorial department for information regarding guest columns. The Chronicle will not publish anonymous or form letters or letters that are promotional in nature. The Chronicle reserves the right to edit letters and guest columns for length, clarity and style and the right to withhold letters based on the discretion of the editorial page editor.

Direct submissions to:

E-mail: chronicleletters@duke.edu Editorial Page Department The Chronicle Box 90858, Durham, NC 27708 Phone: (919) 684-2663 Fax: (919) 684-4696

The Chronicle

Inc. 1993

YESHWANTH KANDIMALLA, Editor LAUREN CARROLL, Managing Editor JULIAN SPECTOR, News Editor ANDREW BEATON, Sports Editor CHRIS DALL, Photography Editor MAGGIE LAFALCE, Editorial Page Editor KATHERINE ZHANG, Editorial Board Chair JIM POSEN, Director of Online Operations CHRISSY BECK, General Manager KRISTIE KIM, University Editor TIFFANY LIEU, Local & National Editor ANDREW LUO, Health & Science Editor CAROLINE RODRIGUEZ, News Photography Editor PHOEBE LONG, Design Editor MICHAELA DWYER, Recess Editor SOPHIA DURAND, Recess Photography Editor SCOTT BRIGGS, Editorial Page Managing Editor MATTHEW CHASE, Towerview Editor ADDISON CORRIHER, Towerview Photography Editor ANNA KOELSCH, Social Media Editor SAMANTHA BROOKS, Senior Editor REBECCA DICKENSON, Advertising Director MARY WEAVER, Operations Manager DAVID RICE, Director of External Relations

at a liberal arts institution. Li’s platform relies on specific, recycled ideas, which are important, but constitute relatively small reforms. Ciryam’s platform relies on continuous student input without clear direction. We encourage the winner to be more thoughtful as they attempt to integrate a broad conception of liberal arts education into the proposals drafted by their committee. For DSG vice president for equity and outreach, Caroline Hall and Jacob Tobia, both juniors, are qualified and competent candidates, but they present diverging approaches to addressing equity concerns. Hall’s action-driven proposals for structuring her committee exhibit thoughtfulness and a thorough understanding of DSG operations. The majority

of her platform, however, is not specific, and her administrative approach to addressing controversial campus issues reveals a degree of naivete. We therefore endorse Tobia for vice president for equity and outreach. He boasts an impressive record of effective advocacy. He has spearheaded successful equity initiatives on campus, including securing gender-neutral housing, opposing Amendment One, advocating for coverage of sexual reassignment and achieving other various accomplishments. The diversity of his involvement in these initiatives demonstrates his dynamic leadership skills and the depth of his concern for all groups on campus. These qualities, paired with his concrete proposals for improvement, make Tobia the

better candidate. Given the recent campus controversies surrounding equity issues, the vice president for equity and outreach will play a vital role in exercising leadership not only in reacting to such cases but also in preventing them from erupting in the first place. This will require a commitment to fostering understanding between students. Therefore, we hope that, instead of pursuing an antagonistic or authority-driven approach, the winner will be tactful in making this understanding a priority. Sam Davis, Thomas Prebble and Martin Shores recused themselves from the academic affairs endorsement due to personal ties. Casey Williams recused himself from the equity and outreach endorsement due to personal ties.

The modern celebrity pantheon

onlinecomment

Est. 1905

THE CHRONICLE

commentaries

MARGOT TUCHLER, University Editor JACK MERCOLA, Local & National Editor DANIELLE MUOIO, Health & Science Editor ELYSIA SU, Sports Photography Editor ELIZA STRONG, Design Editor HOLLY HILLIARD, Recess Managing Editor CHELSEA PIERONI, Online Photo Editor ASHLEY MOONEY, Sports Managing Editor SONIA HAVELE, Towerview Editor MELISSA YEO, Towerview Creative Director NICOLE KYLE, Special Projects Editor MAGGIE SPINI, Senior Editor MICHAEL SHAMMAS, Recruitment Chair BARBARA STARBUCK, Creative Director MEGAN MCGINITY, Digital Sales Manager

The Chronicle is published by the Duke Student Publishing Company, Inc., a non-profit corporation independent of Duke University. The opinions expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of Duke University, its students, faculty, staff, administration or trustees. Unsigned editorials represent the majority view of the editorial board. Columns, letters and cartoons represent the views of the authors. To reach the Editorial Office at 301 Flowers Building, call 684-2663 or fax 684-4696. To reach the Business Office at 103 West Union Building, call 684-3811. To reach the Advertising Office at 101 West Union Building call 684-3811 or fax 684-8295. Visit The Chronicle Online at http://www.dukechronicle.com. © 2012 The Chronicle, Box 90858, Durham, N.C. 27708. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the prior, written permission of the Business Office. Each individual is entitled to one free copy.

O

ne of the most interesting things about is much of the history of the human race. But the Greco-Roman gods is how very hu- a woman who can sell herself possesses a useman they are. They are petty and licen- ful talent. This also helps explain the outsized tious, quick to anger and prone (no pun intended) furor over Kim to tantrums. They murder, rape, Kardashian’s pregnant body. She steal and prank with the impunity has created a career out of selling of the omnipotent. They behave, a certain version of herself. The in short, as any moral person public now feels it has not gotten would hope not to behave if given what it paid for. endless power and eternal youth. The nature of the exchange is And yet they were worshiped and perhaps the most interesting part celebrated. of our relationship with modern mia lehrer There are several parts to the celebrity. We lament the extraordino bino concept of a deity. One role is to dinary amounts of money that be a stand-in for the unknown. In Lindsay, Kim and Paris rake in for the case of the Greeks, lightning happened when living their lives. We lament it even as we conZeus was angry. Apollo’s chariot was responsible tinue to pour it into their pockets by consuming for the rising and setting of the sun. Winter set in their media. We hate Lindsay, Kim and Paris. We when Demeter mourned the loss of her daugh- hate them and we pity them, yet we still watch ter. But questions of morality are also meant to them. And when they make the same mistakes be answered by the deities. Judeo-Christianity that we make, but on the grand scale permitted addresses this with direct commands. The Greek them by their wealth and their exposure, we are gods showed the Greeks how one should be by pleased. It is what we have paid for. exemplifying how one should not be. Endowing This is the difference between Meryl Streep, a mythical character with unlimited power and who is famous for having a talent, and Kim Karunlimited vices produces a powerful source of dashian, who is famous for being famous. Kim, both warning and entertainment. having no talent beyond her watchability, must We (who is “we” here? “La gente.” The people. continue to be watchable or lose her audience, Feel free to exempt yourself in the comments be- which is the source of her power. She has other cause you are above this. Exclaim that you do not sources of income; she sells clothing, perfumes, know who Kim Kardashian is. You are Wise and and jewelry with her name on it. So does Kate Not Like Us.) are not the ancient Greeks. Ac- Spade. But Kate Spade is selling her purses. Kim cording to a Pew forum poll, the vast majority of is selling her body. religious people in the United States identify as We have made a minor goddess of Kim KarChristian, followed by Jewish and Buddhist. We dashian. When Kim sneezes, it is tabloid fodder. are, on paper, a nation of morality prescribed by It is tabloid fodder because we read it. We read edicts—and rarely taken as directed. Yet I would it because it is tabloid fodder. When Kim releasargue we have our own minor deities, our love es a perfume, she makes millions of dollars. She goddesses and trickster gods, who exist in an makes millions of dollars because we buy it. We uneasy equilibrium with us: We lend them the buy it because she has millions of dollars. Unpower, and they provide the story. like the Greek gods, we do not fear her because What does it mean to be famous for being she lacks the power to harm us. If anything, we famous? There are few historical examples of believe we own her. To withdraw our support this. This question seems to have arisen during would be to crush her as we know her. the rise of mass media; the term that was coined And there it is: We have our gods to give us sometime in the 1960s applies now to a whole stories. They have power and they have money. class of people who have enough brand-new But we have bought them and they work for us. money to buy them indemnity from the kind of Mass media have given us the ability to build our indiscretions that would get mortals arrested. own pantheon, and we have chosen wisely. They Ten years ago you would have thought of Paris are draped in Juicy Couture and garlanded in Hilton. Now you think of the Kardashians. cheap perfume. These are not gods to be worInterestingly, almost all members of this class shiped, but to be watched, derided and, ultiare women; notable exceptions, such as Spen- mately, consumed. cer Pratt, usually marry in. Perhaps this is because women’s bodies are already objects, so it is Mia Lehrer, Trinity ’12, is currently a graduate easier to parlay this commodification into a ca- student in geology at the University of Wisconsin, reer. Any woman can be bought and sold. That Madison. Her column runs every other Wednesday.


THE CHRONICLE

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 2013 | 11

commentaries

lettertotheeditor An open invitation to move Instead of attempting to actively change some of the policies currently working their way through the North Carolina legislature, I would urge all Duke students (and all North Carolinians in general) to voice their dissatisfaction with the government’s current trajectory by leaving the state. In a knowledge-based economy, we are the state’s most important asset. We are the intelligent, creative people who have helped make areas like the Triangle vibrant and economically competitive. By voting with our feet and deserting North Carolina, we can reward areas of the country that are implementing progressive policies, while pressuring North Carolina lawmakers to reconsider their social policies. North Carolina government officials need to recognize that adopting legislation that marginalizes whole groups of people is wrong and shortsighted if the state hopes to be economically competitive in the 21st century. By causing it to lose its most important asset, we can force politicians and their supporters in North Carolina to confront the effects of their policies by hit-

ting them in their wallets. Our mass exodus, prompted by their backward policies, will hurt the economic growth prospects of North Carolina and may be more effective than appealing to people’s concepts of fairness and ethics. If you want to live in a place that supports marriage equality, no longer has the death penalty, has a governor who champions women’s equality, would never think of establishing a state religion and has tried in recent years to give identification cards to illegal immigrants, then you should consider moving to states that have done all of these things. Better yet, if you want a place that has done all of these things, and where you can clearly see your personal impact on regional growth, then I further suggest Buffalo, N.Y. By moving to distressed places like Buffalo, we can show the North Carolinians who support backwards social policies how those policies affect them by undermining North Carolina’s economic competitiveness. Dan Pellegrino Trinity ’14

Want to contribute to campus dialogue? The Fall 2013 columnist and Monday, Monday applications are now available. Email Scott Briggs at sab59@duke.edu for more information.

Open access academia

I

n the late 19th century, when prestigious journals such To demonstrate how absurd he believes this process to as Science, Nature and others first appeared, their exclu- be, Eisen constructed a basic analogy. “Imagine you are an sive subscription-based business models made sense. The obstetrician setting up a new practice,” he urged his listenreadership for scientific scholarship was limited, and each ers. “In exchange for your services, you will demand that copy a journal printed represented a cost to the publisher. parents give every baby you deliver over to you for adoption, As a consequence of this, a second feature of the scientific in return for which you agree to lease these babies back to journal was born: in order to keep costs down their parents provided they pay your annual and subscriptions up, they agreed to publish subscription fee.” It is obvious, he concludonly those articles they felt would be of greated, that no parent would agree to such an est interest to the scientific community. arrangement, so it is somewhat baffling that As the 19th century gave way to the 20th, scientific researchers would accept it as one advances in technology and a compounding of the central pillars of their profession. understanding of the world around us creEisen, along with Stanford biochemist Pat ated an explosion in scientific research, which Brown and the Nobel Prize-winning director thereby stimulated the growth of this subscripof the National Cancer Institute, Harold Varchris bassil tion-based academic publishing industry. As mus, has attempted to promote open access human action the industry grew, the journals proliferated publishing through projects like the Public and keeping up with the body of scientific litLibrary of Science (PLOS). After seeking erature became too costly for individuals. Another arrange- pledges from researchers and publishers to commit to the ment, bizarre though it may be, arose to deal with this prob- mission of open access scientific publishing, the PLOS crew lem: The schools and research institutions by which these started two of their own open access journals—PLOS Biolindividuals were employed financed access for all of their em- ogy and PLOS Medicine—whose review and publication ployees, essentially buying back from the publishers the right standards are, according to Eisen at least, just as “elitist” as to consume the scholarship that they had largely generated. those of “Science, Nature and their ilk.” In 2011, though, “Universities are, in essence, giving ... the end result of an PLOS Biology and PLOS Medicine registered impact facinvestment of more than a hundred billion dollars of public tors—a measure of a journal’s average number of citations funds every year ... to publishers for free,” explained biolo- per article that is sometimes equated with its influence—of gist Michael Eisen in a speech to the Commonwealth Club 11.45 and 16.27 respectively, while journals such as Science last month, “and then they are paying them an additional 10 and Nature clocked in at 31.20 and 36.28. billion dollars a year to lock these papers away where almost Although Brown, Eisen and Varmus would probably arnobody can access them.” gue that impact factor is a poor proxy for quality of a sci-

Mariah Hukins is a Trinity senior. You can follow Mariah on Twitter @thehukes.

entific publication, it’s also true that the PLOS project has not been entirely successful in drawing leading researchers and groundbreaking papers away from the major journals. “Colleagues, friends and even family members would stipulate all the flaws in the current system and praise what we were doing,” Eisen confessed to his audience, “but, when they had a high profile paper, would turn around and send it to the same old subscription journals. It was a very frustrating experience.” Eisen’s frustration stems from the fact that academic researchers have a tendency to measure themselves in terms of prestige, a currency always in short supply and which sometimes seems reserved for the top subscription journals. Prestige, Eisen lamented, “is a difficult thing to engineer.” The problems with prestige go beyond scarcity. A 2011 study by Ferric Fang and Arturo Casadevall showed that a journal’s impact factor tended to correlate to its incidence of retraction. Put more simply, the more “influential” a journal was, the more articles it rescinded on the basis of fraud or error. Though there are admittedly several benign reasons behind this—fewer errors pass unnoticed in the widely read journals, for instance, and researchers who rush to publish groundbreaking findings are often treading in territory that is not yet fully understood—they cannot fully account for the shocking spike in retractions that has occurred in the past 10 years. Over the course of a decade in which the number of published papers increased by 44 percent, another 2011 study found, retractions shot up tenfold. Brown, Eisen, Varmus and the PLOS crew have responded by adopting a second strategy for promoting their open access publishing agenda. In addition to PLOS Biology and PLOS Medicine, which attempt to beat existing journals at their own game, the team founded PLOS ONE in 2007 as a means of circumventing prestige and impact factor altogether. “PLOS ONE,” Eisen explained, “dispensed with the notion ... that journals should select only papers of the highest level of interest to their readers,” instead adopting a sole criterion for publication. The open access repository directs its reviewers only to assess whether or not a submission is a technically sound and legitimate work of science. “If it is,” Eisen declared definitively, “it is published.” Although some might object that the PLOS ONE standards could lead to a hyper abundance of shoddy scientific studies, the results observed by Brown, Eisen and Varmus suggest otherwise. In the past five years, for instance, at least five Nobel laureates have published papers in PLOS ONE, and since 2010 an astounding 83 percent of PLOS ONE papers have been cited at least once. (Compare this with the industry-wide five-year citation rate, which has dropped from 45 to 41 percent over the past 20 years.) As the next generation of young, successful scientists comes up, contributions to open access platforms such as PLOS will likely only increase. Raised among failing content distribution dinosaurs like the music industry and Hollywood, few may regret relegating the subscription model of scientific publication to the ash heap of history as well. Chris Bassil, Trinity ’12, is currently working in Boston, Mass. His column runs every Wednesday. You can follow Chris on Twitter @HamsterdamEcon.


edit


April 10, 2013 issue