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T H E I N D E P E N D E N T D A I LY AT D U K E U N I V E R S I T Y

The Chronicle

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2012

ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTH YEAR, ISSUE 73

WWW.DUKECHRONICLE.COM

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Blue Devils desecrate Temple 90-67

Coalition fights NC abortion law

by Daniel Carp THE CHRONICLE

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.—When you play for the winningest coach in college basketball history, sometimes good just is not good enough. The No. 2 Blue Devils were in control from start to finish as they dispatched Temple 90-67 at the Izod Center Saturday afternoon, but head coach Mike Krzyzewski saw room for improvement in his team’s performance. “We were winning on the scoreboard, but we have a higher standard for ourselves. He just thought that we weren’t going out there and playing Duke basketball,” freshman guard Rasheed Sulaimon said. “We weren’t playing hard enough, we weren’t rebounding and we weren’t communicating on defense. Those were little things that could come back to bite us in the butt if we don’t nip it in the bud right now.” Krzyzewski was not subtle about these feelings during the game, laying into his team during a number of timeouts throughout the contest. Nevertheless, following a convincing 23-point victory, Krzyzewski lauded his team for its maturity. “I’ve had some great teams, but this team has a characteristic about it that the really outstanding teams I’ve had had,” Krzyzewski said. “And that is they fight—they fight together. SEE M. BASKETBALL ON PAGE 11

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY JISOO YOON

A physician reads the state-mandated script to a patient seeking an abortion as required by the Woman’s Right to Know Act. North Carolina abortion providers are currently fighting certain aspects of the act. by Danielle Muoio ity of an injunction against the Woman’s the ultrasound for women seeking an THE CHRONICLE Right to Know Act clause that requires abortion. Physicians in the state are being North Carolina physicians are contest- women receive ultrasounds before get- represented in the proceedings by interest ing what they believe is a medically un- ting an abortion. The injunction, enacted groups including Planned Parenthood, founded abortion law in legal proceedings by U.S. District Judge Catherine Eagles the American Civil Liberties Union and this month. following the law’s ratification, currently A state hearing will determine the legal- keeps physicians from having to perform SEE ABORTION ON PAGE 7

Tough job market pushes law Alex Swain talks schools to reduce class sizes DSG goals, successes DUKE STUDENT GOVERNMENT

by Georgia Parke THE CHRONICLE

In response to the current economic climate, many law schools are reducing their incoming class sizes, a recent survey shows. The survey, conducted annually by Kaplan Test Prep, polled admissions officers from 123 American Bar Associationaccredited law schools this year and found that 51 percent of them have been reducing their class sizes. Additionally, 63 percent of those surveyed cited the job market in the legal industry as an incentive for making cutbacks in enrollment. “Historically speaking, the SEE LAW ON PAGE 5

51

percent of law schools are reducing class sizes.

68

percent of law schools have changed their curriculum to better prepare students professionally.

63

percent of those schools reducing class sizes cite the job market for graduates as a major factor.

47

percent of law schools have increased their financial aid. CHRONICLE GRAPHIC BY LAUREN CARROLL

With law school students facing an increasingly challenging job market, many law schools are reducing their class sizes.

Students & professors react to Fall LDOC, Page 2

This semester, Duke Student Government has worked on several major initiatives, including eliminating the statute of limitations on sexual harassment reporting at the University, finding a suitable replacement for Tailgate and facilitating the implementation of gender-neutral housing on West Campus, among other things. The Chronicle’s Jack Mercola sat down with DSG President Alex Swain, a senior, to talk about the body’s successes so far and goals for the rest of the academic year.

Q&A

The Chronicle: What do you see as DSG’s most prominent successes of the semester? Alex Swain: I think we have had a few really exciting successes this

This is the last issue of The Chronicle for 2012. We will resume daily production on the first day of classes, Jan. 9, 2013. Keep checking www.dukechronicle.com as well as our Facebook and Twitter pages for breaking news throughout winter break. Happy holidays!

semester, the first of which was the elimination of the statute of limitations for incidents of student harassment. That is going to have a great impact on the culture here at Duke. It sends an important message about how sexual harassment is treated at the University. It Alex Swain was a good example of student collaboration-—it was an issue people got really behind. I think we’ve had an amazing football season and pretty good pregame celebrations to match. We’ve SEE SWAIN ON PAGE 3

Need a study break? See inside for puzzles, columns and more.


2 | MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2012

THE CHRONICLE

lastdayoffallclassessoundoff As students departed their classes Friday for the last time in 2012, some enjoyed a Duke University Union-sponsored patch of snow on the Chapel Quadrangle while others headed to Perkins Library for a bit more studying. The Chronicle’s Lauren Paylor spoke with students and professors about the joy and trepidation they were feeling at the end of the semester. “As the end-of-semester tasks accumulate each term, I look forward to the last day of class like a child waiting for Santa Claus. But as soon as it gets here, I suddenly feel a loss—for that semester’s students and for the pleasure I get from teaching.” —Mark Leary, professor of psychology and neuroscience “I’m really looking forward to Fall LDOC but also a bit nervous for my first finals week just around the corner. I had an unforgettable first semester and can’t believe it’s almost over. I couldn’t be more excited for the Spring semester.” —freshman June Zhang “Even though it is not the real LDOC, I am still just as excited as if it was. Words cannot truly describe how much I have already mentally checked out of this semester.” —sophomore Jacob Goyne After overloading this semester and spreading myself thin, this Friday is the greatest present I could ask for! I’m thrilled to put this semester behind me and start anew in DukeImmerse South Africa.” —sophomore Yohana Zecarias “Part of me can’t wait for Friday to come and the other part of me is sad to see it approaching.... I’ve really enjoyed

my classes this semester and don’t want to see them end. It felt really good to come back “home” to Duke this year as a sophomore already knowing my favorite study spot, friends to catch up with and my way around campus. Having this foundation of comfort also allowed for me to get to know more of the awesome people at Duke and step outside my comfort zone in new ways.” —sophomore Sarah Haas “It’s hard to believe that the semester is over already, but I feel like I was able to accomplish so much more this year as a sophomore than last year as a freshman when everything was just so overwhelming. I was also able to connect a lot more with classmates this year, so in a way it is sad that I won’t have those same groups to look forward to meeting with each week. In a way, this week is almost worse than finals week, so it’s also hard to remember that I still have finals to worry about.” —sophomore Lindsey Olivere

possibly a Christmas movie in my common room, among other things.” —junior Lucas Talavan-Becker “I hate to say it, but I’d be way more bummed missing Spring LDOC. And, I am thrilled to be coming back to Duke in January. T minus 26 days. Best of luck to everyone on their finals, and I can’t wait to see you all soon.” —junior Bridget Meaney, currently studying abroad in London, England “My second-to-last LDOC is my STLDOC... and I’m from St. Louis. This was prophesied to happen.” —senior Tejas Pulisetty

“Around this time each semester, a large number of people seem stressed, overwhelmed or distracted for whatever reason. I’ve been in a similar position too, where the work is unfathomably difficult and nearly impossible to get through. But now, almost four years later, I’ve realized that life will go on and that I can get through my work, just as I have in past semesters. I’ve gained a deeper appreciation for the aspects of life that are truly important—not theses, problem sets or policy memos, but pictures of puppies and kittens, selfdeprecating humor and sometimes poop jokes too.” —senior Kevin Hedrick

“First-semester LDOC is more of a half-time than a celebration.” —junior Jackson Morton “It’s kind of anti-climatic. Compared to LDOC in the Spring, Fall LDOC just kind of depresses me.” —junior Brian McSteen “Friday’s LDOC will be a bitter-sweet experience for me. On the one hand, I have successfully completed another semester of engineering at Duke. On the other hand, however, I am one step closer to graduation and the end of my Duke experience. Nonetheless, I will celebrate the day by enjoying the Christmas music in ABP, the church bells resonating from the Chapel and

JISOO YOON/THE CHRONICLE

Students take a break to play in the snow before buckling down for finals. Several inches of man-made snow covered the Chapel Quadrangle Friday morning, in an event sponsored by Duke University Union.

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THE CHRONICLE

had celebrations in front of dorms—-groups could have pre-game celebrations by their sections. Then there was the Tailgating on Main Quad on West Campus. We had a pretty good turnout on that, and we’re looking into how we can tweak that model some and reevaluate it to make it even better for next Fall. Also, we’ve gotten three more gender-neutral houses on West Campus, which is a huge sign of progress for the University. There were three levels of gender-neutral housing accessibility. Level 1 means that it could very easily be turned into a gender-neutral house-—those were Kilgo and Few. All selective students there will be able to have the choice of whether or not to become gender neutral. TC: Talk to me about the elimination of the statute of limitations. How did the success come to fruition? AS: This was an initiative started by Ebonie Simpson [Trinity ’12] who was the vice president for student life last year. She worked with people from the Women’s Center, [women’s issues blog] Develle Dish and others to put together an awareness campaign on the issue. A lot of my advocacy has been taking the momentum she built around the issue, doing more research on the topic, looking into loopholes through which we could get around the [U.S.] Department of Education’s civil rights office’s mandate. We worked to reignite student interest on the issue. It was really great that Ebonie laid the groundwork for our advocacy. We fine-tuned her advocacy and maintained the relationships that she built. We had a student group together that met weekly to discuss the issue. It included three DSG members, including Stefani Jones [vice president for equity and outreach and a junior], interns from the Women’s Center, people from Develle Dish and a few other

passionate non-affiliated students. So we were working with organizations that were great at spreading awareness on the issue. TC: How do you see the result of your success with the statute of limitations, and what does this say about the University? AS: It sends a strong message that if students are passionate about something and have a strong argument, things really can be changed. This changed the University’s culture for the better. It sends a message that if you’re a victim of harassment, Duke supports you-—we’re going to do what we can to make you more comfortable. TC: Another point you mentioned was the thriving culture around the New Tailgating. Tell me about the genesis of the idea, how DSG implemented it and how you improved it throughout the semester. What do you plan to do in coming semesters to improve it? AS: We had a student tailgating team and a tailgating advisory board that was made up of students and administrators from all different parts of the University—student affairs, parking and transit, sanitation and groundskeeping, police, athletics and recreation. We met and discussed how we can support the football team and football culture better than we had in the past. In the future, we want to get that group back together and start talking about the things we want to change. From the Old Tailgate, people really appreciated that it was a place where students could come together, and it didn’t matter your affiliation. With [New Tailgate], students were able to register for locations on the Main Quad and for pre-game celebrations by their sections. So this year it was a bit more segmented. We picked up on that feedback, so we’re looking at ways to make sure this is a chill and fun event but also maintain the community feel that was missing this year. Overall, I’m happy about the way things turned out, but we’re

always looking for ways to make the student experience better. TC: What is on your plate for this year that you have not yet accomplished—such as finding a solution to the issue surrounding freshman parking? AS: We want to work on measuring how students use their cars on campus by getting some numerical data from a student survey. That information can be applied in years down the road in discussions about freshman parking and parking in general. We can relieve some pressure from Duke Parking and Transportation. We can look to those numbers to see what areas of parking can be improved. Right now there are needs from a parking standpoint and sustainability standpoint that are not being fulfilled. We’re in conversations with senior administrators about the scope of the issue. We want to find ways to meet those needs without having to take away freshman parking. We want to evaluate how student life at

Duke works—we want to get more information about parking, get more information about how our Tailgate model works. We want to get more information about social culture. We need to look into the alcohol and event policies and see what the student body and student group leaders think about those policies and make sure the policy expectations are clear. We need to clarify the qualifications for a section party—what types of events are on campus and what are the expectations for each type of event from the administration. TC: What do you believe that will change about social culture? AS: We’re looking to make sure that the expectations are clear so that student groups are not expecting one thing and then experiencing another thing when it comes to implementation of policy. I’ve heard there has been a little grey area when it comes to student expectations and administration implementation of policies.

Man-made snow man

JISOO YOON/THE CHRONICLE

Students build a snow man on the Chapel Quad. Duke University Union brought a snow machine to campus Friday to make up for a warm winter in Durham.

NASHER MUSEUM OF ART AT DUKE UNIVERSITY

Collecting Matisse and Modern Masters THE CONE SISTERS OF BALTIMORE November 4, 2012 – February 10, 2013 LEFT: Henri Matisse, Striped Robe, Fruit, and Anemones, 1940. Oil on canvas, 21 5/8 x 25 5/8 inches (54.9 x 65.1 cm). The Baltimore Museum of Art: The Cone Collection, formed by Dr. Claribel Cone and Miss Etta Cone of Baltimore, Maryland, BMA 1950.263. © 2012 Succession H. Matisse/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

SWAIN from page 1

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2012 | 3

“…a fascinating look at the Cones’ evolving relationships with Picasso and Matisse…” – The New York Times Tickets on sale now: 919-684-4444, nasher.duke.edu/matisse or in person at the museum. Nasher Museum members receive two free tickets per day. This exhibition is organized by The Baltimore Museum of Art, The Jewish Museum, New York, and the Vancouver Art Gallery. In Durham, the exhibition is presented in collaboration with the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. At the Nasher Museum of Art, lead foundation support is provided by the Crow Creek Foundation. Lead corporate support is provided by Wells Fargo. The media sponsor is NBC17.


4 | MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2012

THE CHRONICLE


THE CHRONICLE

LAW from page 1 number of applicants is inversely proportional to how the economy performs,” said Jeff Thomas, director of pre-law programs for Kaplan. “Law schools are adapting the size of their class to reflect the shrinking number of applicants.” Thomas explained that the promise of lucrative jobs following graduation from law school is not what it was six to seven years ago. With the large number of lawyers and law students, the job market for those with a law degree is becoming increasingly competitive. Students are carefully weighing their options when deciding whether or not to apply to law school. “[Law schools] are trying to maintain the same high standards of admission by producing a solid class for whom there will be jobs available,” Thomas said. “They are adapting to provide new opportunities to ensure [students] will graduate more ready than ever.” Ray Koh, a senior and law school applicant, said he feels confident about the job market by the time he graduates with a law degree. “Law schools like Columbia have ridiculously high employment rates—it’s a good time for the job market,” Koh said. “The legal job market is recovering.” Senior Derek Scott, also a law applicant, noted that he feels confident about his future job prospects despite fluctuations in the economy. “No degree is ever a promise, but some schools have it better than others, which was something I really took into account,” Scott wrote in an email Sunday. “I selected ones that I knew I would be happy to attend, as well as ones that had a solid reputation for jobs.”

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2012 | 5

This year’s edition of the annual survey, Thomas noted, contained questions regarding entering class sizes for the first time in order to highlight the effects of the economy on law school applicants. The survey also highlighted a positive consequence of having law schools reduce their class sizes. In response to the shrinking class sizes, law schools’ financial aid will increase for those who are accepted. According to the survey, 47 percent of law schools have increased financial aid to students for the 2012-2013 cycle, while 41 percent claimed that the school has maintained their level of financial aid from previous years. Adaptations based on the economy have also come in the form of curriculum changes. The majority of law schools polled in the survey have made alterations in order to make students more prepared for the job market. “A number of schools—68 percent— have already changed their curriculum,” Thomas said. “Fourteen percent of the remaining schools have plans in the works to change.” Thomas cited New York University Law School as an example of one of many schools changing the focus of their third year to include more practical applications, such as client representation and specialization in specific topics. Acceptance rates, Thomas noted, will not be affected by the reduced size of law school classes, as law schools seek a consistent rate of those attending and those applying and do not intend to simply become more selective. “We have seen little adjustment in acceptance rates,” Thomas said. “Law schools have no interest in lowering the threshold—they will be graduating fewer applicants with a high echelon.”

Festival of Lights

NICOLE SAVAGE/THE CHRONICLE

Junior Jessye Waxman lights a candle on a menorah Saturday for the first night of Hanukkah at a ceremony held by the Duke Jewish Students Union on the Bryan Center Plaza.

Time is money. Don’t waste either. Most Flexible Spending Accounts expire December 31st.

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6 | MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2012

THE CHRONICLE

OUR ENTIRE ORGANIZATION JOINS IN SENDING YOU

Holiday Greetings and we wish you a New Year of Health, Happiness and Prosperity.

- The Staff of Duke University Stores®

The following is a listing of the store hours for the Winter Holiday Break. The East Campus Store will be closed from Monday, December 17 through Saturday, January 5. Uncle Harry’s will be closed from Sunday, December 16 through Sunday, January 6.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15* *

Stores not listed are open regular hours. East Campus Store .......................... 12noon - 5pm Lobby Shop ............................................9am - 5pm Uncle Harry’s ...................................9:30am - 6pm

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16* *

Stores not listed are open regular hours. East Campus Store .......................... 12noon - 5pm Lobby Shop ....................................... 12noon - 5pm

MONDAY, DECEMBER 17 - THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20* *

Stores not listed are open regular hours. Computer Store...............................8:30am - 5pm Gothic Bookshop .............................8:30am - 5pm Lobby Shop ......................................8:30am - 5pm Textbook Store ................................8:30am - 5pm University Store ..............................8:30am - 5pm

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21 & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22* *

All stores and offices are closed except as noted: Computer Store...............................8:30am - 5pm Gothic Bookshop .............................8:30am - 5pm Lobby Shop ......................................8:30am - 5pm Textbook Store ................................8:30am - 5pm University Store ..............................8:30am - 5pm

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 23* *

All stores and offices are closed except as noted: Lobby Shop ....................................... 12noon - 5pm Nasher Museum Store .............. 12noon - 4:45pm Terrace Shop..................................... 12noon - 5pm

MONDAY, DECEMBER 24 & TUESDAY, DECEMBER 25 *

All stores and offices are closed except as noted: Office Products (Monday) ...................8am - 5pm

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 26 & THURSDAY, DECEMBER 27* *

Stores not listed are open regular hours. Computer Store...............................8:30am - 5pm Gothic Bookshop .............................8:30am - 5pm Lobby Shop ......................................8:30am - 5pm Textbook Store ................................8:30am - 5pm University Store ..............................8:30am - 5pm

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28* *

Stores not listed are open regular hours. Computer Store...............................8:30am - 5pm Gothic Bookshop .............................8:30am - 5pm Lobby Shop ......................................8:30am - 5pm Medical Center Bookstore ................. 10am - 4pm Textbook Store ................................8:30am - 5pm University Store ..............................8:30am - 5pm

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29* *

All stores and offices are closed except as noted: Nasher Museum Store ................. 10am - 4:45pm

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 30* *

All stores and offices are closed except as noted: Nasher Museum Store .............. 12noon - 4:45pm

MONDAY, DECEMBER 31 & TUESDAY, JANUARY 1* *

All stores and offices are closed except as noted: Office Products (Monday) ...................8am - 5pm


THE CHRONICLE

ABORTION from page 1 the Center for Reproductive Rights. Although many North Carolina physicians contest the medical necessity of the entire act, this case will only determine the fate of the ultrasound component of the law, which is currently enjoined, said Andrew Beck, an attorney for the ACLU who is arguing for the injunction. The matter is currently undergoing summary judgment briefing, which means the defendants and plaintiffs are arguing their respective sides to Eagles. If Eagles can come to a final decision as to whether the injunction should be upheld, the case will not go to trial. If it does go to trial, it is expected to begin in January. The Woman’s Right to Know Act requires that patients seeking an abortion in North Carolina must wait 24 hours before the procedure, receive scripted counseling and get an ultrasound. The law passed both houses of the state General Assembly in June 2011, but Gov. Bev Perdue vetoed the bill later that month. The Senate overturned the veto late July 2011, and the law went into effect that October. During the ultrasound procedure, patients must be given the opportunity to view the image of a fetus, have the image described to them and be offered the opportunity to hear the fetus’ heart tone. “There’s no medical basis to [the ultrasound requirement] whatsoever,” said Dr. Serina Floyd, an obstetrician and gynecologist at Duke Medicine and a plaintiff in this case. “It’s entirely ethical, moral and political and not in any way medically based.” Floyd added that the intent of the ultrasound component of the law is to change patients’ minds so that they keep the child. She noted, however, that it not only does not work but also makes an already difficult process even harder for the patient. District Attorney Benjamin David, one of the act’s defendants, could not be reached for comment. Sen. Jim Davis, RMacon, who voted for the act, also could not be reached for comment in time for publication. William Meyer, an associate clinical professor in the departments of obstetrics and gynecology and psychiatry who provides counseling to patients post-abortion, said the ultrasound component of the law has the potential to incur psychologically damaging effects. “The idea that we should take something that is already difficult and painful and say, ‘Not only is this difficult and painful, but we are really going to up the ante and make you pay psychologically by rubbing something in your face because we don’t like the decision you’re making,’ I think it’s damaging, paternalistic and imposing,” he said. ‘Vexing and complicated’ The law came in the wake of other abortion restrictions rippling throughout the country last year, Floyd said. According to a brief released by Guttmacher Institute Dec. 1, 35 states currently require women to receive counseling before an abortion, 27 detail the type of information women must be given, and 26 specify a time period women must wait before an abortion. Floyd noted that prior to the legislation, North Carolina already had restricted access to abortions. In many states, the gestational age limit—the period in pregnancy after which an abortion is considered “late term”—is 24 weeks, she said. In North Carolina, the limit is 20 weeks. “All over the country, states are trying hard to further restrict access to abortions, and North Carolina jumped on that bandwagon when it passed the legislation,” she said. Although the current trial only looks at the ultrasound requirement, physicians at Duke noted issues with other aspects of the act. Meyer said he completely opposes mandated counseling, for example, because it could have psychologically damaging effects. “What might be right for one person might be damaging for another,” he said. “These are vexing and complicated issues and any attempt to simplify them and say, ‘What is right for one might be necessary for everyone’—well, I don’t think we can go there.” The mandatory counseling states the medical risks associated with an abortion as well as the risks involved in carrying a pregnancy to term. There is also a portion of the script that discusses potential alternatives to abortion. “There are alternatives to abortion, including keeping the baby or giving up the baby for adoption,” reads an excerpt from the state-mandated script. “If you decide to continue the pregnancy the father of the baby is liable to assist in the support of the child, even if he has agreed to pay for the abortion.” Dr. Jessica Morse, an obstetrician and gynecologist at Duke Medicine, said the script does not take into consideration that women receiving abortions may not have had a choice. Women may have had to terminate the pregnancy, for example, because either the fetus will not survive childbirth or they themselves are at risk should they go through with the pregnancy. “It’s insulting for me to have to tell her that the father of the baby, by state law, would be required to pay child support when she wishes to have that child,” Morse said.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2012 | 7

Fueling up

CAROLINE RODRIGUEZ/THE CHRONICLE

Students relieve stress by dancing in the Great Hall before eating Midnight Breakfast Sunday night before the start of finals week.

Get great deals on preselected items on Wednesday, December 12 with the

12 Items for 12 at 12noon Promotion $

only in The University Store Choose from the following items: Duke Wine Glass with pewter Gothic Duke and Shield Duke 16oz Pilsner Glass with pewter Gothic Duke and Shield Duke Pub Glass with pewter Gothic Duke and Shield Duke RetroBar Cap by The Game Duke Khaki Camouflage Snapback Cap by The Game Duke Tradition Scarf by Tradition Scarves Duke Stocking by Forever Collectibles Duke Ceramic Oval Platter by Magnolia Lane Duke Ceramic Deviled Egg Dish by Magnolia Lane Duke Ceramic Plate by Magnolia Lane Duke Clutch by Sara Duke Therma-FIT Glove by Nike

The above items are regularly priced from $1695 to $2495. The 20% discount will not be given on the above items from 12noon - 7pm on Wednesday, December 12. Upper Level, Bryan Center, West Campus Phone: 919.684.2344 Monday - Wednesday: 8:30am - 7pm Thursday & Friday: 8:30am - 8pm Saturday: 9am - 6pm Department of Duke University Stores®


8 | MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2012

THE CHRONICLE

WORK SMART, PLAY WELL

NOW HIRING

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BASKETBALL OFFICIALS NEEDED FOR SPRING INTRAMURAL SEASON.

Interviews January 7-11. $10/hour.

OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT RENTALS

Contact Matt Holdren at mholdren@duaa.duke.edu

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if interested in a position.

CLIMBING WALL WILL BE CLOSED DEC 9 - JAN 9

INTERESTED IN JOINING A SPORT CLUB? FROM SWIMMING TO RUGBY, BASEBALL & MORE, DUKE OFFERS 38 DIFFERENT SPORT CLUBS FOR STUDENTS TO COMPETE!

EXAM STRESS? VISIT RECREATION.DUKE.EDU FOR TIPS FOR DEALING WITH EXAM STRESS!

CONGRATULATIONS AT NATIONALS

Did you know? A balanced diet plays a significant role in promoting a relaxed and healthy state of mind, which can result in better performance during exams.

3rd TIED

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4th

MTN. BIKING

GOOD LUCK on EXAMS!

SPECIAL HOURS OF OPERATION

WINTER/EXAMS 2012

Exam and winter break hours begin December 1st! Please visit recreation.duke.edu for updated hours for all facilities.


Sports

>> ONLINE

The Chronicle

MONDAY December 10, 2012

Make sure to visit the website and the sports blog all throughout break for Belk Bowl and Duke basketball coverage. sports.chronicleblogs.com

www.dukechroniclesports.com

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Rest keys Curry’s success against Temple by Bobby Colton THE CHRONICLE

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.—Things haven’t been easy for Seth Curry this season, even if he made it look that way in Duke’s 90-67 victory against Temple. The senior guard from Charlotte has faced adversity since even before the season started. Curry has been battling a lower leg injury that has kept him out of practice for most of the season, and he suffered a new injury—to his left ankle—in the second half of Duke’s 73-68 victory against Ohio State. The new injury kept him on the sidelines when the Blue Devils hosted Delaware last Saturday at Cameron Indoor Stadium. “[Seth is] a terrific scorer, he’s learned to be a really good defender, and he can handle,” head coach Mike Krzyzewski said. “It’s just sad that he’s had to manage this injury the way he has.” More than anything, the injuries seem to be affecting Curry’s consistency and durability on the court. During Duke’s first Battle 4 Atlantis game against Minnesota, Curry wowed the Blue Devil faithful with 25 points in 33 minutes of action, knocking down 8-of-11 shots from the field, including a perfect 3-of-3 from beyond the arc. Curry’s play declined over the next two days, however, when Duke

23 points After scoring just four points against Ohio State and sitting out against Delaware, Seth Curry looked alive again with 23 points on 7-of-11 shooting.

12/20 3s

With good ball movement all game, Duke had no trouble getting open looks on the perimeter and it showed, as the Blue Devils hit 12-of-20 3-pointers.

22/29 FTs BRIANNA SIRACUSE/THE CHRONICLE

Curry made it rain against Temple, hitting 5-of-9 3-pointers and 7-of-11 field goals en route to a 23-point performance, his second highest mark of the season. matched up with Virginia Commonwealth and then-No. 2 Louisville. In those two games Curry made just 6-of-20 field goals and 2-of-12 from deep. His fatigue carried over into the Ohio State game, where he connected on just 1-of-6 attempts, scoring only four points—his lowest point total since the 2011 NCAA tournament loss to Arizona, in which he scored three points in nine minutes. “[Seth] usually has his shot,” Krzyzewski said. “I have ultimate confidence in Seth. He doesn’t practice much so you don’t know if he’s going to be sharp.” The only cure for Curry’s woes seems to be time off, and that’s exactly what Curry got by resting during the Delaware game last Saturday and having a full week without a game before Duke’s tilt with Temple. “The ankle feels good. I got some rest and it did me real well, and both my shin and my ankle kind of got refueled a little,” Curry said. Refueled they were, as Curry lit up the Owl defense, en route to a 23-point explosion highlighted by 5-of-9 shooting on 3-pointers. “Seth really gave us a spark,” senior forward Mason Plumlee said. “He was hitting shots and playing well.” Curry got off to a good start in the first half, but really showed his dominance during a 1:12 stretch late in the second half. With Duke’s lead at only 14, Curry got to the free throw line and connected with a pair of free throws. He then buried consecutive shots—including one of his five three-

Duke dominated at the foul line, hitting 22-of-29 free throws compared to 1-of-4 for Temple. Ryan Kelly led the way, hitting 7-of-8 attempts.

pointers—on the Blue Devils’ next two possessions, going on his own 7-0 run to push Duke’s lead to 20. He topped off the run by drawing a charge on the next possession. “Once he gets going you have to keep calling stuff for him,” Krzyzewski said. “We just went exclusively to him.” With final exams on the way, the Blue Devils have another long layoff before playing their next game. “That’s going to be good for me personally, to get some rest and try to stay sharp,” Curry said. Weirder, perhaps, than the long layoffs, is the fact that when Duke does return to game action they will be hosting Cornell and Elon on back-to-back days, December 19 and 20. Given the tenuous nature of Curry’s injury, the scheduling may prove to be a

problem. “I’m planning on [playing both games of the back-to-back],” Curry said. “I’m taking it day by day. You never know how I’ll feel after that first game, [but] I’m planning on playing every game.” The Blue Devils have capable backups should Curry miss time, as freshmen Amile Jefferson and Alex Murphy have shown the past two games, but Curry’s play cannot be replaced. Second on the team in scoring—trailing Plumlee—with 16.1 points per game, this Duke team can only go as far as Curry’s legs can carry it. “I think he’s really as good as any so-called twoguard,” Krzyzewski said. “A huge thing for us [all season] will be managing Seth’s injury.”


10 | MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2012

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WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Blue Devils tame the Red Storm in New York by Karl Kingma THE CHRONICLE

NEW YORK CITY—Just nine months ago, St. John’s made a Cinderella run in the tournament, only to be cut short in the regional semifinals by Duke. The Red Storm sought revenge this Sunday against the Blue Devils, but did not find it. No. 4 Duke defeated St. John’s 60-42 at Madison Square Garden Sunday afternoon, giving the Blue Devils (8-0) five consecutive vicDUKE 60 tories against the Red Storm (4-3). 42 SJU The teams came out in the first half playing fairly evenly. Whether it was the jitters of Madison Square Garden or the fatigue of travel, head coach Joanne P. McCallie was not pleased with the Blue Devils’ opening minutes. “We came out pretty flat defensively initially and traded baskets,” McCallie said. “Defensively we were a step slow.” Despite the slow start, Duke found its rhythm with a 15-2 run behind sophomore center Elizabeth Williams. The center was assertive on both ends, finishing a big three-point play midway through the first period and defending the Blue Devils’ basket with huge blocks. St. John’s head coach Joe Tartamella had high praise for Williams, who recorded a team-high 16 points, seven rebounds and five blocks. “She’s a great player,” Tartamella said. “She’s an All-American… has tremendous talent, and she’s stepped up for [Duke].” On the other side of the floor, aggressive guard Nadirah McKenith led the Red

BRIANNA SIRACUSE/THE CHRONICLE

Sophomore center Elizabeth Williams recorded 16 points, seven rebounds and five blocks—all of which were team highs—in Duke’s win against St. John’s. Storm with 19 points and two steals. Without much help offensively, however, she also turned the ball over eight times. Duke, on the other hand, had scoring depth as junior Haley Peters added 11 points along with five rebounds. Peters played well in tandem with Williams— high-low action between the two frontcourt players resulted in quality shots throughout the game.

Ka’lia Johnson was an important addition off the bench for Duke, scoring 10 points in 23 minutes. Four of the sophomore’s points came off explosive backdoor cuts, which resulted in easy layups. McCallie recognized the spark she provided, scoring 10 of the Blue Devils’ 14 bench points. “I thought Ka’lia Johnson off the bench was a big X-factor for us,” McCallie said.

The Blue Devils extended their lead even further in the final two minutes of the first half, thanks in no small part to two picturesque jumpers from junior Tricia Liston. St. John’s lost coverage discipline on two consecutive possessions, and Liston punished this indiscretion with back-to-back 3-pointers, extending Duke’s SEE W. BASKETBALL ON PAGE 11


THE CHRONICLE

M. BASKETBALL from page 1 They don’t play, they compete and they fight…. A little bit today at times I thought that they forgot about it but then they got right back.” It did not take long for Duke (9-0) to extend its lead to double digits in the early-going, utilizing a 16-4 run midway through the first half, featuring the team’s sharpshooting from beyond the arc. The run was bookended by 3-pointers from Tyler Thornton and Seth Curry and gave the Blue Devils a 29-14 advantage with 8:01 remaining in the half. Temple (6-1) could not stop Curry, who led all scorers with 23 points and knocked down five triples on the afternoon. “Curry was great, absolutely great. [Quinn] Cook was great,” Temple head coach Fran Dunphy said. “As good as [Mason] Plumlee and [Ryan] Kelly were inside, the guys that just hammered us were Curry and Cook. [Curry] is just tough enough to say ‘I’m going to make this shot.’” Cook put on one of his best offensive displays of the season in the victory, adding 14 points on 5-of-8 from the field and 3-of-4 from long range. He commanded both ends of the floor, adding three steals as well. But the Blue Devils seemed to lack a spark in the first half on the defensive glass, being outrebounded by an undersized Owl squad 19-17—allowing 10 offensive rebounds—and coming away with just two steals. Temple’s shots began to fall from outside as the first half drew to a close, but Duke still held a comfortable 46-32 cushion heading into the locker room. Picking up the defensive intensity in the second half, the Blue Devils finally seemed to fall into a groove on both ends of the floor. Holding Temple’s two leading scorers, senior guard Khalif Wyatt and senior forward Scootie Randall, to just 12 combined points in the contest, Duke’s pressure was relentless in the second half. “We just came back in the locker room and got our focus back,” Sulaimon said. “We wanted to defend as a team and rebound collectively. We just went back out there, and I think that’s what makes us so much better this year, is that

vacationgames Duke has 11 days in between games for finals following Saturday’s win vs. Temple. Here’s a look at the games over break: >>Wednesday 12/19 vs. Cornell—The Blue Devils take on the Big Red (4-5) at Cameron Indoor Stadium. >>Thursday 12/20 vs. Elon—Duke will have its stamina tested with a game just a day later, taking on Elon (6-3), also at home. >>Saturday 12/29 vs. Santa Clara—After a small break for Christmas, Duke will continue its homestand against the Broncos (6-2). >>Wednesday 1/2 vs. Davidson—The Blue Devils begin 2013 in Charlotte against the Wildcats (5-4). we see what we have to do in the second half and we go out there and adjust.” The threes continued to rain down for the Blue Devils in the second half, with shots from Cook, Curry and Kelly keeping the game at a comfortable margin. Temple found a way to hang around in the second half and was able to draw back within 12 with 6:37 to play, but Curry took over once again, scoring seven straight points to push Duke’s lead back up 20 and put the game out of reach. Fittingly, he sealed his personal run with his final triple of the night. Duke’s performance from outside even seemed to overshadow double-doubles by both of its big men, Plumlee and Kelly, who both struggled from the field throughout the game but got to the free throw line and contributed to the Blue Devils’ 22-for-29 performance from the charity stripe. Plumlee managed to record 16 points and 14 rebounds and Kelly added 14 points and 10 boards. Temple, by contrast, rarely visited the foul line, hitting just 1-of-4 free throws. As the Blue Devils head into the back half of their nonconference slate with contests against Cornell and Elon after an 11-day hiatus, Mason will likely not be the only Plumlee you see on the floor. His brother Marshall—who is yet to appear in a game for Duke after redshirting last season—warmed up with the team today and should be available the next time the Blue Devils take the floor. “He’s really close. I’d be surprised if he doesn’t play in the next two games,” Krzyzewski said. “He did practice the last couple of days, partially. So if we had to, he could have played today.”

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2012 | 11

W. BASKETBALL from page 10 lead to 13. Those two shots weree her only makes of the game, but they weree critical in giving Duke a cushion. “Tricia is a tough competitor,” mpetitor,” McCallie said. “Those two o threes were pretty big I would say. Answering nswering the bell there… coming off the screens ’s a tough the way she did. She’s competitor.” The Blue Devils’ lead d did not fall below 11 for the rest est of the game. McCallie mixed in n 2-3 and ong with 3-2 trapping zones, along man-to-man and full court ourt pressure. Although it was not flawless, Duke’s defense did well in limiting the ies throughout Red Storm’s opportunities the second half.

St. John’s fought to keep things close, but struggled to find its shoo shooting touch. The loss of combo guard Aliyyah Handford, Hand who fouled out with just over 10 minutes to p play, appeared to be a demoralizing blow for the Red Storm. ano Although another double-digit victory is certainly encouraging encou for the Blue Devils, they still acknowledged acknow that there is room for improvem improvement, as they have after every victory th this season. Duke does not play again until Dec. 21 with fin final exams taking place during the next week, and Williams said the team will use that time to improve its offensive efficiency after a season-low 60-point eeffort. “There were times when we weren’t very patie patient,” Williams said. “We took shots earl early in the shot clock when [we] could have kept running our offense. We know better and we can improve.”


12 | MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2012

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CLASSIFIEDS ANNOUNCEMENTS

Open Courses in Public Policy Studies Enroll now! There’s still space available!! Spring 2013 Gridlock: Can Our System Address America’s Big Challenges?

PUBPOL 290.30

TH 4:40-7:10, Taylor This course will examine the current state of American politics and aspects of our system that are preventing America from addressing the large scale challenges. We will explore not only the problems of hyperpartisanship causing gridlock in the federal government, but other trends such as media fragmentation, cultural and demographic changes, campaign finance, and other aspects of our electoral system. A core focus of the course will be the origins and possible solutions to the U.S. debt problem. We will also examine how gridlock is inhibiting our ability to address other long term challenges such as energy dependence and climate change, international trade, and immigration. The second half of the course will explore ideas for reform to alleviate gridlock. Students will conduct an research project analyzing a reform proposal.

PUBPOL 290S.03 US Poverty Policy TTH 1:25-2:40, Gassman-Pines U.S. poverty policy has seen a dramatic overhaul in the last twenty years, with the “end of welfare as we know it” and its replacement with a complicated set of piecemeal programs. At the same time, significant new issues have arisen that the creators and critics of welfare reform did not anticipate. This course begins with a brief overview of the history of poverty policy and the context in which the 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act was passed. Next, we will examine each of the major current anti-poverty policies individually to see what its rationale is, how it is meeting its goals, and how it might be improved. The final portion will evaluate what we have learned in the last two decades about how to improve anti-poverty efforts. Each class member will generate a recommendation for how to improve some aspect of anti-poverty policy.

PUBPOL 590S.01 Economics, Policy and

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email: advertising@chronicle.duke.edu fax to: 919-684-8295 phone orders: (919)-684-3811 ADVERTISERS: Please check your advertisement for errors on the first day of publication. If you find an error, please call 919-684-3811. The Chronicle only accepts responsibility for the first incorrect day for ads entered by our office staff. We cannot offer make-good runs for errors in ads placed online by the customer.

ATTENTION SOPHOMORES: Are you thinking about getting a PhD? THE MELLON MAYS UNDERGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM AT DUKE IS CURRENTLY RECRUITING SOPHOMORES FOR ITS TWO-YEAR FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM

Literature

We are hosting an information session for interested students on Monday, December 10 at 4:00 p.m. 011 Allen Building

Social theories generally are embedded in literature, particularly African American literature, and carry complex messages about the economic policies appropriate to remedy racial inequality. This course will extract those theories from the texts and subject them to critical scrutiny using evidence from social science research, especially from economics. The writings of Toni Morrison, Charles Johnson, Sherda Williams, William Styron, and Thulani Davis will be included in the course.

If you are seriously considering attending a Ph.D. program after graduation in one of the following disciplines, please plan to attend to learn more!

T 3:05-5:35, Darity

PUBPOL 590S.17 Remaking National

Housing Policy M 3:05-5:35, Park For the first time in recent memory, events in the housing market have triggered severe national and global economic crises with generational implications. Policy challenges posed by home foreclosures and the resulting macroeconomic dislocations are as great as they are complex. An estimated 2.4 million American homeowners will experience a foreclosure in 2009, and almost four times as many during 2009-2012. According to the Federal Reserve, between June 2007 and the end of 2008, just a year into the present recession, American households had already lost more than $15 trillion (22%) of their personal wealth, the fastest decline since the Fed began collecting such data in 1952. The goal of the seminar is to help students gain a sophisticated and nuanced understanding of the contributory causes, consequences, and policy implications of the housing bubble and foreclosure crisis. A secondary goal is to encourage students to become more self-conscious about the ethical dimensions of the problem, and the importance of a strong moral compass in the pursuit of personal and professional goals.

Anthropology and Archeology Area/Cultural/Ethnic/Gender Studies Art History Classics Computer Science Geography and Population Studies Earth/Environmental/

Geological Science and Ecology English Film, Cinema and Media Studies (theoretical focus) Musicology and Ethnomusicology Foreign Languages and Literature History Linguistics Literature Mathematics

Oceanographic/Marine/ Atmospheric/Planetary Science Performance Studies (theoretical focus) Philosophy and Political Theory Physics and Astronomy Religion and Theology Sociology Theater (non-performance focus)

The goal of the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship Program, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, is to increase the number of underrepresented minority students (African American, Hispanic/Latino-a American and Native American) and others with a demonstrated commitment to eradicating racial disparities who will pursue PhDs in core fields in the arts and sciences. Mellon Mays fellows receive two years of support, an annual stipend of $7,500 ($3,900 for the summer and $1,800 each semester), a $750 summer housing allowance, and an annual research travel budget of $600. In addition, each senior fellow receives a $400 research budget to cover project-related expenses and a $600 allocation for a GRE prep course. Each mentor receives a yearly award of $800. For further information and application materials, check our website:

http://undergraduateresearch.duke.edu/programs/mmuf Questions? Contact: Dr. Kerry Haynie, 660-4366 (klhaynie@duke.edu); Ms. Deborah Wahl, 684-6066 (deborah.wahl@duke.edu)


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MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2012 | 13

Diversions Shoe Chris Cassatt and Gary Brookins

Dilbert Scott Adams

,

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis ACROSS 1 Jellystone Park bear 5 Mazda roadster 10 Pre-K basics 14 Mary Kay competitor 15 Crop up 16 Female WWII gp. 17 __ ring 18 Cub-turned-radio co-host Ron 19 Thornfield Hall governess 20 *“I’m counting on you!” 23 Foil giant 25 Chi.-based flier 26 Rebellious Turner 27 *Nervous Nellie 31 Wind-borne silt deposit 33 Set (down) 34 Suffix with hero 35 Last inning, usually 36 *“By all means!” 39 Miserly 41 “__ little teapot ...” 42 Rank above cpl. 45 Unhappy spectator 46 *Bar’s business booster, in theory 49 Saturn, for one 50 SoCal ball club, on scoreboards 52 Teeny-tiny 53 Singer of the feel-good a cappella #1 hit whose title begins the answers to starred clues 58 Madison Avenue award 59 Congo creature with notable stripes 60 Look (like) 63 Vocal quartet member 64 Send payment 65 Sporty car roof 66 Piece of work 67 Like a Siberian Husky’s ears 68 W-2 IDs DOWN 1 Thanksgiving veggie 2 Lacto-__ vegetarian

Doonesbury Garry Trudeau

By Amy Johnson

3 One way to relieve pent-up emotion 4 Like some pools 5 Majority 6 Suffix with myth 7 OXY target 8 “Shame on you!” 9 Bakery lure 10 Spellbound 11 Civil War weapon 12 School fundraiser 13 Hunting dogs pick them up 21 Aye’s opposite 22 Novelist Bret Easton __ 23 Shoemaker’s holemaker 24 Hawaii’s Mauna __ 28 Chicken 29 Whichever 30 Aqua __: platinum dissolver 32 Great Lakes prov. 35 Spring tide counterpart 36 Quilting party 37 Ahead of schedule 38 Plate cleaner, at times

12/10/12

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39 Top-selling Toyota 40 Tolkien’s Shire dwellers 42 Petrarchan works 43 “Good Will Hunting” director Van Sant 44 Test, as one’s patience 45 Lynx family member 46 Unauthorized user?

12/10/12

47 “__ out!” 48 Stickups 51 Dean Martin’s “That’s __” 54 Reserve 55 Starlet’s goal 56 Homer’s “Iliad,” for one 57 “Hud” director Martin 61 Forever and a day 62 AWOLs avoid them

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14 | MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2012

Program too much The expansion of Program in traditional majors benefit II has been discussed as a pos- from strong academic commusible avenue to achieve the in- nities. Regardless of choosing terdisciplinary goals that Dean to major in chemistry or reliof Arts and Sciences Laurie gion, you join a department Patton has outlined for Trin- of interested students and elite ity College. Proprofessors that gram II fills an will collectively editorial important but advance your small niche at the University. learning. Students themselves But it should not be expand- cannot recreate this infrastruced for the sheer purpose of ture—and the intellectual cafurthering interdisciplinarity, maraderie that accompanies which can be fostered in more it—by taking courses ad-hoc rigorous ways. across departments. Enrolling in Program II reWe also question the abilplaces the undergraduate re- ity of an undergraduate— quirement of a pre-determined especially a mere freshman or major, or Program I, with a self- sophomore—to design his or constructed major of courses her own Program II curricudistributed across departments. lum. First of all, curricula in Although students can build traditional departments are detheir own educational experi- signed by experts in the field. ence, it has significant draw- They are time-tested. Students backs. For example, students have a more limited grasp of

Horse slaughter has never been and will never be humane. The answers are education, gelding clinics, euthanasia clinics and regulations on those who breed for quantity, not quality. Slaughter is not the answer. —“Deedie Fay Cameron” commenting on the column “Horse slaughter in the U.S.” See more at www.dukechronicle.com.

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YESHWANTH KANDIMALLA, Editor LAUREN CARROLL, Managing Editor JULIAN SPECTOR, News Editor ANDREW BEATON, Sports Editor CHRIS DALL, Photography Editor MAGGIE LAFALCE, Editorial Page Editor KATHERINE ZHANG, Editorial Board Chair PARKER KUIVILA, Managing Editor for Online JIM POSEN, Director of Online Operations CHRISSY BECK, General Manager KRISTIE KIM, University Editor TIFFANY LIEU, Local & National Editor ANDREW LUO, Health & Science Editor CAROLINE RODRIGUEZ, News Photography Editor PHOEBE LONG, Design Editor MICHAELA DWYER, Recess Editor SOPHIA DURAND, Recess Photography Editor SCOTT BRIGGS, Editorial Page Managing Editor MATTHEW CHASE, Towerview Editor ADDISON CORRIHER, Towerview Photography Editor NICOLE KYLE, Social Media Editor SAMANTHA BROOKS, Senior Editor REBECCA DICKENSON, Advertising Director MARY WEAVER, Operations Manager DAVID RICE, Director of External Relations

the intellectual landscape they enter, usually too little to responsibly chart a route through the landscape. Given the lack of syllabus archives and online course synopses, students looking to cobble together a cohesive suite of courses hardly have enough information to understand a course’s content prior to taking it. Furthermore, many Program II graduates tend to focus their degrees on solving problems instead of gaining pure knowledge. These two goals are intimately related, but we resist the former overtaking the latter. Taken to an extreme, Program II can transform majors into problem solving modules: “Environmental Policy for Developing Nations” and “Quantitative Foundations for Health Policy Decision-Making” are

examples. Duke’s “knowledge in the service of society” ethos is important, but Duke’s greatest service to society is still producing the smartest and best-educated graduates in the highest sense, people who have knowledge above and beyond solving specific problems. The ideal Program II curricula would focus on one of two things: First, learning two or more distinct disciplines and studying their intersection (“Music and Computers” or “Neurophilosophy” are past examples) or, second, a discipline in which Duke does not have an established program. For the former objective, interdepartmental majors are an underpublicized and underutilized option that could meet this need. Rather than double majoring, students can

combine the cores and elective requirements of two majors and benefit from each department’s advising infrastructures. For the latter objective, if Duke does not offer a certain program, the student should recognize that Duke may not have the appropriate academic resources to accomplish the student’s academic goals. Expanding Program II is a serious matter. It risks lowering the standard of rigorousness for a Duke degree by providing less academic infrastructure and camaraderie. It also suggests a radical reconceptualization of the purpose of the Duke degree, which is becoming increasingly customizable. Interdisciplinarity can still be achieved, and often with better results, in a traditional Program I.

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The Chronicle is published by the Duke Student Publishing Company, Inc., a non-profit corporation independent of Duke University. The opinions expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of Duke University, its students, faculty, staff, administration or trustees. Unsigned editorials represent the majority view of the editorial board. Columns, letters and cartoons represent the views of the authors. To reach the Editorial Office at 301 Flowers Building, call 684-2663 or fax 684-4696. To reach the Business Office at 103 West Union Building, call 684-3811. To reach the Advertising Office at 101 West Union Building call 684-3811 or fax 684-8295. Visit The Chronicle Online at http://www.dukechronicle.com. © 2012 The Chronicle, Box 90858, Durham, N.C. 27708. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the prior, written permission of the Business Office. Each individual is entitled to one free copy.

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ostalgia is inherent to this part of the year. is always busy, and sometimes discussing your The holidays, a full year to reflect on and past or issues that you are facing can feel like you exams to procrastinate for can always pro- are burdening those around you. As a culture we voke a hearty reminisce. Personally, as Christmas have become so obsessed with our own goals that approaches, my mind usually wanwe seem closed to discussing the ders to childhood and the extreme goals and problems of others. This lengths I went through to fool my can lead to those in need feeling little sister into believing in Santa— stressed, ignored and alone. and pretty much anything else. During my time at Duke, thanks (One time I convinced her that the to organizations like Project BUILD, song “Cotton Eye Joe” is a true, woePeer For You and my amazing soful lament about a blind foundling rority, I have not personally expewho ran away from his foster home. rienced this feeling. Yet I have felt lillie reed WHERE DID YOU COME FROM, another side of excessively pointed wumbology WHERE DID YOU GO?!) behavior. At Duke I have based I was always a really weird kid. most of my decisions around what In fact, I used to thank people for calling me makes me happy, but I have found that this is not weird. I also insisted for about four years that a good enough explanation for many people. And people call me “Bean.” The only video of me when others decide that my reasoning for my befrom my childhood is of me saying that caramel havior is subpar, they find it their right to ascribe is for old people. Things haven’t changed much their own. There must be some clearly articulated, as I’ve aged. Caramel still sucks. I still put huge tangible goal that I am driving for. Every behavior stock in the strange, the weird and the random. must be thought-out and properly justified. And as I’ve entered college, I’ve come to truly As a Baby Einstein myself, I once let goals appreciate all things pointless. govern most everything I did. But after a while, What?! Pointless?!! The very idea can feel for- having to explain every behavior to myself and eign to the high-achieving college student. Since to others became exhausting. So I changed mawe were Baby Einsteins, we’ve all likely been rack- jors. I stopped doing things solely to look good ing up extracurriculars and volunteer hours, tak- (whether to future employers, to parents or to ing all AP classes—all with the clear point of get- friends), and started engaging in activities that ting into college. truly make me happy. As a part of this, I applied If you’re like me, you foolishly expected col- to write for The Chronicle. My goal? That beyond lege to be free of this excessively goal-driven be- perhaps making people giggle, my column would havior. I whole-heartedly believed in the ethereal be completely and utterly pointless. land of self-discovery and exploration that was Next semester, I will be stepping down from purported by movies, parents and Asher Roth my post as a Socialite. Masquerading with this songs. But those days are long gone. Now college label has been an amazing experience. But as is where you groom yourself to be the best candi- much fun as I had, it didn’t serve to forward me date for whatever you want to do post-grad. in some sort of long-term goal. I didn’t expect I’m not saying that having goals and working my writing in The Chronicle to land me a job to attain them is bad. Caring about things and or make me popular or get me a boyfriend (in working to do well are possibly the most impor- fact, I expected the exact opposite of all of those tant attributes of a successful person. The prob- things). The fact that I wasn’t trying to go anylem arises when we take it too far—when every- where with my columns left me free to say whatthing has to have a goal-directed point. When we ever I wanted and to truly enjoy writing for the get so caught up getting what we want that we sake of writing. lose sight of ourselves. It can go beyond picking I hope I’ve interjected some randomness into an unnecessarily difficult course of study to be your life. Some weirdness, some humor and perimpressive (seriously, how many of you are HON- haps one too many dinosaur references. And as I ESTLY enjoying that chem major?). At its worst, leave The Chronicle atop the back of a glorious our pursuit of what’s best for us can turn into pterodactyl, all I can say is this: Don’t take yourfull-blown self-absorption. self too seriously. Just because something doesn’t In my time here, during late-night realtalks, directly contribute to achieving a goal, it doesn’t the main complaint that I’ve heard from Duke mean that it’s not worth doing. There is a point students is that there is a lack of real sharing on to pointlessness. this campus about serious issues. The main reason people cite for this lack of depth? Everyone Lillie Reed is a Trinity junior.


THE CHRONICLE

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2012 | 15

commentaries

We’ve got a long, long way to go

F

or some reason this year, exam season has not the view, please do not climb the mountain. If you are come with the same stress as it usually does. An climbing the mountain, please do not look around. Doexternal observer might say, “Oh, well that’s just ing one at a time will prevent injury.” And I thought, because you’ve decided you aren’t pre-med,” as if the what a beautiful metaphor for life. relationship between exams and grades might be my Charging through life this way—running headlong primary stressor. They might tell me, “It’s because into more and more advanced courses, preparatory you’re thinking of switching out of the hard sciences classes, career fairs, mock interviews, resume build(neuroscience)” as if the “hard” of “hard sciences” was ing—I have been like a horse with blinders. When your synonymous with “difficult.” Someone peripheral vision has been covered up, might hypothesize that it’s the relief of of course you can only think of going realizing “what I want.” But it’s more straight, or being pulled in whatever complicated than that. direction your rider fancies. When you I’ve been thinking back to this sumcan’t see the side paths that branch off mer, when I climbed Xiang Shan mounhere and there, when you feel like you tain in Beijing. It’s something my family have no options but walking in the same does every time we go back, because it direction forever, of course your natural is close to my grandmother’s grave, and inclination is to want to stop, to admit danica liu we always pay our respects. Her grave your exhaustion to yourself and collapse winter is coming is also on a mountainside, because it is in a worn and panting heap. You are too good feng shui to put cemeteries near caught up in this mad race to the top to water and mountains. And we saw these piles of empty realize all the other places you could be going, you are headstones, leaning against each other like unwritten too busy staring at that unlikely pinnacle to appreciate books at some grotesque library. I was happy then, how far you’ve come, how beautiful that tree is, how so I didn’t imagine my own life condensed into a few surprising that stream. carved letters, weathered by time and covered with I turned 20 in November, but sometimes, when I pine needles, one stone sentry standing stoically erect am not feeling like a mayfly, I feel as if I have already among thousands. lived forever. Each new step I take could be the end of After the choking sadness of sweeping her grave, my journey, and maybe that would be okay, or maybe I and carefully going over the letters on her headstone would fight it as hard as I could. That beautiful stanza with gold paint, the physical exertion of climbing Xiang by Robert Frost echoes through me like a mantra, a Shan was a relief. At some points the mountain path is prayer accompanied by the rhythmic clacking of holy frighteningly steep, and you can see Beijing spread out beads: “These woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I beneath you like a map or a smoky painting. There are have promises to keep, and miles to go before I sleep.” signs as you go, politely reminding you to stay hydrated and watch your step. One advised, “If you are enjoying Danica Liu is a Trinity sophomore.

letterstotheeditor Response to “HerCampus is not mine” As a proud writer for Her Campus Duke, let me explain why I value Her Campus and the experiences it has provided me. For one, our writers span a wide spectrum of interests and affiliations, and as such, our pieces reflect that. Secondly, Her Campus by no means proclaims to be a high-browed publication, but it is a great way for relatively inexperienced writers to become confident in developing their voices, as well as for veteran journalists to further hone their skills. Thirdly, all of the writers are Duke students. That means we are receptive to what is going on around campus, and while we do not claim to be the definitive voice on issues and events, these articles serve as springboards to conversations that may sometimes be overlooked. Lastly, girls nowadays seem to be shamed for a multitude of things: being too sexually active, being too prudish, caring too much about relationships, ignoring friends for said relationships, going out too much, not going out at all, putting too much effort into looking good all the time, looking like slobs and not upholding their ladylike images, etc. Granted, any of those extremes are usually not great stances to take, but finding that balance between these demands while staying true to one’s values requires time and effort. In the meantime, Her Campus provides articles written by girls who feel your struggle(s) and want to share how they personally handle these struggles. In short, these comments were taken out of context and distorted to mean things that their writers, who are also enlightened and driven girls, did not intend. It’s my hope that one day in the near future, improved public policy and better social awareness can change the attitudes and social structures that enable these types of problems to manifest themselves in our daily lives. In the meantime, there’s nothing wrong with building a support system to get through it all. Props to the author for voicing her own perspective so confidently, but she by no means speaks for the entire female population at Duke. There’s more than one way to be a female rights activist, and I plan on doing it while wearing my VS bra and eyeliner too. Christina Lee Trinity ’15

Clearing up misconceptions about Econ 101 I would like to clarify details concerning how the Economics 101 course was conducted this semester, in response to the Dec. 7 editorial, “Finish strong.” Here are the facts: First, the course did in fact end at Thanksgiving break. It did so, so that I could travel to give a course on Mortgage Markets and Structured Finance as a part of a team from the International Monetary Fund’s Institute for Capacity Development. As you may know, I am a professor of the practice, and one of my duties is to maintain engagement with the economics profession. I pursue this in many different ways, but one of the ways is to be involved in developing and delivering courses on behalf of international organizations. The preparation work that I do for these courses, as well as the interactions I am able to have with government officials around the world when I teach these courses, greatly help inform and enhance the teaching I do at Duke. As Duke’s student body grows ever more global, having knowledge of international regulatory agencies and the challenges they face becomes more and more valuable. Second, Economics 101 this semester was no vacation. In order to accommodate my absence, I scheduled the course to meet three days a week for 75 minutes each session. This actually resulted in the course’s exceeding the standard number of contact hours for a standard Duke course by a significant margin, even though the course ended at Thanksgiving. Third, the course did end with an exam, and the exam was comprehensive. Fourth, all of the details concerning the conduct of the course were included in the syllabus, which was distributed and discussed with the students, and to the best of my knowledge has been available on the EcoTeach website. I find the tone expressed in the editorial to be one that implies that I am shirking my responsibilities as a Duke professor and an educator. I assure you that I take both of those responsibilities extremely seriously. I would have hoped that you would have also taken your journalistic responsibilities equally seriously, by seeking out some facts before composing and printing this piece. Connel Fullenkamp Director of undergraduate studies and professor of the practice of economics

Anxious for my precious

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ellow hobbitses, we will have our $270 million precious in just one week. Make no mistake—this is no typical precious. Our precious was forged in the depths of J.R.R. Tolkien’s mind, then passed through the long ages until it finally rest in the capable hands of the great Peter Jackson; truly, our precious seems destined for greatness. Yet, there is a fear in my heart, too; for though I am salivating more than a starving cave troll who has just spotted some hobbitses, I fear there will be too much to eat. (If you mike shammas haven’t read “The Hobbit,” befairly unbalanced ware of spoilers.) Though “The Lord of the Rings” movies spanned over 1,000 pages of material, “The Hobbit” movies—of which there will be three—will draw mainly from a short children’s book. Obviously, this sounds like a great idea for the producers. More movies mean more ticket sales, and more ticket sales mean more money. But there is a danger in this, as well; for in order to make three films, Peter Jackson and crew may have to bloat the movies. Small episodes will be expanded, periphery plot lines pursued, irrelevant characters characterized, and all of this could be at the expense of the most important element: the plot. Unfortunately, early reviews confirm my fears. Apparently, “The Hobbit” elaborates on insignificant events that Tolkien relegated to the footnotes. As IGN writes, “It takes a full hour for anything to really happen here.” Sixty precious yet boring minutes are spent in the Shire as we wait for young Bilbo to take off. This “robs the film of a sense of urgency and forward momentum.” The dragging, bloated time in the Shire is largely due to gimmicks like the needless inclusion of Frodo. This, like so much else that was slapped into “The Hobbit,” distract from the central story: Bilbo’s unlikely heroism and the defeat of Smaug. One gets the sense that they were only included because Jackson needed a way to draw the movie out. Needless to say, once Bilbo actually steps onto the road the story revs up. As IGN writes, “Once the quest proper begins, though ‘The Hobbit,’ like the book, becomes a relentless series of chase scenes and action episodes, from hungry trolls to Rivendell to the netherworld realm of the goblins to Bilbo’s fateful encounter with Gollum.” Indeed, from all accounts the riddle competition with Sméagol is executed perfectly. Bilbo stands, nervously wondering whether he will be made into Gollum-food, gently stroking his new-found precious through his pocket as he asks: “What do I have in my pocket?” After answering incorrectly, a disheartened Gollum runs off to find his own precious and to gently stroke it, ignorant of the fact that Bilbo has already stolen his precious and is anxiously stroking it himself as he runs off. Obviously, all this stroking makes for some high drama. It is truly depressing to think that all we will be left with of Gollum is the sad memory of him hiding in a shadowy corner and stroking his precious. Alas, though the precious-stroking scene is sure to excite (as precious-stroking is wont to do), I fear that there is still much to be disappointed by even after Bilbo leaves the safe yet boring confines of the Shire. For example, the orcs and goblins in “The Hobbit,” unlike the monsters of “The Lord of the Rings,” are fake. They are CGI—and you can tell. The Uruk-hai and other villians were terrifying in the LOTR series because they were real, played by makeup-wearing actors using prop swords. Again, drawing from IGN: “The phoniness of these CGI-heavy creatures makes ‘The Hobbit’ feel as inorganic to LOTR as the prequels were to the original ‘Star Wars’ films.” In a way, I think this line sums up my fear pretty well. I fear the “Star Wars” curse—three amazing movies, followed by three mediocre ones. I fear a trilogy of movies that, no matter how much it wants to, cannot recapture the desperation and epicness that characterized “The Lord of the Rings.” Most of all, I fear that the quirky, funny, relatively short children’s book that is “The Hobbit” was not meant to be spread out over three long movies, that doing so is the equivalent of spreading too little “butter scraped over too much bread” (Bilbo’s words from “Fellowship”). So yes, I fear for my precious. I fear for it greatly. I fear that, when it comes out on DVD, it will not be worth a buy, and certainly not a stroke. And why? Because it was needlessly dragged out due to the same sort of greed and materialism that Tolkien so despised. I hope I’m wrong. Mike Shammas is a Trinity senior.


16 | MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2012

What is your world view? Go global to see.

        

Global Education Office for Undergraduates globaled.duke.edu

THE CHRONICLE




       'HF


EXAM BREAK

2 | MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2012

THE CHRONICLE

Where & When to Eat During Exam Break All Hours Subject to Change • Updated December 7, 2012 ALPINE BAGELS

7a-8p

7a-8p

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8a-4p

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LOCO POPS

ARMADILLO GRILL

11a-12a

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11a-7p

LOOP PIZZA GRILL

AU BON PAIN

7a-12a

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MARKETPLACE

BELLA UNION

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11a-8p

BLUE EXPRESS

8a-2p

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closed

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CHICK-FIL-A

9a-7p

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9a-4p

closed

closed

DIVINITY SCHOOL REFECTORY

8a-3p

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closed

closed

DOLCE VITA FRENCH SCIENCE CAFE

8a-5p

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closed

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FACULTY COMMONS

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closed

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FOOD FACTORY AT DEVIL’S BISTRO

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FREEMAN CENTER

closed

closed

GRACE’S CAFÉ

10a-9p

10a-9p

7:30a-10:30a B 11:00a-2:30p L 2:30p-4:30 G&G 5p-8p D

GREEK DEVIL

11:30a-12a 11:30a-12a closed

closed

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7:30a-10:30a B 11:00a-2:30p L 2:30p-4:30 G&G 5p-8p D

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JB’S GOURMET DOGS

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JOE VAN GOGH

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GREAT HALL

*midnight breakfast

closed

closed

Closed For The Winter 11a-12a

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7:30a-11a* 12p-2:30p 5p-9p*

7:30a-11a* 12p-2:30p 5p-9p*

PANDA EXPRESS

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PITCHFORK PROVISIONS

24 hours

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closed

PLATE AND PITCHFORK

Mon-Tue 5p-9p Wed. closed

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REFECTORY DUKE LAW SCHOOL

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SALADELIA AT THE PERK

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SANFORD DELI

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SUBWAY

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*included in Freshman Board Plan

QUENCHERS

TERRACE CAFÉ

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7:30a-11a* 7:30a-11a* 7:30a-11a* 12p-2:30p 12p-2:30p 12p-2:30p 5p-9p* 5p-9p* 5p-9p*

Closed For The Winter

TRINITY CAFÉ

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TWINNIE’S

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WASHINGTON DUKE INN

10:30a-2p 10:30a-2p 5:30p-10p 5:30p-10p


EXAM BREAK

THE CHRONICLE

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2012 | 3

Exam Schedule by Class Start Time Class Time

Exam Date

Exam Time

MWF/MW/MF/WF, PERIOD 1, 8:30 or 8:45 AM

Thursday, December 13

9:00 AM - NOON

MWF/MW/MF/WF, PERIOD 2, 10:05 or 10:20 AM

Saturday, December 15

2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

MWF/MW/MF/WF, PERIOD 3, 11:45 AM or Noon

Friday, December 14

2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

MWF/MW/MF/WF, PERIOD 4, 1:25 or 1:40 PM

Tuesday, December 11

9:00 AM - NOON

MWF/MW/MF/WF, PERIOD 5, 3:05 or 3:20 PM

Thursday, December 13

2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

MWF/MW/MF/WF, PERIOD 6, 4:40 or 4:55 PM

Saturday, December 15

7:00 PM - 10:00 PM

MWF/MW/MF/WF, PERIOD 7, 6:15 or 6:30 PM

Sunday, December 16

7:00 PM - 10:00 PM

MWF/MW/MF/WF, PERIOD 8, 7:30 PM

Sunday, December 16

7:00 PM - 10:00 PM

TTH, PERIOD 1, 8:30 or 8:45 AM

Thursday, December 13

7:00 PM - 10:00 PM

TTH, PERIOD 2, 10:05 or 10:20 AM

Sunday, December 16

2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

TTH, PERIOD 3, 11:45 AM or Noon

Wednesday, December 12

9:00 AM - NOON

TTH, PERIOD 4, 1:25 or 1:40 PM

Wednesday, December 12

2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

TTH, PERIOD 5, 3:05 or 3:20 PM

Tuesday, December 11

2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

TTH, PERIOD 6, 4:40 or 4:55 PM

Friday, December 14

9:00 AM - NOON

TTH, PERIOD 7, 6:15 or 6:30 PM

Sunday, December 16

7:00 PM - 10:00 PM

TTH, PERIOD 8, 7:30 PM

Sunday, December 16

7:00 PM - 10:00 PM

Saturday, December 15

9:00 AM - NOON

Wednesday, December 12

7:00 PM - 10:00 PM

Friday, December 14

7:00 PM - 10:00 PM

Tuesday, December 11

7:00 PM - 10:00 PM

Block Exams Chemistry 101DL Languages French - 101, 102, 203, 204, 301, 303S Italian - 101, 102, 113, 203, 204 Spanish - 101, 102, 111, 203, 204

}

Math 105L, 111L, 112L, 122L, 202L, 212, 216, 353, 356 Physics 141L, 152L

Join the Duke Annual Fund, along with the Friends of the Duke University Libraries and Pepsi for a...

Food!!

Monday, December 10th 8:00 P. M. Lilly Lobby

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EXAM BREAK

4 | MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2012

THE CHRONICLE

The people make the party

I

still remember the day I received my acceptance later for Duke in France’s SciencesPo program. The Duke in France program has two divisions: the regular program, which gives students the option to take two out of your four courses at a French university, and the SciencesPo program, where students take all six of their courses at SciencesPo, France’s top university for political science. The SciencesPo courses are all in French, and most of them are quite rigorous. I grew up with some French experience from my family. By no means was I a fluent French speaker, but in high school language classes I had a substantial head start on my classmates. This experience gave me a lot of confidence in my French studies; I was sure I wanted to apply for philip doerr the SciencesPo program. small world “My French is good,” I told myself. “It would be cool to study at an elite French university.” In hindsight, I realize that I was also yearning to do something impressive. I’ve done well in classes at Duke and always enjoyed myself, but I felt like I had thus far failed to differentiate myself with anything impressive beyond curriculum requirements. Studying at a top French university seemed like a great way to do something that I enjoyed, to speak French, and to challenge myself. When my acceptance email arrived I called my mom, overjoyed. All was right in the world. I was spending

that summer with DukeEngage in Jodhpur, India, and now I knew my fall would be spent in France in the program I had been so excited about. My mom, who had gone to a French high school, warned me that SciencesPo would be really tough and stressful. She warned me that the French grading system is a harsh one and that the French style of teaching would be intense. These are things that I heard from many people. But at the end of the day, my desire to do something special made me too stubborn to listen to anyone. There have been tough moments this semester academically. My mom and Duke were both right when they told me that SciencesPo would be really hard. There have been quite a few stressful days. But at the end of the day the most important lesson that I have taken away from my time in India and France isn’t something that one learns in the classroom or from working at an NGO. The post-study abroad questionnaire asks a few questions about how studying abroad has affected your desire to study a foreign language, your propensity to live in a foreign country and your likely career path. For me, I’m not sure it has had a dramatic influence on those trajectories. What it has made clear to me is which fundamental things matter most in my life. When people talk about “spending the summer in India” or “studying for a semester in Paris,” it sounds amazing, and I’m not claiming it’s not. DukeEngage Jodhpur was truly an experience I will never forget. This semester in France has also been exceptional. The last six months have changed me dramatically and for the better. However, people rarely talk about the reality (or at least what was my reality): that these experiences are

also full of moments of struggle and loneliness. You’re making new friends, seeing new places and doing new things. But every so often, you find yourself very alone. The people who have long given your existence a sense of meaning and stability are an ocean away. The last four or five generations of my Indian host family were born in the same house. At one point this summer, the families of three siblings plus their mother were all living under one roof while their other two older brothers lived in the two homes next door. The concept of being away from home for so long was completely foreign to my host family. After all this time away, I am beginning to understand why. These six months away from home, what I’ve come to realize is that no matter what you’re doing, no matter how good things sound, no matter how beautiful of a city you’re in or how impressive of a gig you’ve got, friends and family will always be the most meaningful things in life. My happiest moments this semester didn’t come from the pride that I took in studying at an elite school or the sheer experience of being in Paris. The best times in these last six months were always the times spent with friends. After having been so lucky to get out and see just a little bit of what’s out there in the world, I am not coming home with a new set of professional goals and or an extended list of places where I want to live abroad. I come home with a new appreciation for the friends and family who have made my life so special and with whom I can’t wait to share the future. Philip Doerr is a Trinity junior and is currently studying abroad in Paris, France.

Want more Chron? Visit www.chronicleblogs.com for our news, sports, editorial and recess blogs.

7 21 Broa d Street cakes • pies • cupcakes salads • soups • sandwiches Another delicious creation from Am y Tornquist, ow ner of W atts G rocery


EXAM BREAK

THE CHRONICLE

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2012 | 5

The problems with consumer protection

A

s Massachusetts senator-elect Elizabeth Warren prepares to be sworn in next month, rumor already has it that she will be assigned to the Senate Banking Committee. As an involved member of the Senate Banking Committee, Warren is sure to pursue her avowed agenda of increased oversight in the financial industry from the perspective of consumer protection. According to her own written work, Warren seems to view this mission as largely analogous to consumer protection practices in all other areas of the market. “Thanks to effective regulation,” she has argued, “innovation in the market for physical products has led to more safety and cutting edge features. … Consumers can enter the market to buy physical products confident that they won’t be tricked into buying exploding toasters and other unreasonably dangerous products.” Although Warren could be right—it is, after all, conceivable, if not likely, that government regulation is responsible for increases in the “safety” of consumer goods—she fails to provide any evidence of a causal mechanism that would support her assertion. She begins with the relatively unobjectionable, if also vague and subjective, premise that consumer products are “safe.” From there, however, she engages in a faulty post hoc, ergo propter hoc—or, “after this, therefore because of this”—line of reasoning to conclude that the coincident temporality of consumer product regulation and product safety is enough to prove that the former is responsible for the latter. In other words, she confuses correlation with causation. If it is true that regulation is responsible for product safety, and especially more so than capital accumulation, private organizations like Underwriters Laboratories, and the general tendency of businesses to avoid blowing up their customers, then it is her responsibility as an intellectual and agent of the state to demonstrate it. In fact, a successful argument in favor of consumer protection practices would also need to demonstrate the philosophical legitimacy of “protecting” consumers in the first place. A simple examination of the exact nature of the relationship between buyers and

sellers on the market will reveal certain complications behind this approach to exchange. In earlier times, for example, economists believed that trades took place between individuals only when both parties to the trade believed that they were receiving a sum of value equal to that which they were giving up. This was exposed as incorrect, however, when it was realized that, under these circumstances, the opportunity cost of physically engaging in the trade itself would preclude a trade of no net value from ever occurring. It has since been recognized as an axiomatic truism that any peaceable exchange between individuals can take place only when both parties feel that they are receiving more in terms of value than they are giving away. The possibility of such an arrangement arises from the fact that goods and trades are appraised by individuals according to their own, unique, subjective scales of value, which do include but are not limited simply to dollar terms. This insight is therefore as true in terms of corporate earnings as it is in those of charitable donations and gift giving. Now, based on such an insight—which, again, is axiomatically true and is a derivation of the recognition of human action as eternally purposeful—it is clear that there are only two possible outcomes, from the point of view of the consumer, to any given exchange. The first of these is that the consumer is proven correct in his evaluation that he would be better off after the trade than he was before, and the second is, quite obviously, that he is proven incorrect. Since it is the second scenario in which both we and Warren are interested, let’s consider the reasons for which such a state of affairs might arise. First of all, it’s possible that a consumer is simply mistaken in his appraisal of the trade. He may come to realize, for whatever reason, that he would have been better off had he not made the trade. This can come about as a result of a failure to inform himself, or simply a failure to adequately forecast his own future conditions. Second, it is also possible that the consumer’s preferences have changed between the point at which he made the trade and the present mo-

ment, such that a beneficial trade according to his previous subjective value scale no longer appears as profitable. Finally, it is possible that the consumer fell victim to fraud, in which the seller promised a certain good or service with certain conditions but ultimately did not deliver on that promise. As to the first and second of these three scenarios, it is obvious that the responsibility for present unease falls squarely on the shoulders of the consumer himself. In failing either to accurately appraise the good he received in the trade or to forecast his own future conditions and desires, the consumer finds himself displeased through no fault of the seller. In the final scenario—that of fraud—the jurisdiction of would-be consumer protection is alchris bassil ready contained under the human action law as it relates to fraud, and there are mechanisms in place already for dealing with such a circumstance. Some might respond that the philosophical case against consumer protection neglects the suffering of the debtors. They might argue, as Warren implies, that credit card contracts occupy some new philosophical ground between voluntary agreement and fraud, or they might agree with her when she tries to claim that unregulated credit card interest rates, fees and penalties are simply “too high.” Such designations, drawn from the personal subjective value scale of Warren herself, are purely arbitrary. If there is any scientific or intellectual rigor behind them, she has chosen to withhold it. In truth, of course, interest rates, penalties and fees are always “too high” when they are considered from the point of view of one of two people: the debtor, or the politician who tries to earn his vote. Chris Bassil, Trinity ’12, is currently working for Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Mass.

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Better in practice than in theory

W

hat if the public policy and political science departments had a love child? As a look back on my academic history, as nostalgic seniors are inclined to do, I’ve been thinking about what my major (political science) could embrace from the department from which I got my journalism certificate (public policy). I absolutely don’t regret being a political science major (though I do wish I had also majored in English—the Connor Southard-esque arguments about that department are for another column). But as I try to identify how, specifically, I’ve changed as a result of the ten classsamantha es in the discipline, I’m lachman almost at a loss. Perhaps what’s our age again? this isn’t a problem—maybe a liberal arts education shouldn’t entail thinking about knowledge as pure acquisition—but it’s still an important issue to explore. Justin Zhao (Trinity ’13), president of the Political Science Students Association, wrote in an email, “There is a general misconception that people who want higher level political theory for law school go to political science and kids who want to get more concrete tangible knowledge for the real world and who want jobs go to public policy. I chose political science because the department as a whole seemed more focused on developing a broader set of intellectual and analytical tools and less towards simply learning tools to help you land a job on the Hill or in consulting. Essentially it seemed to be more of an academic and intellectual as opposed to pre-professional major.” I think Zhao identifies that the tension between choosing between the majors actually represents a microcosm of a broader tension at Duke: What does “knowledge in the service of society” actually mean?

Does it mean learning how to think critically and analytically so one is ready and inclined to go out into the world to solve problems and, hopefully, help others? Or does it mean applying those skills, immediately and less abstractly? These conceptions aren’t mutually exclusive, but in my entirely non-random and non-scientific sample of majors in both disciplines, students consistently cited this dichotomy. I don’t think the political science department’s areas for improvement are at the core, but rather at the periphery. I’ve tremendously enjoyed the classes and professors in my concentration, international relations, and the speakers that the American Grand Strategy program has brought. But the moment in which I became cynical was sophomore year. I had taken two of the most challenging courses of my Duke career with an engaging, innovative professor who had both a remarkable teaching style and original theories and research. Although I can’t say for sure that there weren’t legitimate reasons to not give him tenure (the process is wildly non-transparent), I can say with some confidence that the decision to not grant him tenure was based not on his research output, but on a University-level decision to put fewer resources into the political science department. Beyond the resources issue, the department needs to do a better job advising students on why they’re political science majors, and what that means for their time at Duke. As Dawei Liu (Trinity ’14) wrote in an email, “I would still highly appreciate good advisors who could lay out a more coherent enrollment path.” Though public policy classes are increasingly hard to get into because of popularity, and fulfilling the numerous requirements seem onerous, political science could help its majors with sequencing their classes in a more intentional manner. Public policy, on the other hand, has what Hannah Colton (Trinity ’13), a fellow Chronicle columnist, calls an “attitude problem:” “It’s currently Duke’s most popular major, but maybe not for the right reasons? There’s a lingering perception among some

people (both in and outside of the major) that public policy is a ‘default’ major, a generic fallback, rather than a deliberate choice.” Colton identifies a “loud minority,” of students who “carry out the major apathetically or skeptically, creating a collective attitude that negatively affected the academic atmosphere in all of the public policy core courses I took, despite great professors.” Yet the public policy department has what, arguably, political science needs the most: a centralized space for staff, students and faculty. Every time I walk into the Sanford School I’m struck by the power of the space: Real interactions between students occur right before my eyes as I buy a delicious peanut butter cookie from the deli and head to class. The experience of walking down (usually deserted) hallways in Perkins to meet with a professor is simply not the same. In the same interview, Zhao identified “the lack of interest and cohesion of [political science] undergraduates.” This community aspect will hopefully improve next year as the department moves to its own space in the Gross Chemistry building. Two of my roommates use public-policy-y phrases like “decreasing marginal returns,” and “Pareto efficiency,” when talking about unrelated subjects, such as their sexual histories. Of course this is a silly example, but I think it represents an enthusiasm gap between the majors. I wish I were more excited about how I’ve learned what I’ve learned. Zhao, who is also editor-in-chief of the Duke Political Science Standard, also noted, “It has been really hard to find quality undergraduate research coming from the [political science] department. Empirically fewer and fewer people are writing senior theses even though the department has continually made it easier to do so.” Perhaps an increased sense of community and more academic guidance would make more undergraduates want to do research, which ultimately is the real strength of the department as a whole. Samantha Lachman is a Trinity senior.

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MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2012 | 7

Hope

O

n July 8, 2009, citizens protested and defeated a massive, coal-fired power plant in Delta, Utah. That marked the 100th abandoned coal plant in just six years of Sierra Club’s “Stop the Coal Rush” campaign. Yet news like this is not often heard. In fact, I’ve heard a different phrase uttered in many variations, with different words, at multiple points in my adolescent life. “Climate change? That’s our having to clean up the mess of our previous generations.” I’ve heard it spoken in anger, or with listless intent, or thrown off with the whimsy of someone excusing themselves of their own irresponsibility. And at some point in my life, I actually believed it. I’ve heard that same phrase uttered in many variations, with different words, at many points in my adolescent life. I’ve heard it spoken in anger, or with listless intent, or thrown off with the whimsy of someone excusing themselves of their own irresponsibility. And at some point in my life, I actually believed it. But think about it for a bit. Our previous generations were the ones who built the world we have today. Sure, they tapped the oil wells and lit the steel furnaces. But the books we read, the universities we know; we owe that all to “our previous generations.” And what’s more? They built the foundation of the technological and social change that we, collectively, can accomplish. We’re the millenials. We’re supposed to be the hope for the future. We’re raised with endless choices, encouraged to express our opinions; never before has there been a generation that is perhaps better equipped to recognize entrenched inefficiencies and change them. And so with this in mind, I can find no other way of looking at that opening statement except as an excuse for inaction. Indeed, millenials are a special generation, that’s for sure, but we’re also the least environmentally motivated generation alive today. Researchers from San

Diego State found that only 21 percent of millenials expressed personal stake in a clean environment. A third of baby boomers said the same. Millenials were also the least likely to make an effort to reduce heating fuel. Worse still, only 5 percent of baby boomers said that they had made no effort to help the environment, though a full 15 percent of millenials echoed that statement. However, it’s not that surprising to me. Caring for the environment is, in its own way, painful. It comes fraught with the notion that real suffering occurs as almost a direct result of the luxuries we enjoy. John Fraser, a psychologist at the Institute for Learning Education, saw something related to this while completing a Ph.D. in conservation. Of all the non-profit groups he surveyed, environmentalists were the most distressed. “People were very, very committed to the environmental issues, but when they got into a conversation in a meeting, it could become quite heated over very petty and minor issues.” Some people even exhibited, in his words, “trauma.” I understand that. I really do. I understand how easy it is shy away from the pain that caring about this stuff brings. But I want to argue that it’s precisely this pain that gives us millenials our biggest power: responsibility. It’s our responsibility to take the technology that already exists and use it to help the world. After thinking about this issue a ton, I have realized something. It is so easy to get caught up in the terrifying news about climate change that we don’t look at the good. A rise of 7.2 degrees Fahrenheit would be devastating for the planet and for human society. If lasting legislation isn’t in place by 2017, positive feedback loops may make climate change irreversible in appreciable time scales. Those things are true; they’re absolutely true, and I’ve been one to repeat them (as you all probably know!). But even smog has a silver lining. Close to half of all electricity added to the America grid this year was

renewable energy. Wind energy has nearly sextupled in just five years, and solar panels are finally, finally cheap enough to start competing hard core with coal and oil. Even more exciting, California recently auctioned off permits for its statewide cap and trade system, and similar programs have sprung up in nine Eastern states. The Supreme Court has upheld crucial rights for the EPA over carbon dioxide, and some really great environmental senators got voted into office. There’s a ton of really cool, really exciting news. Just read the science subreddit. Nearly everyday, someone publishes another brilliant idea about green energy. lucas spangher So, under all of the natureLOL weight of dirty businessmen and corporate politics, I see hope. I see millions of passionate people who care about the way things turn out. And being somewhat more in touch with renewable energy then most, I see so many awesome and amazing things that we—the baby boomers and the millenials—produce together. Yes, there is pain in all of this, but there is a reason to care and to take on this pain; there is hope. I promise you all, there is hope. Our parents’ problem, indeed. Well, with that, I’d like to take the time to say farewell. It looks like this is the last column in the foreseeable future that I’ll be writing for The Chronicle. Thank you to all who have read my columns; thank you to those who have commented and emailed and shared my stuff. It’s been awesome writing for you guys, and I’ve enjoyed every column, I really have. Good luck on exams, and keep the fight alive! Lucas Spangher is a Trinity junior.

Want to hear more from your favorite columnists? Follow them on Twitter! Visit www.dukechronicle.com/opinion for columnists’ Twitter handles. Free Wireless

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MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2012 | 9

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SUDOKU PUZZLES & ANSWERS

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C R O S S W O R D

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2012 | 11

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis ACROSS 1 “My Dinner With Andre” co-star Wallace __ 6 Offensively blunt 14 Early Web browser 16 Cadillac Ranch site 17 Words of relief 19 Sanguine 20 Royal Scots for more than three centuries 21 Salon job 22 Not kosher 24 First name in photography 25 Fit solidly 26 Mt. Carmel setting 28 Needle point?: Abbr. 30 Food stamps, e.g. 39 Contributing factor in ozone depletion 40 Without nostalgia 41 Chumley’s title friend in a ’60s cartoon series 42 1989 Jay Presson Allen monodrama 43 Bit of a laugh 44 Half of a downpour? 47 “Peg Woffington” author 51 Way up 55 Hop-__-thumb 56 Ulterior motives 58 Galley propeller 59 Leader elected in 2005 62 Catholic recitation 63 Target of a Pasteur/Roux vaccine harvested from rabbits 64 Sycophant 65 Stripes DOWN 1 Sharp 2 Big hit 3 It’s not for everyone

By Martin Ashwood-Smith

4 Comedian 5 Rock’s Lofgren 6 Exit lines 7 “L’elisir d’__”: Donizetti opera 8 Daydreams 9 Nevado __ Cruces: Andes section 10 Pack item? 11 Steven’s wife on “Family Ties” 12 Tart fruit 13 Gray area? 15 Solution for lens transparency problems 18 Grayish brown 23 Furnishings 25 Cleavers 27 Commercial fishing boat 29 Body of art? 30 Deer tail 31 Writing style 32 Professional gp. 33 Indian titles 34 Corresponding 35 French noodle product? 36 Historic Egyptian lifeline

11/17/12 Friday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

37 How vichyssoise is usually served 38 Greek war goddess 44 Patient responsibility 45 “Don’t make __!” 46 Not at all laid-back 48 Selection word 49 “Now seems it far, and now __”: Scott

11/17/12

50 CD letters 52 Deadly agent 53 Hung over? 54 Schoolmarmish type 56 Quatrain rhyme scheme 57 Labor pain? 60 Common pair? 61 “We’ll let you know” letters

ACROSS 1 Hints at, with “of” 7 Hikes 10 A little later 14 Bar subject 15 Writer’s framework 17 Cartoon bird on a cap 18 Apparent displacement due to observer movement 19 Actress Massey 20 Gain, for one 21 Brie alternative 23 Word on U.S. coins 24 Loosely worn garb 25 Red Cross headquarters 28 Bars on market shelves 31 Go the other way 32 Femur neighbor 33 __-jongg 34 Dominate, in sports lingo 35 Impudence 36 Mariner 37 Places where cellphones are prohibited? 39 “As __ beneath a waning moon was haunted”: Coleridge 40 Block back? 41 Halting one? 42 Volga region language 44 Graynor who played Olivia’s sister on “Fringe” 45 Hit on ice 49 Designed to prevent intrusion, in a way 52 Native of Odessa or Paris 53 Do recon on 54 Supermodel Bündchen 55 Statementmaking accessory 56 Two-direction section 57 Hyphenated IDs 58 Also

By Barry C. Silk

12/1/12

59 Like Consumer Reports merchandise DOWN 1 Hard to move 2 Sokoloff of “The Practice” 3 Universal principle 4 Imitates 5 Lake Michigan feeder 6 Öland Isl. site 7 Shoe parts 8 Oliver of “Frost/Nixon” 9 Vexed 10 Used up 11 Alexandria setting 12 __ equal basis 13 First in line 16 Range exercise 20 Stoops 22 Ripped, so to speak 25 Merriment 26 2004 A.L. MVP Guerrero, familiarly 27 Rhein tributary 28 They closely monitor slides

Friday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

29 Shave 30 Where lion dances may be seen 32 Addresses the court 38 Rank indicators 42 Hyped 43 Animal for whom a blood factor is named 45 Oud __: Belgian beer

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

ACROSS 1 Fictional sleepwalker 12 __ shot 15 1989 Best Original Song Oscar winner 16 Seed used in cat grass 17 Holiday staple 18 GRF succeeded him 19 “The Memory of Trees” album maker 20 Join the cast of 21 1940s Time film critic James 22 Head turner 24 Winter warmer 26 Consented 29 Soften 31 Firing spots 32 Bus stop 33 Exhibits 34 Home of the KonTiki Museum 35 It may be marked 36 Signs of neglect 37 Mass garb 38 Worker, informally 39 Kerosene source 40 Product with the slogan “Get What Fits.” 42 Fair one 43 Political position 44 __ tape 45 Paint company with an ursine image in its logo 46 Skiers’ aids 48 Rescue team, briefly 52 OPEC member 53 Solos 55 Orch. section 56 All fuss and feathers 57 Literary monogram 58 Antipastos, e.g. DOWN 1 Fly in a river 2 Presently 3 Time to 6-Down 4 Equivocal reply

By Barry C. Silk

5 Bouncer-turnedactor 6 See 3-Down 7 Berry of St. Louis 8 Game show host Convy 9 Klondike bar relative 10 Cause of screaming and fainting, perhaps 11 Stable diet? 12 Progress at a faster rate 13 Unfortunate 14 __ Reader: alternative media anthology 21 Hawks’ home: Abbr. 23 Volkswagen model 25 Subject of a 1922 discovery 26 “Cheers!” 27 Windows alternatives 28 “You can count on me!” 29 Board 30 City north of Cologne

11/10/12 Friday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

32 They develop from unfertilized eggs 35 Cultivation wheels 36 Benign fiction 38 Declaration of Independence writer? 39 RBI fly 41 Tip holder 42 Taboo word

11/10/12

44 Paint additive 45 Run in 47 About 49 Noyes’s “ghostly galleon” 50 Hardware bit 51 Mtg. 53 Credit-weighted no. 54 Balancereducing equipment, often

ACROSS 1 Visit 7 Cleaned, in a way 15 Ronald Reagan’s alma mater 16 “Guess again” 17 Windy 18 Voice of Buzz Lightyear 19 Wearing one can block a mind reader, some believe 21 Modest profession 22 Four quarters, in Quito 23 See 47-Down 25 Hotel amenity 30 One often seen from behind? 34 Its GTS model can get 70 miles per gallon 35 Fate of some old ways 36 Treats with malice 37 Operation Crossroads event, 1946 38 Vintage player 40 Unlikely place for his-and-hers towels 43 Bench order 44 One often sleeping on the floor 47 Free of charge 51 Centipede, e.g. 54 “I Cain’t Say No” singer 56 1805 musical premiere 57 It may include gas masks and shields 58 2002 Best Original Song Oscar winner 59 Chickens named for an Italian city 60 Port on the Loire DOWN 1 Anatomical walls 2 2006 Winter Olympics host 3 Eponymous chief of the Penobscot nation 4 Crooked gains 5 Japanese magnate Morita 6 Way across town

By John Farmer

7 1970s militarystyle German import 8 Audrey’s “Love in the Afternoon” role 9 Ancien Régime nobles 10 Señorita’s “a” 11 Hybrid edible 12 Slough off 13 Cabinet dept. formed in response to the 1973 oil crisis 14 Shoot down 20 Actor Jared 24 Offered regrets, perhaps 25 Fix 26 “Criminal Minds” genius Dr. Spencer __ 27 Bone: Pref. 28 Org. that Angola joined in 2007 29 Pretense 30 Not much at all 31 “Kiss Me Deadly” rocker Ford 32 Very brief time, briefly 33 Quiet 36 Stickball ball, familiarly 38 Radioisotopes used in medicine

10/27/12 Friday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

39 Island capital near Robert Louis Stevenson’s burial site 41 Repair shop offer 42 “Master and Commander” novelist Patrick 44 Body shop supply 45 Function runner 46 Sides

12/1/12

46 Wield 47 Have a cow 48 Knock-__ 49 Egyptian symbols of royalty 50 They’re often seen on base: Abbr. 51 Speck 54 Setting at 0 degrees long.

10/27/12

47 With 23-Across, actor/director/ writer with nine Emmys 48 Comics dog 49 “Switched-On Bach” instrument 50 Course 52 “Forever, __”: 1996 humor collection 53 Get past the bouncer 55 Vietnam’s __ Dinh Diem

P U Z Z L E S


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Dec. 10, 2012 issue of The Chronicle  
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Monday, Dec. 10, 2012 issue of The Chronicle with Exam Break supplement. Last issue of The Chronicle for 2012.

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