__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

WINTER 2016


BEN SOLEIMANI DESIGNER / CURATOR LONDON & LOS ANGELES THE REVE & BORRADO RUG COLLECTIONS


Journey

IN SPACE EMIRATES FIRST Unwind in the ultimate private suite, followed by a refreshing shower and fine dining at any time.

Hello Tomorrow

Onboard shower spa available on Emirates A380s.


Š 2016 North Sails. All rights reserved.


Sailing legend and North Sails founder Lowell North’s passion for sailmaking guides everything we do as a brand, from building the best sails in the world, to designing high-performance outerwear and collections made to resist wind and water, so you can focus on what’s important to you. N O R T H S A I L S .CO M

N YC S TO R E O P E N I N G

November 2016 • 5TH AVE & 16TH STREET NEWPORT

 THAMES STREET

ANNAPOLIS

 DOCK STREET


IT'S A GREAT DAY TO JET AWAY INTRODUCING A BREAKTHROUGH WAY TO FLY PRIVATE


JOIN THE WORLD’S FASTEST-GROWING PRIVATE JET COMMUNITY TODAY JUST $10,000/YR + $5,000 INITIATION FEE

Flying private is finally within reach. We’ve brought together the largest and most luxurious collection of unused seats on private jets — not to mention entire aircraft — and made them available to you through our app.

JOIN TODAY AND GET $1,500 IN FLIGHT CREDIT USE INVITE CODE DJ500 1 (888) 9 VIP JET

JETSMARTER.COM

JETSMARTER

JETSMARTER

This offer is valid until December 31, 2016. Purchase of membership is required. Flight credit is a gratuitous credit that can be used exclusively towards creating on demand shared charter flights (sometimes referred to as "create your own shuttle"). If the credit is not fully used, it will expire at the end of the 12-month membership period. Membership will give users access to various membership benefits that are subject to change. Additional restrictions may apply. JetSmarter may offer number of programs including single-entity charters and Public Charters. For single-entity charters, JetSmarter will act solely as your agent in arranging the flight. For Public Charter operations, JetSmarter will act as principal in buying and reselling the air transportation. Seats obtained under the Public Charter Program are subject to the Public Charter rules contained in 14 CFR 380. JetSmarter does not own or operate any aircraſt. All flights are performed by FAA licensed and DOT registered air carriers. See Membership Agreement, Terms of Use, and additional related terms and conditions for full membership details.


®ROBERTOCOIN

POIS MOI COLLECTION | robertocoin.com


BERGDORF GOODMAN


UPTOWN

211 CENTRAL PARK WEST 3 BR 4 BATH $7.85 M KEVIN KELLY (646) 588-4325

WEB ID: 169570

303 EAST 77TH STREET 2 BR 2.5 BATH $1.85 M MADY FABER (646) 532-4913

WEB ID: 652420

DOWN TOWN

204 FORSYTH 3 BR 3.5 BATH $7.5 M WEB ID: 777801 NICOLE S. HECHTER (646) 588-4035 • ASAF BAR-LEV (646) 588-4046

36 GRAMERCY PARK EAST 3 BR 3.5 BATH $6.495 M WEB ID: 760086 ROBERTO CABRERA (646) 998-7445 • ELKIN J. SERNA (646) 545-5078

AROUNDTOWN

234 EAST 23RD STREET 5 BR 5.5 BATH $12.5 M WEB ID: 642367 STEVEN GOLD (646) 998-7403 • DANA POWER (646) 998-7437

100 CENTRAL PARK SOUTH 3 BR 3.5 BATH $7.995 M WEB ID: 524813 LANCE MILETICH (646) 588-4038 • JERRIE BUTLER (646) 588-4040

TO VIEW ALL OF OUR EXCLUSIVE LISTINGS, PLEASE VISIT TOWNRESIDENTIAL.COM


1 WEST 72ND STREET 1 BR 1 BATH $1.695 M WEB ID: 200744 VICTORIA TERRI-COTE (646) 790-6938 • CRISTINA COTE (646) 790-6935

455 WEST 20TH STREET 3 BR 3 BATH $4.795 M FABIENNE TERWINGHE (646) 738-2652

WEB ID: 541018

37 BRIDGE STREET LOFT 2 BATH $1.795 M WEB ID: 792495 COURTNEY SMELTER (646) 561-5346

781 FIFTH AVENUE 1 BR 1 BATH $1.35 M WEB ID: 986514 LAUREN SILK KRONENFELD (646) 532-4954

114 MERCER STREET LOFT 2 BATH $3.995 M SCOTTY ELYANOW (646) 738-2665

WEB ID: 545770

108 NEPTUNE AVENUE 2 BR 2 BATH $750,000 WEB ID: 313601 MORDECHAI WERDE (646) 998-7432 • MICHAEL ETTELSON (646) 588-4317

TOWN Residential LLC (“TOWN”) is a licensed real estate broker located at 33 Irving Place, New York, NY 10003. All property listing information, including, but not limited to, square footage, room count, and number of bedrooms are from sources deemed reliable, but are subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, prior sale or withdrawal and should be verified by your own attorney, architect, engineer or zoning expert. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Real estate agents associated with TOWN are independent contractors and are not employees of TOWN. To find a Representative’s licensed as name, please visit: http://townre.nyc/NameSearch. TOWN owns the following subsidiary real estate brokerages: TOWN Astor Place LLC; TOWN Fifth Avenue LLC; TOWN Flatiron LLC; TOWN Gramercy Park LLC (“TOWN Gramercy”); TOWN Greenwich Street LLC (“TOWN Financial District”); TOWN Soho LLC; and TOWN 79th Street LLC (“TOWN Upper East Side”). The complete terms are in an Offering Plan available from the Sponsor. File No. CD140246. Sponsor: 204 Forsyth Street, LLC ℅ Charles Saulson. 195 Chrystie Street, New York, NY 10002. | File No. CD08-0512. Sponsor: Regent Neptune, LLC. 108 Neptune Avenue, Brooklyn, New York 11235.


What Makes Your Smartphone Smart ? BlackBerry Secure Software


W I N T E R 2 016

CONTENTS 30

THOUGHTS DUJOUR

36

MASTHEAD

38

CONTRIBUTORS

40

DUJOUR.COM

Letters from our editor-in-chief and our CEO

Your 24/7 source for the latest in luxury, lifestyle and more

STYLE 44

STYLE NEWS

50

HOARDING TIME

Resort’s mixed media–inspired fashions; covetable accessories from Ghurka, Shinola and Judith Leiber; two A-list actors design athleisure

LOOK SHARP

Elegant frames for men and women evoke Hollywood’s Golden Age

LIFE

BODY 66

SATURATION POINT

68

SOME LIKE IT HOT

The season’s best salves, plus skin-saving tips from top experts

56

LATE CHECK-IN: BROOKLYN

High-tech saunas cast new light on the age-old practice of sweating it out

60

MIDDLE EAST MODERN

PLAY

A surge in high-end accommodations across the East River means you can now be cool without sacrificing comfort The owners of David/Nicolas put their home city of Beirut on the modern design map

70

ON HIATUS

We “send” the stars of our favorite TV shows on vacation before their series return

On the cover T-shirt, $70, POLO RALPH LAUREN, ralphlauren.com. Sid pants, $128, CARHARTT WIP, carhartt-wip.com. Photographed by Juergen Teller Styled by Poppy Kain

24

DUJOU R .COM

The famous pieces and people behind the greatest watch collections

52

132

Gown, $4,296. BURBERRY X BARNEYS NEW YORK,

barneys.com. Gatsby Oval earrings in 18-karat white gold with diamonds. $7,940, MESSIKA PARIS, messika.com.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY TETSU KUBOTA

FRILL SEEKER


W I N T E R 2 016

CONTENTS 56

26

DUJOU R .COM

LATE CHECK-IN: BROOKLYN

WORK 74

NICHOLS V. HOLLYWOOD

80

FOOD FIGHT

Writer-director Jeff Nichols, the auteur of this season’s Loving, has a thing or two to say Will corporate ownership of Roberta’s allow the famed Brooklyn pizza joint to keep its funky flavor?

CULTURE 84

ELVES ON SHELVES

Independent bookstore owners share the titles they want to give— and those they want to get 88

REIGNING WOMAN

Claire Foy channels HRH Queen Elizabeth II in Netflix’s latest big-budget series, The Crown

90 F*#K SANTA: CHRISTMAS ALBUMS ARE THE GIFTS THAT KEEP ON GIVING

112

FEATURES

120 GOLDEN GIRLS

95

128 SECRET SANTORINI

Why the holiday season brings cheer to fans and musicians alike

DEFINING MOMENTS

Natalie Portman, Dev Patel and more grace our portfolio of the year’s Oscar-worthy performances By Frances Dodds; photographed by Geordie Wood 106 ARE THESE THE MOST INTERESTING MEN IN THE WORLD?

For the dandy, getting dressed is God’s work By Dita Von Teese; photographed by Rose Callahan

HONESTLY, JAKE

The thoughtful, sensitive star of Tom Ford’s Nocturnal Animals is a new kind of leading man By Mike Albo; photographed by Juergen Teller; styled by Poppy Kain Jewelry that only gets better with age Photographed by Landon Nordeman A luxurious estate hits the Greek island’s rental market By Lindsay Silberman 132

FRILL SEEKER

The season’s most surprising fashions are modern takes on the romantic ruffle Photographed by Tetsu Kubota 142 MARLON & ME

Marlon Brandoʼs media-shy former fiancée sets the record straight on their failed love affair By Lanie Goodman

THE WILLIAM VALE HOTEL/PHOTO BY LOVE AND WAR

A view of the Manhattan skyline from a corner suite at The William Vale hotel, Williamsburg, Brooklyn.


DAW N A striking, seductive encounter The new Dawn has arrived – a Rolls-Royce like no other. A striking true four-seater, it captures the exhilaration of open-top driving with an interior crafted in anticipation of unforgettable moments between friends. Anything is possible. Contact us to start your journey.

Rolls-Royce Motor Cars NA, LLC 300 Chestnut Ridge Road, Woodcliff Lake, NJ 07677, USA Tel: 1-877-877-3735 www.rolls-roycemotorcars-northamerica.com Š Copyright Rolls-Royce Motor Cars NA, LLC 2016. The Rolls-Royce name and logo are registered trademarks.


W I N T E R 2 016

CONTENTS 106

CITIES

ARE THESE THE MOST INTERESTING MEN IN THE WORLD?

149

Art Basel Miami Beach tops our list of what to eat, drink, see and do across the country this season 150 ASPEN

A roundup of restaurants, bars and outfitters to patronize during the Audi FIS Ski World Cup Finals 151

CHICAGO

152

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

The Joffrey Ballet does The Nutcracker; a ramen museum opens

153 HOUSTON

Top picks for dining, partying and more during Super Bowl LI 154 LAS VEGAS

The Venetian’s ultimate feast; Cartier returns to the Wynn; changes are afoot at The Cosmopolitan 156 LOS ANGELES

Sunset Boulevard welcomes a luxurious apartment complex; favorite cooks debut fresh culinary concepts; facialist Joanna Vargas goes West 160 MIAMI

Brickell City Centre is a new mall for America; hotels and restaurants dock in the Magic City

Gents like Mr. Christopher Sharrock define a breed of über-stylish men featured in We Are Dandy.

163 NEW YORK CITY

Inside the West Village’s hautest development; North Sails and John Hardy open; the Museum of the City examines the history of the Big Apple 166 ORANGE COUNTY

The latest in retail and cocktails 167 PALM BEACH

A local museum celebrates the feminine mystique; Sant Ambroeus expands to Florida

168 SAN FRANCISCO

Talking art with the head of the de Young and Legion of Honor museums; a fashionable boutique lands in Jackson Square 169 BINNSHOT 172

PARTIES

BACKPAGE 176 FAMOUS LAST WORDS

Mark Seligerʼs handwriting hints at the hidden artistry of his photography

WE ARE DANDY/PHOTO BY ROSE CALLAHAN © GESTALTEN 2016

28

DUJOU R .COM

Dallas Black Dance Theatre turns 40; local chef Tiffany Derry expands her empire


This dance should belong to you. DreamDancer BY KIM

DreamDancer BY KIM transcends the boundaries between dream and reality. Although the ring is cast in one single piece, it forms a mobile structure that constantly reinvents itself. A revolution in ring design. In 18 k rose gold, from $4,745. With brilliant-cut diamonds, from $7,475.


ED LETTER

DUJOU R .COM

W I N T E R 2 016

30

From left: Coat by YVES SALOMON, bag by MAX MARA, trousers by RALPH LAUREN COLLECTION. Coat by BALLY, skirt by BROOKS BROTHERS. Coat by POLOGEORGIS.

closer examination of the familiar: Take our own backyard of Brooklyn, which for years has been deemed hip but is only now welcoming a glut of high-style (and high-price) hotels that signify its arrival as a destination on a global scale (“Late Check-In: Brooklyn,” p. 56). To say it’s been a turbulent year is an understatement—and I’m certainly not just talking about what’s happened in the or the past four years, we’ve dedicated our Winter Midtown Manhattan offices of a glossy magazine. But with every issue to cinematic performances touted as “Defining challenge, change also brings an opportunity. At least that’s how Moments.” But compiling this year’s list gave the my staff and I approached the task of guiding DuJour into its next phrase new meaning—not only because of the robust chapter. I don’t think we’re alone in that sentiment. The performcrop of contenders, but also because, here at DuJour, ers we spotlight in “Defining Moments” (p. 95) shared similar a largely new editorial staff—including myself, feelings about the roles they’re being recognized for. As the old helming my first issue—was called to execute a fresh saying goes, “nothing ventured, nothing gained.” ■ vision not just for the awards season franchise, but for the magazine as a whole. Luxury, culture and lifestyle have always been integral to our book’s mission, but in a world where these terms grow ever more ubiquitous, we owe it to you, our savvy readers, to sort through the fluff and find the stories that define those concepts today. That means looking beyond the expected—to Beirut, say, for the latest in thoughful design (“Middle East Modern,” p. 60), or to our FIONA MURRAY grandmothers for an object lesson in elegance and the latest fine jewelry (“Golden Girls,” p. 120). Sometimes, too, it requires a

F

PHOTOGRAPHED BY LANDON NORDEMAN

Thoughts DuJour


CALIBER RM 037


W I N T E R 2 016

CEO LETTER

32

DUJOU R .COM

T

hroughout DuJour’s history, the Winter issue has been a special celebration of the onscreen achievements that will define the careers of great actors. While working on this magazine, the team and I were fortunate enough to experience some monumental moments of our own in the form of new business, outstanding events and exciting new ventures. Our summer ended with a move to 530 Seventh Avenue and a toast to our new offices among friends—including building owner Bob Savitt—atop the property at David Rabin’s gorgeous rooftop bar, The Skylark. The parties continued during a jam-packed New York Fashion Week, which included an intimate celebration and film screening with Fall cover star Renée Zellweger and an all-out bash at LAVO with guest of honor Jason Derulo. A special thanks is in order to Diageo’s Keenan Towns, who provided specialty cocktails made with Zacapa Rum and Tanqueray for the events. Most recently, we fêted diamond guru Fawaz Gruosi at one of our favorite spots, Harry Cipriani, and enjoyed a gourmet dining experience with Gaggenau at Restaurant 1683. We look forward to many exciting events in the near future as DuJour continues to move onward and upward, forging new partnerships with United Airlines, Judith Leiber, North Sails and more amazing brands. On a personal note, I have had the honor of embarking on two exciting new endeavors at cutting-edge companies. I now serve as Chief Advisor to the Board of Directors at InList (the nightlife and events booking app founded by Gideon Kimbrell and Michael Capponi) and as an Executive Director at JetSmarter (the world’s largest mobile marketplace for private jets). I’m honored to lend my experience to two companies I greatly admire. ■

1

2

3

6

5

4 7

9 8

11 10

Jason Binn

Twitter/ Instagram: @jasonbinn

12

13

1. 5W Public Relations CEO Ronn Torossian, Talent Resources CEO Michael Heller, Jason Binn 2. Related Companies Chairman Stephen Ross, Jason Derulo, Related Companies CEO Jeff Blau 3. Equinox CEO Harvey Spevak, Jason Binn, Republic Group President Charlie Walk 4. Kynetic CEO Michael Rubin, New England Patriots CEO Robert Kraft 5. Vector Group Ltd CEO Howard Lorber, Jason Binn 6. DEL GATTO Chairman and CEO Chris Del Gatto, Veronica Webb Del Gatto, Jason Binn 7. XPT Co-creator Laird Hamilton, Rachel Zalis, Casamigos Tequila Founder Mike Meldman, Harrison & Shriftman Principal Lara Shriftman 8. Code and Theory Co-founder Brandon Ralph, Surf Lodge Owner Jayma Cardoso, Jason Binn 9. Jason Binn, Douglas Elliman Real Estate President & CEO Dottie Herman 10. David Koch, Jason Binn 11. David Rabin, Artie Rabin 12. Financier Edward Lampert, Jason Binn, Full Picture CEO Desiree Gruber 13. LDV Hospitality Founder and President John Meadow, Jason Binn


W I N T E R 2 016

CEO LETTER HANDPICKED

15

16

14

17

19

34

DUJOU R .COM

18

20

22

21 23

24

25

26

27

14. Jason Binn, Republic Records CEO Monte Lipman, Republic Group President Charlie Walk, Sterling Management Group, Inc. President Seth Greenberg 15. Swarovski Director of Brand Communications Iesha Reed, Jason Binn, Selita Ebanks 16. Gina Gershon, Jason Binn 17. Donny Deutsch, Charlie Rose, Jason Binn 18. Jamie Foxx, Jason Binn, Alex Rodriguez 19. Jason Binn, Alicia Keys, Swizz Beatz, Neiman Marcus Group President Jim Gold 20. Jason Binn, Panerai AVP of Marketing Tom Byrczek 21. Jason Binn, Jolie Hunt-Potter 22. Jason Binn, John Legend 23. InList Co-founder Gideon Kimbrell, DuJour Fashion Market Editor Paul Frederick, Renée Zellweger, Jason Binn 24. Jason Binn, Louise Camuto 25. Jason Binn, Audi of America Marketing Manager Nathalie Carpenter 26. Jason Binn, Craig Lawrence 27. Jason Binn, Scott Sartiano

Alexa Lambert Ally Shuster Angie Dalton Becca Thorpe Bob Savitt Brett Dunne Brian Shaw Charlotte & Sophie Bickley Conor Kennedy Craig Lawrence Daniel Lombardi Daniel Saynt Danielle Naftali David Seelinger Desiree De Matteis Drew Schafer Emile Mosseri Emily Briody Eyal Lalo Fran Green Federico Contu Gaby Fernandez Gany Lalo Greg Coleman Greg D’Alba Jim DeMattei John Golieb John Mahdessian John White Jon Patricof Jonas Tahlin Kais Zaiane Ken Grosso Kristen Yraola Kurt Slanaker Laura Hagege Lauren Sonnenberg Leon Cutler Leonard Steinberg Lizzie Grubman Louise O’Brien Lydia Fenet Mark Rosen Matt Haupt Matthew Doull Melissa Pordy Melyssa Reilly Michael Kassan Michael Leedy Michael Rubin Michael Shvo Michael Stillman Mike Frankel Nathalie Carpenter Neal Sroka Nicole Lewis Peter Malachi Peter Tunney Pierre-Antoine Oury Radmila Lolly Reed Phillips Ricardo Dias Richard Myerson Rob Wiesenthal Ronald Perlman Scott Sartiano Sergey Petrossov Shaul Nakash Soojin Kim Stan Meyerson Tennille Kopiasz Terry Darland Tom Byrczek Tom Roberts Valerio D’Ambrosio Veronique Pinsky Virginia Carnesale Wilma Jordan


EDITOR IN CHIEF

CEO/PUBLISHER

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER

Fiona Murray

Jason Binn

Nathalie Kirsheh

Leslie Farrand

LUXURY GOODS DIRECTOR

Adriana Martone

FEATURES

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Araceli Franco

FEATURES DIRECTOR

Anthony Rotunno

JUNIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

SENIOR EDITOR

ADVERTISING SALES OFFICES

Berggitte Maeser

Sylvie Durlach, S&R Media (France), Susy Scott (Italy)

Frances Dodds

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANTS RESEARCH EDITORS

COPY EDITORS

Lu Fong Mick Rouse James Williamson

Gabriella Fuller Kirsten Denker

Jennifer Lyons Brianna Montalto

INTEGRATED SALES PLANNING MANAGER

Stefanie LaGalia

INTEGRATED MARKETING ART + PHOTO

FASHION + BEAUTY

PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR

FASHION MARKET DIRECTOR

Liane Radel

Paul Frederick

PHOTO EDITOR

MARKET EDITOR

Harriet Salmon

Meaghan Hartland

SENIOR DESIGNER

36

DUJOU R .COM

Alexa Speyer

MARKETING DIRECTOR

Jackie Cinguina

MARKETING MANAGER

Jennifer Lentol

MARKETING DESIGNER

Chelsea Hernandez EVENT COORDINATOR

Sara Strumwasser

CITIES REGIONAL EDITORS

Amiee White Beazley (Aspen), Holly Crawford (Houston), Holly Haber (Dallas), Rebecca Kleinman (Miami and Palm Beach), David Nash (San Francisco), Jessica Ritz (Los Angeles and Orange County), Rebecca Taras (Chicago), Andy Wang (Las Vegas)

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS,

William Pelkey

SENIOR PRE-MEDIA MANAGER

Michael Oh

DUJOUR.COM

IT MANAGER

DIGITAL DIRECTOR

Eden Univer

DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL MEDIA AND AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT

WEB PRODUCER

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Caitlin Heikkila

Kevin Singh PRINT CONSULTANT

CALEV Print Media

PAPER SOURCING

Aaron Paper

Rachel Wallace

Kasey Caminiti

FINANCE WEB ASSISTANT

Rachel Barber

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Alyssa Giacobbe, Rhonda Riche (Watches) CONTRIBUTORS

Alex John Beck, Patricia Bosworth, Cedric Buchet, Anne Christensen, Grant Cornett, Arthur Elgort, Douglas Friedman, Kyoko Hamada, Henry Hargreaves, Annette Poizner, Lindsay Silberman, Bruce Weber, Lynn Yaeger

FINANCE MANAGER

John Domingo

CONTROLLER

Dahlia Nussbaum

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Stephanie Cabral-Choudri

BOARD ADVISORS

Dan Galpern Matt Witheiler

GENERAL COUNSEL

John A. Golieb

INTERNS

Monica Daniels, Dominique Dellamaggiore, Madison Ford, Atalie Gimmel, Amaya Nelson, Nathaniel Wu

DuJour (ISSN 2328-8868) is published four times a year by DuJour Media Group, LLC., 530 7th Avenue, Floor M1, NYC 10018, 646-679-1687. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. The publishers and editors are not responsible for unsolicited material and it will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication subject to DuJour magazine’s right to edit. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, photographs and drawings. Copyright © 2017 DuJour Media Group, LLC. For a subscription to DuJour magazine, go to dujour.com/free, call 844-385-6871 or email custsvc_dujour@fulcoinc.com


REBECCA RAMSEY

Contributors

38

DUJOU R .COM

Text by Madison Ford

MIKE ALBO Mike Albo’s own experience in theater provided an instant point of connection between him and cover star Jake Gyllenhaal, who Albo interviewed for “Honestly, Jake,” (p. 112). “Everyone always laments, ‘There aren’t lead actors like there used to be.’ Jake is different,” the writer says. “He is one of the great leading men.” The levity in Gyllenhaal’s artistry was not lost on Albo. “It sounds like he tries really hard to stay open. That includes not being dogmatic about his approach.”

JUERGEN TELLER Renowned photographer Juergen Teller (depicted above in a “self-portrait”) hosted actor Jake Gyllenhaal at his London studio for our cover shoot and inside story, “Honestly, Jake,” (p. 112). What began with a sincere mano a mano conversation evolved into a several-hour session of nonstop snapping that resulted in this series of honest and intimate portraits of the actor.

GEORDIE WOOD “I was thrilled by the possibilities and the challenges of the project,” says photographer Geordie Wood of his “Defining Moments” actors portfolio (p. 95), which anchors this issue. Wood’s penchant for capturing his subjects in an authentic light yielded singular portraits of stars like Natalie Portman, Dev Patel and more. “The folks I photographed are so often seen in a hyperpolished way. I tried to make work that’s a bit more raw,” he says of his images.

CARSON GRIFFITH “I never knew pizza could be such a sensitive topic,” Carson Griffith says of “Food Fight” (p. 80), her investigative report on the corporate shift in power at Brooklyn restaurant Roberta’s. The rupture in ownership and morale at the famous eatery immediately captured the reporter’s attention. “I have a proclivity for writing about old and new New York, and this story was a meeting ground of both,” she says.

MIKE ALBO/PHOTO BY ERICA FREUDENSTEIN. CARSON GRIFFTH/PHOTO BY KIMBERLY MUFFERI.

“When you hear ruffles, you’re like: Okay, romance, over-the-top. But there are some garments that are a little more perverse than you might think,” says Rebecca Ramsey, who styled “Frill Seekers” (p. 132). The style director of New York magazine’s The Cut challenged the notions that traditionally accompany the frilly detail, selecting pieces that are modern interpretations of the age-old adornment. As with most memorable trends, Ramsey is careful to note: “It’s not just about the clothes, it’s about the story you’re trying to tell.”


‘The most enduring legacies a re bor n of the most colour f ul lives’

A LIFE IN COLOUR L O N D O N N E W YO R K AUSTR A LI A A ZER BA IJA N BA HR A IN CA NA DA CZECH R EPUBLIC M A LTA QATA R SAUDI A R A BI A SW ITZER L A ND TH A IL A ND UA E UK UK R A INE USA

FA B E R G E . C O M

@ O F F I C I A L FA B E R G E

Fa b ergé proud l y u s e s G em f ield s c olou re d gem s t one s


W

I N T 2E 0 R1 26 0 1 6

OUR 2016 GIFT GUIDE IS HERE!

RUS S E L L

Thoroughly Modern Lily Lily Collins, who appeared on DuJour.com’s October digital cover, is poised for next-level stardom with a lead role in Warren Beatty’s romantic drama Rules Don’t Apply, opening November 23. Read more on Collins in our exclusive interview. S o n db rl ao u $s 1e ,, 1ISABEL 9 0 , . L- 2i p2 s8 ti4in c k MARANT, 2 1 2 - 2 1 9 A b l a $z 1eMAC 7, , COSMETICS, m ac c osm etic s. c om .

DOWNLOAD DUJOUR TO YOUR IPHONE, IPAD AND ANDROID NOW

Photograph by David Roemer FOLLOW US! @DUJOURMEDIA

B u rm b aa g$ ,1 , 6 9 5 , GHURKA , ghu rk a. c om .

L I L Y COL L I N S / S T Y L I N G B Y P A UL F RE DRI CK A TS , TMA A RW K E ORK UP B S ,Y H FAI ON I R BA Y S G T IRE L EG SORY F OR T H E W G A ROUP L L. G I F T G UI DE / I MA G E COURT E S Y .

4 0 DUJOU R .COM

Featuring the season’s best in beauty, fashion, gadgets, home goods and spirits, this year’s picks are sure to please everyone (kids included!) on your nice list.


DOU BL E TOU R BI L L ON 3 0 ° E DI T ION H I STOR IQU E 5N Red gold case Unique edition of 11 pieces


LUKE GRIMES

5 7 G R E E N E S T, S O H O | 2 0 N E W T O W N L N , E A S T H A M P T O N JEFFREYRUDES.COM


W I N T E R 2 016

Art Class

Like moving mixed-media installations, the resort runways were an eye-popping mash-up of florals and graphic prints

3

2

44

DUJOU R .COM

1

1. Alexander McQueen 2. Dior 3. Louis Vuitton 4. MSGM 5. Fausto Puglisi 6. Coach 7. Altuzarra

PHOTO CREDITS TEEKAY

4


5 Charlie bag, $2,895, GHURKA, ghurka.com.

Utilitarian Chic

Is Shinola, Detroit’s homegrown maker of everything from bicycles to leather bags, now a girl’s best friend? Yes, if its latest covetable accessories are any indication. The brand takes its first foray into fine jewelry with a collection designed by the New York–based Pamela Love, a CFDA winner known for her intricate, refined baubles. Precious stones like tiger’s eye, opal and diamonds embellish the line’s sterling silver and 14-karat gold pieces, from hoop earrings to signet rings to buckle cuffs. “I’m always drawn to things that are forward thinking but nod to the past,” Love says of the collaboration. “I think that’s something that Shinola does very well.”

45

6

7

PHOTO CREDITS TEEKAY

DUJOU R .COM

For Ghurka’s latest collection, Creative Director Kathy Formby returned to the luxe leather goods and accessories maker’s perennial source of inspiration: military style of days gone by. “We’ve incorporated regimental stripes and hardware,” Formby says of the details found in her new men’s and women’s designs (like the saddle bag above). Combing through the brand’s archives and visiting vintage stores with cult followings (such as New York City and Montauk’s Melet Mercantile, a favorite of fashion followers like Garance Doré) resulted in a line of instant classics, many of which—like the “New Tilbury”—reference favorite retired styles.

Lifestyle Finds Love

From top: Statement signet ring in 14-karat yellow gold with opal, $2,800; Buckle bracelet in 14-karat yellow gold, $8,000; Small lug earrings in 14-karat yellow gold, $1,200, SHINOLA, shinola.com.


W I N T E R 2 016

STYLE From left: Polo shirt, $75, WILLIAM MURRAY GOLF, williammurraygolf.com. Traversiamo Jacket/ Vest, $895; Vice Versa tank (on Swank), $495 MISSION STATEMENT, missionstatement.com.

Collections by two award-winning performers elevate your gym bag to a Best Supporting role This season, the exercise-as-everyday-clothing movement welcomes serious star power in the form of debut lines by two actors famous for very different, but equally beloved, sports movies. From Oscar winner Hilary Swank (star of the boxing tearjerker Million Dollar Baby) comes Mission Statement, womenswear that could be desribed as gym-to-boardroom. Of her collection of dresses, jackets, sweaters and more made from a mix of highperformance and luxe fabrics, Swank says, “the underlying goal in creating it was to pay homage to women who are ambitious, focused and have a love for living a full, authentic life.” The line reflects a new chapter for the actress with a fierce tenacity to do it all, who reportedly once lived out of her car. From Golden Globe winner Bill Murray (star of the classic comedy Caddyshack) comes William Murray Golf, a men’s collection of—surprise!— irreverent sportswear, co-created by Murray’s brother, Joel. The brothers Murray are just as passionate about their endeavor, which harkens back to their days caddying together as kids. Their clothes—polos, shorts, hats and button-downs in playful stripes,

plaids and patterns (like a cocktail print that’s sure to be the toast of the clubhouse)—are as appropriate for the green as they are for the streets of fashionable enclaves like New York City’s Williamsburg (where Bill himself has been known to stroll). Again, the creators share a personal connection to their creations. “Bill’s always had a different kind of fashion sense,” says Joel of his brother. “You see him at Cannes and he’s got a plaid jacket and a plaid shirt and bow tie. Somehow it works.”

Psychedelic Clutches Judith Leiber—the accessories designer known for creating bedazzled handbag replicas of everything from an ice cream cone to a French bulldog—expands her menagerie of minaudières with a colorful new capsule collection. Created in partnership with Libertine, known for its bold, whimsical prints, the pieces— which include technicolor, crystal-encrusted purses in the form of dogs, pagodas and more—are sure to make any outfit pop. Lisa Frank, eat your heart out.

Crystal Pagoda box clutch, $4,995, LIBERTINE LOVES LEIBER, exclusively

at Bergdorf Goodman, 212-753-7300.

ALL IMAGES COURTESY

46

DUJOU R .COM

The Latest in A-List Athleisure


STYLE

RED CARPET REBEL A new Dior Homme capsule collection by designer Kris Van Assche adds a dose of rock ‘n’ roll noir to the house’s classically slick formal wear. Cheekily christened “Black Carpet,” the Spring 2017 ready-to-wear line— which reimagines the classic tuxedo in wool houndstooth and Prince of Wales check, and updates the staple white dress shirt with punk details like selvage edges—is a subversive homage to the red carpets upon which Van Assche’s designs will no doubt be spotted.

48

DUJOU R .COM

Jacket, $2,600; Shirt, $400; Trousers, $800, DIOR HOMME, diorhomme.com.

Classic Fusion Aerofusion Chronograph Special Edition ʽʽConcrete Jungleʼʼ watch, $19,500, HUBLOT, 646-582-9813.

Wrist Artistry

The New York–based street artist Tristan Eaton—known for his large-scale murals like Audrey of Mulberry (at right), on display in his home city’s Little Italy neighborhood—takes his talented hand to a much smaller canvas for a new collaboration with luxury watchmaker Hublot. The brand tapped Eaton to create a unique portrait of the Statue of Liberty (left) to adorn the back side of its special-edition Classic Fusion Aerofusion "Concrete Jungle" (which, true to its name, includes a bezel made of concrete). “A city this monumental deserves a tribute that is equally strong and beautiful,” Eaton says of the watch. No time like the present to think big—after all, it is the city where dreams are made.

DIOR HOMME/PHOTO BY IAN KENNETH BIRD. ALL IMAGES COURTESY.

W I N T E R 2 016


STYLE Hoarding Time

50

DUJOU R .COM

Big bucks and even bigger egos drive the lucrative business of watch collecting By Rhonda Riche Still life by John Lawton

W

HO NEEDS A WATCH when you have

an iPhone? Yes, the question pits apples against oranges, but as smartphones grow more ubiquitous, talk of the wristwatch’s inevitable demise gets louder. One thing technology can’t do, however, is project prestige and individuality (all iPhone 7s—and most Apple watches, for that matter—are indeed created equal). That’s one—and perhaps the biggest—reason collecting luxury watches isn’t a dying practice but a thriving cottage industry. Like wine, art and real estate, timepieces can command big bucks at auction. And, of course, the even bigger bragging rights those bucks bring. The art of collecting fine watches is, as we know it, a relatively recent pursuit. Traditionally, they were gifted to mark a milestone: graduating from college, say, or retiring from the firm. Because of their inherent sentimental value, these pieces were kept as family heirlooms. That all changed in the 1970s, as actors like Steve McQueen and Paul Newman and international playboys like Italian industrialist Gianni Agnelli were christened style icons. All were aficionados of high-end makers, and together they spawned a movement. Instead of cars, sophisticated men started buying watches. McQueen and Newman in particular came to be identified with specific timepieces—the Heuer Monaco and the Rolex Daytona, respectively—connected to their love of auto racing. Meanwhile, Agnelli, a champion of individual style, embraced watches of every stripe— from the elegant IWC Portofino to the beautifully ugly Omega Ploprof Seamaster. His penchant for strapping his Patek Philippe World Time over his shirt cuff (reportedly because he couldn’t be bothered to pull it back when checking the time) further popularized the wristwatchas-statement-piece trend. The desire to stand out in a crowd may account for owning two or three timepieces; but accounting for double- and triple-digit hoards requires a peek inside the minds of those who can afford them. Most collectors of this type have an all-or-nothing mentality, and some of the watch world’s most influential players—like comedian Jerry Seinfeld, musician Pharrell Williams and actor Brad Pitt—have other big-ticket obsessions too. Seinfeld, rumored to own every Breitling model available and frequently photographed wearing one, has garages filled with cars (and a show dedicated to getting coffee in them). Williams, an Audemars Piguet fan, amasses art. Pitt, partial to Patek Philippes, also collects works by his favorite architects—including actual buildings. Having come of age in the social media era, many younger aficionados do it, simply, for the likes. Just as sneakerheads will live-tweet their days-long vigil outside a shoe store to be the first to buy Kanye West’s latest collaboration with Adidas, plenty of watch collectors— especially devotees of the limited edition—want to show off online. The Los Angeles Dodgers’ second baseman, Howie Kendrick, for instance, regularly Instagrams the stories behind his mostly military-influenced Panerais and Omegas. In these cases, rarer is better. Take Richard Mille’s approximately $600,000 RM 52-01 Tourbillon Skull,

PHOTO CREDITS TEEKAY

W I N T E R 2 016


Right: The late Gianni Agnelli, former president of Fiat, wearing his iconic “over the cuff” style, 1968.

Paul Newman and a Rolex Daytona

Jerry Seinfeld and a Breitling Navitimer

ONE WATCH, THREE FACES Brad Pitt and a Patek Philippe Nautilus

A timeline of what may be the chronometric holy grail: The pocket watch belonging to Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th Dalai Lama

1937 The Patek Philippe Perpetual Calendar Ref. 658 is introduced, with fancy complications including a calendar with moon phase, a split-second chronograph and a minute repeater. Only about 15 examples were produced.

When it comes to watches, it’s safe to say that John and Greg Simonian, the father and son duo behind California-based retailer Westime, have been around the block—or the dial, as the case may be. Since 1987, their company has dealt in one-of-a-kind styles by the likes of Audemars Piguet, Bvlgari, Hublot and Ernst Benz. As far as their own timepieces go, the two generations take different approaches. While patriarch John, Westime’s founder, often jokes his first watch was “a sundial in the backyard,” son and current company president Greg keeps his first watch—a Longines Legend Diver—quite close (in a Buben & Zorweg watch winder, to be precise). “It remains my go-to for outdoor activities, especially watersports,” he says. “Something unique that you notice right away is that it has two crowns. One is used to set the time, and the other is used to rotate the inner bezel, a feature that allows divers to track how much dive time they have left.” Greg adds that acquiring the piece launched him on a deep dive of his own; nowadays, choosing a favorite is no easy task.— Rachel Wallace

JUNE 2016 Senator Patrick Leahy posts a Facebook photo of the Dalai Lama with the watch at an event in Washington, D.C. Collectors across the world lose their collective minds.

1943 President Franklin Delano Roosevelt sends intelligence agents from the Office of Strategic Services (the World War II precursor to the CIA) to present the then 8-year-old Dalai Lama with the watch. One of those officers is Ilia Tolstoy, grandson of the Russian novelist.

51

Pharrell Williams and a Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Concept

which launched as a 30-piece limited edition in 2013, sparking a feeding frenzy. The Skull became so desirable that, when Russian president Vladimir Putin’s spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, wore one at his wedding, questions about how he could afford it sparked a minor international incident. Compared with other high-end accessories, the most expensive watches have proven themselves to provide good returns on investment; the secondary market is a fast-growing sector. In 2010, Italian banker and watchophile Alfredo Paramico, who values his own collection of 10 rare Patek Philippes at about $20 million, partnered with Luxembourgbased Elite Advisers SA to launch an unprecedented openended watch fund. (Interested investors take note: He’s currently promoting vintage Longines as the under-the-radar brand to buy.) Timelessness is, of course, a virtue—classics are considered good investments because they never go out of style. Catherine Deneuve—a timeless classic herself—has a watch wardrobe that mixes old and new, including iconic models like the Chanel J12, the Jaeger-LeCoultre Grande Reverso and the Cartier Tank Française. Her most memorable is the diamond-encrusted Jaeger-LeCoultre Joaillerie 101 Etrier. Because acquiring a previously-owned watch may be the only way to get a rare or sold-out limited edition, demand for “highly collectible”—also known as “grail”—pieces outweighs supply. In response, auction houses like Christie’s and Antiquorum have increased the frequency of watch-themed sales. Some independent watchmakers, including F.P. Journe, are starting to buy back rare pieces from past collections, authenticating and restoring them and then reselling them to connoisseurs. All of which to say: Accumulating luxury watches can start as a one-percent hobby and easily become a high-risk obsession. Fraudulent financier Bernie Madoff used his Ponzi scheme to fund an immense collection of rare timepieces. In an ironic twist, in 2010 one of Madoff’s watches, a vintage steel Rolex “Moon Phase,” sold at auction for $67,500, its shady history evidently only adding to its value. As for what it will command the next time it hits the block—well, only time will tell. ■

DUJOU R .COM

PAUL NEWMAN/THE LIFE PICTURE COLLECTION-GETTY IMAGES. JERRY SEINFELD/HEIDI GUTMAN-BRAVO-NBCU-GETTY IMAGES. PHARRELL WILLIAMS/TRAE PATTON-NBC-NBCU-GETTY IMAGES. BRAD PITT/MICHAEL BUCKNER-WIREIMAGE-GETTY IMAGES. DALAI LAMA-FACEBOOK. FDR/OMIKRON-GETTY IMAGES. GIANNI AGNELLI/DAVID LEES-THE LIFE PICTURE COLLECTION-GETTY IMAGES. ALL OTHERS COURTESY.

Steve McQueen and a Tag Heuer Monaco

Two Experts On Collecting

1959 The Dalai Lama flees Tibet and seeks asylum in India. The watch goes back to Switzerland for repairs. (His Holiness has said that regular servicing is why the watch still works today.)


W I N T E R 2 016

STYLE 1 2

7

3

1. Optical frames in acetate, $415, TOM FORD, tomford.com. 2. Round frames in tortoise, $360, SELIMA OPTIQUE, selimaoptique.com. 3. 1156 frames in acetate, $565,

6

CUTLER AND GROSS,

4

Look Sharp

His-and-hers vintage-inspired frames are an elegant focal point for dressing the part Photographed by Jens Mortensen

cutlerandgross.com. 4. Santos de Cartier glasses in tortoise composite with platinum, price upon request, CARTIER, cartier.com. 5. Hawksmoor frames in acetate, $650, BLAKE KUWAHARA,

blakekuwahara.com. 6. CL 41427 frames, $455, CÉLINE, Solstice, 646-679-4888. 7. Le Cannet frames in tortoise and 18-karat yellow gold, $865, LEISURE SOCIETY BY SHANE BAUM,

5

leisure-society.com. 8. Stephanie frames in buffalo horn, $1,895, MORGENTHAL FREDERICS, 646-381-0650.

FROM TOP: JAMES DEAN/MICHAEL OCHS ARCHIVES; GRACE KELLY/MURRY GARRETT; MICHAEL CAINE/TOM WARGACKI. ALL PHOTOS GETTY IMAGES.

52

DUJOU R .COM

8


SKY Y.

TANEISHA B.

TIARA T.


CAROLYN S.

CLASSIC BEAUTY YOU’LL NEVER FORGET. VALISA M.

NEW YORK 177 FR ANKLIN ST DETROIT • MIAMI • CHICAGO • LONDON WASHINGTON DC • LOS ANGELES • SAN FR ANCISCO SHINOL A .COM


W I N T E R 2 016

LIFE

56

DUJOU R .COM

A view of the Williamsburg Hotel (left) and the Wythe Hotel (right) from the pool deck of the William Vale hotel, in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

A crop of luxury hotel openings makes clear what sophisticates have long known: New York’s hottest destination may no longer be an island By Laura Itzkowitz

I

low leather chair, sipping a gin-and-lemon concoction and eyeing the well-dressed crowd gathered at Westlight, the rooftop bar at the brand-new Williamsburg hotel William Vale. I nibble my smoked salmon puff and watch a brunette in a white jumpsuit and floppy hat slink past the DJ spinning lounge music. For months, I’ve been watching the 23-story behemoth, on the summit of which I am now reclining, rise on Wythe Avenue. You can’t miss it: The building, by local architecture firm Albo Liberis, is by far the tallest in the neighborhood. It also houses ever-popular restaurateur Andrew Carmellini’s first Brooklyn venture. And though it seems out of scale now, it’s likely a premonition of what’s to come. Among the cognoscenti, it’s common knowledge that Brooklyn rivals Manhattan as New York City’s hippest borough. According to a report by the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce, in the last seven years, the area’s population growth has outpaced not only that of Manhattan, but also that of the city, state and country. Between 2009 and 2014, tourism and entertainment employment in Brooklyn grew at more than twice the rate they did in New

THIS PAGE/PHOTOGRAPHED BY JOHN LEHR. FOLLOWING PAGE/ LOVE AND WAR.

Late Check-In: Brooklyn

T’S FRIDAY NIGHT AND I’M reclining in a


York state as a whole, and the restaurant and bar industry accounted for more than 81 percent of that growth. The scene may have started with scrappy, homegrown spots like Diner, by the Williamsburg Bridge, but today it’s flush with Michelin-starred eateries and award-winning cocktail lounges. Now, finally, the borough’s hospitality offerings are catching up. Eight new hotels opened between January 2014 and August 2016, and 29 more are coming down the pipeline, according to NYC & Company, the city’s tourism authority. “The idea used to be that you’d stay in Brooklyn when you couldn’t afford to stay in Manhattan, or you’d stay in Brooklyn when you were screwed and couldn’t get a room in Manhattan because they were all sold out,” says Peter Lawrence, co-owner of Williamsburg’s Wythe Hotel—the borough’s first prominent boutique property, which opened in 2012. “I think if our project proved anything, it’s that people want to stay in Brooklyn.” Indeed, demand for hotel rooms is so high that when the Wythe Hotel is booked, Lawrence’s team refers would-be guests to the William Vale. With 183 rooms and suites, it’s more than double the size of its neighbor, and luxe in a way I tend to associate with properties across the river. Its largest suite, the Vale Garden Residence, is an airy two-bedroom duplex with an oversize terrace, a living wall, a jacuzzi, a marble dining table and a rate of $6,000 a night. There’s marble everywhere. If it hadn’t been for the agro-urban herb garden near the pool, I’d have thought I was in Miami. Unsurprisingly, hipster-chic Williamsburg will see the highest concentration of Brooklyn’s new hotels and its buzziest, most upscale offerings. A block south of the Wythe Hotel, the new Williamsburg Hotel boasts 150 rooms and suites, Harvey (a restaurant helmed by former Vetri chef de cuisine Adam Leonti), a rooftop pool deck, and a bar in a retrofitted water tower, because—Brooklyn. Owner Toby Moskovits, who traces her Williamsburg roots to an immigrant grandfather, assembled a powerhouse team, tapping Evan Altman and James Stuart—their collective rap sheet includes the Gramercy Park Hotel, the Standard Hotels, the Bowery Hotel and the Jane Hotel—as managing directors. Just down the street, trendy British group the Hoxton has broken ground on a 175-room property. And on Driggs and Metropolitan, Pod Hotels will open a modular tower that will harbor April Bloomfield’s first Brooklyn restaurant. But Williamsburg is far from the only neighborhood getting a tourism facelift. Hotels are breaking ground from Greenpoint and Bushwick to Bed-Stuy and Downtown Brooklyn. A few blocks from the Barclays Center, InterContinental Hotels Group recently debuted an outpost of Even, its wellness-focused hotel brand. And the Bossert Hotel, a landmarked grande dame once known as the “Waldorf Astoria of Brooklyn” (the Brooklyn Dodgers celebrated their 1955 World Series win there) and operated since the 1980s as a free hotel by the Jehovah’s Witnesses, will be reborn next year as the Esplendor Bossert. Run by Argentine group Fën Hotels, the property will retain many of its original details,

58

including its grand staircases and chandeliers. It will not retain the Witnesses’ pricing structure. One of the most exciting openings of 2017 will be 1 Hotel Brooklyn Bridge, the third location of the eco-conscious miniempire developed by Barry Sternlicht and Starwood Capital. The brand’s first two properties, on Miami’s South Beach and near Manhattan’s Central Park, received widespread acclaim for their thoughtful design, use of natural materials like stone, reclaimed wood and living plants, and efforts to reduce waste and energy consumption. 1 Hotel Brooklyn Bridge will be equally green, with a spa, a rooftop bar and a restaurant by acclaimed chef Seamus Mullen—all right in Brooklyn Bridge Park, one of the borough’s most beloved public spaces. While the park may be strikingly egalitarian, the hotel will attract the kind of traveler who can pay $500 a night for a suite with organic cotton sheets and views of the Brooklyn Bridge. Even up-and-coming Gowanus, full of warehouses and artist studios, will get a boutique hotel next year: the Gowanus Inn & Yard, a 78-room property from Matt Abramcyk, the hospitality guru behind SoHo’s Navy restaurant and the industrial-chic Tiny’s & the Bar Upstairs, in Tribeca. Carlo Scissura, president and CEO of the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce, is optimistic about the influx of upscale hotels and confident there’s enough demand to fill them. “Hotels don’t open if tourists aren’t coming; it’s that simple,” he says. Fair— but who are these tourists? According to James Stuart, managing director of the Williamsburg Hotel, “Our [typical] guest has been to New York many times and is looking to explore the rich neighborhoods [beyond Manhattan].” And according to Peter Lawrence, the

Brooklyn’s renaissance has been a long time coming. Below, a time line of notable events leading to the current heyday. 1646

Colonial government formally incorporates the community of “Breuckelen.”

1834

Brooklyn is incorporated as a city.

1855

Williamsburg, Greenpoint and Bushwick become part of Brooklyn.

1883

The Brooklyn Bridge opens. The baseball team the Brooklyn Grays is founded; it later evolves into the Brooklyn Dodgers.

1895

Construction begins on the Brooklyn Museum, designed by renowned architects McKim, Mead & White.

1898

Brooklyn becomes part of New York City.

1921

In a flash of hyper-prescience, the New York Sun declares “Greenwich Village is moving to Brooklyn.”

PHOTO CREDITS TEEKAY

LIFE

DUJOU R .COM

W I N T E R 2 016


Wythe Hotel tends to attract niche travelers from cities like Paris, Copenhagen and Tokyo, who look to Manhattan’s hipster cousin for everything edgy. (Cases in point: Le Bon Marché, in Paris, hosted a Brooklyn-themed pop-up shop last year, and tour companies like New York Off Road offer street art tours of Bushwick conducted in French.) The Brooklyn brand is so hot that Lawrence has been approached about creating a little Wythe Hotel in Tokyo. To the eye of this Brooklynite, stylish European tourists don’t stand out much, but as the night progresses at Westlight, I notice more of the short-skirted, stilettoed bridge-and-tunnel types that have always flocked to “hot” nightlife spots (read: Meatpacking District hotels that have bouncers instead of doormen). For the time being, they’re still in the minority. My friend takes a sip of her mezcal cocktail and murmurs, “I hope it stays this chill.” We go out onto the terrace to take in the sweeping views; it’s partially sectioned off for a private event attended by women in floor-length gowns. I wonder if they represent the logical conclusion of Brooklyn’s continued gentrification. For now, at least, it’s too soon to tell. ■

Goodfellas is filmed in Brooklyn. It goes on to receive six Academy Award nominations.

1992

New York magazine calls Williamsburg “the New Bohemia.”

A view of the Manhattan skyline from the Gotham Corner Suite at the William Vale.

1999

Andrew Tarlow opens Diner, birthing Brooklyn’s farm-to-table movement.

2010

Chef’s Table at Brooklyn Fare becomes the borough’s first restaurant to earn two Michelin stars.

2012

The hit show Girls, partially set in Greenpoint, premieres on HBO. The Wythe Hotel opens.

2015

The New York Times reports artists can no longer afford Brooklyn, declaring Detroit “The Last Stop on the L Train.”

59

Artists Patti Smith and Robert Mapplethorpe rent an apartment in Clinton Hill for $80 a month.

1989

No one can deny that Brooklyn’s in demand. But will that really spell a slowdown in action on the island that started it all? Not if the city’s multibillion-dollar real estate business is any indication. “The development of the west side of Manhattan is one of the most exciting real estate endeavors to happen in New York City in decades,” says Jeff Blau, the CEO of Related Companies, which is overseeing much of the massive undertaking. “In Hudson Yards alone, there will be thousands of new residences and more office space than what is currently available in downtown San Diego.” Slated for completion in 2025, the neighborhood—which spans the area between Tenth and 12th Avenues from West 30th to West 34th Street—will include luxury apartments and retailers (like the city’s first Neiman Marcus), in addition to prospective landmarks like the Vessel, a futuristic public structure that’s expected to draw crowds to rival those at the Eiffel Tower. Just a few blocks south is another part of town that’s only getting hotter, according to Town Residential founder Andrew Heiberger. “The 23rd Street corridor, which was once a retail area, is now seriously appreciating [in value],” Heiberger says of buyers’ desire to own a piece of the rapidly transforming neighborhood, before adding, “The areas south of 34th Street, moving east from Chelsea all the way to Gramercy Park, are thriving.” But don’t just take their word for it—earlier this year, Forbes reported that “more money was spent in commercial real estate” in New York City in 2015 than since 2007’s record peak, with Manhattan netting most of that haul. So, yes, while some might choose Brooklyn, there’s no shortage of those who’ll still take Manhattan. — RACHEL WALLACE

A room at The Williamsburg Hotel.

DUJOU R .COM

1967

I’LL STILL TAKE MANHATTAN


W I N T E R 2 016

LIFE Middle East Modern

I

FIRST MET DAVID RAFFOUL AND

Nicolas Moussallem at Papercup, a bookstore-cum-coffee shop just down the street from their then-brand-new studio space in Beirut’s Mar Mikhael neighborhood (which, as the home to many of the city’s hippest new arrivals, has been likened to New York City’s Williamsburg). I’d traveled to Lebanon earlier this year with a long list of designers I hoped to meet because, despite the country’s political and social issues, the city is a surprising hotbed of modern design. Topping my list were Raffoul and Moussallem, the founders of the five-year-old firm David/Nicolas. Of all the region’s talent, few have gone as global or garnered as much attention as the pair of 28-year-olds. “Our products reflect who we are,” Raffoul explains. “And we like beautiful things.” In the months that followed my initial visit, a slew of debuts have only solidified the men’s status as the design stars to watch. The Lebanese duo launched five products during the Milan Design Week in April: Scudo marble tables for the prestigious Nilufar Gallery; the Dreamstatic rug for Marcel Wander’s company, Moooi; the Lio desk for Haymann Editions; and Rocket Science candleholders for Verreum. A rug for Tai Ping was exhibited in September during Paris Design Week. Most recently, Carpenters Workshop Gallery (whose star-filled roster includes Rick Owens, Maarten Baas, Studio Job and the late Vladimir Kagan) showed a select group of collectors David/Nicolas’ latest creation: a bar cabinet handcrafted from glass, bronze, wood and marble.

David Raffoul (on left) and Nicolas Moussallem in their Beirut studio.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY IEVA SAUDARGAITĖ

60

DUJOU R .COM

The award-winning Beirut firm David/Nicolas is bringing its brand of design to the world stage By Rima Suqi


MODEL RESIDENCE BY JAMES HUNIFORD NOW OPEN 38 Newly Imagined Condominium Residences 3 Bedrooms Prices From $6.6M Developed by Naftali Group Designed by Gachot Studios In the Heart of the West Village 212 995 1010

275W10 COM

All images are artist renderings. This is not an offering. The complete offering terms are in an offering plan available from sponsor. 277 West 10 Owner, L.P. c/o Naftali Group LLC, 1700 Broadway, 16th Floor, New York, NY 10019. File No. CD14-0241. Equal Housing Opportunity.


LIFE David/Nicolas’ Scudo Table.

62

DUJOU R .COM

“OUR PRODUCTS REFLECT WHO WE ARE,” DAVID RAFFOUL SAYS. “AND WE LIKE BEAUTIFUL THINGS.” To hear them tell it, once the men figured out what they wanted to do (they met in 2006 as students at the Lebanese Academy of Fine Arts, where Moussallem had originally studied physics), they were very strategic about how they went about doing it. They pursued graduate studies at Milan’s Scuola Politecnica di Design, but, as Moussallem explains, “it’s not the fact that we were studying in Milan that gave us an edge, it’s the way we lived our experience. Other students were in Milan, but they lived a student life, while we tried to make connections.” Perhaps the most fortuitous of these connections was Sam Baron, a design consultant and creative director at Fabrica (a creative research center that’s part of the Benetton Group). Raffoul, who spent a postgraduate year interning in Fabrica’s design department, apparently made quite the impression when he referenced “Sie Kommen (Dressed),” a 1981 Helmut Newton photograph of four women clothed in fashions of the time, as the inspiration for architectonic vases he designed. “I was like, what?!” Baron recalls. “How can someone think of this supergeometric shape when we are still in the round, pastel, no-corners, everything-is-soft mood? He had a very strong aesthetic, which was completely off the map. Not typical, not cliché.” Which may be why Baron referred Raffoul and Moussallem to his client Vista Alegre, the age-old Portuguese porcelain company, following Raffoul’s stint at Fabrica. That referral led to the duo’s first commission and resulted in Orquestra, a 2014 tabletop collection that went on to become one of the most lauded designs in Vista Alegre’s history, winning the Wallpaper Design Award, the Red Dot Design Award and, most recently, the German Design Award. Creating Orquestra required that the designers spend several months in Portugal. It was during this time that they framed their brand’s vision and design ethos: to create timeless pieces that nod to the past while always looking to the future. Raffoul says that what attracted him to the aforementioned Helmut Newton photograph was that the women in it looked “determined.” The same could be said for him and his business partner. When they heard that Nina Yashar, owner of Milan’s Nilufar Gallery, was going to be in Beirut in 2014, they made it their mission to meet her. Among design buffs, penetrating Yashar ’s orbit is known to be difficult, but Raffoul and Moussallem not only got a meeting, they got what would be their next commission: Dualita, a collection that debuted at Yashar’s gallery that April, during the Milan Design Week. In the weeks

that followed, David/Nicolas was anointed one of the fair’s three breakout stars by T, the New York Times style magazine, a distinction that accelerated their already rapid rise. “They know their value, and know what they want,” says JeanPierre Tortil, Tai Ping’s global creative director. “They want to collaborate with partners, but they want high-end processes and quality. That is the way they have positioned themselves.” Being from Lebanon, a country not typically associated with design, adds to the allure. “No one was speaking about [Beirut] at the time,” says Baron. “They were the new kids on the block, and they were a bit exotic.” Loïc Le Gaillard, co-founder of Carpenters Workshop Gallery, happened upon their designs while dining at a collector’s home in the city. He describes them as “initially very different from what you could have expected. The delicacy of the work contrasts greatly with the political chaos in the region.” That chaos may explain why the pair recently leased a studio space in Milan and, to date, have primarily targeted partners outside the Middle East. Aside from a restaurant they’re designing in downtown Beirut and a villa in Jordan, current projects include the interior of an apartment in Paris, the complete redesign of a client’s Porsche (Raffoul originally wanted to study automotive design) and a new collection for Nilufar Gallery that will be introduced during the 2017 Milan Design Week. When asked about dream projects, Raffoul ticks off a list that includes designing a hotel, trying his hand at scenography, creating a piece for Italian furniture brand Cassina and collaborating with Daft Punk. That last one might seem random, but the designers are huge fans of the electronic music duo because, Raffoul says, “you either take them or you don’t, but they do what they want.” So do Raffoul and Moussallem. They’re in great demand—but, loath to dilute the brand they’ve worked so hard to build, they’re now saying no more often than yes. That doesn’t mean they’re resting on their laurels. “Every year we re-question ourselves about our designs,” says Raffoul. “We get bored easily. We always want to change, to stimulate, to create a new vision.” ■

Rendering of ALFRED, a silver-plated brass and enamel trash ‘butler’ made for House of Today, a non-profit organization focused on the Lebanese design scene.

The Rocket Science candlesticks.

CANDLESTICKS/ PHOTO BY BOYSPLAYNICE. ALL IMAGES COURTESY DAVID/NICOLAS.

W I N T E R 2 016


Clopay ® Avante™ Collection

®

your home reinvented. Uncover the beauty of your home with a stylish Clopay garage door. With so many distinctive choices, you can rejuvenate your home with a dramatic entrance that makes a bold statement. Imagine what you can do with Clopay! Made in the U.S.A. © 2016 Clopay Building Products Company, Inc., a Griffon company.

For a FREE consultation, call 800.225.6729. imagine.clopay.com


www.invictawatch.com


Invicta Thunderbolt Model 21355 Swiss Movement 52mm Case Diameter Surgical Grade Solid Stainless Steel Case and Band Construction 18kt Gold plating on gold Tones Water Resistant Up to 500 Meters

Available at The Invicta Watch Stores: Boca Raton Town Center Mall • Miami International Mall • Tampa International Plaza Baltimore - Washington International Airport • Westfield Brandon Mall • Lenox Square Mall • Mall of Georgia • Christiana Mall Woodbridge Center Mall • Garden State Plaza • Staten Island Mall Sarasota Mall at University Town Center • The Mall at World Trade Center • The Mall of San Juan • Queens Center Mall Orlando’s Florida Mall • Aventura Mall • Times Square, NYC

I N V I N C I B L E I N D E TA I L SINCE 1837


W I N T E R 2 016

BODY Saturation Point

1

Five luxurious potions to quench your skin during cold-weather months, plus four experts’ tips for maintaining a healthy glow By Eden Univer Photographed by Jens Mortensen

2

Smooth Start

Get Rich Quick

“I give clients a richer version of my cream, made with ingredients like shea butter, grape seed oil and avocado oil, which are known to help combat dry skin.” Dr. Barbara Sturm, specialist in advanced nonsurgical beauty treatments and molecular anti-aging medicine

5

66

DUJOU R .COM

3

“A good exfoliation helps remove dead skin cells, which will increase the level of absorption for any product you apply afterwards. (I also suggest a gentle, milky cleanser— nothing too harsh.)” Zaharenia Victoros, lead esthetician at the Sisley Spa at the Carlyle Hotel, New York City

Go Green

“Opt for natural ingredients, especially when picking an exfoliator. Scrubbing with a product that uses organic particles helps to replenish the oils already in your skin.” Shyou Hung, celebrity facialist

Kill the Chill

“When outdoors, keep your hands, face and neck covered. At home, try to keep bedroom temperatures low and use a humidifier.” Naima Refkan, lead esthetician at the La Prairie Spa at the Ritz-Carlton hotel, New York City

1. Morning Aura Illuminating Crème, $95, VICTORIA BECKHAM ESTÉE LAUDER COLLECTION, esteelauder.

4

com. 2. Hyaluronic Serum, $300, DR. BARBARA STURM, spacenk.com. 3. Orchidée Impériale Black Cream, $1,115, GUERLAIN, guerlain.com. 4. Limited Edition La Crème, $535, CLÉ DE PEAU BEAUTÉ, cledepeaubeaute.com. 5. Superfood Facial Oil, $72, ELEMIS, elemis.com.


mermaids welcome

tropical oasis lounging iconic entertainment endless surprises seminolehardrockholly wood.com


W I N T E R 2 016

BODY

Some Like It Hot

A sizzling new sauna craze has fitness fanatics seeing red and feeling zen By Nicole Berrie

O

N E CO U L D E A S I LY B L A M E GWY N E T H

Paltrow for fueling the latest detox obsession that has wellness enthusiasts flocking to the nearest furnace. It all started about a year ago, when the then flu-riddled actress-turned-lifestyle guru posted an Instagram selfie with her lying on a terrycloth towel basked in crimson fluorescent light, with the caption reading “All contagion aside.” Nearly 27,000 likes later, a new health movement was born: Behold the infrared sauna. Since then, a crop of hip holistic haunts touting themselves as urban sweat lodges has popped up across the country, luring city dwellers seeking the—er—hottest way to perspire. In downtown Los Angeles there’s the Springs, a buzzy wellness hub offering millennial hippies an array of healthy amenities, including 30-minute sweat sessions and kombucha tea on tap. Then there’s infrared pioneer Shape House, with three California outposts, where clients like Selena Gomez and the Kardashians bake in space-age body wraps while catching up on their favorite shows. Netflix and sweat, anyone? On the east coast, Manhattan’s HigherDOSE, a subterranean spot that opened on the Bowery last May, has quickly become a mecca for models (Carolyn Murphy) and celebrity fitness trainers (The Class’ Taryn Toomey) looking for a quick detox. “We’re health-club-meets nightclub,” declares co-founder Katie Kaps,

whose futuristic custom Clearlight saunas are also outfitted with LED light therapy—ideal for mood stabilizing or a lavender-hued selfie (glistening clavicles are so in right now). “New Yorkers are stressed and need to chill,” says Kaps. “Our experience is designed to get you high naturally.” To wit, Kaps’ candlelit space recalls a luxury spa—complete with private rooms, plush robes and, in the near future, “dopatonin” edibles purported to help boost serotonin and endorphins. But what makes today’s infrared boom so different from the old boys’ club sauna of yesteryear? Devotees claim the infrared technology penetrates human tissue—actually raising the body’s core temperature—while a traditional Finnish sauna simply heats the air. “Infrared saunas run 20 to 60 degrees lower than a conventional sauna, making it easier to tolerate the heat,” explains Donna Perrone, owner of wellness center Gravity East Village. The result? A deeper detox that can aid in weight loss, inflammation, sleep, stress reduction—and even boost the immune system. “The first time I used one I thought it was broken,” laughs designer-turned-integrative nutrition and lifestyle coach Daphne Javitch, who recommends clients go to cure bloating, particularly after traveling. “I’m not a big sweater in real life, so when you start to sweat intensely after about 15 minutes, it’s a really pleasurable release. You get out, you’re all rosy and it looks like you did a triathlon.” The latest spinoff of the infrared trend? Installing a sauna at home, entering it into the annals of high-end property perks, alongside private screening rooms and home gyms. Clearlight’s Sanctuary 1 model costs about $4,000, while a custom-fitted version could run upwards of $10,000. “Some people own a treadmill; I own a sauna,” says Jamie Graber of Gingersnap’s Organic, a vegan café in New York’s West Village; she installed one in her Union Square apartment and uses it five times a week. “It’s the best investment I made—and my skin is better than it’s ever been.” But is the infrared sauna really a cure-all? Like most wellness trends, not on its own. “Physically, it’s a great complement to a health regime,” says Vanessa Packer, founder of fitness studio ModelFIT. “If you drink juice, eat healthfully and work out regularly, the infrared is a really nice way to help your body recuperate and simultaneously get a deep detox.” In other words, it’s just one piece of the vitality puzzle. As Javitch, who goes once a week, puts it: “Health is cumulative. Every good decision breeds good decisions.” And who doesn’t have 30 minutes to spare? Now to find a machine that keeps us virtuous the rest of the time. . . . Your move, Paltrow. ■

The sweaty selfie posted by Gwyneth Paltrow that sparked a new health obsession (and racked up almost 27,000 likes).

HIGHERDOSE/PHOTO BY KEZIBAN BARRY. INSTAGRAM/PHOTO BY @GWYNETHPALTROW.

68

DUJOU R .COM

At New York City’s HigherDOSE, infrared saunas are outfitted with LED light therapy to stabilize patrons’ mood while they sweat.


PRECISION INSTRUMENTS FOR TIMEKEEPING


W I N T E R 2 016

PLAY On Hiatus

The casts of our favorite television series “take” well-deserved interseason vacations By Chad Thomas Photo illustrations by Alexa Speyer

Shoshanna (Zosia Mamet), Hannah (Lena Dunham), Marnie (Allison Williams) and Jessa (Jemima Kirke) from Girls head to Mexico’s Andaz Mayakoba Resort Riviera Maya.

SILICON VALLEY HITS ICELAND

The third season of HBO’s Silicon Valley, which takes a magnifying glass to the tech set’s most comedic stereotypes, nearly ended in tragedy. But after Richard (Thomas Middleditch) was forced to sell his fledgling company, Pied Piper, his former business partner Erlich (T.J. Miller)—the personification of upward failure—saved the day, buying it with the profits from a blog he unloaded. Balance restored, it’s easy to imagine the company’s perma-stoned new owner proposing the half-baked idea of blowing his remaining cash on a celebratory trip before the gang—rounded out by Jared (Zach Woods), Dinesh (Kumail Nanjiani), Gilfoyle (Martin Starr) and Big Head (Josh Brener)—gets back to the grind in Season 4. Considering their epic journey so far, we can totally see their new leader getting Viking delusions and booking it for Reykjavík, Iceland, home to all manner of natural wonder. “The most beautiful landscape in the world,” Erlich would proclaim. “Topped only by its women!” After excursions to the city’s prime sights—Lake Tjörnin, the Sun Voyager sculpture and the striking Hallgrímskirkja cathedral—dinner at the famed Perlan restaurant, recognized for its glassdomed roof, would be an appropriate venue for toasting Pied Piper’s future. Between bites of Icelandic rye bread, we can imagine Erlich, realizing his pockets are no longer as deep as they were, mumbling, “By the way, this is coming out of your paychecks.”

If HBO’s hit series Girls has taught us anything, it’s that years of casual employment and bourgeois Brooklyn living can really take a toll on a young p e r s o n ’s p syc h e. H a n n a h ( Le n a Dunham), Jessa (Jemima Kirke), Marnie (Allison Williams) and Shoshanna (Zosia Mamet) moved to New York City with wild ambitions but, as some of them near 30, their optimism is waning. Season 5 was particularly rough for Hannah, who watched her ex, Adam (Adam Driver), hook up with her best friend, Jessa. But after Hannah witnesses their explosive fight—principally about her—in the season finale, her spirits are considerably lifted. Now on a high, we can see her, in an attempt to get her besties to bond again before returning for their final season, plan a New Year’s trip they can’t afford—perhaps to Mexico’s brand-new Andaz Mayakoba Resort Riviera Maya, which, when it fully opens in January, will be the newest haute escape for sun-seeking urbanites. Never one to shy away from making the obvious uncomfortable, Hannah might reason, “Nothing will better help us see each other as we really are than yoga in tropical heat.” Surrounded by lush mangroves, tranquil lagoons and pristine shores, the beachfront resort’s serene confines will no doubt go a long way toward soothing any lingering girl-on-girl tension. If any remains, though, the property’s three pools and 10,000-square-foot spa can provide plenty of alone time.

GIRLS/PHOTO BY MARK CHAFER-HBO. BACKGROUND/COURTESY OF MAYAKOBA.

70

DUJOU R .COM

GIRLS GOES TO MEXICO


PLAY GRACE AND FRANKIE TAKE TO THE HIGH SEAS

72

DUJOU R .COM

MASTER OF NONE VISITS THE BOOT

In the Season 1 finale of Netflix’s comedy Master of None, co-created by and starring Aziz Ansari, protagonist Dev (Ansari)—a 30-year-old actor best known for a Go-Gurt commercial—subjects his life to the al dente test: throw everything at the wall and see what sticks. While his girlfriend, Rachel (Noël Wells), and acting career lack adequate adhesion, his passion for pastamaking clings, and he relocates to Italy. After what we expect to have been a successful first semester at culinary school in, we imagine, Bologna, we can see Dev heading north, to celebrate with his New York City crew in Franciacorta—a region in the Brescia province known for producing Italy’s finest sparkling wines—before their series returns for a second season in April. Like Champagne, the area shares its name with the bubbly it produces. The similarities between Franciacorta and its French cousin don’t stop there: Made with grape varieties like those found in the best Champagne vintages, Franciacorta also undergoes a second fermentation process to acquire its carbonation. At Ricci Curbastro, one of the sparkling wine’s oldest and most respected producers, Dev’s guests would toast his culinary success with glasses of Franciacorta brut. We can almost hear the tasting notes: “This stuff would pair so well with a nice carbonara. It’s got all the best properties of a good Champagne, but it doesn’t hurt my tum tum!”

Master of None’s Dev (Aziz Ansari) visits Franciacorta in the Brescia province of Italy.

Grace (Jane Fonda) and Frankie (Lily Tomlin) from Grace and Frankie head to sea on a Seabourn Cruises luxury liner.

The titular characters of the Netflix comedy Grace and Frankie have been rivals for decades, but after being left by their husbands—law partners turned life partners—they’re forced to reconsider their relationship. In the show’s second-season finale, Grace (Jane Fonda) finds a box of gifts labeled ANNIVERSARY, I’M SORRY and JUST BECAUSE—a stash kept by her husband (Martin Sheen) that she equates with treats for a dog. On her end, free spirit Frankie (Lily Tomlin) learns the buyer of her masterpiece painting is not Kenny Loggins, as she’d been led to believe, but her ex, Sol (Sam Waterston). After such sitcom travails, we wouldn’t blame the ladies for planning a sabbatical—say, a 24-day excursion to Antarctica, Patagonia and South Georgia Island on one of Seabourn Cruises’ luxury liners. As Frankie might say, “If we’re going to get away, let’s get away.” They’d fly from Los Angeles to Chile, board their Seabourn Quest ship and spend Christmas traversing the Strait of Magellan. Then, during Seabourn’s Antarctic Experience, a professional expedition team would handpick daily stops, from snowcapped volcanoes to massive glaciers and crystalline lakes—all welcome diversions from the ladies’ cheating exes. We can hear Grace— a touch too accustomed to her privileged SoCal bubble— now: “Wow! I didn’t know anything even lived here.” The cruise would continue, docking in South Georgia Island and Uruguay, and conclude its journey in Buenos Aires— allowing plenty of time for the women’s anger at their families to build up again before the show’s third season airs this spring.

MASTER OF NONE/PHOTO BY K.C. BAILEY-NETFLIX. BACKGROUND/DEA-G. SOSIO-CONTRIBUTOR-GETTY IMAGES. GRACE AND FRANKIE/PHOTO BY MELISSA MOSELEY-NETFLIX.

W I N T E R 2 016


© 2016 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.

575 MADISON AVENUE, NY, NY 10022. 212.891.7000

Artist: Yoni Alter


W I N T E R 2 016

WORK

The director behind the beautiful, probing Loving talks jumping the hurdle from indie to mainstream, changing the way Hollywood thinks and the kinds of conversations he hopes his new film will inspire By Frances Dodds Photographed by Jesse Chehak

F

OR NEARLY THE PAST

decade, the writer and director Jeff Nichols has been playing hard to get. Granted, it’s left him hungrier than the movie studios he’s flirting with, but the 37-year-old filmmaker—whose latest work, Loving, premieres in November—has a notion he can’t shake: that studios should invest in films with narratives which subvert the type of formulaic storytelling viewers have come to expect. That’s not to say Nichols doesn’t want to make mainstream movies; it’s that he wants to change what mainstream means. The Austin-based director made his first film, the gritty drama Shotgun Stories, in 2007. The New York Times called the tale of feuding brothers “as cool-headed as its characters are reckless.” Nichols’ refusal to freight his films with the kind of fill-in-the-blank framework typical of more conventional cinema established him as a genre-bending visionary. It also stumped the Hollywood revenue machine. The writer-director followed his debut with Take Shelter, Mud and, earlier this year, Midnight Special—a family drama that blooms into a strange and beautiful science-fiction fantasia, with little interest in “explaining” the world it introduces to its

GROOMING BY DANIELE PIERSONS FOR EXCLUSIVE ARTISTS MANAGEMENT USING KEVIN MURPHY. VERY SPECIAL THANKS TO FREEMANS ALLEY, NYC.

74

DUJOU R .COM

Nichols v. Hollywood


BOUTIQUES MADISON AVENUE • FIFTH AVENUE BEVERLY HILLS • BAL HARBOUR MIAMI • BOCA RATON • LAS VEGAS PALM BEACH • ATLANTA • DALLAS ORLANDO • HOUSTON • SAN FRANCISCO Tel: 1 800 536 0636

hublot.com

Big Bang Purple Linen. Case, dial and strap made of 100% natural linen fi bers. Bezel set with 36 amethysts. Self-winding chronograph. Limited edition of 200 pieces.


THRILLS

RESORT & VILLAS FAMILIES WEDDINGS GROUPS

GOLF EQUESTRIAN TENNIS SHOOTING SPA MARINA GASTRONOMY EXPERIENCE E N D L E S S POSSIBILITIES CASADECAMPO.COM.DO

866.302.3216

LA ROMANA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC


W I N T E R 2 016

WORK

machine—so it’s very easy to be your most aggressive in that situation. But when you sit two people in a room together, I dare you. I dare you to be as aggressive and dismissive of a person’s existence. I had communications with someone back in Arkansas, an older gentleman who I really respect very much, who has been a mentor in my life. He said to me, ‘Jeff, it’s so great that you’re telling this Loving story. So great, so great. Because that was a really big issue that we dealt with. And that’s just a good thing.’ And I was like, ‘Thanks, I’m so glad you said that.’ Because when you’re talking to an older white gentleman in the South, you never know. And then I said, ‘Well you know, it has a lot to do with what’s happening now with marriage equality.’ And he said, ‘Ha! No, no, no. No, that’s a different issue. The Bible was very clear about that.’ So we’re not done with these conversations. They’re going to be awkward. They’re going to be uncomfortable and aggressive. At times they are going to be violent. But we have to figure out how to have them, and not let them become violent.

I think about politics as much as anyone else, especially this year. But I actually think of Loving as an antidote to political thinking. Richard and Mildred didn’t want to force an agenda on people. And, laying out this film, I didn’t want to force an agenda on people [either]. To be honest, it’s why I felt okay with trying to tell their story. Like, I’m a middleclass white kid born in 1978. What business do I have making a It’s really weird growing up in the South: There are so many film, technically about a piece of the Civil Rights movement in monuments to Civil War battles, but very few to Civil Rights the 1960s? I don’t, but I thought I understood these people and battles. I think nonviolence feels like a foregone conclusion as something about their nature. part of our nation’s civil rights history, but it’s extraordinary that these young men and women in the 1960s were committed to the You know, everybody wants to be on the right side of history. teachings of Gandhi and to nonviolence. They saw through someAnd everybody wants to get on a soapbox and preach. But I come thing that, for all intents and purposes, needed to be met with from a part of the country where I disagree with the social views violence and anger because their subjugation was so disgusting of a lot of people who are friends and family members, and I and apparent. But they trained themselves to answer through nonknow the way to have those conversations with those people is violence. It’s such a bold thing. I think you mention nonviolence not by yelling at them. It’s not, ‘You’re stupid and you’re closed- today and people are like, ‘Yeah, yeah, yeah, I know about that.’ minded and uneducated.’ I’m going to say, ‘Well, try to think But there doesn’t seem to be the same level of commitment to why about the people at the center of this.’ That’s the best shot we it was important.” ■ have. It may not work—but it certainly has a higher chance than the more aggressive option. I’m not very well versed in social media, but I know it’s probably one of the worst places to have social dialogue, because people are so far removed from the humanity of the conversation. It makes sense. We’re alone, typing on a computer—a

Nichols directs lead actors Joel Edgerton and Ruth Negga on the Richmond, Virginia set of Loving.

PHOTO BY BEN ROTHSTEIN-FOCUS FEATURES

“IT’S REALLY WEIRD GROWING UP IN THE SOUTH: THERE ARE SO MANY MONUMENTS TO CIVIL WAR BATTLES, BUT VERY FEW TO CIVIL RIGHTS BATTLES.”

78

DUJOU R .COM

viewers. The film received fervent applause from critics but, disappointingly, scarce widespread attention. Which is why so much hangs on Loving. The filmmaker’s first foray into historical—and in this case, political—drama, the movie tells the story of Richard and Mildred Loving, whose landmark 1967 Supreme Court case, Loving v. Virginia, struck down the state’s bans on interracial marriage. Now, as the film garners serious Oscar buzz, Nichols is finally being courted by suitors with deep pockets. He just signed a deal for a “big war film” with Fox, about which he’ll say only, “I’ve been thinking a lot about aliens.” As he inches closer to redefining the blockbuster in his own nuanced image, the Southern filmmaker speaks about the changes he hopes to see in the world from which he draws inspiration.


W I N T E R 2 016

WORK

Food Fight

80

DUJOU R .COM

Will corporate ownership of Roberta’s, long Brooklyn’s decidedly anti-establishment eatery, spoil its recipe for success? By Carson Griffith Still life photograph by Jens Mortensen

T

HE RUMORS STARTED SWIRLING LATE LAST

winter, sweeping across Brooklyn like a cool breeze before a storm. Roberta’s—the two Michelin– starred Bushwick pizza joint founded in 2008 by two musicians and a cook, whose post-apocalyptic utopia of Christmas lights and pogo sticks, cinderblock walls and razor wire–enclosed garden came to define the borough’s brand of hipster haute cuisine—had been racked with problems. Among them was a private–turned–public feud over the pizzeria’s future and potential expansion between founding owners Chris Parachini (the enterprise’s original leader), Brandon Hoy (its manager and DJ) and Carlo Mirarchi (its chef). Parachini parted ways with his former friends and partners last winter (resulting in a million-dollar legal battle, according to the New York Times), but a bigger conflict had already begun to simmer. According to local gossip, the restaurant, known as much for its food as for its club-like culture (“It was never a surprise when the person I was working with showed up drunk, or had been up all night tripping on acid,” former Roberta’s cook Gabe McMackin told the Times in March), was about to undergo a significant man-


Live the #GiltLife

 WOMEN

MEN

KIDS

HOME

TRAVEL

Gilt.com

EXPERIENCES

UP TO 70% OFF


WORK agement change. In May, the website Eater.com reported what many regulars and employees already knew: Michael Tisch, a member of the billionaire dynastic family best known for its luxurious Loews hotel corporation and for co-owning the New York Giants, had met Mirarchi in 2015 and subsequently decided to make a significant financial investment in Roberta’s. The exact size and nature of Tisch’s involvement is still undisclosed, but a community board meeting in May revealed that a stipulation of the deal is an executive turnover: Reportedly, Mirarchi will maintain his current ownership stake—apparently 12.5 percent of Roberta’s—and Hoy (the remaining original partner following Parachini’s exit) will leave the company once the deal closes. By the time Mirarchi confirmed the news, the idea of Tisch— an Ivy League–educated, suit–and–tie type—involving himself in

was really excited about what we as a whole brought to [Roberta’s] anymore.” Mirarchi insists this isn’t the case. “I can’t even tell you how many hours of conversation [I’ve had] about [...] how important the culture of this place [was], and how important it was to us personally [...]. This place is my life,” he told Eater.com after news of the Tisch partnership broke. (Representatives for Roberta’s and a publicist for the Tisch family did not respond to a request for comment for this piece). For all those “hours of conversation,” the insider says that, while Mirarchi and Tisch (who has become a fixture at the eatery) have made their general plans clear, specific information is still hard to come by. Employees feel like they’re “out of the loop” and are “walking on eggshells,” atypical sentiments for what had always been a very close staff. “It’s like, ‘Can we do this

Roberta’s had already driven out “20 or more employees,” according to a former staff member who worked at Roberta’s for several years. The insider says the number is now closer to 30, but it’s “hard to know for sure [what the final tally will be] since so many people are on their way out the door.” The resistance to Mirarchi’s decision to bring in Tisch and his recently-formed company, Chorus Hospitality, didn’t necessarily stem from opposition to the type of business growth their presence might inspire. By the time Mirarchi and Tisch met, signs of the restaurateur’s expansionistic desires had long been evident. In 2013, the pizzeria put out a cookbook, Roberta’s Cookbook, and there were whispers of a second location opening in Los Angeles. A year later, as branded frozen pizzas appeared at select Whole Foods across New York City, rumors of an outpost in an upcoming Ace Hotel on Manhattan’s Lower East Side had begun to swirl. And, in 2015, a Roberta’s booth opened in the Urbanspace Vanderbilt food court, by Grand Central Terminal. It was clear the little eatery had ambitions beyond Bushwick. The resistance, rather, was to corporate involvement. With the introduction of Tisch, long-time employees feared an obliteration of the culture—a blend of intense creativity and laidback partying—the restaurant had become synonymous with. They worried a deluge of capital would mean new rules and regulations and, consequently, a thinning of the brand. (Many of them have since left and signed non-disclosure agreements.) As the former staff member tells it, their fears were not unfounded: “The change was almost immediate, and it came from [Mirarchi],” the one-time employee says. “He told the staff we had to shape up. We knew he was really excited about this deal, but it didn’t seem like he

anymore? Can we do that?’” says the former employee. “Things that have been the norm for years now seem like they’re not okay.” But a source close to Mirarchi counters that many staffers jumped the gun too soon, without waiting to see what positive developments the new arrangement might bring. The source affirms Mirarchi is “very conscious” of preserving Roberta’s culture, as demonstrated by his reluctance to replicate it wholesale (none of the rumored second locations have materialized), which, the source continues, would just “water down what Roberta’s essentially is.” Instead, the source suggests that Tisch’s involvement could help Mirarchi explore “new restaurants influenced by Roberta’s, as well as more product expansion, like the frozen pizzas that came long before [Tisch] was even in the picture.” These ideas aren’t new, the source adds. “[Mirarchi] just has some money now to make them a reality.” This speculation seems in line with Chorus Hospitality’s mission. Its website touts the company as a hospitality-focused management partner with a portfolio of support services to help bring original culinary concepts to market. Still, many employees can’t shake their unease at the hypercorporate Chorus Hospitality’s majority stake in a restaurant founded on a lark, in the middle of a recession, by a group of friends with a pizza oven, a lot of stamina and not much else. Their work hard, play hard attitude created a dining experience unlike any other: a graffiti-filled, booze-fueled, Michelin-starred party both patrons and staff thought would never end. It turns out, the one-time employee worries, they may have been wrong. “[Roberta’s] can’t be the same,” says the former staffer. “It just won’t ever be now.” ■

Above, from left: The exterior of Roberta’s in Bushwick, Brooklyn; the pizza oven in the restaurant’s takeout area; signage in Roberta’s outdoor seating space.

FAR LEFT/PHOTO BY ADAM KUBAN - FLICKR

82

DUJOU R .COM

W I N T E R 2 016


SARAH JESSICA PARKER for THE JORDACHE LOOK

SHOP NOW on the new

JORDACHE .com


W I N T E R 2 016

CULTURE

84

1

Elves On Shelves

The proprietors of eight of the world’s most beloved independent bookstores reveal titles on their reading (wish) lists and suggest some for yours Compiled by Anthony Rotunno

FOR ME: “I’ve had copies of Revolutionary War–era newspapers like the Massachusetts Spy and the Boston Chronicle in my store before and I’d love to get my hands on another group of them. The history comes across differently than what you read in schoolbooks.” FOR YOU: “I recently appraised a handwritten document on Paul Revere’s midnight ride, penned by Revere himself. Paul Revere and the World He Lived In, by Esther Forbes, is an equally fascinating account. A best seller when it was first published in 1942, it’s a readable, in-depth history of that moment in time.” Ken Gloss, owner of Boston’s Brattle Book Shop, a

2

FOR ME: “In high school I had to write a paper on the American poet Mary Oliver; ever since, I’ve tried to pick up all her new works. If nobody gives me Upstream: Selected Essays by Mary Oliver, I’ll have to get it myself.” FOR YOU: “I love to bake—I once worked as a pastry chef—and Mark Bittman’s How to Bake Everything promises to make baking accessible, but not boring, to even those most intimidated by it.” Emily Powell, owner of Portland, Oregon’s Powell’s Books, one of the world’s largest independent chains.

3

FOR ME: “I’d like to get a copy of the out-ofprint exhibition catalog Recorded Activities. It was published by Philadelphia’s Moore College of Art on the occasion of a 1970 group show of the same name that featured works by leading conceptual artists like John Baldessari and Bruce Nauman. Often overlooked by art collectors, catalogs like this are actually the primary documentation of these types of experimental art practices.” FOR YOU: “Blue Icon, by the minimalist painter Dan Walsh, would make a fantastic gift. The pages recall pixelated patterns with subtle gradations in tone. It’s an amazing, visually rich book.”

must-visit antiquarian shop for

Max Schumann, executive direc-

serious collectors and amateur

tor of New York’s Printed Matter,

historians alike.

a go-to store for rare art titles and one-of-a-kind zines.

PHOTO BY JAN SØNDERGAARD

DUJOU R .COM

The interior of Copenhagen’s Cinnober bookshop.


4

5

6

7

8

FOR ME: “I prefer an ‘authentic’ novel, or fiction set in the time it was written, but Elizabeth Buchan is such a clever writer that I’m sure I’ll highly enjoy her recent debut about life in London just after WWII, The New Mrs Clifton.” FOR YOU: “I’m so proud to be publishing Tirzah Garwood’s memoir, Long Live Great Bardfield. The book, which Garwood started in 1942 (writing at night after her children went to bed), describes how the female artist subjugated her work to that of her husband. It’s fascinating to anyone interested in the history of feminism.”

FOR ME: “Who Is Sleeping on My Pillow: Mamma Andersson & Jockum Nordström, published by David Zwirner Books, features collages, drawings and paintings— many in deep, dark, wintry colors—by the two Swedish contemporary artists. Together, their works create a nice unity.” FOR YOU: “I used to be a graphic designer, so I think books as objects, like Phaidon’s WA: The Essence of Japanese Design, make exceptional gifts. Intricately bound, it showcases a collection of Japanese products, from food to ceramics.”

Nicola Beauman, owner of London’s

Copenhagen’s Cinnober, a

FOR YOU: “I’m suggesting Nathan Hill’s The Nix to everyone. Set primarily in 1968 and 2011, it focuses on generations within one family—there’s a love story as well as political topics that particularly resonate now. It’s rare for me to develop the type of enthusiasm I have for this book.”

Persephone Books, which deals in

temple of high-design titles.

Richard Howorth, co-owner of

FOR YOU: “Paulette Jiles’ News of the World, a work of historical fiction and a 2016 National Book Award finalist, is fantastic. Set in the Wild West, it follows a man named Captain Kidd, who went from town to town reading papers to the uninformed—a real job back then. It’s a fun read.”

Square Books.

Paul Ingram, book buyer, Prairie Lights.

overlooked works by mostly female,

Ulla Welinder, owner of

FOR ME: “I’ve wanted to pick up The Accidental Life, a memoir by Terry McDonell, for a while. McDonell is smart and funny as hell, the type of kick-ass magazine editor I worry our culture is losing.” Lisa Howorth, co-owner, with her husband, Richard, of Square Books in Oxford, Mississippi, long one of the South’s preeminent booksellers.

FOR ME: “I love the early-20th-century American author Mary Virginia Terhune, known by her pseudonym, Marion Harland. She wrote about matters of the home: etiquette, housekeeping and recipes, the latter often with little essays. There are likely some works of hers I don’t have on my shelf.” FOR YOU: “I’d give anyone interested in old cookbooks a copy of Harland’s Common Sense in the Household: A Manual of Practical Housewifery.” Bonnie Slotnick, owner of New York’s Bonnie Slotnick Cookbooks, a favorite of in-the-know gourmands.

FOR ME: “I’m looking forward to Zadie Smith’s novel, Swing Time—Smith’s a terrific writer, and, from what I’ve heard, this—about a young biracial woman who develops an affinity for old musicals—will likely be marvelous.”

Jan Weissmiller, co-owner of Iowa City’s Prairie Lights, popular among students in the University of Iowa’s prestigious writers’ program.

mid-20th-century writers.

8

DUJOU R .COM

5

85

4

ALL IMAGES COURTESY

7

6


PHOTO CREDITS TEEKAY

PHOTO BY ROBERT VIGLASKY/NETFLIX

88

DUJOU R .COM W I N T E R 2 016

CULTURE


I

T’S LATE AT NIGHT. A YOUNG MAN GETS OUT

PHOTO CREDITS TEEKAY

Much is resting on the head of actress Claire Foy as she stars as Queen Elizabeth II in The Crown, winter’s most majestic new show By Frances Dodds

by the weight of precedent, ever the monarchy’s defining attribute. But perhaps most centrally, we watch Elizabeth struggle to maintain peace in her marriage with the Duke of Edinburgh (Matt Smith), a headstrong modernist with little patience for convention, who’s been made to give up a career in the Royal Navy and is left thrashing for purpose. “I think it’s too simple to see [Elizabeth] as a feminist figure who is this really powerful, strong woman trying to juggle being a mother, a queen and a wife,” Foy says of her character, who, as she is pushed further onto the stage of public life, feels her husband slipping away from her, barricading himself inside the smoky lounges of boys’ clubs. “She is trying to juggle those things, but she’s juggling them in relation to her own values and her own sense of self, and her sense of self is as a wife and as someone who supports her husband, not the other way around. I think it’s pretty incredible that she’s able to wake up every morning—that she’s been in Westminster Abbey with a crown on her head and a thick cloak and she’s taken an oath to God that she will do her job to the best of her ability. The interesting thing is to see a person who is between God and her husband and ultimately, God and the Crown are going to win. She’s floundering, I think. She’s massively vulnerable and completely lost.” One of the show’s most poignant characters is the disgraced Duke of Windsor (Alex Jennings), who famously abdicated the crown in order to marry the American divorcée Wallis Simpson. When making the decision to prohibit her sister’s marriage—a blow from which Margaret arguably never recovered—Elizabeth calls the Duke for words of advice. What he offers is hardly consolation. “We are half people,” he says, “ripped from the pages of some bizarre mythology, those two sides of us—human and Crown—engaged in a fearful civil war which never ends and which blights our every human transaction as brother, husband, sister, wife and mother. I understand the agony you feel. And I am here to tell you it will never leave you.” The moment is moving: the Duke at a party somewhere far away, speaking from the confines of his banishment, and Elizabeth sitting in the palace, speaking from the confines of her reign. The sentiment is reminiscent of the sort we often find in the mythical stories of superheroes, as they come to grips with power and responsibility they never asked for. But here, the people speaking were (and are) very real indeed. ■

89

Reigning Woman

Queen Elizabeth II (Claire Foy) and Philip Mountbatten, Duke of Edinburgh (Matt Smith) in season one of The Crown.

DUJOU R .COM

of a car and staggers up the driveway. He stumbles inside and makes his way to the doorway of a bedroom, his figure casting a shadow onto the bed where his wife is sleeping. He says her name quietly, but she doesn’t stir. He turns to go and she opens her eyes, listening to him leave. It’s a scene we’ve seen countless times before, the most familiar depiction of loneliness and resentment gnawing at the tender underbelly of a marriage. But this time, the bedroom is in Buckingham Palace and the couple at odds is Prince Philip and Elizabeth II, the Queen of England. Such is the intrigue of The Crown, Netflix’s highly anticipated $100 million series; written and directed by Peter Morgan, it takes a historical magnifying glass to the world’s most simultaneously public and behind-closed-gates family. The first season offers an intimate perspective on an early chapter in the life of Britain’s longest reigning monarch: the 1950s, when a 25-yearold Princess Elizabeth ascended the throne to become Elizabeth II. The lavish scale of the production is not lost on Claire Foy, the 32-year-old British actress whose own marquee moment comes in the role of Elizabeth. “It’s a big, big job,” she says. Perhaps she repeats herself because her sentiments ring true in more ways than one. The conversation about what it means to be a leader and a woman is now being had at a higher pitch than ever before. Elizabeth abruptly inherited the crown in the midst of a declining empire, with tradition at stake in battles both abroad and at home—sometimes all too close to the latter. As The Crown unfolds, we watch Elizabeth, as the head of the Church of England, make the agonizing decision to prohibit her sister Margaret from marrying the man she loves, on the grounds that he is divorced. We watch her continuously resist the Church, Parliament and a waning Winston Churchill (played with bullish brilliance by John Lithgow), only to be beaten into submission


CULTURE F*#k Santa: Christmas Albums Are the Gifts That Keep on Giving

90

DUJOU R .COM

With the record-release model all but broken, the music industry looks to the “most wonderful time of the year” to bring it some joy—emotional and financial By Carena Liptak

H

OW MUCH CHRISTMAS spirit does Neil Diamond have?

His cheer is bottomless, apparently. This fall, the singersongwriter released his fifth Christmas album, a mix of originals and holiday standards titled Acoustic Christmas. Diamond is generally prolific—he has put out 34 studio albums over the past 50 years, not including a list of live recordings and compilations—but still, holiday season after holiday season, he returns to beloved classics like “Silent Night” and “Jingle Bell Rock.” Diamond isn’t the only repeat purveyor of warm vibes this year: Artists of all stripes—Jimmy Buffett, Sarah McLachlan, Hanson—are coming out with follow-up holiday albums. Then there are first-timers, like R. Kelly, who announced his debut seasonal release, 12 Nights of Christmas, on Instagram in September. Kelly teased the project years ago: “I started it [in 2012] actually, but I don’t believe in putting out a Christmas album just to sell records,” he explained in a 2013 Rap-Up interview. If he was going to put out a Christmas record, it would need to be nurtured until just the right moment. Country singer Kacey Musgraves announced her own holiday debut, A Very Kacey Christmas, with similar sentiments, saying, “I really wanted to create a whimsical throwback holiday record, one that evokes feelings of nostalgia and simpler times.” The nice thing about classics is they don’t have to be flashy. They’re crowd pleasers, no artistic embellishment needed. As the name suggests, Diamond’s Acoustic Christmas keeps it simple. The emphasis is not on performance, but on having a kind of sing-along with the listener. For artists and their audiences alike, the songs are musical comfort food: They represent coziness in a turbulent world. In an age of surprise releases and streaming services, the promise of album sales is a shaky one. In July, Billboard singled out 2016 as the worst year for music sales since Nielsen SoundScan began tracking them in 1991. Compact disc and digital album sales fell 11.6 percent and 18.44 percent, respectively; the albums hit hardest were new releases, which crashed 20.2 percent. In other words, artists can’t assume a release date will equal sales. What artists can rely on, however, is moving music during the most wonderful time of the year. In 2014, according to Billboard and Nielsen Music, by the week of December 14, overall album sales had shot up by about 12.5 percent, and holiday albums accounted for 19 percent of those sales. That’s because, despite the waning power of release dates, the holiday season remains a time of conspicuous consumption, and CDs are the perfect size to cram into a stocking. For many artists, holiday albums are really the gifts that keep on giving. In 1994, Mariah Carey released Merry Christmas, which included the hit “All I Want For Christmas.” Twenty-two years later, that song still dominates the Billboard 100 Holiday Chart—and, sometimes, the Billboard 100 as well: Last December, Mariah’s old yuletide favorite outsold new non-seasonal hits by Adele, Justin Bieber, Selena Gomez, Ariana Grande and Taylor Swift. Regardless of what else is hot that year, December means Christmas tunes and a side of nostalgia, providing musicians a reliable end-of-year bonus. Fun fact: While chart-topping holiday albums are, almost exclusively, Christmas albums, a healthy percentage of them have been recorded by non-Christian artists: Carole King, Bette Midler and Barbra Streisand have all released yuletide records. In a nod to the King’s own best-selling holiday caroling, Diamond has even been nicknamed the “Jewish Elvis.” The point is, Christmas albums do well; but in the spirit of the season, perhaps they have worth beyond being schmaltz for the goyim. Another semi-famously Jewish singer-songwriter, Bob Dylan, released his holiday album, Christmas in the Heart, in 2009. In an interview that year, Dylan said: “These songs are a part of my life, just like folk songs. You have to play them straight too.” Like those old folk tunes, Christmas music is a chance for artists of all genres to get back to basics—perhaps the rarest gift of all. ■

BACKGROUND/REBECCA HANDLER GETTY IMAGES. ALL IMAGES COURTESY.

W I N T E R 2 016


T he U l t im a te in Wire l ess Hea d p hones MW60 Wireless Over-Ear

MW50 Wireless On-Ear

w w w. m a s t e r d y n a m i c . c o m


Live D TechnoMarine Cruise Dream – Model 115117 – Quartz Day Date – Mother of Pearl Dial with hand set designs – 200 Meters Water resistance – 18Kt gold plating Available Available at at The The Invicta Invicta Watch Watch Stores: Stores: Boca Boca Raton Raton Town Town Center Center Mall Mall .. Miami Miami International International Mall Mall .. Tampa Tampa International International Plaza Plaza Baltimore - Washington International Airport . Westfield Brandon Mall . Lenox Square Mall . Mall of Georgia . Christiana Mall )HS[PTVYL>HZOPUN[VU0U[LYUH[PVUHS(PYWVY[>LZ[Ä LSK)YHUKVU4HSS3LUV_:X\HYL4HSS4HSSVM.LVYNPH*OYPZ[PHUH4HSS Woodbridge Center Mall . Garden State Plaza . Staten Island Mall . Sarasota Mall at University Town Center . The Mall at World >VVKIYPKNL*LU[LY4HSS.HYKLU:[H[L7SHaH:[H[LU0ZSHUK4HSS:HYHZV[H4HSSH[<UP]LYZP[`;V^U*LU[LY;OL4HSSVM:HU1\HU Trade Center . The Mall of San Juan . Queens Center Mall . Orlando’s Florida Mall . Aventura Mall . Times Square, NYC 8\LLUZ*LU[LY4HSS6YSHUKV»Z-SVYPKH4HSS(]LU[\YH4HSS;PTLZ:X\HYL5@**VTPUNZVVU!;OL4HSSH[>VYSK;YHKL*LU[LY www.technomarine.com


eeper


DEFINING IT’S COMMONLY SAID THAT MOVIES ARE AN ESCAPE

from reality. In fact, the opposite is often true. Sometimes, the greatest fi lms force us to face the subjects that make us most uncomfortable. This year has been one of the more divisive in recent history, and its defi ning performances—many of them, in turn, career-defi ning for the actors who delivered them—reflect that disconnect, presenting bold revisions on relevant dialogues. When looking at the per formances in this portfolio as a collective, there is a through-line that seems important. It gestures to a storytelling sensibility that permeates both style and narrative. Perhaps it could best be described as “close range.” None of the films in the following pages are what we might call sweeping epics. This isn’t to say that the characters or their stories haven’t had or won’t have an epic impact; it’s to say that their stories are shown in such a way as to keep us close. This is close range: In Jackie, the First Lady applying her lipstick in the mirror on Air Force One— cut to scene, at the same mirror, where she gasps for air as she wipes blood from her face. In Loving, a couple asleep in their home at night, stunned awake by the glare of a police fl ashlight. In Moonlight, a teenage boy trembling after the shock of a first kiss. These are performances that compel us to focus on the individuals at the center of the issues. Because sometimes, in focusing on the bigger picture, we miss the small, and lose sight of an important truth: Beyond the political abstractions, there are people. And their lives matter.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY GEORDIE WOOD TEXT BY FRANCES DODDS

MOMENTS 2016


“[Fame] creates a splitting of the self. Jackie obviously had it on a much larger scale than I do, but it was something I could see in her and empathize with— that there’s this idea of how other people see you, there’s who you really are, there’s who you want other people to think you are, there’s how you think you’re supposed to be. This film was an exploration of someone who is so well known, and yet so two-dimensional in the way we know her, iconographically. We don’t consider her humanity. Now we see that she really took her identity as her husband’s wife and was creating his legacy. She was already saying ‘I’m going to be the author of this story—not a journalist, not a historian.’ It’s so modern: It’s what everyone does now, showing the public what they want them to see.” Dress, $4,800, DIOR, 800-929-3467. Styled by Kate Young

97

Jackie

DUJOU R .COM

NATALIE PORTMAN


DUJOU R .COM 98

JOEL EDGERTON Loving

“I think the great sadness throughout the entire movie is just how much time was stripped from two good human beings. Nine years of constant oppression is an incredibly insidious and violent situation, psychologically. And this film shows how ongoing injustice can cause [people] to become limited in their ability to debate, argue, fight. These people learn to stay silent, walk within the limitations they’re given and lie down instead of standing up to a situation. Loving really brings us closer to the marriage equality debate and, being Australian, I definitely have an opinion about that. Australia still has not given same-sex couples the right to legally marry. The absurdity of what happened to Richard and Mildred, and the absurdity of what’s happening today, is that the decisions being made to limit the freedoms of others are made by people who often will never meet the individuals they are affecting.” Jacket, $3,000, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO, 866-337-7242. Styled by Paul Frederick


Christine

Dress, $1,980, ROSETTA GETTY, justoneeye.com. Holly sandals, $925, JIMMY CHOO, jimmychoo.com. Styled by Paul Frederick

99

“I think that if anyone looks at Christine from a distance and goes, ‘Oh how fascinating, how macabre,’ it’s dangerous. Even though she is an unusual character who did a shocking thing [the newscaster shot herself on air], it was a statement that came out of deep pain and suffering. It’s unthinkable in the abstract, but I think the film allows you access to try and understand how she could have gotten to that point. It walks alongside her and observes her, but also allows space for everything that can never be known about anyone. To me, Christine feels like a sort of harbinger of a lot of things we talk about now, whether it’s mental health issues or suicide. And the biggest tragedy for me is that, for all of her constant selfmonitoring and her performance of how she thinks she will be acceptable in the world, she is actually loved by the people around her. But she can’t see that, and doesn’t feel like she will ever be understood by anyone.”

DUJOU R .COM

NATALIE PORTMAN: HAIR BY DIDIER MALIGE. MAKEUP BY SARAI FISZEL. PHOTOGRAPHED IN THE TAIPAN SUITE AT THE MANDARIN ORIENTAL, NEW YORK CITY. JOEL EDGERTON: GROOMING BY LUCY HALPERIN AT THE WALL GROUP USING BOBBI BROWN. REBECCA HALL: MAKEUP BY STEPHEN SOLLITTO USING NARS. HAIR BY JOHN D AT FORWARD ARTISTS FOR TRESEMMÉ.

REBECCA HALL


NAOMIE HARRIS Moonlight

“We shot in Liberty City, in Miami, and there was all this fear, like, ‘Oh my gosh, this is not a safe neighborhood, how are [the residents] going to respond?’ But people were so happy to have us there— they were hungry to be represented. People want to give this film all kinds of labels: It’s a gay movie, it’s a black movie. But it’s not—it’s a human movie, and that’s what people are responding to. We are all searching for love, dealing with identity crises and other issues… When I started out I had a lot of judgment for my character, Paula, because she was a bad mother and an addict. But what often happens when you’ve been a victim of abuse is that you split in two—there’s your public persona, but then there’s also this private persona that’s always in pain, always suffering.” Shirt, $145, MAJESTIC FILATURES, majesticfilatures.com Styled by Paul Frederick


101

NAOMIE HARRIS: HAIR BY PETER LUX AT FRANKAGENCY.CO.UK. MAKEUP BY ALEX BABSKY @ JED ROOT USING LANCÔME. MANICURE BY MO QIN. BEN FOSTER GROOMING BY JESSICA ORTIZ USING BAXTER OF CALIFORNIA AT THE WALL GROUP.

DUJOU R .COM

BEN FOSTER Hell or High Water

“[My character] loves his brother. And the film poses an interesting question: What would you do for love? The movie is pulpy, it can feel like a Western, it has noir qualities, but it’s grounded in the ‘70s shift in masculine bravado. It’s about the difficulties men have communicating care and love. If we want to bring it into the political [sphere], we could call it Main Street against Wall Street. It’s about human beings who are struggling. It doesn’t demonize these young boys who clearly have nothing, and it doesn’t completely demonize the banks. But it does pose some valid and necessary questions for us as a society today. Now, that’s all buried underneath a lot of wham bam thank you ma’am action. So, hopefully there is a little bit of everything for everybody.” Sweater, $895, ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA, zegna.com. Styled by Paul Frederick


DEV PATEL Lion

“Saroo’s character is incredibly torn, because he’s got this wonderfully loving family in Australia that he is completely thankful for and is at home with. But he’s also riddled with guilt that he’s living this privileged life when his family in India could be out there on a truck still searching for him. At its core, it’s a story about the love between a mother and son, and how that can transcend continents. I’m a real mommy’s boy, so I wanted to make it not only for myself, but for my mom. And I think it’s rare to find a film that will bring a lot of joy to the world, like this one will. The script was one of the most beautiful things I’ve ever read.” Polo, $495, ORLEY, orley.us. Trousers, $800, FENDI, fendi.com. Mark XVIII watch, $3,950, IWC, iwc.com. Boots, $800, BOGLIOLI, 646-870-8250. Styled by Paul Frederick


MICHAEL SHANNON

Shirt, $95, NORTH SAILS COLLECTION, northsails.com. Trousers, $2,495 for full suit, RALPH LAUREN, ralphlauren.com. Montague Chelsea boot, $295, WOLVERINE 1000 MILE, wolverine.com. Styled by Paul Frederick

10 3

“I think my character is honestly a very nihilistic guy, but he has this reluctant sensitivity to Tony [Jake Gyllenhaal]. He has cancer and thinks, ‘Well this is my last shot to leave an impression on the world.’ But to what end? That’s the thing, in the end, across all of the story lines, you’re kind of left with a sort of emptiness. Ultimately the question is, ‘Should Tony and Susan [Amy Adams] be together or not?’ Should they have ever been together? Was it true love? Or was it just a chapter in the lives of these two people? It’s funny, love’s capacity to evaporate. I think about people that, 20, 10 years ago, I would have sworn I couldn’t live without. Now I hardly ever think about them. It’s weird. We’re told you’re supposed to find someone, spend your whole life with them and fall in a hole in the ground with them.”

DUJOU R .COM

DEV PATEL: GROOMING BY LUCY HALPERIN AT THE WALL GROUP USING BOBBI BROWN. MICHAEL SHANNON: GROOMING BY RHEANNE WHITE AT TRACEY MATTINGLY AGENCY.

Nocturnal Animals


TREVANTE RHODES

10 4

DUJOU R .COM

Moonlight

“As a black American man you’re taught that you have to be the most imposing, the most physical, that much better than your counterparts— and being homosexual is perceived as the inverse of that. But finding Chiron’s character, for me, had very little to do with [his] sexuality, because I feel like you fall in love with the mental aspect of people, not the physical. If I’d been born loving men, I’d love them the same way I love women. For me, it was really more about learning to hate myself, because Chiron hates himself. I had to allow myself to feel this disdain towards other people because I couldn’t accept myself. I really didn’t know I wanted to be an actor until this role. [Acting] always felt like pretending. But with this character, I felt as far removed from myself as I could be—and I loved this person. I cried for him.” Turtleneck, $1,050; Trousers, $720, DIOR HOMME, diorhomme.com. Les Grande Classiques watch, $1,300, LONGINES, longines.com. His own ring. Styled by Paul Frederick


10 5

TREVANTE RHODES: GROOMING BY JESSICA ORTIZ USING BAXTER OF CALIFORNIA AT THE WALL GROUP. MICHELLE WILLIAMS: HAIR BY BRYCE SCARLETT FOR GHD TOOLS AT THE WALL GROUP. MAKEUP BY ANGELA LEVIN USING CHANEL ROUGE COCO GLOSS.

DUJOU R .COM

MICHELLE WILLIAMS Manchester by the Sea

“[Your children dying] is the worst thing somebody can live through. It’s the thing that will probably bring you closest to death without actually killing you; it holds your face over the cliff. [Shooting Manchester] was really painful. Once you let your mind go to that place—to know that there are women on this day, in this hour, walking around with that as their reality— it’s very hard to walk it back. The movie is really about how people stay alive after great tragedy. Maybe the theme I return to, in my work, is wanting to bridge loneliness a little bit. Because I just want those little unloved parts to get loved. For some reason I’m very drawn to that in my work. I’m way more of a chicken in my own life.” All clothing, Williams’ own. Styled by Kate Young


DUJOU R .COM 10 6

ARE THESE THE MOST INTERESTING MEN IN THE WORLD?

IN AN ERA OF SWEATSHIRTS AND SNEAKERS AND KANYE, THE DANDY IS A UNICORN: A THROWBACK OBSESSED WITH TAILORING, DRAPERY, FIT AND FINDING THE PERFECT HOUNDSTOOTH. BUT HE IS ALSO, IN A 21ST-CENTURY TWIST, INVESTED IN PRESENTING AS HIS AUTHENTIC SELF. IN THIS EXCERPT FROM HER PREFACE TO WE ARE DANDY–A NEW BOOK ABOUT THE MODERN MEN COMMITTED TO A VERY OLD-WORLD AESTHETIC –BURLESQUE STAR DITA VON TEESE ARGUES THE CLOTHES REALLY DO MAKE THE MAN. WHICH MAKES IT ALL THE MORE FUN TO UNDRESS HIM.... PHOTOGRAPHED BY ROSE CALLAHAN


Name: Mr. Aymeric Bergada Du Cadet Occupation: art director Lives: Paris, France

DUJOU R .COM 10 7


10 8

DUJOU R .COM

As aesthetes by nature over birth, individuals who

nurture insatiable desires to transcend the state in which we entered into this world, the dandy and I share more in the uncommon than not. Why, a dandy is my male equivalent. I consider it manifest destiny that I count so many dandies among my friends . . . and lovers. That’s right. Just as it is ill-advised to assume all dandies look and live equally, only a philistine would think they all love the same. I have dated dandies. I was married to a certifiable heterosexual man who is undeniably a dandy. Likemindedness is seductive, particularly between those who think and act and dress at odds with the rest of society. Practicing dandies or not, the men I’ve been intimately involved with have exceptional taste. A potential paramour has to dress well. He has to be well groomed. Good manners are non-negotiable. These qualities are deal-breakers, if only because a mutual respect along with a joint appreciation of beautiful clothes and shoes and the rest of the dazzling trappings can be such pleasures. Of course, as that chestnut rings so true, a fringe benefit of sharing in the delight of an exquisite ensemble is that it only raises the stakes when that someone worthy requests you take it off. Call them swells, fops, boulevardiers, bon vivants, men about town. But do not for a minute dismiss dandies as layabouts. It involves great diligence and consideration to pull this off day after day. To be a dandy at the level that the men in [these pages] practice is nothing short of an art form. One cannot achieve this height of style without intelligence and purpose. These men are transgressing against contemporary life: they are time travelers cherry-picking embellishments and essentials from another epoch or three, tripping past periods fantastic on a journey to a more authentic self. I know all about this from my own experience. I also know it takes bravery to dress like this, to go out in the world and be repeatedly asked by strangers “What’s the occasion?,” to be catcalled “Wake up, it ain’t 1950!” or to hear whispers behind my back (some even accusing me of posing as Dita Von Teese!). I empathize with the boldness and commitment to the life and style these rare birds dubbed dandies have devoted themselves to sharing with the world—whether that world is receptive or not. Appearance is not always about being accepted or embraced. Something deeper is materializing. The reasons are as varied as there are fingerprints, of course, and, possibly no more so when it comes to the eccentric creature. Given the circumstances so many of the men here are facing, their triumphs reveal how genuinely comfortable they are with their body and spirit, with their place in this world, with all its sticks and stones. It’s not always easy to live on your own terms. I know

this, too. But it would hurt more to spend our time compromising our ideals, our dreams and our integrity. Like these men, I have some genuine obsessions I can’t altogether explain. When they become the norm, I might even lose interest. I’ve never wanted to look like someone else, and neither have the men in [these pages]. These individuals don’t expend energies wishing they could look like other men. As for being two peas in a pod, I’m not so far off in my assessment. History, at least dating back to the early part of the last century, holds up my claim, when a certain kind of feminist emerged with a penchant for tapping men’s wardrobes and brazenness for equal social power. Be it Gabrielle [Coco] Chanel or Marlene Dietrich, the quaintrelle is the female answer to the dandy, a woman with the moxie to revel in a life of beauty, glamour and pleasure. This is not to say quaintrelles or dandies are narcissists. Far from it. They navigate, even survive, life by way of their creative gifts, their intelligence


“I HAVE DATED DANDIES... LIKEMINDEDNESS IS SEDUCTIVE, PARTICULARLY BETWEEN THOSE WHO THINK AND ACT AND DRESS AT ODDS WITH THE REST OF SOCIETY.”

Name: Mr. Christopher Sharrock Occupation: educator and artist Lives: Toronto, Canada

ALL IMAGES FROM WE ARE DANDY, © GESTALTEN, 2016.

10 9

Name: Mr. Yoshio Suyama Occupation: barber Lives: Tokyo, Japan

DUJOU R .COM

Name: Mr. Paulus Bolten Occupation: patina artist and show designer Lives: Paris, France


110

DUJOU R .COM

Name: Mr. Gian Maurizio Fercioni Occupation: tattoo artist Lives: Milan, Italy

V


Left: Haldeman and Aguiar’s home in Brooklyn, New York.

“DO NOT DISMISS DANDIES AS LAYABOUTS. TO BE A DANDY AT THE LEVEL THESE MEN PRACTICE IS NOTHING SHORT OF AN ART FORM.” and, more often than not, a generosity of spirit. Dandy or quaintrelle, freak or eccentric, whatever they continue to call us today, we prevail and we strive to raise those who are bullied, who need beauty in their lives. I feel a kinship with these courageous, convention-breaking shape-shifters. While our numbers might be relatively few, there is strength in them. Every day is another opportunity to re-craft yourself into the individual you imagined yourself to become that day. “A beautiful thing doesn’t have to be new or even particularly valuable or precious, as long as it is a thing to behold. To live a life beautiful is the ultimate joie de vivre . . . ,” I declared in my book, Your Beauty Mark: The Ultimate Guide to Eccentric Glamour. Likewise, dandyism is not about a trust fund. Dandies and quaintrelles do not always belong to the strata of the idle rich, nor are they idle. It’s about privilege, alright—but one of insight, effort, tenacity . . . style.” ■

Name: Mr. Hiroshi Tsubouchi Occupation: shoe designer Lives: Tokyo, Japan

PREFACE BY DITA VON TEESE, TEXT EXCERPT FROM WE ARE DANDY AND ALL PHOTOGRAPHS BY ROSE CALLAHAN © GESTALTEN 2016.

Name: Mr. Mark Haldeman and Mr. James Aguiar Occupations: U.S. manager, Paul Smith, and fashion director, Modern Luxury Magazine, respectively Live: Brooklyn, New York

Name: Mr. Kamau Hosten Occupation: blogger, brand consultant and retail manager Lives: The Bronx, New York


112

DUJOU R .COM


PHOTOGRAPHED BY JUERGEN TELLER

BY MIKE ALBO

ONLY HAS EYES FOR ONE THING: HIS CRAFT

GYLLENHAAL

WHILE EVERYONE AND THEIR MOTHER (AND FATHER) MAY CRUSH ON THE NOCTURNAL ANIMALS STAR, JAKE


1 14

DUJOU R .COM

“Thank you so much for being so patient. I’m sorry

this took so much time to schedule.” Before I can even introduce myself to Jake Gyllenhaal, he is apologizing to me. It’s a blustery Saturday afternoon in October and we are in a room deep in the bowels of the New York City Center theater in midtown Manhattan, where the actor is rehearsing for a benefit performance of James Lapine and Stephen Sondheim’s musical masterpiece Sunday in the Park with George (in which the New York Times will later declare he “shines”). Jake sings the lead, which is known as one of Sondheim’s most difficult parts for a man. I commend him for taking it on, and remark how, with such a short rehearsal process, he must not even have had time to doubt himself. “Doubt is forever your friend in that moment,” he says. “But why do we pretend we are not overwhelmed, or we don’t like the feeling? The other day, I turned to Annaleigh Ashford, who plays Dot, and said, ‘This is why we do this.’” Throughout our conversation, Gyllenhaal will talk this way: philosophically, artistically, passionately. He is head-to-toe Actor-as-Artist. During our chat he will quote Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 29,” praise the text of Lanford Wilson’s Burn This and extoll the under-sung musical theater actress Ellen Greene as “a national treasure.” Between these inspired tangents, we discuss the work Iʼm there to talk to him about: his performance in Tom Ford’s highly anticipated noir thriller, Nocturnal Animals, out this month. Ford directed the film and wrote the screenplay, which is adapted from Austin Wright’s novel Tony and Susan. Gyllenhaal received the script last year as he was finishing the Broadway run of Constellations. “I read it and was immediately like, ‘Yes. I’m in.’” The film is suspenseful to watch and gorgeous to look at (the director is Tom Ford). It follows Susan (Amy Adams), a

Opening spread: Sweater, price upon request, MARGARET HOWELL, margarethowell.co.uk. Trousers, $2,050, HERMES, hermes.com. Original 500 boots, $170, BLUNDSTONE, blundstone. com. Jewelry throughout, Gyllenhaal’s own. Opposite: T-shirt, $70, POLO RALPH LAUREN, ralphlauren.com. Sid pants, $128, CARHARTT WIP, carhartt-wip.com.

chic L.A. gallerist who receives an unsolicited manuscript from her ex-husband, Edward (Gyllenhaal), whom she’d left years prior. Edward dedicates his novel to her and, as she reads it, we watch his character’s story unfold: Tony (also played by Gyllenhaal) is traveling with his wife and daughter along a dark Texas highway when they are forced off the road by a trio of joyriders. Something terrifying and tragic occurs, and Tony spends the rest of the film in mourning, haplessly seeking justice. Meanwhile, Susan has flashbacks about how she cruelly ended things with Edward. The story is violent, relentless. Neither of Gyllenhaal’s characters fares very well. “That was actually a very difficult experience for me, emotionally, because there was no opportunity for retribution,” Gyllenhaal says, recalling the production. “I don’t think I ever really [did] get out of it in a way.” But before my mind can conjure an image of him as one of those actors who terrorizes everyone on set by screaming in an accent, he interjects, “It’s not like I’m walking around in character all the time, but I think the mood definitely [was] pervasive in everything that I did while I was making it. But,” he adds, “I think film, generally, in my opinion, is a lonely place.” It shows. In scene after scene, we see Gyllenhaal portray a man coping with deep pain and loss. He’s right—there is no retribution in the film, and no redemption either. Everyone in the movie is a menace to Tony. Even Bobby Andes (the brilliant Michael Shannon), a laconic detective who works on the case, never appears fully trustworthy. Tony is alone in a highly stylized, very Tom Ford-ian universe. “I found sadness in the fact that everything was about aesthetics in this world. I was living in a space where I was like, ‘Where is the truth here?’ I walked through it like that the whole time—and I think that’s where Tom wanted me to be.” Gyllenhaal’s special kind of vulnerability means he’s often called upon to provide this kind of sensitive dedication to a role—even when playing someone as emotionally stunted as Louis Bloom, his nihilistic newshound in Nightcrawler.


DUJOU R .COM

115


“YOU

CAN SPEND YOUR LIFE LOOKING FOR WHAT YOU THINK LOVE LOOKS LIKE. OR YOU CAN ACTUALLY OPEN YOURSELF UP TO THE THINGS THAT ARE CAPABLE OF LOVING YOU AND YOU ARE CAPABLE OF LOVING.”

1 16

DUJOU R .COM

T-shirt, $90, SUNSPEL, sunspel.com. Trousers, $2,050, HERMES, hermes.com.

“Jake managed to find the humanity of the character,” says Nightcrawler’s writer and director, Dan Gilroy. “That was a worry I had with the script. I didn’t want this to be another study of a sociopath. Jake found a human quality not easy to find.” “Honestly, for me, there was no other choice than Jake,” Ford says of his leading man. “The arc of his character(s) demands a huge range of emotion and performance. He starts off as a young, idealistic and pure 24-year-old, and ends up as a 44-year-old who has literally had everything he values stolen and destroyed. Jake is heartbreaking in the role.ʼʼ It turns out Gyllenhaal wasn’t the only exposed one on set. The pressure was on for Ford, too. His acclaimed filmmaking debut—the dreamy, luxurious A Single Man—was seven years ago. Was his foray into cinema beginner’s luck? “He was together, commanding,” Gyllenhaal says of his director. “But he was very vulnerable, as much as Tom Ford can be.” The actor recalls a telling off-camera moment while filming a scene where his character was to be seated at an untidy desk. On set, the desk in question was perfectly neat, prompting Gyllenhaal to push the point with Ford. “It says [in the script] it’s really messy. Tom’s like, ‘Well, you mess it up, I don’t know how.’ His own struggle with aesthetics [was], could he, as Tom Ford, let go of being organized?” Whatever the emotions that drove the men, they worked. The tensions between real and unreal, between order and chaos, crackle throughout the film. The smallest moments (a paper cut, spilled sugar) are as striking as a gunshot. Gyllenhaal’s performance is perfectly calibrated. He eeks out just enough emotion in certain scenes; in others, like one where he breaks down crying in the shower, he embodies anguish. His co-star Shannon agrees. “Jake is, uh, he’s an animal,” he says. “Very fiercely devoted to the craft—relentless. He’s really searching. He doesn’t let himself off the hook. He’s never satisfied. He’s really tenacious. He’s a beast.” But these days, to survive as an actor in Hollywood, tenacity is just one helpful attribute. You also have to train like an Olympian and remain eternally poised, or risk the consequences of becoming a headline in thousands of gossip outlets. You can tell Gyllenhaal was picked for fame early and given very sound advice on how to be a Professional Lead Actor. Since achieving acclaim on the big screen as a doe-eyed teen with dark leanings in Donnie Darko, Gyllenhaal has more or less been recognized for his potential. But he bristles

when people assume he “made it” because his parents were “in the business.” For what it’s worth, the story of his family’s ascent in the entertainment industry is more inspiring than the reductive label of nepotism would imply. His father, the director Stephen Gyllenhaal, the oldest of six, came from a small town in Pennsylvania called Bryn Athyn. “He sort of left the town and went to college, but then fell in love with making movies,” says Gyllenhaal. Jake’s mother, Naomi Foner, a screenwriter, grew up in Brooklyn. Her mother was a pediatrician and her father was a surgeon, but she also broke free, to follow her passion as a writer. “As a child, you move to where you feel there is love. I think the place where I felt that love really existed, particularly between my parents and in my family, was through expression,” he explains. Gyllenhaal, who moved from L.A. to New York City four years ago, says he did so to follow his great love: theater. “I did one show on the West End in London when I was 22 years old. And then was convinced by a lot of people at a certain age, when I was very impressionable, that it was more important to be doing movies. I’m thankful for that because, you know, it’s wonderful financially—but I think my heart has always been on the stage.” Since taking root in the city, Gyllenhaal has won the theater community’s heart not only with his showings in Sunday and Constellations, but also with his now-legendary concert performance in Little Shop of Horrors, alongside the aforementioned Ellen Greene. Still, the actor won’t be breaking up with the cinema anytime soon: In addition to Nocturnal Animals, he has three films forthcoming. There’s Stronger, in which he plays Jeff Bauman, a survivor of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing (the actor doubles as a producer on the film, alongside his business partner Riva Marker). Also out next year are Okja (in which he stars opposite Tilda Swinton) and Life (co-starring Ryan Reynolds), which just wrapped. “And then,” he adds, “I’m doing a movie with Carey Mulligan that Paul Dano wrote and directed, called Wildlife, which [Riva and I] are also producing. And then I’m having some time off.” Finding the courage to sing Sondheim is one thing, but to play Bauman—who lost his legs in the terrorist attack—is quite another. Especially while juggling four other projects. But at this point, Gyllenhaal seems confident with “his process,” which, ironically, includes not being too stiff or controlling about his process. “There are many beakers that I’ve been mixing some pretty funky solutions in, to see what comes of them,” he says. “Not in a particularly unsafe, or safe, way, but always mindful… I think I came to the realization that acting is not just one thing. There is not just one way.” Moving in and out of a character needs to be done carefully, and Gyllenhaal is seasoned enough to know he needs balance. “There’s this growing notion—there always has been with actors, in particular—that the real great ones are the ones who mess themselves up somehow. I’ve always wanted to dispel that idea. I really don’t condone the idea of hurting oneself.” As he says this, it’s impossible not to think of Heath Ledger, who starred alongside him in Brokeback Mountain and


DUJOU R .COM 118

posthumously won an Oscar for playing the Joker in The Dark Knight, a role we now know may have consumed him. These thoughts yield a string of possible questions—‘How did you deal with Ledger’s death? Is it hard to find someone genuine when everyone wants you? Are you currently in love?’—but I know better than to ask them. When faced with inquiries like these, actors tend to answer in careful abstractions, as if their work were a relationship. But with Gyllenhaal, you get the sense this isn’t deflection: He isn’t lying when he says the theater is his greatest love. “You can spend your life looking for this idea of what you think love looks like,” he says. “Or you can actually open yourself up to the things that are capable of loving you, and that you are capable of loving. And that means people who are of like minds. Finding the space that you love—I think that’s the biggest thing that I feel.” After spending so much time in the “lonely place” of film, it seems branching out into Broadway is giving Gyllenhaal some much-needed connection and community. But, to play armchair psychologist, I get a sense of solitude from Gyllenhaal. After all, he is an artist, and one who knows he needs to cultivate a certain isolation and discipline in order to keep his channels open. Painters go to studios; actors go inside themselves. “My imagination is becoming more and more important to me. When you go too far into the reality of something, you kind of destroy your imagination,” he says, explaining these sentiments are ones he’s adopted lately, especially after shooting Stronger. The serious, with a capital S, actor, who has been intensely working his tail off throughout his career, is ready to loosen his grip a bit. “I sort of went, ‘wait, there’s another way of doing it. Time to play a little more, have a little bit more fun in what you create.’” I start to wonder if Gyllenhaal is like me, and like other New Yorkers in the arts who, after so many years of passionately pursuing creative projects, often at the expense of things like a relationship, finally realize it’s time to enjoy ourselves a bit more. I think about posing the thought to him, but before I can, he emits a yawn that politely signals our time is done. He needs to get going. Sunday has yet to open, remember, and he has much to rehearse. Grabbing his giant binder of a script, he puts on a coat and sunglasses and heads off to the next project in the fulfilling relationship that is also known as his life. ■

Bomber, $3,555, GIVENCHY BY RICCARDO TISCI, 212-650-0180. T-shirt, $70, POLO RALPH LAUREN, ralphlauren. com. Sid pants, $128, CARHARTT WIP, carhartt-wip.com. Original 500 boots, $170, BLUNDSTONE, blundstone.com. Styled by Poppy Kain Grooming by Rebecca Lafford for Schneider Entertainment.


DUJOU R .COM

119


PHOTOGRAPHED BY LANDON NORDEMAN STYLED BY PAUL FREDERICK

120

DUJOU R .COM

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T MESS WITH THE CLASSICS: THE MOST SHOWSTOPPING JEWELS ONLY GET BETTER WITH AGE

girls


DUJOU R .COM

121


DUJOU R .COM 122

Opening spread: Cocoon coat, $3,250, ADAM LIPPES, adamlippes.com. Top, $995; Skirt, $1,550, ESCADA, escada.com. Rings from top: Eclisse ring in 18-karat yellow gold with lapis, $7,300, VHERNIER, 646-343-9551. Bands, from $795, LEGEND AMRAPALI, legendamrapali.com. Solari Cluster ring in 18-karat yellow gold with diamonds, $3,200, DAVID YURMAN, davidyurman.com. Faubourg watch in 18-karat yellow gold with diamonds, $15,950, HERMÈS, hermes.com. Tote, $3,450, NANCY GONZALEZ, bg.com. Above: Jacket, $4,790, AGNONA, agnona.com. Sweater, $298, BROOKS BROTHERS, brooksbrothers.com. Cinta necklace in 18-karat rose gold with rubellite and tourmaline, $49,000, JOHN HARDY, 212-343-9000. Rings from left: Bouton d’or ring in 18-karat rose gold with carnelian, mother of pearl and diamonds, $19,000, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, vancleefarpels.com; ring in 18-karat yellow gold with opal and diamonds, $18,747, LE VIAN, levian.com. Shoulder bag, $3,500, CHANEL, 800-550-0005.


DUJOU R .COM 123

From left, on Bonnie: Jacket, $1,890, OSCAR DE LA RENTA, odlr.com. Rosa earrings in titanium with white diamonds and mother of pearl, $17,000, VHERNIER, 646-343-9551. Dot Bead necklace with moonstones, $2,900, JOHN HARDY, johnhardy.com. Ring in 18-karat white gold with diamonds, $5,047, LE VIAN, levian.com. Band, $795, LEGEND AMRAPALI, legendamrapali.com. On Suebelle: Jacket, $2,200, BOTTEGA VENETA, 800-845-6790. Cactus de Cartier earrings in 18-karat yellow gold with diamonds, $33,600; Cactus de Cartier necklace in 18-karat yellow gold with emeralds and diamonds, price upon request, CARTIER, cartier.com. Ring in 18-karat white gold with pranite, diamonds, emeralds and tsavorites, price upon request, DE GRISOGONO, 212-439-4220.


DUJOU R .COM 124

From left, on Bonnie (in mirror): Safari jacket, $3,350, HERMÈS, hermes.com. Trousers, $2,490, AKRIS, akris.ch. Stena stud earrings in 18-karat rose gold with pearls and diamonds, $4,050, MISAHARA , misahara.com. Impératrice tassel pendant necklace in 18-karat white gold with rubies and diamonds, $47,000; Quadrille ring in 18-karat white gold with rubies and diamonds, $11,000, FABERGÉ , faberge.com. Zara ring in 18-karat rose gold with quartz and sapphires, $12,000, MISAHARA , misahara.com. Cuff in 18-karat yellow gold with diamonds, $51,650, BUTANI, butani.com. Shoulder bag, $3,500, CHANEL , 800-550-0005. Poco pump, $365, STUART WEITZMAN , stuartweitzman.com. On Suebelle: Jacket, $4,790, AGNONA , agnona.com. Sweater, $298, BROOKS BROTHERS, brooksbrothers.com. Trouser, $725, ESCADA , escada.com. Cinta necklace in 18-karat rose gold with rubellite and tourmaline, $49,000, JOHN HARDY, 212-343-9000. Bouton d’or earring in 18-karat rose gold with carnelian, mother of pearl and diamonds, $48,500; Bouton d’or ring in 18-karat rose gold with carnelian, mother of pearl and diamonds, $19,000, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, vancleefarpels.com. Ring in 18-karat yellow gold with opal and diamonds, $18,747, LE VIAN, levian.com. Shoulder bag, $3,500, CHANEL , 800-550-0005. Wilbur 40 shoes, $795, JIMMY CHOO, jimmychoo.com.


DUJOU R .COM

125


126

DUJOU R .COM


DUJOU R .COM 127

Opposite: Jacket, $3,600, DIOR, 800-929-3467. Velvet watch in 18-karat white gold with diamonds, $20,900, ROGER DUBUIS, rogerdubuis.com. Rings from top: Emotion ring in 18-karat white gold with sapphires, $11,000; Alix ring in 18-karat white gold with sapphire and diamonds, $30,000, FABERGÉ, faberge.com. Ring in 18-karat white gold with tanzanite and diamonds, price upon request, PASQUALE BRUNI, pasqualebruni.com. Les 4 Mondes playing cards, $125, HERMÈS, hermes.com. Above, from left, on Bonnie: Jacket, $2,290; skirt, $535, MAX MARA, 212-879-6100. Sweater, $195, ESCADA SPORT, escada.com. Hoop earrings, $3,395, LEGEND AMRAPALI, legendamrapali.com. Stena necklace in 18-karat rose gold with rubellites, sapphires, rubies and diamonds, $89,600; Stena pin in 20-karat rose gold with ruby and diamonds, $9,950, MISAHARA, misahara.com. Shoulder bag, $18,000, GUCCI, gucci.com. On Deborah: Jacket, $4,500, KITON, kiton.com. Heritage earrings in white and yellow gold and platinum with rubies and diamonds, price upon request; Bouton d’or ring in 18-karat rose gold with carnelian, mother of pearl and diamonds, $19,000, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, vancleefarpels.com. Chatelaine pavé bezel ring in 18-karat yellow gold with garnet and diamonds, $2,200, DAVID YURMAN, davidyurman.com. Shoulder bag, $3,500, CHANEL, 800-550-0005. Hair by Martin-Christopher Harper PLATFORM/NYC using Christophe Robin Haircare. Makeup by Colleen Runne at Kate Ryan Inc. using Sephora. Manicure by Chiharv Netsuke using Dior Vernis. Location: the River Club of New York.


C

R

128

DUJOU R .COM

E

THERE IS NOTHING—NOTHING—THAT RIVALS THE POST-

card-perfect scene of a Santorini sunset. Immaculate white buildings set against the shimmering Aegean Sea are what people most often associate with the Greek island, about an hour, or five, from Athens (depending on whether you’re arriving by plane or highspeed ferry). It’s one reason the destination has earned a top spot on must-visit lists of seemingly every type of traveler, from empty nesters to fashionistas to spring breakers to serious globetrotters. But for all of Santorini’s selling points—gorgeous beaches, mouthwatering Mediterranean fare, renowned local wines—it’s decidedly lacking in one key area: private, über-luxe accommodations. Most villa rentals in the region tend to be small with underwhelming service, and the handful of high-end hotels—primarily located in Oia, the island’s most popular village—are crammed together and completely exposed, making it impossible for prominent visitors accustomed to exclusivity and seclusion to escape the peering eyes of passersby. (See: the Kardashians, who, while visiting in 2013, couldn’t avoid the frenzied paparazzi, whether

they were smashing plates or wandering the caldera.) Which is why Erosantorini, a just-completed private estate on the volcanic island, is arguably the best news to come out of Greece since the country received $8.4 billion in bailout aid this summer. Perched on a hilltop 1,000 feet above the Aegean, the property, comprised of a row of whitewashed villas about the size of bungalows, is the kind of place that makes design-lovers—or anyone with good taste, for that matter—weak in the knees. Every inch of space has been carefully considered, from the V-shaped, tri-level infinity pool—the largest on the entire island, designed to give all four villas equal views—to the funky, 1950s-inspired Smeg mini-refrigerators in every room (chosen for their vintage aesthetic and because they produce virtually zero noise). The most unique details, though, are the ones hidden in plain sight: the music playing in the pool that can only be heard underwater; a subterranean hammam outfitted with heated marble floors; a “pool cave” that allows guests to swim while shielded from the beating summer sun.

E


View west over the Aegean Sea from the upper deck of the three-tiered infinity pool; Santorini’s famed caldera is visible in the distance. Opposite: The villa bathrooms are stocked with plush linens and locally sourced amenities.

THE GREEK ISLE HAS NEVER BEEN SHORT ON CRYSTAL BLUE WATERS, JAW-DROPPING VIEWS––AND HORDES OF TOURISTS. BUT NOW A $22,000-A-NIGHT PRIVATE VILLA OFFERS HEAVEN WITHOUT THE HOI POLLOI BY LINDSAY SILBERMAN

T

S

A

N

T

O

R

I

N I


130

DUJOU R .COM

Left: Stairs descend to the pool; interior designer Paola Navone chose to break up the oversize concrete pool area with a series of painted “rugs.” Opposite, from top: Although each of the villas varies in style, they share a unified traditionalmeets-modern aesthetic, seen here in one of the suite’s bedrooms; the terraced villa suites catch the remaining moments of sunset over the Aegean.


Santorini, began with a blessing by a local priest and concluded with an exquisite multicourse dinner prepared by the estate’s head chef. “Greece is not generally known for its great service, but one thing we are known for is great hospitality. If we invite you over as our guest, we’ll bend over backwards for you and do anything to make you feel welcome,” explains Kontomichalos. “In other countries, like Turkey or Thailand or Malaysia, service is delivered in a subservient way. People don’t do that here. We don’t want anyone to feel like they have 20 people hovering around. We want you to feel like you’re at your friend’s place.” It’s a tradition of hospitality so deeply ingrained in the culture, he says, that Greeks have a specific word to describe it: “Philotimo! You need to experience it to understand.”

131

Erosantorini is the brainchild of Greek marketing mogul Pavlos Kontomichalos, who, several years ago, recognized the void in Santorini’s ultra-high-end accommodations and began toying with the idea of opening an exclusive estate that catered to discerning clientele. The Athens-born entrepreneur—who spent the better part of his career as president of Bristol-Myers Squibb China before launching a number of successful health-care companies—envisioned a property that combined the privacy of a luxury villa, the attention to detail of a five-star resort and the intimacy of a friend’s vacation home: A hidden oasis where someone like Bill Gates could comfortably—and discreetly—take his family on a two-week vacation. As he tells it, Kontomichalos scoured the island for a piece of real estate that fit his criteria: isolated while still close to town, spacious and, most importantly, with breathtaking views. He purchased the compound’s two-acre plot of land from the patriarch of a prominent Greek shipping dynasty after convincing him to part with the property, which was originally not on the market. Once the deal was finalized, construction began immediately. Kontomichalos enlisted his dream team of partners—including starchitect and interior designer Paola Navone and top Greek chef Dimitris Panagiotopoulos (an alum of the famed Estiatorio Milos)—and in less than two years, Erosantorini was born. On a breezy September afternoon, Kontomichalos, dressed in jeans, a red polo and topsiders, visits me at the property, still glowing from its “inauguration ceremony” the previous evening. The 10-person event, with guests including the mayor of

the concept until a few days into my trip. Five-star service was something I’d always measured in butlers, chauffeurs and maids. At Erosantorini, however, you won’t find a receptionist, or even a front desk. Instead, there are two hosts—plus various behind-thescenes staffers—who treat you like dear friends instead of patrons and always know exactly what you need, before you know you need it. (Chilly during dinner? Don’t even think about going back to your room for a sweater. You’ll have a pashmina draped over your shoulders before you’ve started the amuse-bouche.) It’s a style of hospitality that strikes the perfect balance between formality and the comforts of home. Every meal served at Erosantorini is an opportunity for the chefs to showcase the region’s best offerings, with fresh seafood—either flown in from Athens or sourced locally—taking center stage, often whole-roasted on the wood-fired oven, then garnished with herbs, lemon, sea salt and the estate’s own brand of olive oil. Still, if a guest is craving a sous-vide steak, say, or a bowl of gluten-free pasta, Panagiotopoulos is happy to oblige. And while never without his chef’s whites, he is not overly precious—he’ll invite you into the kitchen to cook with him should you desire. “We can make everything,” he explains. “But we think our guests will realize they can get a 12-plate menu dégustation at places like Jean-Georges or Per Se. Sometimes the simple cooking, our specialty, is more difficult because you have to let the product speak for itself.” Kontomichalos maintains a similar mentality about marketing his property. Until several weeks ago, Erosantorini didn’t even have a website. “I don’t want to overexpose it,” he says. “This is going to be a word-of-mouth type of thing. People who come and experience our philotimo—that’s the only way to truly absorb it.” Having been there and done that, you can trust me when I say: Truer words were never spoken. ■

DUJOU R .COM

PHOTOGRAPHED BY LOUISA NIKOLAIDOU. ALL IMAGES COURTESY.

T

RUTH BE TOLD, I DIDN’T FULLY GRASP


RUFFLES CAN HAVE AN EDGE, PRETTINESS CAN BRING SOME ATTITUDE. THIS SEASONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOD TO ROMANCE IS ANYTHING BUT STORYBOOK PHOTOGRAPHED BY TETSU KUBOTA STYLED BY REBECCA RAMSEY

132

DUJOU R .COM

frill

seeker


Shirt, $815, RALPH LAUREN COLLECTION, ralphlauren.com. Gatsby Oval Earrings in 18-karat white gold with diamonds, $7,940, MESSIKA PARIS, messika.com.


Dress, $1,575, BALENCIAGA, 212-206-0872. Opposite: Dress, $3,800; Briefs, $410; Boots, $2,200, CÃ&#x2030;LINE, 212-535-3703.


DUJOU R .COM

135


DUJOU R .COM 136 Gown, $8,545, DOLCE & GABBANA, dolcegabbana.it.


138

DUJOU R .COM


Blouse, $905, ROBERTO CAVALLI, robertocavalli.com. Opposite: Skirt, price upon request, CHANEL, 800-550-0005. Necklace in 22-karat yellow gold, 18-karat white gold and diamonds, $9,900, GURHAN, gurhan.com.


Dress, $4,965; Belt, $1,145, ALEXANDER MCQUEEN, 212-645-1797. Opposite: Inka bib, $240; Kennedy skirt, $1,320, ERDEM, erdem.com. Hair by Sabrina Szinay at The Wall Group. Makeup by Aya Komatso at Bridge. Louis Fernandez & Louis Lund KF Production.


DUJOU R .COM

14 1


DUJOU R .COM 14 2

& ME

BY LANIE GOODMAN


DUJOU R .COM

14 3


Previous spread: Detail of photographer Edward Quinnʼs contact sheet of Marlon Brando and Josanne Mariani at Bandol Harbor, France, 1954. Below: Mariani, 1958. Opposite page: Brando and Mariani in Bandol, 1954.

fishing village on the palm-fringed coast of the French Riviera. Marlon Brando is awake early, taking a long stroll along the harbor, puffing moodily on a cigarette. It’s 1954 and the 30-year-old actor, whose dazzling performance in Elia Kazan’s On the Waterfront has catapulted him to demigod status, is taking a weeklong respite from Hollywood. Here in Bandol, nestled between Marseille and Toulon, few of the sun-wizened fishermen unloading their catch of the day are likely to give him a second glance. He ducks into a nautical store and picks out some striped sailor jerseys—his and hers—and throws in a pair of espadrilles. Then he heads back to the modest apartment where his 19-year-old fiancée, Josanne Mariani, is staying with her parents. About 48 hours later, the couple’s engagement is officially announced in the local newspaper, and the quiet fishing village is sleepy no more. “Once photographers got wind of the fact that Marlon was in town they followed us everywhere,” recalls Mariani with a halfsmile. “One of my friends lent us a dinghy, and I can still see Marlon rowing frantically trying to lose them.” We are sitting in the shade of an olive grove in a vineyard perched above Bandol. I had originally come to town to research an article I was writing about the secret Riviera, east of Marseille. While flipping through a Bandol tourist brochure, a photo of Marlon Brando caught my eye; he was decked out in a navy blazer and chinos, walking down the portside quay. As a cinema buff, I was reasonably certain Brando had never shot a scene in the South of France and started asking around. Locals were clueless for the most part, but then a woman at the tourist office volunteered, “I think maybe he had a fling with a girl from Bandol.” A search led me to Mariani, who has been living peacefully in her hometown for the nearly 60 years. It’s a hot summer day and the thrumming cicadas are almost deafening. At 81, Mariani, dressed in white jeans and a turquoise cotton tunic, has the energetic step of a much younger woman. “I was a yoga teacher, and I swim every day,” she shrugs, as we page through the scrapbook of photos that document her unlikely threeyear romance with Brando. When the news of their engagement broke, the press was quick to label Brando’s mysterious young French girl “the fisherman’s daughter.” Mariani amends, “He was actually my stepfather. I was

born in Marseille, and we left after my father died. When we moved to Bandol my mother remarried.” A mere detail, perhaps, but one of many uncorrected errors in the public’s hazy memory of Mariani, who has rarely granted interviews. “I tend to be a private person. I was also incredibly naïve about the press,” she says. In 1960, five years after she and Brando had broken off their engagement, Mariani spoke to a pair of Parisian journalists from a now-defunct magazine, Confidences. They were friends of friends, she says, and corralled her into telling them her story. But when the article was published, she barely recognized her own words.“I was flabbergasted,” she says. “They made up all kinds of absurd, dramatic embellishments based on what I told them, and they signed my name as the author.” Then, to her dismay, a translated version of the piece was picked up by the Chicago Tribune. And while it’s true the better part of a lifetime has passed since that youthful heartbreak, it’s still impossible to reconcile the melodramatic voice found in the 1960 article with the self-contained woman sitting across from me. Now, nearly six decades later, Mariani is ready to tell her version of the story. The uncharted course that led Mariani to Brando began

when, at 16, she began posing as a nude model for Moïse Kisling, a Polish-born French painter hailed as a great artist by his friends Modigliani, Cocteau and Picasso. At the height of his career, Kisling left Paris to settle in tiny port town near Bandol, and after seeing Mariani at the seafront one day, he sent his wife to ask her parents’ permission for her to sit for him. Then chance intervened. While vacationing on the Riviera, a friend of the artist, New York psychiatrist Dr. Daniel Schneider, stopped by Kisling’s studio to buy some paintings. When Schneider spotted Mariani, he was evidently struck by her wide-eyed gamine beauty and impulsively decided to hire her as an au pair for his children. “He told Kisling, ‘This girl needs a proper education, and she’s not going to get it here!’” She smiles wryly, then adds, “Men have always decided for me without asking what I thought.” Finding herself suddenly transported to New York’s Upper East Side, Mariani juggled her minimal duties with loftier pursuits. She pored through the books in the family library and was sent off to study with Stella Adler, the pioneering acting coach. One night in early December 1953, Adler threw a cocktail party

PREVIOUS SPREAD/PHOTO BY EDWARD QUINN, © EDWARDQUINN.COM. LEFT/IMAGE COURTESY JOSANNE MARIANI.

14 4

DUJOU R .COM

IT’S A WARM OCTOBER MORNING IN BANDOL, A LITTLE


14 5

LIFE WITH MARLON WAS UNPREDICTABLE. HE COULD JUST DISAPPEAR.

DUJOU R .COM

PHOTO BY BETTMAN-GETTY IMAGES

for current students and invited some of her prized alumni. Mariani remembers standing in a corner feeling a bit lost. “Marlon suddenly came up to me and asked me to dance. I recognized him, but knew nothing about him—including his previous love affairs. I’ve never been inclined to ask questions.” From there, it all happened very fast. “He called me a few days later and we started going out—to the theater, to Chinese restaurants, to Harlem to hear Louis Armstrong. About two weeks after we’d met, Marlon asked me to take him to see Dr. Schneider.” Once again, Mariani says, she sat quietly in a corner while two men decided where she was going next. Schneider informed her that Brando would be taking care of her from then on. “Later, Marlon would tell me, ‘I’m eleven years older than you, I should act more responsible,’” she says. Free of her au pair duties, Mariani moved into Brando’s apartment on 57th Street, above Carnegie Hall. Thanks to Schneider’s connections, sheʼd landed a small role in a production of Cyrano de Bergérac with José Ferrer. “Marlon would pick me up after the show and we’d go out for dinner. I was never expected to cook— plus, I had never lived with a man before and had no idea what to do.”


“He was already into exotic islands,” she laughs. But life with Brando was unpredictable. He could disappear for two days, but Mariani says that she took it in stride, no questions asked. Among the happiest memories, she recalls, were their trips to Coney Island. “It was hilarious, Marlon would call up his old friend and makeup man, Phil Rhodes, who would disguise him beyond recognition—a fake nose, a wig, glasses, a mustache. We were like kids—the merry-go-round, the Ferris wheel, the shooting gallery…” Fast forward to Bandol, October 1954. Mariani had left

New York to visit her parents for a few months. “Marlon was in Paris and decided to surprise me. He took the train and turned up at my parents’ place one morning,” she says. “When we were

PHOTO BY BETTMAN-GETTY IMAGES

14 6

DUJOU R .COM

Her first night with Brando is rapturously recounted in the Chicago Tribune piece: “He threw a scarf over a lighted lamp bulb, then took my hand in his and anointed our two hands with oil, [then] with the warm scarf, bound our hands together [and gave me] a strange refined kiss.” Mariani snorts with laughter. “What a bunch of baloney! It is true that he put a scarf over the lamp to dim the lights, like everyone did in those days.” When Mariani met Brando, he was in post-production of On the Waterfront and reading scripts. The Carnegie Hall apartment, she notes, was nothing fancy: a sofa, partly chewed by Brando’s pet raccoon (“He had to give it away, but he loved animals”), a little workout room with barbells and another corner for his bongos. On the bedroom dresser sat a brown bottle of Brando’s thenfavorite cologne, Bay Rum, from the C.O. Bigelow pharmacy.


Opposite page: Brando and Mariani with a vespa on the streets of Bandol. Right: Brando and Mariani stroll along the Bandol Harbor, 1954.

alone in my room, he slipped a ring on my finger—a beautiful silver Native American ring with a turquoise oval stone—and said, ‘We’re engaged.’ Then he kissed me. He wasn’t the kind of person who would get down on his knee and propose. That just wasn’t his style.” There are a number of instances in the Tribune account that recall shocking cruelty on Brando’s part, but perhaps none more than what’s described as having happened just after the press conference announcing their engagement. “When the interviews were over,” the article reads, “Marlon and I were left alone. I turned to him, more thrilled than I could say—to find an utterly changed man beside me. His face was set, his eyes were hard. I felt anger boiling inside him. I can’t remember precisely what he said, the shock was too great. All I know is that he accused me of forcing him into the engagement. The publicity our visit had aroused, he told me, had jolted him into going further than he had intended.” Mariani flatly denies that Brando ever felt forced into the announcement of their engagement, or that it was some kind of publicity stunt. She says it was an entirely joyous day. “That night, we celebrated at dinner with my stepfather’s freshly caught lobsters.” The fisherman’s daughter had made a fine catch, smirked the press. Unperturbed, Mariani returned to the States that November, and let things take their course. But when she got there, all her belongings had been

PHOTO BY EDWARD QUINN, © EDWARDQUINN.COM

moved to Brando’s new home in L.A.’s Laurel Canyon. It was there, during the shoot of Désirée, that the relationship began to show signs of strain. L.A. was a different life, racing around in Brando’s new black Thunderbird convertible and taking in the Hollywood glamour. There was still no date set for the wedding. On set every day, usually holed up in Brando’s trailer, Mariani now recognized that she was “very naïve” about her fiancé’s relentless womanizing. “I remember watching Marlon and Rita Moreno doing intricate dance steps in the living room. She was a real professional, and I simply thought, ‘How wonderful!’ I’m not jealous by nature. You couldn’t be jealous with Marlon.” Still, she could see that Brando was becoming a meaner version of himself. After meeting James Dean at a friend’s house (“He was a sensitive, spiritual person, very discreet”), the last thing Mariani expected was Brando’s dismissal of the young actor. “He could have helped Dean, but he just avoided him.” By September 1955, when Mariani received the 4 A.M. news of Dean’s fatal car crash, she was no longer in Laurel Canyon with Brando, but living alone. His company, Pennebaker Productions, had arranged everything: She was set up temporarily in an apartment on Doheny Drive, then came a house in Coldwater Canyon

“I REMEMBER WATCHING HIM DANCE WITH RITA MORENO. YOU COULDNʼT BE JEALOUS WITH MARLON.”

with a pool. By 1958 she had been moved again, to a less expensive part of town near Sunset Boulevard. So why the eventual severing? Mariani stiffens visibly and is momentarily silent. “Marlon’s father told him that he would make me unhappy and that he should stop the relationship as soon as possible. So he took his advice and told me, ‘You’re young, you have your whole life ahead of you.’ I knew in my heart that Marlon was a Don Juan.” Even today, recalling the moment of their breakup is still painful. “We were at the house in Laurel Canyon, sitting on the edge of the bed. He was smoking a cigarette. I asked him, ‘Doesn’t it hurt you?’ He said, ‘This is how much it hurts me,’ and put his lit cigarette on his palm and held it there.” “And then,” she pauses and starts to smile, “he got up and put a Band-Aid on it. Always such drama!” Mariani gazes out over the grape vines and blue-gray foothills in the distance. Suitably, a bottle of red Bandol arrives

at the table. “He was always so impulsive,” she says. “When I first arrived in Los Angeles, he said, ‘I’m going to take you to see where the real stars are.’ He wouldn’t say where we were going, and we drove all the way to the Mount Wilson Observatory.” Has she ever asked herself what Brando saw in her? “No, never, [likely because] I wasn’t an opportunist; I saw him with new eyes,” she says. “But I remember him quoting something Tennessee Williams once said: ‘Nobody sees anybody truly but all through the flaws of their own egos.’ And I’d say that sums up Marlon really well.” ■


New York City, The Hamptons & Palm Beach.

Custom Home Builders. Exceptional design. Superior quality. Instant gratification. SciameHomes.com 212.232.2200 561.318.5048


CITIES CITIES → ASPEN

CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

DUJOU R .COM

COURTESY ART BASEL

14 9

BIGGER BETTER BASEL

Art Basel Miami Beach returns to the Magic City for its 15th installment this December, bringing together a record 269 galleries from 29 countries. As in years past, the U.S. edition’s focus is on the Americas, with galleries like New York’s contemporary Galerie Lelong (home to Cuban artist Zilia Sánchez, whose Lunar [Moon], 1980, is shown above). Expect the usual mix of jet-setting A-listers, deep-pocketed collectors, fashion folk and oligarchs at the five-day fair-cum-festival, which kicks off December 1. artbasel.com


ASPEN CITIES → ASPEN

CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

→ After being shuttered for more than a decade, The Cooking School of Aspen reopened this year with a new menu of classes, farm-to-table feasts and special events sure to delight aspiring local chefs. cookingschoolofaspen.com

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

PEAK OF THE SEASON

This March, for the first time since 1997, the United States will be hosting the Audi FIS Ski World Cup Finals, and star athletes like Mikaela Shiffrin and Ted Ligety will descend upon Aspen in droves to carve out their winning paths. They’re set to race downhill, super-G, giant slalom, slalom and the nation’s team event with upwards of a $125,000 purse on the line. Here, a guide to the winter wonderland. aspensnowmass.com The Little Nell

Ê  FOR MORE ON ASPEN, VISIT DUJOUR.COM/CITIES

WHERE TO STAY:

During the World Cup, Aspen’s granddame resort, The Little Nell, is realizing the ultimate skier’s fantasy with its Ten Star Deluxe World Cup Finals Package. Ringing in at approximately $25,000, the package includes a four-night stay for two in one of the hotel’s luxury suites, a snowcat powder tour, dinner at acclaimed Element 47, a visit to the cellar with wine director and Master Sommelier Carlton McCoy and access to The Little Nell’s mobile champagne and caviar bar, stationed on Aspen Mountain during the races, making a celebratory toast always at arm’s reach. 675 East Durant Avenue;

thelittlenell.com

WHAT TO WEAR:

Those who’ve dusted snow off that Bogner one-piece one too many times needn’t fret. GetOutfitted—a Rent the Runway for the snow set—can help. With head-to-toe looks for men and women (including helmets, skis and poles) that are shipped directly to your hotel or home in Aspen, the service ensures you’ll hit the slopes in style. Returns are as simple as packing the gear in an included prepaid mailer—no schlepping, or dusting, required. getoutfitted.com

Nothing beats a hearty meal after a day spent in the elements. On Aspen’s restaurant row, Meat & Cheese (meatand cheeseaspen.com) has carved out a “world farmhouse” dining experience, and the Sunday brunch scene scores with the debut of The St. Regis Aspen’s decadent Dean Street Social (stregisaspen.com), complete with bottomless mimosas, a dessert bar and a carnival-themed kids’ dining room. On the beverage side, Jimmy’s (jimmysaspen.com) amps up its American-produced wine list, and for the liquor connoisseurs, Hooch (hoochaspen.com) boasts a nuanced list of regional whiskeys. Bottoms up!

A spread at Meat & Cheese.

SNOWMASS/ PHOTO BY SCOTT MARKEWITZ © 2013. ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY.

150

DUJOU R .COM

WHAT TO EAT AND DRINK:


CHICAGO CITIES → ASPEN

CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HOUSTON

→ Chicago-based designer Maria Pinto celebrates more than two decades in fashion with a retrospective exhibit, Maria Pinto: 25 Years, at City Gallery in the Historic Water Tower, through January 8. cityofchicago.org

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

KEY TO THE CITY

Pamella Roland The designer of the eponymous label, known for its elegant eveningwear, shares favorite spots in the city she calls her “second home” FIELD TRIP:

THE NUTCRACKER/PHOTO BY TODD ROSENBERG.

10 East Randolph Street; joffrey.org

Ê FOR MORE ON CHICAGO, VISIT DUJOUR.COM/CITIES

DATE NIGHT:

When you’re in the mood for a few good laughs, The Second City (secondcity.com) comedy club can’t be beat. DON’T MISS:

A Chicago Cubs (chicago.cubs.mlb. com) home game at Wrigley Field. HIDDEN GEM:

For the perfect nightcap, The Violet Hour (theviolethour.com) is a must.

USE YOUR NOODLE Chicago may have lost the bid for the George Lucas museum to San Francisco, but the Windy City has a new cultural institution paying homage to a highly digestible art form: ramen. Kizuki Ramen & Izakaya, in Wicker Park, recently added a 100-square-foot “Ramen Museum,” complete with a live stream of a Tokyo street, handmade exhibits showcasing the history of ramen and a three-dimensional map of Japan that features different regions’ toppings, noodles and broth. It’s time to inform your taste buds. 1482 North Milwaukee Avenue; kizuki.com

151

Seeing The Nutcracker is as much of a Chicago holiday tradition as watching the tree lighting ceremony in Daley Plaza. But while the 55-foot evergreen’s decor changes each year, the whimsical ballet production has stayed steadfast—until now. This holiday season, the Joffrey Ballet will showcase an entirely new adaptation of the classic tale (December 10–30). Instead of the traditional 19th–century parlor setting, the Joffrey rendition will take place at Chicago’s 1893 World’s Fair, the legendary event that transformed the White City. The $4 million production is the brainchild of 2015 Tony award-winning choreographer Christopher Wheeldon, known for his work on the Broadway hit An American in Paris, which he also directed. Ashley Wheater, the Joffrey’s artistic director, knows Wheeldon was the right person to reinvent the timeless classic while retaining its magic. “I’ve danced in many Nutcrackers through the years and understand the power of a good story,” says Wheater. “But we live in a diverse and rapidly changing world. Our storytelling must recognize these changes.”

COCKTAIL HOUR:

RM Champagne Salon (rmchampagnesalon.com). Need I say more?

DUJOU R .COM

DANCERS IN THE WHITE CITY

The Joffrey Ballet (see left; joffrey. org) is wonderful!


→ The spirit of the season is alive and well at the Dallas Arboretum, which restages its 12 Days of Christmas exhibit, featuring twelve 25-foot Victorian-style gazebos decked to the nines, through January 8. dallasarboretum.org

DALLAS/FORT WORTH CITIES → ASPEN

CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

HIGH TECH WITH A TWIST The future of cocktails is here. Hide, which opens this December in Deep Ellum, uses machines like centrifuges and roto-vaporizers to prepare its potent concoctions. “We’re using some different technology and techniques to really enhance the taste, the visual aspect of the drink and also the feel it has on your mouth,” says owner Nick Backlund. The unique preparation processes can render transparent drinks—or “cocktails clarified,” as the bar’s motto suggests. But don’t be fooled by appearances: Some may look like water, but Backlund ensures all of his drinks pack a punch. 2816 Elm Street; hidebar.com

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

DANCING WITH THE (LONE) STARS

Local culinary star Tiffany Derry, who catapulted to national fame on Bravo’s Top Chef, returns to the Dallas dining scene with not one, not two, but three restaurants opening across the city in the coming year. First up is Derry’s fast-food debut, The Cupboard by Tiffany Derry, at Uptown Urban Market, which just opened in Cedar Springs. Next comes Roots Southern Table, a tribute to the comfort food Derry grew up eating, which opens in Trinity Groves this winter. While the chef’s famous duck fat–fried chicken earned a place on the menu, lighter, farm-focused fare, like mason jar seasonal pickles, sweet potatoes

and spring peas, is also being plated. The chef will conclude her whirlwind year with Roots Chicken Shak, set to open inside Plano’s European-style food court, Legacy Hall, in fall 2017. When Derry thinks about what sets her eateries apart, she says, “It’s the fried chicken. That’s what I’m known for in Dallas. That’s what the people want.” tiffanyderryconcepts.com

Tiffany Derry’s famous duck fat–fried chicken and biscuits.

Dallas Black Dance Theatre,

which since 1976 has given expression to African-American experience through innovative programming, rings in its 40th anniversary this season. Among the performances being staged for the landmark celebration, which kicked off in October, is company dancer and choreographer Sean J. Smith’s Interpretations, a multimedia ode to the organization’s history that debuts in February. The season’s highly anticipated Spring Celebration, featuring choreography by the legendary Twyla Tharp, will conclude the festivities in May. “My dream was always to have a piece by Twyla Tharp,” says DBDT founder and current artistic advisor Ann M. Williams. “That really puts a stamp on a company from Dallas, Texas.”

2700 Ann Williams Way; dbdt.com ÊFOR MORE ON DALLAS, VISIT DUJOUR. COM/CITIES

DALLAS BLACK DANCE THEATRE/ PHOTO BY THE DALLAS DANCE PROJECT. TIFFANY DERRY/PHOTO BY RANCE ELGIN.

152

DUJOU R .COM

Triple Play


HOUSTON CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

GAME ON

February 5 marks the second time in 13 years that Houston plays host to the Super Bowl (casual observers may remember the first, in 2004, for Janet Jackson’s infamous “wardrobe malfunction” during halftime). Since then, the city has more than tripled its miles of rail and nearly doubled its hotel rooms. In a town so sprawling—655 square miles for an estimated 2.2 million residents—one thing is certain: Even locals can use a guide. Here’s what to do when you’re not watching the main event.

WHERE TO PARTY

Whether your team wins or loses, Omni Houston Hotel’s iconic nightclub, Black Swan, is the place to celebrate (or forget) in style. Fresh off a $2 million facelift, the 30-yearold haunt’s rebirth isn’t restricted to décor— behind the bar, expect new cocktails like the LeFleur (a sparkler made with fresh raspberries) and the Houston Sour (a whiskey sour with a dash of red wine). But longtime patrons needn’t fret: The club’s namesake drink, a mix of vodka, sparkling wine and lemon juice, hasn’t gone anywhere.

4 Riverway; omnihotels.com

153

WHERE TO EAT

Cuisine is front and center in the city, as evidenced by its approximately 10,000 restaurants. One of 2017’s most anticipated openings is One Fifth Steak—the first of five new limited-edition eateries from chef Chris Shepherd, owner of the critically acclaimed Underbelly and 2014 winner of the James Beard Foundation’s award for best Southwestern chef. Debuting in January, the new spot shares Underbelly’s recipe for success: Shepherd’s use of all cuts of meat. “Even as a kid, I understood the importance of utilizing a whole animal,” he says. “It’s how I cook at home, and it’s how we’re going to cook at One Fifth.” Get it while it’s hot because, as part of the chef’s plan to open five restaurants over five years in the same building, Shepherd’s steakhouse will turn into One Fifth Romance Languages (featuring food from Spain, France and Italy) next September.

1658 Westheimer Road; onefifthhouston.com

DUJOU R .COM

ONE FIFTH ROMANCE LANGUAGES/PHOTO BY JULIE SOEFER PHOTOGRAPHY. ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY.

CITIES → ASPEN

→ Super Bowl Live, taking place in and around downtown’s Discovery Green park from January 27 through February 5, is a free festival of music, food, games and attractions leading up to Super Bowl LI. visithoustontexas.com/events

WHERE TO SHOP

In the year–and–change since it opened, the River Oaks District has quickly become one of the city’s top purveyors of all things luxe. Already home to outposts of Tom Ford, Jo Malone and Harry Winston, the indoor–outdoor mall recently welcomed branches of Indonesia– based jeweler John Hardy and Texas’ iconic Forty Five Ten boutique.

4444 Westheimer Road, riveroaksdistrict.com

Ê FOR MORE ON HOUSTON, VISIT DUJOUR.COM/ CITIES


LAS VEGAS CITIES → ASPEN

CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

READY FOR TAKEOFF

EAT LIKE A KING This December, The Venetian, with The Palazzo Las Vegas, is staging the fourth installment of its annual culinary extravaganza, Ultimo—A Weekend of Excellence. For the event, a lineup of world-renowned chefs—including Thomas Keller, Jérôme Bocuse and Emma Bengtsson—will prepare cuisines representative of their heritage. To wash down the global feast, pairings from select wineries like DAOU Vineyards, Marqués de Murrieta and Pio Cesare will be poured. Throughout the weekend, activities including a Rolls-Royce driving experience with a hot-air balloon ride (complete with a posh picnic at Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area) ensure attendees work up an appetite.

3355 Las Vegas Boulevard South; venetian.com

Just in time for the holidays, the Wynn Las Vegas reopens its Cartier boutique (below) following a minor facelift. The shop’s gold, bronze and beige interiors showcase the fine jeweler’s elegant baubles, a number of which—like the Ballon Bleu de Cartier Serti Vibrant watch (above), with brilliant-cut diamonds set in 18-karat white gold—are otherwise only available abroad. 3131 Las Vegas Boulevard South; wynnlasvegas.com

ALL IMAGES COURTESY

154

DUJOU R .COM

Crown Jewel

Thanks to a new partnership with Maverick Helicopters, the Four Seasons Hotel Las Vegas offers a literal taste of the high life with its Natural Wonders Experience. The three-hour excursion stops at the topmost peak of Nevada’s Valley of Fire State Park before continuing to the Grand Canyon, where guests sip bubbly and feast on a lunch prepared by the hotel’s culinary team from a private landing site 300 feet above the Colorado River. The journey continues with flyovers of Lake Mead, Fortification Hill and the Hoover Dam—concluding, of course, with aerial views of the Strip. 3960 Las Vegas Boulevard South; fourseasons.com/lasvegas


→ BAZ—Star Crossed Love, a production at the Palazzo Theater, is a must-see immersive experience inspired by director Baz Luhrmann’s iconic films, including Romeo + Juliet and Moulin Rouge! palazzo.com

RAISING THE BAR... AGAIN

Already home to Eggslut, Jaleo and Scarpetta, The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas amps up its culinary star power this winter with the opening of the first western U.S. outposts of David Chang’s Momofuku and Christina Tosi’s Milk Bar. Upgrades aren’t limited to the kitchens, however: The resort will also debut a suite of 21 new penthouses looking out over the Strip from 570 feet in the air, according to Cosmopolitan CEO Bill McBeath. The accommodations, conceived by Daun Curry, Richmond International and Tihany Design, will themselves be sights to behold. In his seven suites, Richmond designer George Meikle’s palette of cobalt and teal sets off the arid landscape outside. Curry says her seven will be “a little rock ‘n’ roll, a little gritty, but still very glamorous.” The remaining seven, according to designer Adam D. Tihany, will be a split between a bright, soft “Hotel California” vibe and a sharper black-and-white motif. Together, they’re sure to appeal to high-rolling tastes across the spectrum. 3708 Las Vegas

Boulevard South; cosmopolitanlasvegas.com ÊFOR MORE ON LAS VEGAS, VISIT DUJOUR. COM/CITIES

Above: Richmond International’s and Daun Curry’s sketches for the Boulevard Penthouse Suite.

155

ALL IMAGES COURTESY

KEEPING UP WITH THE COSMOPOLITAN

DUJOU R .COM

Ace mixologist Tony Abou-Ganim is a pro at creating cocktails for massive venues and intimate watering holes alike. So it’s no surprise that in his newest post, at James Beard Award–winning chef Shawn McClain’s new Libertine Social at Mandalay Bay, AbouGanim is in charge of the drinks at two distinct spaces: the Main Bar (with a menu of draft, bottled and barrel-aged cocktails) and the cozy, 40-seat Arcade Bar. “At the Main Bar, we celebrate many styles of cocktail preparation in new and entertaining ways,” Abou-Ganim says, “from colorful fizzes in handblown glassware to social swizzles by the pitcher, meant to be shared with friends.” At the Arcade Bar, his focus is on resurrecting forgotten drinks like the sherry cobbler and the brandy fix. History never tasted better. 3950 Las Vegas Boulevard South; mandalaybay.com


LOS ANGELES CITIES → ASPEN

CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

→ L.A.’s Getty Museum gets the royal treatment with Bouchardon: Royal Artist of the Enlightenment, an exhibit of works by the 18th-century French artist Edmé Bouchardon that runs from January 10 to April 2. getty.edu

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

FRENCH TWIST

L’Eclaireur’s new West Hollywood

Ê FOR MORE ON LOS ANGELES, VISIT DUJOUR.COM/CITIES

About Face

Joanna Vargas’ signature non-invasive treatments, like her Triple Crown Facial with diamond peel and micro-current processes, are already a staple among New York City’s spa set. “It’s like going to the gym for the face,” Vargas says of her salon, which is ground zero for A-listers during awards season. So it’s no wonder the esthetician homed in on Tinseltown for her next storefront. The “smaller, more private” location offers Vargas’ full range of treatments, in addition to products from her all-natural, eponymous skincare line. 310-424-5141;

What’s Cooking in L.A.

Local chefs are dishing up new concepts city-wide

This winter, beloved Los Angeles chefs from Downtown to Venice are reinventing themselves: Josef Centeno, who oversees a dining micro-empire on Main Street, in Downtown’s Historic Core, introduces a fresh, plant-centric concept at P.Y.T. (pytlosangeles.com). While multi-cultural vegetarian dishes like salt-baked turnip with hoja santa and shiso chimichurri thrill local herbivores, a few well-placed daily meat and fish specials will cheer devotees of the famous burger at Centeno’s Ledlow (with which P.Y.T. shares a space). In Hollywood, Curtis Stone’s butcher shop-meets-restaurant, Gwen (gwenla.com), keeps things old school with a European-style meat counter. For those who’d prefer their meat cooked, the eatery (co-owned by chef Stone’s brother, Luke) also boasts a glamorous Art Deco-inspired dining room and a prix fixe, five-course tasting menu of cured, smoked and grilled fare. Loyal followers of chef Evan Funke, whose 2015 departure from Culver City’s Bucato is still mourned, can rejoice knowing the pasta master is back in the kitchen at Felix (felixla.com), his new temple to the Italian staple. Located in the Venice bungalow formerly occupied by the iconic Joe’s Restaurant, the eatery heralds Funke’s return to top form—not to mention the comeback of his cacio e pepe.

SUNSET’S NEW TOWER Sunset Boulevard’s Chateau Marmont and Sunset Tower Hotel have long been the preferred homes-away-from home of the Hollywood in-crowd (also Lindsay Lohan). Thanks to the strip’s newest high-end residential project, the contempo-cool Hollywood Proper Residences, it can be their actual home, too. At the 23-story tower, near the intersection of Sunset and Gower, designer Kelly Wearstler’s modern Angeleno aesthetic (think natural wood, earthy textures and clean lines) is accented with original artworks by locals such as fiber artist Tanya Aguiñiga and ceramicist Ben Medansky. In addition to furnished and unfurnished residences, the building offers its short- and long-term tenants a suite of amenities, from a rooftop pool to an in-house restaurant “We’ve had the unique opportunity to design something from the ground up,” says Proper Hospitality’s creative director Joshua Katz. “[Our property] is built to serve a very creative community and a new generation of innovators being drawn to the area.” 1550 North El Centro Avenue; livehollywoodproper.com

L’ECLAIREUR/PHOTO BY SAMUEL FROST. ALL IMAGES COURTESY.

156

DUJOU R .COM

boutique marks a shift in the Paris-based retailer’s focus, from fashion to interior design. Housed in florist David Jones’ erstwhile studio and home, the shop’s rare, artist-made pieces, mostly imported from Europe, include works by French sculptor Philippe Hiquily and Italian ceramicist Aldo Londi. “The L.A. I used to visit 10 years ago is very different from the city it is today,” says owner Meryl Hadida Shabani, the daughter of the retailer’s founders, Martine and Armand Hadida. “Now is the moment to start a business around design, because that is where the city is heading.” 450 North Robertson Boulevard; leclaireur.com


A unique luxury resort& casino /877 552 7778


Thirty-three original works by

RAPHAEL VIC ENZI ALBER TO SEVESO HUGO VALENTINE

NOBU HOTEL MIAMI BEACH ON EXHIBITION DURING MIAMI ART WEEK

NOVEMBER 30 TH - DECEMBER 3 RD, 2016 Art inquiries: info@meetingjasmin.com #MEETINGJASMIN


M E E T I N G C A PT U R IN G A D I G I TA L E N C O U N T E R I N A P H Y S I C A L SPAC E

A LBER T O S EV ES O TH E MANY EM OT I ON S OF GA BY M OOR , 2 0 1 6 3 0 X 4 0 I N C HES SOM ERS ET V ELV ET A R C HI VA L PA P ER F L O AT IN G IN C U S T O M C A S T E L L I F R A M E EDI T I ON OF 5


MIAMI CITIES → ASPEN

CHICAGO

→ Passport 305, a new VIP program from Runway Resorts, gives members access to cabanas, pools and other amenities at top South Florida boutique hotels, like Nautilus and Casa Morada, without booking a room. runway-resorts.com

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

Brickell Boom

A wave of new hotels, restaurants, residences and shops breaks across the bay from South Beach

Three’s Company

If there’s one language all Miamians speak, it’s shoptalk. Brickell City Centre, the latest retail destination to open in the 305, boasts not only Miami’s first Saks Fifth Avenue in 30 years but also its first-ever food hall: a three-story, 38,000-squarefoot mecca devoted to Italian delicacies. Miamians are giddy over the new U.S. outposts of Acqua di Parma and Italian menswear line Boglioli—just two of the international brands among the center’s 85 tenants. “We have a strong mix of menswear,” says Debora Overholt, vice president of retail for the developer, Swire Properties. “Several have set a precedent for Miami, like Stitched, which offers made-to-measure suits and a signature scotch lounge.” Other anticipated boutiques include Richard Mille, Westime and Chopard. The dining program is equally eclectic, from a third location of local favorite Pubbelly Sushi to the inaugural American iteration of South African golfer Ernie Els’ Big Easy Winebar & Grill.

701 South Miami Avenue; brickellcitycentre.com

Already a major figure in Miami’s hotel scene, the Los Angeles-based hospitality group sbe, in partnership with South Florida condo king The Related Group, makes its first play at the Magic City’s residential game with the opening of SLS Brickell Hotel & Residences.

The property, steps from Downtown and not far from the Design District, comprises 450 condos and 124 hotel rooms and suites. “Building it from the ground up [allowed for] more spacious rooms, including a two-bedroom penthouse suite,” says sbe Hotel Group’s SVP Thomas Meding of the 55-story tower. Still not impressed? It also boasts Philippe Starck interiors and restaurants from José Andrés and Michael Schwartz (more on that, below). 1300 South Miami Avenue; slshotels.com

1300 Brickell Bay Drive; lpmlondon.co.uk

SNEAK PEEK: FI’LIA

Local chef Michael Schwartz expands his culinary empire this winter with Fi’lia, his first full-blown Italian eatery, at SLS Brickell Hotel & Residences. Its wood oven–centric menu mixes updates of favorite pizzas from the chef’s Harry’s Pizzeria, like a pesto pie with a pistachio-based sauce, with new dishes, like braised short-rib sugo in a heavenly foil of crespelle. “The recipe is worth the labor,” he says. “We do a lot by hand.” The same attention to detail is given to the spritz-based cocktails, like the refreshing Bicicletta, made with Campari and white wine. 1300 South Miami Avenue; filiarestaurant.com

ALL IMAGES COURTESY

16 0

DUJOU R .COM

Racks on Racks

Having hit home runs with the Brickell outposts of Zuma and Coya, the team that imported the London-based Japanese and Peruvian restaurants steps to the plate for a third time with the opening of La Petite Maison. Grander than its British sister, its 3,700 square feet fit 163 seats, nearly half of which are outside (and ideal for sipping a tomatini, the Bloody Mary’s cosmopolitan cousin, on a balmy evening). “[The cocktail] has been called La Petite Maison in a glass,” says co-owner Bob Ramchand, who has more signature touches in store for diners who come for Provençal-inflected fare like foie gras–stuffed roasted chicken with prawns. “Several nights a year, we’ll fly in our favorite buskers, from Nice, who also perform at our London location.”

PLAYING HOUSE


IC E

ABU

DH

ABI

DU

BAI

NG

HO

N KO

G

IB

IZA

S LO

S ELE

O XIC ME

CIT

G AN

@cipriani WWW.CIPRIANI.COM

Y

MIA

MI

E NT MO

C

LO AR

N

RK YO W E

A RIY

DH

VEN


MIAMI CLOSER LOOK:

MALIBU FARM Swedish model–turned– chef–and–author Helene Henderson’s Malibu Farm Pier Cafe, once dubbed a

Malibu Farm Pier Cafe’s passion fruit panna cotta dish.

Haute Ticket

Just in time for Art Basel Miami Beach, the prolific Argentine developer Alan Faena (the brain behind the $1 billion Faena district) debuts Faena Forum, a new temple for culture on Collins Avenue. The 43,000-square-foot, multi-purpose venue, designed by Rem Koolhaas’ firm OMA, is fully committed for Miami Art Week, with A-listers paying top dollar to book the space for their parties and performances. Its cube- and cylinder-shaped structures, with spiderweb-like white facades, house a 150-seat amphitheater from which guests can ascend a spiral ramp to the top of a 40-foot high dome for unparalleled views of Indian Creek and the surrounding neighborhood. “There’s nothing like it,” Faena says of the space. “Miami needs culture in all ways. Faena Forum will be part of that movement.” Inaugurated last month with the world premiere of Once With Me, Once Without Me (a cross-disciplinary work choreographed by Pam Tanowitz in collaboration with OMA partner Shohei Shigematsu), Faena Forum exhibits “Time Capsule,” a free series of films, projections and virtual-reality visuals, on its geodesic dome through December 4. 3300 Collins Avenue; faena.com

When chef Nobu Matsuhisa makes his annual trek to the South Beach Wine & Food Festival, he’ll now be able to check into Nobu Hotel Eden Roc, his third namesake hotel and first beachfront resort. New York City-based architect David Rockwell oversaw the transformation of Morris Lapidus’ ‘50s-era Eden Roc hotel: Inside, walls are adorned with works on loan from the Brant Foundation and powder rooms feature rosemary– and white tea–scented products by Natura Bissé. Room service comes in the form of—what else—Nobu classics like yellowtail jalapeño and black cod with miso. Guests can also enjoy the chef’s signature dishes at his namesake restaurant, while an East Coast location of California’s Malibu Farm Pier Cafe rounds out the dining options (more on that at right). 4525 Collins Avenue; nobuedenroc.com

ÊFOR MORE ON MIAMI, VISIT DUJOUR.COM/CITIES

malibu-farm.com

HOT TIP For a respite from the frenzy that Art Basel brings to South Beach, Sotheby’s Chairman of the Americas, Lisa Dennison, escapes to the city’s South Pointe Park to watch the many cruise ships going in and out of PortMiami. “I love seeing them from the shore,” she says of her ritual. For those looking to get closer to the action, we suggest Crystal Cruises Caribbean voyages (hitting tropical destinations like St. Barts, Martinique and Panama), departing from the port this winter. crystalcruises.com

ALL IMAGES COURTESY

16 2

DUJOU R .COM

NOBU’S NEW DIGS

“little experiment” on the Pacific Ocean, is having a growth spurt. With help from patron and Nobu Hospitality co-owner Meir Teper, the farm-to-table Californian café is opening two new dining rooms at Nobu hotels in Miami Beach and Cabo San Lucas. The former stars a pizza oven and frozen drinks, including one inspired by Henderson’s best-selling cocktail of cucumber-infused vodka with watermelon and organic agave. The chef, known for crafting her menus around local ingredients, is excited to play with new flavors, tropical seafood and regional produce. “I’m adding key limes to our basil ice cream,” she says. “And I hope to get my hands on swamp cabbage.” 4525 Collins Avenue;


NEW YORK CITY CITIES → ASPEN

CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

→ Chef Chad Brauze (who’s trained under culinary gods like Thomas Keller and Ferran Adrià) brings a taste of something new to the Park Hyatt New York with the December opening of his innovative restaurant, Bevy. bevynyc.com

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

AHEAD OF THE HERD At The Shephard—a circa 1800s warehouse in Manhattan’s West Village that has been transformed from rental apartments into state-of-the-art condos by The Naftali Group—less is more. Over the past few years, the building’s units, which once numbered 145, have been completely redesigned as 38 stand-alone residences that begin welcoming occupants this winter. Twenty-six of the homes boast unique floor plans, including the recently debuted, sixth-floor model unit seen here (it can be yours for just under $12 million). Originally a four-bedroom, under its new design the residence forfeits a sleeping quarter to gain a massive den (also: an additional dining room and living room, because why not). “The Shephard is an incredibly special building with tremendous floorplans that set it apart from anything else in the area,” says developer Miki Naftali, who tapped designer James Huniford to decorate the model in a French mid-century style inspired by the dwelling’s intricate brickwork, arched windows and barrel-vaulted ceilings. “An opportunity to develop a property like this comes along once in a lifetime.” The same could be said about the chance to buy one. 275 West 10th Street; 275w10.com

HISTORY LESSON Five years in the making, New York at Its Core, at the Museum of the City of New York, is the first show of its kind to examine the city’s evolution from quaint fishing village to modern metropolis. “It’s powerful to connect to the past,” says MCNY chief curator Sarah Henry of the exhibit, which features personal ephemera from such notable New Yorkers as “Boss” Tweed and Calvert Vaux. “Everyone is going to find some surprises.” 1220 Fifth

Avenue; mcny.org

16 3

Restoration Hardware adds another star to its singular firmament by partnering with Robert Sonneman, the New Yorkbased owner of the eponymous studio, whose work has been credited with raising contemporary lighting design to an art form (and has, fittingly, been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art). Among his RH Modern pieces, available now, is an exclusive version of his iconic, mid-century pendant lamp, recast in solid brass (above). rhmodern.com

DUJOU R .COM

THE SHEPHARD/PHOTO BY ANNIE SCHLECHTER. RH/RH MODERN CATHEDRAL BRASS PENDANT LAMP BY SONNEMAN.

SEEING THE LIGHT


NEW YORK CITY

Transatlantic travelers seeking to cut flight time from New York City to London need look no further than their smartphone. JetSmarter, the membership service that revolutionized private jet booking with its signature app, recently debuted an Intercontinental JetShuttle flight between the two metropolises. “We expect our flights on this route to save fliers three to four hours each way,” says Sergey Petrossov, the company’s founder and CEO. jetsmarter.com

Ê FOR MORE ON NEW YORK CITY, VISIT DUJOUR.COM/ CITIES

Bauble Bar

New Yorkers who can’t make it to Indonesia this season are in luck: Balinese-based fine jewelry brand John Hardy brings a dose of the island’s indigenous glamour to SoHo with the November opening of its U.S. crown jewel. Designed to recall the company’s showroom and workshop in Ubud, the Prince Street location spotlights exclusive accessories as rare as those found at the jeweler’s headquarters on the other side of the world. Among them: unique pieces designed for the brand’s popular Cinta line, as well as a capsule collection of clutches to be unveiled throughout the coming year (the first in this series, made with bamboo, below, debuts with the boutique). To celebrate its launch, the shop is hosting an in-house “Artisan in Residence” program through December 3, at which customers receive handson lessons in design techniques like wax carving and chain weaving. The New York City store, according to John Hardy CEO Robert Hanson, “will really be a distinctive 3D articulation of the brand’s powerful design, dramatic detail and inspiring meaning.”

118 Prince Street; johnhardy.com

KEY TO THE CITY

Chris Del Gatto

Setting Sail This winter, Olympic gold medalist Lowell North, the founder of nautical apparel and lifestyle brand North Sails, embarks on his latest odyssey: opening the brand’s flagship store near Manhattan’s Flatiron district. The more-than2,000-square-foot space will be a new home for the company’s men’s and women’s collections, comprising functional, performance-based outerwear (like waterproof jackets, above, and cozy fleeces) and fashionable ready-to-wear (like chunky knits and a healthy dose of sailor-striped sweaters). Unique to the location will be a water bar, serving bottled varieties sourced from around the world. Its menu divides offerings by their total dissolved solids, allowing customers to choose their refreshment by mineral content. In addition, the space plans to host regular events—like dinners with past America’s Cup winners—celebrating icons of the sport. Perhaps most exciting for landlubbers: Sea legs are not required for entry. 108 Fifth Avenue; northsails.com

The CEO of DEL GATTO (del-gatto.com)—the chic set’s go–to source for the finest previously–owned jewels, watches and more— shares favorite spots in his home city POWER LUNCH:

Our offices are right across the street from La Grenouille (la-grenouille.com) on East 52nd Street. It has the best lunch crowd—I’d like to buy all of the fabulous jewels I see in that dining room. FIELD TRIP:

A tie between Central Park and the Metropolitan Museum of Art (metmuseum.org). I never tire of them. RETAIL THERAPY:

I love Cesare Attolini’s (cesareattolini.com) sport jackets and shirts. They’re beautiful and extremely well made—the best in Neapolitan tailoring. COCKTAIL HOUR:

The Surrey Hotel’s Bar Pleiades (barpleiades.com) is super glamorous and cozy—the perfect hideout. And they make a great Manhattan! HIDDEN GEM:

Director Valerie Steele does an amazing job at the Museum at FIT (fitnyc.edu). We’ve given a lot of [my wife] Veronica Webb Del Gatto’s items to it—you should get rid of the clothes and jewelry you no longer wear!

ALL IMAGES COURTESY

16 4

DUJOU R .COM

FORGET THE CONCORDE


Welcome to the Centre of Attention. F R O M S A K S F I F T H AV E N U E T O C M X C I N E M A , S T O R E S , E N T E R TA I N M E N T & E AT E R I E S W I T H S T Y L E .

701 S Miami Ave, Miami, FL 33131

brickellcitycentre.com


ORANGE COUNTY CITIES → ASPEN

CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

→ Frida Kahlo—Her Photos, on view from February 25 through June 25 at the Bowers Museum, in Santa Ana, offers a peek at 241 images from the Mexican painter’s 6,000-plus collection. bowers.org

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

RETAIL ROUNDUP

The Compton-based apparel brand Drifter— recognized for its athletic-inspired, street style-approved staples (think cropped tees, graphic bombers and slouchy sweats)—brings Golden State-cool to Costa Mesa with its first brick-and-mortar location. The shop, which carries full collections for both men and women, also boasts a well-curated selection of home goods and accessories.

LIQUID GOLD This season’s opening of Blinking Owl Distillery, in Santa Ana, marks the O.C.’s official entry into California’s craft beverage boom. Co-owned by actress Kirsten Vangsness and husband and wife Brian and Robin Christenson, the establishment is a homage to a beloved local mid-century bar of the same name. “It’s Art Deco– meets–the ’70s,” Robin says of her design for the space: “kind of quirky, but luxurious and comfortable.” Distiller Ryan Friesen oversees its range of spirits—which includes vodka, aquavit and gin—and looks to the region’s bounty for grains, oranges and other ingredients. “The goal is to work with farmers and distill everything from locally-grown produce,” says Brian, who was first introduced to the business through his great-grandfather, a Prohibition-era Nebraska bootlegger. Cheers to that! 802 East Washington

Avenue, Santa Ana; blinkingowldistillery.com

The Deco-meets-1970s bar at Blinking Owl Distillery.

Sip on This With room for only 20 patrons at a time, YNK (an acronym for “You Never Knowˮ), Irvine’s newest drinking room, adds a shot of exclusivity to Orange County’s cocktail scene. Owner Chris Adams, of Ellis Adams Group, imbues the bar’s menu and décor with mystery, too, by completely reimagining both every two months. While most of the spot’s ever-changing details are unknown, one thing’s for sure: Only with such secrecy and attention to detail can Adams pull off the type of transportive experience—making patrons feel like they’re sipping a caipirinha in Rio, say, or a sazerac in New Orleans—YNK serves. 18000 Von Karman Avenue, Irvine; ynk-irvine.com

3323 Hyland Avenue, Costa Mesa; drifter.com

New Zealand import Rodd & Gunn, known Down

Under for crisp, tailored menswear and luxe leather goods, debuts its first stateside store in Newport Beach. Inspired by its motherland’s rugged coastline, the label’s fall collection of soft knits and performance outerwear will be equally at home in wardrobes on Southern California’s shores.

1129 Newport Center Drive, Newport Beach; roddandgunn.com

Ê FOR MORE ON ORANGE COUNTY, VISIT DUJOUR.COM/CITIES

ALL IMAGES COURTESY

16 6

DUJOU R .COM

Two new boutiques inject Orange County’s surfercool style with a dose of local and international flair


PALM BEACH CITIES → ASPEN

CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

→ As the epicenter of Palm Beach’s social season, The Breakers will host 16 galas this winter, including the ForEverglades Benefit and the American Heart Association’s Heart Ball—the oldest charity ball in the U.S. thebreakers.com

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

In Vino, Paradiso

Palm Beach denizens can skip the Tuscan vineyard tour this year: Sant Ambroeus Palm Beach—the first Florida outpost of New York’s classic Milanese café—offers 150 wines, 99 percent of them Italian, including a rare 2001 Masseto from Tuscany’s famed Tenuta Dell’Ornellaia vineyard. “We buy from huge cellars and at auction,” says beverage director Alex Berlingeri. But to build up his tropical offshoot’s catalog he’s also going grassroots, so we can allow him an enterprising sidenote: “FYI,” he says, “any locals who’d like to part with some Italian gems can contact me.” 340 Royal Poinciana Way; santambroeus.com

FARMHOUSE TABLE

NORTON MUSEUM/ARTWORK © SVENJA DEININGER. ALL IMAGES COURTESY.

Avenue; norton.org

Ê FOR MORE ON PALM BEACH, VISIT DUJOUR.COM/CITIES

16 7

The sole selection prerequisite for the Norton Museum of Art’s annual Recognition of Art by Women exhibition is—you guessed it—being a (living) female artist. The daunting task of narrowing the list of candidates has fallen to Cheryl Brutvan, the museum’s director of curatorial affairs. Since 2011, she’s given the likes of Jenny Saville, Njideka Akunyili Crosby and Klara Kristalova their first U.S. survey shows. This year, for what might be the series’ final iteration (February 4–April 16), she highlights the hushed, neo-Constructivist canvases of Viennese painter Svenja Deininger. “I stopped dead in my tracks when I saw her works at Frieze London,” says Brutvan, who chose 22 paintings for the artist’s debut solo museum show. “They’re like notebooksized jewels that evolve, sometimes over years, revealing layers of processes and colors, almost like sculptures.” 1451 South Olive

The Palm Beach restaurant scene goes rustic with the debut of The Regional Kitchen & Public House. While chefowner Thierry Beaud, of PB Catch and Pistache French Bistro, is an industry veteran, the eatery is partner and co-chef Lindsay Autry’s first venture—and she’s making sure it feels like home. “My grandfather had a butcher shop and was known for his country-style sausage,” says the North Carolina native. She adapted his recipe for cassoulet with field peas and poached egg, and pays subtle tribute to her Southern roots throughout. Her smoky small-batch pimento cheese, for instance, is whipped up tableside. Eat your heart out, Paula Deen. 651 Okeechobee Boulevard; eatregional.com

DUJOU R .COM

The Feminist Exhibitionist


SAN FRANCISCO CITIES → ASPEN

CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

→ Brokerage firm Compass makes finding a Bay Area home easy with the San Francisco debut of its Compass Markets app. Its real estate market analyses are updated to-the-minute, giving users all they need before making an offer. compass.com

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

Above: Pia Øien Cohler at her eponymous boutique.

ÊFOR MORE ON SAN FRANCISCO, VISIT DUJOUR.COM/CITIES

ART AND AUTONOMY Max Hollein, the new director of San Francisco’s fine arts museums, talks about his institutions’ future

“Every change involves a challenge,” says Max Hollein, who earlier this year assumed his position overseeing two of the city’s foremost cultural centers. But taking simultaneous charge of the de Young (deyoung.famsf.org) and Legion of Honor (legionofhonor.famsf.org) museums, two drastically different entities, isn’t the trial in question for the Austrian-born Hollein, who spent the last decade helming three different museums (the Schirn Kunsthalle, the Städel Museum and the Liebieghaus Sculpture Collection) in Frankfurt, Germany. As Hollein opens Frank Stella: A Retrospective (on view through February 26 at the de Young) and prepares for the Legion of Honor’s February show Monet: The Early Years (a seminal exhibition of approximately 60 works), he notes his real

Already known for its world-class interior design and antique shops, the Golden City’s Jackson Square neighborhood further elevates its fashionable reputation with the opening of PIA, a new store inspired by cult purveyors of high style from around the globe (like Paris’ Colette, Milan’s 10 Corso Como and New York City’s Opening Ceremony). The shop represents a major career shift for its 32-year-old, Norwegian-born proprietor, Pia Øien Cohler, who moved to the Bay Area in 2015 to work at an international law firm. “My job would have been to accompany French start-ups through their incorporation in the States,” explains Cohler, a petite blonde who defies the simplicity of such description. Instead, she gave that up to pursue an innate passion for fashion that, within a year’s time, yielded her eponymous boutique. “I’ve had some really great experiences with designers and I’ve found some really great stuff that no one else has,” she says. “I love feminine things—Paco Rabanne and Nina Ricci—but nothing stands in the way of having something cool and masculine from House of Dagmar [layered] over them.” Like the best fashion icons, Cohler—whose husband, Matt Cohler, is a partner in the venture capital firm Benchmark and purportedly worth upwards of $700 million—has no rules. “Everyone has nuances within them, so their style can be different from one day to the next,” she says. “People should be allowed to switch it up, and hopefully find everything they need here.” 414 Jackson Street;

piathestore.com

challenge is elevating the visitor experience and building an audience outside the museum walls—a duty he feels should be shared by his Silicon Valley neighbors. “[The tech industry has] a responsibility to be active and present to create a more complex story about San Francisco today,” says Hollein, noting that progress is already being made. “There’s a great momentum. We’re working on a digital course called ‘Understanding America,’ using material from the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco’s Rockefeller Collection, to reach audiences way beyond [the museum itself].” As Hollein sees it, this union will strengthen the city. “The eyes of the world are on San Francisco,” he says. “It’s one of the most interesting metropolises, defining the way we live in the 21st century.”

PHOTOS BY ANGIE SILVY

16 8

DUJOU R .COM

THE EDGE OF HAUTE


BINNSHOT CITIES

ASPEN

CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

3

1

2

6

4

5

9

10

. 16 9

7

8

11

12

13

17

18

15

14

16

19

20

21

22


BINNSHOT 24

23

29

26

27

31

32

34

35

30

17 0

DUJOU R .COM

28

25

CAMERA READY

These three highly Instagram-able destinations are ready for their close-ups WAIPIO VALLEY, HAWAII

If you can brave the White Road Hike, you’ll happen upon a wondrous 35-foot waterslide, as captured by @gangstamcasian.

Once a year, this arid desert comes alive with a kaleidoscope of colorful wildflowers, as captured by @para.klet.

VAADHOO ISLAND, RAA ATOLL, MALDIVES

Glowing marine life turns things upside down on this beach where the water lights up like a “Sea of Stars,” as captured by @istanbul74_. Presented by:

COURT E S Y

NAMAQUALAND, SOUTH AFRICA

I MA G E S

1. Aryeh Bourkoff, Harvey Weinstein, Jason Binn 2. Maya Henry, Katie Holmes 3. Restoration Hardware CEO Gary Friedman 4. Jason Binn, Maggio Cipriani, Strategic Group Co-founder Noah Tepperberg 5. Lionel Richie, Lisa Parigi, Jason Binn 6. Related Companies CEO Jeff Blau 7. Jason Binn, Tracy Anderson 8. Molly Sims, Scott Stuber, Jason Binn 9. Mr. and Mrs. Tim Davis 10. Gilt Groupe VP of Integrated Marketing Virginia Carnesale, Jason Binn, Mary Hamilton, Robbins Wolfe Eventeurs VP Chris Robbins 11. Turner President David Levy, Jason Binn 12. Record producer Nile Rodgers, Jason Binn 13. ONE Management President Scott Lipps 14. CNN Worldwide President Jeff Zucker, Andrew Zucker, Jason Binn 15. Rande Gerber 16. Jennifer Fisher Jewelry Owner Jennifer Fisher, Jason Binn 17. The Udell Family 18. Wayne Boich, Jason Binn 19. Peter Malachi, Jason Binn, Alyce Panico, Vincent Sabio, Hermes President & CEO Robert Chavez 20. Cindy Crawford 21. New York Jets Owner Robert “Woody” Johnson, Jason Binn, Greycroft Partners Managing Director Alan Patricof 22. Neal Sroka, Carlos Orozco, Jason Binn, Edward D. Burke, Jr., Esq. 23. Shadow PR Owner Brad Zeifman, Shadow PR Owner Lisette SandFreedman, Gucci Worldwide Director of Entertainment Lila Staab, Jason Binn 24. JoAnn Kruger, Bernard Kruger, Designer David Yurman, Sybil Yurman 25. Strategic Group CEO Jason Strauss 26. The Blond Creative Director Julio Montero, Jason Binn, The Metric Principal Eric Marx, KNR Hospitality Managing Partner Nicola Siervo, Chris Paciello 27. Cantor Fitzgerald CEO Howard Lutnick, Kirsten Norman, Greg Norman 28. JetSmarter CEO and Founder Sergey Petrossov 29. Jason Binn, BuzzFeed President Greg Coleman 30. Jason Binn, Olivia Palermo 31. Pauly Shore 32. Jocelyn Medland, Kiera Chaplin, Jason Binn, Mucknick, Golieb & Golieb PC Partner John Golieb, MongoDB Founder Kevin Ryan, Clare Ashforth, Natalia Gonzalez 33. Lilla Soria, HBC President of Outlets Jonathan Greller, HFPA President Lorenzo Soria, Jason Binn 34. 5WPR CEO Ronn Torossian 35. David Yurman, Sharon Bush, Jason Binn, Marla Maples, Sybil Yurman at Gaggenau 1683

A L L

33


DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T BE DRIVEN BY SUCCESS

BE DRIVEN TO SUCCESS

PROUDLY CHAUFFEURING VISIONARIES, LEADERS, INNOVATORS, AND DISRUPTORS FOR OVER 30 YEARS empirecls.com

.

(800) 451-5466


PARTIES ASPEN

CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

Lepa GalebRoskopp and Berggitte Maeser

Karen Binman, Jason Binn, Goryi Amador and Keenan Towns

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

Celeste Chang, Dr. Richard Firshein and Elan Nehleber

Bert Grange and Kira Grange

Heather Hadwin

DUJOU R .COM

HOUSTON

Renée Zellweger and Jason Binn

Dr. Richard Firshein, Danielle Villafana and Jason Binn

Shadia Khalil

Nadya Nepomnyashaya

Natalia Gonzalez and Clare Ashforth

17 2

Stephanie Rizzolo

Leslie Eichner and Ian Bruce Eichner

Miss Jay and Carmen Sol Espejo

Mike Heller and Ronn Torossian

Gaia Matisse, Danielle Naftali and Alana Miller

Florent-Aymeric Dubiez, Fiona Murray, Adriana Martone, Jason Binn and Andrea Fodera

Natassia Halabi and Bella Hunter

DuJour’s Housewarming Party T h De u J ou r t e a m , K e v i n Ry a n , B o b Ac e l e b r a D t i ou nJ ou o fr’s ne of ces at pace WHERE: T h Se k y l a r k WHO:

WHAT:

A Night at the Movies S a with v i t t , Da v i d Ra bZellweger in Renée Re n éZ e e l l w e g eJar y, A,Min s ds rWe wa r rGe an i, a Ma t i s s e Co c k t a ni ladss c r e e n Bi nrid g get oJ ones’ f s B ab y WHERE: Harry ipriani and inema PRESENTED BY: et marter, n ist, acapa um and mpire WHO:

WHAT:

JA S ON DE RUL O F A W SEHE I KON/ GI MA E T GT EY S - A S T RI D S T A W I A RZ - S T RI N G E R. RE N E E / G E T T Y I MA G E S - DA V E K OT I N S K Y S T RI N G E R. S K Y L A RK P A RT Y / G E T T Y I MA G E S - MA RK S A G L I OCCO- S T RI N G E R. DE G RI S OG ON O DI N N E R/ G E T T Y I MA G E S RA B B AA NN ID S OL I ME N E P H OT OG RA P H Y - S T RI N G E R.

CITIES


PROMOTION

LUXURY IN YOUR INBOX Subscribe to DuJour’s newsletter for your weekly fix. Your insider’s guide to design, style, culture, travel, art and more.

Sign up today and never miss an update! dujour.com/exclusive-newsletter-offer


PARTIES CITIES

ASPEN

CHICAGO

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

Lisa Damiani Hochfelder and Adam Hochfelder

Ola Abrams and Tony Abrams

Jason Derulo, Kiera Chaplin and Jason Binn Jason Derulo and Kristen Sosa

Jonathan Greller and Gaia Matisse

Fawaz Gruosi, Marla Maples, Tiffany Trump, Sergio Vacca and Jason Binn

DUJOU R .COM

John Mahdessian, Dorinda Medley

Katia Graytok and Thierry Chaunu

James Bundy and Simon Huck Berggitte Maeser

174

Jane Wogan Notar and Richie Notar

David Sheriden and Jason Derulo

Kiera Chaplin

Gideon Kimbrell and Elaine Wynn

Rachel Ash and Marla Maples Ray Kelly and Veronica Kelly

Carol Wright, Eric Caldwell and Holly Graham

Celebrating Fashion Week with Jason Derulo

Dinner with Diamonds

F a w Ga zr u o s i , Ma r l a Ma p l e s , S i m o n H u c k , K i e r a Ad i n n e r w e l c o m i n g d e G r i s o g o n o f o u n d e r F WHO: Ja s o n De Ar un l do rW , e wa r rGe an i, a Ma t i s s e , Do r i n dt oa N Me e Ywd ol eCi r ykt y WHAT: A c e l e b r a t i o n a n d i m p r o m p t u p e r f o WHERE: r m a nH c ae r rf yr o Ci m p rt hi ae n si i n g e r WHERE: L A V O PRESENTED BY: Je t S m a r t e r , I n L i s at ,n G Z d ai lct a p a Ru m WHO:

WHAT:


Putting a date [is] a sign of humility. Children are instructed very specifically when to use capitals and when not. Some writers defy the rules; they show a strong independent-mindedness. This spiral is a psychological symbol; it represents an inner essence which radiates outwards as he expresses himself.

17 6

DUJOU R .COM

He doesn’t give his signature. This is not an oversight.

Famous Last Words Mark Seliger’s penmanship underscores the respect his portraits have long exhibited By Gabriella Fuller

I

n certain quarters, you aren’t really someone until you’ve had your picture taken by Mark Seliger. The photographer made his name shooting rock stars for Rolling Stone and has gone on to capture heavyweights from the Dalai Lama to Barack Obama. To the casual observer, then, his most recent project, On Christopher Street, seems like a striking departure: It’s a book of portraits of transand genderqueer New Yorkers—few of them famous—who have long called Greenwich Village’s Christopher Street home. But the project, three years in the making, is not as much of a deviation from Seliger’s celebrity work as it appears. A common philosophy, encapsulated in the Minor White quote above, permeates Seliger’s art: Be receptive, prioritize consent and strive to capture the subject’s essence. These principles, while great when shooting J -Law, become hugely important when documenting the unsung members of a marginalized community. Especially one that—despite the rise of celebrity avatars like Laverne Cox and Caitlyn Jenner—often remains stereotyped and misunderstood. Seliger’s respect for his subject’s core is key to everything he does—including the way he writes, says graphologist Annette Poizner. “He carefully prints one letter at a time, honoring the

form of each with great loyalty.” The photographer was careful to honor the multiplicity of ways his Christopher Street subjects presented themselves, too. “Their stories were so varied,” he says, “and it became so important to reflect that diversity of experience.” Especially because woven through that carefully rendered individuality was a common thread. “A lot of the stories—regardless of social class, race or group—included an element of hopelessness.” He adds, “And then the sky cleared once they knew they could do something about [reconciling their appearance with their true gender]. [With those stakes], you really feel you have to get it right.” But how? Again, Seliger’s writing provides a clue. “Almost all of the samples I’ve analyzed have had a signature,” Poizner says. “This one doesn’t.” Seliger’s refusal to sign White’s quote mirrors his commitment to, as he says, “take myself out of the equation” when it comes to how his subjects are portrayed. Paradoxically, then, the real hallmark of a Seliger portrait—raw, stripped-down, intimate without ever prying—is a documentarian’s attempt at self-erasure. Trans- or cisgendered, the stories Seliger wants to tell are someone else’s. Poizner suggests his all-capitals lettering is distancing, noting, “He’s not an easy man to get to know through his words.” Seliger isn’t easy to get to know through his photographs either. But that’s okay: His subjects are. ■


NOW MORE THAN EVER, YOU BELONG ON ANGUILLA INTRODUCING FOUR SEASONS PRIVATE RESIDENCES ANGUILLA To an island renowned for its beauty and exclusivity, the top-rated luxury hotel in the world now brings its personal service, dining and experiences. Four Seasons makes ownership on Anguilla effortless: our Villas and Residences, designed by the inimitable Kelly Wearstler, offer sophisticated living for family and friends in a resort with spectacular pools, innovative restaurants, and an authentic connection to a relaxed and welcoming island community. At Four Seasons Private Residences Anguilla, you belong like nowhere else.

STUDIO RESIDENCES TO 5-ROOM VILLAS $750,000 TO $10 MILLION FOR A VERY LIMITED TIME TO FIND OUT MORE OR PLAN A DISCOVERY WEEKEND, CALL +1 800 901 7079

AnguillaPrivateResidences.com

This offer is not directed to residents in any state in which a registration is required but in which registration requirements have not yet been met, including, but not limited to, New Jersey. Recreational features and amenities described herein are subject to change periodically. Warning: the California Department of Real Estate has not examined this offering, including, but not limited to, the condition of title, the status of blanket liens on the project (if any), arrangements to assure project completion, escrow practices, control over project management, racially discriminatory practices (if any), terms, conditions, and price of the offer, control over annual assessments (if any), or the availability of water, services, utilities, or improvements. It may be advisable for you to consult an attorney or other knowledgeable professional who is familiar with real estate and a law in the country where this subdivision is situated. In New York, the complete offering terms are in an offering plan available from sponsor. File no. CD11-1029 (Resort Residences) and file no. H11-0007 (Villas). Four Seasons Private Residences Anguilla are not owned, developed or sold by Four Seasons Hotels limited or its affiliates (Four Seasons). The developer, an affiliate of Starwood Capital Group, uses the Four Seasons trademarks and tradenames under a license from Four Seasons Hotels limited. The marks “FOUR SEASONS,” “FOUR SEASONS HOTELS AND RESORTS,” any combination thereof and the Tree Design are registered trademarks of Four Seasons Hotels Limited in Canada and U.S.A. and of Four Seasons Hotels (Barbados) Ltd. elsewhere. © 2016


HERMÃ&#x2C6;S BY NATURE

Profile for DuJour Media

Winter 2016  

Jake Gyllenhaal gets honest; the most elegant frames for men and women; the season's most defining moments from Natalie Portman, Michelle Wi...

Winter 2016  

Jake Gyllenhaal gets honest; the most elegant frames for men and women; the season's most defining moments from Natalie Portman, Michelle Wi...

Profile for dujour
Advertisement