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™ W IN T E R 2 014

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SEVEN DOLL ARS

WINTER 2014

2014’s

DEFINING MOMENTS starring

CATE BLANCHETT Edward Norton HILARY SWANK Benedict Cumberbatch CHRIS ROCK and...

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ANGELINA JOLIE JACK O’CONNELL

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Teeth of The Dog


BEHIND THE SCENES

GOING THE DISTANCE

On a tiny Mediterranean island, we learn to find beauty in the process

CATE BLANCHETT ( PAGE 138)

Clockwise, from top: The rocky cliffs of Gozo; DuJour’s Paul Frederick styles Gael García Bernal for our “Men of the Year” portfolio; a picturesque view of The London Eye from Corinthia Hotel’s Hamilton Suite; lighting Jack O’Connell Far left: Photographer Ben Hoffmann shoots Rosemarie DeWitt in New York City

Four years after “Peter Lindbergh’s Portofino,” an exhibition of photographs for watchmaker IWC Schaffhausen, the lensman reunited with Cate Blanchett, one of his subjects, in the quaint Italian fishing town. Wearing a blue jean shirt, chinos and sneakers—and sporting a new beard—Lindbergh photographed Blanchett around Portofino once again, using backdrops that ranged from a speed boat in the Ligurian Sea to a medieval monastery. Says Blanchett, “This year’s experience with Peter Lindbergh was filled with even more intensity and passion.” One of the resulting images, seen in “The Veteran: Cate Blanchett,” captures her sentiment perfectly.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: MALTA: ETTA MEYER. BERNAL: ADAM RATHE. LONDON: PAUL FREDERICK. COURTESY OF IWC.

20

E

ver y image that appears in this magazine —be it a photograph, an illustration or a conceptual design—is the result of a carefully orchestrated effort, and oftentimes, months of preparation. Such was the case with our cover story, shot on the secluded island of Gozo in the Mediterranean Sea. A remote location presents a number of unique obstacles in and of itself, but when the subject of said shoot is one of the most revered actresses in the world, the challenge becomes exponent ially more complex... and rewarding. Our journey culminated in the striking images of Angelina Jolie and her muse, Jack O’Connell, starting on page 130. Beyond the majestic Mediterranean, our “The Contenders: Men of the Year” portfolio—featuring luminaries like Ralph Fiennes and Edward Nor ton—took our team from New York to San Antonio, Los Angeles and London. That the aesthetically consistent portraits were captured in four vastly different settings speaks to the skill and precision required for each shot. I n t he eyes of ou r st af f, eve r y piece of the magazine is a labor of love, accompanied by behind-the-scenes intrigue and unanticipated complications. What we find in producing each issue, though, is that the intricate process always has a way of making the end result an even greater triumph.—LINDSAY SILBERMAN


contents

War Stories

pa g e 1 3 0

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BODY

You Are What You WEar   |  43 As fashion grows increasingly eco-conscious, Lynn Yaeger ponders the feasiblility of vegan dressing

FACE Time |  80 The latest facial treatments replace fluff and soft music with ingredients and technologies to deliver real results. Abby Gardner gets the glow

Classic Dwyane   |  46 The NBA and sartorial star launches a new timepiece. Plus: beauty by the numbers

Buying a Six-Pack  |  82 More men are going under the knife for super-cut abs. Alyssa Giacobbe tucks in

Pliés and Thank You | 50 Justin Peck is ballet’s best shot at a bright future. Brian Schaefer finds his balance

Vanity Project  |  86 Products to make your counter shine

style news | 56 High-end hiking boots; wearable tech; gemstoneinspired accessories; a bag brand’s new muse; the season’s best pants; a classic clothier’s comeback

LIFE Taking Shape | 63 Boxy is back: A once-controversial architectural movement makes its mark on design and decor Fur & Bones | 64 Bruce Weber’s canine gang on their recent campaign for Shinola Collected: Mark Mothersbaugh | 66 The Devo co-founder and composer recalls his acquisition of a piece by the L.A. artist Bob Zoell Scene Stealer |  70 Bon vivant Anthony Haden-Guest evokes departed hotspots in their moments of glory. Plus: Gael Greene ponders what makes a restaurant a hit Transformative Travel |  72 Perspective-building excursions that inspire, captivate and thrill. Plus: a new way to jet Tokyo Rift |  74 A darling of the design world has also become a symbol of a cultural crossroads. Jen Renzi pays tribute to the treasured Hotel Okura

ON THE RUN  |  88 A new fad has exercise buffs reconsidering their relationship with the treadmill. Kayleen Schaefer puts the trend on trial

PLAY Party PEople  |  90 Washington’s most impressive new hostess isn’t an heiress, a diplomat or a lobbyist. As Matthew Cooper discovers, she’s a guy The Lavish Elixir  |  94 Can a luxury vodka label convert a dark spirits devotee? Anne Roderique-Jones treks to a remote Swedish distillery in search of the answer. Plus, ultra-high-proof liquors WEll-Rounded | 97 Explore a collection of the sleekest new gadgets LEarning Curve | 100 For the Q50 Eau Rouge performance sedan, Paul Biedrzycki finds, Infiniti takes direction from the world of Formula One (and a champion driver)

WORK An Artful Dodger | 106 Louise T. Blouin built a formidable media company focused on fine art, but her detractors say the publisher isn’t what she seems. Joe Pompeo paints a troubling picture

Sealed and Delivered | 110 When the threat level is at red, some tycoons are calling the Navy. Adrienne Gaffney enlists to find out more. Plus: Tony Robbins’ newest tome Power Seat: Eli Broad  |  112 Inside the office of a modern-day Medici, Lesley McKenzie finds vision and not just a view Celebrity, Inc. | 114 For a certain set of savvy stars, the role of entrepreneur can be the most lucrative one of all The Plame Game  |  116 Valerie Plame left the CIA but didn’t give up on international intrigue. Nancy Bilyeau investigates

CULTURE Going His Way |  118 At 50, Lenny Kravitz, who just released his tenth album and his first book, isn’t even close to slowing down. Adam Rathe tries to keep up FEeling Shelf-Conscious | 120 Without vinyl albums or paper books on display, new rules exist for how to win kudos for having great taste. David Browne charts the territory. Plus: winter’s hottest fiction everything’s Coming Up Rose’s | 122 Rosemarie DeWitt is seemingly everywhere this winter. Adam Rathe assures us that’s a good thing The Second Coming | 123 Lisa Kudrow on reviving her beloved series The Comeback. Plus: Broadway’s newest star and a memoir about Gore Vidal Twist of Fate |  124 Artist George Condo spent his career subverting the status quo. So how, asks Paul Biedrzycki, did he suddenly get so relevant?

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contents Doggone It

PA G E 6 4 FEATURES THE VISIONARY: ANGELINA JOLIE | 130

Shine Bright

PAGE 182

How one long-forgotten tale of heroism changed the lives of the world’s luckiest young actor and the superstar who believed in him. By Adam Rathe; photographed by Francesco Carrozzini

CHICAGO | 193 A talk with restaurant designer Karen Herold

Having kicked off the year with a triumphant awards season, the actor considers her options. By Natasha Wolff; photographed by Peter Lindbergh

DALLAS | 195 What’s new in fashion and beauty, including a line of customizable Lucite clutches

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Inside the minds of the actors who gave 2014’s most astonishing performances. By Adam Rathe; photographed by Alex John Beck

HOUSTON | 197 Go-tos for (almost) every beauty need

THE CLOSER: HILARY SWANK | 152

LAS VEGAS | 199 New hair salons, new hotels and a couple of surprisingly old-fashioned winter pastimes

Back in the spotlight with a pair of brave new roles, the consummate pro talks craft and commitment. By Joanne Kaufman; photographed by Eric Ogden

LOS ANGELES | 202 Dishing with chef Akira Back; a chat with the SoCal twins who are heating up the activewear scene

THE OPERATORS: SCREEN SCENE | 154

After the movies get made come the people responsible for really making the movies. By Sarah Horne Grose WEST MEETS EAST | 158 Turkey is a country of many views, each more beautiful than the last. By Alyssa Giacobbe; photographed by Katherine Wolkoff MIA | 166 From stolen masterpieces fenced out of airport hangars to gallerists going undercover to nab the thieves, the Miami scene is a portrait of audacious art crimes. By Nina Burleigh GIVE ME LIBERTY | 170 British model Liberty Ross channels the ’70s in a series of louche yet sophisticated looks. Photographed by Cedric Buchet

On the cover, on Angelina Jolie: Shirt, $885, STELLA McCARTNEY, neimanmarcus. com. On Jack O’Connell: T-shirt, $185, ATM ANTHONY THOMAS MELILLO, barneys.com. Photographed by Francesco Carrozzini; styled by Anne Christensen.

ASPEN | 192 Three ways to explore roads less traveled this winter; inside the opening of the Aspen Art Museum

THE VETERAN: CATE BLANCHETT | 138

THE CONTENDERS: MEN OF THE YEAR | 140

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CITIES

MIAMI | 206 Designer Deborah Aguiar on her latest project NEW YORK | 209 The return of the Knickerbocker hotel TRI-STATE | 213 Mario Batali takes New Haven; an upstate development with style ORANGE COUNTY | 215 L*Space’s sandals; staying fit in Fashion Island PALM BEACH | 216 Jonathan Adler on the newly renovated Eau Palm Beach Resort; cute suits from Flagpole Swim SAN FRANCISCO | 218 Looking star Jonathan Groff shares his favorite local spots; two new wineries

THE FACE, THE FRAUD & THE FORTUNE | 178 Hoyt Richards was one of the 1990s’ most successful male models, but his secret life as a member of a doomsday cult left him broke and running for his life. By Mike Sager; photographed by Prakash Shroff

PARTIES | 220 DuJour celebrates with digital cover stars Chrissy Teigen and Lenny Kravitz

A BRILLIANT DISGUISE | 182 Go undercover—but not unnoticed—in the season’s most dazzling gems. Photographed by Martin Vallin

FAMOUS LAST WORDS | 224 A look at Paula Deen’s handwriting offers insight into the mind of a culinary mogul

BACK PAGE

LEFT TO RIGHT: MARTIN VALLIN; BRUCE WEBER

A HOLLYWOOD STORY: THE DEFINING MOMENTS of 2014


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Letter from the cEO

Jason BInn

28

A

s we all busy ourselves with finishing out winter and (hopefully) easing into spring, we here at DuJour have many exciting developments to raise a glass to. It’s been a year of exceeding expectations—even our own! In the last couple of months since our fall issue, we have been fortunate enough to celebrate a number of very special DuJour partners. In September we were thrilled to host the premiere of Black and White, starring my dear friend Kevin Costner, which looks as if it just may earn him a third Oscar. None of this would have been possible without EMM Group’s Mark Birnbaum, Eugene Remm and Michael Hirtenstein, who hosted the event at their East Hampton club, Finale, as well as Andrea Coreale’s Elegant Affairs, which catered the after-party with delectable hors d’oeuvres. That month we also feted our everradiant fall cover star Katie Holmes with a scenic soiree on Jason Strauss and Noah Tepperberg’s rooftop PH-D Lounge, atop Vikram Chatwal’s Dream Hotel. Then in October we welcomed our cover star, music legend Lenny Kravitz, in the ballroom of the stunning new flagship Park Hyatt Hotel—another masterpiece by the Pritzker family, American royalty, and run locally by Walter Brindell. And to say farewell to the warm weather, we reveled in an immersive tropical pop-up experience created by the modern Italian architect Piero Lissoni at Boffi Soho for the Ritz Carlton Miami Residences, led by Ophir Sternberg of Lionheart Capital. But as always, there’s as much work to be done as there is play to be had, and here at DuJour we

certainly have some exciting progress to show for that. After innumerable hours of fine-tuning our cutting edge new website, the new and improved DuJour.com is up and running, making it even easier than ever for DuJour readers to get all of their luxury lifestyle news, up to the minute. This plays out at the ideal time, as we’re also delighted to announce that a recent BPA AUDIT has verified that our circulation is 3.25 million—RECORD BREAKING—including the most affluent and engaged readers. The good news doesn’t stop there: For the second year in a row, we’re finalists in Adweek’s Hot List Reader’s Choice Awards, this time under the “Hottest Lifestyle Magazine” category. And of course, we can’t forget our New York Times feature, which signifies the great strides that DuJour has made both commercially and editorially, and celebrates our seamless print and digital integration—on- and off-line, at home and internationally. Last but not least, we cannot express how pleased we are to have an actress, director, activist, philanthropist, mother, wife and cultural icon such as Angelina Jolie, along with Jack O’Connell, on our cover this winter, especially at such a pivotal moment in her career. We are thrilled to capture her as she steps further into the role of directing with Unbroken, the empowering epic of Louis Zamperini—already predicted to be a heavyweight at the Oscars this year. This is Hollywood history in the making. Enjoy the holidays! Next year is sure to be even bigger and better— for all of us.

craig robins, kelly rutherford & nick pritzker

zegna’s jory wood syed & matt lauer

k arolina kurkova & roberto lorenzini

elle publisher kevin o’malley

in the rockwell zone with david rockwell

mayor philip levine and his mother meet pope francis

zegna’s shauna brook & carmelo anthony

denise de luca & Dina De Luca Chartouni

david lauren with white street’s dave zinczenko & dan abrams

behind the velvet rope

BInnshots

henrik lundqvist & maserati’s andrea soriani

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PHOTOGRAPHERS VINOODH MATADIN & INEZ VAN LAMSWEERDE WITH NICOLE VECCHIARELLI

HANDPICKED

30

Adam Neumann Adam Sandow Alan Potamkin Alina Cho Andrew Heiberger Barry Slotnick Ben Carter Brent Lamberti Brooke Travis Bruce Weber Charlie Walk Cynthia Mitros Danny Govberg Dario Parrilla David Blumenfeld David Yanks Doug Scott Edouard D’Arbaumont Eric Podwall Eyal Lalo Frank Furlan Gary Patrick Gena Smith Gideon Kimbrell Graziano De Boni Hugues De Pins Ireana Vereshchagina Izvor Zivkovic

Jonas Tahlin Kaitlyn Kim Kevin Fisher Len Blavatnik Leon Kalvaria Lora Schaffer Ludivine Pont Mallory McGill Mary Hood Matthew Witheiler Michael Capponi Natalie Crain Neil Luthra Paolo Roviera Patrick Hall Pauline Brown Richard Predder Robert Blick Roberto Tincati Ron Kramer Ryan Haskins Shaina Brook Stacie Woods Susan Anthony Thomas Ricotta Tomas Hill Tony Berger Wendy Maitland

LANEY CROWELL & SHAWN SACHS

VINCENT SABIO & HERMÈS’ BOB CHAVEZ AT THE PARK HYATT NYC REAL ESTATE MOGUL HANNA STRUEVER

DESIGNER PHILIPP PLEIN & LUDIVINE PONT AT PLEIN’S NYC STORE OPENING TIFFANY’S ANTHONY LEDRU, CATHERINE LACAZE & MELISSA PORDY WITH MAVERICK CARTER, ELAINE WYNN, MICHAEL MILKEN AND KEVYN WYNN

CHLOE’S ARNAUD CAUCHOIS

DUJOUR’S PARTY FOR COVER STAR KATIE HOLMES AT PH-D AT NEW YORK’S DREAM DOWNTOWN

WITH RESTORATION HARDWARE’S GARY FRIEDMAN MOET’S JON POTTER

PHOTOGRAPHER PATRICK DEMARCHELIER & MIA DEMARCHELIER

STEVE MADDEN

DAVID BECKHAM FOR BELSTAFF

BOBBY ZAREM & CHRISTY TURLINGTON AT THE CUTTING ROOM

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JASON BINN FOR BELSTAFF, DAVID BECKHAM’S BODY DOUBLE

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PAGE SIX’S STEPHANIE SMITH & CHRIS MITCHELL

BINNSHOTS: THE NEXT GENERATION EMANUELLE DELLA VALE & DIEGO DELLA VALLE

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The Visionary

PAGE 130

A MOMENT WITH THE EDITOR

THOUGHTS DUJOUR West Meets East

PA G E 1 5 8

A

t this time of year—every year—we maga-

San Antonio —an expansive portfolio of talent

zine editors like to look back at the stories

that spans decades and represents careers

that made us think, dream, laugh and cry,

both iconic (Robert Duvall! Tommy Lee Jones!)

a sort of 12-month recap of our media-driven

and up-and-coming (the already inimitable

emotional highs and lows. This is also when it

Oscar Isaac). We also highlight two legend-

becomes painfully clear how quickly the months

ary supermodels, fashion’s most famous dogs

fly by; weren’t we just having this conversation?

(photographed by their just-as-famous owner,

(Although I have to admit that this particular

Bruce Weber) and the style icon that is Lenny

year did not move along as quickly for me as it

Kravitz who does not, it seems, ever age.

might have for you: I was pregnant for most of

we didn’t rely exclusively on pretty people

wrapped, my husband and I welcomed a new

to see us through, and a number of pieces

baby, Enzo Samuel, to our family.)

in this issue found our writers digging deep.

I have this to say about 2014: It was a good

32

And yet, though there are so very many,

it, and in October, just as this issue was being

In “The Operators: Screen Scene,” on page

year to be a film lover and got better as the

154, Sarah Horne Grose takes a serious look

year went on. And, perhaps not surprisingly,

at the high-stakes world of planning film

the most satisfying films were the ones that

premieres. The business of buzz is changing,

seemed the most difficult to make; my per-

like everything else, and as you might expect in

sonal favorites included Birdman, The Theory

the age of social media, it’s a young person’s

of Everything, and of course, Unbroken. The

game. Darker notes are found in our look at

highly anticipated—as in, 50

model Hoyt Richards’ escape from a fashion-

years in the making—war drama

able Manhattan-based cult (Fabio plays a key

was directed by our cover star,

role; true story); Nina Burleigh’s investigation

Angelina Jolie, and headlines our

into Miami’s booming stolen-art scene (is your

other cover star, Jack O’Connell.

Matisse hot?); and the rise-and-faltering tale of

How Jack met Angie is one of

a media empress.

entertainment’s most compelling stories, and in the opener to

We also visit Tokyo’s Hotel Okura, a storied hotel facing probable alterations, and Turkey,

“A Hollywood Story,” the two

a complex country set to prove itself as one of

talk with Features Editor Adam

the world’s most luxurious travel destinations.

Rathe about their pitch-perfect

The mottos we hope to leave you with as we

collaboration. Jolie also hints

sign off on what was our best year yet—and,

at her impending retirement

we hope, yours too: Explore, watch, celebrate.

from acting, though the im-

Happy holidays, and see you in 2015.

ages captured by photographer Francesco Carrozzini make it pretty clear that Jolie remains as comfortable, and as stunning, in front of the camera as ever. But I feel particularly close to this issue because it represents Oscar Isaac wears PAL ZILERI and BRUNELLO CUCINELLI.

a remarkable achievement for the magazine and our staff.

The Contenders

PA G E 1 4 0

These pages feature 17 major movie stars—12 of which were shot by Alex John Beck in New York, London, Los Angeles and

Nicole Vecchiarelli NV@DuJour.com Instagram: editor_nv

LEFT, TOP TO BOTTOM: FRANCESCO CARROZZINI. KATHERINE WOLKOFF. ALEX JOHN BECK. RIGHT: THOMAS WHITESIDE.

Angelina Jolie wears SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE.


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Editor in Chief Nicole Vecchiarelli

CEO/Publisher Jason Binn

Art Director Stephanie Jones

Sales

Executive Editor Nancy Bilyeau

Chief Marketing Officer Alan Katz

Associate Publisher John Clarkin

Editor at Large Alyssa Giacobbe

Executive Directors Phil Witt Cat Dewling

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Art + Photo

Marketing Director Julia Light

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Chief Advisor Monty Shadow

Senior Market Editor Sydney Wasserman

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Associate Fashion/Market Editor Paul Frederick Editorial Assistant Frances Dodds

DUJOUR Cities Regional Editors Amiee White Beazley (Aspen), Anna Blessing (Chicago),

Production Vice President, Production Shawn Lowe Senior Pre-Media Manager John Francesconi Systems Administrator Julio Gonzalez Print and Paper Management CALEV Print Media

Holly Crawford (Houston), Sam Glaser (Las Vegas),

Finance

Holly Haber (Dallas), Rebecca Kleinman (Miami), Lesley McKenzie (Los Angeles and Orange County), David Nash (San Francisco)

Senior Financial Analyst Michael Rose

DUJOUR.com Chief Digital Officer Ashley Parrish

Contributors Patricia Bosworth, Dori Cooperman, Anne Christensen, Grant Cornett,

Digital Director Dave Sorenson

Arthur Elgort, Douglas Friedman, Kyoko Hamada, Henry Hargreaves, Alex John Beck, Ros Okusanya (Casting), Jeffrey Podolsky, Mickey Rapkin, Rhonda Riche, Bruce Weber, Thomas Whiteside, Lynn Yaeger Contributing Editors Sandie Burke (Art), Nick Earhart (Copy), Laura Henry (Fashion), Lauren Kill (Photo), Dacus Thompson (Research), Lauren Waterman (Features), Chloe Weiss Galkin (Art)

Digital Editor Eden Univer

Social Media Editor Alisha Prakash

Web Developer G. Leo Fulgencio

Senior Web Developer Devario Johnson

Senior Web Producer Julianne Mosoff Web Assistant Jessica Khorsandi

Interns Sarah Elizabeth Gilbert, Yukiko Fujii, Giau Nguyen,

Chief Financial Officer Stephanie Cabral-Choudri

Stephanie Sporn, Bryan Vargas

Co-Chairman James Cohen

Director of Editorial Operations Haley Binn

General Counsel John A. Golieb

Co-Chairman Kevin Ryan

Chief Advisors Dan Galpern Matt Witheiler

DuJour (ISSN 2328-8868) is published four times a year by DuJour Media Group, LLC., 2 Park Avenue, NYC 10016, 212-683-5687. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. The publishers and editors are not responsible for unsolicited material and it will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication subject to DuJour magazine’s right to edit. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, photographs and drawings. Copyright Š 2014 DuJour Media Group, LLC. For a subscription to DuJour magazine, go to subscribe.dujour.com, call 954-653-3922 or e-mail duj@themagstore.com.


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CONTRIBUTORS

Getting to know some of the talent behind this issue—Natalia de Ory takes lunch orders and all

Francesco Carrozzini Photographer, “The Visionary: Angelina Jolie,” p. 130 Soup DuJour: anything italian

“There are very few people who have that kind of magnetic presence in person,” says Francesco Carrozzini, who traveled to Malta to photograph cover subject Angelina Jolie. Fortunately, the star was game to go along with his plan to shoot her and actor Jack O’Connell “in the most beautiful place on the island,” even if it “also happened to be the most exposed [to the elements].” Carrozzini, whose work has appeared in L’Uomo Vogue and the Sunday Telegraph Magazine, ultimately felt that it was worth braving the weather. “It was a bit of a gamble, but we were lucky.”

Martin Vallin Photographer, “A Brilliant Disguise,” p. 182 Soup DuJour: spinach

Sarah horne grose Writer, “The Operators: Screen Scene,” p. 154 Soup DuJour: butternut squash

Film publicity has become an intensely competitive business, and Sarah Horne Grose knew it wouldn’t be easy to get the top brass in the industry to spill their secrets. But she was confident that the resulting story would be worth the effort. “It’s an interesting microcosm of Manhattan and its power players,” says Horne Grose, who has contributed to the Wall Street Journal and the New York Observer. ”On any given week there are about 10 screening events; the tempo and volume are astounding.”

Paul Frederick Stylist, “Pliés and Thank You,” p. 50, “Everything’s Coming Up Rose’s,” p. 122, and “The Contenders: Men of the Year,” p. 140 Soup DuJour: spicy tomato

It’s not easy to outfit nine different subjects for three shoots spread out over two continents. “You have to have a solid game plan,” says DuJour’s associate fashion/market editor Paul Frederick. But dressing the likes of actors Chris Rock and Rosemarie DeWitt and dancer Justin Peck does have its perks. “Watching Justin move in the clothing was wonderful; he has such a natural presence in front of the camera.”

Katherine wolkoff Photographer, “West Meets East,” p. 158 Soup DuJour: hot and sour

Even though Katherine Wolkoff, who has shot for Condé Nast Traveler and the New York Times Magazine, had been to Turkey before, the stunning landscapes still managed to take her breath away when she visited for DuJour. “The country has an amazing spirit and such a fascinating history,” she says. Her favorite part of the trip? “Spending the night in a cave-like room in Cappadocia. The hotel is built on the side of a mountain, and it feels like you’re on the moon.”

*du jour [doo zhoor] adjective [from French: of the day] Example: What is your soup du jour?

Frederick: courtesy of alex john beck. all other images courtesy.

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Sometimes the most interesting ideas emerge from a simple thought. “I wanted to be up close to a piece of jewelry without cropping the model too much,” says Martin Vallin of the beautiful baubles he photographed for DuJour, using female silhouettes as a kind of backdrop. But then Vallin, who has shot for L’Ófficiel and Elle, is used to seeking inspiration wherever he can—though his job takes him all over the world, he always makes an effort, when in New York City, “to visit the Whitney and MoMA.”


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COLUMN

YOU ARE WHAT YOU WEAR As concerns familiar to foodies come increasingly to the forefront in fashion, too, Lynn Yaeger ponders the feasibility (and attractiveness) of vegan dressing

EVEN STELLA M C CARTNEY ISN ’T PERFECT : SHE STILL WORKS WITH SILK , ALTHOUGH SHE DOES USE

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INDIGITALIMAGES.COM

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agpipe players line the entrance to Mayfair’s Royal Institution of Great Britain, and lookie-loos crane their necks as a steady stream of fashion professionals enters the elegant edifice—it’s London Fashion Week, and Livia Firth, the eco-activist and wife of actor Colin, is hosting her “Green Carpet Challenge.” Inside, there is plenty of alcohol, a fake jungle and a line-up of stunning Stella McCartney dresses, all made of sustainable materials, some decorated with water-based inks. Even the tipsiest of guests can’t fail to notice not only that eco-correct clothing has become a serious industry goal but also that seriously chic people will come out and look at it, and it can be seriously gorgeous. McCartney, who has always made this issue a top priority, may be a standard bearer, but she is hardly alone in thinking about the ethical implications of fashion these days— Tom Ford, Giorgio Armani and Valentino have also taken part in Firth’s “Green Challenge” in the past. In fact, so many illustrious companies are thinking about this that at least one fashion editor’s inbox (mine) is daily stuffed with claims of environmental awareness. Ball gowns proudly made from plastic soda bottles! Dazzling jewelry proclaiming that its dazzle relies strictly on recycled diamonds! Still, I can’t help but wonder—when we talk about environmentally conscious luxury fashion, and we obviously are talking about it more and more, what do we really mean? Are we speaking about recycling and reinvention? And if so, does this mean that to be on the safe side, we have to ferret out the secret history of the fabrics we are wearing (no easy task) or confi ne ourselves to vintage clothing? (The latter might be okay if one loves wearing old clothes exclusively, but, of course, it might result in the ruination of the fashion industry as a whole.) And does ethical fashion also mean paying closer attention to how animals used in clothing production are treated? Some activists feel we shouldn’t

wear leather at all, a position that presents its own unique challenges. (More on this a little later.) But even if you feel confident that Ms. Cow met her end in a relatively humane way, what about the fact that, according to the site ethical.org, “Most leather produced in the U.S. and around the world is chrome-tanned. All wastes containing chromium are considered hazardous by the Environmental Protection Agency… Among the consequences of this noxious waste is the threat to human health from the highly elevated levels of lead, cyanide and formaldehyde in the groundwater near tanneries.” Because I am not sure how to sort out all these harrowing (Cont’d on p. 46)

“PEACE SILK” ( HARVESTED

IN A WAY THAT LEAVES SILKWORMS UNHARMED ) WHENEVER POSSIBLE .


LIFE

You Are What You Wear (Cont’d from p. 43)

facts, especially when I just want to go shopping without feeling like a greedy, soulless pig, I ring up Valerie Steele, the director of the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology. The morning I reach her, she has python on her mind. “I do care about all this a lot!” she exclaims. “I’m anxious about python, how it can be raised on farms—I don’t want us to be killing the last big python, and it can be difficult to find information.” She says she is happy that some Italian leather houses are paying more attention to natural dyes, but she is frankly worried about the worldwide jeans situation: “Denim is terrible for the environment.” Steele is a proponent of the buy-less-wear-more school of conservation: Today she is sporting Akris trousers she has had for years with a silk

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jacket, but “I don’t know how the silkworms were treated,” she admits. If Steele is the poster child for moderation, my bosom buddy Mickey Boardman, the editorial director of Paper magazine, charts a radically different course. Not only will he not eat anything that has a face, he won’t wear it either. “It’s hard, since I am such a fashion victim,” he laments, relating the heartbreaking tale of the time he was told he could pick out anything he wanted from the Christian Louboutin boutique as a gift and had to skulk away empty-handed: Even the espadrilles had leather soles. To see what life is like for this poor guy, I embark on a SoHo shopping trip in search of highend accessories that are, as Mickey would put it, “cruelty-free.” At the Prada on Prince Street, a

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The total number of women who have been the face of Chanel No. 5, including its current cover girl, Gisele Bündchen. The model stars in the latest ad campaign for the scent, which includes a Baz Luhrmann–directed short film called “The One That I Want”

CLASSIC DWYANE

The NBA and sartorial star launches an elegant new timepiece

M

C U LT U R E

clerk tells me the shop can replace the calf zipper pull-tab on a nylon backpack, but alas there is no substitute for the leather triangle behind that metal Prada plaque. A Fendi iPad case at Kirna Zabête appears to be entirely skin-free, but the Givenchy nylon Bambi pouch—so perfect for Mickey!—is, on closer examination, sunk by its back panel. Vuitton comes to the rescue, with a keepall that has had its trademark hide trim replaced with a rubber-like material—not to court the vegan market, but to waterproof the thing for use on a yacht. But it is at eco-conscious Stella McCartney’s store, no surprise, that I fi nd the most seductive suggestions for the fully evolved fashionista: glamorous chain-handled totes, wood platform wedges and even—listen up, Valerie Steele!— satchels made of 100 percent fake python.

GOING ROUGE BY THE NUMBERS

Color us (un)surprised that Gucci is joining the ranks of designer brands with beauty lines— here, a brief history of fashionable cosmetics

3 2 0

TICK-TOCK

iami Heat superstar Dwyane Wade has gone through big changes in 2014: In August, he wed actress Gabrielle Union, and in October, he began his 12th season in Miami, surrounded by new teammates. But his latest collaboration with luxury watchmakers Hublot shows that he is not afraid to shake things up. “Although I’ve always had a love of tailored suits, I was more casual in my downtime,” Wade says of his personal style when he launched the King Power “D-Wade” watch in 2011. “Since then, I’ve matured as a basketball player, businessman, designer and father. I enjoy sporting a suit or tuxedo even when it’s not required, and I wanted a new watch to reflect that growth.” The result is the sophisticated Classic Fusion Dwyane Wade, an elegant sports watch with a sleek case made of polished black ceramic. “It’s bold without being too big,” says Vincent Vuillaume, president of Hublot America. Red, black and gold embellishments reflect the Heat’s team colors, and the logo is subtly integrated at three o’clock. As Vuillaume says, ”It looks good whether you’re sitting courtside or in the front row of a fashion show.”—Rhonda Riche

WORK

Number of bristles on a Marc Jacobs Beauty O!Mega Lash Volumizing Mascara wand

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Shades (including gold, black and red) that Frida Giannini used as the basis for Gucci’s new cosmetic collection

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Main notes in Calvin Klein Eternity. The fragrance, unveiled in 1988, is described as a “romantic floral”

Models at the Dolce & Gabbana spring/summer 2015 show who were given Aurealux Masks (each of which contains 30 ml of radianceboosting Aurealux serum)

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NOTICED

PLIÉS & THANK YOU Dancer and choreographer Justin Peck is ballet’s best shot at a bright future. Brian Schaefer finds his balance PHOTOGRAPHED BY MARCUS MAM

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H

e might be the toast of New York’s ballet scene, but there’s something distinctly Californian about Justin Peck. Sometimes it manifests itself in his work—like Paz de La Jolla, a playful and sweet yet sophisticated ode to his San Diego roots—but mostly it comes across in his surfer-like nonchalance and the way hype seems

“I REALIZED HOW MUCH WORK IT WAS TO ACTUALLY MAKE A DANCE.”

Easdale sweater, $525, BELSTAFF, belstaff.com. Pants, $420, BOTTEGA VENETA, bottegaveneta. com. His own ballet shoes, worn throughout.

to roll off him like water from a wet suit. “I don’t really think about it that much,” Peck says of his growing popularity. “I only notice it when people ask me about it. I’m like, Oh, yeah, there’s that.” Buzz has been swirling around Peck since the 2012 premiere of Year of the Rabbit, his fi rst choreographic commission for New York City Ballet, where he is also a dancer. The New York Times called it “a triumph,” and Peck’s subsequent work for the company has been so well

GEORGE BALANCHINE CHOREOGRAPHED OVER 400 BALLETS . HIS FIRST IN AMERICA , SERENADE , WAS SET TO MUSIC BY TCHAIKOVSKY AND PERFORMED OUTDOORS IN WHITE PLAINS , NEW YORK .


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Collett shirt, price upon request; Humpale pant, price upon request, DRIES VAN NOTEN, Bergdorf Goodman, 800-558-1855.

received that in July he was named resident choreographer—the company’s second ever. “It kind of caught me off guard,” the 27-year-old Peck says of the appointment. “It was really something I was hoping for down the line.” Peck’s always been somewhat advanced, however. He moved to New York to train with City Ballet at age 15, focused on being a dancer, but choreography became “like this itch that I couldn’t get rid of,” he says.

His f irst attempts caught the eye of the company’s director, Peter Mar ti ns, and not long after, Peck was invited to create work with the main company. He hasn’t stopped since. His rise to resident choreographer has been meteoric and speaks not only to the company’s confidence in his talent but also to audiences’ appetite for more accessible dances. For Peck, the security of the position gives him the ability to think long-term and, he says, “lets me take greater risks.” Risk is a tricky thing in ballet, an art form

highly codified in its technique and anchored in tradition. But unlike the ballet renegades of a generation ago, like William Forsythe, who distilled ballet to its basic elements and largely discarded romance and whimsy, Peck is unafraid of mixing emotion into his work. He nods to the past while keeping his eyes on the future. “It’s about paying respect to classical technique and the academic setup for ballet,” he says, “but at the same time figuring out how to push the envelope.” R isk for Pe ck mea n s a n u nexpe ct e d choice of musical collaborator (he has twice worked with indie darling Sufjan Stevens) or a reimagining of an American classic.

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In February, he premieres his latest work for Cit y Ballet, set to Aaron Copland’s Rodeo score for Agnes de Mille’s 1942 ballet of the same name, which she choreographed like a stylized hoedown. But not Peck. “I really want to dive deep into the music itself and strip the ballet of its themed elements,” he says. “I don’t want to do the whole cowboy thing. I don’t want to do such a literal approach to it.” This instinct and modern sensibility are further indications that Peck

“I really want to dive deep into the music itself...” carries City Ballet DNA. After all, the company’s founding father, George Balanchine, whose portrait hangs in Peck’s apartment, is worshipped for his neoclassical innovations, stark ballets and frequent collaborations with contemporary comp o s e r s. For Pe ck , PHOTOS + @MORE duJour.com too, music is muse, all centuries are fair game for inspiration and collaboration is the key to ballet’s future. “I think there are a lot of great artists working out there right now, and I’d like to be a part of bringing us all together,” he says. “Dance has this history of being a meeting point of different artistic mediums. I want to keep that going.”


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IN SEASON

LEATHER & LACES

Just in time for winter, the humble hiking boot gets a high-end makeover PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHRISTINE BLACKBURNE

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EDITED BY PAUL FREDERICK

Clockwise from top left: Cobb hikers, $378, FRYE, thefryecompany.com. Hiking sneakers, $460, CAR SHOE, carshoe.com. Nuova Everest Mountain boots, $735, SANTONI, santonishoes.com. Kermann hiking boots, $1,250, BALLY, bally.com. Boots, $1,600, HERMÈS, hermes.com. Brunico boots, $2,700, BERLUTI, berluti.com. Boots, price upon request, PRADA, prada.com.

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THIS MONTH ’S WILD OPENS WITH A DRAMATIC SCENE : REESE WITHERSPOON ACCIDENTALLY DROPS A HIKING BOOT OFF A MOUNTAIN ( AND , FRUSTRATED , CHUCKS THE OTHER ONE AFTER IT ).


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TRENDING

WEARABLE TECH

The newest versions are far sleeker than the first generation (think: high-end accessories, not house-arrest bracelets). Read on for a roundup

GILT X MICHAEL BASTIAN WATCH

Smartwatch, $249, gilt.com/mbxhp.

Smartwatch technology meets high design in Michael Bastian’s classic gentleman’s watch. The timepiece, which looks more like a typical chronograph than a futuristic gadget, has the ability to receive texts, turn on music, check your stocks and more.

Romancing the Stones

One might have imagined that Jimmy Choo’s wares couldn’t get any more decadent, but with the release of a new capsule collection, creative director Sandra Choi takes the 18-year-old brand to another level. The line, dubbed Vices, includes heels and clutches and was inspired by precious stones like rubies, sapphires, diamonds and emeralds. (That’s the Jet stiletto above.) “I’ve been collecting un-set gems for years,” Choi explains. “They have a certain energy that hints at the power to seduce and transform.” Rock on.

Solar jacket, $599, tommy.com.

Tommy Hilfiger’s limited-edition tartan tech jackets will keep you toasty warm and fully charged. Detachable solar panels on the back of the outerwear, plus a corresponding battery pack, allow you to juice up your phone and tablet on the go.

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TECH: DAVOR BAKARA ILLUSTRATION. JIMMY CHOO: COURTESY. VIVIER: SOFIA SANCHEZ AND MAURO MONGIELLO

TOMMY HILFIGER JACKETS

OPENING CEREMONY X INTEL JEWELRY

MICA bracelet, $495, openingceremony.com.

The bracelets unveiled at Opening Ceremony’s spring/summer 2015 fashion show appeared to be just another elegant accessory, made of semi-precious stones and snakeskin, but undeneath that chic exterior they transmit both calendar alerts and SMS texts.

RALPH LAUREN ACTIVEWEAR Track everything from your heartbeat and respiration to your stress levels and energy output simply by wearing Ralph Lauren’s new Polo Tech shirt. Information collected during golf or tennis games is Polo Tech shirt, price upon transferred to the cloud and readrequest, ralphlauren.com able on your device of choice.

AS FAR BACK AS THE 1980 S ,

TWO OF A KIND

It’s easy to see why Roger Vivier asked Amber Medda, a co-founder of both Design Miami (an annual fair devoted to design) and L’ArcoBaleno (an online marketplace for same), to be the face of its new collection: The European curator made a name for herself with her chic, creative sense of style—she’s the kind of woman whose official bio closes with mention of her “extensive” hat collection—and she provides a fine model for how best to wear the brand’s Miss Viv’ handbags. “I tend to use the sequined bag with jeans and sneakers,” she says, referring to a rainbow-hued version she helped design, “while I dress more elaborately with the leather bags. I love the tension that you can create by wearing something simple with something remarkable.”

“WEARABLE TECH” WAS SEEN AS FUTURISTIC , IF NOT EXACTLY

COOL ; FOR PROOF, CONSIDER THE CASIO CALCUATOR WATCH , BELOVED BY NERDS EVERYWHERE .


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RUNWAY

BOTTOMS UP

This season, designers are pledging their allegiance to pants. And because the resort collections serve as a bridge from winter to spring, anything goes when it comes to length. The only silhouette that’s not so on-trend? Slim-cut, skinny styles. When you’re shopping for the new britches, you’ll want to think big.

UPDATE

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THE CULOTTE

Maiyet / Alice + Olivia / Fendi / Issa / Rosie Assoulin / Tibi / Stella McCartney / Thakoon Addition

BIG FLARE, DON’T CARE

Louis Vuitton / Jason Wu / 3.1 Phillip Lim / Altuzarra / Derek Lam / Giambattista Valli

LARGE AND IN CHARGE

Max Mara / Maison Martin Margiela / Erdem / Sportmax / Mugler / Gucci / Halston Heritage

S

TAILOR-MADE

ince its founding in 1899, Hickey Freeman has been making the sort of suits worn everywhere from Fortune 500 boardrooms to the Oval Office. After more than 100 years of turning out high-end suiting, the brand was beginning to show its age—that is, until Arnold Brant Silverstone came along. The veteran menswear executive was appoi nted president and chief creative officer in 2010 and now, after some retooling, is rolling out what he calls, “classic American clothing that keeps up with the best of Europe.” Beginning this winter, Hickey will unleash a refreshed identity, complete with updated fits, overhauled stores, expanded fabric offerings—including collaborations with Loro Piana and Ermenegildo Zegna—and an entirely new advertising campaign. The brand also plans to get a bit more exclusive. Distribution will be tightened to focus on Hickey’s own boutique and upscale retailers, and prices for a classic suit will start at around $1,500 and go up—in some cases way up—from there. “We thought there was an opportunity to be an alternative to all these Italian brands,” Silverstone says. “We’re designing for the American customer. We live here; we design here—these are our contemporaries, and we’re creating a collection that’s different than the Europeans and, if anything, better.” Silverstone predicts the overhaul will impress longtime customers and draw in new ones as well: “Customers are going to see the product,” he says, “and ask, ‘Wow, is that Hickey Freeman?’ ”

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ON DISPLAY

TAKING SHAPE A once-controversial architectural movement, Brutalism has gained a fresh following and is making its mark on design and decor. From lighting and furniture to building construction, boxy is back

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ASPEN ART MUSEUM: DAVID X PRUTTING/BFANYC.COM; PRODUCTS FROM TOP: JOSEPH DE LEO; COURTESY OF FENDI CASA; COURTESY OF ARMANI/CASA; COURTESY OF MATTER; LUISA ZANZANI; LEFT PIC: COURTESY OF LOEWE

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Top: The new Aspen Art Museum, designed by Shigeru Ban. Above: The setting for Loewe’s spring-summer 2015 fashion show, on the patio of the Garden of Peace by Isamu Noguchi (1957–58), with, in the background, buildings designed by Pier Luigi Nervi, Marcel Breuer and Bernard Zehrfuss (1955–58), UNESCO House, Paris.

1. Gridlock 1912 pendant, PHILIPPE MALOUIN FOR ROLL & HILL, rollandhill.com. 2. Ephedra Table Lamp, FENDI CASA, Luxury Living, NYC, 800-634-4043. 3. Brass Fante vases, $1,050 for pair, ARMANI/CASA, 212-3341271. 4. Bookish chair by Ian Stell, MATTER, mattermatters.com. 5. De Natura Fossilium 1991 Stool, 2014, FORMAFANTASMA, libbysellers.com.

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LAP OF LUXURY

FUR & BONES 64

Bruce Weber’s canine gang on their recent campaign for Shinola PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRUCE WEBER

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e’d just come in from our morning swim when we overheard Bruce talking to Billie Holiday—our sister, not the singer— about a new project with Shinola, a Detroit company that makes watches and leather goods for humans. “You’re going to Detroit?” whined River, the needy one. Most of us understand that Bruce has to go out and bring home the bacon. Still, although we do love bacon—like, really love it—we far prefer it when he is home. Turns out, it wasn’t just any old project, but a campaign for, get this, accessories for pets! Like us—we’re pets. Bruce frequently turns to us for career advice, and so we told him this Shinola gig was a great opportunity—and bigger than

“UNLIKE SOME MODELS, WE’LL GET OUT OF BED FOR NOTHING MORE THAN AN EAR RUB.” he realized. He could be more than just the photographer, and we could be more than just the pretty faces. “We know what dogs want to wear and swim in better than some bipeds in Detroit. There’s not even an ocean there,” we told Bruce. “Yes,” he answered. “It is time for dinner, you’re right.”

Say cheese: Shinola’s new line of leather pet accessories was made in collaboration with Weber and, of course, his dogs: golden retrievers Hud, Kodiak, River, Dream and Tao, and Billie Holiday, a lab and pit bull mix.

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Model behavior: The Weber gang knows that looking cute doesn’t guarantee you a walk—but it doesn’t hurt, either.

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But he got the message —he always does—and it wasn’t long before we were working hard as official designers, in between our mandatory six-hour naps. Tao was the chief bed tester/hog. Hud, the group’s best-dressed, was on collars, made of leather so soft you ba rely k now you’ve wor n you rs i n the ocea n (oops). We put Dream in charge of the leashes and bridles, because he is the most hot-tempered. Kodiak oversaw the whole operation, when we saw him at all. He fancies himself a lone polar bear. After the products were perfected came the easy part: the photos. Unlike some models we know, we’ll get out of bed for nothing more than an ear rub. Bruce wanted the line to feel inclusive, and so he cast a few extras like Finn, an old hound, and a little white fuss bucket whose name we never did catch. We always get nervous about the extras because you never know if one will just up and stay. The good news, though, is that whitey left with Bruce’s acupuncturist, and Bruce stayed home with us.


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Bob Zoell, Untitled (4 works from Cat food), 1989

I MARK MOTHERSBAUGH

studied printmaking at Kent State University, but then Devo took me on a side trip. In the early 1980s, I spent time in downtown L.A. on Traction Avenue, which was a big artist hangout. I worked with Richard Duardo from Future Perfect Gallery, who was the screen printer for artL.A. artist Bob Zoell was a source of inspiration ists like Ed Ruscha, while I was designing album covers. I for the Devo co-founder, prolific composer and met this artist, Bob Zoell. We had friends in common, and artist, who launches his eyewear collaboration, we both worked on covers. Zoell reappropriated the style Mothersbaugh X Baum, this winter of the street sign and turned that into his artwork. He did poetry on top of it, with phrases like “Nobody understands me,” “Call the police,” “I wish I was happy,” “The end is near” and stuff like that. He used the same aluminum material and same kind of reflective and all-weather inks that the city of Los Angeles used for their signs, and his looked identical, except for the content. I just loved that so much. People would say they looked exactly like street signs, but you could see that there was a story being told, and everybody got a good laugh every time they got to the last sign in the series. I actually traded him for this work. He was looking at the glow-in-the-dark artwork that I was doing at the time, and I traded him a set of works on paper from my “Postcard Superheroes Series” for four of his signs. Although I no longer have cats, I still love them. What smells worse than cat food? The signs have been in two different recording studios over the years, but they’ve spent most of their lives at my Sunset Strip recording studio, in a circular hallway across from Devo’s gold and platinum records, being both happy and inspirational to others. You don’t have to do anything except maybe wipe them off every six months.— AS TOLD TO NATASHA WOLFF COLLECTED

A RETROSPECTIVE OF MOTHERSBAUGH ’S ART FROM THE 1970 S TO THE PRESENT,

“MARK MOTHERSBAUGH : MYOPIA ,” IS

ON VIEW THROUGH APRIL 12 AT THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART DENVER .

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Brian McNally’s 1980s hotspot attracted the A-list with roast chicken and porcini polenta.

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Elizabeth Taylor and Nick Hilton f lew in the salad dressing from this Chicago steakhouse for their 1950 wedding.

A SKETCHY GUY

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SCENE STEALER

Bon vivant and reporter Anthony Haden-Guest is a nightlife veteran. Here, he evokes departed hotspots in their moments of glory ILLUSTRATED BY ANTHONY HADEN-GUEST

The original Brown Derby on Los Angeles’ Wilshire Boulevard was shaped like a hat, and while later incarnations of the see-and-be-scene eatery were not, stars and moguls alike clamored to get inside.

Boston’s most happening club in the 1930s and ’40s shut down in 1942 when a massive fire killed 492 revelers.

C H EC K OUT MORE SC ENES FROM A DAY IN ANTHONY HADEN - GU EST’S LIFE AT DUJOU R .COM

Zebra-striped banquettes were the calling card at this East Midtown Manhattan haunt, which attracted the rich, famous and powerful for two decades, beginning in the 1930s.

Best remembered for Truman Capote’s bridgeburning story that bore its name, this French restaurant was one of New York’s most fashionable eateries.

EL MOROCCO HAS HAD MANY INCARNATIONS IN ITS SEVEN-DECADE HISTORY — IT WAS A SPEAKEASY DURING PROHIBITION AND, BRIEFLY, A TOPLESS BAR IN THE 1990 S.


DIGESTED

THE LURE of the LEGENDS

What makes a restaurant a hit? Critic Gael Greene digs in

W In the 1980s, there was nowhere in Hollywood hotter than Morton’s, the 19-table power spot founded by Hard Rock Café honcho—and later, of course, film producer—Peter Morton.

When the Meatpacking District was actually still a meatpacking district, Florent was a 24-hour diner that catered to everyone from movie stars to spaced-out club kids.

I remember coming to the Four Seasons for a sort-of-celebration dinner after my husband and I had decided to divorce. The house put a personal floral arrangement on the ledge next to our table for two. That is what can tie you to a legendary restaurant. It becomes part of your history. It gives you the intimacy and ownership of a small town in a vast anonymous city. As New Yorkers (my ex-husband born, me a fierce transplant), we’d grown up in legendary restaurants. He introduced me to the Brooklyn places his parents shared with him: Lundy’s, where he taught me how to stand too close and make diners itchy and uncomfortable so they’d eat faster and vacate their table. And Peter Luger’s, where you were supposed to pretend the rude waiter wasn’t offending you. A legendary restaurant may hang on, with a glimmer of its onetime powerful aura, or it can seem evergreen. Such a restaurant is likely to have an owner or generations of a family that never forget your face. The ringmaster at the door makes you feel essential, even more important when you are ushered to a royal banquette and watch as the comelatelies are banished to shadowy back rooms. The generation that “owned” the bar and the tables in the Bar Room at “21” Club don’t get out much anymore. But a passion for the legendary by a parade of owners has kept “21” alive. You might still need to be recognized to win a table in the fi rst room, where, during and after Prohibition, presidents and kings of industry were protected from the hoi polloi. Cosmopolitan’s editor Helen Gurley Brown once confessed to me that when she fi rst came to run the magazine, she scheduled all her advertiser lunches at “21” so that proprietor Jerry Burns would come to know her and give her a kiss when she arrived. On the fi rst Sunday in October, I arrived for the debut brunch in the legendary Rainbow Room, restored after it had been closed five years. Dozens of cooks stood at attention in the spokes of an ambitious buffet. It was a dazzling blue-sky day. And as I surveyed the daunting temptations, the sun on crystal beads hanging at the window made a rainbow on the gray carpet.

“THE ‘21’ MYSTIQUE IS A TANGLED SKEIN OF IMPROBABLE THREADS: TIMING, SOCIOLOGY, THE PERVERSITY OF MAN,” GAEL GREENE WROTE IN HER 1971 REVIEW OF “21.”

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Glenn Bernbaum’s Upper East Side café opened in 1976 and became ground zero for New York society, attracting a daily phalanx of ladies who lunch and throwing over-the-top parties for the boldest of the boldface names.

ith the intense seasonal jockeying to launch new restaurants each fall, I can’t help but think about the rigors of survival. I fi nd myself longing for the reassurance of the legendary restaurants. Spago and Michael’s are almost senior citizens in Los Angeles. Chicago’s Cape Cod Room is 81 years old. Joe’s Stone Crab has survived the South Beach boom, Miami bust and yet another boom. In New York, fabled restaurants that seemed unquenchable, like Lüchow’s on 14th Street and Gage & Tollner in Brooklyn, vanished. The real Lindy’s, a Broadway institution of guys and dolls that opened in 1921, is gone, along with its strawberry cheesecake. The Brown Derby, with movie stars at every table, where I discovered Cobb salad as an 8-year-old in Los Angeles, lost cachet for me when it became a chain. So did The Palm when it went national, though the 1926 original Palm still thrives on Second Avenue with the cartoons of ink-stained stalwarts on the wall. But the venerable Tadich Grill survives in San Francisco. I remember James Beard urging me not to miss it 40 years ago. Even as a green and underpaid transplant to New York, I was aware of its instant landmark ambition when the Four Seasons, designed by Mies van der Rohe and Philip Johnson, opened in the Seagram Building in 1959. Critic Craig Claiborne found the avatar of Contemporary American cuisine not as refi ned as that in his favorite bastions of French cooking, but he raved over the fresh herbs grown in pots in the kitchen and exotic mushrooms rarely encountered in an American restaurant. Today the glasses are no longer lead crystal. Nor will you see waiters marching like Rockettes at the dramatic California Barrel Tastings in a room stuffed with grape nuts, culinary stars and press. But the menu type and live plants do change with the season, as the demanding restaurateur Joe Baum once ordained. Moreover, there are still tiny croissants in the bread dish, the metal curtains ripple in the Pool Room and the intense competition in the Grill by fi nancial and publishing moguls—not just for tables but for particular tables —continues.


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Ò AFRICA Rugged Experience conservation first-hand in Kenya's Nairobi National Park by participating in a unique elephant adoption program. Sponsors get to meet and even bottle-feed their fostered calf, while learning about the rehabilitation process of rescued orphans.

Rich Located in the Kalahari desert, South Africa's Tswalu game reserve ranks among the continent's most luxurious safari experiences (and with just nine suites, it’s also one of the most exclusive). Lodges come with a sundeck overlooking a watering hole, plus a private guide, tracker and Range Rover.

JET SET

FLIGHT PLAN

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n the world of private aviation, WheelsUp is the new kid on the tarmac—but the com-

pany is already shaking up the industry. That’s largely thanks to co-founder

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Transformative Travel n tr ansform-a-tiv / tr a-vel ( )

Perspective-building excursions that inspire, captivate and thrill

Kenny Dichter, who launched WheelsUp in August 2013 with the intent of providing a “jets-ondemand” service similar to that of its competitors, exclusive club. Members pay a one-time fee of $15,750 and then a flat rate of $3,950 per hour of flying time—significantly cheaper than fractional ownership alternatives. And now, WheelsUp is sweetening the deal for its 1,000-plus members with 8760 Concierge,

THE ARCTIC Rugged For a truly immersive experience in the Arctic Circle, head to Svalbard —a remote Norwegian archipelago—for a dogsledding safari. Thrill-seekers revel in the exquisite polar landscape of glaciers, mountain passes and virgin snow.

a partnership with the

Rich Descend upon a remote Canadian base camp via helicopter, where a luxury igloo awaits. The spacious tents have large picture windows, high ceilings, duvets and fireplaces, with stunning mountain backdrops.

luxury-lifestyle management firm Four Hundred. The initiative gives members complimentary access to a full-service concierge, which means that WheelsUp won’t just handle your jet to Arizona for this year’s Super Bowl—they’ll also make sure you have

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field-level tickets, five-star hotel accommodations

ASIA Rugged Board a floating library boat and visit impoverished villages along the Mekong River in Laos to distribute books and solar lights. It's an exercise that facilitates safety, education and empowerment among local residents.

Rich Check in to Satri House, an elegant boutique hotel in Luang Prabang with aristocratic roots. The property was once the residence of the Prince of Laos. Today, it's an urban oasis with exotic gardens and first-class hospitality.

and reservations at every top restaurant. And as for the genesis of the name "8760"? Says Dichter, “Our average member might only fly 20 to 25 hours annually, but we’re committed to giving them the experience all 8,760 hours of the year.”—L.S.

AFRICA: COURTESY OF TSWALU KALAHARI. ASIA: MARC CHAFIIAN; COURTESY OF SATRI HOUSE. THE ARCTIC: UNNI ROYLAND. WHEELSUP: COURTESY.

W

hen Mark Lakin and Marc Chafiian left their cushy corporate jobs to start Epic Road, a boutique travel company, their goal was to create life-changing journeys for a high-end clientele. Since the company launched in 2011, they've taken clients around the world—combining luxury and adventure with authentic local and cultural experiences. "It's about giving people a taste of the unfamiliar," says Lakin. "We plan five-star vacations with a soul." Here, the founders of Epic Road showcase a few of their favorite escapes. EPICROAD.COM — LINDSAY SILBERMAN

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landmark

TOKYO RIFT

A darling of the design world has also become a symbol of a cultural crossroads. Jen Renzi pays tribute to the treasured Hotel Okura

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PHOTOGRAPHED by KYOKO HAMADA

Elevator doors on the lobby level are dressed in op-art silk featuring a lightening-bolt motif.

T

o enter the Hotel Okura Tokyo is to be teleported straight to 1960s Japan—a country newly embracing of International Style modernism, and a property imbuing the movement’s pared-down aesthetic with a unique East-meets-West spin. The atmospheric lobby, a bento box of rich wood paneling, exudes a decidedly jet-set aura thanks to mood lighting from paper lantern–like chandeliers. Lowered a few steps from the main level is a conversation pit furnished with aerodynamic lounge chairs that cluster around red lacquer tables. First-

the hotel became a legacy- defining masterpiece for baron kishichiro okura , its namesake — he died just eight months after the okura opened .

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clubhouse. Take a discreet glance around and you’ll notice starchitects schmoozing with clients, renowned decorators sizing up the lighting scheme and off-duty product designers talking shop over martinis. Prominent dignitaries and heads of state have booked its Imperial Suite, but it’s the designerati who lend the proper ty enduring cultural cred. They’re also the ones most vocally opposed to its future demise: The original wing is slated for demolition

in September 2015 to make way for a new mid-rise tower, though the adjacent museum and 1973 South wing addition will remain undisturbed. Kishichiro Okura would doubtless be thrilled that his namesake property, built in 1962, has proved so beloved. The Western-educated hotelier and arts patron had a yen for contemporary architecture; it was he who commissioned Frank Lloyd Wr ight in the 1920s to erect the famed Mayan-inspired pavilions for

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time guests could easily imagine they’ve stumbled onto the set of a period film, and indeed the lobby has made memorable cameos in the James Bond f lick You Only Live Twice and the Cary Grant comedy Walk Don’t Run. Its star turn as mis-en-scène notwithstanding, the Okura has played another recu r r i ng i ngenue role: muse to an international roster of design-world luminaries, who treat its public spaces as a sort of private

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the hotel okura tokyo was designed in anticipa tion of the

1964 tokyo olympics .

Lobby furniture is grouped to mimic flower blossoms, with lounge chairs arrayed petal-like around circular tables.

the hotel okura tokyo was designed in anticipation of the 1964 tokyo olympics . japan ’s first high - speed bullet trains were also unveiled just prior to the games .

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THEFRYECOMPANY.COM


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the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo. In conceptualizing the Okura some 40 years later, the hospitality mogul wanted to create luxurious accommodations that would appeal to the worldly sensibilities of an international audience—yet still capture and celebrate the uniqueness of the locale. Architect Yoshiro Taniguchi, a seminal figure in the country’s postwar modern movement, was enlisted to create a forward-thinking yet carefully crafted design. (The name may ring a bell: His son Yoshio was the vision behind MoMA’s 2004 makeover.) Tanig uchi’s 11-stor y st r uct u re pairs the long, lean lines and horizontal gestures characteristic of Western modernism with touchstones of vernacular Japanese architecture. Pagoda-ish f lourishes perk up the roof line, while the facade is embellished with a plasteron-tile treatment called n a m a k o k a b e (w h i c h t ranslates to “sea cucumber”) that derived f r o m a hu m ble r u r a l housing style. Some elements are even more st r idently old-school: There’s a tea-ceremony room styled like a private residence, complete with shoji screens and tatami mats; a verdant rooftop garden with sinuous raked-sand pathways; a Go salon for devotees of the ancient board game; and even an adjacent museum, founded by Okura’s collector father, showcasing Buddhist artifacts and modern Japanese painting. Taniguchi and collaborator Saburo Mizoguchi, who is credited with overseeing the design committee, enlisted prominent Japanese artisans to create myriad features: an outdoor lap pool with a meandering free-form edge, evocative murals, intricate wall coverings, decorative panels graced with a wavelike collage of layered paper. Although the guest rooms have been revamped over the decades—including a 1980s makeover by legendary British decorator David Hicks—the public spaces have been left relatively untouched: latticework wooden

IT HARKENS BACK TO A TIME WHEN GLOBALIZATION DIDN’T COME AT THE EXPENSE OF REGIONAL FLAVOR.

Above: The rooftop garden, visible from the tea-ceremony room, boasts a walkway intended to look like the winding, serpentine path of a river. Top right: Bonsai arrangements atop checkerboard tiles in the passageway connect the main and south-wing buildings.

DECORATOR DAVID HICKS , WHO REVAMPED OKURA’S GUEST ROOMS IN THE ‘80 S , DESIGNED HIS OWN COFFIN AND SPECIFIED THE EXACT STYLE OF HEARSE TO BE USED AT HIS FUNERAL .

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Top: Hexagon patterns repeat in the lobby. Below, left to right: “Ikebana,” the Japanese art of flower arrangement; a screen wall patterned with interlocking diamonds; the tea-ceremony room; corridor walls embellished with a patchwork of brocades and damasks.

screens, stylized fern-print wallpaper that embellishes the Orchid Room and a patchwork damask wall treatment called nishikibari that swaths corridors. Even the elevator doors were considered a prime canvas for lavish artistry, dressed in

era in more ways than one. On a purely aesthetic level, it highlights the shared st ylistic sensibilities between Western modernism and traditional Japanese architecture, with their simpatico emphasis on organic mater ials, screen walls,

onymous with homogenization: A luxury hotel chain’s Tokyo prope r t y t e nd s t o lo ok p r et t y much identical to its Shanghai or Azerb a ija n b r a n ch . I n c ont r a s t , t he Okura, through its cross-cultural design, effortlessly straddles East

gold-and-black silk brocade. Recurring motifs abound, from hexagons and lozenges to ginko leaves and abstract wisterias. (Hotel president Iwajiro Noda even published a book documenting the many patterns and their meaning.) The Okura’s design speaks of its

t wo-dimensional patter ning and hor i zont al volu mes. But it also harkens back to a time when globalization didn’t come at the expense of regional f lavor, when the universal and the local could coexist in a happy tension. Today, globalization is practically sy n-

and West, old and new, in a manner that proposes traveling as an inspired condition of in-betweenness—one to be celebrated at every turn. For guests, it’s a perfect fusion of where you are, where you we r e a n d w h e r e yo u’r e g o i n g . Check in while you can.

THE VAPORS’ HIT SINGLE

“TURNING JAPANESE ,” RELEASED IN 1980 , SPENT

A WHOPPING 17 WEEKS ON THE BILLBOARD HOT 100 CHART.


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AESTHETICS

The latest facial treatments replace fluff and soft music with ingredients and technologies—stem cells, micro-needles—to deliver real results. Abby Gardner gets the glow

Beverly Hills: Age Control Apple Stem Cell Facial, Sonya Dakar Skin Clinic, $450

New York: Sapphire 3 Photo Abrasion Therapy Treatment, Paul Labrecque Salon & Spa at The Core Club, from $400

For this 90-minute treatment, Dakar, a go-to for celebrities like Gwyneth Paltrow, chose the stem cells of a very specific variety of Swiss apple for their rejuvenation and self-preservation properties. These cells are included in the peel, exfoliant and treatment-cream portions of the facial, made even more effective by an LED red light, which helps the cells penetrate more deeply into the skin. so n ya da k a r s k i n c li n i c .c o m

The newest treatment from Joanna Czech, fashion’s favorite facialist, calls on a not-so-common combination of both wet and dry exfoliation (not a dead skin cell will remain!), as well as microdermabrasion using sapphire granules, to help increase the production of collagen. LED therapy to finish sends light waves deep into the skin, signaling to create new cells. Together, you’ve got radiant skin from the moment you walk out the door. pau l l a b r ec q u e .c o m

Boston: SkinPen, Ardan MedSpa + Salon, $300

New York: Vitaglow, Shirley Madhère, MD, $825

Micro-needling is one of the hottest buzzwords in the land of anti-aging; injured skin, it turns out, naturally repairs itself by producing brand new cells. In this 30-minute treatment, tiny needles pulsed into the middle layer of skin create very precise “micro” injuries to stimulate new cell growth and create more collagen, helping to reverse sun damage and reduce acne scars and stretch marks. Expect some slight redness for a couple of days.

The New York–based plastic surgeon takes a holistic approach to every skin-care patient, working on “lifestyle adjustments”—diet, exercise and sleep—before and after treatments. The 20-minute Vitaglow consists of microinjections of a cocktail consisting of multi-vitamins, antioxidants and hyaluronic acid followed by a cooling face mask for zero recovery time. The results: great skin nutrition, serious radiance and increased firmness after multiple sessions.

a r da n s pa .c o m

t h e n e wa e st h e t e .c o m

brazil recently surpassed the u . s . as the cosmetic surgery capital of the world , with 1.5 million procedures performed in 2013 alone .

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UPGRADE

Club Medicine

For patients willing to pony up, there’s a whole world of posh hospital possibilities. Adrienne Gaffney takes its pulse ILLUSTRATED BY TIMOTHY GOODMAN

PROCEDURE

BUYING A SIX-PACK

More men are going under the knife for super-cut abs. Alyssa Giacobbe tucks in

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religiously avoiding since 2010. Though even the paunchiest of dudes may qualify for an ab tuck, most doctors say optimal results come from f lattening your belly on your own with clean eating and dedicated cardio, followed by a little surgical finish work where necessary. “No one wants to look like a fat guy in a Spider-Man suit,” says Moelleken. “And besides: What good is being Mario Lopez from the nipples to the pelvis if you’re ‘Doritos and remote control man’ everywhere else?”

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APRÈS SKI

Four secrets to mastering the post-slope glow: 1. A clean scent 2. A subtle flush 3. Nourished nails 4. A tame mane

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IT DEBUTED IN 1961, INCLUDING FULLY FLEXIBLE ARMS , A DIMPLED SMILE AND A MORE MUSCULAR PHYSIQUE .

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ou cut out the sugar, haven’t touched a grain since Memorial Day and never miss a WOD. And yet your ab muscles are playing hard to get—much harder than the next guy’s. Plastic surgeons across the U.S. are reporting a rise in those seeking solutions to their Crossfit-induced ab envy and responding with sculpting procedures that call on a combination of techniques to create a six-pack—or better. As Chicago plastic surgeon and American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery doc Karol Gutowski says, “Traditional lipo does a very nice job, but what if you want to do a really great job?” In Beverly Hills, plastic surgeon Brent Moelleken uses a combination of sucking and tucking in an ab sculpting procedure he calls the “Boardshort Tuck,” especially ideal for men with skin that’s loosened with age or significant weight loss and meant to create that downward V that has made the career of many an underwear model. Of course, not every guy is born to be Nick Jonas: “Some men just aren’t genetically predisposed to those striations that give the appearance of washboard abs,” says Moelleken. “And if you remove the fat but don’t address the extra skin, the results won’t be as dramatic as they should be.” Others use lipo to reduce overall abdominal fat followed by more precise ultrasound etching to sculpt and tighten around existing ab muscles. In all cases, the word “existing” is key. Both Gutowski and Moelleken say ab sculpting is not a quick fix for those who think a plank is nothing but a piece of wood , but rat her t he ici ng on t he ca ke you’ve been


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THE NEW WAVE Saying goodbye to the blowout

W ON THE RUN 88

A new fad has exercise buffs reconsidering their relationship with the treadmill. Kayleen Schaefer puts the trend on trial

“I

can’t believe I’m skipping on a treadmill,” I marvel to celebrity trainer Anna Kaiser as she puts me through the paces of her new workout, AKTread. The program launches this winter at Kaiser’s studio in New York—a place that boldfaced names like Kelly Ripa and Shakira have been known to frequent. The innovative training session consists of shuffles, hops with a twist and hurdlestyle leaps on the treadmill, plus strength-based exercises performed while using the machine for support (imagine doing push-ups with your hands on the frame and your feet on a stability ball). At one point or another, most of us have probably dragged ourselves to the gym to “do 20 minutes on the treadmill” and plodded through the entire time with one eye on the clock and the other on Access Hollywood. A new class of treadmill-championing trainers is hoping to change that, by developing workouts to make us rethink the stalwart machine and push ourselves harder on it than we ever have before. The methods all involve interval training, or alternating between high-intensity exercise and periods of recovery, a technique that’s proven to torch fat. The treadmill was once seen as a decent way to get a solitary workout, but new studios are using it in group classes—with the intention of making a spot on a treadmill as coveted as one on, say, a SoulCycle bike. Chicago’s Shred415 studio offers workouts with side shuffles, backwards runs and hill climbs on the treadmill, all done in dimmed lighting

and, often, with a live DJ. “We felt that Chicago was oversaturated with yoga and Pilates and didn’t have that heart-pounding workout,” says co-owner Tracy Roemer, “and the atmosphere makes it fun.” New York’s Mile High Run Club—a large, airy studio that opened in late fall—offers 38 treadmillcentered classes. “People have been on their own at the gym, logging their miles,” says Debora Warner, founder and creator. “Not having classes like these is a missed opportunity for runners. The sport becomes easier if you do interval training. You’ll get faster, stronger and be able to go longer.” Nationwide, Equinox gyms have developed a treadmill class called Precision Running, designed to give you a lung-swelling cardio workout that doesn’t wreak havoc on your hips, knees and ankles the way street jogs can. And at Burn 60 in Los Angeles’ Brentwood neighborhood, the hour-long workout alternates between 10 minutes of sprints on Woodway treadmills and 10 minutes of grueling resistance training on the floor. “When you’re part of a bigger group, with a trainer motivating you and guiding you, you step it up,” says Rick Wenner, director of fitness operations. Barry’s Bootcamp is also known for this approach; celebrities like Kim Kardashian swear by it. Some studios, like FitMix in L.A., are using the treadmill paired with another machine. FitMix offers a class it calls “The Mashup” where the workout switches between intervals on a treadmill and Pilates on a reformer. “We wanted to let people do their cardio and strength training in the same place,” says Diana Newton, co-owner. “Running is wildly efficient, and Pilates is a great complement to it. Running is high impact. Pilates is low impact.” Back at AKTread, I’ve fi nished the workout and am way sweatier and more tired than I’d be after a normal run. I’m not sure when I’ll be ready to try it again, but Kaiser—ever chipper—encourages me. “The great thing about a treadmill,” she says, “is you can fi nd one almost anywhere.”

THE WORLD RECORD FOR A TREADMILL HALF - MARATHON IS 67:29 , COMPARED TO 58:23 FOR A STANDARD HALF - MARATHON .

GETTY IMAGES

FITNESS

hile hair trends come and go from season to season, you can bet your front-row seat that silky, blown-straight strands will inevitably make an appearance each Fashion Week. But at the spring 2015 runway shows, bedhead and air-dried (albeit expertly tousled) tresses reigned supreme. Models at Victoria Beckham, Derek Lam, Vera Wang and more had cascades of loose and understated—if not slightly disheveled—locks. Late risers rejoice: Textured hair is in. Backstage at Derek Lam, famed hairstylist Orlando Pita achieved the look by coating wet locks with Phytovolume Actif Volumizing Spray. He then roughdried the hair—leaving it partially damp—and added subtle waves to front pieces with a styling wand. “I’m into people wearing their hair naturally and enjoying its beautiful quality and texture,” says Pita, who intended for the models to have flyaways as they walked in the show. So sleep in that extra half hour, embrace your curls and waves—and part with the idea of being perfectly polished. — Eden Univer


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Washington’s most impressive new hostess isn’t an heiress, a diplomat or a lobbyist. As Matthew Cooper discovers, she’s a guy

year, private equity titan Mark Ein— the town’s longtime most eligible bachelor, whose 2013 wedding to analyst Sally Stiebel was attended by Valerie Jarrett and Larry Summers and officiated by Senator Mark Warner—purchased her property. For years after Ein bought the Graham house, le tout Georgetown wondered what would happen to the estate where the likes of Bob Woodward, Robert McNamara and Nancy Reagan had spent so many nights. And Ein is fi nally ready to answer. He’s opened the home to host a preparty for the glitzy White House Correspondents’ Dinner—guests i ncluded Li ndsay Lohan, David Axelrod and Elle Macpherson—and after renovations under the eye of architect Outerbridge Horsey, he’s set to move in. Which means, while the house might not operate as it did for Mrs. Graham (who surely never hosted reality stars alongside policymakers), it shouldn’t be long before

AMBASSADOR PAMELA HARRIMAN , A DC SOCIAL LEGEND , WAS FINE WITH BEING GOSSIPED ABOUT.

the city’s elite gather there again. Washington parties—where socializing and policy-making find their hazy intersection—have historically been a woman’s game, whether they were hosted by Mrs. Graham, the late ambassador Pamela Harriman or today’s social set, which includes the corporate executive Juleanna Glover, whose bipartisan buffet

well-connected guests. “Hosting,” observes veteran White House correspondent Julie Mason, “has become more of a dude thing.” Why, after all these years, are men getting in on the act? There are a few reasons—one being the loosening of traditional gender roles. We could very well elect a female president in 2016, so is it any wonder men are

IN WASHINGTON, “HOSTING HAS BECOME MORE OF A DUDE THING.” suppers remain a DC destination, and the writer Margaret Carlson, who favors homey dinners. But today there’s a new breed of hostess: the host. In the 21st century, Washington’s men are increasingly the ones picking out invitations, signing off on the canapés and opening their homes to legions of

free to send out invitations, whether via Paperless Post or from Copenhaver, the city’s toniest stationer? What’s more, men are marrying later—like Bill Dean, the 49-year-old bachelor electronics mogul called “Washington’s Hugh Hefner” and k now n for the bev y of gorgeous women who attend par ties at his

“I WOULD RATHER HAVE BAD THINGS WRITTEN ABOUT ME ,” SHE

SAID ,

“THAN

BE FORGOTTEN .”

GETTY IMAGES; PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: SANDIE BURKE

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he Beall-Washington House holds a special place in our capit al’s lore. Built i n the late 19th century by one of Georgetown’s founders and a descendant of George Washington, it slopes gently down 30th Street NW in Washington, DC, and faces the Oak Hill Cemetery where the home’s former owner, Katharine Graham, is buried. Graham, of course, ran The Washington Post Company and for many years her manse was the center of Georgetown social life. It’s where writers and politicians, blue bloods and parvenus, met in a home that walked a tasteful line, avoiding the gauche trappings of a mega-mansion and yet grand enough to host hundreds for an outdoor party in honor of a visiting dignitary. Mrs. Graham, as most Washingtonians knew her—Kay to her intimates—died in 2001, and her funeral at the National Cathedral was worthy of a head of state. The following


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Georgetown and Miami homes. And then there are the men author Malcolm Gladwell has dubbed “connectors,” those who play an essential role in bringing people together. In a previous era, this might have been done over golf at the Congressional Country Club or steaks at The Palm, but today it’s just as likely to happen at a casual Christmas party or a fundraiser for a businessman’s pet cause. “I think men have always known that business in this town doesn’t happen entirely in the boardroom,” notes Kiki Burger, a former Politico gossip

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“BUSINESS IN THIS TOWN DOESN’T HAPPEN ENTIRELY IN THE BOARDROOM.” columnist. “So if a deal is going to go down at a party—and let’s face it, parties are more fun than golf—they want it to go down at their party.” In the Washington of yore, it was enough to simply open your home. Back in the 1960s and ’70s you could have a cozy spontaneous Sunday supper at the home of inf luential newspaper columnist Joe Kraft, where guests including Henry Kissinger would gather for pot roast and pie. But today’s parties reveal a town that’s no longer what John F. Kennedy called “a city of southern efficiency and northern charm.” The city is booming, and entertainers have had to keep up. Dean’s annual Independence Day bash is notable for bikini-clad guests, hamburgers on the grill and Veuve Clicquot by the caseload, and is only trumped by the Gatsby-esque Halloween party he throws each year at his $5 million Georgetown’s Beall-Washington House, owned by Mark Ein.

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Georgetown townhouse. Guests, often including ambassadors and congressmen, are checked in by an iPad-wielding assistant before receiving an access-granting wristband and posing for photos in front of a Dean-branded step-and-repeat. For years, consultant Jim Courtovich’s gaucho-themed soirees were legendary for their South American food, margarita machines and guest lists heavy on politicians and Washington rainmakers. In 2009, Politico covered one party, breathlessly recounting the tented backyard festooned with roses, a buffet dinner of lamb chops and roast beef, and hundreds of guests, including White House staffers, political journalists and a pre–Today show Savannah Guthrie, whose husband, communications consultant Michael Feldman, swapped blazers with former RNC chairman Ken Mehlman. More intimate gatherings are Courtovich’s norm now. This marks a departure from Washington’s traditionally grim procession of campaign fundraisers, charity balls and book parties, where you’re expected to pay for your 300-pager on U.S.-Swedish relations and smile for the privilege. Those affairs have long greased the wheels of the city’s social life, but in a town full of people considering the fate of the world, nobody seems opposed these days to having a little more fun. “I want to find interesting people and bring them together,” says Dale LeFebvre, the MIT- and Harvard-educated entrepreneur who’s hosted discussions of Greek philosophy for the Aspen Institute but is perhaps better known for dinner parties— think Dover sole cooked on a custom stove—that friends say have attracted guests like Congressman Joseph Crowley, Jamaican-born millionaire Michael Lee-Chin and even Oprah Winfrey. Lobbyist Tony Podesta also aims for intimate affairs thrown at his art-fi lled Kalorama home.

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Bill Dean, above, with an unidentified friend, is known for throwing extravagant parties. His July 4 bash, at top, draws congressmen as well as young patriots.

Whether it’s dinner—perhaps for his clients, which have included Lockheed Martin, BP and the Republic of Georgia—fresh from his backyard pizza oven or his annual Academy Awards bash, entertaining at home is as integral to Podesta’s sway as what goes on in his G Street office. Winston Bao Lord, the son of one of Washington’s best known diplomats, recounts how he’s gone from throwing blow-outs—including a marathon holiday party known as “The Twelve Hours of Christmas”—to intimate suppers at his Foxhall home. “I guess I’ve evolved,” Lord says. “It’s more likely to be a small dinner now, with no seating chart.” In a city where bipartisanship is a rare commodity, Steve Clemons, events maven for Atlantic Media, says entertaining is an opportunity to bring together people too often divided by political parties. “Ideology has hijacked too much of Washington,” he says. “Most people want an on-ramp to something better.” Or something more light-hearted: When Joe Biden couldn’t make an event Clemons was hosting for Jewish advocacy group J Street, Clemons addressed the crowd wearing a Biden mask. As Courtovich puts it: “I never want to host a ‘business event.’ Never.”

AT A 52 ND BIRTHDAY PARTY THROWN FOR FRANKLIN ROOSEVELT, 52 GIRLS PARADED THROUGH NEW YORK ’S WALDORF ASTORIA HOTEL WEARING WHITE GOWNS AND BIRTHDAY CAKE HATS .

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BOOZE NEWS

The Lavish Elixir Can a luxury-vodka label convert a dark-spirits devotee? Anne Roderique-Jones treks to a remote Swedish distillery in search of the answer

HOT SAUCE

PROOF POSITIVE

94

A closer look at the complex distillation process.

I

’m a bourbon drinker. The warm, amber-hued liquor is what I know best. My father drank it. Faulkner did, too. But if the mood were to ever call for a clear spirit, I’d shake up a gin martini with a pickled onion. That said, a true cocktail connoisseur should never be dismissive—and after noticing a resurgence of highend vodka, my interest was piqued. A slew of little-known artisanal labels have recently popped up, touting pricey, small-batch bottles. But one company leading the luxury vodka charge is the 135-year-old spirits staple Absolut. Last year, the brand launched Absolut Elyx in the U.S., an upmarket expression of vodka with a “seed-to-bottle” concept, whereby production and ingredients are all sourced within a 15-mile radius of the distillery in southern Sweden. The wheat used for the spirit comes from Råbelöf, a farming estate where the grain has been grown since the 1400s. The city of Åhus, where the vodka is produced.

Naturally, this sounds like typical farm-totable speak, but upon visiting Råbelöf, I learn that it’s here—in these utterly Swedish, middleof-nowhere fields, where one can find a handsome hunting lodge and not much else—that fresh swaths of winter wheat thrive. The liquor is crafted at a nearby distillery in Åhus, a charming town that spans less than four square miles. (It’s hard to imagine the bottles produced here will eventually land on the menu at a bustling New York City nightclub for $600 a pop.) The liquid is distilled in 100 percent copper stills that employ a single-use copper ring, referred to as “sacrificial copper,” which gives the spirit a distinct, refi ned flavor. But f lavor’s always been my beef when it comes to vodka: It never seems to have much of it, and simply picks up whatever is in the cocktail. The tofu of spirits, so to speak. Elyx is trying to change that. While many of the super-premium vodkas vie for a “clean” flavor—hence stripping the aromas and taste—the intention for Elyx is to enhance these qualities in the product, which is why Absolut is left unfiltered. To me, this results in a flavor that’s soft, creamy, almost butterscotch-y—and quite easy to sip. In fact, this spirit wasn’t meant to be tossed in an overly thick Bloody Mary, nor a cloyingsweet Cosmo (though one can do so). Elyx is designed for savoring neat; ice-cold, in a handcarved crystal glass. And from now on, that’s how I’ll be drinking it. Though I don’t plan on giving up bourbon any time soon.

Å HUS IS ALSO HOME TO EUROPE’S LARGEST BEACH HANDBALL TOURNAMENT — THE BEACHHANDBOLL FESTIVAL— HELD EVERY YEAR IN JULY.

COURTESY OF ABSOLUT ELYX

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nce, there was a single liquor that made barflies wince in fear: 151, the massively alcoholic rum often found floating atop fruit drinks. These days, though, liquors well over the standard proof of 80 stalk bar menus like the four horsemen of the hangover apocalypse: Rittenhouse Rye (100 proof), Laird’s Bonded Applejack (100), Green Chartreuse (110) and George T. Stagg (140-ish). Like those days—long gone, of course—of groggily waking up somewhere unexpected, we wondered: How did this happen? Though liquors were as robust when classic cocktails were popular the first time around, most producers eventually began watering down their products to 30 or 40 percent ethanol. With the advent of the cocktail renaissance, however, bartenders have needed stronger base spirits to ensure their drinks possess balanced levels of sweetness, acidity and alcohol. The result: a resurgence of 100-plus proof liquors that hearken back to the days of pirates and bootleggers. “The fact that you can get drunk quickly isn’t the appeal of high-proof liquors,” says Sean Kenyon, co-owner of Denver speakeasy Williams & Graham. “These days, you have all sorts of flavors going into drinks. A strong liquor allows the spirit to shine through.” Strong, indeed. —Jacqueline Detwiler


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SONY PICTURES CLASSICS PRESENTS AN ANNAPURNA PICTURES PRODUCTION IN ASSOCIATION WITH LIKELY STORY A FILM BY BENNETT MILLER “FOXCATCHER” STEVE CARELL CHANNING TATUM MARK RUFFALO AND VANESSA REDGRAVE CASTING BY JEANNE McCARTHY, C.S.A. MUSIC SUPERVISOR SUSAN JACOBS MUSIC BY ROB SIMONSEN ADDITIONAL MUSIC BY WEST DYLAN THORDSON COSTUME DESIGNER KASIA WALICKA-MAIMONE EDITED BY STUART LEVY, A.C.E. CONOR O’NEILL JAY CASSIDY, A.C.E. PRODUCTION DESIGNER JESS GONCHOR DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY GREIG FRASER, ASC CO-PRODUCER SCOTT ROBERTSON EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS CHELSEA BARNARD RON SCHMIDT MARK BAKSHI MICHAEL COLEMAN TOM HELLER JOHN P. GIURA PRODUCED BY MEGAN ELLISON BENNETT MILLER JON KILIK ANTHONY BREGMAN WRITTEN BY E. MAX FRYE AND DAN FUTTERMAN DIRECTED BY BENNETT MILLER © MMXIV FAIR HILL LLC - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


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hen the Red Bull Racing team officially took on Infiniti, Nissan’s luxury division, as a title partner in 2013, it seemed like a deft marketing move aimed at raising awareness of the Infiniti brand throughout the countries that host Formula One races. Infiniti has long tried to differentiate itself in a crowded performance market, and aligning with the pinnacle of motor sports goes a long way toward chipping away at the abiding domination by such brands as BMW, Mercedes and Porsche. But change in this case isn’t just about naming rights or marketing opportunities: For its inaugural effort, Infi niti teamed up with four-time F1 world champion and Infi niti Red Bull Racing driver Sebastian Vettel to provide feedback on performance and handling to Infiniti engineers and designers. For Vettel, the process was initially out of his comfort zone. “In F1, everything happens very quickly,” he says. “If I have a problem in the fi rst practice, it has to be solved by the second. With road cars, the process is longer. You don’t have to fi nd a solution just for yourself, but for every customer. I had to learn to be patient.” T he re s u lt of h is i nput is Infiniti’s Q50 Eau Rouge. Named after the famous uphill curve at the Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps in Belgium, home of the Belgian Grandprix, the “F1-inspired” concept performance sedan debuted at Geneva last year. Despite the cherry-red paint job, the Q50 Eau Rouge is not simply lipstick on a pig but the fi rst harvest from what is hoped to be a long-term exchange of ideas and technology between race team and sponsor. “Infiniti is a performance brand, but we’re always working on futuristic technologies,” says Kyle Bazemore, Infi niti’s Senior Manager of Communications. “They make the driving experience safer and more fun.” It used to be that cars could be designed for speed, efficiency or safety, but rarely all three. The fi rst generations of hybrids, for example, were safe and efficient, not exactly

meant to get a driver’s pulse racing. As Infi niti introduces new advances to its road cars, such as direct adaptive steering and improved hybrid technologies, the involvement with F1 has been integral in seeing that the “fun to drive” element is not lost. Just as in the paddock, Vettel’s highly tuned sensitivity helped maintain the emotional element of driving—the pleasure of getting from point A to point B. Meanwhile, recent advancements in racing—such as changes in F1 specifications that call for the use of smaller and more efficient engines that are just as powerful as their predecessors but use 30 percent less fuel—signal that even this high-charged world is headed toward automobiles that have both heart and mind. W hich is why it’s impor tant to note that I nf i niti isn’t the exclusive benefactor of the relat ion sh ip w it h F1. “A s F1 becomes i ncreasi ngly dependent on battery and hybrid technology, having access to the kind of resources Infiniti provides is invaluable,” says Christian Horner, team principal of I nf i n it i Red Bull Racing. At one point, for example, it was discovered that the magnesium used for Inf initi’s production-model pa d d le sh i f t e r s wa s l ig ht e r than what the F1 team had been using. Since every ounce counts in F1, the race team quickly enlisted its sponsor to provide materials for the race cars’ new paddle shifters. Although Vettel recently announced he’ll be leaving Infiniti Red Bull at the end of the 2014 season, the synergy between team and sponsor is set to continue. Teammate Daniel Ricciardo, who has already won three races this year, could easily step in. And as Red Bull Racing moves from sponsored team to practical R&D arm, it can’t be long before the collaborative efforts yield benefits demonstrated not only in models like the Eau Rouge Q50, but also in Infiniti’s full line of cars. After all: Who knows driving better than professional drivers?

THANKS TO AERODYNAMICS , AN F 1 CAR IS CAPABLE OF DEVELOPING 3.5 - G LATERAL CORNERING FORCE , WHICH MEANS THEORETICALLY, AT HIGH SPEEDS , IT COULD DRIVE UPSIDE DOWN , LIKE A JET FIGHTER .

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For the Q50 Eau Rouge performance sedan, Infiniti takes inspiration from Formula One—and direction from a World Champion driver. Paul Biedrzycki suits up


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best known—to non-locals, at least—for serving as the

setting to a pair of twentyyear-old cultural sensations: First, 1994’s true-crime bestseller, Midnight in the

A SOUTHERN TOWN ON THE CUTTING EDGE

Garden of Good and Evil (in which the “Hostess City” is practically a main character), and, later that

clubs, and shops have made Savannah a top destination for

same year, Forrest Gump (the park bench upon which Tom Hanks

vacationers (quite a few of whom have fallen so in love with the

sat, telling everyone who’d listen his life story, was situated in

place that, like Carter, they’ve moved there). “When he founded

Chippewa Square).

the city in 1733, General James Oglethorpe laid it out as a grid

But the city has much more to offer than mid-1990s nostalgia

which featured buildings around park-like squares,” Carter

tours. Proponents like Ben Carter, founder of the commercial real

explains. “The concept was a city that could grow and prosper

estate firm Ben Carter Enterprises, point out that the mixture of

organically and efficiently.”

gorgeous architecture, gracious residents, and great restaurants,

A popular local shop, the Savannah Bee Company, sells both “artisanal” and “everyday” honeys, as well as a range of balms, creams and lotions made from the sweet stuff.

ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF BEN CARTER ENTERPRISES AND COLIN DOUGLAS GRAY

S

avannah, Georgia is probably

All SMILES for SAVANNAH


promotion

Visit us at

premierportfoliobroughtonstreet for a full listing of art festivals, cultural events, retail listings and dining options.

Today, there are 22 squares, and Carter says that each one is

the shopping districts boast a unique mix of local and national

like “an oasis.” (Forsyth Park, a 30-acre green set in the middle

options, including the beloved honey-and-beauty-purveyor the

of the Savannah Historic District—which, combined with the

Savannah Bee Company, the century-old Globe Shoe Company,

Savannah Victorian Historic District, is one of the largest National

and newer arrivals like L’Occitane and J. Crew. (Soon, Carter’s

Historic Landmark Districts in the United States—offers another

company plans to open Broughton Exchange, a shop/incubator

alternative to those seeking sanctuary.) Dotted throughout the

similar to New York’s Dover Street Marketthat will feature young

city, and surrounded by businesses and private residences, they

designers, including many who attended the nearby Savannah

function as neighborhood hubs and are a big part of what makes

College of Art and Design.)

Savannah so walkable.

Factor in the lively music scene, the annual film festival, and

Visitors can book rooms luxurious local hotels like the

the Jepson Center for the Arts, which was completed in 2006,

Bohemian, the Mansion on Forsyth Park, and the Marshall

and it’s clear that the city is having a moment. But, as Carter

House (which first opened back in 1851), ; can’t miss eateries

points out, one can’t quite call it a renaissance, because—as the

include The Pink House, Dept. 7 East, and Leopold’s, an ice

many historical buildings and businesses prove—Savannah has

cream shop that’s celebrating it’s 95th birthday this year. And

been thriving for centuries.

The culture of Savannah is incredible,” says Carter. “On any given night, I can listen to jazz, go dancing, go to the theater, see an independent movie. And it’s a sub-tropical climate, so the weather is beautiful year round.”


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AN ARTFUL DODGER?

Louise T. Blouin built a formidable media company focused on fine art, but her detractors say the benevolent publisher isn’t what she seems. Joe Pompeo paints a troubling picture

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n late September, a cabal of luminaries gathered at the Museum of Modern Art Education Center in Manhattan for a two-day gabfest. It was the Louise Blouin Foundation’s annual Creative Leadership Summit, a sort of mini-Davos that encapsulates the raison d’être of the foundation’s namesake, Louise T. Blouin. The fi rst day concluded with a black-tie reception at Blouin’s Charles Street penthouse, but really, the summit was all about making the world a better place, and its lineup was quixotic and lofty: Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales on democracy and technology, Financial Times U.S. managing editor Gillian Tett on the future of the Eurozone and so on. “Innovation, Creativity and Change” was the theme, according to a description for Blouin’s address, which noted, “… innovation and creative leadership can be applied to pressing global challenges. These challenges include not only the mitigation of destructive forces, such as war, poverty or security threats, but also the reinvigoration of positive practices that enable nations, communities, organizations and businesses to thrive.” Lending a touch of irony to the confab—but absent from the agenda—was the fact that Blouin’s business, by all appearances, is anything but thriving. In fact, after years of troubles, Louise Blouin Media seems to be at a breaking point. The company has faced rounds of layoffs and lawsuits alleging non-payment, as well as speculation over when, not if, it will self-destruct completely. An arts-focused publisher lugging around more baggage than a Louis

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Vuitton boutique, Louise Blouin Media is wholly owned by its proprietor. The company was created in 2003 with Blouin’s acquisition of Art & Auction (soon renamed Art + Auction). The French-Canadian multimillionaire has since expanded into a collection of print titles and international websites; she’s nothing if not ambitious. “You need to be f ive times better than the New York Times in terms of volume,” she once advised employees, re-

“I DO THIS TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE.” —LOUISE BLOUIN

ferring to performing-arts content. To hear Blouin tell it, she doesn’t buy and launch art publications and organize boldface conferences for the sake of it. “I have everything I want in my life,” she said back in 2005. “I do this to make a difference.” Difference or none, it wasn’t long before people were saying Louise Blouin Media wasn’t paying its bills. More than 10 years on, the company is said to be at a place where the lights could go out and the phones might not work. And Blouin—never mind her aristocratic mien, her reported $600 million net worth, her lavish properties in Manhattan, Southampton and London—seems a case study in how to become a formidable businesswoman and society maven while still ending up a punch line. Slim and blonde with a soft voice known to deliver monologues equally assertive and meandering, Blouin rose from the Montreal convent where she spent her upper-middleclass adolescence to the top of a near-billiondollar classified publishing company she cofounded in 1987 with her second husband, John MacBain, and which she later cashed out on for a reported $250 million. Her foray into the art world began in the early 2000s with a short-lived relationship—allegedly more than just business—with the auctioneer Simon de Pury. Having relocated to London, where the tabloids feasted on her rumored fling with Prince Andrew, Blouin set out on what was said to be a $500 million mission to build up her publishing empire and its affiliated philanthropic arm. Her persona, described in 2004 by Britain’s Telegraph, was that of a “future George Soros of the art world.” Two years later, when she was moving Blouin Media to New York, where she had dropped $20 million on that Richard Meier–

BLOUIN ’S NEIGHBORS IN HER TONY WEST VILLAGE APARTMENT BUILDING HAVE INCLUDED CALVIN KLEIN , MARTHA STEWART, VINCENT GALLO AND NICOLE KIDMAN .


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Guests at Blouin’s 2011 Creative Leadership Summit enjoyed a swanky evening at Manhattan’s Metropolitan Club.

designed penthouse (at press time on the market for $40 million), Blouin seemed poised to become a patron saint of high culture. Though stern, she’s not unpleasant to be around, according to people who have worked for her, and she’s possessed of a magnetism that made her an object of fascination from Notting Hill to the Upper East Side. “Everybody is talking about her,” the New York Observer declared around the time of the company’s transatlantic move, while New York magazine described Blouin’s Manhattan society debut as “gutsy, ruthless and frivolous.” Cracks in the facade were beginning to show by the mid-aughts. There were reports of unpaid bills, salary cuts and a revolving door of disillusioned employees. In 2006, Blouin shuttered the magazine Spoon, which she’d only recently acquired. In 2008, Blouin Media’s two-year-old Culture + Travel also folded. (In addition to Art + Auction, Blouin Artinfo.com and its international verticals, the company’s remaining assets include Modern Painters, Blouin Lifestyle, Blouin Gallery Guide and the Blouin Art Sales Index.) In early 2013, Blouin Media handed down pink slips following a global web expansion which had involved “a level of investment that was kind of astonishing,” as one former employee put it. There have been layoffs every year for at least the past five years, according to a company insider, who estimated that more than 100 staffers have voluntarily come and gone during that same period, adding, “She takes it really personally when someone quits. It’s kind of like a breakup.” Blouin is fiercely private, and her company’s losses are difficult to confirm. But Blouin Media has been known to bleed millions of dollars a year, according to sources familiar with the books. Of roughly 200 employees who were listed on the payroll during the fi rst half of 2013, salaries ranged from $28,000 for an assistant up to $330,000 for president Ben Hartley, who resigned the following February. During 2012, the monthly

editorial budget for a group of foreign sites was at least $60,000, a former employee says—a large amount for any media venture. With much of her wealth said to be in nonliquid assets, Blouin has lately been selling off personal property. She also downsized Louise Blouin Media’s headquarters in 2014, relocating from an upscale West Side office to a smaller space downtown. When employees moved to the new digs, many were sequestered in a windowless basement that flooded come summer. What’s more, a number of legal challenges have been mounted. The New York State court system lists 25 cases against Blouin or her company since 2007, 12 of which are labeled as active. In one of the latest suits, filed in February 2014, two former executives, Catherine Shanley and Wendy Buckley, allege they are owed $137,431.32 and $90,025.65, respectively. Blouin hit back in a counterclaim saying the duo undersold ads and bartered with buyers for special perks, an allegation their attorney has dismissed. In September, the Fortune 500 printing titan R.R. Donnelley reportedly slapped Blouin with a suit seeking payment on an unpaid tab in excess of $1 million. There’s been wage rage outside the courtroom as well. In 2010, nearly two-dozen writers demanded almost $18,000 wor th of back pay under the

Blouin’s stable of magazines includes Art + Auction and Modern Painters.

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acronym WAAANKAA (Writers Angry At Artinfo Not Kidding Around Anymore). This past August, a group of foreign contract writers calling themselves “Victims of Louise Blouin in India” launched their own PR campaign. “It was always an ordeal getting paid,” says J. Hoberman, the veteran film critic, who was recruited to write for Artinfo.com on a contract basis. “It was so arduous, every single month.” (Hoberman left after about a year for a more reliable paycheck as a Times columnist.) The past year has been particularly trying. So frequent were Blouin’s unflattering cameos in the New York Post in 2014 that her sobriquet, “The Red Queen” (a play on her wardrobe), has taken on a life of its own. “It appears to be a classic rise and fall story,” says New York Social Diary editor David Patrick Columbia. “In New York society, money is the ticket. If she has the money, she will be taken seriously.” If Blouin’s fortune disappears, however, it’s possible her high-minded cohorts will abandon her as well. What is it that drives Blouin, who didn’t respond to interview requests, to keep up appearances in the face of discord and negative press? Vanity, perhaps? Or denial? Pride? If we’re to believe Blouin, the talk of turmoil is just noise. “The company is not having money problems,” she told the Observer in early 2014. “And we have our business that is really growing… Are we making mistakes? With the growth that we’re doing, we probably are.” Just before the Creative Leadership Summit, one of Blouin’s business-side soldiers responded—via “reply all” (presumably by accident)—to a colleague’s company-wide farewell note: “So sorry to hear you are leaving, but not surprised… so many good people have left due to mis-management.” Blouin’s rebuttal was a 1,021-word e-mail meant to counter the critical employee’s “disgraceful” note. But it could have also betrayed an unwillingness to bow to defeat. “Maybe we had to go through this up and down to know whom we wanted to work with in the future,” Blouin wrote. “I am proud of all the team to have built the awareness that is meaningful for this world’s cultural dialogue. I am proud of those who have contributed to this respectable venture and that will embrace it moving forward because we feel that getting up and [being] in an industry that helps the world is what matters.” After all, Blouin is still publishing well-regarded titles covering the art world. And, for all her apparent troubles, she’s displayed a willingness to invest in journalism and philanthropy and a committed refusal to fail. As she herself noted in the aforementioned staff e-mail: “Do not judge those that try.”

IN 2005 , IT WAS REPORTED THAT BLOUIN ARRIVED THREE HOURS LATE TO DINNER AT KENSINGTON PALACE , RESULTING IN ANOTHER WOMAN LANDING THE COVETED SEAT BESIDE PRINCE ANDREW.

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“ONE OF THE GREAT MOVIES ABOUT AN ARTIST.” -John Powers, VOGUE

J U L I A N N E A L E C

M O O R E

B A L D W I N

K R I S T E N

S T E W A R T

S T I L L A L I C E

“TIMOTHY SPALL HAS ALWAYS BEEN TERRIFIC, THIS IS THE PERFORMANCE OF HIS CAREER.” -Stephanie Zacharek, VILLAGE VOICE

“LUMINOUS AND MOVING.” -Leslie Felperin, HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

“MIKE LEIGH’S MASTERWORK.” -Anne Thompson, INDIEWIRE

“ECSTATICALLY BEAUTIFUL.” -Scott Foundas, VARIETY

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f i l m

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T I M O T H Y

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A FILM BY

R I C H A R D G L AT Z E R A N D WA S H W E S T M O R E L A N D

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C A N N E S F I L M F E ST I VA L

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RICHARD GLATZER AND WASH WESTMORELAND

ONE WEEK AWARDS QUALIFYING RUN BEGINS DEC. 5TH OPENS JANUARY 16TH IN NEW YORK AND LOS ANGELES

OPENS DECEMBER 19TH IN NEW YORK AND LOS ANGELES


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GAME TIME

SAFETY FIRST

SEALED AND DELIVERED

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When the threat level is at red, some tycoons are calling the Navy. Adrienne Gaffney enlists to find out more

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he unofficial motto of the United States Navy is non sibi sed patriae, which means, “Not for self, but for country.” For a slew of former Navy SEALs, the motivating factor of country has been replaced by that of clients. These days, top-earning Americans concerned for their security are hiring teams of ex-Navy SEALs who make their living as bodyguards to the highest bidders. The customers seeking such protection are as diverse as the threats they face: CEOs fearing potentially scandalous information leaks, families looking to beef up security after a robbery, prominent billionaires traveling in volatile nations or, in one case, a survivor of a deadly terrorist attack at a foreign resort. After leaving the service in 2008, former SEAL Jason Padilla started the Los Angeles–based fi rm SEALs on Security, which handles protection for high-level executives. (“We don’t deal with celebrities,” he admits. “They can’t afford our services.”) The fi rm’s rates start at around $500,000 per year, and offerings range from body-guarding and dispatching advance teams to scout out any potentially treacherous location to training families in self-defense. SEAL training is rigorous and lasts a minimum of six months, during which candidates are tested on their ability to endure limited sleep, brutal cold and tremendous stress—excellent preparation, Padilla says, for security threats that would include kidnappings and corporate espionage. As an ex-SEAL who now runs the Cleveland-based SEAL Team Consulting, Chris Heben thinks former SEALs offer something more complex than brawn and shooting skills. The extreme mind-set of former SEALs can be appealing to intense business types, while the strategic thinking required to plan a military raid lends them the

ability to anticipate and prepare for any hazardous situation. “Clients will let us know where they’re going to be heading, from Timbuktu to the Sudan,” he says, “so we will act as an information-gathering service to look at the current threats in those areas.” In 2012, a client reached out to Heben about plans to fly to a Mexican city plagued by drug wars. Allowing the executive to take the trip the way he had envisioned was a no-go for Heben. “We made daily security checks with the contacts I have within Mexico and gave him an update every morning,” he says. “We said, ‘If you’re hell-bent on going there, you’re not going to do it the way you think.” The team arranged for the client to fly into Brownsville, Texas, land on a U.S.-controlled airfield, and then drive into Mexico in the company of armed Mexican guards in cars retrofitted with armor. Aiding Heben and Padilla is the incredible Rolodex that SEALs carry. With a network of alums working at the CIA, FBI, State Department and Department of Defense, as well as at contract fi rms, they have access to intelligence civilians could only dream of. “Your connections are deep, they’re varied, they’re strong and they’re very loyal,” Heben says. Still, there’s only so far even a SEAL can go. Padilla is adamant about refusing outlandish demands from clients, including requests to hold drugs or tail spouses, while Heben will refuse business that would willfully put his men in harm’s way. “Sometimes the best job is the one you don’t do,” he says. Indeed, the phenomenon of hiring ex-SEALs begs the question of whether your everyday billionaire truly requires the services of someone capable of the things a SEAL can do. “In the United States, a lot of our clients don’t really need this kind of service,” he says. “But if you’re a billionaire, is it worth it? Absolutely.”

IT ’S NO WONDER SO MANY SEALS HEAD TOWARD THE PRIVATE SECTOR — THE PAY FOR ACTIVE NAVY SEALS IS REPORTEDLY AS LOW AS $54,000 PER YEAR .

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ore than two decades after Awaken the Giant Within hit best-seller lists and brought his brand of life-coaching advice to millions, Tony Robbins is back, and this time he’s talking about money. Literally. Money: Master the Game: 7 Simple Steps to Financial Freedom (Simon & Schuster) hit bookstores in late November. Robbins says, “In my previous works, I’ve been obsessed with finding breakthrough strategies to help people lose 30 to 300 pounds, or transform their relationships from tolerable to passionate, or grow their business 30 to 130 percent in a year. After the 2008 economic crisis I decided to interview 50 of the smartest financial minds in the world—selfmade billionaires to Nobel Laureates—and get them to give me their best strategies to help anyone become financially free.” Robbins wasn’t kidding around when he came up with his list of advisors. Master the Game incorporates the advice of Carl Icahn, Warren Buffett, John Bogle, Charles Schwab and Paul Tudor Jones. Robbins promises that his book will help anyone achieve more financial success, even the most sophisticated stock investors. Now that’s a plan. — NANCY BILYEAU


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power seat

ELI BROAD

Inside the office of Los Angeles’ modern-day Medici, Lesley McKenzie finds vision and not just a view PHOTOGRAPHED by Daniel Trese

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sk Angelenos to point o u t t h e s k y l i n e ’s greatest building, and chances are they won’t single out the most architecturally significant structures. Instead, your gaze will be directed toward Fox Plaza, a 34-story skyscraper in Centur y City more commonly known as the buildi ng where Die Hard was filmed. These days, Bruce Will i s i s n’t t he bu i ld i ng’s

greatest hero. It’s Eli Broad, L.A.’s most influential philanthropist, who occupies a corner office on the building’s 30th floor. Since arriving in Los Angeles 50 years ago, Broad has left an imprint on the city’s cultural and business landscape—not to mention its skyline— with a fortune spent on philanthropic causes from education to the opera, trustee seats at MOCA and LACMA and buildings including the Broad Stage in Santa Monica and the soon-to-open Broad museum downtown. And while billionaire Broad manages his empire from Fox Plaza, he didn’t build it there. His operation recently moved after 14 years in Westwood, giving its leader a fresh work space. “I wanted a different kind of office,” he says. “I wanted all white, all open, all the light.” The result is a sun-soaked 25,000-square-foot space, designed by Shubin + Donaldson, that houses the 80-person team that makes up the Broad Family Office, the Broad Center and the Broad Education Foundation. (The Broad Art Foundation remains in Santa Monica.)

yippee ki -yay ! aside from die hard, fox plaza has made cameos in a variety of action films , including fight club and lethal weapon 2.


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Broad, at right, poses with a piece by Julian Lethbridge in his Los Angeles office, which also features works by Julie Mehretu, at left, and Ed Ruscha, above.

The founder of two For tune 500 companies—residential-building behemoth KB Home and financial firm SunAmerica—Broad stepped away from business in 1999 to focus on philanthropy, but his is an odd retirement. These days, Broad comes to his memento-strewn office four days a week, commuting from his art-filled home in Brentwood, which was designed, in part, by Frank Gehry. Broad’s workspace displays a similarly imposing aesthetic. An 11-footlong custom-built white oak desk commands the room, framed by giant windows that look out onto downtown Los Angeles, a neighborhood Broad is committed to revitalizing. “Every city needs a vibrant center,” he explains. The neighborhood is also the future home of the Broad museum. Set to debut in 2015, the $140 million Diller Scofidio + Renfro–designed building will showcase more than 2,000 pieces of art from both the Broad Art Foundation and its namesake’s personal collection, which includes works by Jeff Koons, Cindy Sherman and Roy Lichtenstein.

“We believe in having contemporary art in the office,” says Broad, whose own walls boast a 1981 Jasper Johns. “It stimulates creativity.” The main reception area features pieces by Ed Ruscha and a Koons sculpture, while a conference room, anchored by a customized Frank Pollaro table, is home to two Terry Winters canvases and a large-scale print by Julie Mehretu. Like all the other offices on the f loor, Broad’s is encased in glass, with privacy shades that he says he’s never lowered. Prominently on display are a collection of silver-framed photos and hard hats that represent various construction projects on which he’s broken ground, evidence of past accolades and achievements and photos of Broad with Edythe, his wife of almost 60 years. It’s a place that Broad says he can enjoy spending his time, whether he’s planning to build another museum or figuring out funding for a f ledgling arts organization. “I work all the time,” he says. “I enjoy it.”

broad once purchased a $2.5 million roy lichtenstein painting at a sotheby ’s auction with his american express credit card , earning 2.5 million frequent- flyer miles in the process .


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CHA-CHING

CELEBRITY, INC.

For a certain set of savvy stars, the role of entrepreneur can be the most lucrative one of all

Races Patrick Dempsey has entered with his team, Dempsey Racing, since 2007

32

Number of Nobu restaurants worldwide, all co-owned by Robert De Niro

0: Number of times James mentions “Sprite” in a new commercial for the soda

LEBRON

10,000: Estimated number of LeBron James jerseys sold each year

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$51,500: Cost of one special edition LeBron James watch by Audemars Piguet

7: Years in James’ $93 million contract with Nike, which he signed immediately after high school 30,000: Size of his Akron, Ohio, compound, in square feet

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Different casks used to produce Haig Club, the new single-grain scotch whisky launched in partnership with David Beckham and Simon Fuller

JESSICA ALBA’S START-UP, THE HONEST CO., A LINE OF ECO-FRIENDLY BABY PRODUCTS, IS VALUED AT $1 BILLION AND EMPLOYS 275 PEOPLE

$80 MILLION Estimated amount Gisele Bündchen and Tom Brady earned, combined, in endorsements throughout 2013

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Jessica Simpson’s estimated current weightloss as part of her $4 million deal with Weight Watchers

480

Calories in one of Karlie’s Kookies, a wholesome line of baked goods created by supermodel Karlie Kloss and Momofuku Milk Bar

lbs

Months the Lincoln car commercial featuring Matthew McConaughey has aired: 7

Percentage increase of Lincoln sales since then: 16

The leafy green is mentioned in 38 articles on Gwyneth Paltrow’s lifestyle website, GOOP. “Detox” is mentioned in 66 articles

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0 Races Patrick Dempsey has won since 2007

$42 million: Reported income earned off the court, thanks to endorsements with brands like Nike, Coca-Cola and Saumsung


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a ny t h r ille r s st r ive for a ripped-from-the-headlines t one, but Bu r ne d, wh ich opens with a bombing by a secret extremist group, takes authenticity to a new level. The reason is its co-author, Valerie Plame, who worked as a CIA officer before she was herself “burned.” In 2003, a newspaper column about Iraq’s development of nuclear weapons revealed Plame’s identity, spurring a scandal, hearings and arrests. Not the least of Plame’s troubles was that her career in the CIA was over. Plame wrote about the harrowing experience in her nonfiction book, Fair Game: My Life As a Spy, My Betrayal by the White House. Several years later, Plame, paired with author Sarah Lovett, penned a thriller called Blowback, about the dangerous missions of a blonde CIA officer named Vanessa Pierson. With the recent release of the sequel, Burned, Plame

THE PLAME GAME

Valerie Plame left the CIA but didn’t give up on international intrigue. Nancy Bilyeau investigates

talks frankly about her new career— and whether she misses her old one. D U J O U R : Had you always wanted to write a novel when you signed the deal for Blowback? VALERIE PLAME: Up to that point, I’d only written a memoir and a lot of intelligence reports, so it was a very different genre. My publisher suggested it to me and I thought, “Okay,” because I despise how female CIA officers are portrayed in popular culture. They are highly sexualized, either arm candy or the villainess. It ticks me off, and I thought, “Well if I’m going to do this, I want a heroine who I would want to read about!” Mine is smarter than average, but still faces

some of the real issues that women do in a somewhat odd career. DJ: Is Vanessa Pierson, your main character, really you? VP: She has aspects of me. But she’s younger, and better at languages. DJ: You write about the sort of education and field training a CIA officer would receive. That’s interesting. VP: I know what type of person the CIA looks for in their operations officers, so I worked with that. I wanted her to be relatable. She’s not some superhero. DJ: When recruiting out of college, what does the CIA look for? VP: They look for someone who takes initiative, and yet does not disregard

authority; someone with common sense who has intuition. You must demonstrate some competency in languages, have traveled and have a desire to serve your country. You must be a really good problem solver. You’re constantly trying to figure out, “Okay, how do we get to this point or how do we recruit that person?” It’s problem solving, it just happens to be in the realm of national security. DJ: And we’re talking big problems. VP: There’s nuclear threat and terrorism, and yes, those are big problems. D J : You r exp e r t ise wa s cou nt e rnuclear proliferation. When you see the news, do you want to get back into intelligence work personally? VP: Of course! I really miss my job. It gave me a great sense of satisfaction. DJ: What do you think of Homeland? Its star is a female CIA analyst. VP: I saw the fi rst season. Claire Danes is fabulous, but it was unrealistic. Bipolar? I mean, come on.

IN THE FILM ADAPTATION OF FAIR GAME , NAOMI WATTS PLAYS VALERIE PLAME AND SEAN PENN PLAYS HER HUSBAND , FORMER U . S . AMBASSADOR JOSEPH WILSON .

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GOING HIS WAY

At 50, Lenny Kravitz, who just released a tenth album and his first book, isn’t even close to slowing down. Adam Rathe tries to keep up PHOTOGRAPHED BY HIROYUKI SEO

“YOU BECOME A PART OF PEOPLE’S LIVES WITHOUT BEING AWARE OF IT.” part of people’s lives—a chiseled, bohemian, guitar-wielding patch of our cultural wallpaper—he might be the only one. Since his 1989 debut, Let Love Rule, Kravitz has released five platinum albums, has appeared in everything from Zoolander to The Simpsons and Precious and, this fall, released an eponymous coffee table book with Rizzoli celebrating his role as an internationally admired clotheshorse. According to Kravitz, the element all of this work has in common is that it appeals to his visual sense—even the aspects that can’t been seen by the naked eye. “When I hear music, it’s visual; I see things,” he says. “Most of it is abstract, but sound fires vision. It also happens when I enter an empty space and automatically envision where things should go based upon the guidelines or the

project I’m working with. It’s something instinctual.” His book, for example, provided the opportunity to curate and ref lect on 25 years of (often shirtless, sometimes rather experimental) st yle and gave K ravitz, himself a photographer, a chance to take a lesson from the big-name shutterbugs (Patrick Demarchelier, Ellen von Unwerth and Anton Corbijn to name a few) who’ve shot him. “After more than two decades of photography it’s interesting to see how many versions of myself there have been,” Kravitz says. “I didn’t even realize it.”

KR AVITZ WROTE THE LYRICS TO HIS MOST RECENT ALBUM AT NIGHT WHILE ON THE SET OF THE HUNGER GAMES : CATCHING FIRE .

+ more @ DuJour.com

GROOMER: LORAINE ABELES

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n the opening moments of the music video for “The Chamber,” the first single off Lenny Kravitz’s latest album, Strut, the screen is splashed with a quote from Friedrich Nietzsche. “The true man wants two things,” it reads, “danger and play.” For Kravitz, there seems to be more out there than these two options: The man wants to be heard. “I don’t tend to think about what people are going to get from my work,” Kravitz says. “I just think about expressing myself. But then, you meet people and they say this or that song meant something to me, or when my child was being born I played this album. You become a part of people’s lives without being aware of it.” If Kravitz isn’t aware of how he’s become


The sea is our home.

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BRAGGING RIGHTS

Feeling Shelf-Conscious Without vinyl albums or paper books on display, new rules exist for how to win kudos for having great taste. David Browne charts the territory

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ILLUSTRATED BY TIMOTHY GOODMAN

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f you’ve ever watched the USA Network series Suits, you’ve probably admired the natty threepiece duds wor n by suavely aggressive lawyer Harvey Specter (played by Gabriel Macht). But you may have caught sight of something equally striking: that wall of vinyl in Harvey’s law office. Loaded up with new and vintage R&B, from the Spinners to Sharon Jones, the collection is meant to send a message to anyone who steps into his space: I may be a killer lawyer, but I have soul, literally and figuratively. Whether the Suits creators intended it or not, that set décor also serves as a nostalgic throwback to those swiftly vanishing days when we would tell the world who we were by openly displaying our beloved records, books and movie collections. For me, the ritual began when I first left home. No sooner had I picked out my bed in my four-student dorm room than I began flaunting my tastes to my roommates: Annie Hall poster on the wall, E.L. Doctorow and James Kirkwood novels on a bookshelf, along with Neil Young and Rolling Stones LPs. Part of me liked having my favorite things around, but I also wanted my fellow college students, and anyone who dropped by our room, to know me by my taste. I wasn’t just some shy geek, but someone who loved smart movies, elegant fiction and “quality” rock ’n’ roll. (Yes, I was that insecure.) For many of us, this tradition didn’t end when we

picked up our diplomas. The formats changed: LPs gave way to compact discs, videocassettes to DVDs. (Books were still books, and the more weathered and dog-eared the better—it showed we’d actually read them.) But the concept was the same: These for-all-tosee picks were our personal signifiers, our way of telling the world we were what we devoured, at least until we matured a bit more. The practice also came in handy when assessing others. While doing a story on a musician I thought had impeccable taste, I’ll never forget spotting a Styx album in his record collection. Was he that hip after all? Or, more recently, I noticed a Glenn Beck book on a friend’s bookshelf. Yikes! Should I still socialize with this person? In our ever-more-digital world, that tradition is joining the rotary phone or the roll of fi lm you’d get developed at the drugstore. Increasingly, our entertainment choices are becoming byte-size, tucked away on our computers and mobile devices for only us to know and scrutinize. CD sales are plummeting (a 20 percent drop in the fi rst half of 2014 alone). E-book sales are on the rise—over 500 million were sold last year—and more than 50 million people now subscribe to Netflix (exponentially more than about a decade ago). To find out what our friends are listening to, reading or watching, we’d have to hack into their iTunes, online-movie accounts or e-book readers, which probably isn’t worth the legal consequences.

THE FIRST COMMERCIALLY RELEASED COMPACT DISC WAS BILLY JOEL’S ALBUM 52 ND STREET — IT WENT ON SALE IN JAPAN IN 1982 .

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BOoks

A new crowd recognizes the quality of old-school sound. what it was in the ’60s or ’70s, but four million vinyl LPs were snapped up during the first half of this year, almost double the amount of 2013 (and multiple times more than a decade ago, when the format was pretty much left for dead). When it comes to the latest Jack White or Tame Impala record, a new crowd—mostly college kids—recognizes the quality of old-school sound. And when someone asks, “What kind of music do you like?” they won’t have to log on. Like many of us once did, they can simply point to their wall and let the vibrantly designed pieces of 12-by-12 cardboard speak for themselves.

the estate of david foster wallace has disavowed an upcoming biopic , saying ,

winter’s hottest fiction Five literary triumphs to curl up with this season

Blood-Drenched Beard Daniel Galera In an atmosphere both languid and tense, a story unfolds of a young man searching for the truth of his grandfather’s death. Daniel Galera is a Brazilian writer who sought to fuse an experimental, postmodern writing style with a murder mystery. The novel wouldn’t succeed so well without its setting, a Brazilian town on the Atlantic Ocean known for its surfing and fishing—but beneath the community’s sleepy surface lie violent secrets.

The David Foster Wallace Reader David Foster Wallace

Six years after his suicide, David Foster Wallace’s work is gathered in this intriguing collection. A dozen writers and critics selected the offerings, which run the gamut from excerpts of his novels Infinite Jest and The Pale King to his first published story—and his reading lists for students. What comes through clearly in the reader is not just his originality and gorgeous prose but also Wallace’s humor.

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Yet this tradition hasn’t actually died; like many things, it’s migrated to the web, social media in particular. Whether it’s a new song we just heard, an old one we’ve discovered for the first time or an episode of Game of Thrones we want to rave about, we can tell the world about it with a Facebook post or a pithy tweet. That concert photo you snapped on your phone? Stick it onto your Pinterest board. Show the world what songs you’ve been digesting by way of a “public playlist” on Spotify. Sites like Goodreads are the digital equivalent of a curated bookshelf. Assuming you have a lot of “friends,” more people than ever will know what piece of art has you psyched, as opposed to the few dozen buds who might trample through your home and check out your coffee table. Of cou rse, this reinvention of the I-am-what-Iconsume ethos comes with a crucial qualifier. Thanks to the Internet, people can now proclaim their cultural loves, and all they symbolize in terms of self-image, without having to actually invest in said objects—in other words, they can lie a lot. Nowadays, you don’t have to go out and buy that Girls DVD or all-encompassing Beatles box set. Just post a link with a comment like, “Looks awesome!” Odds are that people who like and comment the most on Instagram or Facebook haven’t actually met their friends in the f lesh, much less had the chance to peer in the dark corners of their bookshelves. Who could know the difference if the last song you listened to was sung by Celine Dion not Lykke Li, or if you post, “Can you believe how funny that Fallon musical skit was?” because it was #trending (not because you stayed up late enough to see it yourself ). The only risk to this is being busted by those pesky high school friends who insist on an occasional reality check, prefaced by, “Wow, what happened to you?” Is there any chance of a return to authenticity? As Harvey Specter’s office shows, vinyl has staged its own version of a comeback tour. The medium will never be

Find Me Laura van den Berg The debut novel from short-story-collection veteran van den Berg follows the ironically named Joy—a grocery store clerk with a cough-syrup addiction—as she finds her way to the center of a deadly national epidemic. An unforgettable group of supporting characters are introduced, giving the book a sprawling, offbeat ensemble feel and begging the question: Why does it sometimes take death for us to realize life is worth living?

West of Sunset Stewart O’Nan This fictionalized account of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s later years isn’t the first time the author of The Great Gatsby has himself been used as a literary device, but it has to be one of the most enjoyable. Award-winning novelist O’Nan charts Fitzgerald’s misadventures in 1930s Hollywood, as he dates gossip columnist Sheilah Graham and attempts to rebuild his fortune, while his wife, Zelda, deteriorates in a North Carolina asylum.

Her Harriet Lane In her sophomore novel, Lane continues to channel Alfred Hitchcock by way of Bridget Jones. Two women—Emma, a dowdy young mother, and Nina, a wealthy, cultured artist—split apart by a painful secret are thrown back together against the backdrop of contemporary London and the pitfalls, heartache and class envy that come along with it. Expect to turn pages at a rapid pace and compile a comprehensive list of anyone you might have wronged.

“we do not consider it an homage and

prefer that david be remembered for his extraordinary writing .”


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Tiara coat, $3,590, AKRIS, akris.ch. Sweater, $595, RALPH LAUREN BLACK LABEL, ralphlauren.com. Wrap skirt, $1,920, TOMAS MAIER, tomasmaier.com. Nudist sandal, $398, STUART WEITZMAN, stuartweitzman.com. Rings, DeWitt’s own. Photographed on location at Abington House, NYC.

PROFILE

EVERYTHING’S COMING UP ROSE’S Rosemarie DeWitt is seemingly everywhere this winter— and as Adam Rathe assures us, that’s a good thing PHOTOGRAPHED BY BEN HOFFMANN STYLED BY PAUL FREDERICK

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osemarie DeWitt was too happy to play sad. As a new mother, the actress found it difficult to conjure the demons required to become Rachel Coulson, the depressed New England mother she portrays in Olive Kitteridge, the recent HBO miniseries. “The tricky thing about my character was that she was a deeply depressed person looking for a way out, and I was a new mom and the happiest I’d ever been in my life,” DeWitt says. “There was a part of me that was resisting playing Rachel, because I just couldn’t wait to get home to my family.” A chance encounter with a filthy bathtub made her job a bit easier. “There was a scene where I had to take a bath, and they cleaned it as well as they could,” she recalls, “but at one point, I saw a mold spore f loating on the water and thought, well, this is depressing. It definitely ruined my mood—and that helped.” W hat that f u ng us can’t t ake credit for, however, is DeWit t’s on-screen ubiquit y this year. From the Lisa Cholodenko–directed Kitteridge to turns in the CIA cover-up thriller Kill the Messenger and Jason Reitman’s latest, Men, Women and Children, DeWitt has appeared in some of the season’s most talked about movies. Reitman’s film finds her in an especially memorable role as Helen, a woman trapped in a failing marriage who fumbles through the world of online dating. “She’s looking to feel desire and feel desirable,” DeWitt, who herself is married to actor Ron Livingston, explains. “And she’s not abnormal in that way—looking outside your marriage is as old as the institution of marriage itself.” What made the character compelling to DeWitt was the modernity of her adultery. “She was not the type to go to a bar; she wouldn’t have had the courage,” she explains. “It was easier to sit at her desk, type up her profile and hit send.” Reitman says the part required a unique kind of charisma. “She’s one of those rare actresses who’s very beautiful but also has the ability to play the everywoman,” he says. “She has an affair, which is about the hardest thing for an actor to do on-screen because it’s so unforgivable. But she brings such a human approach to it that you almost understand it. She sells the stagnation of the marriage in such a real way that the affair becomes this exciting journey you go along on.” With Helen now in her rearview mirror, DeWitt is prepared to tackle new projects, including an upcoming remake of the horror classic Poltergeist. And while she’s glad to be as in demand as she is, working so frequently does have its pitfalls. “We were shooting in Toronto and I didn’t have my family with me, so I woke up, looked out the window and freaked out for a solid two minutes because I had no idea where I was,” she says. “I was running through my head all the places I had been working before I was like, ‘OK! I’m in Canada.’ I don’t have so much trouble keeping my characters straight. I just need to remember where it is I’m waking up.”

D E WITT PLAYED A SMALL ROLE IN THE FILM CINDERELLA MAN , BASED ON THE LIFE OF HER GRANDFATHER , DEPRESSION - ERA BOXER JAMES J . BRADDOCK .

HAIR: SARAH POTEMPA FOR AUSSIE AT THE WALL GROUP. MAKEUP: KRISTOFER BUCKLE FOR KRISTOFER BUCKLE COSMETICS.

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FUNNY GIRL

PAYNE’S GAIN

THE SECOND COMING

U.K. sensation Nick Payne on his inaugural Broadway turn

Lisa Kudrow on reviving her beloved comedy series The Comeback

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Comeback, not Friends.” That was interesting, and I noticed it more with younger people. DJ: Valerie’s reality show came before so much of today’s unscripted TV. She was kind of a pioneer. LK: There were only two when we first started doing this: The Osbournes and The Anna Nicole Smith Show. It all was just what a bad idea it is to be famous without having a real skill or task that you can actually throw yourself into. DJ: Are you a reality-TV connoisseur? LK: I love watching T he Real House wives and it seems that for some of them, they’re looking to establish a brand so they can have a career after the inevitable divorce. DJ: You and Valerie both found success on a sitcom. Your lives took different paths, of course, but is she a scary version of how things could have been? LK: I think she’s a person anyone would be scared of ending up like.

KUDROW: JOHN JOHNSON/HBO. PAYNE: HELEN MURRAY. VIDAL: GETTY IMAGES.

CRANKS

‘‘ ‘‘

THE GORE-Y DETAILS

On Death Threats Anyone who’s not paranoid is not in full possession of the facts.

‘‘

Michael Mewshaw’s new memoir, Sympathy for the Devil,

On His Homeland

details a 40-year friendship with literary wit Gore Vidal,

Americans prefer their writers obscure, poor and, if possible, doomed by drink or gaudy vice. All the things I’m not.

who was as famous for his barbed quips as for his writing

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On Recreation Think how many American men kill themselves with two or three highballs before dinner, then wine with a heavy meal. Then they jump into bed and have sex…. The trick is to arrange for sex in the afternoon and save the booze and food for afterward.

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On Money That’s how I know I’m not rich. I pick up bills. Rich people never pay. No matter how much money they have, they let other people pay. That’s why they’re rich.

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alerie Cherish might not be the most famous character Lisa Kudrow’s ever played, but she’s certainly the most persistent. After one season in 2005, The Comeback—Kudrow’s wryly funny series about a fading sitcom star attempting to hold on to celebrity with a reality show—was canceled. But following almost a decade as a cult favorite, it’s back this winter on HBO for a second go-round. Here, Kudrow discusses the series’ unexpected new season. DUJOUR: The Comeback went off the air in 2005. Why start it up again? LISA KUDROW: We never stopped loving the show, and when HBO said we should do some more episodes, [co-creator] Michael Patrick King and I said, “Yes! We’ll make it work.” DJ: It’s a show that, despite its short initial life, had a real impact. LK: Over the past nine years, more and more people have been saying, “I love you and it’s for The

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ick Payne is fretting over his latest play’s New York debut. “I’m terrified,” says the 30-year-old playwright regarding Constellations, the award-winning two-hander opening in January. “You don’t know how audiences are going to react.” It’s not all jitters for Payne. “Obviously, I’m also looking forward to it,” he adds. “I should say that as well.” And what’s not to look forward to? The show stars Broadway first-timers Jake Gyllenhaal and Ruth Wilson, and its premise— the romance between a physicist and a beekeeper as it exists in parallel universes—is refreshingly unique, even though plans for an American overhaul have been scuttled. “We were toying with shifting the setting to the U.S.” Payne admits. “But Ruth is a Brit and Jake’s accent is really brilliant, so we’re going to keep it in Britain.” No matter the location, Gyllenhaal—who starred in Payne’s If There Is I Haven’t Found It Yet in 2012—is thrilled to take another crack at the playwright’s words. “Nick’s writing has an overwhelmingly tremendous subtext,” Gyllenhaal says. “There isn’t a line that could be delivered the same way every night, which for an actor is exciting and terrifying.” For Payne, what’s terrifying seems to be keeping up the success of the show, which had a lauded run on London’s West End. “I’ve got no idea why it did well,” Payne says with a laugh. “But I’m glad it did.”


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IN COLOR

TWIST of FATE Artist George Condo spent his career subverting the status quo. So how’d he suddenly get so relevant? WRITTEN BY PAUL BIEDRZYCKI

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eorge Condo’s career as an artist spans almost 40 years; his paintings sell for nearly half a m illion dollars. One could safely assume that a guy of his stature would work in an expansive —and expensive — cathedral-like studio bathed in natural light. Yet, on a recent afternoon, Condo could be found tapping into the inspiration of…a tiny one-car garage attached to a rented house in the Hamptons. “A cook cooks in the kitchen, not in the living room,” he says of the unlikely space, neatly tapping the ash off his unfiltered cigarette. Condo’s matter-of-fact demeanor is a stark contrast to the tumultuous and chaotic nature of his work. He is the art world’s Dr. Moreau, fastidiously cloning and splicing to create strange animals out of the scraps of our culture, borrowing freely from both the canon of art history (a Picasso-esque brush stroke here) and cartoons (Elmer Fudd’s nose there). While his incorporation of references aligns him with several other artists who also came out of the postmodern era, what sets Condo apart and explains his staying power is his ability to masterfully execute this vision. He blends the subtle shading of Rembrandt with the heavyhanded caricature of Looney Tunes characters into frenetic compositions that would give the Abstract Expressionists a run for their money— and does so without a drop of irony.

George Condo, Double Heads on Yellow, Pink, and Silver, 2014.

Condo grew up in a bucolic New England town and came of age in the New York of Basquiat and Haring, who both became close friends. But while those artists were determined to bring a graffiti-inf luenced style of mark-making from the streets into the gallery,

“I TOOK IT AS A SIGN THAT I MUST BE DOING SOMETHING RIGHT.” —GEORGE CONDO

IN HIS DIARIES , ANDY WARHOL REFERRED TO CONDO’S APPRECIATION OF THE FINER THINGS IN LIFE , DESCRIBING HIM AS

“THIS ‘POOR

Condo, although equally driven by a desire to subvert the mainstream, chose to refine his painting craft, learning to faithfully emulate masters such as Cézanne and Modigliani. Eventually, he would turn that language back on itself. Through gigs that included working on the assembly line at Andy Warhol’s factory, he steadily built a reputation as an “artist’s artist” whose work was actively collected by other artists, including Warhol. Shortly after Warhol’s death, in fact, Condo learned that a small painting of his had sat at Warhol’s bedside during his last days. “I took it as a sign that I must be doing something right,” he says. Still, he never became a household name

ARTIST ’ [ WHO ] HAS A ROOM ... AT THE RITZ CARLTON .”

COPYRIGHT GEORGE CONDO, COURTESY SKARSTEDT NEW YORK

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PORTRAIT: PAUL BIEDRZYCKI

in Condo’s case; soul music in West’s). The collaboration benefitted both: Kanye was further legitimized as a bona fide artiste while Condo was now “trending,” with a whole new generation exposed to his work. In November, Condo opened a solo show at New York’s Skarstedt Gallery. Created in the Hamptons garage this past summer, the large-scale painting titled Double Heads on Yellow, Pink, and Silver that anchors the exhibition represents both the future and past of his work. “I needed something different to happen,” he says. “I thought I would paint two large heads on a single canvas, two figures alienated from one another. I also thought ‘Which color have I never used in my life?’ So, I ordered massive amounts of silver paint and started blasting away.” Although he shows no signs of slowing down, Condo, now in his late fifties, has come to value what he calls the “longevity” of his work—as have others. “If something that I did in ’84 looked like shit today, I’d probably be a pretty unhappy person,” he says. “What I got from Warhol is that whatever kind of art you want to do, whatever you like, whatever you love, whatever you’re fascinated by—that should be a part of your work. Everyday, I want whatever it is I’m doing now, even if I can’t figure it out at the moment… I want to look back in ten years and think, It wasn’t easy, but I came up with something.”

GHOST OF CHANCE , A NOVELLA ABOUT ENVIRONMENTAL DEVASTATION BY WILLIAM S . BURROUGHS , ILLUSTRATED BY GEORGE CONDO , WAS FIRST PUBLISHED BY THE WHITNEY MUSEUM IN 1991.

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l i ke Ha r i ng or Ba squ iat , a nd du r i ng t he Schnabel and Kiefer–era, Condo decamped to Europe and drew inward. “I decided to take it back a thousand steps to the idea that painting is just painting,” he says. It was during this time that his idea of “artificial realism,” still a guiding principle of his work, began to gel. As the world became increasingly synthetic, Condo set his sights on, he says, “creating a realistic representation of what was artificial,” to accurately describe where t he cu lt u re wa s hea ded. It wa sn’t about depicting an actual, physical place, but instead a psychological st ate. Rather than revel i n the mater ialism of the d ay,

Condo, along with artists such as Jeff Koons and Duane Hanson, continued to pick and p r o d a t t h e c o r n e rstones of this mounti n g t owe r of B a b el , t ap pi ng i nt o ou r i n creasingly strange and absurd existence. It was on ly a matt e r of t i me u nt i l t he outside world caught up to Condo’s vision, helped along by things l i ke pl a s t ic s u r ge r y and genetic engineering. As we’ve entered an age that religiously sets its clock to Warhol’s 15 minutes of fame r u le, t he releva nce of Condo’s work ha s snowballed. The surreal gap between reality and fantasy, other wise k nown as Condo’s home turf, is shrinking. W hen fellow sample ar tist Kanye West called to commission Condo to create a cover for his 2010 album, My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy, Condo admittedly “had absolutely no idea who he was.” And yet, they were kindred spirits who had built their respective oeuvres out of borrowed bits, essentially creating something new out of the remnants of bygone eras (the history of painting


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Angelina JOLIE

How one LONG-FORGOTTEN TALE OF HEROISM changed the lives of the world’s luckiest young actor and the superstar who believed in him

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ouis Zamperini knew a thing or two about waiting. The Olympic runner turned U.S. airman spent 47 deadly days living on a raft after a 1943 plane crash and subsequently survived two years as a Japanese prisoner of war. Still, when he sold Universal Pictures his life story in 1957, Zamperini couldn’t have known it would take more than 50 years for his tale to be told. Come Christmas Day, however, the wait will be over. When Unbroken hits theaters, Zamperini’s stor y— originally optioned for a then up-and-coming Tony Curtis—will unfold on-screen for moviegoers around the globe. But beyond just exposing the world to the incredible life of Zamperini, it will give audiences a peek at the inner workings of another exceedingly impressive creature: director Angelina Jolie. “I was looking for something to do and studying what was out there as a director,” says Jolie, perched poolside at a villa on the tiny Maltese island of Gozo. “Directing is very different from acting because it takes more than two years of your life, so it has to matter—really matter—in a different way.” It wasn’t until Universal presented Jolie—whose directorial debut, In the Land of Blood and Honey, came and went quietly in 2011—with a Hail Mary list of available ideas gathering dust that she found what she was looking for. “Every time you visit a studio, they give you the projects” that have been in limbo, she says, “and I saw these four sentences on Unbroken. I went home and I said to Brad, ‘I’m really curious about this fi lm—it’s a triumph of the human spirit fi nding faith and forgiveness, and this man’s life seems so interesting.’ And Brad said, ‘Oh, honey, that project has been around forever.’ ” Jolie never lost interest, however, and says she was halfway through Laura Hillenbrand’s 2010 Zamperini

WRITTEN BY ADAM RATHE

biography, Unbroken, when she knew she had to make the film. “I fought for it for months,” Jolie says, “and it became less about wanting to do a film and more that I wanted to be close to be somebody like Louie. I felt I needed to go on that journey, that it would make me a better person if I could. I was begging not only to be the director—I was begging to have the opportunity to spend two years of my life focused on Louie Zamperini.” According to Peter Cramer, Universal’s co-president of production, Jolie’s years on-screen and her gusto for the project won her the job. “I don’t think anybody would consider Angelina Jolie to be in the same league as a director just out of film school,” he says. “She’s obviously had a tremendous amount of experience in the movie business prior to becoming a director, all of which served her very well when she did decide to get behind the camera. We weren’t looking at her as a new director any more than people were when Clint Eastwood or Robert Redford fi rst stepped behind the camera.” So, in 2013 Jolie got her wish and set out for Australia for almost four months of filming. She also found her Louie. “It was an enormous opportunity, beyond anything I had the audacity of expecting,” says Jack O’Connell, the 24-year-old English actor who landed the role. “I’ve been knocking on the door, waiting for someone to give me a chance to branch out, and Louie’s just perfect for that.” Casting her leading man—a role that required an international search—was no easy feat. “The trick of casting Louie was that he had to be somebody that was really a man’s man,” Jolie says, “but also somebody who had a strong sense of family, a talented actor with a deep emotional well.” O’Connell, a veteran of the British teen soap Skins

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and a series of rough-and-tumble independent films, did the trick. “Jack had this combination of fight, fire and spirit,” says Jolie. “As soon as I met him, I knew he was Louie.” She rounded out her cast with a host of other young actors, including Domhnall Gleeson, Garrett Hedlund and the Japanese singer Miyavi. And while headlining the film was a huge boon for O’Connell, who’s since landed on so many rising-star lists his next gig could be at NASA, the work he was in for wasn’t going to be easy. To portray Zamperini as a brittle prisoner of war, O’Connell is said to have been on an 800-calorie-per-day diet, and to play him as an Olympic athlete, O’Connell had to train to become a world-class runner. “It’s hard to highlight one particular point because the whole film was very fucking brutal,” O’Connell says. “The worst part of the shoot was the first half. We were doing the final POW sequences and there was a lot of coal involved, so everything was blackened, and there were days when you couldn’t engage outside of the scene because you had to preserve your energy. When I had to come back and play an Olympian, I stupidly thought it would be easier than playing a POW, but it wasn’t. That really stuck with me.” The film shoot was emotionally fraught as well.

Just before arriving in Australia, O’Connell—who as a teenager lost his father to pancreatic cancer— discovered a close friend of his had been diagnosed with liver cancer. Dealing with the off-screen stress gave O’Connell and Jolie—who publicly dealt with a preventative double mastectomy and who lost her own mother to ovarian cancer in 2007—the opportunity to deepen their personal relationship. “I was feeling my worst, with the diet and the effects of preparation, and the only way I could possibly see him was if someone were to expedite the journey,” he recalls. “And Angie arranged for a helicopter. The same weekend, she organized some of my closest people around a table to have a meal with me. That exceeded the requirements of a director. It made me think how I had kicked the shit out of myself for two months before starting the film, but all I wanted to do was be on set and repay the favor. That isn’t a conventional actor-director relationship, so for her to make me feel like this was a two-way investment was so important.” For Jolie—a mother of six and internationally crusading humanitarian—directing a group of young men in a film about war was an experience that tested her resolve. “All the boys had to starve—even the extras—and we’d have days when there were 200 young men just


standing in the heat,” Jolie recalls. “The mother in me wanted to stop and put everyone under a tent and give them water and just call it a day. The other side of me had to do my job and push it forward.” As much as her actors were pressed to go beyond their limits, Jolie says directing Unbroken forced her to supersede her own. On one particular day, she had a large group of actors, some missing limbs, standing out in the sun, waiting for shadows to be cast perfectly before filming could begin. Jolie says her instinct was to give the boys a break, but a military adviser on the film offered a different solution. “He made everybody come to attention and then made them start doing push-ups,” she says, her eyes unbelievingly wide even months later. “I thought, Oh no, but they did the push-ups and were tested and pressed and had purpose, and 10 minutes later they

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—ANGELINA JOLIE were all smiling.” She adds, “I learned something about men that day. I learned that a challenge is good for everyone, so I was never again shy to push, knowing that we had a real purpose.” The lessons Jolie learned on set didn’t stay there; her three sons benefitted as well. “In the back of my mind, I wanted to make a film that would help my boys become better men,” she says. “They know Louie’s story, so I’m able to say to them that it’s not bad to be full of fire—it’s what you choose to do with that fire.” As for what Jolie’s chosen to do with her own fire, directing seems to be it. After years in front of the camera and a slew of awards—including an Oscar for 1999’s Girl, Interrupted—she says her focus from here on out will be on making films, not starring in them. “I’ve never been comfortable as an actor; I’ve never loved being in front of the camera,” Jolie says. “I didn’t ever think I could direct, but I hope I’m able to have a career at it because I’m much happier.” Is the plan to give up acting entirely? She smiles. “Absolutely.” But not yet. In fact, where we’re sitting is just a stone’s throw from the set of By the Sea, a period love story that Jolie wrote and is directing—and will star in, alongside her longtime partner and new husband, Brad Pitt. (It’s something of a family affair: The couple’s 13-year-old son, Maddox, is working on the film as a production assistant. “It’s so weird,” Jolie notes.) “Compared to Unbroken, this film is a walk in the


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park,” Jolie says of the movie, which follows a 1970s American couple and their complicated marriage during a trip to France. “The tricky thing is directing myself and directing Brad. It’s hard, dramatic material, and we’re balancing.” It’s the first time the couple, who met on the set of 2005’s Mr. & Mrs. Smith, have worked together since their August wedding. Not that things have changed much for them—“I think when it’s right, it feels the exact same [as before],” Jolie says of married life—but working side by side can take some getting used to. “It’s a heavy film, and it’s not easy for us,” she says. “But even as you struggle through it, you’re in the trenches together and you don’t expect it to be easy. We’re challenging each other and that’s a really good thing.” Challenges, of course, are part of any creative process. And while Unbroken came with its share of difficulties, perhaps none hit harder than the death, at 97 years old, of Zamperini in July. “I was mor tif ied when I heard of his passing,” O’Connell says. “I always had this fantasy of the two of us on the red carpet and I’d be in the background and it would be ‘The Louie Show.’ That’s not going to be the case now, but we’ve got to show the world this film in his honor. It is a tribute to a man who’s no

longer with us.” Jolie echoes the sentiment. “The most overwhelming part of making the film, for me, was bringing it to Louie in the hospital and watching him watch his

“I’ve never loved being in front of the camera.” —Angelina Jolie life,” she says. “He gave us so much and he inspired us so much, but as sad as I am about losing him, I’m so grateful to have known him.” Above all, Jolie says she’s honored to have been given the chance to tell Zamperini’s story and to offer him immortality, even if it’s only the celluloid kind. “I still can’t believe I got to make this movie,” she says. “When it comes to being a director, it’s so new for me and I’m quite shy about it because I’m still learning. I’ll feel better when audiences start to see it. I think we’re on the right track, but I’m not breathing easy just yet.”


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Blanchett, in a GIORGIO ARMANI shirt and CHLOÉ jacket, wears a Portofino Midsize Automatic timepiece, featuring a 37-millimeter stainlesssteel case, $11,500, IWC, iwc.com.


Cate BLANCHETT

Having kicked off the year with a TRIUMPHANT AWARDS season, the actor considers her options

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ed in theaters next year). “Your attitude doesn’t change when you’re working on a big fi lm,” she says. Especially, she adds, in the case of the half-dozen J.R.R. Tolkien adaptations she’s appeared in, all directed by her fellow antipodean Peter Jackson. “There is no bloat on the set of The Hobbit; no unnecessary 17-member entourages,” she says. “Peter has an enormous crew, but everyone is working, and you really feel like you’re on the set of an independent film because he’s got the same hunger that a young, independent filmmaker has. And he carries that into every minute, even though he’s working across three stages, shooting three different films at once.” Blanchett says that she has considered directing a movie, although she’d like to wait until her three sons—who range in age from 6 to 13—are a little older. “It does take up a lot of your time, so that would be quite complex for me at the moment,” she says. She is, however, genuinely bothered by the difficulties faced by female directors in Hollywood. “I think that women have to get a bit pissed off, to reactivate themselves,” she says. “I feel like we’ve given away a lot, or let a lot of ground go without consciously realizing it, and it’s time to claim it back. And it’s very important for [the industry] to have access to directors of different interests.” She did her part, certainly, in the six years that she served alongside her husband, Andrew Upton, as the co-artistic director of the Sydney Theatre Company (a position that Upton, an accomplished writer and director, continues to hold on his own). “It was something that we were very, very conscious of when we took on the role,” she explains. “And, as a result, Andrew’s lineup for the next year is primarily female directors, not as an equal opportunity thing but because they are out there, and they are good.” Still, Blanchett does seem to be relishing the extra time that she’s enjoyed since relinquishing the position a while back. “It was wonderful,” she says, “but I’m feeling quite free of responsibility.” There’s that idea again, of freedom. She has a few more movies at various stages of readiness, including a live action version of Cinderella and a Todd Haynes–directed period piece called Carol (both due out next year), but beyond that, she’s looking to tick off a bucket list that includes working with Ang Lee, Jane Campion, Sof ia Coppola and Martin Scorsese, again. There’s always a hunger, in Hollywood, for the next big thing, but clearly, it’s good to be a veteran. PHOTOGRAPHED BY PETER LINDBERGH

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he’s been working steadily for two decades and has spent most of that time at the very top of her industry, having gained worldwide fame and acclaim. Yet, during an interview conducted on a sun-bathed terrace at the Splendido resort in Portofi no, Italy, Cate Blanchett seems as utterly open to whatever the future might bring as any ingenue. A guest of Swiss watchmaker IWC, she’s here for a photo shoot with longtime collaborator Peter Lindbergh—the results of which will debut during this year’s Art Basel Miami Beach—and feeling particularly settled. “I’m quite enjoying the freedom of thinking, ‘What’s next?’ ” she says. “I’m liking that sense of not knowing what’s coming.” Which makes a certain kind of sense: Having won every major acting award available to those working in Englishlanguage cinema (multiple times), the 45-year-old Australian actress has nothing left to prove. That doesn’t mean that Blanchett is resting on her laurels. To the contrary, she’s had a remarkably busy year. She began 2014 by winning the Oscar, the Golden Globe and the BAFTA (among others) for her portrayal of the suddenly destitute, increasingly unhinged title character of Woody Allen’s Blue Jasmine, and then returned to the stage to star opposite Isabelle Huppert in an acclaimed, limited-run New York City revival of Jean Genet’s The Maids. In between, she appeared in a couple of movies, including The Monuments Men, and shot a few more; not bad, considering that, as she says, “I emerged from Blue Jasmine thinking that it was the end of my career.” Truly? “I knew that people would want to see it irrespective of whether I was hopeless or extraordinary, because it was a Woody Allen fi lm. And I knew that the writing was good, that he would make an interesting film, and that he would survive.” Nevertheless, she admits, “You never know. Even if you put all of the right components together, sometimes it doesn’t lift off. You can’t legislate for it. There is no formula.” Maybe not, but Blanchett’s current project is as close as Hollywood comes to a sure thing: This month, she reprises her role as the elven ruler Galadriel in The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies. She insists that her approach is the same whether she’s working on a would-be blockbuster or an artier indie (like the pair of movies she’s made with director Terrence Malick, at least one of which is expect-


MEN of the YEAR

Inside the minds of the actors who gave 2014’s most ASTONISHING PERFORMANCES

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t’s long been a goal of Edward Norton’s to work with director Alejandro González Iñárritu, so when the actor got his hands on a copy of the script for Birdman, he knew he had to act fast. “I think I read the script at 2 A.M., and I was meeting Alejandro for coffee by nine,” Norton says. “To me it was a no-brainer. Immediately I was very excited about doing this.” His enthusiasm paid off. As Mike Shiner, a veteran stage actor and confirmed hellion who complicates the plans of a one-time action star (Michael Keaton) staging his comeback on Broadway, Norton’s fantastic. Furthermore, he says that he relished the chance to play the sort of ham he’d encountered during his own life in show business. “If you’re someone who comes up in theater, Mike is immediately recognizable as one of those wonderfully larger-than-life characters,” he says. “There are those actors you hear about—famously brilliant and tempestuous—who become part of the romance of life in the theater. When I was reading Mike, it brought to mind those stories.” For Norton, playing that kind of grandstander was a long time coming. He says, “It was the kind of experience you aspire to when you get into this business.”

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nitially, Robert Duvall says, the jury was out when it came to The Judge. “It didn’t appeal to me,” he recalls. “I really needed time to think about it.” Nevertheless, he came to love his role (opposite Robert Downey Jr.) as tough-as-nails Judge Joseph Palmer. The part required Duvall to portray Palmer—a longtime judge with a seriously dysfunctional family who finds himself on an unfamiliar side of the bench—at both his most ferocious and his most helpless. Luckily, the actor had a strategy for pulling off such a complicated character: “You daydream in the middle of the day and you dream during the night about the part,” Duvall says. “You go in each day and try to meet the demands, which are different from any other day and any other scene. So, you just go in and operate, and let it come from within yourself.” Duvall says he filmed some of the most harrowing scenes of his career for The Judge, which follows Palmer as his faculties fail him, sometimes graphically, and he comes to begrudgingly rely on the son he’s long been estranged from. Looking back, he says he’s glad he took the risk. “It’s hard to decide to do something like this initially, but not so hard to watch now,” he says, “because it’s just making believe.”


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ff-screen, J.K. Simmons and his Whiplash co-star Miles Teller got along famously. “I’m older than Miles’ dad, but our relationship is sometimes like two knucklehead eighth graders,” Simmons says. But when the cameras were rolling, the twosome enacted a very different dynamic. In the film, Simmons’ Terence Fletcher is a top-notch music instructor who could, on a good day, double as a drill sergeant. Teller is a student desperate to please him. For Simmons, himself in possession of a degree in music, the character, however brutal, was too good to pass up. “My first take when I read the script was, ‘This guy is a beast,’ ” he says, “but it was so well written that I completely understood where he was coming from.” That didn’t exactly make the process of filming the movie easy, though. “The days were long and intense and we had many, many shots every day,” Simmons says of the 19-day shoot. “It was a little bit like running a marathon at the pace of a sprint.” And while the actor was able to put some of his musical training to use playing jazz piano in the film, he admits he never had a teacher like Fletcher. “The closest I’ve experienced,” he notes, “was probably a football coach.”

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ohn du Pont, the character Steve Carell portrays in Bennett Miller’s Foxcatcher, was a convicted murderer. But Carell says that when he took on the role, he was intent on digging deeper into the man’s being. “I didn’t necessarily approach him as a dark character,” says Carell, whose transformation into du Pont required heavy makeup and a prosthetic nose. “It’s always about making your best estimate of who a character is, and with him, that was challenging.” Another challenge for the famously funny Carell was making his first film based on a true story—specifically that of du Pont, an heir who funded an Olympic wrestling team that would eventually be his undoing. “This was a real person, and I had never portrayed a real person before, so there was an added responsibility,” he says. “I had to try to the best of my ability to do justice to the type of person he might have been. I had a responsibility to all the other people involved, and I think each one of us felt that obligation.” Once the makeup came off, Carell admits the character stuck with him. “He lingered for a while,” the actor says. “It’s a tragic story, and it’s difficult even to talk about. It’s sad on so many different levels, and it was a tough thing to let go of. It was a very moving experience.”


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Most Violent Year takes place during an early 1980s crime wave in New York City, and while today’s Big Apple is undoubtedly a safer place, the film’s star, Oscar Isaac, insists that there’s much that hasn’t changed. “One thing that’s still there,” he says, “is the idea you’ve got to hustle to make it, whether it’s 1981 or 2014. My character’s an immigrant, and I had to figure out how he relates to other people.” But Isaac says that making the film—which was directed by J.C. Chandor and co-stars Jessica Chastain—did allow him to channel a grittier outlook than a modern-day New Yorker might have. “You explore aspects of yourself whenever you go into a character,” he says of playing a man whose family and business are threatened by the city’s upheaval, “and this one had a little bit of the sociopathic nature of people who are overly focused on success.” So, was it a relief to walk away from a role that came with such heavy baggage? “Sure,” the actor says, “but it was fun to inhabit that space for a while. I enjoyed that.”

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or Chris Rock to get the kind of leading role he’s most desired, he says he always knew he’d have to pen it himself. “I write with myself in mind because no one really writes for me,” says Rock, who wrote, directed and stars in the witty comedy Top Five. “I’m not writing for Denzel Washington or Matt Damon—those guys have scripts coming every hour. I’m always writing for me.” Luckily, he has great material. Top Five follows a single, pivotal day in the life of comedian (and recovering addict) Andre Allen. His first serious movie is about to be released, and his marriage to a reality star is imminent. Some of which Rock knows about firsthand. Sort of. “Andre’s life is all about trying not to get high, and I don’t really have that problem,” he says. “Andre Allen, the character, is an asshole. He brings security around and he wears shades inside; he’s like the prototype of a hotshot comedian.” Rock himself is assuredly more modest. “I’m humbled by the whole thing,” he says of the film, which was a hit at the Toronto International Film Festival. “I’ve never really gotten accolades for acting or writing. It’s nice to see all this work pay off.”


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hen Ralph Fiennes first considered a part in Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel, he knew the role of the eccentric concierge M. Gustave was for him. “Wes said, ‘Tell me which part you’d like to play,’” Fiennes recalls, “which was quite funny because there’s really only one great part.” Gustave is indeed the film’s plum role, but it required Fiennes, an alumnus of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, to attempt something he wasn’t entirely comfortable with: comedy. “I’m not naturally a funny person,” he says. “It’s essentially a comedic film and that has to do with timing and rhythm and phrasing. I certainly wanted someone who could guide me, so working with Wes was what you might call the fun part.” For audiences, Fiennes was the fun part, deftly delivering Anderson’s hilarious lines and proving he can play more than Shakespearean heroes and supervillains. As a bonus, he says, one often overlooked demographic has been noticeably enthusiastic about his role. “Concierges in hotels are very friendly these days,” he says. “They seem to feel like their tribe has been recognized, and they’ve liked that. It’s been appreciated.”

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Opposite page: Topcoat, $6,995, RALPH LAUREN PURPLE LABEL, 212-606-2100. This page: Overcoat, $12,768, KITON, kiton.it. Sail Rigger shirt, $40, LANDS’ END, landsend.com. Pants, $1,895 for full suit, LANVIN, barneys. com. Spall photographed on location in the Hamilton Penthouse, Corinthia Hotel London.

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imothy Spall’s portrayal of the controversial 19th-century painter J.M.W. Turner in Mr. Turner was a long time in the making. In 2006, he explains, “I was walking in London near where Mike Leigh has an office, and I bumped into him and he said to me, ‘I’m making a film about Turner, do you want to play him?’ And I said, ‘Yes, I’d love to.’” Four years passed and, with Turner on his mind, Spall phoned Leigh to ask if the offer still stood. The director said it did, then added, “Will you also do me the favor of learning how to paint?” Spall agreed. Of course, it took more than painting for the actor to get inside the head of the landscape artist, who famously spent four hours strapped to the mast of a ship in order to observe, and then document, a nocturnal snowstorm. “It was our work to be detectives and see what he was made of,” Spall says. “What was his emotional interior like, and how did that present itself as a human being?” The answer, it seems, came from the late artist himself. “The one thing that Turner did palpably is work,” Spall says. “He never discussed it, he just did it. And if you want to do anything that’s really, really good, you can’t just sit there and press a button, you’ve got to work your bollocks off. That’s what this film is about.”


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o play English mathematician Alan Turing in The Imitation Game, it was important for Benedict Cumberbatch to walk the line between fact and fiction. “It’s tricky to get the balance right between storytelling and authenticity,” Cumberbatch says. “Being true to the character and being honest to him, and at the same time trying to tell a cinematic version of the story, that’s always a challenge.” Of course, Turing’s story is plenty fantastic even without being embellished. Known today as a godfather of the modern computer, Turing lead the team that cracked the Nazi’s infamous Enigma code, thereby helping the Allies to win World War II. But in the wake of this achievement, Turing was prosecuted for homosexuality; he was later chemically castrated. He died in 1954 from cyanide poisoning, in what many suspect was a suicide. Cumberbatch says it was a privilege to play someone whose contribution to history has been so overlooked. “It’s an extraordinary thing to link this mildmannered, slightly different scientist to the spying and secrets involved with killing the Enigma code,” he says. “It’s a bit like The Avengers, except these are real superheroes and they did it all in a little town in the southeast of England—and they had to keep it quiet for 35 years. I think we can all take a lot from that.”

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Opposite page: Brooklands Blouson jacket, $795, BELSTAFF, belstaff.com. Oxford shirt, $75, J.CREW, jcrew.com. Commute Crew T-shirt, $55, ADRIANO GOLDSCHMIED, agjeans.com. Cumberbatch photographed on location in the Hamilton Penthouse, Corinthia Hotel London. This page: Topcoat, $6,995; Turtleneck, $995, RALPH LAUREN PURPLE LABEL, 212-606-2100. Pants, $2,800 for full suit, GUCCI, gucci.com. Shoes, price upon request, DIOR HOMME, dior.com.

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hen it came to playing Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything, Eddie Redmayne faced something of a learning curve. “I gave up science when I was about 14,” he says, “but I started reading A Brief History of Time knowing that I had to for this job. I got to chapter three and thought I understood it, but if someone asked me to explain what I’d read, I would have had no idea.” Fortunately, portraying Hawking, the world’s most recognizable living scientist, turned out to be easier than understanding his work. “The thing that was perhaps most complicated to deal with was the extraordinary mixture of what a privilege it was to play him and what a responsibility it was,” Redmayne says. “I felt that weight from the day I was cast and until Stephen saw the film.” What was Hawking’s take on Redmayne’s performance? “Just before he went into the screening, I said, ‘Stephen I’m very nervous about what you’ll think,’ ” Redmayne recalls. “And he took a moment—it takes him a while now to speak—and he said in his iconic voice, ‘I will let you know what I think, good or otherwise.’ ” Lucky for Redmayne, he liked it.


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ome actors-turned-directors prefer not to wear both hats in a single film, but Tommy Lee Jones says he doesn’t mind the extra work. “They’re two different jobs,” he says plainly. “I don’t have much trouble doing both of them at the same time.” He certainly didn’t seem strained in The Homesman, the moving western he wrote, directed and starred in this year. He plays George Briggs, an army deserter who joins a quartet of women on a troubled trip from Nebraska to Iowa in 1854. Jones says the shoot— like the journey it depicts—wasn’t always easy. “We had rain, hail, sleet, snow and boiling sun—and then went to lunch,” he says. “It was demanding, but very beautiful and rewarding.” Indeed, Jones more than pulled his weight on the film, and he now notes that holding multiple positions had its perks. “I wrote the film,” he says wryly, “so I didn’t have to spend a lot of time studying my lines.”

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he role of Maziar Bahari in Rosewater was appealing to Gael García Bernal for a number of reasons: One was that Bahari’s story—he’s an Iranian-Canadian journalist who was jailed in Tehran while covering the 2009 presidential elections—made for a compelling, inspiring tale. Another was that the film marks the directorial debut of Jon Stewart. “He has an accute intelligence,” Bernal says, “and he put me off balance in a very good way.” Working in Jordan on the movie, which follows Bahari’s incarceration, might have been challenging, but Bernal says it was never a chore. “It wasn’t hard to go to work on this film,” he says. “On the contrary it was a great experience. Like any job, it had difficult parts, but nothing will change if this film doesn’t exist.” Rosewater addresses freedom of speech and freedom of the press among other issues and relies heavily on Bernal to portray a man whose interest in fairness lands him in prison. “I think the consequences of this movie are yet to be seen,” Bernal says. “In terms of doing a job with a big heart and attempting to put a finger on an important subject, it was one of the best roles of my life.”


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Trench dress, $1,590, MAX MARA, 212-8796100. Hair: Harry Josh for HarryJosh.com. Makeup: Fabiola for Anastasia of Beverly Hills at TraceyMattingly.com. Manicure: Deborah Lippmann at the Magnet Agency. Photographed at her home in NYC.


HILARY SWANK

Back in the spotlight with a pair of brave new roles, the CONSUMMATE PRO talks craft & commitment

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WRITTEN BY JOANNE KAUFMAN

of a peach-blueberry pie, reveals her secret for creating lemon curd and boasts happily, “I’ve learned to make a tarte au citron, which I have to say I’ve perfected.” Swank does turn serious, and eloquent, when describing the character she plays, a strong-willed pioneer, in her latest film, The Homesman. The film co-stars Tommy Lee Jones, who also directed the off beat western. It’s a role that suits her well, she believes, and not just because the movie is set in her native Nebraska. “I’ve had instilled in me good morals, good values and good manners, and to me that’s the character I’m playing,” Swank says. “This is a woman who does the right thing not because she wants applause or for someone to like her more; she just does it because it’s right. I feel that, and feel we need more of that.” What Swank herself had to deal with—the childhood poverty and slammed doors—has become a source of inspiration to others. “That’s incredible to me,” she says. “I see how people think they can’t achieve something because of their economic situation. It’s just not the case. You can look at any circumstance and make it what you want it to be, even if you’re talking about this other movie I just did.” She’s referring to You’re Not You, the recent release she produced and stars in as a musician stricken with ALS. “All these patients I talked to, the silver lining for a lot of them was, ‘Having a terminal illness is making me live the last few years of my life knowing I have this expiration date right in front of me,’ ” she says. “Those people were an inspiration to me. They’re dealing with a grave situation, but they’re looking at it with an attitude that makes you think, ‘Yeah, let’s put things into perspective.’ ” A tour guide who has left his bus behind approaches the table. “Everybody loves you,” he says, pointing at the excited passengers on the top of the double-decker. “Would you wave to them?” She lifts her hand in a brief salute and smiles gamely as iPhone cameras click. “I’ve probably got food in my teeth,” she says ruefully, as she stands up and prepares to leave. The next night, I come home to a voicemail message from Swank. When I call back, she says she is concerned about something she said about ALS and wants to clarify it. “I wasn’t suggesting that people ignore their situation,” she says. “Being an optimist doesn’t mean you can’t be aware of the reality, but my point is never to give up.” Swank continues: “I sometimes read magazine articles about me to see if something comes across the way I meant it to come across. If not, I can re-form it the next time. That’s the artist in me.” I reassure her. And then I request her recipe for lemon curd. “Maybe,” she says. “First let’s see how the story turns out.”

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ilary Swank, her dog Kai at her feet, is having lunch at an outside table at Barbuto, a carefully casual Italian restaurant on Washington Street in New York City’s West Village. It’s a risky seating choice for an actress who generally keeps a low profile, but Swank has a pair of new movies to promote— You’re Not You and The Homesman—even if she doesn’t intend to allot a great deal of time to this interview. “Thirty minutes,” Swank tells me as I sit down. “Because you know this isn’t a cover.” In other words, the focus and commitment that the double-Oscarwinning actress brings to her work also comes into play in her media relations. Nevertheless, we end up talking for an hour. Part of the reason could be she’s waiting for her car, which is late. And part of it could be that she is enjoying her lunch of mussels, striped sea bass with farro and sautéed greens. But I’d like to think the chief reason is our absorbing conversation, which ranges from her determination to take subways and otherwise live a regular life (“I don’t understand how you can play people if you lose touch with people”) to her passion for acting. “I treat every performance as if it’s my last one,” she says. “I don’t want to leave anything on the table.” Some of what the 40-year-old says about her career, it’s true, she’s said many, many times before. But even if this is take 50 for lines like, “I love people. I love people. I love how we all have our own unique stories,” she utters the words as though for the first time. Depending on your point of view, this is an actress who has a script and is sticking to it or someone who shows remarkable forbearance to the questions about her trailer park upbringing and her meteoric rise to fame in the late 1990s. If you’re looking for a short answer, ask Swank about her private life. Me: “Are you seeing anyone?” Swank [pause]: “There is someone in my life. There is someone I’ve been dating for a couple of years now.” Me: “He’s the Frenchman I read about?” Swank [grudgingly]: “He’s French.” Me: “Laurent Fleury?” Swank [more grudgingly]: “That’s his name.” Me: “Do you see yourself getting married again?” Swank [even more grudgingly]: “Hopefully, someday, yeah.” The controversies in Swank’s life—how she was paid to attend a 2011 birthday party for Chechnya’s dictator, Ramzan Kadyrov, and later apologized for it, after which she parted ways with her PR team—are even less welcome than the boyfriend queries. If you want a full and animated answer, ask Swank about baking. She holds up her arm, pointing to a “war wound” earned in the service


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After the movies get made come the people responsible for really MAKING THE MOVIES

conversation and eventually driving box-office takings nationwide. (It doesn’t always work: A Walk Among the Tombstones grossed just $26 million domestically during its fi rst four weeks in theaters.) Peggy Siegal built her company on this smaller-is-better model; in the last decade Andrew Saffi r has too, making the prospect all the more attractive to studios by bringing in fashionable blue chip sponsors like Dior or Chanel to defray the significant costs of bubbly and hors d’oeuvres at the latest boȋte. “I don’t claim to have invented the idea of sponsorship,” says Saffi r, “but I think it was unique to pair fashion sponsors and film; those worlds work well together.” Saffi r spent 11 years as a VP at Ralph Lauren before launching his company in 2005 with a splashy premiere for the Gwyneth Paltrow fi lm Proof. He is described by fi lm-industry insiders and media reporters alike as solicitous and suave, an agile host who makes everyone in the room feel significant and is known for his dapper fashion sensibility, all starched collars and pocket squares and loafers. He regularly appears in the pages of lifestyle magazines with his boyfriend, Daniel Benedict, also a society fi xture. After Saffi r’s fall premiere for the coming-of-age music drama

MAKING IT AS AN EVENT PLANNER IS ALL ABOUT “THE LIST.” Whiplash at Carnegie Hall, Sony Pictures Classics studio boss Tom Bernard lauded Saffir’s talents for getting a movie talked about. “Andrew runs an impeccable show,” he says. “I’ve never seen anything like it in an events group. He runs it like it’s at his house, and he’s a wonderful host.” The intimate event, co-hosted by Brooks Brothers (with booze by Grey Goose), lured creative types like Darren Aronofsky, Paul Haggis and Zac Posen. “He makes [a place like] the Crosby Street Hotel look like it’s a Ziegfeld event,” added Bernard, referring to the storied midtown theater that’s set the scene for many a major film premiere. But while Saffir exudes a calm, calculated charm, the 67-yearold Siegal, who began throwing “tastemaker” film screenings

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n a warm Wednesday night in September, sometime after 10 P. M., Andrew Saffir, the founder of modernday movie salon The Cinema Society, strolled the room at The Top of the Standard hotel with intent, New York’s skyline twinkling dramatically through f loor-toceiling windows on every side. It was the thick of screening season. Armed with their carefully honed lists, a trio of New York characters—events maven Peggy Siegal, operator Andrew Saffi r and upstart Darin Pfeiffer—were throwing bash after bash to get some of the year’s most anticipated pictures seen by the right set. While some fi lm studios greenlight these screenings to lure Academy voters, others simply wish to drum up buzz by attracting the media influencers and A-listers sure to generate an ever-expanding ripple of clicks and column inches. This party, for the Liam Neeson police thriller A Walk Among the Tombstones, was in full swirl, with Neeson ensconced in a corner with an animated Seth Meyers. Along with a coterie of pretty young things with only semi-bold names, the guest list included fashion heavy hitters like Calvin Klein, Donna Karan and Bruce Weber; entertainment types like Andy Cohen and Saturday Night Live’s Cecily Strong; and cultural characters like artist Will Cotton. As the night wore on, the dressy, animated crowd, occasionally lit by a photographer’s flashbulb, settled into banquettes with their passed Standard burgers. Saffi r, whose business model has paired budget-starved fi lm companies with image-savvy, deep-pocketed sponsors and glamorous VIPs, would later e-mail, in a tone polite yet fi rm: “Can you also hopefully mention that people drank Qui Tequila cocktails (named Scudder’s Nightcap, in keeping with the fi lm) and Taittinger Champagne, if possible?” Movie premieres have traditionally been major events, with thousand-person guest lists and red carpets packed with dozens of news outlets. But ever since the economic upheavals of 2001 and 2008, there’s been a shift in New York away from giant movie premieres, which had come to seem both gaudy and wasteful. While they still happen in L.A., to an extent, and for summer popcorn behemoths like The Hunger Games franchise, for more than a decade, film studios have been banking on the power of what they term W.O.M. screenings, for word of mouth. Execs host a privileged few for a small, seated dinner or cocktails and appetizers in the hopes of generating


ray Abraham and Dr. Oz and a bunch of CBS execs. It’s an esteemed crowd, but not the kind of thing that’s going to get you millions of hits the next day.” Notably, the source asked not to be identified lest he risk banishment from Siegal’s obsessed-over list, fusty as he may deem it to be.

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hat mention of online hits is telling: For some time, the movie industry has been undergoing a shift. In 2013, the Motion Picture Association of America released data declaring that it’s the young, those 18- to 25-year-olds, who now buy the largest share of movie tickets (even while the overall number of tickets sold has been flat, facing pressures from digital technology and outlets like Netflix). This younger, social media-savvy crowd is crucial to driving box office results, and they’re more likely to be interested in Beyoncé than F. Murray Abraham. Academy voters—overwhelmingly white, male and on average 63 years old—are one thing, Us Weekly readers and Twitter acolytes something entirely different. Adding a dash of red-carpet heat to even the smallest of events is what Saffir excels at. Saffir is characteristically careful not to mention Siegal by name. But, he notes, “film screenings were a bit drudgerous for people to attend in the past, and you went because you had to go.” Indeed, screenings often took place on Midtown office blocks, with a somewhat staid after-party at this or that buttoned-up eatery. Instead, Saffir lends his events a clubby, Beautiful People vibe, and treats everyone as a VIP. There are financiers and fashion designers, models and movie stars, creating a mood that messages “the place to be” to the attending press. For a party to celebrate the release of Woody Allen’s 2009 film, Whatever Works, guests arrived at Brooklyn’s storied River Cafe by water taxi, lending the night a decidedly pre-Recession glitz. Of the competitive nature of his business, Saffir says, “It’s never a monopoly, that wouldn’t be entirely fair. Occasionally [a film studio] is looking for a different crowd altogether, an older audience, a theatre audience, and I can’t be all things to all people.” Each spring, the arms race moves to Cannes, where Saffir pops up at a slew of parties. In May he appeared at a shindig on Roberto Cavalli’s yacht, along with notables like Sharon Stone, John Travolta and Justin Bieber. “I go to Cannes, well, a) because it’s a lot of fun, but b) I go to see as many films as I can with an eye to working on them,” he says. Despite the yacht parties, Saffir maintains his approachability, clearly crucial in a host. Siegal is also out in force during events like Cannes, the Venice Film From left: Andrew Saffir holding court; Saffir with The Weinstein Company’s Harvey Weinstein; Peggy Siegal with actor Ezra Miller.

Left to right: Angela Pham/BFAnyc.com; Getty Images; Patrick McMullan

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and after-parties in the late 1980s and is often considered the awardsseason go-to, is a ball of nervous, spitfire energy and punchy one-liners. Described by veteran entertainment reporters and industry insiders as by turns brusque, challenging to work with and old-school, Siegal, who declined to be interviewed for this piece, is seen by some as obsessed with strict hierarchy, seeing New York in black and white, divided between those who matter and those who don’t. Says one influential film reporter, “You can go to her things for years and she pretends she doesn’t know who you are. That’s part of her shtick.” Even while her practices sometimes alienate prickly members of the cognoscenti, the sight of Siegal at venues like Le Cirque—madly dashing around the room and moving place cards about with seconds to spare before her guests arrive while berating this season’s young assistant—is nearly as iconic a New York image as the skaters at Rockefeller Center. While known for being tough, she’s also become an artful caricature of herself and seems to be aging in reverse, topping off a 2012 Harper’s Bazaar article titled “24Hour Party Peggy” with a flattering picture showing her at the premiere of Argo wedged impishly between newsman Brian Williams and rocker Sting. In the piece, Siegal says she was the first to convince studios that they could have the same impact by screening a film for 100 people as they could for 1,200 people. Her list of potential guests, she notes, is broken down by an intricate code, which includes details about their children and country houses, lest she need to screen a cartoon or host a summer premiere in the Hamptons. “The minute someone dies they’re off the list,” she deadpanned. Not everyone is amused. “She’s of a [certain] generation,” says one executive who has worked with Siegal. “With Peggy, there always has to be this elitist choreography of who sits next to who. It’s a silliness that’s perhaps about justifying the paycheck from the studios. It’s the kind of social planning that goes back to a Mrs. Kennedy, but she sometimes gets it wrong, and there can be a sloppiness to it.” And yet, concede even her harshest detractors, Peggy Siegal delivers. Her screenings for eventual Oscar winners like Argo, The King’s Speech and Blue Jasmine were highly sought after invitations, even if their execution can be an exhausting process for all involved. “Peggy’s quirkiness is sort of legendary. There have been a hundred times I’ve thought about Peggy’s personality and [wondered] if I wanted to go through it for the sake of a film, but in the end you do,” says the executive, because Siegal connects films to personalities like Charlie Rose or Henry Kissinger and can create an event that lends a movie an extra dash of gravitas. Siegal has cited Brian Williams promoting the 2005 film Good Night, and Good Luck. on his evening broadcast as a signature coup. For those more interested in the sort of high-low, of-the-minute glamour that Saffir brings to the table, Siegal’s much-vaunted list isn’t always the best mix. “Peggy does these luncheons,” purportedly because some long-in-theteeth Academy voters don’t like to stay up late quaffing champagne, scoffs one red-carpet scribe. “Yes, the cast is there. And there will be, like, F. Mur-


From left: Siegal at the Oscars; Siegal flanked by Carine Roitfeld and Marion Cotillard; Darin Pfeiffer on the red carpet; Pfeiffer with Poppy Delevingne and Derek Blasberg.

Festival and the Oscars, penning a column for Avenue (republished by The Huffington Post) on the fame game and its perks. In April 2014, after having been turned away at a party for Madonna, Siegal wrote, “The week before the Oscars, the real Oscar—de la Renta—had invited me to his beachfront paradise in the Dominican Republic with Lord and Lady Astor. In June, the Duke and Duchess of Marlborough are expecting me at Blenheim Palace. So much for not making the cut at Madonna’s.” Private planes feature heavily in her articles. In 2012 she wrote, “I have hitched a night flight on a friend’s G5 to Nice and arrive at Teterboro early enough to sneak three trunks filled with 10 Marchesa gowns onto the plane.”

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Left to right: Patrick McMullan; Getty Images; @darin_downtown Instagram; Billy Farrell/ BFAnyc.com

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ith the business changing, getting the digitally distracted masses into movies is harder, says Saffir, but armed with his list—which he refers to as both his “arsenal” and his “constituency”—he has gone from hosting an event or two a month just nine years ago to what he estimates will be upwards of 70 events in 2014. Adding some young blood to the mix, there’s the blond Darin Pfeiffer. At an October event hosted by Pfeiffer for the Jason Reitman film Men, Women & Children, capped off by a Psychology Today panel on the culture-quake that is modern technology, the vibe was considerably more low-key than at a Siegal or a Saffir screening. Guests wore jeans or khakis. Until the end of 2012, Pfeiffer was at The Peggy Siegal Company. He threw his first solo event, a screening for the Roman Coppola film A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swann III, in January 2013. “Sofia Coppola hosted it,” says Pfeiffer, who has an affinity for music and what he describes as a “downtown and Brooklyn” scene, peppered with influencers like the members of Vampire Weekend or MGMT, as well as young actors like Elizabeth Olsen and Ezra Miller. At the door to the Men, Women & Children after-party at the Hudson Hotel’s Library Bar (a clever nod to the analog world of print longed for in the movie), Pfeiffer and his colleague Melanie Blum, who also previously worked for Siegal, greeted guests. Pfeiffer, Blum and their team, including what Pfeiffer calls “an army of interns,” seem to be cultivating a knack for screening indie movies with a Millennial appeal, like Boyhood or The Fault in Our Stars. They work in both New York and Los Angeles. The following night, Pfeiffer screened White Bird in a Blizzard with an after-party at 303 Broome where, he says, the crowd danced until two with the film’s star, Shailene Woodley. Pfeiffer’s enthusiasm is infectious and his business is growing. In October, he had 11 events on the slate on both coasts and notes that his workload has doubled over the last year. Social media is invaluable to what he does, and Pfeiffer regularly curates guest lists to include YouTube stars as well as actors, rockers, novelists and artists. After a showing of Frank, a Maggie Gyllenhaal flick about an indie musician, Pfeiffer gushed on Instagram, “And I got to meet #jackwhite. Kind of an amazing night. #FrankFilm #afterglow.” Still, Pfeiffer (who declined to give his exact age) bristles at the suggestion that he delivers a youthful crowd rather than old-school ink. Getting on-

air talent to promote a film is still a goal, even as he curates lists of cultural influencers who lend a movie and a party a more general air of cool. “We did an event for James Cameron, and Regis Philbin was there, Elizabeth Vargas was there, Charlie Rose was there—I invite him to everything,” he says. “That’s why I don’t think [my age] is relevant.” Insiders say Pfeiffer has cultivated goodwill with movie studios. Matt Cowal, the senior VP of marketing and publicity at Magnolia Pictures, worked with Pfeiffer on White Bird in a Blizzard and Frank. “Darin always puts together thoughtful, exciting and fun events for us,” says Cowal. “It doesn’t matter if the event is small with a tight budget, or big and glamorous—he delivers the right people, and he can do it in New York or L.A. He’s cultivated relationships with many up-and-coming actors and filmmakers, so we especially like using him on smart, younger-skewing projects.” Fighting to keep ticket sales from crashing in the face of ever-increasing competition for consumers’ entertainment dollars, studios are realizing that the best approach to generating buzz may be a more comprehensive one. Studios now often host small screenings for multiple audiences, and might use Siegal for one crowd, Saffir or Pfeiffer for another. Marcy Granata Currier, the former head of marketing and PR for Miramax and an Academy voter, says she regularly gets invites to more than one premiere for the same film. Both Siegal and Saffir have screened Woody Allen pictures; Siegal and Pfeiffer showed Richard Linklater’s Boyhood, a likely Academy contender and the sort of auteur-made movie that’s hot in artisan-obsessed Brooklyn. As such, Pfeiffer planned its summer premiere at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, with an after-party at Skylight One Hanson that included ironic, unstuffy treats like snow cones and nachos (guests like J.Crew creative director Jenna Lyons and comedian Jenny Slate—@jennyslate, 139,000 Twitter followers—apparently approved; Vogue covered). And while the notion of a deep-seated rivalry between the three is intriguing—behind closed doors, says a source, Siegal likes to say that she truly cares about promoting films, while Andrew Saffir “only cares about promoting himself”—Granata Currier feels that studio heads rarely listen to such white noise. The point is to get people to the movies, and if that means screening a film multiple times to reach multiple audiences, so be it. “You want young kids to fall in love with it as well as socialites and Academy members,” says Granata Currier. “It’s an opportunity for them to have an emotional connection with a film.” So while Saffir and Pfeiffer may be making their own dramatic tweaks to Siegal’s vision of who matters in New York (and convincing studio execs that they know who ultimately has the power to sell movie tickets), the fight to get those distractible, busy VIPs to clear their calendars, silence their smart phones and submit to the magic of the movies is the true battle. For Saffir, that means dazzling a fickle crowd over and over again with the right recipe of crowd and venue. “It’s work, it’s definitely work,” he says. “The thing I love so much about New York is the incredible diversity that exists here. There’s fashion, there’s art, there’s media. All of these incredible worlds exist here. I try to create the best amalgam of people. And ultimately, through that buzz, to get people to buy tickets and keep seeing movies.”


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This page: OrtakÜy Mosque was built in 1853 in the neobaroque style on the banks of the Bosporus. Opposite: A view of Asia from the legendary Çiragan Palace, an Ottoman palace-turned-hotel.


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h r o u g h o u t h i s t o r y, Tu rkey has found itself at any nu mb e r of c r o s s r o a d s — relig ious, polit ical, geo graphic—and so it remains. In August, the country elected a new, and controversial, president whose paternalistic rule as prime minister inspired protests in 2013. Appeals for admission into the European Union are ongoing. And although Turkey became a secular state in the 1920s, the population is still predominantly Muslim, with an eastern border shared with Syria. Which of course begs a question asked by many a friend and father before my trip: Is it safe to go? The short answer, of course, is yes, as safe as any foreign—or domestic, for that matter—travel is these days. Destinations in

western Turkey are many hundreds of miles away from what’s happening on the borders shared with Syria and Iraq. That said, the ever-changing nature of the modern world makes a good case for taking certain precautions. As when planning any trip that’s

extensive, expensive or far in the future, it’s not a bad idea to invest in trip insurance when traveling to Turkey. Because the answer isn’t to avoid going altogether. Turkey is a complex, magical place, and a lot of fun, with a little something

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Whether by land, sea or air, TURKEY is a country of many views, each more beautiful than the last


160 Above: Istanbul’s iconic Sultanahmet Camii, more familiarly known as the Blue Mosque, was commissioned in 1609 with six minarets—rather scandalous at the time, since most mosques (then and now) top out at four. Opposite: The more than 20,000 blue tiles, handmade in the Iznik style, lining the domed ceilings of the mosque led to its nickname. Although it draws as many as 5 million visitors a year, it still functions as a working mosque.


for everyone: history, culture, sun, sea, nature and some truly excellent food. Herein, the people and places to know if you go. The guide: After just a few minutes with Vedat Palandöken, a fifth generation Istanbulu who’s been taking visitors around the historic Old City for 50 years, it’s clear your tour will not be textbook. With half of the city in Europe and the other half in Asia, Istanbul quite literally straddles East and West, the gleaming Bosporus in the middle, and Palandöken knows

Argos hotel is “a village with a reception desk.”

the construction of the Blue Mosque. He also offers plenty of more practical k nowledge, like how to skip the line at Topkapi Palace; which is the best of the many baklava stands in the Spice Bazaar (Karaköy Güllüoğlu, and try the double pistachio); and the Turkish towel

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the town from every which way. His walking guides of Istanbul’s most important sites are told in fascinating (and precise) detail, down to the breakfast (and wife) one sultan favored and the ego-driven particulars that inf luenced


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Above: Perched above Pigeon Valley, Argos in Cappadocia was fashioned into a hotel by carving into a hillside of soft rock. Below, from top: Argos’ wine cellar holds some 70,000 bottles; an on-site garden provides fresh produce for its restaurant, Seki.

vendor favored by Jessica Alba, because, well, it just so happens he’d been here with her a few months earlier (it’s Sivasli Yazmacisi, a tiny stall near the center of the Grand Bazaar). Although Palandöken has never been to the U.S., he can say with certainty that an imperial seal that Sultan Abdülmecid sent the U.S. became par t of the Washi ng t on Monu me nt — Joh n McCain told him so. But the na me - d roppi ng is not for

show. Palandöken has become the VIP goto because he’s that good. Over mid-tour tosts (a sort of grilled cheese sandwich), ask him to tell you the story of how, as a girl, his aunt delivered a basket of eggs to an ailing Prime Minister Ismet Inönü, who then helped her grow up to become one of the country’s first female bank presidents. The hotel: Carved into the soft rock and volcanic ash that makes up most of the landscape of Cappadocia, a region of fairy chimneys and rock pinnacles about 450 miles from Istanbul, Argos is one of the many local “cave hotels” that draw from Cappadocia’s history as an underground


Cappadocia is one of the world’s best spots for hot air ballooning. Local laws allow for as many as 150 balloons in the air at once, which cruise 1,500 feet above volcanic ash formations, olive groves and apricot orchards.

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Above: A tree strung with nazar—“evil eye”—charms overlooking Pigeon Valley in Cappadocia. Right: The rocky shoreline of Altinkum beach in Çesme.

shelter for Christians f leeing persecution. But it’s not kitsch: The 53-room hotel is act ually built around ancient subter ranean kitchens, bedrooms and chapels, and

lage with a reception desk”—and it is the perfect home base from which to explore Cappadocia’s peaks and valleys either on foot or by hot air balloon.

A trip on a gulet is a practice in blissful nothingness. rooms are classic, comfor table and entirely modern. Some have terraces, others offer in-room plunge pools and all come with a bottle of wine produced by Argos’ own winery, using grapes grown on the property. Meanwhile, a garden cascading down the hillside provides the in-house restaurant, Seki, with fresh vegetables and herbs for its excellent pastas and mezes. The owner calls Argos “an ancient vil-

The voyage: Traditionally, gulets— Turkish wide-bottomed wooden yachts— were used to transport oranges and olives to the major trading ports throughout the Aegean Sea. These days, they’re used for transpor ting vacationers along the still largely unspoiled Turkish Riviera, past ancient stone ruins and tiny villages, and into and out of coves, each more scenic than the last. It’s a practice in blissf ul

nothing ness, with roomy decks outf itted with pillows for lounging and days built around sprawling meals that likely haven’t changed much in centuries: fresh f igs, hummus, grape leaves, sea beans. Most gulets are constr ucted in the posh port city of Bodrum, where the boats fill each harbor awaiting day trips through the bay of Gokova, a longer excu rsion over to the Greek islands of Santorini and Mykonos or up the Turkish coast to the Çesme Peninsula. The host: There is plenty of opportunit y to eat well in Tu rkey, but the best meals tend to be the ones that don’t try so hard. The small town of Alaçati, overlooking the Aegean Sea on the Çesme Peninsula, is positioning itself as the sor t of anti-Bodrum, a quainter, quieter destination where days are spent at the beach, by


Left: A view of Bodrum harbor, which Homer described as “the land of eternal blue.” Below: Traditional Turkish wooden boats called gulets offer a particularly luxe way to explore the Turkish Riviera.

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the hotel pool or around some long and collegial table where wine glasses never seem to empty. Celal Bayraktaroğlu is the owner of Alaçati’s Beyevi, a former Roman stone house he and his wife restored into a small hotel as part of their “retirement plan,” which, he’ll tell you, is more work than he thought. Bayraktaroğlu will direct you to the town’s best meals, including dinner in the lively courtyard at Asma Yapraği, where each afternoon Ayse Nur Mihçi and her son pull from their garden to plan the evening’s menu. Guests wander right into the kitchen to choose their meze and main course—braised artichoke, mintstuffed zucchini f lowers, fresh tomatoes served simply—if they can choose at all. It’s a problem that pops up often in Turkey: How to possibly fit it all in? FOR CONTACT INFORMATION AND MORE RECOMMENDATIONS ON WHERE TO STAY, EAT AND SHOP IN TURKEY, VISIT DUJOUR.COM


Šrobin utrecht/epa/Corbis

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MIA WRITTEN BY NINA BURLEIGH

From stolen masterpieces fenced out of airport hangars to gallerists going undercover to nab the thieves, the Miami scene is a PORTRAIT OF AUDACIOUS ART CRIMES

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amón Cernuda works out of a glass-fronted gallery on Ponce de Leon Boulevard in Coral Gables where, this season, his white walls display paintings in shades of emerald and ruby by a young artist he just discovered. As a respected Miami dealer in contemporary work, he’s seen a lot of art—great, bad and mediocre—and nurtured quite a few emerging talents. But 2014 marked a first for him. This spring, with a single phone call from his office, he personally uncovered a crime. A few weeks prior, another Miami dealer had offered to sell Cernuda, who specializes in Cuban and Latin American art, a painting by the late Eduardo Abela, one of Cuba’s top 20th-century artists. Cernuda was immediately interested. The asking price was $15,000, well below the six-figure threshold at which Cernuda typically asks the seller to provide provenance—the art world’s version of title clearance. He forked over the cash, took possession and then commenced his own research. To his surprise, Cernuda spotted his newest acquisition—Carnaval Infantil, a darkly jolly painting in yellow, black and ochre, of balloon-faced children playing musical instruments—in a book stating it belonged to the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Cuba’s national art museum some 230 miles away. When he called Havana to inquire about when the museum had sold it, the startled director said the painting was still very much museum property. She asked for 24 hours to investigate. A day later the assistant director called to say the Abela was missing from the warehouse, along with around 80 other works by prominent Cuban artists. Many had been sliced out of their frames, and the frames left on the racks, so no one had noticed their absence. At that point, the dapper, white-haired gallerist was left with only one choice: turn the painting over to American authorities or become an accessory to a crime. The global art and antiques market is a $66 billion industry. Law enforcement agents say that art comes on the market through “the five D’s” – death, debt, disaster, disease, divorce. More and more, they include a sixth “D,” for deception. Stealing— and then fencing—the art is only one part of the equation. The FBI believe that a full 40 percent of today’s market is made up of fakes, illicit copies passed off as real. These thefts and forgeries have always plagued the sophisticated art markets of London, New York City and Los Angeles. In recent years, South Florida, home of the increasingly popular Art Basel Miami Beach, joined the club—with a bang. Conditions were ripe. Because of its position as a north-south continental crossroads and a great port city, Miami has been a center for fencing all manner of illicit cargo, from guns and computers to cocaine. On any given day, there is a large group of FBI agents and other law enforcement tracking down stolen-goods transactions in Miami, says one agent. Smuggled, stolen bits of pricey cultural heritage often arrive in South Florida via the MIA airport cargo building. Authorities have confiscated hundreds of pieces of pre-Columbian art and jewelry heisted from Latin America, priceless pieces of Egyptian antiquity (including a whole sarcophagus) along with stolen works by European masters. The FBI arrested a Frenchman, Bernard Ternus, who with four accomplices


17t h - c e n t u r y B a r o q u e painting called The Last S u p p e r fe n c e d i n a L a Qui nt a motel room i n subu rba n Pla nt at ion; priceless pre-Columbian ar tifacts, smuggled out of Ecuador and piled like toys on the f loor of a suburban house in Coconut Grove; French art-museu m bu rglars set tli ng i n unincor porated MiamiDade Cou nt y to u nload A London work by famed graffiti artist Banksy was set for auction—but then the police got a call. Brueghels and Monets. The audacity and frequency of these Sunshine State shenanigans have recently earned South

Museum of Contemporar y Ar t. The Venezuelans paid $500,000 in 1981 for the painting, called Odalisque in Red Pants. It was stolen sometime before 2000, according to the FBI. The investigation became a lengthy cat and mouse game, in which the painting, now valued at $3.7 million, traveled around the world. I n Miam i, u ndercover FBI agents met with thieves at a Starbucks and a posh beachfront steak house. They f inally got their hands on the piece in 2012, in a four-star hotel room.

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ll these capers don’t amuse the denizens of the South Florida art cognoscenti. But it doesn’t surprise anyone, either. “The Miami art world is like a banana republic,” says art collector and gallerist Gary

“It would blow your mind how simple it is to forge.”

had heisted four paintings by Monet, Sisley and Br ueghel from the Musee des Beaux-Ar ts in Nice. The FBI nabbed Ternus after he came to Miami to try to fence his treasures. Why Miami? Interviews with dealers and FBI agents say the city is a particularly fertile ground for art fraud because of a transitory population, newly minted millionaires eager to build collections and an underworld populated by middlemen skilled in the art of the fence. “The conditions are good for people to make lots and lots of money here,” a law-enforcement source told me. “There’s a lot of meat on the bone.” Last year, Art Basel Miami Beach drew some 50,000 curators, ar tists, dealers and ar t lovers—and millions of dollars— during what’s called “the season,” roughly December through February. Under the tropical winter sun, beautiful people and the inter national art set f lock down to view, buy and sell mostly contemporary, Pop and graffiti works, and stroll the colorful garages and low warehouses of Wynwood—the arts district recently carved out of the ghetto known as Overtown. Pulling in right behind this chic set, like sharks to chum, are shady dealers looking to fence stolen art and forgeries to gulls with loads of new money to blow. The area’s ar t-crime capers read like they were plucked out of a Carl Hiaasen novel: a

Florida its own outpost office of the FBI’s elite Art Crime Team. “We get a lot more complaints in high season,” one FBI agent told me. During the months around Art Basel Miami Beach, more dealers and exhibitors will report “leakage”— that is, opening a packing crate before an exhibit and finding that items on the bill have disappeared. The Art Team office also fields a larger volume of calls from individuals or families dismayed to find they have just blown $50,000 or more on a work of art that they soon come to learn is a worthless fake. “I know of con artists with no background in art who came down here to open galleries,” a law-enforcement source says. “They didn’t move to Dallas. They moved to Miami.” Last year a judge sentenced Coral Springs art dealer Jerry Bengis to prison for his role in what authorities called a national forgery ring. He was charged with taking more than $50,000 for counterfeit Chagalls, Lichtensteins and Picassos at his gallery. A Salvador Dalí expert, he is also accused of taking more than $23,000 for appraising and certifying fake art for other dealers. The Art Team unit makes arrests after mingling convincingly with the players. “They’re our wine-and-cheese guys,” one agent jokes. The FBI teases out stolen art exactly the way it finds any other stolen thing that requires a middleman to unload. Art Team agents, dressed to kill as super-loaded buyers, go undercover, arrange meetings and, if all goes as planned, get the bad guys to bring the stolen goods to someone they think will buy them. In their biggest bust so far, agents recently ret rieved a Matisse looted f rom Caracas’

Nader. Nader says he has the largest Fernando Botero collection in the world, which he houses along with an extensive modern Latin American painting collection in an enormous white warehouse gallery in Wynwood. Nader, who shaves his head, favors art-worldblack attire and is built like a weightlifter, has been a victim himself. Before setting up in Wynwood, he had a smaller gallery in Coral Gables. In 1995, thieves cleaned it out during a Wifredo Lam show. The paintings were later recovered, mostly destroyed, in a dumpster in Hialeah. Insurance paid the owners but police never made an arrest. Nader has also had objects disappear during shipping to his exhibitions. As a major Botero collector, Nader gets called frequently to give his opinion on authenticity. The FBI once showed him a sculpture of what looked like a Botero. But the sculpture had a closed bottom, and Nader knew Botero leaves them open. He judged the object to be a fake, and when the FBI cracked it open they saw it was filled with cocaine. In another instance, the FBI showed him photos of 500 Boteros confiscated in Singapore, all of which were rip-offs. He says he was not surprised. “A while ago, a guy was selling fake Rodins. He sold hundreds,” he says. He shakes his head, and orders an assistant to fetch an espresso, which arrives a minute later, black. “I try,” he says. “But I can’t be the police here.” Last year, an outfit called Fine Art Auctions Miami was set to auction a piece of a wall decorated by the British graffiti artist Banksy. Days before the auction, the FBI’s Miami field division became aware of complaints originating

top to bottom: getty images. John Stillwell/PA Wire (Press Association via AP images

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—FBI agent, Miami office


Getty images (2)

in London, objecting to the sale. “I got alarmed calls,” a law-enforcement officer recalls. “This was stolen off the side of a building! And my first question was, if it was stolen, where’s the police report?” Since no one had ever filed a theft report on the particular Banksy work, the FBI couldn’t get involved. But the owner of the auction house, Fredric Thut, pulled it at the last minute and returned it to the consigner, the actual owner of the art. Thut’s spokeswoman called the episode “a misunderstanding” and said the consigner “didn’t have the proper paperwork.” Nader believes the Ban ksy incident was a genuine misunderstanding. But he says the matter was typical of an amateurish strain in the Miami art world. “People come to Miami and they think they can fool everybody,” he says. “Like they are offering the last Coca-Cola in the desert. There is no seriousness. If you don’t know what you are doing, don’t call yourself a professional in the field.” Law enforcement takes a jaundiced view of such complications. “Ever ything’s a ‘misunderstanding,’ ” one agent says, rolling his eyes. The works of another famous graffitist—Keith Haring—were the focus of a misunderstanding last year. A promoter put up a show of Haring’s in downtown Miami, and the Keith Haring Foundation cried foul, suggesting that the pieces were fake. Days later, 200 works were taken off the walls. No one was charged with wrongdoing. “Everything can be forged,” an agent in the Miami office says. “Everything can be faked. It would blow your mind how simple it is. They can counterfeit the paper. They find the exact brand of paints the painter used.” And, he adds, “there’s always a story” when someone is trying to sell shadily provenanced work. “Never buy the story,” he advises. The FBI won’t comment on the Cuban artmuseum case. Cernuda says he doesn’t know how many of the paintings eventually turned up in the United States, or even whether the dealer who approached him has been implicated or not. He has heard that some of the Cuban museum staff were fired, but the status of the case inside Cuba is unknown. And because of the political situation, the fate of the stolen artworks lies with the U.S. State Department, far away from Miami and Havana. Some of Miami’s top collectors don’t want to comment on the criminal element in the art world. I stop in at the sprawling gallery of the Rubell Family Collection, and Juan RoselioneValadez, the collection director, declines to ask the Rubells to comment. “This just doesn’t

apply to them,” he says. “They go to the artists’ studios and watch the artists work and then buy the work.” Another major Miami art collector, former Philadelphia Eagles owner and billionaire Norman Braman, has Calders and Picassos among his treasures. He declined to comment through an assistant, who writes that “he really does not know anything about this topic.” But there are collectors in Miami who do know. Unfortunately. In 2010, thieves made off with 32 paintings from a dealer’s Miami warehouse. Other dealers were warned to be on the lookout for the paintings, even though typically, thieves would be expected to fence the art outside the country. Not long after getting the warning, a welldressed elderly gentleman walked into Cernuda’s gallery with a much younger woman, carrying photos of some of the stolen paintings. “They told me they belonged to a Jewish lady in New York who didn’t want to divulge her name,” Cernuda recalled. He told them he was interested in 11 of the works. As soon as they left, he reached for the phone. “I called the FBI immediately,” he says. “I said, ‘I’ve been approached; they want me to go see the works.’ The FBI said I couldn’t go by myself, I had to go with an undercover policeman.” On the appointed meeting date, however, the local cop failed to show up. Just as Cernuda was preparing to cancel the plan, the couple decided to bring the works over to the gallery themselves. Cernuda told his assistant to contact the Coral Gables police if he called down to order a coffee. T he couple showed up a nd u nveiled t he works. Cernudas ordered coffees, and within two minutes the gallery was surrounded by Coral Gables cops. Eleven of the stolen paintings belonged to a Miami dermatologist named Dr. Blas Reyes, innocent of wrongdoing. He’d consigned them to the dealer who kept the warehouse. Reyes says the incident changed his attitude about security—and his own home. “It made me more aware of the danger that’s out there,” he says. “Like my wife says, we collectors have a disease. We end up with more paintings than our walls can hold, so we have to find a place to safely keep them. Now I have mine in a very secure area. And when people are coming over, I become a little paranoid. You don’t want people to know what’s in your home.” Victims are traumatized in ways that go far beyond lost cash. In 2008, the FBI rounded up a New York dealer, Giuseppe Concepcion, who had set up a Miami gallery called Proarte. The

FBI said he bought real works by Calder and Matisse, then com missioned fakes and sold them as real. In 2011 he was sentenced to 51 months in prison. One of Concepcion’s victims, a private collector in the Northeast who engaged in “hundreds of transactions” involving art and antiques over 35 years, wrote a letter to the sentencing judge, stating that he lost not only confidence in the fine art market but pleasure in his collecting.

Thieves with a hot Matisse, top, found their way to Miami.

“We have not engaged in a single art or antique transaction since I learned of the investigation into Mr. Concepcion’s criminal activity more than a year ago,” the victim, who asked not to be named, wrote. “We no longer spend weekend afternoons with our children at Park Avenue Armory shows, and we no longer visit galleries on family vacations. And I will never again invite an art dealer into my home to do business.” Cer nuda himself takes a measured view. “Miami is your ultimate cosmopolitan city.” he says. “Probably the only real multicultural city in the United States. There is very significant wealth and, so, there is an interest in art. There is a concentration of important private collections too, and a market to sell.” With a sigh, Cernuda says, “It’s normal that as art follows money, crooks follow money too.”


PHOTO CREDITS TEEKAY

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LIPPES, adamlippes.com. adamlippes.com. Coat, $1,690, ADAM LIPPES, EQUIPMENT, net-a-porter. Penelope shirt, $248, EQUIPMENT, com. Pants, price upon request; Belt, price upon com. GIULIETTA, giulietta-newyork.com. giulietta-newyork.com. Gaucho request, GIULIETTA, JAVITS, ericjavits. hat, price upon request, ERIC JAVITS, com. Panthère de Cartier ring in 18-karat yellow com. gold with garnet, $11,700; Panthère de Cartier ring in 18-karat yellow gold with diamonds, emeralds CARTIER,, 800-227-8437. and onyx, $36,200, CARTIER


Give me

liberty PHOTOGRAPHED by cedric buchet styled by sabina schreder

a little scandalous: In a series of ’70s-inspired looks—

including high-waisted pants, a peekaboo sweater and a variety of must-have hats—she channels the louche era

photo credits teekay

with a very modern sense of sophistication and flair

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British model Liberty Ross isn’t afraid of seeming


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Opposite page: Dress, $7,950, VERSACE, 888-721-7219. Gaucho hat, price upon request, ERIC JAVITS, ericjavits.com. Boots, Ross’ own. This page: Coat, $28,000, MARC JACOBS, marcjacobs.com. Jean Schlumberger Paris Flames brooch in 18-karat gold and platinum with diamonds, $15,000, TIFFANY & CO., tiffany.com. Hat, stylist’s own.


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Ring sweater, $3,400; Pants, $1,850; Essential V belt, $1,780; Mask Pochette GM bag, $3,825; Twist ring, $555, LOUIS VUITTON, louisvuitton. com. Hat, $234, CLYDE, welcometoclyde.com. On nails: Lacquer in Night Viper, $20, GIORGIO ARMANI, giorgioarmanibeauty-usa.com.


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Shirt, $382; Skirt, $372, FAUSTO PUGLISI, Neiman Marcus, 310-5505900. Gaucho hat, price upon request, ERIC JAVITS, ericjavits.com. Ray of Sun pumps, $1,350, LOUIS VUITTON, louisvuitton.com.


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Noeud Dior blouse, $1,500, DIOR, 800-9293467. Jean Schlumberger Paris Flames brooch in 18-karat gold and platinum with diamonds, $15,000, TIFFANY & CO., tiffany. com. Hat, stylist’s own. On skin: Enlighten Even Effect Skintone Corrector SPF 30, $40, ESTÉE LAUDER, esteelauder.com.


photo credits teekay

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Blouse, $3,275; Skirt, $2,075, HERMÈS, hermes. com. Hat, stylist’s own. Sunglasses, $1,065, LINDA FARROW LUXE, lindafarrow.com. Ray of Sun pumps, $1,350, LOUIS VUITTON, louisvuitton. com. Hair: Cecilia Romero for René Furterer at The Wall Group. Makeup: Francelle. Stylist assistants: Janelle Olsen, Deja Turner.


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THE FACE

the fraud and the fortune

Hoyt Richards was one of the 1990s’ most successful male models, but his secret life as a member of a doomsday cult left him isolated, broke and running for his life Written by mike sager

PHOTOGRAPHED by Prakash Shroff


H

eads turn as Hoyt Richards saunters through the low light and fashionable din inside the Petty Cash Taqueria, in Los Angeles’ Fairfax District. Six-foot-one with a chiseled jaw and a dimple, a forelock of gray-blonde hair cascading rakishly over one brow, he makes an immediate impression: That guy must be someone. And he was. During the 1980s and ’90s, Richards was one of fashion’s most in-demand models. He traveled the world, appearing in campaigns for Versace, Valentino, Ralph Lauren and Cartier and was a favorite subject for photographers like Bruce Weber, Richard Avedon and Helmut Newton. In 1992, the Italian men’s magazine Mondo Uomo gave him a 58-page spread, while Vogue named him one of the top 25 male models of all time. He worked and socialized with the era’s A-list models, including Cindy Crawford, Linda Evangelista, Christy Turlington and Naomi Campbell, and has a ribald story about being sandwiched between the latter two—they were nearly naked; Richards was sporting a bustier—at a birthday party for photographer Steven Meisel. He was, no doubt, the first male supermodel. As successful as Richards was professionally, however, he harbored a harrowing secret. For years, he was enmeshed within a shadowy religious sect called Eternal Values, which kept him psychologically enslaved with convoluted forms of love and abuse, reassurance and disapproval. Eventually he would save himself, but he would never be the same.

“It was like, ‘Let’s Go to Madonna’s for the weekend!’ But i was like, “I can’t. The end of the world is coming.’ ” —hoyt richards

tion. The attention he paid to the young Richards was invigorating. At the time, Richards was being forced by his parents to transfer out of his public school to attend the prestigious Haverford School, and he was not, he says now, in a particularly good place. “I was 16, he was in his thirties,” Richards says. “When you’re that age, having an adult who will talk to you like an adult gets your attention.” Von Mierers invited a bunch of the underage kids from the beach back to his place for beer. “I remember arriving there and knowing very quickly that this was clearly the cheapest beer you could buy,” Richards says. “I was not very impressed.” But the next summer von Mierers was back, and again the summer after that, and Richards continued to be drawn to him for reasons he can’t really explain. Freddy, as he came to be called, did Richards’ astrological chart and Richards, in turn, began reading Hindu texts and other books von Mierers suggested. He went from unimpressed to infatuated. “One year I was going to England. He told me the experience would really change my life—which it absolutely did, but it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure that out,” Richards says today. “I remember thinking, when stuff was happening to me, Freddy really is clairvoyant!” While he was at Princeton, and in the early days of his modeling career, Richards began visiting Freddy in Manhattan on the weekends. He and other young acolytes would go with Freddy to Studio 54, where it was impossible to get in without connections. Once inside, the group would see clubbers having sex on the dance floor and doing cocaine in the bathrooms, but Richards and his coterie had nobler pursuits. Freddy was against drinking and drugs. He thought the body was God’s temple. In the wee hours, the group would return to Freddy’s ornately decorated apartment to discuss Eastern philosophy. “In my mind I was thinking that I was working him,” Richards says. “I was bringing up a couple friends with me from school, and we knew he could get us into Studio 54 and we could crash at his apartment. I was looking at it like I was taking advantage of this guy!” By his senior year in college, Richards had signed with Ford Models and proudly paid for his last two semesters of college tuition himself. He graduated in the spring of 1985 and moved into an

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his junior and senior years at Princeton, Hoyt Richards was discovered by a modeling agent and cast in an ad campaign for Jeffrey Banks. He was John Richards Hoyt back then—the professional name change would happen later. “The pictures came out that fall and all of a sudden I was one of the ‘new faces,’ ” he says now. “The agency was calling. They were like, ‘We’ve got a job for you in Tokyo on Tuesday.’ And I was like, ‘Listen, sorry, I’ve got a test.’ ” It was an intoxicating experience for an All-American kid who just months before counted Friday night football games as among the more exciting events in his life. Richards was the fourth of six children, born in 1962 in Syracuse, New York. His father was a Lehigh University–trained engineer and his mom, Terry, a Mount Holyoke alumna. Both families claimed roots in the American Revolution. When Richards was two, the family moved to a wealthy enclave on Philadelphia’s Main Line. Later on, at Princeton, he majored in economics and played varsity football. Richards’ mother, however, had a difficult upbringing that Richards says likely inf luenced how she related to her own children. When her mother, an alcoholic, died at an early age, Terry Richards had assumed full care for her younger siblings. “When you come from that background,” Richards says, “you try to control everything because you don’t want to ever get hurt again. You develop this kind of bubble that you live in where it’s never your fault, and if anything goes wrong, you’re the victim.” As a child and teen, he tried very hard to please her. “[My mother] was very clear about what she expected me to be,” he says. “In order to get the love I wanted from her, I felt I had to try to become the thing she wanted me to be, even though that didn’t feel necessarily like who I really was.” A gifted athlete from an early age, Richards gravitated to sports.

At the end of the summer between

“I was always drawn toward things that would have a crowd; with sports, you had that stadium,” he says. “All those eyes on me felt like maybe it would heal something. It’s the same reason I think I ended up modeling.” Like many affluent families, the Hoyts summered in Nantucket, in an area called Shimmo and in a house his mom named Shimmo the Merrier. One day during the summer before his junior year of high school, Richards was at Nobadeer Beach—a kids’ hangout referred to by locals as “No Brassiere Beach”—when he encountered an older but still youthful-looking man drawing a yin and yang diagram in the sand. Frederick von Mierers was full of ideas. Tall, gaunt and handsome, he spoke about Eastern philosophy, Hinduism and reincarna-


apartment in the same Manhattan building as Freddy’s. But there was much more to it than being neighbors. Richards was becoming part of Eternal Values, a cult led by von Mierers that counted a number of the building’s residents among its ranks. Starting then and for years after, Richards donated almost all of his earnings to the group, helping to cover the rent on the apartments Freddy kept in the building, as well as others he began to acquire as the group grew in number. When he wasn’t jetting off to a modeling or commercial job, Richards spent his days and nights doing menial tasks around the building or studying alongside Freddy and, despite his financial importance to the group, sleeping on a mat on the floor. by von Mierers, himself a former model, interior decorator and socialite. An astrologer and self-styled prophet, he claimed to be an alien reincarnated from the distant star Arcturus. He said he had come to Earth to warn people of an impending apocalypse to be triggered by a change in the planet’s magnetic poles, and to train his students to become leaders in the aftermath. Based out of von Mierers’ apartment building on the east side of Manhattan—the group also kept a loft in the Bronx and, later, a large house in North Carolina—Eternal Values attracted young, intelligent and often wealthy followers. Most were seeking a greater understanding of the universe; some were rewarded with a life of mind control and fanaticism. At its peak, there were perhaps 100 active members. They spoke in New Age jargon, with much talk about “highly evolved personalities,” “ego renunciation,” “the white light and the violet light” and the coming apocalypse, which made personal wealth and relationships unnecessary. Astrological charts and life readings, performed by von Mierers or one of his acolytes, played a central role. Included was often a “gem prescription,” adopted from Hindu belief in the heali ng proper t ies of certain precious stones. “ T he gems a re God’s thoughts condensed,” he told Vanity Fair in a 1990 interview. Von Mierers told followers he had connections for great deals on stones, which he often sold to them for more t h a n $10 0 , 0 0 0 ; p a yments were only accepted in cash or traveler’s checks. “The gems were Von Mierers, right, with a friend in the mid-1980s. supposed to be the most pure forms of matter on our planet,” says Richards, who bought a fortune’s worth over the years. “They were supposed to strengthen your inherent weakness and enhance your strengths.” Within the group, the number of gems one possessed was treated as a sign of devoutness. “I spent over $150,000,” Richards says. “The gems all came with bogus appraisals. When I sold them later, I found out they were worth less than $8,000.” When Freddy’s story was included in a popular 1985 book,

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Eternal Values was founded in the early 1980 s

Frederick von Mierers’ East 54th Street apartment in Manhattan.

Aliens Among Us—“Dazzling true testimony that extraterrestrials are on earth,” the book promised—Eternal Values became a national phenomenon. Thousands of hopefuls contacted Freddy for astrological readings at $350 per session. Hundreds were drawn into his gemstone scams. Richards, then in his modeling heyday, was trotted out for interviews and appearances. But while von Mierers was getting rich, Richards found in Eternal Values something more grounding. “The economy was kicking ass, there was opulence everywhere: a lot of drugs, a lot of cocaine,” says Richards. “Being in [Eternal Values], you had this sense that there was an alternative to all that. The message was, don’t be attached to this wealth and decadence because there’s really a higher meaning to it all. Freddy was basically saying, ‘Get your head out of your ass because the world is coming to an end— you better get your shit together because you’ve spent lifetimes preparing for this opportunity.’ ” Gilberto Picinich joined the group in 1981 after hearing Freddy speak on the radio. A lifelong seeker, Picinich remembers the sense of purpose Eternal Values gave him. “We all had the feeling that we were on this critical mission that would help save ourselves, friends and family from the coming apocalypse,” he says. “The message self-validated over the years. You started to fear that if you left, you might miss something important, something that you’ve sacrificed for.” Because Richards was the group’s golden goose, some felt he was given special privileges, “like flying around the world fucking beautiful models,” says Picinich. Yet while they lived off his money, the group felt that Richards’ work was inherently evil. “The fact that the world puts so much importance on someone who won a genetic lottery—to the point of putting a billboard in Times Square and paying that person hundreds of thousands of dollars—is the exact reason why the world needs to be destroyed,” Richards says in an attempt to explain the cult’s point of view. He tried to downplay his secret life with the people he met as a model while making choices those colleagues didn’t understand. “Everyone else was living it up. It was like, ‘Hey, let’s go to Madonna’s for the weekend!’ ” Richards has said. “But I was like, ‘No, no. I can’t. The end of the world is coming.’ ” As it was with his mother, it was with the cult. Nothing

he did was good enough, but Richards kept trying. “More than anything, I felt like I’d made a commitment and I couldn’t give up,” he says. “Freddy had told us that we were responsible for our own


his two decades with the group did he ever consider he might be a member of a cult. In his mind, he was in a special group on an important mission; he believed he was one of the Chosen who would lead the earth into a new era of peace and prosperity. Like anyone suffering from Stockholm syndrome, he had no ability to objectify his experience. The reason he finally left the group, he says, was because he felt like a failure, unable to conform to their standards. “And then one day I was doing some research, and it hit me,” Richards says, unabashed. “I was like, Oh, my God! I’m a textbook cult victim.”

“I’d have to go out to the end of the dock and do belly flops as a form of self-punishment.” for that offense they shaved my head,” he says. “Mostly I would do menial jobs like scrubbing toilets and vacuuming. Any job they could think of that was a pain in the ass, they’d get me to do it.” The abuse was also emotional. “My nickname was Dipshit. When I wasn’t in trouble, they’d call me Dippy, but generally I was just called Dipshit,” Richards says. “And this was after I’d been financing this thing for 15 years. Sometimes I would have to go out to the end of the dock and do belly flops as a form of self-punishment.” Finally, on the night of July 3, 1999—after two previous unsuccessful attempts to leave the cult—Richards escaped, having tithed to Eternal Values the majority of his earnings, estimated at nearly $4.5 million dollars over almost two decades of work. He hadn’t spoken to his parents in 12 years. He turned to an old friend from his modeling days: Fabio Lanzoni, the long-haired and pectorally gifted spokesmodel best known for gracing the covers of hundreds of romance novels. “When the shit hit the fan, he knew I would help,” Lanzoni says. “The other models used to make fun of him because he believed in aliens, but I’d tell them, ‘Listen, you shouldn’t make fun of him because there was something that happened in his life that put him in this situation.’ ” Richards lived in Lanzoni’s house in Los Angeles—and drove one of his Porches—for nearly a year. On a recent afternoon, Richards sits on the sofa in his West Los Angeles apartment. He’s in bare feet and shorts; his forelock looks a bit limp. He recently wrote, produced and starred in a movie called Dumbbells, playing a guy who escapes from a cult and opens a gym. Another movie, Invisible Prisons, is in the works. After he left Eternal Values, Richards says, he began doing a lot of reflection. As unbelievable as it sounds, never once during

In recent years, Richards has sought counseling and worked to build a film career. A civil lawsuit recouped some of his funds and effectively killed the remnants of Eternal Values. These days Richards feels that he’s finally reached a place of peace within himself. “I’ve come to understand that all this didn’t happen because there was something wrong with me,” he says. “It wasn’t because my mother didn’t love me enough. I was able to forgive myself. It’s how I was able to relieve myself of all that shame.” His great hope is that his story will be useful to others, “to make it cool for others to talk about their abusive situations, their fuck-ups.” Likewise, he tries to make the best of his years with Eternal Values. “When you meet new people, you’re never quite sure when to mention it,” Richards says. “But I know one thing for sure: If I do bring it up, nobody ever finds my story boring.”

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Shirt (worn throughout), $195, THEORY, bloomingdales.com. Stylist: Sarah Schussheim. Groomer: Barbara Lamelza using Kevin Murphy hair products. Stylist assistant: Ashley Wong.

lives—which I could deal with—but we were also responsible for the millions of people we were supposed to help, and that was a heavy trip that I couldn’t screw up.” The hold Eternal Values had on him became so strong that he stayed on even after von Mierers’ death in 1990 from AIDS-related causes. According to Richards, the Manhattan district attorney’s office was investigating von Mierers’ gemstone scams at the time of his death, but discontinued after he died, when it was discovered that the self-proclaimed alien’s real name was Freddie Miers. He’d been raised Jewish in Brooklyn. After Freddy died, there was a power struggle within Eternal Values. Freddy’s successors were even more extreme. As the years passed and the group relocated to a big house on Lake Lure, North Carolina, Richards continued to earn money and fame but the group became increasingly hateful toward him. He was often interrogated for hours on end about what they called his “ego lapses.” “He was a good guy and a bit of a people pleaser,” Picinich recalls. “After Freddy’s death, the [new] leader was pretty cruel to him. You could see the toll it took.” Richards recalls some truly terrible behavior: “They said I was resistant and resentful of my chores, and that I was guilty of vanity and looking in the mirror—


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Bracelet with emeralds and diamonds, price upon request, GRAFF, 212-355-9292.


PHOTOGRAPHED by Martin ValLin

Edited by Sydney wasserman

Go undercover—but not unnoticed—in the season’s most dazzling jewels in RUBIES and diamonds,

Jade and emeralds

A Brilliant disguise 183


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From top: Earrings in 18-karat gold and platinum with jade and diamonds, $65,000, DAVID WEBB, 212-421-3030. Pétales de Camélia earrings in 18-karat white gold with opal sapphires and diamonds, $102,000, Chanel fine jewelry, 800-550-0005. Coat, stylist’s own.


Frizzante necklace in 18-karat white gold with diamonds and emeralds, price upon request, ROBERTO COIN, 212-486-4545. Coat dress, price upon request, ALEXANDER McQUEEN, 212-645-1797.

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Necklace with opals and sapphires, price upon request, TIFFANY & CO., 212-755-8000. Dress, $3,170, MISSONI, 212-517-9339. Pumps, $675, Christian Louboutin, christianlouboutin.com


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Bals de Legende collection Enchanteur necklace in 18-karat white and rose gold with diamonds, spinels and sapphires, price upon request, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, 877-826-2553.


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Diamond Links bracelet in platinum with diamonds, price upon request, HARRY WINSTON, 800-988-4110. Bustier, $1,490, OSCAR DE LA RENTA, oscardelarenta.com.


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High Jewelry collection Flora necklace in 18-karat yellow gold with sapphires, emeralds and diamonds, price upon request, BULGARI, 212-315-9000. Top, $355; Skirt, $495, TIBI, tibi.com. Hair: Erika Svedjevik at L’Atelier using Oribe Hair Care. Talent: Gwen Loos at Marilyn. Manicurist: Roseann Singleton for Warren Tricomi Salon at Art Department.


TRAVEL

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Dallas in Bloom

Luxury boutique Grange Hall, known for its curated selection of worldly home decor, jewelry, handbags, apothecary items and outof-the-box flower arrangements, is adding to the lavish experience with a lunch-only café. The brains behind the upscale 50-seat eatery are the shop’s founders, Rajan Patel and Stanley Korshak vet Jeffrey Lee. Chefs Chad Martin, formerly of Hotel St. Germain, and Sharon Hage will run the kitchen, serving seasonal menu items like black olive biscotti with green garbanzo hummus, house-made ricotta and pickled baby crudité. Mariage Frères tea, wine, champagne and locally roasted coffee help wash it all down. “This restaurant will not only serve as a place to lunch, but it will also be another outlet to showcase our artistry—and our imagination,” says Patel. 4445 TRAVIS STREET; UFGRANGEHALL.COM

Edited by NATASHA WOLFF


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BACKCOUNTRY BOOTY THREE WAYS TO EXPLORE ROADS LESS TRAVELED THIS WINTER

This winter the St. Regis Aspen is partnering with a professional dog trainer to school guests and their four-legged friends in the art of skijoring—skiing while being pulled by a pooch. STREGISASPEN.COM

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The Aspen Art Museum had reason to celebrate after completing its recent $45 million construction this summer. Here, CEO and director Heidi Zuckerman Jacobson shares her favorite moments from the opening of the new museum, designed by Pritzker prize–winning architect Shigeru Ban.

THE SPECTACULAR NOW: “First Buddhist monks blessed the building. We opened and 8,000 people came through. They were lined up down the corner and around the block. I almost started to cry.” BAN-AID: “For Shigeru Ban’s exhibition, ‘Shigeru Ban: Humanitarian Architecture,’ inside the museum, it was important for me to show the broad-based nature of his practice, including his creations for United Nations refugee shelters in the 1990s. His humanitarian work emphasizes the notion ‘do well to do good,’ which characterizes a lot of people in Aspen.” CULTURE HIGH: “Visitors will be profoundly and permanently affected by the artwork and these spaces. It was just something that was never here before.”

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WayBack 96 skis, $840 (without bindings), k2skis.com

MOUNTAIN MUST-HAVE K2 Skis has reinvented its backcountry collection. The BackSide touring series includes the WayBack for men and TalkBack for women. The skis are extremely light, thanks to a new Snophobic topsheet, and feature tapered tips and tails with centered grommets perfectly positioned for slapping on skins.

Elevated Art 637 EAST HYMAN AVENUE; ASPENARTMUSEUM.ORG

GREAT EXPEDITIONS In August, a fleet of fully loaded 2014 Range Rovers traveled close to 1,000 miles of rocky trails and unpaved mountain passes along a portion of the original Great Divide route. The trek commemorated the 25th anniversary of the original offroad Land Rover Great Divide Drive and Tread Lightly!, a national nonprofit developed by the U.S. Forest Service to promote safe and responsible off-road driving. LANDROVER.COM

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PEDAL POWER While skis still dominate roof racks in Aspen, there is a new toy in town. The Fat Bike—a mountain-bikestyle frame outfitted with four-inch-plus tires with unique treads and filled to a lower pressure—can maneuver on winter roads and trails, through snow and ice or on sand. Rent one from Ute City Cycles on Main Street and compete in the Fat Cycle Challenge during Aspen’s annual Wintersköl celebration in January. Carver Carbon Fat Bike, $4,000, carverbikes.com

Down-valley from the Aspen Art Museum, Powers Art Center opened in July. The venue features the largest collection of Jasper Johns’ works on paper, housed in a 15,000-square-foot building graced with stunning views of Mount Sopris. 13110 HIGHWAY 82, CARBONDALE; POWERSARTCENTER.ORG

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CARVER BIKES: C2 PHOTOGRAPHY; ST. REGIS: HOLLY EXLEY; ASPEN ART MUSEUM: BILLY FARRELL/BFANYC.COM; JACOBSON: LEIGH VOGEL/GETTY IMAGES FOR ASPEN ART MUSEUM; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

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TELLING TIME LOOKS BETTER THAN EVER WITH TWO NEW WATCH COLLECTIONS

900 NORTH MICHIGAN AVENUE; MONTBLANC.COM Bohème stainless steel and diamond watch, $5,400

The 606 is officially afoot. Planned for completion this summer, the elevated park along the Bloomingdale rail line will eventually include a 2.7-mile trail, an observatory and a skate park.

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20/20 VISION

With artistic director Ashley Wheater at the helm, the Joffrey Ballet celebrates 20 years in Chicago.

SHINOLA It was only a matter of time before Detroitbased Shinola came to town. The new Wicker Park/Bucktown flagship stocks the brand’s American-made watches (like the new Runwell Chronograph), bicycles and leather goods, with the cool community vibe that has helped fuel its rapid rise to the sartorial mainstream. “Opening a store in an area whose history is steeped in manufacturing makes this location that much more exciting,”says Steve Bock, the brand’s CEO.

WHAT HAVE YOU BROUGHT TO THE JOFFREY SINCE YOU STARTED AS ARTISTIC DIRECTOR IN 2007? “I am not a choreographer; I think of myself as a curator. I fashion programs to present the best of the best, celebrating many different points of view. We have introduced so much new work into the repertoire and added beautiful dancers. Our audience has grown by approximately 35 percent.” WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR FAVORITE EXPERIENCE WITH THE COMPANY THUS FAR? “The opening of the new studios and offices in the Joffrey Tower in 2008. The company never had a permanent home before then. The people of this city saved the company. We hope to give something in return.”

1619 NORTH DAMEN AVENUE; SHINOLA.COM

The Runwell Chronograph watch, $750

WHAT PRODUCTIONS ARE YOU PARTICULARLY EXCITED ABOUT THIS SEASON? “You are asking me to choose from amongst my children. They’re all wonderful.” AT THE AUDITORIUM THEATRE,

TKTKTKTKTK 606: HOLLY EXLEY; PHOTO ALL CREDITS OTHER STYLE? IMAGES COURTESY

50 EAST CONGRESS PARKWAY; JOFFREY.ORG

THE REAL DEAL

The mission at Real Good Juice Co. is serious: to make honestly good-for-you (local, organic, super-food packed) smoothies and cold-pressed juices. Friendly juicers, cool playlists, an upbeat vibe and an addictive array of healthy and cheekily named drinks (Kal E. Kopowski, Juice-Tin Bieber) promise to make winter a little brighter. 1647 NORTH WELLS STREET; REALGOODJUICECO.COM

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FROM LEFT: VICTORIA JAIANI AND MIGUEL ANGEL, DYLAN GUTIERREZ AND JERALDINE MENDOZA

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MONTBLANC Bohème is Montblanc’s newest collection of watches and pens, geared toward women. The sophisticated line includes feminine timepieces with floral Arabic numerals, special date displays, diamond paved bezels, mother-of-pearl dials and leaf-shaped hands. “The extensive range of timepieces and jewelry allows women to mix and match the pieces while maintaining their original and authentic style,” explains North American CEO Mike Giannattasio.

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WATCH THIS!

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Interior designer Karen Herold has had a hand in crafting top eateries like Girl & the Goat and GT Fish & Oyster. She struck out on her own earlier this year with her Studio K firm and is working on the new GT Prime, as well as a factory design for Vosges Haut Chocolat. WHAT’S THE BEST THING ABOUT WORKING IN CHICAGO? “We are in the world of restaurant design and Chicago is becoming the place for the best culinary excellence.” WHAT MAKES YOUR WORK DISTINCTIVE? ”From an aesthetic point of view, our work expresses a passion for honest

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materials. We tend to layer lots of textures of natural wood, leather and plaster to create a warm environment that makes people want to come back.” WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER THE MOST IMPORTANT ELEMENTS OF A RESTAURANT’S DESIGN? “Lighting and sound largely contribute to the levels of energy in every space. Besides

LOS ANGELES

that, it needs to be comfortable. We always choose comfort over ‘wow’ moments.” WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE SPACE IN THE CITY? “It might sound

cheesy, but right now my favorite place is my own office. We have all worked so hard to turn our office into a comfortable and laid-back space, and this is my home away from home.”

GIRL & THE GOAT

CURRENTLY CRAVING “A Picante de la Casa cocktail (Cazadores reposado, lime, agave, chili and cilantro) on the roof at the new Soho House and the bacon-wrapped dates at Avec.”

FLY AWAY Two storefronts north of Real Good Juice Co., the cycle cult continues with the city’s second location of NYC import Flywheel Sports. For those preferring firm ground to spinning wheels, the studio also offers its Pilates-based FlyBarre classes. 1653 NORTH WELLS STREET; FLYWHEELSPORTS.COM

HEROLD: ERIC KLEINBERG; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

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18-karat gold necklace, $22,900, GUCCI

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Clutch, $425; charlottemax.com

ON THE ROCKS Omorovicza’s 60-minute Blue Diamond facial at Neiman Marcus will give you that extra bit of sparkle around the holidays. Diamond-infused peptides from the Budapest-based brand’s new three-step program of products, coupled with an advanced copper compound, increase collagen and elastin to brighten lackluster skin and restore firmness. In other words, you should leave feeling like a million bucks. Blue Diamond Concentrate, $410, OMOROVICZA, omorovicza.COM

WHAT’S IN STORE

Fifty-year-old family-owned fine jewelry boutique Eiseman Jewels recently unveiled a newly redesigned NorthPark Center salon. “Fashion reigns with our expansion,” says the company’s president and CEO, Richard D. Eiseman Jr. The 3,200-squarefoot, Gensler-designed space offers a range of items, including exclusive timepieces from Audemars Piguet, as well as additions from Vacheron Constantin and IWC Schaffhausen and a dedicated diamond and bridal collection. Browse Italian designer Roberto Coin’s jeweled animal cuffs, Gucci’s horsebit jewelry collection, an expanded estate collection including signed pieces from David Webb and other baubles displayed in bronze-trimmed cases suspended from the ceiling. 8687 NORTH CENTRAL EXPRESSWAY; EISEMANJEWELS.COM

The Root of It

Jo Malone is changing the landscape once again—this time quite literally. The fragrance empire has sponsored an Edible Schoolyard–type farm at Dallas’ Larry G. Smith Elementary learning garden, which will house a fragrance bed planted with perfume ingredients including pomegranate and fig trees—a nod to Malone’s Pomegranate Noir and Wild Fig & Cassis scents. Pomegranate Noir cologne, $120, JO MALONE, jomalone.com

FROM SEA TO SKIN Flush out your pores with aesthetician Joanna Czech’s new facial at Michael Flores Salon (1618 Main Street). The treatment’s main attraction: La Mer’s Intensive Revitalizing Mask, made with its signature Miracle Broth, an antioxidant and marine ingredient–rich blend that fights aging, hydrates the complexion and protects against stress and pollution. Kelp, lime tea concentrate, grapefruit and mint make for a soothing treatment—and all it takes is eight minutes. MICHAELFLORESSALON.COM

Intensive Revitalizing Mask, $160, LA MER, lamer.com

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WHAT’S NEW IN FASHION & BEAUTY

For Michelle Morgan Lockhart, it’s all about the golden touch—and pink, orange, green, purple and red. Since 2013, the local designer has been doling out 1950s-inspired Lucite handbags for her line, Charlotte Max, which is named for her grandmother. For her latest collection—dubbed The Galaxy—Lockhart reintroduces the classic box clutch in that same acrylic material and a kaleidoscope of customizable colors. “The clean, contemporary design coupled with the vintage-inspired material is a playful juxtaposition,” she says. “We hope that the elegance and whimsy of these designs will delight a whole new generation of American women.”

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Clear History


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JAPANESE FASHION AT CROW COLLECTION OF ASIAN ART Mary Baskett, a former Cincinnati Art Museum prints curator, puts her wardrobe on display at the Crow Collection of Asian Art. Peruse Baskett’s extensive closet, which includes a mash-up of vintage styles from then lesser-known fashion icons like Issey Miyake, Yohji Yamamoto and Rei Kawakubo. The avid collector picked up such iconic pieces during her travels to Japan in the late 1960s. Through February 21.

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Two x Two for AIDS and Art’s 16th annual gala was hosted on October 25 at the Rachofsky House. The fundraiser, which included an auction of contemporary art, honored painter Wade Guyton. TWOXTWO.ORG

Upcoming Performances

2010 FLORA STREET; CROWCOLLECTION.ORG

DOUBLE FEATURE AT THE DALLAS OPERA British composer Joby Talbot’s debut opera, Everest, shines a light on a fatal 1996 expedition atop the Himalayan mountain. Staged by Moby Dick’s Leonard Foglia, the world-premiere play is paired with Alfredo Catalani’s 1892 La Wally, a gripping romance set in the Austrian Alps starring former Aida soprano Latonia Moore. Premieres January 30. 2403 FLORA STREET; DALLASOPERA.ORG

“STAGGER LEE” AT THE DALLAS THEATER CENTER Penned by playwright-in-residence Will Power with Justin Ellington, the premiere of this musical tells the true story of an early 20th-century African-American carriage driver who was convicted of murder and includes an original score chock full of Janis Joplin–inspired tunes, R&B and hip-hop. Through February 15. 2400 FLORA STREET; DALLASTHEATERCENTER.ORG

RAMBLING MAN

Midnight Rambler, the new cocktail bar at the Joule hotel downtown, has a moody feel throughout. The bar features a custom walnut barreled ceiling, brass bar tops and terrazzo checkerboard flooring—not to mention top-notch mixology. 1530 MAIN STREET; THEJOULEDALLAS.COM

+ MORE ON DALLAS/FT. WORTH @ DUJOUR.COM /CITIES

TKTKTKTKTK TWO X TWO: HOLLY PHOTOEXLEY; CREDITS MIDNIGHT STYLE? RAMBLER: MEI CHUN; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

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LIVE IT UP WITH THE HAUTEST CLOTHING, ACCESSORIES AND TABLETOP TREASURES

CLARIDGE + KING

HOUSTON DASH: HOLLY EXLEY; EDIBLE ART: DEBORA SMAIL; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

CLARIDGEANDKING.COM

LAUREN CRAFT COLLECTION In less than five years, 29-year-old jewelry designer Lauren Craft has developed a following that includes Debra Messing, Charlize Theron and Miranda Lambert. Known for her gem-encrusted accessories— trendy index-finger armor, skulls and lots of pavè—Craft’s latest creations have a vintage vibe with opals and emeralds. “These pieces make me want to get dressed up,” says Craft, who honed her skills working for Brooklyn-based designer Alexis Bittar. “I’m such a believer in mixing statement pieces with the unexpected.” LAURENCRAFT.COM

The newly introduced Houston Dash soccer team makes five pro sports teams for Houston—and the ninth in the National Women’s Soccer League.

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Though this clothing line was inspired by menswear fabrics, Claridge + King is all woman. Founded six years ago by stylish sisters Laurann Claridge and Lizbeth King, the collection has grown from one shirt to an extensive line of classically tailored tops, luxury loungewear and its newest fall additions, silk blouses and jackets. “The jackets are investment pieces made for any occasion,” Claridge says. “I wanted to create something I couldn’t find, to precise specifications and the details I wanted.” Tailor-made and hand-stitched in Texas, both jacket styles are cotton with a hint of stretch. “In our climate, you always need a light topper, because everywhere you go is air-conditioned!”

KATY BRISCOE HOME COLLECTION What began with an offhand comment by a friend led to a new kind of launch for jewelry designer Katy Briscoe, who just unveiled her bone china line. “My friend said, ‘You know, your bangles would make really great napkin rings,” she recalls, “and in that moment, I could see my design work morphing into different forms.” Spurred on by her friend’s suggestion, Briscoe created her new Bangles collection with 24-karat hand-painted gold. “No machines touch the pieces ever,” she says of the American-made line. So how is designing dinnerware different? “The lead time is longer,” Briscoe says. “I started working on my 2016 collection last month!” KATYBRISCOE.COM

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Annie Rupani may have been Miss Pakistan World in 2010, but she’s Houston’s reigning queen of chocolate. The owner of the new luxury chocolate boutique Cacao & Cardamom launched her handcrafted truffles and bonbons biz in 2012—sans storefront. In 2014, she opened her sharp-looking 1,400-square-foot shop near the Galleria, where she offers a rainbow of exotic cacaobased delicacies in flavors like lychee basil and coco curry. For Valentine’s Day, expect aphrodisiac-inspired star anise and honey, champagne and Pop Rocks and balsamic ganache-infused figs. “It gives me great joy to watch customers enjoying these uniquely infused chocolates and experience spices and fruits they’ve never tried before,” she says. “It inspires me to push the limits a little further in creating inventive flavors, while still retaining the ultimate flavor of chocolate in each bonbon.” Rupani also holds classes in her “Chocolate Laboratory” at the back of the store, where she walks guests through her chocolate-making process, from creating the ganache to shelling each confection—all served with bubbly. 5000 WESTHEIMER ROAD; CACAOANDCARDAMOM.COM

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For flawlessly applied eyelashes and glamorous makeup—in the central location of Upper Kirby’s West Ave development—see Aubrie Layne, the principal makeup artist at The Vanity Lounge. A seasoned artist with a decade of training from Laura Mercier, she also started her own faux-lash company, Lucky Cat Beauty, and has worked with Molly Sims. The menu of services has just expanded with some of the most in-demand beauty experts and new concepts in town. These include makeup artist Tonya Riner, Glow Bar (organic spray-tan sculpting by the city’s best, Throwing Copper) and Facial Bar from esthetician Natalie Bolton, famous for her nonsurgical face-lift and express prep and peel facial treatments. 2800 KIRBY DRIVE

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PARTY TIME: WHERE TO GET GORGEOUS

1 1 THE VANITY LOUNGE

MIAMI

When social obligations spring up and you’re short on time, call on these pros for your every beauty emergency.

2 NOT JUST TEASING

Looking to create “a new experience in getting your hair done,” 20-something stylists and owners Travis Player and Roi Alan revealed TEASE Color & Style Bar in July. “We wanted a space where you can relax and disconnect from the world while getting beautified,” Player says of the newest addition to the Upper Kirby area. He and Alan designed it with the busy and fashionforward in mind. Services include cuts, color, blowouts, conditioning treatments, extensions and makeup. The sleek salon, envisioned by Dennis Brackeen Design Group, features an inspired blue ombré wall, plus products by Bumble & Bumble, Kérastase, JK Cosmetics by Jentry Kelley and FORM, their in-house line developed using client feedback. 2828 RICHMOND AVENUE

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3 THE BEAUTY BRIGADE

Nails, hair, makeup and waxing, oh my! Clients can check off their entire beauty to-do list with one stop by the neighboring Rice Village houses, home to Studio A Salon, Mai’s Nail Perfection and Svelte Waxing. “You can get a mani-pedi while you’re getting a blowout with me or makeup application with artist Bunmi Bush,” says Studio A owner David Armendariz, who has the Southwest exclusive on Italian makeup brand Lord & Berry cosmetics (best known for its Kajal Stick eyeliner). “We’ve got you covered.” Plus, Mai’s sells accessories like earrings and clutches if anyone needs some last-minute bling. 2405 SUNSET BOULEVARD; STUDIOAHOUSTON. COM; MAISNAILPERFECTION.COM

MISTER FRENCH’S GOURMET BAKERY With a childhood nickname like Cookie Monster, it seems only fitting that Scott French would enter the sweets game. The result is Mister French’s Gourmet Bakery, which offers intricate designer cookies that look like Fabergé eggs—or anything else a customer can imagine. “For years I tried new recipes until I made the perfect sugar cookie,” says the self-taught baker and owner. “Then friends started asking if I could do special events.” French, a former architect who opened his Heights shop in 2014, also has a Sur La Table partnership in the works. 1318 EAST 29TH STREET; MISTERFRENCHS.COM

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THE DELANO MAKES WAVES South Beach stalwart Delano has made its way to Las Vegas and brought its high-concept style along. The all-suite hotel hosts a bevy of entertainment options, including Alain Ducasse’s French Riviera–inspired restaurant Rivea, live music at Franklin lounge and luxe treatments at the Bathhouse Spa. Our favorite feature? The private pool just steps from the resort’s “main beach.” 3940 LAS VEGAS BOULEVARD SOUTH; DELANOLASVEGAS.COM

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Styled on the Strip

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It’s rarely a white Christmas in Las Vegas, but it is this holiday season at the Ice Rink at the Cosmopolitan, which boasts fire pits, s’mores and cocktails, in addition to actual skating over the Boulevard Pool. COSMOPOLITANVEGAS. COM

St. Tropez hits Sin City with the opening of hair guru Claude Baruk’s first two stateside salons, inside the Wynn and Encore resorts. The salons specialize in both color and cut, offering custom-tailored services. “Whatever the client dreams, I make a reality for them,” says Baruk, who was lured to Las Vegas after serving as Steve and Andrea Wynn’s longtime hairstylist in France.

THE SLS OPENS ON LAS VEGAS BOULEVARD One of the largest hotel debuts on the Strip in years is that of the SLS Las Vegas, designed by Philippe Starck. The resort features 1,613 guest suites spanning three towers and offers a number of multi-concept dining spots and lounges, including carnivore’s delight Bazaar Meat by José Andrés and L.A. favorites like Umami Burger, The Griddle Cafe and 800 Degrees pizza.

3131 LAS VEGAS BOULEVARD SOUTH; WYNNLASVEGAS.COM

2535 LAS VEGAS BOULEVARD SOUTH; SLSHOTELS.COM

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OPENING RECEPTION

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RAISING THE BARRE

This winter’s most festive spectacle is the Nevada Ballet Theatre’s production of The Nutcracker, running from December 13 to 21 at the Smith Center for the Performing Arts. The ballet’s life-size Victorian dollhouse and 30-foot tree promise to be among the season’s greatest gifts. 361 SYMPHONY PARK AVENUE; NEVADABALLET.COM

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WORLDLY DELIGHTS

TRAVEL THE GLOBE WITHOUT EVER LEAVING THE DESERT AT THESE SIX NEW INTERNATIONAL OUTPOSTS

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WHIST STOVE AND SPIRITS

UK

Taking over the former Presidio space at Green Valley Ranch, Whist Stove and Spirits redefines traditional dining with a small plates sharing menu and decor including wood and copper accents. The restaurant opens in tandem with the adjacent Due & Proper, an authentic English pub perfect for a comforting pint of Guinness. 2235 VILLAGE WALK DRIVE; WHISTSTOVE.COM

BARDOT BRASSERIE

Michael Mina’s new restaurant pays homage to Parisian brasserie favorites, featuring indulgences such as roasted bone marrow with bacon marmalade, a roving shellfish cart and, of course, to-die-for steak frites. The French-inspired interior brings out an alluring atmosphere reminiscent of the café culture.

ALEX STRATTA ITALIAN STEAKHOUSE

ITALY

Celebrated chef Alex Stratta returns to town with this Gramercy Las Vegas restaurant, which serves a combination of rustic Italian fare and contemporary steakhouse favorites. Enjoy pizza, filet mignon or something from the raw bar before checking out live entertainment at the stand-alone bar, then marvel at the Strip skyline from the enclosed glass patio. 9257 WEST RUSSELL ROAD; ALEXSTRATTASTEAKHOUSE.COM

This Los Angeles–based transplant is known as one of the pioneers of shabu-shabu dining, a prepare-it-yourself meal with meat, vegetables and noodles cooked in boiling pots of water right at the table. Diners will love the fondue-style participatory experience. 9440 WEST SAHARA AVENUE; YOJIE.COM

USA

YARDBIRD SOUTHERN TABLE & BAR

One of the most eagerly anticipated openings of the year is Miamibased Yardbird, which is finally setting up shop at the Venetian. Known for family-style fried chicken and Southern comfort food, the boîte will have two private dining areas, a bar with an expanded cocktail program and even an on-site ice room for mixologists to hand-cut specialty ice blocks. 3355 LAS VEGAS BOULEVARD SOUTH; RUNCHICKENRUN.COM

MR. CHOW Opening in early 2015, Mr. Chow at Caesars Palace is the Chinese restaurant’s first Vegas outpost. After arriving via private elevator, guests will be treated to Asian staples like chicken satay, green prawns and hand-pulled noodles, along with stunning views of the Garden of the Gods pool complex. 3570 LAS VEGAS BOULEVARD SOUTH; MRCHOW.COM

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3730 LAS VEGAS BOULEVARD SOUTH; ARIA.COM


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Las Vegas’ only luxury hotel and casino with a rooftop pool and nightclub Must be 21 or older to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700. ©2014, Caesars License Company, LLC.


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GLOBE-AL WARM-UP

THE GROUP BEHIND THE GOLDEN GLOBES GIVES BACK TO ARTS PROGRAMS

MELROSE SPACE

On the eve of her first store opening, L.A. fine jeweler Irene Neuwirth talks about her vision for the jewel box

Amanda Chantal Bacon’s vitaminpacked Moon Juices are now being served at the Ace Hotel Downtown. Stop by the ticket booth in front of the property’s theater for organic, coldpressed juice, snacks and health tonics. MOONJUICESHOP.COM

“They’re a crazy bunch!” said Channing Tatum of why he was eager to break bread with the international journalists of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association at their annual grants banquet at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on August 14. This particular gathering, though, was altruistic: The group bequeathed $1.9 million to nearly 50 arts education programs—causes close to the hearts of the Hollywood-insider attendees, who grew up dreaming of a life in the arts. “I probably learned more from The Goonies than I did from school!” joked Tatum, who was joined by Sofia Vergara, Kerry Washington, Morgan Freeman and Robert Pattinson. Kristen Bell also admired the HFPA’s philanthropic push: “I had a really

good music and theater program in high school, which got me into wanting to be a performer,” she told DuJour. “But I went to a Catholic school. If I were in a public school and that was dropped, I have no idea what I’d be doing for a living.” HFPA president Theo Kingma, a Dutch photojournalist, created a glamorous yet relaxed dinner affair so guests could “stay off their Blackberries.” Despite the starry elbow-rubbing, “This is not an evening for us,” Kingma explained. “We have the opportunity to celebrate so many wonderful organizations that do so much good work, from film restoration to teaching children to get involved in the film industry and having screenings in third world countries.” —SCOTT HUVER

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THEO KINGMA, PRESIDENT OF HFPA, AND NICOLE KIDMAN

HOW WAS IT WORKING WITH COMMUNE, THE DESIGN FIRM ON THIS PROJECT? “When I met Pam [Shamshiri, partner at Commune], she wowed me. I knew she could think outside the box in just the way I wanted. I really hoped the store would feel warm and inviting and fun. I wanted the experience of shopping here to not be so precious and for customers and friends and family to feel like they can hang out all day if that’s what they want to do. I dreamed of creating an environment that was more like a home.” HAVE YOU COMMISSIONED ART FOR THE BOUTIQUE? “Clare Crespo fabricated the most incredible dioramas, Claire Oswalt painted some pieces and my mom, Geraldine Neuwirth, is a painter, and created a piece for the store.” WHAT FUN PLANS DO YOU HAVE FOR THE SPACE ASIDE FROM YOUR EXQUISITE GEMS? “We’ll do all sorts of unusual events in the store: whiskey tastings and readings, dinner parties with chefs. I want it to be vibrant and lively and creative and most of all fun!” 8458 MELROSE PLACE; IRENENEUWIRTH.COM

BEAUTY NEWS French vinotherapy beauty brand CAUDALIE touches down in Venice with its first West Coast boutique and spa, featuring anti-aging facials, massages and nail treatments. CAUDALIE.COM

Eyebrow guru KELLEY BAKER and her tweezers have taken on Beverly Hills. Her latest

studio is now open at the Lasky Clinic. KELLEYBAKERBROWS.COM Complex complexions, rejoice! Studio City beauty mecca FACE HAUS has introduced a new express “facial bar” concept, a 30-minute facial for all ages, at its 3rd Street location. THEFACEHAUS.COM Skin care and state-of-the-art technology unite at AEONIUM INTEGRATIVE SKINCARE CLINIC, the West Side’s new go-to salon for customized

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treatments, including full-body microdermabrasion and micro-needling.

AEONIUMSKINCARE.COM

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HOW DID YOU FIND THIS LOCATION AND DECIDE ON MELROSE PLACE FOR YOUR FIRST JEWELRY BOUTIQUE? ”I fell in love with the block ages ago and always said it’s the only place I’d want to be. As soon as the right space opened up, I grabbed it. Melrose Place is such a beautiful, tree-lined street.”


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FEAST FROM THE EAST

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SCOTTISH SALMON “A great citrus sauce accompanies this fish.”

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I always had a dream of cooking. My mom was such an amazing cook. It was a natural transition from enjoying my mom’s food. I loved it. I wanted to make other people feel the same way about food that I did.

CHEF AKIRA BACK DISHES ON THE PERFECT MEAL AT HIS NEWLY DEBUTED EATERY, YELLOWTAIL SUNSET

SEARED HALIBUT “The fish has unique flavor thanks to a coconut lemongrass broth. It’s completely addicting.”

NEW YORK

I am a big fan of California and its local ingredients. So opening a restaurant in Los Angeles has been a dream of mine for a while now. Yellowtail is becoming such a big name throughout the world. It only makes sense to open next in L.A. A lot of our customers live there so it is nice to host them in their city.

JEJU DOMI “A Korean sauce that I grew up with—but I added my own twist.”

LOBSTER CARPACCIO “This is my dad's favorite dish.”

POPPING SPICY CRAB “Inspired by my childhood. My mom would put candy in my food so that I would eat more.”

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SUNSET STRIPS “Just a clean, fresh halibut sashimi.”

Athletic Support

CALIFORNICATION

The Golden State gets its due at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) with an exhibition of late local photographer Larry Sultan. Titled “Here and Home,” the first museum retrospective of the artist shines a light on more than 100 of the California-based lensman’s works, which blend documentary and staged photography to create images of the psychological as well as physical landscape of suburban family life. Sultan’s images negotiate between reality and fantasy, domesticity and desire, as the mundane qualities of the domestic surroundings become loaded cultural symbols. Through March 22. 5905 WILSHIRE BOULEVARD; LACMA.ORG

As the guys behind Athletic Propulsion Labs’ Concept 1 basketball shoe (the first shoe to be officially banned by the NBA for the increased vertical leap it offered players), twins Adam and Ryan Goldston have their finger on the pulse of innovation—and ingenuity in their genes. Their footwear industry–vet father helped create the Reebok Pump and LA Gear lighted shoes. So it makes sense that their new fitness apparel line and latest footwear offerings are just as forward thinking: Look for light and flexible running shoes that enhance the wearer’s speed potential.

WHAT MADE YOU DECIDE TO LAUNCH APL? “Adam and I were athletes at USC,” Ryan says, “and being that we always try to push ourselves to maximize our athleticism, we always felt like while there were cool shoes on the market, there was never anything that allowed us to instantly increase our perfor-

Sneaker, $140, ATHLETIC PROPULSION LABS

mance. When we set out to create APL, our goal was to find a technology that could instantly make the wearer jump higher, because that’s what we always wanted as athletes. Our goal was to really disrupt the marketplace and enter with products unlike anything that had ever been seen before.”

HOW DO YOU DIVIDE THE RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE BUSINESS? “We always like to say that Adam gives you what you want, and I give you what you need. While there are many things that we collaborate on together for the brand, there are certain areas where one of us will take the lead.” ATHLETICPROPULSIONLABS.COM

LARRY SULTAN/LACMA: COURTESY OF THE ESTATE OF LARRY SULTAN; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

SoCal twins heat up the activewear scene


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TURNING JAPANESE AND THEN SOME

As the globe-trotting Brazilian behind an eponymous architecture and design firm in Sao Paulo, Debora Aguiar understands that modern life can be stressful. So she was elated when hospitality veteran Barry Sternlicht and Richard LeFrak commissioned her to work on interiors at their new brand’s first property, 1 Hotel & Homes South Beach. Slated to open in early 2015, the 425-room ocean-

front hotel and 156 full residences serve as an oasis within the action-packed neighborhood. Aguiar’s work suits the space’s use of natural elements and organic materials, as well as the seamless transition between indoor and outdoor settings. So far, units have been purchased by buyers from more than 20 countries. Only 28 prized penthouses remain— mainly because they

weren’t released on the market until late this year. Here, Aguiar discusses the project with DuJour. WHAT ARE YOUR FAVORITE ASPECTS OF THIS PROPERTY? “You’re embraced by a warm, harmonious atmosphere through old washed wood, natural fibers and indirect lighting. You always feel connected to Mother Nature, especially with the amazing views.”

WHAT ARE THE SMALLER THINGS YOU DID TO ENSURE THAT CONNECTION? “There’s detail everywhere, from woven textures to river rocks to plants. Everything invites you to touch, to sit, to stay.” WAS THE COMMITMENT TO GREEN DESIGN IMPORTANT TO YOU? “I feel responsible to create green environments, especially since I’m in a position in my career that my actions

teach and influence others to practice these initiatives.” HOW DO YOU HOPE IT WILL MAKE AN IMPACT? ”We have to show how easy it can be to go green. Unlike most trends that come and go quickly, wellness, nature and coziness are durable, imperishable and profitable. Eco-luxury has staying power.” 2399 COLLINS AVENUE 1HOTELS.COM

Fontainebleau Brings on the Bon Bons

When the Fontainebleau came on the scene in the 1950s, its coffee shop—complete with an on-site patisserie—was one of the hotel’s biggest draws. To recapture that original luster, Chez Bon Bon is back. Sweet and savory cuisine stations add up to a cruise ship–worthy buffet for the senses. Exclusive coffee blend Black Velvet, roasted by Lamill in Los Angeles, complements executive pastry chef Jordi Panisello’s homemade chocolates. Guests can also pop in for cupcakes, gelato and prepared items. 4441 COLLINS AVENUE; FONTAINEBLEAU.COM

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A recent explosion of Asian restaurants has been a much-appreciated boon for the Miami dining scene. South Beach’s appropriately named Drunken Dragon is so fire-hot, thanks to its hipster take on Korean barbecue, that scoring a seat around one of its seven grill tables has already become a feat. Those who can’t get in will have to settle for one of the former bodega’s other seating options, such as at a bar topped with a slab of Oregon-sourced Douglas fir. 1424 ALTON ROAD; DRUNKENDRAGON.COM

Japanophiles in search of a Jiro Dreams of Sushi dining experience can savor a bento box at N by Naoe, the follow-up to owner Kevin Cory’s neighboring Naoe, or sidle up to Morimoto South Beach’s sushi bar, which runs the full length of its space in Shelborne Wyndham Grand. Grab a seat and wait for Iron Chef Masaharu Morimoto to send out his famous tuna pizza and hamachi tacos, along with South Beach specials like ceviche and wasabicharged clear gazpacho. 661 BRICKELL KEY DRIVE; NAOEMIAMI.COM 1801 COLLINS AVENUE; SHELBORNE.COM

Come January, Thai fans will be reunited with chef Piyarat Arreeratn at his spacious Asian street-food spot NaiYaRa in Sunset Harbour or enjoy the offerings at Red Ginger in South of Fifth, where Top Chef Masters contestant Herb Wilson is offering a Thai-meets-omakase menu sprinkled with ingredients imported from Japan. 1854 BAY ROAD 800 FIRST STREET; MENINHOSPITALITY.COM

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1 HOTELS & HOMES READIES FOR ITS BIG REVEAL WITH DESIGNER DEBORA AGUIAR IN A LEAD ROLE

Miami’s falling for Asian fare this season.


OCEANFRONT RESORT FINE AND CASUAL DINING LUXURY SHOPPING S PA A N D F I T N E S S C E N T E R F O R E V E R F O N TA I N E B L E A U S TAY LO N G E R , S AV E M O R E RECEIVE UP TO $500 I N D I N I N G A N D S PA C R E D I T JAN 4 – APRIL 30, 2015 F O N TA I N E B L E A U MIAMI BEACH


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Miami Beach condo records were shattered when a Faena House duplex penthouse— featuring 8,273 square feet of interior space, nearly 10,000 square feet of exterior space and a 70-foot-long rooftop pool—was sold in April to an unnamed buyer (it was listed at $50 million).

PUTTING ON THE RITZ A NEW RESIDENTIAL PROJECT FROM LIONHEART CAPITAL SEEKS TO REDEFINE THE MIAMI BEACH SKYLINE

Lionheart Capital’s newest development,

staircase and a soaring ceiling, the sleek

The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Miami

lobby features exotic furniture and pieces

Beach, is a collaboration with renowned

Lissoni has sourced from trips around the

Italian architect and designer Piero Lissoni

globe. There are also references to the

and Miami architecture firm ADD Inc.

indigenous cultures of South Florida and

The property boasts sprawling gardens,

the Everglades.

24-hour concierge service, a pet salon,

clean lines and connecting the apartments

terfall, a cinema-quality screening room,

with their outdoor surroundings. The resi-

outdoor yoga studios, a fitness center

dences have open layouts that encompass

and, most special of all, 36 private boat

the living room, dining room and kitchen,

dockages. Located in a quiet and charm-

as well as floor-to-ceiling glass windows

ing residential community of Miami Beach

throughout the space. “It is exactly like a

on Surprise Lake where lake, ocean and

European or Italian town,” Lissoni explains.

waterway meet, the seven-acre project will

“But at the same time, it’s in a special cloud

offer 126 two- to five-bedroom homes

of tranquility, security and beauty.”

ranging in size from 1,700 square feet to over 10,000 square feet. With a sculptural

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EXPANSION MODE Max Mara mingles with other chic brands that are descending in droves on the Miami Design District. The fashion powerhouse commissioned Duccio Grassi Architects to design the store with a glass facade donning a painted metal mesh overlay and organic interiors swathed in ash-treated oak and acid-treated metal with platinum leaf glass. Eight collections include Max Mara accessories, Sportmax and The Cube. 106 NE 39TH STREET; MAXMARA.COM

For Lissoni’s residences, it’s all about light,

an expansive infinity-edge pool with a wa-

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4701 NORTH MERIDIAN AVENUE;

THERESIDENCESMIAMIBEACH.COM

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GUCCI ARMANI

ZEGNA VERSACE

CIAO, DARLING THE ITALIAN CLOTHIER RIFLESSI HAS A NEW HOME

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serious competition. “You will find things that you would never find in a department store,” says owner Avi Benayoun. “From size to color to style, we pride ourselves on having an unbeatable selection.” Can you say “luxury” in Italian? (It’s lusso.) 49 WEST 57TH STREET; RIFLESSI.US

Polo Spreads Its Wings on Fifth

Ralph Lauren is set to score with a new three-story Midtown flagship for its expanded Polo line. “I believe there’s an opportunity to add a fresh, modern spirit to this enduring brand,” says Lauren himself. But it’s not all henley shirts and pullovers. Inside, Ralph’s Coffee serves the brand’s proprietary blend of La Colombe beans. 711 FIFTH AVENUE; RALPHLAUREN.COM

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CHARTOGNE-TAILLET, SAINTE ANNE, CHAMPAGNE NV “One of my favorite Grower Champagnes. It is 50 percent Chardonnay and 50 percent Pinot Noir, creating a richness and freshness all at once.”

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RIESLING, SCHMITGES, GRAUSCHIEFER, MOSEL 2011 “Grey Slate is a very mineral-driven and dry expression of Riesling from the Mosel region.”

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SAUVIGNON BLANC, CLOS ROCHE BLANCHE, TOURAINE 2013 “An organic-farmed Sauvignon Blanc that shows balance, and really good quality for its price point.”

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BLAUFRÄNKISCH, WACHTER WIESLER, SÜDBURGENLAND 2012 “The Blaufränkisch delivers a robust and juicy style of wines which are wonderful for food pairing.”

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SULAUZE “LES AMIS ROUGE SANS SOUFRE,” PROVENCE 2013 “Certified organic and with zero sulfur used. It’s very pure in fruit with rich and silky tannins.” 151 WEST 51ST STREET; ALDOSOHMWINEBAR.COM

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Riflessi, the wholesale supplier and retailer specializing in Italian ready-to-wear and accessories, has opened a palatial two-story space in Midtown. Featuring discounted prices on brands like Armani, Zegna, Versace and Gucci, and offering free, same-day custom alterations, Riflessi is giving its full-price competitors some

NEW YORK

ALDO SOHM’S TOP 5 WINES

Le Bernardin’s longtime sommelier Aldo Sohm has expanded his reach with his new Aldo Sohm Wine Bar, just down the street from the flagship. Look for an over-the-top list of wines by the glass and snacks like baked Camembert and baby beet skewers.


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The Knickerbocker Is Back

The return of the landmark hotel from This Side of Paradise proves that heaven—in Times Square, anyway—isn’t so far off.

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During the frigid winter months, chocolatier Vosges Haut Chocolat sells 2.5 tons of its hot chocolate mix (available in three flavors: Parisienne, Bianca and Aztec).

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A century after its initial opening, The Knickerbocker Hotel is poised to recapture its golden age. Having been accepted to the elite “Leading Hotels of the World” portfolio, and with celebrated chef Charlie Palmer at the helm of its food and beverage program, the Beaux Arts landmark building offers a new option in the heart of the city. Managing director Jeff David says, “Our vision for The Knickerbocker is to take its incredible past and infuse it with modern New York.” With 330 luxe guest rooms and 40 suites designed by Gabellini Sheppard Associates, the hotel also features a 7,500-square-foot rooftop bar, a stateof–the-art fitness facility (featuring TRX bands, Power Plates and spin bicycles) and a spa program operated by Tribeca favorite AIRE Ancient Baths. 1466 BROADWAY; THEKNICKERBOCKER.COM

REDEFINING DESIGN

THE MET GETS A GIFT

The Smithsonian Design Museum gets a makeover.

The Leonard A. Lauder Cubist Collection stuns this winter.

This December, design is digging in its heels uptown. The Cooper-Hewitt will reopen its Fifth Avenue doors to showcase a stunning renovation, including the addition of over 16,000 square feet of gallery space. The only museum in the world dedicated exclusively to historic and contemporary design, the revamped Cooper-Hewitt is embracing cutting-edge technology and creating more of an interactive experience for visitors. As the museum’s director Caroline Baumann says, “It’s all about access and interactivity, giving people the opportunity to engage with our offerings like never before. Accordingly, we want the visitor experience to be more social and playful.”

Leonard Lauder has given the Metropolitan Museum of Art a major gift: his unrivaled collection of Cubist artwork. Including 78 masterworks by Georges Braque, Pablo Picasso, Juan Gris and Fernand Léger, the assemblage, organized by Lauder Collection curator Emily Braun, is on view now. As Lauder, who’s been involved with the institution for decades, explains, “This collection is a 35-year effort. Thirty-five years of study, travel, buying, selling, perseverance, mistakes, refinement—you name it… Having it go to the Met is thrilling.” The museum’s director, Thomas P. Campbell, boasts that “now Cubism will be represented with some of its greatest masterpieces.”

2 EAST 91ST STREET; COOPER-HEWITT.ORG

1000 FIFTH AVENUE; METMUSEUM.ORG

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KNICKERBOCKER HOTEL: RICK LOU; COOPER-HEWITT MUSEUM: JAMES RUDNICK © 2014 COOPER-HEWITT, SMITHSONIAN DESIGN MUSEUM; LEONARD A. LAUDER: THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART; VOSGES: HOLLY EXLEY

ASPEN


RIFLESSI LUXURY EUROPEAN BRANDS AT NEW YORK‘S LOWEST PRICES

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Photos by Brett Matthews; Elliott Kaufman; Stefen Turner (aerial)

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MAYFLOWER

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Gym Rats

11 RIVERDALE AVENUE, PORT CHESTER INSIDECLAY.COM

MAYFLOWER GRACE: HOLLY EXLEY; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

PIZZA PIZZA

Mario Batali is set to open an outpost of his popular casual Italian restaurant Tarry Lodge in the heart of Yale University’s New Haven campus. Serving housemade pastas, pizzas (cooked in a massive steel oven), charcuterie and soft-serve gelato, the restaurant is nothing if not a crowd-pleaser. “We can’t compete with the storied slices of New Haven,” says Batali. “The pizza will be our own take on the Neapolitan pie, and it’s delicious all its own.”

INTO THE WOODS

278 PARK STREET, NEW HAVEN; TARRYLODGE.COM

HUDSON WOODS HOMES AIMS TO RE-ENVISION HOUSING DEVELOPMENTS

With buyers looking for full-time residences or a second home near New York City, the 26 glass and timber homes of the Hudson Woods development are attracting plenty of interested parties. Located 100 miles north of the city, it’s close enough for a weekend trip but far enough away to feel like an escape. The homes, which feature sustainable and locally sourced materials, sit on 3 to 12 acre lots and will be completed by the spring. Architect and developer Drew Lang explains that “Hudson Woods appeals because the area is much more laid back than other second-home markets and the price point is more attainable.” Priced from $665,000. HUDSONWOODS.COM

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Owners Seth Hirschel and Stefan Malter of Union Square’s cultish private gym Clay have moved north to the border of Port Chester and Greenwich, Connecticut, for a second location. The club features luxe amenities like indoor valet parking, a café by Maison Prive, fireside lounge, roof deck, full spa with steam room and sauna and Malin + Goetz products. With five training studios, Pilates, yoga, spin, golf performance training and an extensive array of cardio and strength equipment, the 25,000-squarefoot behemoth caters to all kinds.

TRI-STATE

The Mayflower Grace’s destination spa in Washington, Connecticut, launches a new treatment this winter, Hot Toddy for the Body. However dreadful the weather outside, this restorative service (infused with warming spices like cinnamon, orange peel and cloves to increase circulation) creates a glow from head to toe. GRACEHOTELS.COM/

ORANGE COUNTY


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Orange County can double its juice fix this fall with the opening of two Pressed Juicery locations, in Fashion Island and Westcliff Plaza. Known for its over 50 varieties of cold-pressed juices (like the Roots 3, made of apple, lemon, ginger and beet), the California-based brand has also attracted a legion of fans with its juice cleanses, delivered locally and nationally. These new boutiques will also serve Freeze, a new frozen treat made of 100 percent fruits, vegetables and nuts. “We know that there is a lot of confusion when it comes to health trends, and we created our products to provide people with a simple way to get fresh, essential nutrients,” says founding partner Hayden Slater. “Orange County has always embodied a health-focused, active culture that emulates our own values, and we’ve found a perfect fit.”

Celebrate the Newport Beach Christmas Boat Parade, the annual lighted holiday event, from December 17 through 21. Watch Newport Harbor transform into an illuminated wonderland with over 100 vessels adorned with lights, decorations, dancers and music. CHRISTMASBOAT PARADE.COM

SPIN CITY

New York–based fitness phenomenon SoulCycle is bringing its addictive indoor cycling classes to Fashion Island. Snag a seat on one of the studio’s 58 stationary bikes for a calorie-blasting, body-sculpting workout to high-octane playlists, topped off with instructors’ motivational cues and a whole lot of feel-good vibes. 401 NEWPORT CENTER DRIVE, NEWPORT BEACH SOUL-CYCLE.COM

PRESSEDJUICERY.COM

CHRISTMAS BOAT PARADE: HOLLY EXLEY; ROOTS THE BEAUTY: ZELLERPHOTOGRAPHY.COM; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

–MONICA WISE, FOUNDER L*SPACE

Milano sandal, $119

Fringe sandal, $75

Snake Wrap sandal, $119, all available dianesbeachwear.com

SHOE-IN Savvy beachgoers are all about L*Space, the Corona del Mar-based line of swimwear. Now founder Monica Wise has expanded her love of sand and sea to her first shoe collection. L*Space by Cocobelle features embellished sandals crafted in Bali, the ideal complement to the brand’s swimwear and clothing. “Sandals are the perfect accessory to elevate a bikini and create a complete beach-to-bar look,” Wise explains. . LSPACE COM

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“I wear the sandals paired with cut-off shorts or simple maxi dresses.”

ORANGE COUNTY

Main Squeeze

FACE TIME

ROOTS THE BEAUTY UNDERGROUND At Roots the Beauty Underground in Laguna Beach, product junkies can find a treasure trove of non-toxic and organic hair and skincare alternatives, curated by founder and owner Laura Linsenmayer. The same philosophy also extends to the store’s salon services, which run the gamut from organic color to protein treatments. 384 FOREST AVENUE, LAGUNA BEACH; ROOTS-BEAUTY.COM

MONBON Meanwhile, Newport Beach–based cosmetic surgeon Dr. Monica Bonakdar has channeled her passion and know-how into MonBon, a physician-grade, results-driven skin-care line capable of tackling everything from aging to sun damage.

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ORANGE COUNTY @ DUJOUR.COM /CITIES

2121 EAST COAST HIGHWAY, NEWPORT BEACH BONAKDARINSTITUTE.COM


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Photographer Harry Benson and society doyenne Hilary Geary Ross have released Palm Beach People, a coffee table book that offers a look inside the exclusive world of the island’s inhabitants. POWERHOUSEBOOKS .COM

ORANGE COUNTY

PA L M B E A C H

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Eau, the Glory of It All

INSIDE THE RECENT EAU PALM BEACH RESORT & SPA RENOVATION WITH DESIGNER JONATHAN ADLER 100 SOUTH OCEAN BOULEVARD; EAUPALMBEACH.COM

DESIGN INSPIRATION “It’s important that the hotel feel incredibly luxurious and that it capture the dreamy spirit of Palm Beach. The vibe is Capri meets Santorini meets Palm Beach and is about crisp, fresh glamour.”

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ARTIST COMMISSIONS “We had Donald Robertson create a beach scene—much chicer than the pastel waves or seashell-encrusted frames you usually see at beachfront hotels. Rooms will also have art from Jenna Snyder-Phillips and Leila Jeffreys, two rad artists.”

FROM PEN TO PAPER

Suit Yourself

The Palm Beach Hermès boutique plays host to “Carte Blanche,” an exhibition of detailed paper sculptures made by five different artists. The pieces are so elaborate that it’s hard to believe each one is, essentially, made from the same material that fills everyday printers. And what is paper without a pen? The only suitable option to pair with this work would be the new Hermès Nautilus, created by visionary Australian designer Marc Newson. 240 WORTH AVENUE; HERMES.COM

Megan Balch and Jaime Barker grew up in West Palm Beach, so creating their swimwear line, Flagpole Swim, came naturally. “We felt like there were two types of suits: the ones you lay out in and the ones you wore to do fun activities,” says Balch. “We wanted suits that could do both.” Their collection consists of stylish cuts in a variety of colors, perfect for pro surfers and sunbathers alike. Swimsuit, $398, FLAGPOLE SWIM, flagpoleswim.com

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PALM BEACH PEOPLE: HOLLY EXLEY; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

PALETTE CLEANSER “The color scheme is fresh and vibrant and evokes a sense of place. A trip here should be like lemon sorbet for your mind and body, and I think the rooms capture that. I also used our Maxime chair in every room. It’s minimalist and sculptural.”


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LOOKING AROUND TOWN

AS HBO’S SF-BASED SERIES LOOKING ENTERS ITS SECOND SEASON, STAR JONATHAN GROFF SHARES HIS FAVORITE LOCAL SPOTS FOR CULTURE, COFFEE AND MORE

1 ON THE GRIND “Never before in my life did I like coffee, not even coffee ice cream. But there’s this place called Philz, and it’s so delicious that it started me drinking coffee.” 2 FLICKS FIX “I love seeing movies at the Castro Theatre. One night we went to see Can’t Hardly Wait, which is one of my favorite movies of all time.”

an episode there and then went back that night to go dancing.” 4 THE WHEEL WORLD “I ride my bike everywhere here, and Golden Gate Park is an amazing place for it. At every turn there’s some cool thing, like how there are buffalo in some parts of the park. It’s the best.”

5 DINING AL FRESCO “I love Tartine, which is near Dolores Park. They have the most incredible pressed sandwiches that I’ve ever had in my life. I like to eat them in the park for a little picnic after work.”

especially the caramelsalted ice cream. And pretty much every other flavor of ice cream they have.”

Visitors to this year’s Pebble Beach Automotive Weekend were able to brush up on their alphabet—the letters F and E. Jaguar rolled out its U.S. production version of both the F-Type Project 7 all-aluminum roadster and the new limitededition Jaguar Lightweight E-Type, the first design produced from the automaker’s Jaguar Heritage team. Only six of the E-Type will be produced, as homage to the original 1963 . GT E-Type. JAGUARUSA COM

6 IN THE CONE “Bi-Rite Creamery is amazing—

3 BOTTOMS UP “My favorite bar is The Stud. It’s a down and dirty gay bar with drag shows. We shot

TOEING THE POLITICAL LINE

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During his relatively short career—he died in 1990 at age 31—Keith Haring made an enormous impact on the art world and worked tirelessly to generate awareness about AIDS. The first major Haring exhibition on the West Coast in almost 20 years, the de Young Museum’s “Keith Haring: The Political Line” explores the artist’s response to capitalism, nuclear disarmament, race relations and the environment. Over 130 works will be on display—several of which haven’t been seen since his death. Through February 16. 50 HAGIWARA TEA GARDEN DRIVE; DEYOUNG.FAMSF.ORG

CASTRO THEATRE & GOLDEN GATE PARK: GETTY IMAGES (2); KEITH HARING: © 2014, KEITH HARING FOUNDATION; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

Hot Wheels

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ET CASTRO STRE

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VALLEYS APART, TWO WINERIES FIND THE RIGHT BLEND FOR SUCCESS

WESTIN ST. FRANCIS: HOLLY EXLEY; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

THREE STICKS WINES When vintner Bill Price gave designer Ken Fulk a few sticks, a historic dwelling in need of a major transformation and a lot of leeway, what he got in return was his Vallejo-Casteñada Adobe, the new Three Sticks Wines tasting lounge and headquarters. Price, whose Three Sticks produces lush and complex pinot noirs and chardonnays, was obsessed with the downtown Sonoma landmark and had a vision for its restoration. The Adobe, built in c. 1842, is considered the oldest occupied residence in Sonoma, and efforts were taken to preserve its integrity. An archeological dig at the site turned up ceramics, apothecary bottles and even fragments of wine bottles. “Our main priority was preserving its historic qualities,” says Price. Landscape architect Penney Magrane took charge of preserving the gardens, which were originally designed by Helen Van Pelt, the visionary responsible for the grounds of Frank Lloyd Wright’s famous Millard House in Pasadena.

The historic Westin St. Francis hotel debuts its largest renovation since 1972 in time for its 110th anniversary. The 569room, 32-floor Union Square fixture recently completed a $20 million spruce-up of its Tower Building. WESTINSTFRANCIS.COM

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ROBERT SINSKEY VINEYARDS The Napa Valley’s landscape is made up of rolling, vineyard-lined hills and is, in some cases, tended by sheep. At least that’s the case at Robert Sinskey Vineyards, where Robert and Maria Sinskey utilize animals for landscaping, among other things. The method is in keeping with their biodynamic winemaking practices—in fact, since 1991 the winery has reduced its carbon footprint significantly, generating 75 percent of its energy through solar installations and on-site biodiesel production. These complicated practices yield equally complex and satisfying wines: Abraxas, a white Alsatian blend, is a musttry, as is the Pinot Gris Late—a delicious dessert wine. Tastings are paired with bites created by Maria, a chef and cookbook author, in the kitchen adjacent to the tasting room. An expansion of the winery is about to be completed and will include a massive new kitchen and an open grill capable of producing whole-animal dinners—sheep not included. 6320 SILVERADO TRAIL; ROBERTSINSKEY.COM

143 WEST SPAIN STREET; THREESTICKSWINES.COM

Golden Age Empowered by the computing age but also feeling stalled by it, Lisa Baird and Vanessa Corrêa worried that their creative contributions were going to be “digital, hack-able, intangible and delete-able.” Coléoptère was their response 18-karat gold, platinum and diamond necklace, to that. $64,900; 18-karat gold and diamond pavé bracelet, As Baird explains, $29,750, coleoptere.us

the Oakland-based jewelry design duo had “a hunger for something distant and mysterious.” Utilizing skills from their high-octane professions—business and creative directing, respectively—they began work to feed their creative needs. “Our first collection [which debuted in 2013] had a motif

of hidden luxury, which complemented the origins of the brand,” explains Baird. In some cases, the hidden element was literal—552 diamonds lining the interior platinum core of the Diving Bell necklace or the six diamonds on the platinum tongue of the Affaire de Coeur bracelet, which disappear beneath the gold closure. Of their collaboration, Corrêa

adds: “We both offer input into all parts of the business, and we’re also respectful of the expertise we each have.” Artists such as Lucie Rie and Ruth Duckworth as well as the floral arrangements of Makoto Azuma are sources of inspiration, says Corrêa. Like the work that informs them, Coléoptère’s designs are clean and full of wit. COLEOPTERE.US

SAN FRANCISCO

DIVINE WINES

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THE IN CROWD

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High Steaks

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DR. LEE GAUSE AND JOHN LEGEND

JUSTIN GUARINI

WHO: Chrissy Teigen, John Legend, Robert Chavez WHAT: Cocktails for Teigen’s DuJour cover WHERE: NYY Steakhouse in NYC

DAVID CONE

ORANGE COUNTY

FRANCES KAZAN

RAUL ADORNO JOHN GALLOWAY

PATRICIA BOSWORTH AND MARIA COOPER JANIS

ERIN MULLIN

PHILIP AND ANNA AUERBACH

CYNTHIA MITROS AND DARIO PARRILLA

MELISSA BESTE AND JOHN LEGEND

AMANDA VAILL AND NICOLE VECCHIARELLI

JIM CLERKIN AND CHRISSY TEIGEN

GAIL SHEEHY AND PATRICIA BOSWORTH VINCENT SABIO AND ROBERT CHAVEZ

All Hail Gail WHO: Gail Sheehy, Joan Juliet Buck, Jane Friedman WHAT: DuJour breakfast for Sheehy’s new book, Daring WHERE: Sopra in NYC

HIGH STEAKS: GETTY IMAGES; ALL HAIL GAIL: SHAWN MICHAEL LOWE

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JUDY COLLINS, JANE FRIEDMAN AND JOAN JULIET BUCK


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TOM ROBERTS ANDREW HEIBERGER AND DAVID LIPMAN

BARRY SLOTNICK AND ELAINE WYNN

MAYOR PHILIP LEVINE WON-G

ARLEEN AND TOMMY DAVIDSON

WALTER BRINDELL AND ERNIE ARIAS

GENA SMITH, LENNY KRAVITZ AND PAULINE BROWN

MARY HOOD

JASON BINN AND EMILY SMITH

STEFANIA GIROMBELLI

JEFF ZUCKER

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KEVIN RYAN ALEXANDRA, FRANK AND FIONA SCIAME PASCALINE SERVAN-SCHREIBER

HALEY LANKAU

NACHO FIGUERAS AND DELFINA BLAQUIER

JONAS TAHLIN JANINA BOSS TAHLIN

ARYEH BOURKOFF

ANDREA CORREALE AND KEVIN COSTNER

HEATHER VANDENBERGHE BILL BRATTON AND RIKKI KLIEMAN

Top Cop GETTY IMAGES

THE IN CROWD

WHO: Lenny Kravitz, Elaine Wynn, Miami mayor Philip Levine WHAT: A party for Kravitz’s latest album and DuJour cover WHERE: Park Hyatt in NYC

WHO: David Lipman, Heather Vandenberghe, Kevin Ryan WHAT: A party in honor of Police Commissioner Bill Bratton and his wife, Rikki Klieman WHERE: Tao Downtown and Harry Cipriani in NYC

DAVID YURMAN

BERN APTER

JIM AND BETH GOLD

SUE APTER

Holiday ScreenatScene Harlow WHO: WHO:Jon Kevin Steinberg, Costner,Ray JeffKelly, Zucker, EricJim Villency, Gold, Richie David Yurman Notar WHAT:WHAT: A screening A Memorial and party Day summer for the kick-off film Black party and White WHERE: WHERE: Harlow FinaleEast in East in Sag Hampton Harbor


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Living Out Lavo WHO: Kendall and Kylie Jenner, Gigi Hadid WHAT: A party to toast the Jenner sisters’ fashion shoot WHERE: Lavo in NYC

BRIELLE, PATRICK AND PARKER DAY JIM DOLAN

MARTI CRAMPSHEE AND JASON BINN JAMES HANCOCK AND TOM MARCHITELLI

GIGI HADID

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KENDALL JENNER, TOMMASO BRUSO AND KYLIE JENNER

MICHAEL CAPPONI, TATIANA BRUNETTI AND GIDEON KIMBRELL

DR. RUTH WESTHEIMER

LEON AND BARBARA KALVARIA CAMILLE DOUGLAS

BRENT LAMBERTI

VIKRAM CHATWAL

KATIE HOLMES AND KEITH GEORGE

JIM MULLANEY

It’s Only a Dream WHO: Katie Holmes, Jason Weinberg, Jim Dolan WHAT: Cocktails to celebrate Holmes’ DuJour cover WHERE: Dream Downtown in NYC

GETTY IMAGES

LESLIE SLOANE, HALEY BINN AND JASON WEINBERG

RON AND ABIGAIL GALOTTI


promotion

SPOTLIGHT

new york

The art of the smile NYC’s Real-Life Tooth Fairy Promotes Dental Health, One Piece of Art at a Time When Dr. Lee Gause arrived in Man-

who would normally go without dental

hattan nine years ago, he made it a

care due to financial constraints.

point to deliver the highest quality dental care with a focus on advanced technology and patient care. The exceptional service and its results have been winning over patients—many even fly across the country for an appointment. But his proudest achievement is the newly launched Smile

Monthly art shows are curated specifically for Smile Design Gallery, with 100 percent of the value of art sold matched in free dental care for those in need. To date, over $200,000 of charitable dentistry has been provided to over 500 patients.

Smile Design Manhattan is located at 24 West 57th Street between 5th and 6th Avenues and specializes

Design Gallery. Working closely with artists

Participating artists and galleries include:

and galleries, Dr Gause merges a passion

Takashi Murakami, Swizz Beats, Chi Modu,

for art with dental philanthropy. He has

Salvador Dali, Marc Chagall, Ron Agam,

successfully tapped the art market to pro-

URNY, the Martin Lawrence Gallery and

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vide much needed funds to treat patients

Klein Sun Gallery.

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in general, cosmetic and implant dental care.


FAMOUS LAST WORDS

A look at celebrity chef Paula Deen’s handwriting offers insight into the mind of a culinary mogul

People will sometimes embody words or images in handwriting that are near and dear to the heart. In this case, never actually looks more like the word menu.

Look at the n in been and the v in never. Here we see very sharp, tight angles that often allude to a “sharp” person—someone who is smart and critical.

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Large-size writing reveals a person who enjoys being the center of attention.

In some instances her writing is distinct and individual, but elsewhere it showcases traditional “copybook” style. She straddles the line between rebellious and conservative.

The initials in her first and last name are formed in her own unique style. She prides herself on doing things in a nonconformist way.

F

or well over a decade, Paula Deen has been buttering up her television audiences and recipes alike. The chef—known both for her quirky witticisms and calorie-laden dishes— gives the experience of “comfort food” a new meaning. Here, Deen’s handwriting sheds light on her culinary and TV-personality success. According to graphologist Annette Poizner, “all the roundness in her writing reflects a warmhearted, emotional and social” instinct. Her penmanship suggests a person who is deeply sensual, who loves to indulge and be indulged. But don’t mis-

take her kindness for weakness. “Look at the hook at the end of her last name and the end of her fi rst name,” Poizner says. “Such people are often very accomplished because they want to achieve more and more. They grasp for different forms of success.” Case in point, the silver-haired Southern belle recently launched her own subscription-based online platform called the Paula Deen Network, which houses recipes, culinary tips and bite-size cooking videos. Deen says she’s loving the authenticity of the new experience. “It’s so different from TV. There’s very little

editing. One day I set off the kitchen alarm and we just went with it, because that’s what happens in kitchens across America. We want you to see things as they really unfold.” It’s a sincerity that seems to resonate with the 67-year-old, following one of her more challenging years. When asked about the meaning of her favorite quote (above), she said, “When I was in my early twenties, I read a book called A Woman of Substance—I loved that book. I said, ‘One day I want to be a woman of substance. And if it takes me until my last day, I want to be that woman.’ ”—FRANCES DODDS


Winter 2014  

Defining Hollywood leaders like Angelina Jolie and Cate Blanchett; Lenny Kravitz talks about his tenth album; men are going under the knife...

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