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contents Dress, $6,495; Bra, $275; Panties, $295, DOLCE & GABBANA, 212-897-9653. Bombe necklace, price upon request, GRAFF, graffdiamonds.com. Ronde Collection watch in 18-karat white gold with diamonds, $45,300, FRANCK MULLER, franckmuller.com. Ring, Hadid’s own.

A Guatemalan Escape

pa g e 1 3 6 STYLE

The State of the Socialite

pa g e 1 7 6

in the pink | 47 Reworked classics take on a rich color palette for effortless and entirely fresh looks

style news | 58 Inspiring new timepieces; London’s latest shopping spot; the season’s must-have sandals blank canvas | 62 Luxury designers are in agreement: The utilitarian fabric isn’t just for beach bags anymore something commissioned  |  64 For a new set of brides, a custom-made gown by a major designer isn’t a fantasy. It’s a necessity

LIFE peaking in | 72 One Colorado couple welcomes the majesty of Aspen into their home the plastic fantastic | 76 Faux flowers, once considered the antithesis of good taste, are blossoming

when prenups attack|  94 Is it possible to break that pre-marital agreement? Judith Newman discovers the loopholes

BODY grin reapers  |  96 Chewing over the latest in high-tech and innovative dental procedures money can’t buy you sleep  |  98 But that doesn’t mean you won’t keep trying. Alyssa Giacobbe goes in pursuit of some Zs hot for coal  |  102 Activated charcoal is grooming’s dirtiest little secret extreme wellness  |  104 Old-school European spas offer youth-enhancing fixes in the form of punishing routines

PLAY stroke of genius  |  106 A French maison’s hand-crafted putters are the hautest on the green

travel | 80 Upgrading iconic hotels; your Tokyo bucket list; at home on the high seas

who’s your caddy?  |  108 This isn’t your grandfather’s Cadillac

a cave of one’s own |  84 For one artist, there’s nowhere to go but down

house of the spirits  |  110 The secret to a well-stocked bar? Beautiful bottles

garden variety |  86 Restaurants across the country are welcoming the new reign of the vegetable superstar

You’ve got it maid | 112 Household staff can feel invaluable, but what’s the true cost of good help?

fit for fendi |  90 A new design collaboration finds its home among high fashion

back to the future | 114 Lindsay Silberman meets the high-tech humanoids about to hijack your home

WORK no brakes | 116 Racing’s royal family forgoes the silver spoon for a helping hand a mayor’s moment | 118 San Francisco mayor Ed Lee helms one of the most beautiful and complex cities in America the good boy’s club  |  120 Forget cocktail parties and conferences, the new power networking is happening at the dog park power seat: Robert A.m. stern | 122 The celebrated architect shows Jen Renzi his distinctly modern office

CULTURE first piece of art: chloë sevigny  |  124 The actress, whose first book is out this spring, tells of a painting she loved and lost high society | 126 Meili Cady on designer clothes, private jets and smuggling tons of marijuana across the country band book | 127 With her enthralling memoir, rock goddess Kim Gordon makes an entirely new type of noise suspense smarts | 127 Five new thrillers chocked with depth and flair

left to right: paul costello; stefan ruiz

28

dot-com baubles | 56 As jewelry splurges move online, Lynn Yaeger finds a true gem is never out of reach


contents

FEATURES

Going Faux

PA G E 7 6

JANE FONDA | 130 With a new series on its way, Jane Fonda’s entering her sixth decade in the spotlight; here, she reveals what she’s learned about acting, marriage, drugs, politics and life outside her comfort zone. By Mickey Rapkin; photographed by Thomas Whiteside

30

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OUT OF THE BLUE | 136 Beyond the ancient Mayan ruins, Guatemala’s Lake Atitlán has long been a muse to artists and one of Central America’s best-kept secrets. By Sara Ruffin Costello; photographed by Paul Costello SPRING AWAKENING | 146 She may have traded in her modeling career for a life in activism, but, in the season’s most daring looks and most dramatic necklines, Angela Lindvall proves she’s still got every ounce of her charm. By Eden Univer; photographed by Paul Jasmin MIA, IN THE BEGINNING | 154 Never-before-seen images of a 19-year-old Mia Farrow’s first photoshoot, before she became a worldwide superstar. By Patricia Bosworth; photographed by Tom Palumbo SHOWING SKINS | 158 A look at spring’s most coveted shoes and bags, all of which are wild at heart. Photographed by Ina Jang JAI AND MIGHTY | 164 Jai Courtney might be our next great movie hero, but he’s more than just muscle. By Adam Rathe; photographed by John Balsom OFF THE GRID | 170 Rediscovering where city meets country—and old world meets modern—in an often overlooked New York City neighborhood, Riverdale. By Jen Renzi; photographed by Mia Baxter

PARIS HILTON: THE VETERAN | 178 YOLANDA FOSTER & BELLA HADID: THE ASCENDANTS | 180 TINSLEY MORTIMER: THE REBRANDER | 182 THE BALLERS | 184

Angela Lindvall: Model Citizen

PA G E 1 4 6

BILLY MARTIN TAKES NEW YORK | 186 A new biography reveals the volatile baseball manager’s historic 1976 season with the Yankees, when he turned around not just the team but New York City. By Bill Pennington

LEFT TO RIGHT: PAUL JASMIN; GIEVES ANDERSON

THE REINVENTION OF THE AMERICAN SOCIALITE


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contents Getting Jai

PA G E 1 6 4

CITIES ASPEN | 192 Indulging in yoga, jaw-dropping jewelry and the best in outdoor outfitting CHICAGO | 193 New York invades the Windy City; Richard Branson becomes a local; must-try eateries DALLAS | 195 The accidental jewelry genius; California fashion done Texas style; a Design District hot spot HOUSTON | 197 How to mix a mint julep; vitamin therapy; Houston’s massive new shopping mecca

Animal Attraction

32

PA G E 1 5 8

Above: Platform clog, $2,950, TOM FORD, 212-359-0300. Top right: Shirt, price upon request, YOHJI YAMAMOTO, yohjiyamamoto.co.jp.

LAS VEGAS | 199 A new app for nightlife; where to see art in Sin City; delicious eats on the Boulevard LOS ANGELES | 202 The Palm starts from scratch; where to find wellness; the Streicher sisters set up shop MIAMI | 204 Julian Schnabel’s southern sanctuary; Miami’s topnotch pizza; luxury gyms NEW YORK | 208 Checking in with power lawyer Ira Garr; the best in beauty; Milanese menswear takes Manhattan

ORANGE COUNTY | 214 Costa Mesa’s Asian favorites; a must-see exhibit at the OC Museum of Art PALM BEACH | 215 Beth Rudin DeWoody’s Palm Beach picks; Vilebrequin finds a fabulous home SAN FRANCISCO | 216 David Sinegal’s latest vino venture; how to find the perfect restaurant; notes on the SF art scene

On the cover: Blouse, $1,750, CHLOE, Saks Fifth Avenue, 212-753-4000. Trousers, $100, & OTHER STORIES, stories.com. Line bracelet with diamonds, price upon request, GRAFF DIAMONDS, graffdiamonds.com. Photographed by Thomas Whiteside; styled by Anthony Unwin.

PARTIES | 218 Tony Robbins launches his latest book; IWC takes over South Beach; Dior delivers in NYC

Hitting It Home

PA G E 1 8 6

BACK PAGE FAMOUS LAST WORDS |  224 Opera star Renée Fleming’s handwriting hits an ambitiously high note

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: INA JANG; JOHN BALSOM; GETTY IMAGES

TRI-STATE | 212 Going sky high with Blade helicoptors; exciting news in high-end hotels


Letter from the cEO

Jason BInn

34

A

nother incredible year is off to a running start! The last few months have been full of excitement for us here at Du Jour. In December we were thrilled to reveal ou r exclu sive Kou r t ney Kardashian shoot, for which the beautiful mother of two posed for Dujour.com—au naturel—while nine months preg nant with her third child. The stor y gar nered over 11 million views in less than a week and was the top-trending story on Facebook. Fresh on the heels of Kou r tney ba r i ng all, we were elated to be named winner of Adweek’s Reader’s Choice Award for Hottest Lifestyle Magazine—having won last year’s Reader’s Choice Award for Hottest Newcomer. We have all of you, our devoted readers and partners, to thank for this honor. We can’t help feeling the win is exemplary of DuJour’s growing presence in the media world, and we are truly grateful to have all of your support to show for it. In November, we fêted the inspirational genius Tony Robbins at EMM Group co-founders Eugene Remm and Mark Birnbaum’s Catch, i n honor of Tony’s new book, MONEY Master the Game: 7 Simple Steps to Financial Freedom. Together with our sponsor Invicta’s president, my good friend Eyal Lalo, we gathered to applaud the incredible pledge Tony has made to put the book’s profits toward feeding 50 million families in need. As usual, there was never a dull moment at Ar t Basel. This year IWC Schaff hausen’s worldwide CEO Georges Kern hosted a kickoff party at W South Beach, where alongside DuJour, he presented the U.S. opening of Peter Lindbergh’s

hotly a nt icipated photography exhibit, “Timeless Portofino.” The gorgeous i mages feat u red Emily Blunt, Adriana Lima and Karolina Kurkova, all of whom attended the exhibit’s opening soirée. I was also delighted to join Barry Sternlicht, Richard LeFrak and award-winning designer and architect Debora Aguiar in hosting a farm-fresh brunch preview of 1 Hotel and Homes South Beach, and of course I loved being a part of the week’s ongoing parties at the Casa Elyx rooftop lounge. O n r e t u r n i ng t o Ne w Yo r k , and just in time for the holiday shopping rush, I joined my wife, Haley, in co-hosting two wonderful charity shopping events. One was a benefit with Rachel Shnay of WIZO, the Women’s International Zionist Organization, at the beautiful DKNY on Madison Avenue, and the other was an extravaganza at the Dior boutique on 57th Street, for the amazing organization God’s Love We Deliver. And moving into the spring, I couldn’t be more delighted to have the ever-gorgeous, legendary Jane Fonda on our cover. The moment is perfect as the buzz builds around her upcoming Netflix show Grace and Frankie, which boasts an allstar cast including Lily Tomlin, Martin Sheen and Sam Waterston. This hilarious romp through an unconventional marital dilemma is certain to be one of the year’s most-watched TV comedies, and if it’s half as fun as hanging out with Lady Jane at the Golden Globes was, it’s going to be a hit classic. So here’s to having a little fun this year!

jordache’s shaul nak ash

At Absolut’s Casa Elyx during Art Basel Miami Beach

with music mogul izvor zivkovic & soho house’s Guy chetwynd

Southern Wine’s Wayne Chaplin & scott robins

jordy cobelens, kelly rowland & matthew morrison

the light group’s Andrew sasson

westfield’s stacie henderson & samantha fennell

with k anye west and yellowtail sunset’s chef akira back

Michael’s general manager Steve Millington is never at a loss for words

scotch & soda’s ari hoffman & Robert Polet

calarts’ michael & erick a carter

archie drury, k arolina kurkova & IWC Schaffhausen’s georges kern

behind the velvet rope

BInnshots

crossed wires with terrence jenkins & scott disick

Follow on Twitter and Instagram @JasonBinn


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36

HANDPICKED

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MARCIE PISTOL

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MARIAM KARIM

BROOKE AUSTON

MARK EIN

BRUCE WEBER

MARTI CRAMPSHEE

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MATHEW EVINS

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MATT WITHEILER

DAMIEN

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DESIGN MIAMI’S CRAIG ROBINS INLIST’S MICHAEL CAPPONI

THE PENINSULA’S OFFER NISSENBAUM & ORNA NISSENBAUM

CHANEL’S BARBARA CIRKVA

TINCATI’S DARRAH WAHLSTEDT, MORY K ABA, ANTONIO TINCATI & ROBERTO TINCATI

ASHLEY SPITZ & DWAYNE WADE

WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES’ DEBORAH NEEDLEMAN & GETTY’S ROXANNE MOTAMEDI

LA ROYALTY MARYAM LIEBERMAN

MAYOR PHILIP LEVINE & ROYAL CARIBBEAN’S EYAL OFER

REAL ESTATE MOGUL DAVID BLUMENFELD & TOP RANK BOXING’S TODD DUBOEF

BURBERRY’S GEORGE KOLASA

WITH ENTREPRENEUR EDDIE LAMPERT

GIORGIO ARMANI’S A-TEAM: ANOUSHK A BORGHESI & ROD MANLEY

WITH HALEY BINN, EILEEN LIBUTTI & BRIAN STEEL

ALINA & ANTHONY SHRIVER

WITH GIUSEPPE CIPRIANI ... GUESS WHERE?

TOWN RESIDENTIAL’S ANDREW HEIBERGER & HALEY LANK AU

HERMÈS’ PETER MALACHI, MARTINA NAVRATILOVA & DEPARTURES’ HORACIO SILVA

AUDEMARS PIGUET’S FRANCOIS-HENRY BENNAHMIAS

DORI COOPERMAN & PEPE FANJUL AT CASA DE CAMPO

LIV’S DAVID GRUTMAN

JULIANNE MOORE & DOM PÉRIGNON’S TRENT FRASER

DE GRISOGONO’S FAWAZ GRUOSI


Jane Fonda

PAGE 130

A MOMENT WITH THE EDITOR

THOUGHTS DUJOUR

Jane Fonda wears ISABEL MARANT, WOLFORD and VALENTINO.

The Good Boy’s Club

38

PAGE 120

Guatemala, writer Sara Ruffin Costello and photog-

love knowing that the narrative, whether

rapher Paul Costello find that, nine years after the

our own or someone else’s, may not be the

end of a 30-year civil war, the country has become

final version. Luckily, these days, there are

a destination for adventurous, yet laid-back, luxury

nearly endless opportunities to reinvent

seekers. We also take an extended look at what it

ourselves in some way, be it a new career or body

means these days to be a socialite, itself an almost

or simply a great new handbag for spring.

outdated term. Long lunches at the Plaza have

Personal reinvention gives us regular folks the

been replaced by brand strategy sessions. Did you

chance to be heroes of our own lives. But for those

know that Paris Hilton is a real estate mogul? It’s no

who work in Hollywood, there’s not just ample

joke—and she earns way more than you do. Even

opportunity to reinvent, but also a certain expec-

flowers are getting a reinvention: Perishable is out,

tation. Producers are always busting this genre,

plastic is in.

or breaking this ground, while actors constantly

High-net-worth divorces, meanwhile, are sud-

rebrand themselves through an unexpected role

denly getting even more contentious as soon-to-

or a dramatic physical transformation. Jane Fonda,

be-exes question the notion of the impenetrable

of course, knows quite a bit about reinvention,

prenup. In “When Prenups Attack,” Judith Newman

having undergone plenty of it in the span of an

looks at some recent examples of marriages—and

almost 60-year career, from in-demand actress

pre-marital contracts—gone bust and offers some

to aerobics queen to full-time wife to in-demand

helpful tips on how to get out of yours, in case you

actress once more. She knows that staying rel-

happened to be wondering.

evant, and happy, requires a certain flexibility (fit-

One more bit of reinvention: If you haven’t vis-

ness pun not intended), and in her conversations

ited us online lately, DuJour.com got a refresh.

with writer Mickey Rapkin—as relayed in “Jane

Check it out and let us know what you think.

Fonda,” on page 130 —she reveals

Spring is certainly a time for change, but then,

herself to be a woman of a refresh-

when isn’t?

ingly vast number of contradictions. She is self-assured but shy, refl ective but, even at 77, incredibly unstuck in her way s. She is b oth iconic—

Out of the Blue

PA G E 1 3 6

sort of a living legend, wouldn’t you say?—and real. Although, as she is sure to point out to Rapkin, she’s no stranger to cosmetic work. (She was also in a sharing mood.) In the business world, the pursuit of personal reinvention has inspired many professionals to rethink how they network—or, at least, to call on their every last resource. Which is perhaps how it came to be that, as writer Adrienne Gaffney finds in “The Good Boy’s Club,” some of the most successful networkers are those who let their pets do the talking, so to speak, connecting at dog parks and pet play groups about much more than grooming tips and their favorite cat videos. In

Nicole Vecchiarelli NV@DuJour.com Instagram: editor_nv

COUNTERCLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: THOMAS WHITESIDE; DRUE WAGNER; PAUL COSTELLO; THOMAS WHITESIDE

A

udiences love a good reinvention story. We


1.866.max mara

maxmara.com


Editor in Chief Nicole Vecchiarelli

Executive Editor Nancy Bilyeau

CEO/Publisher Jason Binn

Sales

Editor at Large Alyssa Giacobbe Managing Editor Natalia de Ory

Chief Marketing Officer Alan Katz

Executive Vice President, Global Sales Marc Berger

Features

Fashion + Beauty + home

Associate Publisher John Clarkin

Features Editor Adam Rathe

Market Director Sydney Wasserman

Executive Directors Phil Witt Cat Dewling

Senior Editor Lindsay Silberman

Associate Fashion/ Market Editor Paul Frederick

Research Editor Ivy Pascual

DUJOUR Cities

Editorial Assistant Frances Dodds

Deputy Editor Natasha Wolff

Art + Photo

Regional Editors Amiee White Beazley (Aspen),

Art and Design Consultant Black Star Creative

Anna Blessing (Chicago), Holly Crawford (Houston),

Photo Editor Etta Meyer

Holly Haber (Dallas), Scott Huver (Los Angeles and Orange County),

Art Assistant Bryan Vargas

Rebecca Kleinman (Miami), David Nash (San Francisco)

Senior Account Executives Gwen Beckham Brett Zuckerman Project Manager Isabelle McTwigan Advertising Sales Offices Janet Suber (Los Angeles) Sylvie Durlach, S&R Media (France) Susy Scott (Italy) Sales Associate Jennifer Lentol Senior Executive Assistant Brianna Calabrese Administrative Assistant Maggie Miles Sales Assistant Stefanie LaGalia Assistant to Project Manager Sara Strumwasser Marketing Director Julia Light

40

DUJOUR.com Digital Editor Eden Univer

Social Media Editor Alisha Prakash

Web Developer G. Leo Fulgencio

Senior Web Producer Julianne Mosoff

Chief Digital Officer Ashley Parrish Web Assistant Jessica Khorsandi

Marketing Manager Jen Goldenberg Ad Trafficker Meryl Frick Designers Jenna Bresnahan Eleny Ramirez Chief Advisor Monty Shadow

Production Vice President, Production Shawn Lowe

Contributors Patricia Bosworth, Dori Cooperman, Anne Christensen, Grant Cornett, Arthur Elgort, Douglas Friedman, Kyoko Hamada, Henry Hargreaves, Alex John Beck, Ros Okusanya (Casting), Jeffrey Podolsky, Mickey Rapkin, Rhonda Riche, Bruce Weber, Thomas Whiteside, Lynn Yaeger

Senior Pre-Media Manager John Francesconi Production Intern Adam Sareen Print and Paper Management CALEV Print Media

Finance

Contributing Editors Paul Biedrzycki (Automotive), Sandie Burke (Art), Christopher Carbone (Copy), Nick Earhart (Copy), Chloe Weiss Galkin (Art), Laura Henry (Fashion), Regan Hoffman (Research), Lauren Kill (Photo), Dacus Thompson (Research)

Interns

Senior Financial Analyst Michael Rose Assistant Controller Dahlia Nussbaum Finance Intern Amanda Brody

Pauline Balmas, Sarah Emily Gilbert, Yukiko Fujii, Taylor Hakimi, Alejandra Ott, Stephanie Sporn

Director of Editorial Operations Haley Binn

Chief Financial Officer Stephanie Cabral-Choudri

Chairman Kevin Ryan

General Counsel John A. Golieb

Chief Advisors Dan Galpern Matt Witheiler

DuJour (ISSN 2328-8868) is published four times a year by DuJour Media Group, LLC., 2 Park Avenue, NYC 10016, 212-683-5687. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. The publishers and editors are not responsible for unsolicited material and it will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication subject to DuJour magazine’s right to edit. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, photographs and drawings. Copyright Š 2014 DuJour Media Group, LLC. For a subscription to DuJour magazine, go to subscribe.dujour.com, call 954-653-3922 or e-mail duj@themagstore.com.


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CONTRIBUTORS

Getting to know some of the talent behind this issue—Natalia de Ory takes lunch orders and all

thomas whiteside Photographer, “Jane Fonda,” p. 130 Soup DuJour: potato, bacon and corn

It was a family affair on the set with cover star Jane Fonda when photographer Thomas Whiteside brought along his brother and mother. “Nine to Five was my favorite movie as a kid,” reveals the shutterbug, whose work has also appeared in Elle and Interview. “My mom had to meet her.” In between takes, Fonda sang along to music and even surprised Whiteside with her various turns of phrase. “She’s really funny and has a dirty mouth,” he says. “I liked hearing her say ‘fuck’; can you print that?”

patricia bosworth & Tom Palumbo Writer and Photographer, “Mia, In the Beginning,” p. 154 Soup DuJour: egg drop

Jen Renzi Writer, “Power Seat: Robert A.M. Stern,” p. 122, and “Off the Grid,” p. 170 Soup DuJour: LENTIL

“It’s impressive how available he makes himself to his team,” says Brooklyn-based writer and former House & Garden editor Jen Renzi of her visit to architect Robert A.M. Stern’s New York City office. “He sets up his days in 30-minute blocks, which allows him to be hyper-productive.” For Stern, who is also professor at the Yale School of Architecture, efficiency seems to be the key to his success, but kindness plays a part, too. As Renzi says, “He doesn’t have the veneer of accessibility, but he’s very easy to talk to.”

Stefan ruiz Photographer, “The Reinvention of the American Socialite,” p. 176 Soup DuJour: Homemade chicken with vegetables

Stefan Ruiz hadn’t photographed Paris Hilton before and was pleasantly relieved to find the heiress and former reality star a consummate professional. “You never know what to expect,” says Ruiz, who has shot for the New York Times Magazine, Details and Rolling Stone, “especially when it’s someone who’s so constantly in the media.” In the end, though, the Los Angeles shoot couldn’t have been easier. “She didn’t show up with a big entourage,” he says, “and was great to work with.”

Judith newman Writer, “When Prenups Attack,” p. 94 Soup DuJour: matzoh ball

What struck Judith Newman most in her report about prenuptial agreements was just how much your chance of getting out of one can vary from state to state. “All I can say is: Don’t try to do it in New York or California,” says the veteran journalist, who has written for the Wall Street Journal, Allure and Vogue. She does admit, though, that if she were ever to remarry, she would want a prenup, no question. “I don’t find them as unromantic as I used to,” she says. “Does that make me old? Maybe it does.”

*du jour [doo zhoor] adjective [from French: of the day] Example: What is your soup du jour?

renzi: rossana rizzo. newman: Carly Otness/BFAnyc.com. all other images courtesy.

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When Patricia Bosworth began the daunting task of cataloging her late husband’s collection for an upcoming book—Palumbo was a staff photographer at Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar in the 1950s and ‘60s—she stumbled upon something rare: one of Mia Farrow’s first photo shoots. “The images were really amazing,” recalls Bosworth, a regular contributor to Vanity Fair and New York. Having met Farrow years earlier, she instantly reached out. “She remembered the photographs immediately and we had a series of amazing conversations as a result.”


WATCH THE FILM AT JIMMYCHOO.COM


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in season

in the pink

Spring feels particularly lush as reworked classics take on a rich color palette for looks both effortless and entirely fresh Styled by catherine Newell-hanson

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PHOTOGRAPHED by thomas Giddings


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getty images

Above: Sweater, price upon request; Skirt, price upon request; Chain cuff earring, $525, Boots, $1,915; LOUIS VUITTON, louisvuitton.com. Right: Vice blazer, $565; Tomo tank top, $315, SANDRO, sandro-paris.com. Jeans, $495, MICHAEL KORS, michaelkors.com. Earrings, $500, UNCOMMON MATTERS, uncommonmatters.com.


Punctually Unpredictable

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Trench coat, $645, APIECE APART, apieceapart.com. Cami, $155, ANDREW MARC, andrewmarc.com. Pants, $630, BOTTEGA VENETA, bottegaveneta.com. Dora bag, price upon request, LOUIS VUITTON, louisvuitton.com. Emidia slides, price upon request, MANOLO BLAHNIK FOR EDUN, edun.com.

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Coat, $5,900; Bermuda shorts, $1,400, DIOR, 800-9293467. Tank, $158, LAFAYETTE 148 NEW YORK, bloomingdales .com. Sophie slide, $360, MARYAM NASSIR ZADEH, maryamnassirzadeh.com.

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Right: Leon coat, price upon request, ACNE STUDIOS, acnestudios.com. T-shirt, $20, LANDS’ END, landsend.com. Skirt, $79, BEBE, bebe.com. Below: Dress, $98, GUESS, macys.com. Skirt, $850, CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION, 212-292-9000. Emidia slides, price upon request, MANOLO BLAHNIK FOR EDUN, edun.com.

Above: Sports jacket, $1,595, MAISON MARGIELA, 212-989-7612. Military Patchwork tube top, $595, MARC JACOBS, marcjacobs.com. Asymmetrical pant, $119, BEBE, bebe.com. Millicent satchel, $5,000, MICHAEL KORS, michaelkors.com. Sophie slide, $360, MARYAM NASSIR ZADEH, maryamnassirzadeh.com.

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STUARTWEITZMAN.COM


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Jacket, $2,995, BURBERRY PRORSUM, burberry.com. Skirt, $1,280, PRADA, prada .com. Sophie slide, $360, MARYAM NASSIR ZADEH, maryamnassirzadeh.com. Hair: Joey George using Oribe at ArtList. Makeup: Cyndle Komarovski using Chanel at Brydges Mackinney. Model: Manuela Frey/The Society Management. Casting: Ros Okusanya. Set Designer: Lauren Nikrooz. Nails: Roseann Singleton for Warren Tricomi Salon at Art Department. Fashion Assistant: Amber Harris.

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Boldly Created. Boldly Worn.

Daria Strokous

942 Madison Avenue, New York 212-421-3030 9621 Brighton Way, Beverly Hills 310-858-8006 DavidWebb.com


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COLUMN

Dot-Com Baubles

As jewelry splurges move online, Lynn Yaeger finds a true gem is never out of reach PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHRISTINE BLACKBURNE

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jewelry for yourself in those antediluvian days was considered weird, and sort of sad. But fast forward: If Monroe were alive today (she would be 88 years old!), she might well be sitting up in her bed in her pajamas, trolling sites like Latest Revival and Stone & Strand, looking for exquisite jewelry that with a click and a sigh would be in the mail before she fell asleep. In my case, the Internet searches that occupy far too much of my waking life involve jewelry that was old when Lady Mary and Lady Edith were hanging out in their imaginary drawing room. The Georgian and Victorian trifles I favor were made long before anyone thought of radio, radium or even railroads. When I started collecting, I was restricted to the sellers in my hometown, and the occasional antique show. Now every vintage dealer from Sheboygan to Singapore is at my feet, or at least my fi ngertips. It’s heaven—no suspicious shop owner to eye me warily when I visit an item 1,000 times. And really, if it’s perfectly acceptable to find a suitable spouse on a website, why shouldn’t I use it to locate a lavaliere? But this panacea has its down-side. (Don’t all panaceas?) You unwrap that UPS box, heart bursting, only to see that the gold of the ring is not quite

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as rosy as you thought it would be, the stones not quite as glittery, the whole thing is, well, smaller than you thought from the photo. (Of course you should have looked at the carat chart—also readily available on the Internet!—to see how big .03 carats really is.) But let’s not dwell on the dark side: For every disappointing unboxing, there is the unalloyed joy when your little darling, arriving from some far-flung address, exceeds even your wildest imagination. Not everyone is like me, searching websites for baubles from the long-vanished past. Lots of people who prefer brand new pieces apparently have no compunction about spending big bucks on items they’ve only seen in two dimensions. At Cartier, which started selling online in 2010, a source tells me that up to oh, say, $40,000 or $50,000, customers don’t even bother to call the store, but are content to Add to Cart. “Fine jewelry is an important growth category for us, more than doubling year on year with 70 percent of the sales happening online,” says Natalie Kingham, the buying director for fashion e-commerce site Matchesfashion.com. This hybrid selling arrangement apparently exists throughout the jewelry market. My friend Steve Herdenian, who sells vintage jewelry from a busy booth in New York City’s 47th Street diamond district, says that, more and more, shoppers fi nd out about his existence when a happy customer Instagrams a purchase. Her friends see the picture and then wander over to Steve’s on their lunch hour, where they rapidly fall into a bottomless pit of platinum and diamonds, drowning in desire. But of course all this information, this ability to traverse the world in search of the objects that will make you happy, can be slightly too much of a good thing. In Vienna on a lost afternoon a few years ago, I passed a tiny shop where two elderly

“NOW EVERY VINTAGE DEALER IS AT MY FEET”

Necklace in 18-karat gold and platinum with emerald and diamonds, price upon request, DAVID WEBB, davidwebb.com. Metropolis Dome ring with diamonds and moonstone, $3,950, IVANKA TRUMP FINE JEWELRY, ivankatrumpcollection.com. Reine de Naples Mini watch in 18-karat gold with diamond, sapphire-crystal and mother of pearl, $35,100, BREGUET, breguet.com.

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ladies sat sipping tea. In the window was a gold charm with an enameled blue rat and a message on the back dated 1909. (I mean, come on, you don’t see these everyday.) I was besotted. Were you ever haunted by a rodent? Back home, I hunted down the shop’s email address and sent off a missive without much hope. Two minutes later the teadrinkers wrote me back, and two seconds after that, Ratatouille’s photo was filling my screen. Those ladies may have looked like characters out of The Third Man, but they took Visa.

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hen Marilyn Monroe purred, “Talk to me, Harry Winston,” she was not sitting in front of a computer, waiting for a live chat to commence. It was 1953, and Monroe was simply describing the way she and other glamour pusses had been acquiring jewelry for decades, for centuries! Back then, you went to a shop that was haughty and hushed. You sat at a table and a very proper salesperson presented dazzlers laid out on a velvet tray. Lots of times, pretty much almost all the time, there was a man with you, because buying

BODY


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Tick-Tock

Stealing time

timepieces

Recent watch scandals

Lunar Landing

John Mayer and the fake Rolexes

Haute horologists are celebrating the Chinese New Year with limited edition artworks inspired by the Year of the Goat

In 2014, musician John Mayer, a wellknown watch aficionado, sued watch dealer Robert Maron for allegedly selling him vintage Rolexes with counterfeit parts, which he’d discovered when he sent them to Rolex for servicing.

PHOTOGRAPHED by Eric Helgas paper art by daniel sean murphy

Patriarch KIRILL’S Vanishing Breguet In 2009 The Russian Orthodox Church—often condemned for its displays of wealth—released a picture of its leader, Patriarch Kirill, sitting at a table. In the image, Patriarch was bare-wristed, but upon closer inspection, a rumored $30,000 Breguet Le Réveil du Tsar could be seen reflected in the table’s polished surface, having been (sloppily) Photoshopped out.

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jay z’s Hublot Hubris Shawn Carter (aka Jay Z) gave a Hublot Shawn Carter Classic Fusion watch as a birthday present to former Yankee Robinson Cano, whom he manages through Roc Nation Sports. The MLBPA launched an investigation, but publicly did not issue any sanctions and Cano kept the timepiece. Cano later gave Derek Jeter a Shawn Carter Classic Fusion as a retirement present. Regift? You decide.

ABU Bakr al-Baghdadi’s flashy watch

From top: L.U.C. XP Urushi Year of the Goat, $24,290, CHOPARD, chopard.com. Métiers D’art The Legend of the Chinese Zodiac Year Of The Goat, price upon request, VACHERON CONSTANTIN, vacheronconstantin.com. Calendrier Chinois Traditionnel, price upon request, BLANCPAIN, blancpain.com. Petite Heure Minute Relief Goats, price upon request, JAQUET DROZ, jaquet-droz.com.

World leaders want to be seen as men or women of the people, no matter how wealthy, privileged or ruthless they really are. This aw-shucks vibe applies to terrorists as well. When the self-proclaimed caliph of the Islamic State of Iraq (ISIS) Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi emerged from hiding to release video of a speech calling for the world’s Muslims to “obey him” in July 2014, social media commenters couldn’t help but notice his swaggy timepiece, which looked like a highend Rolex or Omega. His supporters called the footage fake. Then they claimed the timepiece was by the Saudi-based watchmakers Al-Fajr. —Rhonda Riche


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NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH

ENGLISH ROWS

Bond Street is so last season. The arrival of London’s chicest new address is just around the corner. ILLUSTRATED BY EDWIN FOTHERINGHAM

Known for name after name of prestigious storefronts, Bond Street was once shopping royalty, but another stylish street is challenging the crown. High-end brands are now flocking to Mount Street to establish their brick-and-mortars. Marc Jacobs was an early pioneer, settling on Mount in 2007 when it was still populated mostly with galleries and smaller boutiques; others quickly followed. Now, stores from Delfina Delettrez, Christopher Kane and Erdem are expected to open before the year’s end, further confirming the common theory that birds of a (fine) feather flock together. — EDEN UNIVER

FOOTNOTE

GREEK CHIC

The seven-piece, limited-edition Ancient Greek Sandals with Ilias LALAoUNIS collection comes in five colors of the sandals’ trademark vacchetta leather and features 24-karat gold plated detailing by the jeweler. Sandals, from $285, ANCIENT GREEK SANDALS WITH ILIAS LALAOUNIS, ancient-greek-sandals.com.

GETTY IMAGES. SANDALS: COURTESY

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TRENDING

BLANK CANVAS

Luxury designers are in agreement: The utilitarian fabric isn’t just for beach bags anymore PHOTOGRAPHED BY ERIC HELGAS

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EDITED BY SYDNEY WASSERMAN

From top: Sebille espadrille, $395, TABITHA SIMMONS, net-a-porter.com. Junior Cadet bag, $1,700, MARC JACOBS, marcjacobs.com. Elliot clutch, $1,125, PROENZA SCHOULER, 212-420-7300. Arion bag, $4,025, HERMES, hermes .com. Heels, $550, RALPH LAUREN COLLECTION, ralphlauren.com. Shopper, $2,690, LOEWE, loewe.com.

THE TOTE BAG CRAZE HIT THE U . S . IN 1944 WHEN L . L . BEAN RELEASED ITS FAMED BOAT AND TOTE BAG , WHICH THE COMPANY CLAIMS CAN HOLD UP TO 500 LBS .

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LAP OF LUXURY

LA LADYTKTKTK

Frutiger eriatiu ntionse quatiassinispe quatur, dusor quatiassi Author Tk ions. PHOTOGRAPHED BY PHOTOGTK WRITTEN BY PHOTOGTK

ALTERED

Something Commissioned

For a new set of brides, walking the aisle wearing a custom-made gown by a major designer isn’t a fantasy. It’s a necessity. Virginia Sole-Smith dives for the bouquet

NOT ONLY WAS KATE MIDDLETON’S ALEXANDER MCQUEEN GOWN VALUED AT A STAGGERING $400,000, IT ALSO INSPIRED A 2011 EXHIBIT AT BUCKINGHAM PALACE, TITLED “THE ROYAL WEDDING DRESS.”

MONDADORI/GETTY IMAGES

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hen Eleanor Ylvisaker tried on her first custommade wedding dress, she knew right away: It was all wrong. “It was a beautiful dress,” she says now. “But I had such a specific idea of what I wanted.” So specific, in fact, that Ylvisaker even had her vision sketched out by the design team at Earnest Sewn (the denim brand she helped launch in 2004) before meeting with her chosen dress designer. But something didn’t click. The designer— who Ylvisaker declines to identify—went for rhinestones where Ylvisaker had hoped for something subtler. “I probably didn’t know how to describe what I wanted,” she says in polite hindsight. “But I remember feeling sick.” The wedding was only a few months away and a do-over dress was not in the budget—until Ylvisaker happened to fi nd herself seated next to Zac Posen at the American Museum of Natural History benefit in NYC later that same week. When Posen heard the bedazzled tale of woe, he insisted Ylvisaker come to him for a new gown. The result, fi nished in just two months, featured ivory jacquard silk, a drop waist and a vintage lace veil. Although the Posen dress was not exactly a gift, Ylvisaker made the budget work by repurposing the fi rst dress as a rehearsal-dinner gown. “It was everything I wanted and beyond anything I could have imagined,” she says. Almost a decade later, Ylvisaker, now 37 and a mother of two, is amused by how hear tbroken she was about the first dress. But her designer-in-shining-armor story (and the subsequent press generated) may have kicked off what is now considered the ultimate status symbol among brides who work in fashion or reside in certain zip codes: to have your wedding dress custom-created by a designer who ordinarily dresses only the biggest of boldface names for far more public events. Posen describes it as a “rare luxury available only to those lucky enough to have the funds” and, presumably, the right connections—Posen takes on just a handful of custom wedding dresses per year. Meanwhile Francisco Costa of Calvin Klein has made dresses for several high-profile brides, including f ur nit ure designer Ana Meier, daughter of legendary architect Richard Meier, and Paula Bezerra de Mello, director of public relations for the famed Philippe Starck–designed Hotel Fasano Rio de Janeiro. All designers and brides interviewed declined to comment on exactly what “funds” these dresses require, but high five and even six figures are reportedly not uncommon. Many designers view custom dress projects, however, as a marketing opportunity—for both sides. “A bride becomes an ambassadress of the house and this has turned into a PR


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tool,” Posen explains. “That’s not why I do it. But having a designer change, like tuck the shoulder strap a couple of centimeters and make your dress can also help the bride achieve a certain level of completely change the shape of the bodice,” she says. “But I think press or status.” Indeed, Ylvisaker considers herself “extremely sometimes you get dressed up in these white dresses and it’s not lucky” to have had a Posen dress “because I was not nearly as necessarily you. At the end of the day, I felt like me.” That said, control is in no way guaranteed when working with high profile as the girls having dresses made for them today.” Still, Posen’s dress rescue mission piqued the interest of Vogue, which creative genius. Carolyn Tate Angel had her dress designed by covered Ylvisaker’s wedding alongside the nuptials of socialites Kate and Laura Mulleavy of Rodarte and, even after pulling together inspiration boards of favorite dresses, had to make peace Plum Sykes and Vanessa von Bismarck. Not every designer is dying to tie that particular knot. “I’ve only with the Mulleavys’ fabrics. “I’d be like, should we have lace? And done a couple of wedding dresses for friends and to be honest, I’m a they’d say, ‘Let me daydream…I see you in tulle!’” Angel, who little bit cautious about doing more,” says designer Thakoon Panich- was an editor at W at the time, was nevertheless thrilled with the end result: “Working in fashion gave gul. “It’s such a big day, and there are a me the ability to design my own dress, lot of expectations.” A wedding dress, but for someone who doesn’t work in after all, is often the culmination of a fashion, it would be a lot easier to go fantasy decades in the making, and perto Vera Wang, Carolina Her rera or haps especially so for women who work Oscar de la Renta.” in fashion or who frequent the gala cir—JOANNA HILLMAN But other brides say that a chance cuit. As Ylvisaker says, “There is so to reject the classic Vera Wang–style much pressure on that one opportunity to wear the perfect dress.” For a designer, the pressure is doubled, wedding atelier experience—not to mention its Kleinfeld spawn— as he works to honor both his own aesthetic vision and the bride’s— is the whole point. “I actually did go to Kleinfeld at first, more as a joke, and thought, ‘Wow, this solidifies all of my fears,’ ” says who may have standards that make Anna Wintour look laid back. After all, any bride with the means to commission a custom Joanna Hillman, the style director at Harper’s Bazaar. She ended dress is unlikely to be planning a low-key kind of wedding. When up wearing a Rochas dress, which designer Marco Zanini gifted Meier married real estate investor Daniel Creighton at her family her from his archives. Paula Bezerra de Mello, who was married home in East Hampton, her 250 guests dined and danced under a on the rooftop of the Fasano hotel, also eschewed the “big white clear tent hung with sheer white linen panels, designed by Lewis dress” moment. “I love lace and tulle as much as the next girl, but Miller. “Everything looked simple, classic and effortless, but there that fairy-tale bridal ball gown was never an option,” she says. “I was a lot of very complicated planning involved!” says Meier now. wanted to feel in charge of my dress. Francisco was a genius at And the same could be said of her dress, which Costa designed empowering that feeling.” Empowerment aside, a big gown may directly on Meier, draping and sculpting the fabric around her have been more forgiving: “I was happy that I ended up losing through six fittings. “The construction of my dress was complex enough weight to look good in the dress,” Bezerra de Mello notes. and it was fascinating to watch how Francisco would make a tiny “Those 10 pounds made all the difference.”

“A SMALLER PULL QUOTE STYLE TK TKTK KTKT THEK.” –TEEKAY TEEKAY

From left: Ylvisaker in Zac Posen, Hillman in Rochas, Angel in Rodarte and Bezerra de Mello with designer Francisco Costa.

COURTESY

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“I WENT TO KLEINFELD AT FIRST, MORE AS A JOKE.”


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Party on the top—and party on the bottom! Spring’s mixed prints give traditional suiting an unexpected kick in the pants PHOTOGRAPHED BY ERIC HELGAS EDITED BY PAUL FREDERICK

MOONLIGHTING

CAMERA READY

Photographer Maxwell Snow focuses his talents on a menswear collection

Clockwise from top left: Jacket, $3,440; Trousers, $785, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI, brunellocucinelli.com. Jacket, $3,895; Trousers, $1,100, ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA COUTURE, zegna.com. Jacket, $2,093; Trousers, $486, ETRO, 212-317-9096. Jacket, price upon request; Trousers, price upon request, KENT AND CURWEN, kentandcurwen.co.uk.

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fter making a name for himself photographing guns and naked wome n , a r t ist Ma x wel l Snow discovered one key element was missing from his day-to-day: a simple wardrobe that easily transitioned from studio to gallery presentation. “I work with my hands in my studio, but then I may have to go to a meeting uptown,” explains Snow. “I wanted clothes that look appropriate throughout the entire journey of a day, and still be stylish if I decide to go straight to dinner.” From a young age, Snow was filling the holes he found in the menswear arena with designs he cobbled together. Take the leather vest he had custom made when he bought his first motorcycle—and which he still wears today. “The experience taught me not to accept what was available to me,” he says, “and that just because it’s not out there doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be.” Most men swea r, he says, felt “overly designed. I have always liked sleek, discreet, streamlined clothing. I fou nd elements here or there but no one brand that encapsulated t h i s a e s t h e t i c .” N o w, S n o w w i l l share his sensibility with the masses. His epony mous li ne is made up of d ay-to -n ig ht st aples that he hopes w ill “st ay releva nt forever.” — E.U.


Montblanc Star Classique Crafted for New Heights Manufactured in Switzerland, the Star Classique Automatic, with its slim 8.9 mm 18 K red gold case and its ergonomically shaped case back, is a ďŹ ne companion for an elegant appearance. Visit and shop Montblanc.com


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VISTAS

PEAKING IN One Colorado couple welcomes the majesty of Aspen into their home. Amiee White Beazley enjoys the view

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY SAM FROST

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he day real estate developer Daryl Snadon drove his wife, Dallas, to a parcel of land located on a plateau above Aspen known as McLain Flats, five miles from downtown, she refused to get out of the car. “He looks at land all the time,” Dallas says. “What I saw was an old ski chalet in the middle of nowhere. But he saw something different.” In time, she came to see it, too—and more. The new home that the couple eventually built on the plateau, set among the majestic Elk Mountains, is an eightbedroom showstopper that Dallas, an interior designer, decorated personally. “I could never build something just average,” says Dallas. The Snadons anointed one of the best views in t he ent i re reg ion. Local h istor ia n Tony Vag neu r has said the McLain Flats and nearby Woody Creek were striking, serene and sparsely occupied, known mostly for ranching and farming, until well into the 1970s. That’s when John Denver of “Rocky Mountain High” fame moved in. Woody Creek celebrity

GEORGE HAMILTON SAID OF ASPEN ,

“THIS IS

residents have ranged from Hunter S. Thompson and Don Henley to Nancy Pelosi. Yet even now, with its grand homes and gentleman’s ranches, McLain Flats is full of unspoiled, wide open spaces. “The view just goes on and on, from Mount Daly in Snowmass to Capitol Peak,” Vagneur says. “It’s incredible.” Anyone would be drawn to such mountains, but Dallas Snadon says it was the water, a narrow stream that wove its way through the grasslands, that won her heart. N o n e t h e l e s s , f o r a t i m e t h e c o u p l e’s p r i o rity was elsewhere in town. They were working on a 21,000-square-foot luxury home on Red Mountain’s exclusive Willoughby Way, one that overlooked downtown Aspen, and they had no intentions of leaving. That all changed in 2009, when the Snadons were approached with a $43 million cash offer for the Willoughby residence — one of four Aspen proper ties they owned at the time—and accepted, setting a sales record for that year, all the more remarkable for the

STILL A STETSON AND BLUE -JEANS TOWN . IT ’S NOT HOW RICH AND FAMOUS YOU ARE BUT HOW MANY LOCALS YOU KNOW THAT COUNTS .”

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Left, living room: Allan Knight and Associates custom sofas, sculptures by Henry Royer and Robert Rogers, J. Robert Scott’s La Jolla coffee table and Harlow occasional tables.

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Above, living room: J. Robert Scott custom stainless steel dining table and Darby dining side chairs. Right, kitchen: Cristallo polished quartzite countertops and custom tree-branch light fixture by Allan Knight and Associates.

lingering recession in real estate. The Snadons then tur ned their attention to their seven-acre lot on McLain Flats. The new residence carries the name “The House of Glass,” owing to the f loor-to-ceiling panes on both levels. Thanks to the design ethic of “glass everywhere,” the ponds, meadows and wildf lowers that explode throughout summer form the center of attention on the main f loor. Inside the living space, a work called Contemplation, by the artist Orbedonne, hangs and mid-20th-century lighting by Sputnik illuminates the vaulted ceiling. “The f loor plan star ted with the way we like to live — on the main level,” says Dallas. The master bedroom sits farthest to the west, the space decorated in deep hues. The room is dominated by a custom bed made of black crocodile skin and a 16-arm Murano

chandelier, circa 1940. “I wanted it to have a warm feeling,” Dallas says. “It’s a place where we could have breakfast in bed and watch movies with our 7-year-old daughter. You could spend the day there but still feel like you are outside. With the glass there is no barrier between in and out.” The main level also plays host to the kitchen, media room and breakfast room. In the kitchen, stainless-steel shelves and a custom-designed tree-branch chandelier made by Allan K night bestow char m. In the summer, the doors can be opened, connecting to the patio. Naturally these are the places where their extended family—including Daryl’s adult children and triplet grandchildren—congregates on visits. The dining room, adjacent to the kitchen, is furnished with a large round table and high-back chairs lined in neutral Loro Piana cashmere. The other bedrooms and guest rooms—all designed by Dallas—occupy the lower level of the home, each with distinct


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features, like bathtubs dipped in chrome or a grouping of Lucite furniture. The house fills every need for guests, says Dallas. “Here, everyone lounges in the morning,” she notes. “On winter days we go skiing and have a late lunch, or in the summer we’ll hike and then hang out by the pool. And at night, we used to always go out in town, but living here, everyone wants to be home. That’s what I love about this location, it brings us together.” The couple lives in Aspen for about three months of the year; the rest of their time is spent primarily in Texas.

“I LOVE HOW THIS LOCATION BRINGS US TOGETHER.” —DALLAS SNADON

Top, master bedroom: Custom black crocodile bed and cashmere bench, glass chandelier, Ralph Lauren Home chairs and steel and barn-wood custom fireplace by Travis Terry Design. Above: Farlane by Thomas O’Brien bronze and brass chandelier, Niermann Weeks charlus étagère and Calacatta Danby marble throughout.

Daryl Snadon owns Beltway Development Company and Beltway Commercial Real Estate and some manufacturing interests. The McLain Flats home is the place where the Snadons can truly relax and take a deep breath. “The day we moved in, my daughter ran to the fishing ponds in the front of the house and looked back at me, as if to say, ‘Do we really get to live here?’ ” Dallas recalls. “I am so happy that I could say, ‘Yes.’ There is nothing in that house that was missed. This one turned out perfectly.”

IN THE 1970 ELECTION , HUNTER S . THOMPSON , AUTHOR OF FEAR AND LOATHING IN LAS VEGAS , RAN FOR SHERIFF OF ASPEN AND THE SURROUNDING COUNTY.

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“WHEELS UP GETS ME FROM BALL GAME TO BALLROOM WITH TIME TO SPARE.” Name: Title:

Erin Andrews Sportscaster, Journalist, Television Personality Aircraft: King Air 350i

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With two hectic hosting gigs, I’m always on the go. I spend weekends covering football games across the countr y, and then it’s back to L.A. on Sunday night to rest up for a Monday taping on the dance floor. With Wheels Up, I know my aircraft is guaranteed, and the crew is always available. I rely on the King Air 350i to manage two busy jobs and still get home for some much-needed down time. Wheels Up acts as an agent for the Wheels Up members, and is not the operator of the program aircraft; FAA licensed and DOT registered air carriers participating in the program exercise full operational control of the program aircraft. Subject to additional terms and conditions in the Wheels Up Program documents.


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NOTICED

The Plastic Fantastic Faux flowers, once considered the antithesis of good taste, are blossoming PHOTOGRAPHED BY GIEVES ANDERSON

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EDITED BY KEITH POLLOCK

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ncient Egyptians are said to have made them out of paper. The Romans were partial to wax. From the dawn of civilization through the modern era, hopeless horticulturists have relied on bogus blooms to give the impression of a green thumb. While f lower snobs have long sniffed at phony petals, today’s specimens, the best of which imit ate wildf lowers and skew more understated than ar ranged, offer a beautiful authenticity and unbeatable lifespan that seems to have them sprouting up in all the right places.

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Poppies (previous page) and draping trumpets, price upon request, CFD New York, cfdnewyork.com. Props styled by John Guidi. Photographed on location at Alan Moss Studios.

SINCE THE 1980 S , HUNDREDS OF ARTIFICIAL- FLOWER FACTORIES IN THE PEARL RIVER AREA OF CHINA’S GUANGDONG PROVINCE HAVE SUPPLIED THE INDUSTRY.


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WORK Top Left: The newly updated rooms at Paris’ Plaza Athénée. Below: The hotel’s façade has stayed consistent over its 100-year history.

C U LT U R E ROUNDUP

THE BUCKET LIST

Five of Japan’s most exclusive, life-altering offerings 1. Get a BODY SCRUB from the HOTTEST NEW SPA

UPGRADE

HISTORY, REINVENTED Everything old is new again at these storied, landmark hotels. Chadner Navarro checks in

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ake a quick glance at the façade of Paris’ Hôtel Plaza Athénée—with its vibrant red geraniums dripping down over quaint Juliet balconies—and you might be fooled into believing that not much has changed since the property’s debut in 1913. But inside, it’s a different story. The famed hotel recently reemerged from a $268 million face-lift, a 10-month affair that offered subtle yet dynamic changes, like new lighting to brighten up interiors, revamped restaurants and the addition of 14 guest rooms. The makeover couldn’t have come at a better time: The Plaza Athénée celebrated its centennial in 2013. Renovating a historic property is a delicate art, of course. And in the case of Plaza Athénée—one of the city’s most legendary landmarks—the stakes are even

greater. The hotel’s marquee restaurant helmed by Alain Ducasse underwent the most dramatic transformation, thanks to designer Patrick Jouin, who added mirror-back chairs and a Swarovski crystal ceiling installation. Inside Plaza Athénée’s bustling cocktail lounge, an illuminated glass bar appears to glow when the lights are dimmed. It’s in these spaces that the hotel feels the most contemporary, and yet, Athénée’s overall character remains unchanged. The same can be said for Ashford Castle, a medieval estate-cum-luxur y hotel in County Mayo, Ireland, that is completing a multi-year restoration. Dated f lorals and faded plaids have been replaced with a mix-and-match decor, such as striped silk wallpaper, dark-wood chests and chairs upholstered in Ikat. Irish resplendence still dominates, because that’s vital to the property’s DNA, but there’s something modern about the delivery—especially with the addition of a cigar lounge and billiards room. An equally old-meets-new ethos came to San Juan, Puerto Rico this past December, when the Condado Vanderbilt completed a refurbishment that began in 2012. With guests like Charles Lindberg and Theodore Roosevelt, the Spanish Revival retreat is an established Caribbean icon. That signature aesthetic has been preserved—the lobby’s original lyre-shaped staircase is still intact—but there are now suites with Europeanstyle kitchens and 24hour butler service. The renovation also introduced a 10,000squ a re -foot spa , which houses the island’s first hammam. It’s an unprecedented unveiling, and proof that even the most historic institutions can reinvent themselves anew.

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Sukiyabashi Jiro, Tsukamoto Sogyo Building, Ginza Book now for lunch at Chef Jiro Ono’s kitchen, home to a $300, 20-course omakase meal enjoyed by President Obama (among others) and featured in the documentary Jiro Dreams of Sushi. SUSHI -JIRO. J P

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Choujiya, Toranomon, Minato Kimonos start at $2,500 and the handpainted silks are worth every yen. Discretion keeps the owner from mentioning celebrity clients, but the shop’s old-school website confirms its seriously local status. HOM E PAGE2.NIF T Y.COM / TOR ANOMON C HOUJIYA

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—Mickey Rapkin

FASHION LUMINARY CHRISTIAN DIOR WAS SO TAKEN WITH HOTEL PLAZA ATHÉNÉE THAT HE OPENED UP A COUTURE HOUSE NEXT DOOR TO THE HOTEL IN 1947.

INTERIOR: ERIC LAIGNEL. COURTESY.

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AO Spa, Andaz Tokyo, Toranomon Hills, Minato


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AHOY

HIGH LIFE on the HIGH SEAS

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On this residential luxury liner, daring jetsetters can travel the world without leaving their living rooms. Lindsay Silberman climbs aboard

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hen a resident aboard The World absolutely must have something—be it foie gras from France, or a sunset camel safari in Australia, or a private dinner for 45 people at the most sought-after restaurant on the planet—they get it. Even if that restaurant is the famed elBulli, which, when it was open, typically carried a 3,000 person waiting list. For the ship’s privileged residents, the impossible is made possible. Think of The World as a full-service high-rise on water—a megayacht-meetsvacation home with 165 uber-luxe residences. Adventure-seekers can buy or rent the apartments, which range from studios to a six-bedroom penthouse suite. At present, a few units are available for resale, but many residents rent out their apartments like vacation homes. Sale pr ices range from $1 million to $13 million. On board, ind u lge nt a me n it ie s include a golf simulator, a regulationsized ten nis cou r t, a Cigar Club and a ret ract able mar i na for water sports. The 6 4 4 -fo o t s h i p h a s seven dining options, including Portraits, which serves “haute cuisi ne.” (Lest the residents grow tired of Michelin-inspired fare, there are sand-

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wiches inside Fredy’s Deli.) The World has been circumnavigating its namesake since the ship’s inaugural journey in 2002. This year, it will travel to Singapore, the Maldives, Africa, the Mediterranean, Greenland, the Panama Canal , South America and Antarctica. “We have a six-member committee of residents that make eight proposals about where The World goes next,” explains General Manager Arjan Scheepers, the man responsible for overseeing the ship’s 270 crew members. “We’re already starting to plan for 2018. It’s a complex process.” What’s perhaps more complex, though, is figuring out the best way to source fresh raspberries for a guest with a hankering— particularly when the boat is traversing the Arctic on a 26-day expedition from Greenland to Alaska. Scheepers recalls how the crisis was averted: “One of our residents was planning to meet us at the half-way point on his private jet, and he asked if we still needed fresh produce. So I gave him a list. That saved the day.” This communityminded spirit makes sense, given that The World is privately owned by its residents, 130 families from 19 countries. (North Americans represent half; the rest of the owners come from Europe, Asia, Australia or South Africa.) On a typical day, the ship averages around 150 guests, a modest number that guarantees Mrs. Robinson needn’t wait long when she requests fresh orchids. Owners are welcome to customize the spaces; they can import made-to-order furniture, install a wine cellar or hire a preferred interior designer. So long as they abide by safety regulations, “the sky’s the limit,” says Scheepers. Or, it seems, the sea.

WEB SIGHTED

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Four wanderlust-worthy Instagrammers to inspire your next getaway @ScottLipps a.k.a. Scott Lipps President, One Management

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@VuTheara a.k.a. VuThéara Kham Founder, VuThéara Digital Branding Agency

BILLIONAIRE ORACLE CEO LARRY ELLISON HAS A BASKETBALL COURT ON TWO OF HIS YACHTS — AND A STAFFER THAT TRAILS THE SHIP IN A POWERBOAT TO RETRIEVE ERRANT BALLS .


Š2015 Showtime Networks Inc. All rights reserved. SHOWTIME and related marks are trademarks of Showtime Networks Inc. You must be a subscriber of Showtime to receive Showtime Anytime. Showtime Anytime is available through participating TV providers.

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hideaway

A Cave of One’s own

For one artist, there’s nowhere to go but down. Frances Dodds explores what’s beneath the surface

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PHOTOGRAPHED by Julien McRoberts

Above: Ra Paulette’s cave-home creation, commissioned by Liz and Shel Neymark. The bathtub’s tile detailing, far left, is by Shel, an architectural ceramics artist. Far right: the entrance to the outside world.

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or the past 30 years, Ra Paulette has been digging in the desert. Unknown to the world until 2014, when the short documentary CaveDigger was nominated for an Oscar, Paulette has been single-handedly digging ornate, mesmeric, cathedral-like spaces into the Ojo Caliente sandstone of western New Mexico. To date, 65-year-old Paulette has excavated 14 caves, many on private land for local residents and some on public land. These caves have become shrines in the wilderness. Hikers who encounter them leave behind religious relics or mementos of deceased loved ones. “It seems I’ve stumbled on a visual mechanism that opens up the sense of wonder,” Paulette says. “The cave medium is evocative because it completely surrounds you. The light of the open sky is juxtaposed by the inside of the earth, and that juxtaposition works a number on people, psychologically.” The cave pictured here is a bit different than the others. It’s the only cave that was intended as a living space and the only one that has running water and electricity. But also, it belongs to a couple, Shel and Liz Neymark, who are old friends of Paulette’s. Long ago Liz was Paulette’s girlfriend, until,

one of paulette’s caves , the

as he says jovially, Shel stole her away. The couple commissioned Paulette in 1997, but soon after the project began Liz was diagnosed with advanced melanoma and breast cancer. The doctors gave her a 20 percent chance of living five years. For Paulette, work on the cave became a labor of love—a tangible prayer. For over two years, 20 hours a week, he toiled in solitude. “Ra is like no other person I’ve ever known,” Shel says. “He totally gives himself up for other people. He is less interested in financial rewards or the trappings of society than anybody else. He is happy with almost no possessions. Those things just don’t interest him.” Paulette has said he thinks of himself more as an archeologist than as an architect. “The cave-digging process is very uncertain,” he says. “I don’t have plans... I seem to be uncovering something that already exists. It’s there in front of me, and I’m just working hard to see what’s there.” In many ways his art—a study in uncertainty and visceral perseverance—mirrors his philosophy of life: “We’re not going to think our way out of the problems we’re in. We have to feel our way out.” Eighteen years after her diagnosis, Liz is alive and well, and Ra Paulette is still digging.

“heart chamber ,” attracted so many tourists that paulette became

terrified of a collapse and asked the bureau of land management to let him refill it.


© 2015. DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.

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DINING OUT

GARDEN VARIETY

Restaurants across the country are welcoming the new reign of the vegetable superstar. Rebecca Flint Marx goes green PHOTOGRAPHY BY INA JANG

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ow that kale salad has achieved world domination, it can be easy to forget that not so long ago vegetables were mostly relegated to the sidelines, ninth-inning players in a game where meat got all the glory. Save for a few vegetarian restaurants and the all-veg tasting menus occasionally trotted out at fi ne-dining establishments, members of the plant kingdom were rendered as afterthoughts, the oft-overcooked accompaniments to artfully prepared animal parts. Today, however, it’s a different story. Thanks to the farm-to-table movement, Meatless Mondays and the dissolution of the traditional appetizerentrée menu structure into one featuring plates of varying sizes, chefs are conjuring intricate, nuanced vegetable dishes that rival their meatbased counterparts in both complexity and price. Consider the Proprietors Bar & Table in Nantucket, where a $15 order of king trumpet mushrooms is seared a la plancha and served with pickled turnip, cauliflower and sumac yogurt. At NoMad in New York City, roasted acorn

VEGAN BUTCHER SHOPS ? THE BUTCHER’S SON , OPENING IN BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA , IS MEAT- FREE YET CLAIMS TO BE MODELED AFTER AN

“OLD NEW YORK – STYLE DELI .”

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squash with mustard greens and bread pudding costs a beefy $22. Even the otherwise meat-laden menu at San Francisco’s aptly named Game recently featured a paean to the carrot, serving the humble vegetable sous vide, slivered raw and pureed and strewn over an edible soil made of XO sauce. Later this year, Jean-Georges Vongerichten is opening an all-vegetable restaurant whose menu will be devoted to raw, vegan and vegetarian dishes. “I don’t think you can pin the rise of the vegetable on any one reason, but never underestimate the fact that chefs are really competitive,” says Amanda Cohen, the chef-owner of Dirt Candy in Manhattan. She became one of the pioneers of the vegetable-based-cuisine movement when she opened her restaurant in 2008. Although Dirt Candy is expressly vegetarian, Cohen’s innovative preparations—like rosemary-eggplant tiramisu and broccoli hot dogs with salt-and-vinegar broccoli-rabe chips—inspired many diners and chefs to rethink their perceptions of vegetables. Cohen remembers the time that she realized the

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“Why not cook the vegetables like a piece of meat?” —chef josh lawler tide was turning. “It was when two well-known restaurants swiped a couple of my recipes, passed them off as their own and received a lot of positive press for them,” she says. “I suddenly felt like other chefs were paying attention and trying to step up their vegetable game.” At the Farm and Fisherman in Philadelphia, the menu’s best seller is the bloody beet steak, a roasted, flattened and seared beet served with yogurt, pan drippings, amaranth and balsamic vinegar. The $12 first course is so popular, says chef-owner Josh Lawler, that, “it even inspired a local artist to paint it in oil.” The idea came from his days cooking at Blue Hill at Stone Barns, in upstate New York, where vegetables roasted under bricks developed a flat-

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tened texture and caramelized edges. When he opened his own restaurant, Lawler decided to try the same thing with beets. “When I noticed the beautiful and caramelized juices it produced, it really was something different than I have ever tasted,” he says. “I’m always trying to cook vegetables that are hearty and almost meat-like, with soul and depth. So why not cook the vegetables like a piece of meat?” Vegetables, he adds, “have moved into the forefront of my cooking. In the past it was, come up with a protein and then figure out what veggies are going to accompany it. Now I buy my vegetables first, then create my menu around them.” For all the advances vegetables have made in restaurants, however, Cohen cautions that their proponents should n’t declare tot al victor y. “They’ve finally been invited to prom, but they’re still not out on the dance f loor,” she says. That said, she continues, “all the hype has gotten people used to the idea that cooking vegetables and cooking vegetarian food are two entirely different things. And that’s no small achievement.”


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ON DISPLAY

FIT for FENDI

A recent design collaboration finds its home among high fashion

ALL PHOTOS COURTESY

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There’s a new must-have from Fendi, and it’s not something you can wear. The fashion house has teamed up with design firm Dimore Studio, and founders Britt Moran and Emiliano Salci, to create furniture pieces, light fixtures and even a rug that will be exclusively distributed through Fendi’s fashion boutiques. “We’ve exhibited more experimental works by young artists, but this collaboration is more realistic—and for sale,” says Silvia Venturini Fendi, who plans to move the showcase into a renovated apartment in the Fendi Palazzo in Rome. She adds, “We may even let people stay there.” —Rebecca Kleinman

Clockwise from top: Iron and glass bookcase; chairs lined in Fendi Selleria Roman leather; table with smoked glass top; daybed lined with natural sheared mink.


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Teeth of The Dog


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A r nall rejected her ex-husband’s ust how fraught handwritten check is the whole islove & money for $975 million, saysue of prenups? ing it was far below A sk G e orge Da rwhat she, as a wife withren (not his real name) out a prenup, was owed afa prominent L.A. meter 26 years of marriage. (She dia executive. Darren loves relented after several days, but h i s s e c o n d w i f e v e r y, v e r y So is it possible to break that premarital agreement? will still appeal the divorce case.) much. O n ly she is not h is w ife, Judith Newman finds the loopholes T hese headli ne -ma k i ng stor ies despite t he lav ish Beverly Hills ILLUSTRATED by timothy goodman highlight an issue that’s of some concern we d d i ng. Vi r t u a l ly no o ne k now s t he even to those who are not in the one percent of truth—not friends, family, coworkers or chilthe one percent: When can prenups, seemingly ironclad dren. The only people who know are their attorney and legal documents, be broken? Right now, only about three percent of the one close friend who faux-married them. And why? “My first marriage lasted four years and did not involve children, yet all Americans have such agreements, but the overall number increased by I lost one-third of all I worked for my entire life,” says Darren, 57, who 73 percent between 2006 and 2011, according to the American Academy of came from a working-class family. “And I mean everything—a third of Matrimonial Lawyers. And it’s not just the uber-wealthy who are getting my house that she’d always signed quit-claims on, half of my retirement them. Notes Byron Divins of Divins and Divins, P.C., whose Long Island account. She even went after my frequent-f lier miles. If she had taken the practice does not have a particularly wealthy clientele, “A prenup can be amount I wanted to settle for, she would have gotten the same as what she just as bitterly disputed if the assets are not millions but maybe a few huneventually did. But instead, she insisted I was hiding money, so hundreds dred thousand and the dog.” “The problem with prenups as I see them is you can’t anticipate everyof thousands went to attorneys and forensic accountants.” Darren’s new wife, who has three children and a prestigious academic thing,” says Ellie Wertheim, a New York attorney whose distaste for the career that nevertheless pays a fraction of what he earns, also had a terrible acrimony of divorce led her to give up litigating and specialize in mediadivorce: She had to pay alimony to her deadbeat ex. Yet she felt hurt by tion. “So, what happens if you waive spousal support and then get sick or Darren’s insistence on the prenup. Life is too full of unknowns, she feels, have a profoundly disabled child or need to care for a parent? Or you lose to draw up a hard-and-fast contract like this. She’d rather rely on love and a job? The divorce actually happens, but the parties’ lives have deviated.” It is still rare for a prenuptial agreement to be overturned. Yet these agreegood faith. And so it stands, four years after their beautiful ceremony, that ments are dissolved—sometimes. Think your prenup is challengeable? they are still not legally bound. Given the current state of marriage, with divorce rates high as ever, Here are the circumstances where you may be allowed to revisit history: it’s hard not to have sympathy for both points of view. He didn’t feel safe without a prenup; she didn’t feel safe with one. You (or your mate) didn’t live up to Prenups (and their malcontents) have been much in the news lately. There’s your part of a very specific bargain the story of Ken and Anne Dias Griffin, the wealthiest couple in Illinois. After In other words, you established a set of “musts” in the original document, Griffin, the CEO of Citadel hedge fund, who is worth an estimated $5.5 billion, and someone—maybe both of you—didn’t abide by them. For example, blindsided his wife of 11 years with a request for a divorce, Dias Griffin—herself your wife promised to have children and didn’t, or she promised to have a wealthy and accomplished businesswoman currently worth about $50 mil- a certain number of children. (This was a stipulation in the prenup of a lion—has been trying to get her prenuptial agreement dissolved. Perhaps she is friend marrying an older, enormously wealthy man who already had six looking for inspiration in Sue Ann Arnall, ex-wife of Harold Hamm, the CEO kids, but apparently had some sort of King of Siam fantasy. A certain of Continental Resources in Oklahoma. In January, with much media fanfare, payout would only kick in after the second. She delivered, just when she

J 94

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when prenups attack

last year , russian oligarch dmitry rybolovlev settled with his ex- wife , elena rybolovleva , for a record $4.5 billion . there was no prenup.


thought her eggs had given up the ghost.) A recent inclusion? The social-media clause. Enough young couples have seen embarrassing or hostile postings on Instagram or Facebook wreck a romance, so now they are getting prohibitions or limitations on postings written into their agreements. (Surely this clause will be a source of litigation. The temptation to ignore it in a hotheaded moment is too great.)

YOU WERE TRICKED What exactly constitutes fraud in the prenuptial contract? Lying about your finances for starters, says Connecticut attorney Gaetano Ferro, past president of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers. In other words: Your mate said he was worth $1 million at signing, and he was worth $10 million. Whoops! Of course, because many people are trying to negotiate their conjugal finances while maintaining the illusion of being swept along on gossamer wings, partners often waive their rights to this disclosure. In which case: Enjoy your prenup, because you’re probably stuck with it. Yet another variation of fraud: when it is impossible for one party to understand what he/she is signing. “I had a case recently where the wife only spoke Russian and the agreement was in English,” says attorney Byron Divins. “Nobody used the expression ‘mail-order bride’ but basically that’s what she was.” It was not that difficult to nullify the prenup, Divins adds—though when it was over, Divins, who has lost only four trials in 18 years of practice, was more relieved than triumphant. “She was my client, but by the time it was all over I wanted to divorce her.”

called off, but the party at the Breakers continued, with the now-non-groom’s family glumly drinking in one room, and the non-bride’s family in the other. After many tears, the bride eventually emerged—shaky and dressed in black. But she danced with her family. “She is not only beautiful and smart, but she was very close to her family, and she really understood that she was being protected,” the friend says. Fisher has since gone on to a happy marriage. “In the end, everything worked out perfectly,” the friend adds. But perhaps it’s no coincidence that during the years she practiced family law in New York City her specialty included premarital and postnuptial agreements. In order for “duress” to have any legal standing, Raoul Felder explains, there has to be the threat of real violence—pretty much a literal, not figurative, gun to your head. This was part of Anne Dias Griffin’s argument for scotching her prenup. Days before her 2003 wedding to Ken Griffin at Versailles (guest appearances by Donna Summer and Cirque du Soleil!), Dias Griffin had not signed their agreement, and her fiancé allegedly intimidated her by destroying a piece of furniture. (Griffin’s version, according to “Page Six”: He was gripping one pole of their four-poster bed, it broke and the bed collapsed.) There was also the emotional threat. Dias Griffin claims that two days before the ceremony she was bullied into visiting a therapist to settle their dispute—a therapist Griffin had an undisclosed business relationship with. He contends that before the visit, his future bride (who was formerly head of a hedge fund herself) had several lawyers amend the prenup, making it harder to argue that it was sprung upon her. In December, a judge struck down Dias Griffi n’s claims of emotional duress, leaving her with one further prenup-dissolving argument....

YOU WERE STRONG-ARMED

THE HAMMS: GETTY IMAGES

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Every week, says matrimonial attorney Raoul Felder, clients walk into his YOU DISCOVER... THIS SUCKS office and claim “duress” as their reason for breaking a prenup. The argument The legal word is “unconscionable,” meaning that the terms of a contract are so goes like this: At the last minute he was waving legal papers in my face. The grossly unfair or one-sided that no court could uphold it. Apparently in the prewedding was planned, everyone booked their tickets and sent presents, so I nup she signed, Dias Griffin was entitled to only one percent of her husband’s would have signed a paper saying I was a space alien. fortune. That doesn’t sound so great, until you realize that one percent of $5 “That’s not duress,” Felder explains. “Even if it’s down to the wire and billion for an 11-year marriage is not scratch. More importantly, the Griffi ns they’ve cued up ‘Here Comes the Bride,’ you have a choice about whether had some sort of complicated arrangement whereby millions of dollars of payto get married or not.” outs have been made already, which further muddied the waters for her claim A prenup, in fact, halted the 2008 Palm Beach wedding of Wall Street trader that the prenup was forced upon her and wildly unfair. Incidentally, none of Jason Bailer and Alexandra Fisher, an attorney and daughter of billionaire this includes any child support for their three offspring, who presumably will real estate magnate Jeff Fisher. “It was probably the most beautiful wedding not lack for future aircraft of their own. I’d ever been to,” says one attendee. “The Indeed there is recent precedent for a chuppah alone must have been covered with prenup being thrown out for being both CHECK-MATE: Harold Hamm, possessing an estimated $10 billion 100,000 flowers.” But there was trouble in the signed under duress and unconscionable. oil fortune, wrote a check of almost $1 billion to Sue Ann flower-strewn paradise. According to press Felder calls it “extremely rare,” but in 2013 Arnall, his prenup-free wife of 26 years. At first she rejected it. reports, the prenuptial had been signed but Elizabeth Petrakis, wife of Long Island the bride’s father made additional demands millionaire Peter Petrakis, worth at least on the wedding day, including the stipulation $20 m illion, had her prenup dissolved that in case of divorce the groom would still when a court agreed that the document she have to pay alimony to the bride. Discussing signed four days before the wedding was the terms of the future divorce on the wed“fraudulently induced.” In it, she signed ding day perhaps did not set the right tone. away the rights to all marital assets, exBut the attendee, who was close friends with cepting $25,000 for each year they were the bride’s family, says the press got it wrong. married. The husband gave her a verbal “The groom”—who had his own money, but promise that he would rip up the document not Fisher-level money—“was demanding when they had children. He didn’t. that he be paid alimony for Elizabeth Petrakis has since started a comlife if the marriage pany called Divorce Prep Experts. ended,” she says. “Here’s the thing about shredding a prenWhatever the true up,” says Divins. “No matter what happens, story, the millionno matter who gets what, very few people dollar wedding was walk away happy.”


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STYLE

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ORAL REPORT

GRIN REAPERS

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Not intended as an offer of or solicitation to buy real estate where prior qualification is required. Void where prohibited by law. Illustrations are conceptual renderings (or photographs included for illustrative purposes only) that may not reflect the project as currently designed or ultimately be constructed. Plans, specifications, features and pricing and are not complete and are subject to change without notice. References to prices are estimates only and will vary based on the unit that is purchased. English shall be the controlling language regarding interpretation. The Baha Mar Project (and the residency component) is owned, offered, marketed, sold, constructed and developed exclusively by Baha Mar Ltd. Baha Mar is not owned, offered, marketed, sold constructed or developed by Rosewood Hotels and Resorts, L.L.C., SBE Hotel Group, LLC; or Hyatt Corporation, or any of their affiliates (collectively, the “Brands”). All registered trademarks, trade names, and photos and product/facility depictions (collectively “Brand Intellectual Property”) of the respective Brands are owned by each Brand, as applicable and such Brand Intellectual Property has been included for illustrative purposes only. The Developer’s use of the Brand Intellectual Property is pursuant to various contractual agreements with each of the Brands which contractual agreements may be amended or terminated in the future in accordance with their terms. The respective Brand’s Intellectual Property will not be associated with the Residences, or any residential unit situated within the Residences, upon termination of any of the agreements with the respective Brands. While certain management functions will be under the direction and auspices of the Brands, neither the Developer nor the Brands guaranty the continued use or availability of such services or of the Brand Intellectual Property. Neither purchasers of any Residences, nor any community association constituted with respect to the Residences nor any segment thereof shall have any right, title or interest in and to the name of any of the Brands or Brand Intellectual Property. Any purchase of a residence should be without reliance upon any Brand identification. Any purchase of a Residence should be for personal use and enjoyment and should be without reliance upon any potential for future profit, rental income, economic or tax advantages. No legal or financial advice is being offered and purchasers are solely responsible for determining whether any investment is appropriate or suitable based on personal investment objectives and financial status. No warranty or guarantee is made concerning eligibility for permanent residency and/or citizenship and in all cases specific inquiries should be made to the relevant agency. Consult with your own legal and business advisors. THE COMPLETE OFFERING TERMS ARE IN AN OFFERING PLAN AVAILABLE FROM THE SPONSORS. FILE #s: CD13-0215, CD13-0216, CD13-0217. SPONSORS: BAHA MAR, LTD., BAHA MAR LAND HOLDINGS, LTD., BMP GOLF LTD., BMP THREE LTD. - BAHA MAR BOULEVARD, CABLE BEACH, NASSAU, N.P., THE BAHAMAS. OBTAIN THE PROPERTY REPORT REQUIRED BY FEDERAL LAW AND READ IT BEFORE SIGNING ANYTHING. NO FEDERAL AGENCY HAS JUDGED THE MERITS OR VALUE, IF ANY, OF THIS PROPERTY. © 2015 - Baha Mar Ltd. - All rights reserved. Equal Housing Opportunity.


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Money Can’t Buy You Sleep PILLOW TALK

T

here was a day when lack of sleep was something of a status symbol—not because you couldn’t, but because you were just too damned busy. Those days have officially caught up with us. We now know there’s nothing particularly impressive about inviting in premature aging, weight gain and distractedness. “People have realized that it’s not a badge of honor to walk around foggy and disengaged,” says the Better Sleep Council’s Mark Kinsley. “If your life is so packed that you can’t fit in a good seven or eight hours, it’s time to reevaluate.” Now that we want it, of course, we want it yesterday. Sleep is

currently an estimated $40 billion business, increasing nearly 10 percent each year as we clamor for $100,000 mattresses made of hand-woven horsehair, infinity-count bedding and snore-proofed walls, as well as Fitbits and their kin and alarm clocks that promise to wake us at the precise ideal time. We’re also employing more personal sleep assistants than ever. Cognitive behavioral sleep therapy, one of the fastest growing segments of psychotherapy, uses a combination of approaches to help you understand what you’re doing wrong, and how to stop, while professional sleep consultants will often temporarily move in with clients to figure

the longest any human has gone without sleep is 264 hours , or 11 days . this record was first set in 1964 by a 17 -year - old for a science - fair project.

Ted Spagna/getty images

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But that doesn’t mean you won’t keep trying. Alyssa Giacobbe goes in pursuit of some z’s


P L AY out the things they can do, or stop doing, to sleep better. “We’re a ver y results-oriented culture,” says Kinsley. “If we don’t eat well, we can decide to eat better. If we don’t exercise, we can decide to go to a class. But don’t sle e p wel l? Bu m me r. We d o n’t know what to do. Which is why it’s such ripe territory for the people who m a ke p r o d uc t s t o c ome i n and say, Hey, have I got something for you.” Spas like Canyon Ranch and Golden Door, meanwhile, offer sleep treatment programs that range f rom weekend workshops to month-long retreats, and hotels are getting in on the act, too: This year, the Corinthia Hotel London introduced the “Sumptuous Sleep Retreat” program following what a re p cal ls “re se a rch a nd g ue st

Arizona’s Miraval and who continues to lead increasingly sold-out sleep retreats around the country. “A rich man can buy a bed of gold, but he can’t buy a better night of sle e p.” Pa r t of t he p roble m , he says, is our ar rogance about our sleep. “We don’t have a clear sense for what it is and why we can’t buy it,” he says. “We don’t get sleep because we don’t get sleep.” We also don’t want to put in the work to make it better—practices like drinking less coffee, going to bed at a consistent hour, unplugging earlier each night. Instead, we tell ourselves we need a new mattress, a bet ter sleeping pill, new pajamas. Most of all, though, we don’t sleep for the right reasons. “The big ge s t p r oble m i s t h a t we s e e sleep as a means to perform better

DILEMMA: CONDé NAST ARHCIVES/CORBIS

—Rubin Naiman, ph.d.

feedback indicating that a g reat night’s sleep is becoming the ultimate luxu r y” and feat u r ing an in-room menu of sleep-conducive food s, 30 0 -t h read- cou nt cot ton bedd i ng a nd bla ckout cu r t ai n s; spa treatments that promote good sleep th roug h foot massage and polar it y balance body work; and a “turndown treat” of warm milk and pumpkin-seed cookies. Since its launch, the program has been wildly successful with guests that include new moms, frequent f lyers and desperate insomniacs who are willing to shell out upwards of $1,150 a night. The problem, of course, is that none of it’s working. All the help notwithstanding, nearly 70 million Americans suffer from problematic sleep. “It’s really clear that t h i ngs a re get t i ng wor se,” says Rubin Naiman, Ph.D., a clinical p sycholog ist a nd vet e r a n sle e p specialist who has created sleep programs for Canyon Ranch and

while we’re awake,” he says. “But the people who actually succeed at sleeping are people who don’t just do it because it’s the r ight thing to do, but because they enjoy it. W hen I spea k to good sleepers, t hey all have one t h i ng i n common. They tell me, ‘I love sleep.’ ” Ironically, simply loving sleep may help us get more of it—for free—because it’ll make the work required to get there seem like less of a chore. “People I see want to improve their sleep, but often don’t realize that it may involve changes in their cur rent lifest yle to have that happen,” says Dr. Ilene Rosen, a sleep physician board-certif ied w it h t he A mer ica n Aca demy of Sleep Medicine. As Naiman says, “We still need products, but they should be understood as something that supports sleep, not supplants it. T he best way to t wea k slee p isn’t to tweak our sleeping situation. It’s to tweak how we act when we’re awake.”

C U LT U R E

1 percent

dilemma dujour

Design out of reach

My sister-in-law stole my interior designer, and now I hear they’re putting the vintage kangas meant for me on her couch. What do I say when she invites me over? I can’t bear to see my dream living room in her house. Luckily, you’ve already moved on from that aesthetic. Everyone knows that new is the new vintage—especially you. You could tell her so. (How jealous will she be when she hears about how your new Miriam Ellner verre églomisé just came back from starring in a show at MoMA?) Or you could take the classy road and compliment her good taste. My preferred tack is a little of both. How about, “I just love what you’ve done to the place. I saw that Ado Chale replica in Brimfield, too, and fell in love. I wanted it instantly! But my Jeffrey— I’m working with Jeffrey Bilhuber now; yes, Anna got me in—refused. He said we could wait a few months and get the real thing. I guess your girl disagreed. Lucky you!”

Staff quarters

Please settle a bet : I have a 6,000 -square-foot home plus twins, two golden retrievers and a cat. I think we’re pretty clearly a four-personlive-in-staff family, but my husband says three, max. What’s the standard here? Unlike children, there’s no such thing as too much staff. My own dear cat has a nanny, a groomer and a professional litter-box attendant. That said, I’m a firm believer in only essential sleepovers. (This goes for relatives, too.) I advise just enough live-in staffers to avoid doing anything that could be considered soft labor or which involves another creature’s fecal matter, but not so many that you could run into a strapping young lad in the hall and not know if he’s your driver or your husband’s sidepiece.

Dilemma DuJour welcomes your social-misfit questions. E-mail us at askdilemma@dujour.com

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“When I speak to good sleepers, they all have one thing in common. They tell me, ‘I love sleep.’ ”

WORK


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PAIN & GAIN

EXTREME WELLNESS

104

Old-school (and old school–inspired) European “health spas” offer body purification and youth-enhancing fixes in the form of punishing routines. Kari Molvar finds reason to escape to the sanitarium this spring

THE GERMAN REGIMEN

THE BULGARIAN BOOTCAMP

Where: Sha Wellness Clinic,

Where: Schiffmann Spa and Health

Where: Dr. Emilova Wellness

Where: The Paracelsus Clinic,

Alicante, Spain

Hotel, Mülheim an der Mosel,

Clinic, Varna, Bulgaria

Lustmühle, Switzerland

What it’s about: Located on the

Germany

What it’s about: Dr. Ljudmila

What it’s about: The most medi-

Mediterranean coast, Sha is among

What it’s about: Schiffmann

Emilova, a specialist in cardiol-

cal option, Paracelsus is run by a

the cushier wellness clinics in Eu-

resembles a European dorm, and

ogy and rheumatology, founded

team of 10 physicians who combine

rope, but it still promises total body

regulars check in for detox holidays

this no-frills clinic on the belief

traditional and experimental tech-

transformation. Argentinean busi-

and therapeutic pampering (salt-oil

that fasting stimulates the organs,

niques to treat acute and chronic

ness executive Alfredo Bataller Pari-

rubdowns, pulsation massages) in

improves the metabolic system and

health conditions (ulcers, allergies,

etti opened the clinic in 2009 after

the German countryside. Inspired by

slows the process of aging. More

weak immune systems). The cam-

meeting a naturopathic doctor who

the principles of Dr. Otto Buchinger,

than 40,000 devotees have flocked

pus, which opened in 1958, will be

cured him of digestive problems

the father of fasting, most programs

here to enjoy a daily diet of one to

expanded this summer and is for

that had plagued him for years.

entail colonics, liver compresses and

two kilograms of fresh fruit, juices

out-patient services only. Guests

Sha blends Eastern and Western

a sparse diet of fruit juices, vegetable

and herbal teas mixed with honey.

stay at nearby hotels, then shuttle

medicine with natural therapies

broths, carbonated water and teas.

With no time wasted on meals,

over for tests and treatments, such

and chef-prepared macrobiotic

Guests can also go on guided hikes

you have plenty left to dedicate to

as whole-body hyperthermia to

food (no starving here!). Several

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one-day packages are offered; start

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PLAY

TEE TIME

STROKE OF GENIUS

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A French maison’s hand-crafted putters are the hautest on the green


REFRESHING THE MIAMI SKYLINE Renowned artist Julian Schnabel brings his unique vision & playful palette to the public spaces of Downtown Miami’s most anticipated condominium tower.

1 0 0 1 S O U T H M I A M I A V E N U E , M I A M I , F L O R I D A , 3 3 1 3 0 | C M C R E A L E S T A T E , E XC L U S I V E S A L E S A G E N T | ( 8 8 8 ) 7 3 9 - 0 7 1 0 | B R I C K E L L F L A T I R O N . C O M

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY | ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING THE REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, MAKE REFERENCE TO THIS BROCHURE AND TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. THIS OFFERING IS MADE ONLY BY THE OFFERING DOCUMENTS FOR THE CONDOMINIUM AND NO STATEMENT SHOULD BE RELIED UPON IF NOT MADE IN THE OFFERING DOCUMENTS. THIS IS NOT AN OFFER TO SELL, OR SOLICITATION OF OFFERS TO BUY, THE CONDOMINIUM UNITS IN STATES WHERE SUCH OFFER OR SOLICITATION CANNOT BE MADE. PRICES, PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE.


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From left: A 1966 Cadillac DeVille convertible coupe; the 2016 Cadillac CTS-V Sedan

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WHO’S YOUR CADDY?

around a curve—that gives merican car manufacthem a distinctiveness that t uring has been in a American luxur y vehicles state of f lux in the past With youth-friendly models and a shiny new have lacked. decade, unsure how to posiManhattan headquarters, this isn’t your grandpa’s Ca d illac’s CMO Uwe Eltion itself without the cr utch Cadillac. Paul Biedrzycki goes along for the ride linghaus, a former BMW exec, of nostalgia. Big-budget comis the first to admit to befuddled mercials featuring cars driving the messaging. “There was no way fordeser ted streets of what looks like ward with Cadillac’s old positioning, Batman’s Gotham while an actor makes which was more on the side of traditional marginally coherent philosophical remarks luxury and comfort,” he says. “No one wants that about what it means to be American have been the anymore. We all want better looking and better driving approach of choice, but have done little to incite drivers to take “American luxury” seriously when compared with European and cars, and now we deliver this.” Ellinghaus is German, perhaps giving Asian offerings. Cadillac has been no exception, most famously with him an outsider perspective less swayed by American nostalgia. He last year’s spot regaling the triumphs of the “greatest generation”— understands that in order for Cadillac to truly compete in a competihigh-fives all around for Americans landing on the moon nearly 50 tive global luxury market, harking back to its big, boatish sedans is less pertinent than demonstrating a willingness to listen to and deyears ago while the rest of the world lazily watched. The irony, however, is that the cars Cadillac has been producing are, in liver on the changing needs of today’s drivers. In that spirit, Cadillac is relocating its world headquarters from fact, a formidable challenge to those of European luxury’s big three (Mercedes, BMW and Audi). Before I had a chance to sample the new midsize Detroit to a city where many have gone to reinvent themselves: New CTS and compact ATS luxury model lines, I was skeptical. I’ve become York. The move is a step in the right direction in helping the brand accustomed to the disappointment in most American “luxury” models of regain cultural relevance, and will allow Cadillac to step out of the late, finding them a bland redress of the manufacturers’ base sedan and often insular thinking of a one-industry town. While product development and manufacturing will stay in Michigan, the New York lacking a point of view in their styling despite the bells and whistles. However, in the case of Cadillac’s high performance V-Series, operation will focus on building partnerships and brand awareness. there may well be some future classics in the crop. The steering and Of course, history isn’t all forgotten: The move to Lower Manhattan suspension of both the CTS-V and ATS-V are on par with, if not bet- is less about abandoning the epicenter of American automotive greatter than, their European counterparts, but more importantly, the cars ness than about starting a new chapter for a storied American luxury retain a dash of Detroit—a personality in the exhaust note and enough brand. As Ellinghaus predicts, “Going global in New York will keep power to push you back in your seat, or get the rear end a little loose the factories in Detroit busy.”

IN 1968 , COSMETICS MOGUL MARY KAY ASH BECAME THE FIRST PERSON TO BUY A PINK CADILLAC — IT WAS PAINTED ON- SITE TO MATCH THE SHADE OF HER BLUSH COMPACT.

FROM LEFT: GETTY IMAGES; COURTESY

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BOOZE NEWS

HOUSE OF THE SPIRITS

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The secret to a well-stocked bar? Beautiful bottles PHOTOGRAPHED BY ZACHARY ZAVISLAK

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1. Bitters, $10 each, BITTERCUBE, bittercube.com. 2. Royal glasses, $125 each, MOSER, moserusa.com. 3. HIBIKI 17 Year Old Whisky, $150, astorwines.com. 4. FLOR DE CAÑA Centenario 25 Year Old Rum, $155, cellar.com. 5. AVIATION American Gin, $30, bevmo.com. 6. WOODFORD RESERVE Master’s Collection Whiskey, $100, astorwines.com. 7. Pierpont ice bucket, $150, RESTORATION HARDWARE, rh.com. 8. THE GLENROTHES 1968 Extraordinary Cask Whisky, $9,500, astorwines.com. 9. Ice tongs, $48, ALESSI, alessi.com. 10. Rocks glass, $55, DEBORAH EHRLICH, deborahehrlich.com. 11. Arc corkscrew, $60, TOM DIXON, shophorne.com. 12. Lia bottle stopper, $64, ANNA NEW YORK BY RABLABS, rablabs.com. 13. Capelle coasters, $195, RALPH LAUREN HOME, ralphlauren.com. 14. Chez Harrods cabinet, from $24,570, CHRISTOPHER GUY, christopherguy.com.

PROP STYLIST: VICTORIA PETRO CONROY

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BY THE NUMBERS

YOU’VE GOT IT MAID

A household staff can feel invaluable, but what does good help truly cost? Frances Dodds gets the breakdown

The number of square feet one must oversee to officially be considered an estate manager.

4 Years: Time the late Leona Helmsley was sentenced to for tax evasion after her housekeeper ratted her out.

$900,000

The amount ex– NBA player Stephon Marbury reportedly offered his personal chef to keep their affair a secret.

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The alleged number of people in Mariah Carey’s paid personal entourage, which is said to include three personal assistants, a hairstylist, a makeup artist, a chauffeur, a masseuse and a dietician.

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11 MONTHS How long Lauren Weisberger worked as personal assistant to Vogue editor Anna Wintour before leaving to pen her roman à clef, The Devil Wears Prada.

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Years The length of time supermodel Heidi Klum spent dating her one-time bodyguard Martin Kirsten after separating from her former husband, Seal.

ANDY WARHOL’S FORMER BODYGUARD HAS BEEN ACCUSED OF HIDING LIZ, THE 1964 PAINTING OF ELIZABETH TAYLOR, FOR 30 YEARS The amount of the claim Jay Z filed, and later dropped, against his former personal chef for stealing a secret chicken-wing recipe.

The reported head count of personal staffers for Prince Charles’ household and the households of his children.

$1.5 MILLION

$5.33 MILLION

The sale price of the apartment of former Citigroup chairman Sandy Weill’s maid at 15 Central Park West.

BOTTOM RIGHT CORNER: MIKE TAUBER. ALL OTHERS: GETTY IMAGES.

10,000


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Back to the future High-tech humanoids are about to hijack the home. Lindsay Silberman explores the robot revolution

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1. Pepper

2. Keecker

3. Jibo

Unlike its contemporaries, Pepper is designed with a “friend over function” ethos in mind. The emotional, “love-powered” robot has a peculiar ability to connect with its owner— Pepper makes wisecracks, engages in thoughtful banter and uses humanlike gestures. The Android-operated companion, invented by a French robotics firm and Japanese telecom company, will be sold in U.S. Sprint stores by summer. ($1,900)

The smartphonecontrolled device— which was the most pricey gadget ever launched on the crowdfunding site Kickstarter—is the brainchild of a former Google employee. What Keecker lacks in personality, it makes up for in practicality: The robot can project video, play music, make calls and create “digital decorations” for the home. It will even follow its owner from room to room with the press of a button. ($4,000-$5,000)

Despite its 11-inch stature, the MITborn bot has lofty goals: Jibo aspires to be “the world’s first family robot.” And that might just happen. Jibo’s creators promise it will become an invaluable addition to the home, playing the role of family photographer, personal assistant, bedtime-story reader and more. The robot won’t be available until 2016, but it’s already received $2.3 million in pre-orders and $25.3 million in funding. ($599)

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PHOTO illustration by Sandie Burke

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“THIS IS MY TIME” Mitchell Niemeyer CO L L E CT IO N

www.twsteel.com


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GIVING

NO BREAKS Racing’s royal family forgoes the silver spoon for a helping hand. Paul Biedrzycki gets the spin

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Brian and Amy France at home in New York City with their 4-year-old twins, Meadow and Luke

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hen, in the winter of 1947, Bill France, Sr. stood over a smoky room at the Streamline Hotel in Daytona Beach, Florida, to describe his vision for a unified stock car racing circuit, the former mechanic admitted he had “no idea how big it could be.” His wish was to organize a burgeoning sport that had struck a nerve with post-WWII America. At its core were a humble work ethic and an enduring commitment to family and country—do-the-best-with-what-you-got. Nearly 70 years later, his grandson, Brian France, now the CEO of NASCAR, sits atop a sports and entertainment empire built on the hardscrabble gospel of the self-made and contemplates how to stay attuned to the spirit his grandfather had keyed into. Success does have its pitfalls. Sitting in their Manhattan penthouse, Brian and his wife, Amy, admit they’ve struggled with the idea that wealth can be an “albatross,” never prompting children of privilege to develop the skills necessary to think and act independently. “If you entitle someone, you look past their ability to fi nd their own way and reach their true potential,” says Brian, who recalls walking into the NASCAR offices while in his late teens to ask his father why he hadn’t mentioned anything about a tr ust fund. His father replied, “Because you don’t have one.” Instead, Brian took a job as a

janitor at Talladega Speedway and began working his way up. Warding off entitlement could be considered a France family tradition, but it’s also congruous with what families like the Buffets or Gateses have done in recent years, putting their wealth towards philanthropic causes instead of stashing it away for the kids. To that end, Amy and Brian have created the Luke and Meadow Foundation, an umbrella charity named after their 4-year-old twins and focused on children’s causes like funding pediatric cancer research and neonatal intensive care facilities. Amy, who doesn’t see the sense in simply sitting on a board and writing a check, has taken a hands-on approach to the foundation’s giving. For instance, the Frances have helped place several children with adoptive families. As their kids near school age, Amy’s attention is focused on the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD. “This foundation is very much a mirror of Brian and I—his business values, my compassion and the environment I want my children to be raised in,” says Amy. “And it’s also consistent with the NASCAR model of how the business began. Consider yourself lucky that you have an in at the track so that yes: You can be a janitor. You’re welcome.”

DURING A THREE - PLUS HOUR RACE , A NASCAR DRIVER MAINTAINS THE SAME HEARTBEAT AS A SERIOUS MARATHON RUNNER : 120 TO 150 BEATS PER MINUTE .

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San Francisco mayor Ed Lee at City Hall.

POLITICS

A MAYOR’S MOMENT San Francisco’s Ed Lee helms one of America’s most beautiful cities but also one of its most complex. Melissa Griffin Caen moves in PHOTOGRAPHED BY CARLOS CHAVARRÍA

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ust before Thanksgiving at the St. Anthony’s Turkey Carve, city officials were gathered, ready to slice up birds for San Francisco’s homeless. And while many were engaging in boisterous conversations or brandishing knives for the cameras, one man was quietly focused on the task at hand. “You know how Obama is the president of the United States,” a woman in the crowd said to her child, pointing at the short, mustachioed man. “That’s Ed Lee, and he’s the mayor. That means he’s like the president of San Francisco.” The little girl looked at the man and took him in. “Really?” You can’t fault the kid for her disbelief. San Francisco is known for being a f lamboyant city, a place where neither the smell of marijuana

SAN FRANCISCO WAS THE FIRST CITY IN AMERICA TO INSTITUTE AN

at 9 A . M . nor the sight of a grown man in a tutu is likely to merit a second thought. And its politicians are usually equally colorful; the office of the mayor has been held by outsize personalities like Dianne Feinstein, Willie Brown and Gavin Newsom. What makes Lee so interesting is how little he has in common with his predecessors. Possibly the most exciting thing about San Francisco’s current mayor is how very unexciting he can seem. He’s the guy who’s been charged with making traditionally lively Board of Supervisors meetings into drab affairs—“Mayor Lee Defends Being Boring,” a local news site trumpeted when he declined to amp up the gatherings—and who asked local bars to serve something other than alcohol when the 49ers played in the 2013 Super Bowl.

“UGLY LAW,” IN 1867, WHICH FORBADE UNSIGHTLY PEOPLE

FROM SHOWING THEIR FACES IN PUBLIC . IT ’S SINCE BEEN REPEALED .


Still, Lee is presiding over an exceptional time in San Francisco’s history, one marked by outrageous growth in prestige, wealth and housing prices and also spotted with protests, inequality and, for some, a fear that the city is losing its soul.

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t was Lee’s low-key nature that was integral to his becoming mayor when, in 2010, Gavin Newsom vaulted into the office of lieutenant governor. Newsom had one year left on his mayoral term, and the city’s Board of Supervisors needed to appoint his successor. The day of the vote, suitors were roaming the corridors of City Hall, each pleading his case. Despite this army of contenders, when the dust settled, the one person the Board of Supervisors could agree on was then-obscure City Administrator Lee, who had not expressed interest in the job and was traveling in Hong Kong at the time. Just before the final vote, a headline in the San Francisco Chronicle asked, “Who’s Ed Lee?” In a sense, the way Lee became mayor is also how he leads: by letting people come to him. As far as he’s concerned, the people of San Francisco have assigned him tasks and his job is to perform them. His first was to lower unemployment. “When I came in, my mantra was jobs, jobs, jobs,” Lee says. “And for the right reasons everybody praised me, saying, ‘You recognized double-digit unemployment.’ ” Lee’s focus and success were rewarded when, after serving out Newsom’s term, he won the office outright in November 2011, becoming San Francisco’s first Asian-American mayor and garnering a reported 61 percent of the vote. What Lee lacked in colorful behavior, he made up for in a businesslike ability to run the city. Take, for example, San Francisco’s long-held

Ed Lee at the 2013 Gay Pride Parade in San Francisco.

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o the casual observer, San Francisco seems to be thriving. Unemployment is hovering around four percent and the economy is booming. “We’ve got investments like crazy, and what is the consequence of that?” Lee asks. “More people want to live here, so real estate prices go up and affordability becomes the issue.” To some of Lee’s constituents, however, that’s a stunning understatement. Driven by tech titans and venture capitalists, the median housing price in San Francisco is now over $1 million and rents are the most expensive in the nation. Eviction stories are commonplace and a visible backlash to the changing city has grown during Lee’s administration. Protests blocking the buses that shuttle Google employees to Mountain View have become the norm, as have demonstrations outside Twitter’s headquarters and, this past October, Lee’s own home. Protests also raged when Lee—behind what were reported to be locked doors guarded by deputy sheriffs—signed into law legislation that made it legal for sites like Airbnb to operate in San Francisco, an act opponents derided as the death of the city’s neighborhoods. (While it’s estimated the city will collect around $11 million annually from this type of business, challengers point out that Airbnb is also poised to be let off the hook for an estimated $25 million in back taxes.) But, in other areas, Lee has made impressive progress. In November, voters endorsed his plan to build 30,000 new homes by 2020, the majority of which will be for low- and middle-income residents. “This city has given my administration an order to get more housing done,” Lee says of the vote. “It is a mandate in my opinion, but also they want me to do it smartly, and I will do that.” His approach to governing isn’t without its flaws. “Fans of the mayor would say he’s responsive,” says Corey Cook, a professor of politics at the University of San Francisco. “But critics of the mayor would say, ‘He’s not leading, he’s not a visionary. I haven’t heard him articulate where he sees the city going.’ ”

anti-corporate reputation, which Lee dispelled by offering companies tax breaks, loans and even personal phone calls asking about their needs. “I espouse those principles that help working folks kind of see a way forward,” Lee says. “I know what the sharing economy is all about because growing up I had to share everything from socks to beds.” Lee was one of six children raised in Seattle, and as a young man he worked as a restaurant dishwasher before attending Bowdoin College and UC Berkeley law school. After graduating, he practiced as a civil rights attorney, focusing on housing rights for immigrants. In 1989, he was appointed to his first government job as San Francisco’s investigator of whistleblower complaints. Since then, he has held positions including executive director of the San Francisco Human Rights Commission and director of city purchasing, before being named city administrator in 2005. Throughout his career, Lee’s habit of putting personality after politics has worked in his favor. “His leadership style is very much his experience as a bureaucrat,” says Cook, the political professor. “It’s this post-partisan bringing everybody together to hammer out compromises where he’s at his best.” And for all the criticism that Lee is doing too little, too late for housing, his background as a housing-rights attorney is providing some political cover. As Lee faces re-election in 2015, no credible candidate has emerged to challenge him. Asked about his re-election platform, he refers to the housing and transportation initiatives that voters have passed. “I want to be there on every occasion to say, ‘This is another example of what you voted on and I’m going to carry out,’ ” he says, leaning forward. “I’m going to get it done so that you have constant faith your government is working.” It seemed that way at the turkey carving, where Lee yelled hellos and smiled gamely as a constituent snapped a picture of him wearing a hair net above his thick-rimmed glasses. Then, amid the din, Ed Lee turned his attention back to meticulously carving his bird, the task to which he had been assigned.


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barking of Myrtle, a mixed breed, spiring f ilmmakers might and Rocky, a Norfolk terrier. Not spend their entire careers even owners are always safe: In vying for face time with an 2014, Lena Dunham took to Instaexecutive like Har vey WeinForget cocktail parties and conferences. gram after her mutt bit her on the stein. While it’s unlikely for an Adrienne Gaffney finds the new power backside. Likewise, those whose unknown to land an impromptu networking is happening at the dog park pooches have bad habits can find tête-à-tête, there is a group of ILLUSTRATED BY DRUE WAGNER themselves similarly ostracized. ever yday fol ks with u nprecBut for those with animals edented access to Weinstein— willing to play along, a pet can they know him as Myrtle’s dad. be the key to unexpected social From entertainment executives to fashion designers, some of the world’s the canines of Truman Capote and Jackie connections, as Engel has seen while walkmost powerful people have one thing in com- Onassis, Engel’s experience isn’t out of the ing through her neighborhood with Vito. mon: a soft spot for their pets. And that can ordinary. He swears to the democratizing “We meet people in fashion or in other indusmean a networking gold mine for anyone at effect dogs have on the rich and power- tries that we wouldn’t have met,” she says. ful. “When it comes down to animals,” he “You start talking to people who normally the other end of a friendly pooch’s leash. would be very guarded.” Shortly after opening an Instagram account explains, “they’re just ordinary folks.” While those who frequent the membersThis comes as no surprise to retired NFL for her adopted bull terrier, Vito, former model Lonneke Engel received a message from Marc player Mitch Marrow, who runs the Spot only West Village D.O.G. Run might clamor Jacobs inviting the two of them over for a play Experience, a chain of doggy day cares that for play dates with Wacha, the beagle mix of date with the designer’s own bull terrier Nev- serves the pets of Mariah Carey and Howard TV star Andy Cohen, petworking isn’t only ille. It was an opportunity for something far Stern. “In New York, people have their guard for the aspirational. Even Cohen isn’t immore intimate than anything Engel had experi- up,” he says. “When you’re walking with a mune. In his recent memoir, he recalls seeing Wacha return home with the dog walker, enced during her 20-plus years in the industry. dog, it disarms them. It’s a great asset.” That said, making your way into the right a neighborhood pooch in tow. “He came “Marc was much more approachable,” Engel says. “It was outside of fashion so it was circles is largely contingent upon your pooch’s into my apar tment looking just like the good behavior. In 2012, the New York Post Target dog,” he w r ites. “Tu r ns out it’s a different way of talking to each other.” According to Manhattan veterinarian reported that Weinstein had angered West Vil- Marc Jacobs’ dog, so I kind of feel like Marc Lewis Berman, whose clients have included lage neighbors on account of the overzealous Jacobs has been in my apartment.”

DOGS AREN ’T THE ONLY ONES NETWORKING . A MANHATTAN CAT CAFÉ , WHERE $4 BUYS 30 MINUTES OF FELINE FELLOWSHIP, HAS REPORTED A TWO - MONTH WAIT TIME FOR RESERVATIONS .

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Left: Robert A.M. Stern posing in the penthouse reading room of the RAMSA office. Top: The space boasts exposed trusswork original to the building. Above: Gio Ponti Superleggera chairs surround the conference table in front of a curved, Venetian-plastered partition.

POWER SEAT

ROBERT A.M. STERN

The celebrated architect is known for classical design, but his New York office shows off a distinctly modern spirit. Jen Renzi goes to work PHOTOGRAPHED BY SEAN DONNOLA

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ilicon Valley startups tend to hog all the credit for kick-starting the open-office phenomenon. But these young technocrats have nothing on illustrious architect Robert A.M. Stern, who has embraced porous, partition-free floor plans since founding his practice in the late 1960s. “All this talk of open environments—the Googles, the Apples— really started in architecture,” Stern explains. And he practices what he preaches: Private offices are practically verboten in the architect’s New York City headquarters, which is spread over five levels of a former printing press on West 34th Street. Stern’s own workspace on the building’s 18th f loor seems more like a busy hallway than an inner sanctum. “People walk through it on their way to this place or that,” he says. It’s a setup that perfectly suits his preferred way of working: in groups. For private meetings, Stern holds court in the penthouse three fl ights up, a book-fi lled haven boasting Hudson River views

ALONG WITH OTHER APPRAISERS OF STERN ’S WORK , ELISABETH BUMILLER OF

and a curated array of design classics: a Marcel Wanders floor lamp, Alvar Aalto lounges, Gio Ponti Superleggera chairs. But even this tucked-away space is communal, shared with the firm’s writing staff, who type away behind a curved partition wall. “The office is modeled on what I learned from my principal design teacher, Paul Rudolph,” he explains. Stern studied under Rudolph, the godfather of brutalism, at the Yale School of Architecture, where he received his master’s degree and now presides as dean. Since 1998, Stern has split his workweek between Manhattan and New Haven, where his office is similarly accessible: “There’s no door,” he notes. Renowned for his historically minded designs, Stern is also lauded for contemporizing and making relevant the architectural vocabulary of pediments and pilasters. He is widely considered the guardian of classical architecture—and has a portfolio to back that up. His fi rm has designed 15 Central Park West, stately edifices for Ivy League campuses, the George W. Bush Presidential Center in Dallas and the town of Celebration, Florida. This fall, Stern will unveil a hotly anticipated new residential project: 20 East End Avenue, a 17-story brick-and-limestone condo building featuring duplex townhouses and apartments graced with elegant millwork, oversized bay windows, Juliet balconies and a distinctly prewar-inspired élan. But don’t confuse style with mindset or traditionalism with conservatism; Stern is a forward thinker—except when it comes to leasing office space. When he moved into his building 20 years ago, he signed on for just one f loor: “I am always sure we are going to go out of business”—an unfounded fear for someone so successful—“so we didn’t take as much space as we should have.” As his practice has

“THE NEW YORK

TIMES” HAS DESCRIBED HIM AS THE

“RALPH LAUREN OF

ARCHITECTURE .”


grown into the 325-person multidisciplinary machine it is today, with a scope that includes landscape design, interiors and product design, the office has expanded both upstairs and down. “One of the half-floors is not contiguous,” he says, “which is a mite inconvenient.” Not that he does much wandering these days. Stern confesses he was more of a roamer before computers became ubiquitous. “You can no longer just drop by and look on peoples’ desks to see what they are working on, which is unfortunate for the culture of any office.” Ster n is unapologetically old school when it comes to the Hudson River views from the terrace

artistic process and is a devoted practitioner of hand drawing. Every design—from a vacation home in Martha’s Vineyard to an urb a n m a s t e r pl a n i n C h i n a — i s c o n c e i ve d v i a s ke t c h a n d t hen built i n Sculpey clay before a computer-aided desig n f ile is created. “D rawi ng has been vi r t u ally abandoned as a discipline, I thin k much to the det r iment of the f ut u re of architecture,” he laments. “The eye, the hand, the brain—the cognitive sciences tell us they are intimately connected in the creative process.” He also finds that scale is hard to understand on-screen, one of the reasons he favors oversized architectural models. “I like to be able to put my head inside them, to look around and really see the structure of the space,” he says. Stern is not anti-technology so much as pro-humanist. “I believe architecture comes out of other architecture, out of traditional forms, out of meeting the needs of human beings: how they walk and talk and see and sniff the air,” Stern notes. “Architects are so enthralled with technology these days that they don’t think about what it’s like to walk in the door.” Though Stern likes to set theoretical limits to his workday, arriving at the office around 9 a.m. and clocking out at 6 p.m., his brain doesn’t seem to have an off switch. “Design is something you refine and refine and refine,” he says. “You don’t want to build your first sketch: You want to figure out what the idea was and evolve it and nurse it and baby it.” He is quick to dispel what he calls the Fountainhead myth of architecture—that the genius makes a sketch and calls it a day. Not exactly: “The genius works his ass off.” Just not behind closed doors.

a 2014 study found that people who work in open offices are more likely to call in sick than their office - inhabiting colleagues .

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Clockwise from above: A Marcel Wanders Big Shadow lamp illuminates floor-to-ceiling bookcases; the lounge area features Alvar Aalto chairs and a coffee table; a Leonard Porter print given to Stern along with the Board of Directors Honor from the Institute of Classical Architecture and Art in 2007.


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CHLOË SEVIGNY

The actress—whose first book, an eponymous tome chronicling her style, is out this spring—tells of a painting she loved and lost

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“I

Karen Kilimnik, The Great Hamptons Fire, 1995. Courtesy 303 Gallery.

t’s kind of a tragic story. It was the 1990s and I was living on Prince and Crosby streets, and 303 Gallery was in the neighborhood. I’d always go around and look at all the art in SoHo in the different galleries, and that’s when I started seeing some of Karen Kilimnik’s work around. Lisa Spellman was showing her and she had this painting, The Great Hamptons Fire, in the back room in her office. It was also on the flyer for the show. There was a lot of art I wanted to buy back then, but I was really gun-shy because I didn’t have a lot of money. I remember seeing the Felix Gonzalez-Torres puzzles and his gallerist saying, ‘Oh, you can do the layaway plan.’ Now, of course, I’m kicking myself for not doing it. Anyway, I was really obsessed with this painting, which is of Amber Valetta in a Jil Sander ad photographed by Craig McDean. The whole thing was kind of perfect for me: the lightness of this bright, blonde, beautiful girl and a menacing fire in the background. So I went for it, I bought it. It was a big deal for me to buy my first painting, and then the ICA in London wanted to borrow it for a show, and I felt really big and important. I was living at the time with Harmony Korine, but then he moved up to Connecticut, and I hung it in his house because he had a great art collection and more people would go over there and appreciate it than if it was in my bedroom. After that there was an accident at his house; there was a fire, and the painting burned. The Great Hamptons Fire burned in a fire in Rowayton, Connecticut. It’s so creepy. So that’s it. It’s gone forever. I still have the flyer for the show at 303 Gallery, but that’s all I have. And I’ve never bought a painting since.” — AS TOLD TO ADAM RATHE

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LIFE

BODY

WORK

P L AY

Q&A

HIGH SOCIETY

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In her memoir, Smoke, Meili Cady recalls a life of designer clothes, private planes and nearly 7,000 pounds of marijuana smuggled across the country. Adam Rathe takes a hit

W

hen Meili Cady moved to Los Angeles, her plan was to become a movie star, but the closest she got to being in pict ures might have been her mug shot. After struggling to find work as an actress, Cady took a job as the personal assistant to Lisette Lee —a mercurial bombshell who purported to be an heiress to the Samsung fortune—and soon found herself accompanying her boss, along with a burly bodyguard or two, on champagnesoaked trips in private jets. What Cady didn’t know, at least not until it was too late, was that Lee’s jaunts

THE RIGHT PUFF GEAR

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Cady in 2012, at home in Los Angeles under house arrest.

from L.A. to the Midwest weren’t for legitimate business, but instead were part of an elaborate plan to move tons of marijuana across the country for an international drug ring. It all ca me c r a sh i ng dow n i n 2010, when Cady and her cohorts were busted at an Ohio airport with 500 pounds of pot. Cady explains to DuJour how it went down. DUJOUR: You transported drugs packed in desig ner luggage in Bentleys and on private jets. Was this beau monde masquerade part of the plan? MEILI CADY: The people who organized this decided on a small entourage that looked like they belonged on a

private plane. The idea of looking like we fit in wasn’t just part of the plan, it was the plan. DJ: If you had been less ostentatious, do you think you could have gotten away with it? MC: There are people who use private planes all the time; it’s not that outlandish. And it wasn’t all fi rst class all the way. We would be in three star hotels when we got to Ohio. We’d get into velour pantsuits and take our makeup off and chill. DJ: You write that you weren’t aware of what you were involved in until it was too late. Did writing about the experience unearth any clues

you’d previously missed? MC: Writing about my experiences was very cathartic. I was forced to write about things I may not have told anybody about or I hadn’t thought about myself. I drew connections to things I had never previously seen. DJ: Was there a point, even if you weren’t sure of what was going on, that you knew you were in a not-sogreat situation? MC: Being around criminals was very strange for me. It felt shady in ways that other things didn’t. It felt dangerous and I felt that I was unsafe. Being in court was also very strange. I was an honor student. I was always the kid who stayed out of trouble. DJ: Has being conned by your best friend made you less trusting? MC: My bullshit meter is very, very sharp these days. When I meet new people, I always wonder what their motivations are. DJ: How d o you r e a c t t o p e o ple smoking pot now? MC: I’ve been drug tested over 200 times, so I used to be really sensitive to that. When I was on house arrest, someone brought pot to my apartment and I flipped. I can’t have that around. DJ: In the book, you admit you were misled but you don’t blame anyone else for the consequences. MC: I’m responsible for my decisions— I made them and they affected my relationships and every other thing in my life. Before I knew it, I was lying to every person I loved, and I ended up hurting all of them.

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HIGH SOCIETY: COURTESY MEILI CADY. PUFF, STYLIST: RENEE FLUGGE.

STYLE

CULTURE


TIMELINE

NOW & KEN

1989 Henry V His directorial debut was praised for its gritty take on the Bard’s history play. Branagh also starred as the titular monarch.

With this season’s Cinderella, Kenneth Branagh’s come a long way from Shakespeare. Here, Natalia de Ory charts his progress

2011

BOOKS

Thor Action isn’t simple. “If it was easy, we’d all be doing it,” Branagh said of directing the hit comic franchise.

With these five new novels,

1994 Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein Branagh’s first horror flick was a classic, and it featured Robert De Niro as the Creature.

1993 Much Ado About Nothing For this comedy, RADA-trained Branagh assembled a cast including then-wife Emma Thompson and Keanu Reeves.

SUSPENSE SMARTS

2007

readers get page-turners

Sleuth

written with depth and flair

Branagh’s witty, Harold Pinter–penned remake of the 1972 thriller featured Jude Law and Michael Caine.

1996

2006

2015

Hamlet

As You Like It

Cinderella

In this first-ever unabridged film adaptation of Hamlet, Branagh himself played the Prince of Denmark.

Set in 19th-century feudal Japan, this was Branagh’s first Shakespeare adaptation in which he didn’t star.

In his latest update of a time-honored tale, Branagh brings new life to Disney’s Cinderella.

The Tapestry

by Nancy Bilyeau

GORDON: TONY MOTT. NOW + KEN, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: GETTY IMAGES; EVERETT COLLECTION (3); COURTESY.

Band Book

The Damned by Andrew Pyper After a near-death experience, a bestselling writer is haunted by his beautiful but vindictive twin sister.

With her enthralling memoir, rock goddess Kim Gordon makes an entirely new type of noise

The Stranger by Harlan Coben

K

im Gordon’s never been one for oversharing. Despite three decades in the public eye—as the bassist for Sonic Youth, a fashion designer, an actress, a visual artist and a model in a 2013 Saint Laurent campaign—Gordon’s remained the epitome of indie-rock cool thanks in part to her apparent distaste for attention. Until now. Gordon’s memoir, Girl in a Band, boldly exposes her life, from a 1960s Southern California childhood through her career in Sonic Youth and her messy split with former band mate and husband Thurston Moore. So, what finally got Gordon to open up? “It wouldn’t have occurred to me to write a memoir until people started asking,” the 61-year-old says. “After the success of Patti Smith’s Just Kids, I started to get approached by editors, and I was at the point in my life where I was starting to look back.” There’s plenty to ref lect upon. In addition to her

A lie creates a comfortable life—until a marriage is destroyed and one man learns the deadly power of truth.

The Invention of Fire by Bruce Holsinger

accomplishments, Gordon’s lived a fascinating life— she’s dated Danny Elfman, toured with Neil Young and produced a record for Courtney Love—and she covers it extensively in her account. “I just wanted to get th i ngs out,” she says of writing publicly about her private affairs. Ever the rocker, she adds, “T he more conventional par ts of writing were what I found to be really boring.” — ADAM RATHE

Medieval poet John Gower must discover who is murdering a string of men to create “the future of death.”

The Witch of Painted Sorrows by M. J. Rose In 1890s Paris, a woman fl ees her dangerous husband only to find something even more menacing.

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Sister Joanna Stafford must foil a murder plot to find her salvation amid the sexual turmoil of Henry VIII’s court.

SPOTLIGHT


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ane Fonda Written by mickey Rapkin

PHOTOGRAPHED by Thomas Whiteside

There are no seasons in Southern California, unless you count awards season. It’s a Thursday morning in early January, the height of the trophy derby, and Jane Fonda is telling me about the night she won her first Oscar, in 1972, for her role as a reluctant prostitute in Klute. “I wore a Saint Laurent wool suit—black,” Fonda says, in disbelief. “A Mao wool suit that I’d had for five years. I never had a stylist. I didn’t know you could get someone to come and do your makeup. I thought you had to buy a dress.” We’re seated at a corner table at Soho House, high above West Hollywood, settling into a deep tweed couch for a conversation about her new Netflix series, Grace and Frankie, which premieres in May. Fonda’s body is toned as ever, and she’s dressed all in black. Black turtleneck, black fedora and tall black boots over black

Styled by Anthony Unwin

leggings, with a dozen thin gold strands dangling around her neck. She’s chic as hell, pausing for a moment to take in the sunlit rooftop. “My boyfriend said the heat wave is over, so I thought, OK, it’s gonna be cold. Then I’m seeing everyone looking way more California than me. But anyway.” When the waiter appears, Fonda, 77, orders a hot mint tea with honey. “Peppermint or the fresh mint?” he asks. “Make it fresh!” Fonda says. “Fresh sounds good.” Fresh indeed. Fonda couldn’t have predicted how fashion would come to dominate the red carpet, but in every other conceivable way this woman has been way ahead of her time. While Bridesmaids was heralded as groundbreaking, Fonda’s Nine to Five did it back in 1980, earning $103 million. It was the second-highest-grossing film that year. Then there was the wildly successful Jane Fonda Workout, a revolution that not only changed the way women exercised but also is credited with creating the home-video market; there was no reason to buy a VCR in 1982 unless you were “doing Jane.” She’s also been on the forefront of social consciousness. In 2004, Fonda spearheaded the first-ever transgender production of The Vagina Monologues. Heck, she’s arguably the first celebrity to have had a reality show. In 1962, while rehearsing to open The Fun Couple on Broadway, Fonda let cameras follow her from the rehearsal room into

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She’s been famous since the 1960s, but this two-time Oscar winner couldn’t be more relevant today, with a new Netflix series and those fiery social causes. In this no-holds-barred interview, Jane Fonda reveals what she’s learned from acting, being married, doing drugs and stumping for politicians—and why for her a comfort zone doesn’t even exist


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her dressing room for a documentary called Jane (available through SundanceNow Doc Club). The footage was so raw, so revealing of a young woman’s psyche, that Fonda found it traumatic to watch the film, decades after the fact. Now, some 35 years after Nine to Five, Fonda will be back onscreen with Lily Tomlin in a series about two women whose husbands come out as gay and leave them for each other. “It’s a tragedy, when you’re 70 and your husband leaves you,” Fonda says. Grace and Frankie may be a sitcom, but it’s also the story of having to rediscover yourself late in life and asking that terrible but essential question: Who am I? Fonda’s been asking that question for years.

W

hen Jane Fonda left her third husband, CNN founder Ted Turner, in 2001, he wasn’t just hurt, he was flat-out confused. Fonda recalls Turner telling her, People aren’t supposed to change after 60. “I think about that all the time,” she tells me, sipping her tea. “He has hardly changed. And I feel like a different human being.” We are never just one person over the course of our lives. This is true of most people but especially of Fonda, someone who would grow and stretch and mold herself searching for the skin that fit her best. While married to the French director Roger Vadim, she could be wild and carefree, as comfortable acting for him in a foreign language as she was with his predilection for bringing prostitutes into their bedroom. With the activist and politician Tom Hayden, Fonda would eschew glamour for the barricades. With Ted Turner—whom she still cares for deeply—she retired from acting completely to support him. Fonda acknowledges the dichotomy between her repu-

she and Roger Vadim had a romantic fever dream. But Vadim accused her of being “bourgeois” and pushed for an open marriage. “One night he brought home a beautiful red-haired woman and took her into our bed with me,” Fonda writes in her memoir. “She was a high-class call girl employed by the well-known Madame Claude. It never occurred to me to object. I took my cues from him and threw myself into the threesome with the skill and enthusiasm of the actress that I am.” What’s more revealing is what happened next. “I’ll tell you what I did enjoy,” she writes, “the mornings after, when Vadim was gone and the woman and I would linger over our coffee and talk. For me it was a way to bring some humanity to the relationship, an antidote to the objectification.” Vadim wanted Fonda to star in Barbarella; he liked the script but was mostly interested in it as a directorial vehicle for himself. A sci-fi sex romp isn’t a natural fit for an actress battling with bulimia. Perhaps the film at least made her feel sexy? Not until years later, she says, telling me a story. “The first week I was dating Ted there was this big rally in Hollywood and my job was to introduce Virgin Airlines…”—she pauses to think of his name—“Richard Branson. So, I introduced him. He came up. I started to leave the stage, and he grabbed me and he pulled me back. He said, ‘You really owe me.’ I looked at him. And he said, ‘I was 15 when I was circumcised. I still had the stitches in when I watched Barbarella. And you made me burst my stitches!” She laughs, adding: “Isn’t that a strange thing to say in front of 3,000 people?” Fonda’s activism came to the forefront during her time with Tom Hayden. Still evolving, still moving, still doing the personal growth

tation as an outspoken feminist and the good wife she sometimes played at home, referring to this as a struggle with the “disease to please.” There is beauty—and knowledge—in that struggle. “We all wonder what, if anything, we’re going to leave behind,” she says. “My ability to understand what my life means—to put it in a way that can be meaningful to other people—that’s the gift I would leave behind. It’s the strangeness of my life that is the most important thing about me, more than any particular part of my work.” The first label slapped on Jane was “Henry Fonda’s daughter.” Rather than accept that, she dropped out of Vassar and fled to Paris to study painting. Returning to New York, she took classes at the Actors Studio, working twice as hard as everyone else to prove she belonged. She describes her 24-year-old self as “a human being underwater, barely making it one foot ahead of the other, and numb,” which is what makes the 1962 documentary Jane compelling: It’s a portrait of a woman at war with her instincts. Fonda watched it for the first time in decades while writing her 2005 memoir, My Life So Far. “I pulled the shades down and locked the door and drank some vodka,” she tells me, “and sat on the floor and shook like this. It was so upsetting to me.” Of the decision to star in a play that didn’t have a finished script, let alone a point of view, she says, “The director wanted to do it. And he was my friend. So I said yes. I didn’t want him to be mad at me.” Why let cameras in? “Those were the days when I didn’t know how to say no.” There are easy-to-spot patterns in her life. From the outside,

work most of us only talk about. She was hanging with the Black Panthers and leading anti-war rallies, insisting on doing issue-oriented films like The China Syndrome and Coming Home. (If you still think she’s somehow un-American, her apologies for that infamous Vietnam photo are numerous and—most importantly—wholly sincere. She said she regretted it the moment it happened, and her track record of philanthropy should count for something, too.) On paper, it was an odd time for her to launch a fitness empire. But Fonda needed a revenue stream to bankroll her husband’s political career. His nonprofit, the Campaign for Economic Democracy—which supported progressive candidates—was the exclusive owner of the Jane Fonda Workout, which is kind of funny considering Hayden’s distaste for Hollywood. When Fonda won her second Oscar, in 1979, Hayden cheered from the audience with their son, Troy, on his lap, but he turned up his nose at Tinseltown’s glamour. Of the Oscars, Fonda says: “I wore a dress that a Tom supporter had made. I went home after. In a station wagon. Because Tom didn’t like going to those parties. I never went to a party. Ever.” Fonda was somehow still teaching aerobics classes th ree mornings a week in Beverly Hills while filming Nine to Five. Forget Goop. It’d be like Gwyneth Paltrow baking gluten-free banana bread for your kid’s bake sale. But Fonda would shed that skin, too, marrying Ted Turner in 1991 and retiring from acting entirely after seven Oscar nominations. The mogul’s world was seductive, in more ways than one. On one of their first dates, they

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“Would my life have been better if I focused more?”


flew to Big Sur on his jet and Turner introduced Fonda to the mile high club. “Before I could inquire about the logistics,” she writes in her book, “a fully made-up double bed materialized where just minutes before there had been a row of seats.” Did Fonda really have to retire? After 1990’s Stanley & Iris, she didn’t make a movie for 15 years. Yet that spirit—that sense of self she’d been cultivating and refining over the years—was clawing its way to the surface. When she left Turner, she told him she craved true intimacy and fulfillment. “People always say, Oh my god, how do you stay looking so blah blah blah,” Fonda tells me. “I’ve had plastic surgery. I’ve talked about that. That doesn’t matter. What matters is realizing you can always get better. That you have to keep taking leaps of faith. It gets harder as you get older. You have to stay brave and keep trying to go beyond your comfort zone and see what you need to get to become who you’re supposed to be.” “As I look back over my life, which I do a lot, I sometimes wonder if it was a mistake that I had so many other things besides acting. Would it have been better if I had focused more?” It’s an impossible question to answer, or then again maybe not. Because the veracity she brings to the screen now wouldn’t be possible without the life she has lived. “You so often see women in our media competing with each other. I like that [Grace and Frankie] is two women befriending each

park from poachers and British oil interests, and reached out to the film’s producer, Leonardo DiCaprio, to ask what she could do. Fonda is getting louder now: “I had dinner with some activists and I said, ‘We need to get a lot of famous people to go [to Virunga] and literally lay their bodies on the line and say to the oil company, “You’ll have to kill us before you go in there.” ’ The challenge is to stay angry and at the same time not burn yourself out or get an ulcer. It’s hard. That’s another reason I’m meditating. I work on issues that concern adolescence and violence against women, but I’m not on the barricades. I don’t know whether I should be or not.” When asked if she’d stump for Hillary Clinton, she says, “No. Not because I don’t care for her and admire her and respect her, but I don’t stump for anybody anymore.” Because you’re polarizing? “Hmm hmm. They don’t ask me. But you know, I hope she wins. More than that, I hope if she wins that it will make a difference.” She’s circling around a thought which, I realize, is what this whole conversation has been about, and maybe her whole career. What she’s meditating about, she says, is this question: “How can I remain an interested and full person who is relevant?” In Hollywood, you can’t get much more relevant than Netflix. Fonda and Tomlin presented together at the Golden Globes a few

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“No one teaches you to look for kindness in a partner when you’re young. They should.” other. That’s very good for people to see.” She pauses, adding: “I have a strong belief that older people have a greater sense of well being. Older women in particular, it’s like, What the hell do we have to lose?”

F

onda is a woman of extremes. After leaving Turner, she was celibate for seven years. Then, at 74, she announced she was having the best sex of her life with music producer Richard Perry. She earned two Emmy nominations for her work on HBO’s The Newsroom. (With a single monologue about the hotness of Daniel Craig, Fonda put that show in her back pocket and walked away with it.) And yet she’s not relaxing into her third act so much as wrestling it to the ground, sometimes winning, sometimes struggling. “It started maybe six or seven months ago,” she says. “I have to be very intentional about keeping myself grounded and centered. I can fly off and become scattered and lose confidence.” Confidence in your work? “In everything.” For someone who drove the conversation for so long, she’s wondering where and how to direct her energy. “It’s about the Zeitgeist,” she says, almost exasperated. “You’re not driving the Zeitgeist anymore. And guess what? That’s just fine! But you have to settle into it.” She describes herself these days as “a feminist, small-c Christian who is studying Buddhism.” I ask if she misses being on the barricades, which prompts a passionate discussion about activism. She can’t believe we’re still talking about equal pay 35 years after Nine to Five. “I said that at the Kennedy Center Honors when I was honoring Lily,” Fonda recalls, “but they cut it. Talking about equal pay was too far out for [producer] George Stevens.” There’s more. The other night, she watched the Netflix documentary Virunga, about the struggles to protect a Congolese national

days after we meet, Fonda dressed in a stunning, body-hugging red sheath she calls a “Versace hot number.” (She has a stylist now: Tanya Gill, who has worked with Hilary Swank and Kate Winslet.) From the podium, introducing best actor in a comedy series, Fonda joked: “You know, it’s nice—it’s nice—that men, at last, are getting the recognition they deserve for being good at comedy.” Moments later, Lena Dunham tweeted, “Jane F. + Lily T. = what heaven looks like 2 me.” Which, for the record, is the Zeitgeist. When it comes to this third act, one wonders if Fonda is being too hard on herself. She’s the oldest living face of L’Oreal. She’s got two films in the can, Fathers and Daughters with Russell Crowe and Youth, Paolo Sorrentino’s follow-up to The Great Beauty. A video of Ellen DeGeneres catching her wife, Portia de Rossi, doing a vintage Jane workout went viral. The conversation meanders to a close. On the subject of marijuana, Fonda says, “I’ll smoke pot every now and then. I cannot see a movie on pot. The number of movies I’ve seen thinking, This is probably the best I have ever seen, and then I’ll see it again sober and think, What was I thinking?” And she says she’s found that intimacy she craved—with her children, grandchildren (“You’re only as happy as your least happy child”) and Perry. “He’s a good man,” she says. “It’s hard. He has Parkinson’s. He’s a very kind person. One of the things you should look for when you’re looking for a partner should be kindness. They don’t teach you when you’re young. They should.” We talk about her dog, a Coton de Tulear, whom she adores. “You can have a bigger dog when your husband has a plane,” she says, with a laugh. And we talk awards season, too. She won’t play favorites, though she loved Foxcatcher. “I used to date a du Pont,” she says, as if she’s just recalled the man herself. “That didn’t make the book. I should make a book of the stories I left out.”


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B Blue

Out of the

Beyond ancient Mayan ruins, Guatemala’s Lake Atitlán has long been a muse to artists and writers—and one of Central America’s best-kept secrets. Now, a well-traveled contingent of luxe-loving expats is catching on PHOTOGRAPHED BY PAUL COSTELLO

PHOTO CREDITS TEEKAY

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WRITTEN BY SARA RUFFIN COSTELLO


She may have tLorerae illam in cuptaturiae dolestrum nesequo modios aspicienis si accusda ndanditem sandignia quam, ut aut aut officae nonseribus sum quiatem es res maiore, idebis nonsectem quo to etum sapellit aut pe Written by TKTKTKTKKTKT

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Many homes overlooking Lake Atitlán, in Guatemala’s central highlands, are accessible by boat only.


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m e r i c a n a r c h a e o l o g i s t D r. Richard Hansen meets us at the pr ivate ai r por t i n Gu atemala Cit y loa de d dow n w it h fo o d a n d s u p pl i e s a n d l o o k i n g l i ke a 21s t - c e n t u r y I n d i a n a Jo n e s . Wit h just t wo side compa r tme nt s on ou r sm a l l chop p e r, it appears we’ll be taking only the essentials into the rainforest. That i s , of c ou r s e, not c ou nt i ng t he cooler of stone crabs, prosciutto and mushroom risotto our friend Be r t h i l h a s a r r ive d w it h. Ha n sen looks at Berthil like he is insa ne, but t he coole r snea k s on. A nd w it h t h at we’r e of f, he a d i ng nor t h t owa rd t he b orde r of Mex ico i n sea rch of a n a ncie nt Mayan city hidden under the jungle, led by the man who has spent much of his career uncovering it. The Mirador basin was the seat of an advanced Mayan superpower in the Pre-Classic Age. In other words, it was the New York City of 1000 b.c., a massive region that included about 80 cities, 51 of which Hansen has excavated. Since there are no roads in, it’s a challenge to access, involving either a three-day hike through the jungle with a guide and pack mules or a chartered helicopter, which is why the ruins only see about 2,500 intrepid visitors per year, compared to the hundreds of thousands at Tikal and Chichén Itzá. A symphony of birdsongs wakes us up at 6 a . m . and after breakfast

Top left: American archaeologist Dr. Richard Hansen at the summit of La Danta pyramid. Above and opposite: The Antigua home of French interior designer Eric Ledoigt.

tor t illa s, we motor to Ha n sen’s latest dig site in a Kawasaki fourwheeler that could drive straight up a t ree. Besides the birds, the on ly other sou nd at th is hou r is the roar of howler monkeys. The excavated site is a breatht ak ing multi-level building with double ref lecting pools and water falls. Ha n se n pu l ls ba ck a prot e ct ive

tarp revealing an intricately carved bas-relief depiction of the Mayan “story of life” that covers the back wall of the water feat u re. Tu r ns out, we are likely standing on the same limestone f loor where Mayan princes and princesses once stood; Hansen believes this structure, one of many he is work ing on at the moment, might be a king’s burial

site that will make Tutankhamun look like a pauper. Later that af ter noon, we f i nd ourselves 230 feet up perched atop La Danta, the most volumetric pyramid at El Mirador and, in fact, the world. With nothing but the sound of the wind blowing, and the sight of a vast infrastructure the size of Los Angeles spreading toward the


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Right: Casa de los Cantaros in Antigua was built in 1597 and for many years served as a B&B. Below: A local artisan makes pottery in Matthew Esposito’s 502 Home workshop in San Antonio Palopó. Opposite: A lakefront home near the village of San Marcos.

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horizon, we can’t help but feel a sort of spiritual connection to a grand society that has come and gone. Following a white-knuckle descent, we bid the protector of the pyramids good-bye and head for a different kind of bliss on Lake Atitlán. Berthil Espegren, a Norwegian model who has seen some of the most astonishing houses and gardens in the world, f irst launched t he idea of a t r ip to Gu atemala , insisting my husband, Paul, and I would connect to the countr y’s s t a g g e r i n g b e a u t y a n d h i p p ie mystical vibe. Berthil first visited Lake Atitlán 20 years ago, and instead of bringing back Guatemalan textiles, he came home with a piece of lakef ront proper t y. (It’s not an uncommon story.) T he e nd le s s ch a i n of r u g ge d green mountains we see on the halfhour helicopter ride from Guate-


142 Above: Traditional Guatemalan sweets are served at Antigua shop Doña María Gordillo. Right: A view of El Mirador’s La Danta pyramid, covered in jungle.

mala City is pretty enough, but a sudden heart-palpitating cliff-drop followed by a sharp descent through clouds as the lake comes into view is thrilling. On the ground, we are greeted by the bikini-clad proprietress of Casa Prana, our home for the next few days, and a Norwegian expat called Lord Eric who has a jumble of stylish compounds high on the mountainside nearby. Jungle life has rendered us a grim-looking lot, so the rest of the afternoon is

spent taking hot showers, drinking fresh watermelon juice and getting hour-long, $40 dollar massages in Casa Prana’s gorgeous yoga room. Lake Atitlán, in the highlands of central Guatemala, was a New Age healing destination long before mindfulness became an annoying buzzword of the 2010s. Three hours west of Guatemala City by car, the nor t h shore st ill at t ract s a laidback crowd of tourists looking to get off the power grid and vacation

i n e x p e n s i vel y — s o m e c o m p a r e it to Tulum 30 years ago. On the souther n side, weekenders f rom Guatemala City party and practice yoga in their mansions. High up in the hills, Mayan communities continue to take part in centuries-old shaman-led rituals. Part of the allure of the lake is the near-constant 70-degree weather and the startling scenery: turquoise water sur rounded by three looming volcanoes and a string of steep

mountains on whose sides coffee a nd cor n a re tended. I n t he of tquoted words of Aldous Huxley, Lake Atitlán is “really too much of a good thing.” That said, the attraction transcends more than just the pretty view. By nightfall, Casa Prana is humming with house guests, including a young entrepreneur, Diego Arzú, whose father is Guatemala’s former president and the current mayor of Guatemala City, along with his partner, Matthew Esposito, an American designer with a ceramics factory on the other side of the lake. A 60-something healer who has just done some kind of work staring into Berthil’s face floats over to the pergola to join us for cocktails. For the next hour she has us on edge with an amazing tale about circumnavigating the globe on a sailboat with only one other person, who tragically fell overboard. Though she barely knew anything about sailing, she willed herself to find him, and against odds she did—and alive at that. (So many questions, starting with: Why didn’t she take some sailing lessons first?) Despite the luxury of Casa Prana, with its full-time housekeepers whipping smoothies and soup from bananas and carrots grown on the


“Too much of a good thing.” –Aldous Huxley

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property, the north shore of the lake is low-key, and as such has been a magnet for expat gringo artists, writers and hippies for decades. Some say the lake inspired Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s The Little Prince, and locals will point to a certain hatshaped mountain that looks like the drawing of the snake that swallowed an elephant as evidence that SaintExupéry was, in fact, here. Other famous landowners include disciples of the Indian mystic Osho, who arrived in the 1970s, and author Joyce Maynard, Salinger’s famous ex, who still throws writer retreats at her

From top: Casa Palopó in the village of Santa Catarina; the base of El Mirador’s La Danta pyramid.


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The attraction transcends more than just the pretty view.


lakefront house. It’s easy to get seduced by real estate here, par tially because the handsome French agent, A rm a n d B o i s s y, t o u r s p r o p e r t i e s by boat , wh ich is, a s you m ig ht i m a g i ne , way b e t t e r t h a n d r iving arou nd in a car. A r mand expla i n s t he de mog r aph ics of t he 13 villages sur rounding the lake, e a ch w it h it s ow n d i s t i n c t p e rs o n a l i t y. Q u a i n t S a n M a r c o s of fer s gorgeou s veget able - dyed ha nd-wove n t ext iles, wh ile Sa n Ped ro, a back packer’s pa rad ise, is a festive lakefront scene k now for its potent marijuana. In a chic pr ivate home high up in San Ped ro’s hills, we are int roduced to

contemporary-art star Antonio Pichillá, who has chosen to live and work here, in his hometown, rather than in Guatemala Cit y near the galleries, “simply because of the inspiring beauty and spirituality.” Indeed, Ber thil and Diego are so energized from all the fresh air and mou nt ai n hi kes that over brea kfast one morning they hatch a plan to launch a bespoke travel agency with tours through Guatemala. On our last night, we lie s q u i she d t oget he r at t he e nd of Casa Prana’s long dock, seven faces pointing heavenward, debating which constellations are twinkling overhead. Not one of us has a real handle on astronomy except for a

qu iet code -w r it i ng ba n ker f rom Manhattan via Croatia named Dusan. I insist one is the Big Dipper, someone else thinks Taur us. Like every debate in the 21st century, it’s settled by asking a smartphone. As Dusan has said (more than once), we are staring at Cassiopeia. Despite being hundreds of m i le s f rom a m ajor cit y, on t he e d ge of a va s t l a ke s u r r ou nd e d by volcanoes and mountains, we st ill have Wi Fi. Luck ily, even a strong cell signal isn’t enough to get i n t he way of pr i mord ial Mayan bliss. FOR CONTACT INFORMATION AND MORE RECOMMENDATIONS ON GETTING TO AND AROUND GUATEMALA, VISIT DUJOUR.COM.

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Left: A local jump site built into the cliffs of San Marcos. Below: San Pedro artist Antonio Pichillá’s mother and brother.


She may have traded in her modeling career for a life in activism, but in the season’s most daring looks— and most dramatic necklines—Angela Lindvall proves she’s still got every ounce of her charm

s p r i n g * a w a k e n i n g

photo credits teekay

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Written by eden univer PHOTOGRAPHED by paul jasmin Styled by anne christensen


photo credits teekay

000 On Lindvall: Dress, $11,500, DIOR, 800-929-3467. Metro bangles in 18-karat gold, $9,500 each, TIFFANY & CO., tiffany.com. On him: Shirt, $195, VINCE, vince.com. Trousers, $350, RALPH LAUREN PURPLE LABEL, ralphlauren.com. Star Classique Automatic watch, $10,450, MONTBLANC, montblanc.com. Lace-up shoes, $625, TOD’S, tods.com.


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Gabrieli dress, $4,990, ALTUZARRA, net-a-porter.com. Aura Pendant necklace, $2,650, DE BEERS, debeers. com. T bracelet in 18-karat white gold with diamonds, $15,000, TIFFANY & CO., tiffany.com. Classic Chain Flat Twisted ring in 18-karat yellow gold with diamonds, $1,500, JOHN HARDY, johnhardy.com.


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Dress, $2,440, PRADA, prada.com. Classic Chain Long Drop earrings in 18-karat yellow gold, $1,400, JOHN HARDY, johnhardy.com. Faubourg watch, $8,700, HERMĂˆS, hermes.com.


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On Lindvall: Dress, $7,990, OSCAR DE LA RENTA, oscardelarenta.com. T bracelet in 18-karat white gold with diamonds, $15,000, TIFFANY & CO., tiffany.com. On him: Perfect tank top, $40, ALTERNATIVE, alternativeapparel.com. Trousers, $350, RALPH LAUREN PURPLE LABEL, ralphlauren.com.


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ngela Lindvall got her break at age 14 when a talent scout plucked her from a Kansas City fashion show, and she’s been working in the spotlight ever since. The 36-year-old model has been shot by the world’s most prominent lensmen and has lent her face to campaigns for brands including Louis Vuitton, Chanel and Christian Dior. So it’s more than a little surprising when she’s asked how she first knew she had made it and she fires back, “I feel like I’m not quite there yet.” It’s not some out-of-reach modeling gig that will give this mother of two validation, however. It’s something more down to earth. Literally. “ I’ve a lway s b e e n s ome o ne who l ive s i n nature, but I was pretty naive u ntil I star ted to quest ion what’s i n ou r food, and what’s in our water and our air,” says Li ndvall. “I wa s bombarded by the st ate of the planet, and overwhelmed by it.” Environmentalism is what Lindvall considers to be her true calling, and she’s not just lending her name to the cause: She has designed a collection of recycled-silver baubles with luxury jeweler John Hardy, has pioneered the environmental nonprofit initiative The Collage Foundation and is a founding board member of the Natural Resources Defense Council’s Clean by Design initiative, which aims to change the textile industry in China. Her hands-on approach to sustainability is most

apparent at home. Lindvall lives on a nine-acre, eco-friendly compound in L.A.’s Topanga Canyon with her two young sons, Dakota and Sebastian, alongside a greenhouse, an orchard, a yoga studio and some chickens Lindvall refers to as “the ladies.” It’s an unusual menagerie, but Lindvall says it ensures her brood grows up with a personal connection to the nature around them. “My sons were both in charge of painting the chicken coop, and I think they loved that,” she says. “They had to work together and got paint all over themselves. Dakota looked like an old man for days because his hair was stained white from the paint.”

went against her beliefs. “I’ve always felt this contradiction between who I am as a person—what inspires me—and who I am in my career,” she says. “They don’t always go hand in hand.” Still, she has done her best to reconcile the situation. Relying on her fashion-industry connections and impressive visibility, Lindvall has created initiatives meant to incite global change, but she’s also focused on an audience closer to home. “I like to engage my kids in the act of service, coming from a place of gratitude and being thankful for everything that we have,” she says. How exactly does that work? “We w r ite dow n t he things that need to be done and take t u r ns pick ing what we want to do to contribute,” she explains. “It’s really about what we have to do to help out, to make our lives harmonious.” Lindvall’s quick to stress that one needn’t be a supermodel in order to make a difference. She encourages anyone struggling to find a footing in the movement to start small, by composting, vintage shopping and, most importantly, teaching the next generation about doing their part. She describes the actions she’s taken, both big and small, as “stepping off the edge, and doing something totally different than a mainstream modeling career.” It’s true that this level of commitment is in no way mainstream, but with people like Lindvall devoted to the cause, it may just get there yet.

“I’ve always felt this contradiCtion between who i am as a person–what inspires me–and who i am in my career.” —angela lindvall

Idyllic as Lindvall’s agrarian life sounds, it hasn’t been without its struggles. During the early days of her sustainability crusade, which began around the time she turned 18, she felt a great sense of duty—for better or for worse. “I had what I call environmental anxiety, but I feel like that’s counterintuitive to living a balanced life,” Lindvall says, “because we have to still enjoy life and we have to celebrate the beauty.” The anxiety stemmed from the seemingly conf licting nature of her careers. Lindvall worried that the industry that made her famous sometimes


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Opposite, on him: Pajama set, $584, LA PERLA, laperla.com. This page: Mikado Plunge dress, $3,695, MICHAEL KORS, michaelkors.com. Pocket square (worn as scarf), $100, ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA, zegna.com. Looking Glass Scapular necklace in 18-karat rose gold with diamonds, $2,800, FINN, finnjewelry.com. Classic Chain Long Drop earrings in 18-karat yellow gold, $1,400; Bamboo Station necklace in 18-karat yellow gold, $4,900; Bamboo Flex cuff in 18-karat yellow gold with diamonds, $9,800; Classic Chain Flat Twisted ring in 18-karat yellow gold, $1,500, JOHN HARDY, johnhardy.com. Salonu heels, $945, CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN, 212-255-1910 Hair: Robert Vetica for Robert Vetica Salon at The SLS Hotel. Makeup: Jo Strettell using Charlotte Tilbury. Male model: Jerreth at DNA Models. Fashion Assistant: Rachel Pincus.


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In the Beginning

Mia

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PHOTOGRAPHED by Tom Palumbo

he first season of the prime-time soap opera Peyton Place was a tremendous hit in 1964, with its ingénue star, 19-year-old Mia Farrow, drawing a lot of the attention. Photographer Tom Palumbo was struck by Farrow’s wide-eyed beauty and asked his editors at Look magazine if he could shoot her. The answer was yes. Fifty years later, those photos, rows and rows of contact sheets, are part of a collection I keep in my Manhattan apartment. Palumbo, who happened to be my husband, was a staff photographer at Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar before shooting for Look. He photographed everyone from Grace Kelly and Audrey Hepburn to Miles Davis and Jack Kerouac, but I’ve always thought the Mia shoot was special. This is the first time these particular photos have been published. I wondered if the Look photos held the same importance for Mia Farrow, and decided to reach out to her, showing her the contact sheets and asking for an interview. She was receptive, delighted to talk to me and share her memories—fond and very specific—of being photographed by Tom. “It was my first photo shoot for a national magazine, and it was very important for my career,” she says. Not that she was a calculating starlet. Although Mia came from a famous Beverly Hills family—her father, writer-director John Villers Farrow, won Oscars and her mother, Maureen O’Sullivan, played Tarzan’s Jane—she was pretty much a shy Catholic schoolgirl when she won her first part, innocent Allison McKenzie on Peyton Place. “I was unbelievably naive, living in a dream world most of the time,” says Mia now. Tom photographed Mia in two shoots in New York City, one in 1964 and the second in 1965, while she was on break from Peyton Place. By the latter shoot, she was dating Frank Sinatra, 49. Mia reminisces about meeting Sinatra at the height of his fame. “We were filming the show on a

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Written by Patricia Bosworth


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“Mia Farrow couldn’t take a bad picture,” said photographer Tom Palumbo. For Look he shot hundreds of rolls of film, with Mia wearing a slew of sweaters—or just a towel. Look magazine went on to put Mia on its cover in 1967, during the filming of Rosemary’s Baby, with the cover line: “Mia and Frank Sinatra: Their Two Careers Together and Apart.” The couple divorced the following year.

soundstage at 20th Century Fox,” she says. During lunch breaks Mia would roller-skate from lot to lot, curious about what was going on. One day Mia, her hair in braids, wandered onto the set for the war film Von Ryan’s Express. Sinatra, who was sitting with a group of men, looked straight at her. I share with Mia that my husband had told me that during the shoot she confided in him about her much older boyfriend and pleaded, “Don’t say anything to my mother about Frank Sinatra.” Mia laughs but insists, “That couldn’t have happened. I told my mother right away I was seeing Frank. She approved.” Soon the whole world knew of the relationship and she was photographed nonstop. Even so, she says, “In those days the media attention was more personal. And slower!” Tom photographed Mia with her Abyssinian cat in some of the shots. The pictures trigger a flood of memories: “Malcolm was just a kitten,” she says. Because he was blind, Mia had him on a leash and took him everywhere, including her first secret weekend in Palm Springs with Sinatra. “Frank was the love of my life,” says Mia. At Sinatra’s 1998 funeral she put her wedding ring and a note in the coffin, along with a dime. “That’s because Frank said you should never go anywhere without one.”


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Lace up sandal, $1,195, FRANCESCO RUSSO, francescorusso.fr. On nails throughout: Nail lacquer in Black Cherry, $32, TOM FORD, tomford.com.


KWOOD $1,795, NICHOL AS KIR Gladiator sandal, . om r.c rte -po t-a FOR ERDEM, ne

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PHOTOGRAPHED by INA JANG

Styled by SyDNEY WASSERMAN


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$1,770, Regin a handbag, ert ocaval li.c om. rob I, ALL CAV O ROBERT


Kaya sandal, $2,195, JIMMY CHOO, jimmychoo.com.

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Handbag, $1 ,190, SA LVAT OR E FE RR AG AM 866-337-7242 O, . Hai ry cu ff , $710, IS ABEL M AR AN T, 212219-2284. M y Way wat ch w ith Fox Fu r Gla my and D ia mond D $1,795, FE ND ial, I TIMEPIECES, fe nd i.c om.


Biker boot, $785, STUART WEITZMAN, stuartweitzman.com. Talent: Gabriella Mendez/Parts Models. Manicurist: Roseann Singleton for Warren Tricomi Salon at Art Department.

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Shirt, $590, BOTTEGA VENETA, bottegaveneta.com.


Jai MIGHTY AND

Written by ADAM RATHE PHOTOGRAPHED by John balsom

Styled by Julie ragolia

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Jai Courtney might be our next great movie hero, but to hear the Australian actor tell it, he’s more than just muscle


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Jacket, $2,159; Pants, $845, GIORGIO ARMANI, 212-988-9191. T-shirt, $1,040, CANALI, canali.com. Necklace, Courtney’s own. Kensington adjustable stool, $499. ARHAUS, arhaus.com


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Fitzgerald tuxedo, $1,198 for full suit, BROOKS BROTHERS, brooksbrothers.com. Muscle tee, $90, T BY ALEXANDER WANG, alexanderwang.com.


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f something explodes on-screen this year, chances are Jai Courtney will be nearby. With starring roles in action tentpoles like Insurgent and the newly rebooted Terminator franchise, the brawny 28-year-old Australian—who’s appeared alongside Tom Cruise in Jack Reacher and Bruce Willis in A Good Day to Die Hard—seems poised to become the go-to blockbuster bruiser of his generation. If only he didn’t have grander plans. “I’ve done heavy action and that’s a lot of fun, but it’s something I’m hungry to get away from,” he says over breakfast at a quiet New York hotel. “I love doing action— obviously I just signed on to a big franchise—but it also means that for the next job, I don’t want to repeat history.” Lucky for Courtney, redundancy doesn’t seem to be in the cards. Not only are his action heroes (or villains, as the case may be with his role in the Divergent sequel Insurgent) uniquely memorable characters that inhabit singular worlds, but he’s found an impressive place for himself in somewhat less pyrotechnic work as well— thanks in part to some very well-connected fans. “I’ve been watching his work and thought he was really starting to understand the job,” says Russell Crowe, the Oscar-winning actor who cast Courtney in his directorial debut, The Water Diviner. In the f ilm, Courtney plays Cyril Hughes, a World War I–era Australian soldier searching in Turkey for his missing sons. It’s a role Crowe says required a certain understanding that Cour tney—who also appeared in

Angelina Jolie’s Unbroken—had in spades. “His perfor mance shows a deep connection to the character’s reality and the quiet leadership that the real Lt. Colonel Hughes possessed,” Crowe says. “It’s brilliant, understated, masculine, inherently Australian and deeply compassionate.” For his part, Courtney says working for Crowe, who also appears on camera in the f ilm, marked a career highlight. “Russell was really incredible,” he says. “I was in awe watching a man not only delivering his own performance, but getting up out of the mud, checking the shot and directing the other actors in the scene. There’s a lot going on there with that creative control. It feels like a natural evolution [for Crowe], but it’s ballsy stuff.” Evolution is something Courtney himself has always been drawn to. Since his days in the grammar school drama club, an extracurricular he counterbalanced, naturally, with rugby, Courtney says his goal has always been to find a way to take what he’s good at and become even better. “I think it’s important to remember that several years ago I would have given it all to be in the position I’m in now,” he says. “But I feel like I’m at the start, and there’s still that drive to keep going, to get better and grow as a performer.” So if that means saving the world an extra few times in addition to taking on more nuanced work, Courtney’s just fine with it. “I don’t have a clear sense of like ticking boxes as far as roles are concerned,” he explains. “I’ve been getting some incredible opportunities, and those are the things that dreams are made of.”


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Trench coat, $2,475; Pants, $725, GIORGIO ARMANI, 212-988-9191. Shirt, $590, BOTTEGA VENETA, bottegaveneta.com. Wilson glasses, $310, GARRETT LEIGHT CALIFORNIA OPTICAL, garrettleight.com. Jules Audemars Extra-Thin watch in 18-karat white gold, $28,200, AUDEMARS PIGUET, audemarspiguet. com. Belt, $620, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI, brunellocucinelli .com. Socks, $35, BRESCIANI, luxuryclothing .com. Boots, $645, TOD’S, tods.com. Kensington adjustable stool, $499, ARHAUS, arhaus.com. Groomer: Mira using Chanel and Oribe. Prop Stylist: Robert Sumrell at Walter Schupfer. Fashion Assistant: Hanna La Cava.


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rediscovering where City meets country—and old world meets modern— in an often overlooked NEW YORK CITY neighborhood, Riverdale. Written by Jen Renzi

PHOTOGRAPHED by Mia Baxter


photo credits teekay

Opposite page: The foyer of a landmark 1928 Mediterranean Revival home by architect Dwight James Baum. This page: Leafy streets dense with trees, a signature of the area.


Opposite page: Inside a high-ceilinged Victorian, the elaborate carved-wood door casings have been carefully restored. Left: In the Mediterranean Revival home, one of the seven bedrooms is octogonal. The owner uses it for storage. Bottom: The 20-room mansion on Independence Avenue that President John F. Kennedy called home; Kennedy attended Riverdale Country School in the late 1920s.

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n New York, the land of multimillion-dollar penthouses and double-wide brownstones, a standalone home cocooned by lush landscaping is the holiest of grails. Sure, there are charming Victorians on Staten Island and turnof-the-century Colonial Revival manses in Brooklyn’s Prospect Park South—some with sizeable front lawns, even. But those are still stridently urban in character, with front doors opening onto sidewalks and property lines that adhere to the city grid. Upmarket house hunters seeking pastoral acreage and a speedy Midtown commute typically set their sights beyond city limits, zeroing in on a short list of tony burbs like Scarsdale, Larchmont and Greenwich. But there is one of t-overlooked New York Cit y neighborhood where it is possible to buy a freestanding home—a castle, even—on a wooded lot, just miles from Manhattan: Riverdale. The under-the-radar nabe in the northwest corner of the Bronx sits at one of the highest elevations in the city, affording hillside homes both an aura of seclusion and transporting views of the Palisades. A number of leafy lanes spiral into cul-de-sacs, that defining suburban feature. Squint and you’d think you were in New Canaan, not New York. Its residents regard Riverdale as a happy medium between city and country. Trim your topiaries in the morning and then pop down to the Four Seasons (just 10 miles south) for lunch; shop Fifth Avenue by day and bird watch by dusk. “When you live in Riverdale, you don’t need a country house,” says Anne Shahmoon, an agent with Exclusive Properties Sotheby’s International Realty who specializes in the area’s stately abodes. That is not a sales pitch, but the voice of experience: Shahmoon lives here, too, lured by its proximity to—and isolation from—the hustle-bustle. “We moved here 14 years ago because one daughter attended school in Manhattan and the other in Riverdale. We weren’t quite ready to live in the city; Riverdale proved the perfect in-between spot.” Although the area first became a haven for upwardly mobile urban expats in the mid-19th century, the arrival of railways in the 1850s cemented its status as a bedroom

community. The most picturesque estates date back to this period, including Wave Hill, a 28-acre property with manicured gardens and a Greek Revival mansion built in 1843. (Notable figures like Theodore Roosevelt and Mark Twain took up residence in the home.) Though two residential zones have been given landmark status—small portions of the Estate Area and Fieldston in its entirety—successive efforts to preserve the area’s old-world character have been even more instrumental. When the City of New York annexed t he neig hborhood i n 1874, Frede r ick Law Olmsted, who designed Central Park, helped thwart an attempt to superimpose the urban grid on Riverdale’s sinuous streetscape; as a result, straight lines segue to curves after 239th Street. And in 1975, residents fought to


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Left: High elevation allows for picturesque views of the Hudson River, Palisades and beyond. Bottom: The living room of the home by Dwight James Baum, which features a Spanishtiled fireplace. Opposite page: One of the area’s modern gems—a clean-lined glass-and-concrete house developed in the 1970s.

designate Riverdale a Special Natural Area District, an act that safeguarded its marshes, century-old oaks and jagged rock formations from impending development. Another strategy to mitigate — or at least micromanage—development was spearheaded by wealthy residents who bought tracts of land for subdivision into garden communities. The largest was Riverdale’s Fieldston section, designed to harmonize with the surrounding mid19th-century manses. Strict guidelines dictated minimum house and plot sizes as well as architectural styles—hence the preponderance of Tudor, Mediterranean and Medieval Revival structures. The committee also designated approved architects, among them Dwight James Baum, who designed 62 of Fieldston’s homes. Courtesy of their exquisite detailing and grand yet humanistic scale, his designs command top dollar in today’s real-estate market. There are more modern subdivisions, too, including Ladd Road, a neighborhood of midcentury-era glass boxes. In 2006, the noted classicist Robert A.M. Stern was tapped to mastermind Villanova Heights, an ambitious development adjacent to what is perhaps Riverdale’s most notorious property: Chapel Hill Mansion, built in 1928 by a prominent member of the Theosophical religious organization in anticipation of the Second Coming (Jesus apparently has a yen for rococo fireplace surrounds and parquetry). Stern’s mansions, though larger than many neighboring homes, were painstakingly conceived to be unobtrusive. “They were designed to look like wings were added to a central structure, giving the sense that they grew over time,” explains Gary Brewer, a partner in the firm. “We wanted to illustrate that you could add to a historic community in a manner that’s architecturally appropriate”—yet scaled for modern living. The Villanova Heights development reflects Riverdale’s stylistic eclecticism—an attractor for design-minded homebuyers. A diverse range of properties is on the market, from Craftsman to Mediterranean, midcentury modern to contemporary. Prices tend to be more competitive (and property-tax rates lower) than in nearby areas like Scarsdale. Large mansions are often listed in the $3 to $4.5 million range; a record-breaking sale got $5 million. “But some sellers are testing the glass ceiling, with asking

prices substantially higher than that,” explains Shahmoon. She adds that, although well-priced homes are often snapped up quickly when they become available, discerning (and confident) sellers keep things in check: “Many feel no hurry to sell and are willing to wait for the right buyer.” The right buyer is satisfied with a relatively sleepy downtown. A quaint village-like cluster of storefronts along Riverdale and Johnson avenues is serviceable, if not exactly a destination in its own right. For locals, it mostly suffices. “The strip of restaurants and bars is quite entertaining and varied—a place where everyone seems to know each other,” says Dorcia Kelley, an interior stylist who moved to one of the contemporary rental buildings that have been attracting younger residents. “But you really have to search for the wine bars and cool spots. And when you do find them, the crowd tends to be either very young or more mature; there’s not much middle ground.” For hipper, livelier fare, residents simply jump on public transportation or drive 20 minutes to Manhattan. In Riverdale, one can enjoy the pleasure of living in the city—and the thrill of making the effort to venture to it.


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Squint and you’d think you were in New Canaan, not New York.


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It might seem as if the fascination with a certain kind of society girl has dimmed, if not disappeared entirely. But socialites haven’t evaporated. They’ve evolved PHOTOGRAPHED by stefan ruiz

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n December 1938, at the Ritz Carlton on Central Park South, Brenda Diana Duff Frazier danced with actor Douglas Fairbanks Jr. in front of 2,000 guests and was dubbed “Deb of the Century” in the resulting press frenzy. Later, Frazier would grace the cover of Life magazine and marry, then divorce, a football player named John “Shipwreck” Kelly, making her ideal fodder for early 20th-century tabloids, which had come to rely on rich kids—including Frazier as well as girls with names like Hutton, Duke and Vanderbilt—as entertainment for the downtrodden majority. Almost 80 years later, no one is really aspiring to the title of “socialite”

anymore. Instead, the haut monde is turning out a stream of young women who do their best to eschew the image of a ditsy debutante in favor of something relatively more hardscrabble—and they’re far less interested in marrying an important name than in creating their own. From recovering TV bad girl Paris Hilton and 18-year-old fashion darling Bella Hadid to the up-and-comers clamoring for a seat on the planning committee du jour, status seekers these days don’t have time for three-hour makeovers or whiling away the afternoon over lunch at the Plaza. They’re too busy building brands.

Gown, $890, ZAC ZAC POSEN, neimanmarcus.com. Isobel sunglasses, $295, MOSCOT, moscot.com. Tennis Bracelet in rose gold with diamonds, $11,960; Tennis Bracelet in rose gold with garnet, $9,90, LUCIFER VIR HONESTUS, marissacollections.com. Sandals, $1,475, PHILIPP PLEIN, 212-644-3304.

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t’s safe to say that, at least during The Simple Life years, few might have expected Hilton to become a perfume mogul like her idol Elizabeth Taylor, or any sort of mogul at all. The assumption was that Hilton would f lame out, become old news, settle in with her ample inheritance and live a good life with a suitably rich man. But while confidence is never something she lacked (“I know I have good taste,” she says), she credits her maternal grandmother with pushing her to do something more. “She was really encouraging and we were very close,” says Hilton. “She made me feel so special. I’m lucky I had someone like that.” Another part of the Paris Hilton empire is music: making it and spinning it. She built her own recording studio in her house, where she records and writes what she calls “dance-oriented” songs. She may not love the dance floor anymore, but she loves electronic music. “I go to music festivals all over the world, and I’m friends with the DJs now,” she says. “I was always in the booth when I’d go to clubs when I was younger and telling them what to play, so it’s a natural evolution. I even love learning about the DJ software and the technical side.” She has a new single coming out soon, with plans for a full album release, her second, later this year. When she does DJ residences at the Ibiza club Amnesia in the summer, she plays for up to 10,000 people. And her average pay is over $30,000—an hour. Asked if it’s true she’s been offered a million dollars for a gig, she proffers, “My mother always told me it’s not polite to discuss money.” But she doesn’t deny it. Then there’s clothing and accessories, full of Paris-esque details like bright color and crystals, which sell incredibly well in Asia and the Middle East. For this, she is probably her own best advertisement. When she’s not suited up, she wears her brand of clothes, and she pays attention to what her customers want to wear, too. Asian girls in particular, she says, are “more covered up, more sophisticated, it’s a totally different look.” She designs accordingly. She travels constantly, as you might imagine (and with 20 pieces of luggage, as you also might imagine), to do in-store appearances for her international fans. And soon, she may be able to stay overnight at Paris-branded hotels. Her real estate arm has recently opened the Paris Beach Club in the Philippines and is currently building a second property there—the first two, she hopes, of many worldwide. “The vibe of my places is very modern and sexy and fun, very cool,” she says. “International futuristic. I built my brand, and I’ve always wanted to get into the family tradition.” The only thing Paris Hilton doesn’t have time for, it seems, is a man. She’s currently single—a state one has never associated with your average socialite. But Hilton, we know by now, isn’t your average socialite. “I’m doing what I want,” she says. “I don’t really have time for a boyfriend.” Also, she says, the guys in L.A. aren’t all that, adding what may be the most antithetical statement to the socialite ethos to date: “I’d rather be single.” —MERLE GINSBERG

Dress, $1,750, GIULIETTA, Tender, 248-258-0212. Classic Creoles earrings, $16,000, MONTBLANC, montblanc.com. Styled by: Paul Frederick. Hair & Makeup: Etienne Ortega using Oribe Hair Care and Nars Cosmetics at The Only Agency. Production: Frank Roller/GlamPR.com. Fashion Assistant: Ashley Wong. Photographed on location at the Annenberg Community Beach House in Santa Monica, CA.

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top the presses: Paris Hilton doesn’t really go out anymore. These days, you’re more likely to find her behind a desk or in a boardroom than on a dance floor. Sure, you’ll see a picture of her, from time to time, with her trademark near-platinum locks and famous pout and pose (oh, that pose), a micro-mini teacup Pomeranian in her arms. And yes, she’s often photographed at a club or a party; she’s not exactly hibernating. But chances are good she’s getting paid to be there. And heftily. Remember when Linda Evangelista said she wouldn’t get out of bed for less than $10,000 a day? Paris gets a lot more than that. She may be the original celebutante—a party girl from a fancy family who turned herself into a household name using risqué outfits, reality TV and the requisite sex tape, in the process spawning a whole genre of wannabe girls eager to follow in her well-heeled footsteps. But over the last 10 years, while those girls have been parading on red carpets and keeping up with the Kardashians, Hilton has been busy creating a billion-dollar brand. A whopping 18 perfumes (the newest one a limited 10th-anniversary edition) have resulted in $2 billion in sales; she has 56 eponymous branded stores in the Middle East and Asia selling her line of handbags; and she’s got 16 licenses across the categories of clothing, accessories, beauty and watches. Then there’s an entire DJ and recording-artist career. Her business, Paris Hilton Entertainment, now has hundreds of employees. This kind of empire building isn’t something one does between glasses of champagne. “I was playing a character on The Simple Life, so I don’t blame people for thinking I was ditzy,” says Hilton, now 33. “People assumed that’s who I really was. Now they meet me and realize I’m completely different. But it doesn’t bother me that people thought I was dumb. Playing that character made life easier—I do have a certain amount of shyness, which I’m sure is a surprise to people. And I’ve never cared what people think about me—I know the truth. I’ve always known what I was capable of.” What’s a typical day in the life of Paris Hilton now that getting up at noon and partying till dawn are behind her? Meetings, she claims. Playing with her pets, of which there are 30, from flying squirrels to ferrets. Making art projects. Singing. Writing. “I don’t ever get bored,” she says. But the club days are long gone. “I like to see girls looking hot and having fun—that’s what life’s about,” she says. “But I’m kinda over the whole scene. I used to love going out all the time but now it’s only for DJ’ing and getting paid.” She doesn’t go to clubs because “Thursday is the cool night, and I have to get up and work.” She’s an Aquarius, she notes, so she doesn’t mind the grind. She even dresses like a businesswoman these days, more or less, with a professional penchant for tailored Chanel or St. John suits. “Sometimes I’ll still wear my signature pink, but not all the time like I used to,” she says. The ultimate girly-girl, it seems, is a woman now.


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o,” shouts Bella Hadid, the 18-year-old daughter of Yolanda Foster, of The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills fame, as she saunters into her mother’s photoshoot. It is everything that word can be at once: a greeting, a heads-up and a cutesy out-loud emoji. Foster, holding a pose with both the discipline of a yogi and the grace of a ballerina, asks in that motherly, you-better-not-be-drinking-out-of-the-milkcarton way, “Did you just say ‘yo’ to me?” Bella smiles. She knows she’s not in trouble. She knows her mother is seeing her, as so many mothers of 18-year-olds see their daughters, as not her little girl anymore. “I knew it would get your attention,” Bella says. Yolanda laughs. “That it did!” She smoothes her ivory Emilio Pucci dress, leans in and whispers in my ear: “The next generation!”

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olanda—the kind of woman impossible not to call by her first name— was a young model in her own right before marrying 16-time Grammy Award winner David Foster, best known for writing the theme to St. Elmo’s Fire. Just take a gander at the Throwback Thursday trump cards she plays on Twitter and Pinterest. Now, Bella is following in her mother’s stiletto footsteps, but this is not your typical reality-TV mother-daughter pair. Foster and her daughters—Bella’s older sister is the ubiquitous model Gigi—aren’t catchphrase debutantes like some TV families. These are women for whom the spotlight is an extension of a natural, girl-next-door enthusiasm. The ascent of this accessible trifecta has done more than put their 1% lifestyle on display for the masses; it’s made it seem almost normal, in the meantime installing Foster as a fan favorite among the generally unlikeable Housewives. An Instagram account for Foster’s impressively organized refrigerator has almost 15,000 followers. The only thing unoriginal about Yolanda is that she is not an original member of The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills. She joined in season three and in a way is the franchise’s Heather Locklear, the bombshell you drop in as a fifth-inning pitch hitter. Whereas other mother-daughter socialites pretend they are more like distant sisters or gal pals, Yolanda and her daughters, Bella and Gigi, who both now live in New York, are more clearly a family. “I love you!” Yolanda coos to a golden retriever named Jake, as she pads around barefoot in a 7,000-square-foot apartment in Manhattan’s Meatpacking District, one specifically outfitted with bells and whistles designed to optimize healthy living. Yolanda, who’s publicly dealt with Lyme disease, seems wowed by the swank trappings. Jake immediately starts following her. Who wouldn’t? It’s funny, though: She feels too much like a lowercase housewife to ever be a Housewife. She doesn’t wear flashy statement jewelry, her platinum hair is more about playful bounce than shoulder-pad volume and she doesn’t don her boxy glasses because a stylist commanded it; she wears them because, when she’s well, she answers her emails on her BlackBerry. Among a bevy of alpha amazonian scene-stealers, she is Bravo’s beta babe, the one for whom

hadid

there is no I in Housewives. In a reality-television demimonde where the drink of choice is more likely to be a dirty martini thrown in someone’s face, Yolanda favors warm herbal teas and cold-pressed juices. She’s still in some ways the ingénue who arrived in New York so many years ago. “I didn’t know they made apartments this big,” she gasps upon entering. It’s been a long journey for the Dutch beauty, who began as a freelance hair stylist and was called onto the runway as a last-minute stand-in at a Frans Molenaar show. Yolanda was spotted by Eileen Ford, of the starmaking Ford modeling agency, who quickly jetted her off to the runways of Paris, Milan, New York and Tokyo. Yes, she grew up with her own pony, but she also washed dishes and silverware at a Chinese restaurant to pay for it. She knows luck cuts both ways and that, when it comes down to it, you make your own.  It’s a cliché in celebrity profiles to gape at how normal stars can be. But for Yolanda and Bella it’s not a performance. Yolanda shops at Target. She has an AOL account. She wears clogs from her native Holland to calm herself down when she’s nervous, and the only brand name the two endorse in our interview is Jenga, which is also their only destructive habit. In a photo shoot, Bella holds her mother’s hand and cheers, “You look cute today!” Yolanda, for her part, seems mesmerized by her daughter, all dolled up. They make goofy faces at each other and do silly voices. When the photographer offers direction, Yolanda laughs and says, “Sorry, we weren’t paying attention,” her face squished into a pout. It’s a girl’s-night-out moment.  Bella bears a resemblance to that other girl next door, Jennifer Lawrence, while Yolanda radiates searing Ellen Barkin vibes. Neither mother nor daughter use that glamour as leverage, but rather to build bridges. They listen. They ask questions. They have a sense of awareness that is very cosmopolitan.  “People who start in L.A. end up in L.A.,” says Bella, her mother nodding. She is in New York for a reason: studying photography at the Parsons School of Design. “Everyone here is too busy living their dream to notice you.” She still marvels at snow in New York and, yes, she still likes her very California smoothies (ginger, apple, cayenne), but has also already found her favorite New York City restaurant, about which I was sworn to secrecy, but it’s Italian and speaks well of her foodie cred. But maybe their best connection—closer even than the one they forged bedside the last time Yolanda was knocked out by Lyme disease— is Bella’s equestrian passion. Yolanda boasts that Bella wants nothing less than the 2016 Olympics for herself. Even with work and school, Bella finds time to stamp good luck symbols into the mud. Their connection feels less like the passing of a torch and more like gathering around a shared campfire.  On a recent visit to Bella’s apartment, Yolanda dug into her daughter’s closet and helped figure out a budget. They changed light bulbs. It was hopelessly ordinary. It wouldn’t have made good television. — RICHARD MORGAN

On Yolanda: Gradient jumpsuit, $699, CAMILLA AND MARC, camillaandmarc.com. Matilde pump, $695, AQUAZZURA, aquazzura.com. On Bella: Caged top, $4,500; Caged skirt, $3,900, FENDI, 212-897-2244. Peggy sandal, $895, GIANVITO ROSSI, net-a-porter.com. Jewelry, Foster and Hadid’s own. Styled by: Sarah Schussheim. Hair: Keith Carpenter using Oribe hair care at The Wall Group. Makeup: Cedric Jolivet using Marc Jacobs Beauty at See Management. Photographed on location at 66 East 11th Street listed by TOWN New Development and Dolly Lenz Real Estate LLC.


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mortimer The rebrander

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a celebrity, someone might need to label me.” She shrugs. Still, the woman who once won top billing on the now defunct website Socialite Rank says that she’s not sure the term still holds the weight for the skeletal hostesses Tom Wolfe dubbed Social X-Rays. Mortimer explains. “It was used for women who were social and weren’t working, but the number of [those women] seems to have dwindled.” And what’s taken their place? “The term still connotes a woman from a good social background, but today one can have more serious aspirations,” offers Mortimer, whose latest venture involves a line of tabletop accessories. “I take pride being a businesswoman, I work hard and make my own money. And I like making my own money.” Indeed, Mortimer’s return to New York coincided with the launch of her collection of home goods—including palm tree–printed highball glasses, plates emblazoned with koi and acrylic-and-faux-leather trays—that aim to land her as a tastemaker akin to Martha Stewart or Tory Burch.

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he idea of being a successful businesswoman or brand certainly seems to have taken precedence over an idle life of leisure for many social young women today. There’s no lack of gals about town making a living for themselves, whether by founding a PR agency, a cosmetics line or the ubiquitous oddity of working as a DJ. It’s all apparently in service of that new must-have item: a personal brand. As one Upper East Side social mainstay told me, “Today’s woman has more education. There’s true depth there.” Not that all the social changes these days strike her as being better. “You would be surprised at how some of these young women show up at Locust Valley and Palm Beach clubs,” she griped. “Everyone looks like they fell off a lorry. In my day, no one would ever have dreamed of going out to an event without preparation. I’m not saying women were happier, but no one talked about herself as being a brand.” Where the old guard may view the new rules for today’s society girls with disdain, modern socialites know using the moniker is a viable business strategy. And these days what passes as admirable is a character whose social life at least appears to come second to her real life. Pressed to reveal her greatest ambitions, Mortimer doesn’t f linch. “I would like to have a successful business, get married and have children.” Even if status is something that occasionally crosses her mind—after all, the girl has an agent instead of a social secretary—a bit of ambition doesn’t turn a nice girl from Richmond into Becky Sharp. As my Grandmother Elsie, herself a New York-born businesswoman, once said of a niece’s assertive aspirations, “Darling, you can’t fault a girl for trying.”—RICHARD KIRSHENBAUM

Dress, $1,995, MICHAEL KORS, michaelkors.com. Styled by: Sarah Schussheim. Hair: Keith Carpenter using Oribe Hair Care at The Wall Group. Makeup: Cedric Jolivet using Marc Jacobs Beauty at See Management. Photographed on location at 66 East 11th Street listing by TOWN New Development and Dolly Lenz Real Estate LLC.

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s there still such a thing as a socialite? The answer is complicated, according to Tinsley Mortimer. “The term might be a bit dated today, but I have come to embrace it,” she says, sipping Pinot Noir at Harry Cipriani on Fifth Avenue. “If it means a woman who is out and about, dressed beautifully and photographed, so be it. However, I also view it as a platform for my brand.” Dressed in a patterned A-line dress, her skin highlighted by a retro Southern makeup aesthetic and her hair in perfectly coiffed curls, Mortimer looks like an American Girl doll come to life, and that isn’t far off. Mortimer—née Mercer, as in the Manhattan street— certainly had a regal upbringing. “I made my debut in Virginia at the Bal du Bois,” she says, reclining in a banquette. “I was chosen as leader of the ball and just loved it. I always loved girly things and got to pick out a big Vera Wang. It was almost like getting married.” While the Richmond native doesn’t hesitate to use her frilly packaging to her advantage, it’s not the only weapon in her arsenal. An alumna of Lawrenceville Prep and Columbia University, where she was an art history major and nationally-ranked tennis champ, Mortimer held positions planning events for a New York PR firm and worked in the beauty department at Vogue before her 2002 marriage to her high-school boyfriend, Standard Oil heir Robert “Topper” Mortimer. Seemingly overnight, Mortimer was everywhere. Her blonde hair and penchant for f lirty dresses were like catnip for party photographers, and soon enough she was one of the most recognizable young women on the society circuit. Then came a handbag line, a Dior lip gloss named in her honor, a chapter in a book called The Park Avenue Diet and, of course, the reality-TV show High Society. Tinsley Mortimer had most definitely arrived, but she wouldn’t be staying long. In 2009 she and Topper separated, and other less-than-august occurrences weren’t far behind. There was a Jersey Shore-themed spread in a fashion magazine and reported canoodling with an American Idol runner up. The girl who’d come from nowhere appeared to be bordering on overexposed before, all of a sudden, she was gone. Mortimer spent two years at her family’s place in Palm Beach, avoiding the spotlight and plotting a comeback she shrewdly executed during New York Fashion Week late last year. Mortimer says she’d do it all again. “I have no regrets,” she declares before offering that, “in Newport or Palm Beach, with the country-club set, it’s a bit tricky to navigate. One has to walk a fine line.” Ask her about the s-word, and she’ll pause. “It is a term that’s often used with my name,” Mortimer says tentatively before hitting her stride. “People often try to categorize someone, and since I am not an actress or


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the ballers The amateur party planners who keep the social scene swilling Moet operate with a side of high drama

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y 10:30 p.m. on a November Wednesday, the Whitney Gala was breaking up, leaving behind empty tables littered with wine glasses and graphically compelling desserts. Elvis Costello had played and Julian Schnabel, Jeff Koons, Hilary Rhoda, Padma Lakshmi, Riley Keough and other bold-faced names began to drift towards the doors. Some of the guests, perhaps buoyed by the fact that the event had raised over $4 million (seats started at $7,500 each) or that it was the last gala in the old Breuer building, wanted to revel more before calling it a night. “Time to check on the children,” joked Kyle DeWoody, the 30-yearold daughter of Beth Rudin DeWoody, a collector and Whitney museum trustee. The “kids” in question were the 630 guests at the Studio Party, one of the gala circuit’s better junior after-parties, a more moderately priced, $250-per-ticket event attended by far dimmer names that was just getting started upstairs. Among them was a handsome and lithe man with a good head of pale hair who’d just finished posing for some photographers on the red carpet and who, at 43, was pushing the limits of “junior” membership. He was most definitely not a child. “You look so nice,” a friend told him. “I put on a tie tonight because it’s the last party in the building,” he said. He was Kipton Cronkite, one of the Whitney’s “Contemporaries,” the name the museum gives to its group of young patrons who pay $500 to $1,000 a year for access to benefits that include invitations to fundraisers and museum events and the potential of one day being asked to be part of a party planning committee. Committee participation has plenty of perks. Beyond the social and career networking opportunities at meetings in private homes or glamorous offices, members have access to conversations with curators and are invited for visits to artists’ studios and private collections. To be asked aboard the executive committee, it takes the recommendation and approval of a trustee, curator or fellow committee member, not unlike at a social club, although for less money and with different factors for qualification. In recent years, these junior groups and the parties they host have become one of the nonprofit world’s most, well, profitable endeavors, largely by connecting with, and counting on, younger patrons eager to belong. Cronkite is a typical junior group member and committee aspirant: not quite arrived, but trying his damnedest to get there. Born James Kipton Cronkhite, he moved to New York in 2001 from his native Oklahoma after graduating from Oklahoma State University. When he hit New York, he changed the spelling of his last name, which helped open more doors. As he segued from working with high net-worth clients in finance to the art

world, he found himself a sought-after guest with expertise. Artists liked that he was associated with business. Social people thought he was related to the aristocratic newscaster. That misunderstanding, which he didn’t bother to correct, landed him in tabloid trouble in 2009. “I admit I have made some mistakes along the way,” he says. But that didn’t slow him down. In the past 10 years, Cronkite has been on committees for a number of junior organizations, including the Young Fellows at the Frick, Young Patrons of the American Friends of the Louvre, the Young Collectors of the Winter Antiques Show and the New York Botanical Garden. The night of the Studio Party, he stepped into the nightclub-like scene on the fourth floor, where the Studio Party had taken over with a DJ booth, bar and massive slide projections of the view from the new Whitney in the Meatpacking District. His fellow Contemporaries were all over the place and he went around visiting them like a pollinating bumblebee. He greeted Ariana Rockefeller, a fashion designer; Adam Abdalla, an arts publicist and co-chair of the Whitney Contemporary group; and Sarah Arison, a film producer who helped found Mr. Cronkite’s online art advisory. Like Cronkite, Arison serves on various committees around town and beyond. “It all dovetails,” she said. Whitney trustee Joanne Cassullo, who joined the board at an unusually young age many years ago, watched the scene of drinking, networking, f lirting and hair tossing with pleasure. “Are all the people at this party on the make?” a guest asked her. “Ninety percent of them,” she said. In one way or another, at least.

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veryone knows that if it weren’t for its fundraising, New York would be a wasteland for arts and social services. The city has, for at least a century now, made charitable giving, and the parties it seems to require, part of the cultural fabric. In the decades until this one, grand dames such as Brooke Astor, Jacqueline Kennedy, Judy Peabody and Pat Buckley would lead the charge by chairing gala committees and charming friends into buying tickets and tables. They had family names with clout and were able to take charge because they were willing to do the work and, let’s face it, because they didn’t have jobs to distract them. They could chair committee meetings, court sponsors and rally friends on the phone. Many even wrote notes by hand to encourage contributions and followed up with thank-you notes as well. But lately, the profile of committee members has been moving away from old society names to include people with marketing and social media


insiders,” he says. And while he seems to be a worthy presence at the Whitney (“He’s great at connecting all kinds of people,” says Holly Strong, the Director of Institutional Advancement), not all committee members are equally appreciated. “Committees can be great or a pain,” says Anne Livet of Livet-Reichard, who has planned events for B.A.M., Bomb magazine and the Bronx Museum of the Arts. “You have to be careful they don’t go in the wrong direction.” Indeed, when so many people have their own agendas—least of which, let’s be honest, likely includes planning a party—there is competition for billing and power. “The fighting is about who gets to be the chair or spokesperson,” says Couri Hay, who counseled Tinsley Mortimer about committee work when she first came to New York. “For all the people who want to do good for an organization, the politics can be brutal.” But then charity, as Oscar Wilde once suggested, creates a multitude of sins. “A third of the people on committees these days are going for the exposure and don’t even know what the charity does,” says Bancroft, who once told an attention-grabbing charity chair that that her favorite philanthropists are anonymous. “If you chair more than three parties a year, you stop being credible.” Indeed, one writer who received a prestigious New York Public Library fellowship attended a cocktail party honoring her and her colleagues and could not help but notice that the committee members in attendance seemed more interested in speaking to one another than to any of the authors in the room. All this is why some non-profit advisors caution organizations to know what they’re getting into before starting committees. “They can be exciting for members, but they can also be detrimental if you’re a smaller organiza-

“a third of the people on committees these days don’t even know what the charity does.” –Debbie Bancroft

luxury fashion site FEYT who encourages her associates to pursue on-site volunteer work. But, adds Columbia, with something like dismay, “Some people are hustlers and publicity hounds.” A New York Times story not that long ago singled out the particularly pervasive Jean Shafiroff. She has been chairing events with surprising frequency in Southampton, and was described as “twirling like a music box ballerina” for photographers as she entered the New York Botanical Society’s Conservatory Ball in June of 2013 and “hijacking” the “otherwise decorous affair.” Another figure, Lisa Marie Falcone, ruffled feathers when she walked up to the microphone uninvited at a benefit for the High Line and pledged $10 million. “Look, Nan Kempner was a social climber,” says Debbie Bancroft, a columnist for Avenue who has chaired the gala benefit committee for the Parrish Art Museum in Southampton. “But at least she knew how to do it. Some of these other people are just an embarrassment.” It costs junior committee members like Kipton Cronkite thousands in membership fees and gala tickets. Cronkite freely admits the costs are offset by the benefits, as it were. “We have access—to collectors, curators and other

tion,” says Anne Pasternak of nonprofit public arts group Creative Time, which limits them. Larger institutions don’t have that option. And many don’t want it. “As long as people bring something to the table, I’m OK with them fulfilling their own agendas,” says Livet, who will help organize the New Museum’s benefit in April. “I have more respect for people pitching in for any reason than being gadf lies or f lies on the wall.” Nobody would accuse Cronkite of that. At the Whitney Studio Party, he worked the f loor with a youthful vigor that belied his age. Soon it will be appropriate for him to think about moving from the juniors to the grownups, a much more expensive commitment that many aging junior committee members try to avoid for as long as possible. Patrick McGregor, a fashion public relations consultant and co-chair of the Whitney Contemporaries, watched Cronkite circle the room with something like amusement. “Over the years there’s been a big change in the face of committees in New York,” said McGregor. “And Kipton has been on just about every one of them. It’s no longer about a family name.” Even when it’s Cronkite. —BOB MORRIS

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savvy, connected friends and enough money (or desire to belong) to buy tickets and tables. While some organizations such as the New York Public Library, Memorial Sloan Kettering, Central Park Conservancy and Boys and Girls Club maintain some exclusivity, others can’t afford to do so. And so they establish junior groups and after-party committees that serve as permeable entry points for charmers like Cronkite and others eager to see their names appear on invitation committee lists. These are people who in a previous social era might have been shunned entirely—due to fake name or fake pedigree or both. Today, though, they do too much for institutions to be left out. They pay membership fees, buy benefit tickets and have a hand in planning parties as well as guiding the museum staff in its outreach and fundraising. The crowd is notably younger, and more single, and socially ambitious. They may not be among the few paying $7,500 for a seat at a table, but they are among the many willing to pay $250 for standing room only. The success of junior involvement has become so obvious that organizations now dedicate staff positions to managing young committees, which can bring in high-six-figure amounts in fundraising. “New York is a city for people who want to get ahead,” says journalist David Patrick Columbia, who chronicles countless philanthropic events on his website, New York Social Diary. “And getting on a committee in New York is a way to get in with certain groups of people.” On the whole, Columbia, who can be a stern judge, sees committee culture as one of hardworking volunteers who believe in the mission of their organizations. He singles out Sloan Kettering committee members as particularly serious, as did a recent article in Town & Country about Eleanor Ylvisaker, founder of


olen collection/getty images

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Billy Martin TAKES

New York

In 1975, the city was broke, ugly and dangerous. Even President Ford told New York to "drop dead." But when George Steinbrenner hired volatile Billy Martin to manage the slumping Yankees, he turned around not just a team but a city. In a new biography, Bill Pennington reveals the secret to Martin's magic.

By the middle of 1975, Billy Martin had already resurrected downtrodden major league baseball teams in Minnesota, Detroit and Texas. He was widely viewed as a miracle worker and dugout genius, and yet each team he revived ultimately fired him for warring with management. Every dismissal devastated Martin, but losing the Texas job left him especially disconsolate. Asked about his future in the Texas locker room, Billy wiped tears from his eyes and answered: “I have no idea. I love this game; baseball is my life. But at this very moment, I feel like telling the game to shove it.” Billy escaped to the mountains of western Colorado, where he went fishing with his wife, Gretchen, and their son, Billy Joe. For days, the phone at their Texas home rang unanswered. It was Gabe Paul, the general manager of the New York Yankees. Paul was acting on orders from George Steinbrenner, the team’s owner of two years. Steinbrenner had been suspended from baseball after he pled guilty to making illegal contributions to Richard Nixon’s election campaign. Officially, Steinbrenner could not conduct Yankee business. But when it came to picking the manager, he was still unquestionably running the show. The Yankees’ phone calls eventually made their way to Billy’s Colorado fish-

ing lodge, but he refused to come to the phone. As Gretchen said nearly 40 years later, “He had built three winning teams and got fired three times. He was the reigning manager of the year and yet he still got fired. He just wanted to fish right then and that’s all.” The Yankees were insistent. At the Denver airport hotel where Billy finally agreed to a face-to-face meeting, contract negotiations moved quickly. At one juncture, there was a squabble over a behavioral clause—“a good boy clause,” as Billy’s legal advisor called it. George Steinbrenner got on the phone and said, “Let’s face it, Billy, this is the job you’ve always wanted. I’m giving it to you.” It was not the last time that George would hold a carrot in front of Billy and demand that he take it. On August 2, 12 days after he was fired by the Rangers, Billy Martin was named Yankees manager. In a press conference in New York, Billy, his face flushed and his voice cracking, said the day was a dream come true. “This was the only job I ever wanted,” he told reporters. Eighteen years earlier, Billy, then the Yankees second baseman and the inspirational leader of five World Series-winning teams, had been banished from New York baseball after one too many barroom brawls. Now in middle age, three years short of 50, he was back as the Yankees manager. Billy had returned to Manhattan, but everything around him was different. In the mid-1970s, the Wall Street area was in decay, reflecting a faltering national economy. Times Square was no longer a place of panache and glitz but of peep shows, strip clubs and whorehouses. The city’s police force had been exposed as corrupt by former detective Frank Serpico. Strikes had damaged the public schools and services. Central Park rarely saw a pedestrian after 3 p.m.; people were afraid of being mugged. That was the year New York officials turned to the federal government for help with a fiscal crisis. President Gerald Ford announced he would veto any bailout. As the headline in the New York Daily News said in huge bold type: “Ford to City: Drop Dead!” Yankee Stadium, once a majestic symbol of the city itself, had been shuttered for renovations. That forced the Yankees to play the 1974 and 1975 seasons at Shea Stadium, squeezing in games whenever the Mets were on the road. Renting space from a fledgling baseball colleague was humiliating to the franchise of Ruth, Gehrig, DiMaggio and Mantle. The Yankees were dressing in another team’s locker room.

Excerpt from BILLY MARTIN by Bill Pennington. Copyright © 2015 by Bill Pennington. Used by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

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B

illy Martin is one of baseball’s most famous figures, a “big city, bright lights manager” praised for his ability to turn failing teams into World Series champions but vilified for his temper as he threw dirt at umpires and screamed at both players and team owners. Howard Cosell once said: “Some love him, some despise him. But he’s the best. Maybe ever.” Born into “a broken home surrounded by a shantytown” in Northern California, Martin was a professional baseball player and then a team manager, but his most famous job was “five loud stints as a central character in George Steinbrenner’s 1970s and 1980s mix of follies and championships.” Twenty-five years after Martin’s death in a car accident, award-winning sportswriter Bill Pennington decided to write about the manager “because I saw the fascination in people’s eyes when I told stories about him….Billy was beloved because he represented a traditional American dream: freedom. He lived independent from the rules. He bucked the system.” In this excerpt, Pennington describes the dawn of Martin’s epic career with the Yankees.


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Previous page: Billy Martin during his first stint with the Yankees in 1957, as a player. Clockwise, from top: Martin's mentor Casey Stengel (left) celebrates with Martin (center) and Dodgers' Chuck Dressen; Martin on the Sports Illustrated cover, 1978; Martin, managing the Texas Rangers, arguing with an umpire; Martin cavorting with Anjelica Huston on SNL, 1986.

And the ceiling leaked. “I had heard so much growing up about the Yankees and New York and then I got there and it was like we were playing in some minor league place, like Toledo or something,” said Lou Piniella, who the Yankees traded for in 1974. The Yankees that Billy inherited were not going to catch first-place Boston, a team thick with young talent. Billy’s goal was preparing for 1976. With Steinbrenner not allowed at the ballpark or the team offices, Billy developed a good working relationship with Gabe Paul. They agreed on a plan to completely remake the roster. The central goal was to give Billy some youth and quickness in the lineup. “I remember leaving the clubhouse after our last game in 1975,” Piniella said. “I had an awful season and I was hurt. Billy was standing at the door and he says to me, ‘Lou, don’t worry about it. Go home and get healthy. We’re going to win the pennant next year.’ “He told the other guys that, too, and we believed him. And those who didn’t believe him, it’s like he knew who they were because by the time we got to spring training, they were off the team.” Billy went to Florida early for spring training. He could not wait for the players to trickle in, to feel the presence of a team forming as a unit. Steinbrenner, who Billy did not know very well but of whom he was suspicious, was far away. His suspension from baseball was to extend until November 23. Late in the previous season, Steinbrenner had taken to taping pep talks for his players on an audio cassette. Prohibited from going into the locker room, George ordered Gabe Paul to have the speeches played for the team before certain games as a way to motivate them. The cassette player would be placed on a stool in the middle of the clubhouse with the volume turned high.


“Billy just kept everyone on edge,” trainer Gene Monahan said. “Right from the first inning, if he didn’t like an umpire’s call, he’d be on him. He’d yell, ‘OK, pal, that’s it. You’re off the Christmas card list. You owe me one now. You don’t get back on the Christmas card list until I get that call back.’ ” Most of the American League still considered the Boston Red Sox the team to beat. The Red Sox came to Yankee Stadium with the swagger of champions. In the first game of the series, a violent collision at home plate evolved into a brawl so vicious the Boston starting pitcher ended up with torn shoulder ligaments. The Yankees had a 10-game lead over the Red Sox by the Fourth of July and never looked back. The team drew two million fans for the first time since 1950, Billy’s rookie year. The boost in attendance was in part due to what everyone now called the new Yankee Stadium. It had some features rare at the time, like escalators to whisk fans to their upper deck seats and air-conditioned dugouts. The Yankees felt like kings in their new palace. Manhattan’s elite was not left out. From Billy Joel to Cheryl Tiegs to Gloria Vanderbilt, the bold-print set made regular appearances at Yankees games. It was the surest way to get into the gossip pages of the city’s tabloids. People did anything to be near the Yankees and the center of it all was No. 1: Billy Martin. After the team clinched the Eastern division and returned to New York from Detroit, more than 1,000 fans awaited them at LaGuardia Airport. One woman held

“Trust me. You do that, and we’ll win.” —Billy Martin

aloft a sign that said, “Today is the First Day of the Second Yankees Dynasty.” he Yankees’ American League championship series against the Kansas City Royals underscored the cultural divide in America. The Yankees were the moneyed blueprint of the future and Steinbrenner was the ultimate wealthy urban bully. He, and everything his team stood for, was reviled in Middle America. “It was like Billy said, ‘Watch this, I’m going to turn the pressure up a notch,’ ” Piniella said. “And he did.” When the Kansas City fans jeered Billy, he doffed his cap and blew kisses. A fierce, bitter struggle unfolded with the teams converging on Yankee Stadium October 14th for the fifth and final game of the series. An early Yankee lead was erased by an eighth inning home run by Kansas City’s George Brett, which tied the game. Billy had his pitcher hurl his next pitch at the head of the subsequent Kansas City batter. The game was not over. Leading off the ninth inning, in what has become an indelible moment in New York baseball history, Yankee first baseman Chris Chambliss lofted an inside fastball over the right field fence to win the game and series. Fans flooded the field, knocking Chambliss down before he could reach second base. After retreating to the dugout, Chambliss needed a 10-man police escort to fight his way back onto the field so he could touch home plate. Throughout the city, fans celebrated. Times Square filled like it was New Year’s Eve. Inside Yankee Stadium, in front of a national television audience, Billy doused George Steinbrenner with a bottle of champagne. Emotionally spent, the Yankees were swept by the Cincinnati Reds in the 1976 World Series. But the team did win the series in 1977, beating the Los Angeles Dodgers after such an incendiary summer that was turned into a book called The Bronx Is Burning. A year later, Billy Martin’s feuds with both Steinbrenner and his new star player Reggie Jackson raged. Billy was ultimately forced to resign the only job he ever wanted. He would be re-hired and dismissed by Steinbrenner another four times. A fifth comeback for Billy was in the works when he died. But in the summer of 1976, Martin and Steinbrenner, dominant sports personalities, peaceably combined to rebuild a storied New York institution. The Yankees have since won seven world championships, restoring the luster to a celebrated franchise.

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The first speech was just two minutes long. The next one a week later was a little longer. When the third speech went on for more than four minutes, Billy emerged from his office, stalked toward the middle of the clubhouse and kicked over the stool. Then he pushed the “stop” button on the cassette. The players roared their approval. About 10 days into the 1976 spring training, Baseball Commissioner Bowie Kuhn abruptly shortened Steinbrenner’s suspension and reinstated the owner immediately. Billy’s life as Yankees manager would never be the same. He knew that now Steinbrenner could deliver his speeches in person—and there would be no stop button to push. “George just loved to be seen and to be involved, and truthfully, I think he thought he was helping,” said Piniella. “At first I think it just amused Billy. George would come strutting by and say something like, ‘OK, Piniella, now let’s whip that bat around.’ Or he would watch the infielders and shout, ‘Step lively boys.’ “And Billy would be standing there with his hands in his back pocket biting his lip. Then George would walk to the next field and Billy would wait a minute and say, ‘You heard the man, step lively boys.’ And everyone would start laughing, turning away so no one could see.” But Steinbrenner was not just a buffoon the Yankees appeased. The players appreciated that he spent money on the roster. One of Steinbrenner’s first acts was to upgrade the Yankees’ travel arrangements. The team now had newer jets to transport them around the continent. Whatever the city, they stayed in the best hotels. “George was obsessed with the Yankees always looking first class,” said Bill “Killer” Kane, the Yankees traveling secretary from 1976 to the mid-1980s. “So we had to have the best planes, the best buses, the best bus drivers, the best made uniforms. Billy, meanwhile, wanted to make sure the players’ lives were easy and that they felt special. One of the first things he told me was that he wanted Chivas as the only Scotch served on the planes when we traveled. We had good food, too—shrimp cocktail, steak, you name it.” Kane, who smoked unfiltered Lucky Strikes and closed many a hotel bar, was in a unique position to assess the thorny, benevolent, multifarious relationship between Billy and George Steinbrenner. “They had a lot of affection for each other,” he said in 2012. “They were like two cousins who loved each other but couldn’t stop fighting. They rubbed each other the wrong way without even trying.” But Steinbrenner had brought Billy in to deliver the Yankees a pennant, and for the time being, he would get out of the way. Before the opening game of the 1976 season in Milwaukee, Billy assembled the team for a clubhouse speech. “He didn’t say much,” said Piniella. “The first thing was ‘We’re winning the division this year and then we’re winning the pennant.’ “Then the next thing he said was, ‘The only way that doesn’t happen is if you don’t believe in what I’m going to ask you to do. We’re going to scare the shit out of the whole league if you buy into what I’m trying to do. Trust me, you do that, and we’ll win.’ And then he walked out the clubhouse door and headed for the dugout.“ The second game of the 1976 baseball season sealed Martin’s hold on the players. Milwaukee had just won the game on a ninth-inning grand slam and the dejected Yankees began to trudge off the field. But Billy, eyes narrowing, roared out from the dugout and headed for first base umpire Jim McKean. “You called time out just before the pitch,” Billy was yelling. McKean had no response. Billy started screaming, “I saw you raise your hand—you were calling time out.” After conferring with the other umpires—and with the crowd watching uneasily—McKean conceded. No one, it appeared, had seen the gesture except Billy, who always claimed he could see the entire field in one glance. But the grand slam was nullified. The game resumed, and the Yankees won, 9-7. After the game, Billy nodded at his Yankees and said to Kane: “I’ve got them now.” Day by day, Billy challenged the rest of the American League to stop his refurbished, hard-charging Yankees. They ran the other teams ragged, stealing bases with abandon. Slides into bases were hard and tags were forceful. Pitchers weren’t afraid to throw inside. Billy worked the umpires from the dugout ceaselessly.


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The Sky’s the Limit

Year-old membership-based private aviation company Wheels Up is moving west and south—and soon everywhere. In addition to its new fleet of Beechcraft King Air 350i planes out of Houston and Dallas, the company, which offers flexible flying options and very few restrictions, has readied a West Coast expansion complete with Cessna Citation Excel/XLS aircrafts. “As we scale up our business this year—we are at roughly 40 airplanes and over 1,000 members right now—we’ve been able to cover more regions,” explains founder and CEO Kenny Dichter, who innovated the industry with Marquis Jet. “There is an enormous amount of wealth creation in areas like Texas and on the West Coast, and these customers want to use private aviation to their advantage.” And that sounds like an idea that’s about to take off! WHEELSUP.COM

Edited by NATASHA WOLFF


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Aspen’s iconic, members-only Caribou Club, which has played host to Jack Nicholson, Kevin Costner and Kate Hudson, celebrates its 25th anniversary this year. CARIBOUCLUB.COM

Step into the natural wonder of Colorado high country on an upland bird-hunting trip with Aspen Outfitting Company. Located in the St. Regis Aspen Resort, Aspen Outfitting, run by father-and-son team Jon and Jarrod Hollinger, also offers target-shooting lessons and fly-fishing trips on a private stretch of the pristine Roaring Fork River. 315 EAST DEAN STREET; ASPENOUTFITTING.COM

FRONT RANGE FAVES HEADING THROUGH THE FRONT RANGE ON THE WAY TO ASPEN? THESE TWO OPENINGS SHOULD BE ON YOUR RADAR

ASPENYOGASOCIETY.ORG

TODD REED In Boulder, jewelry designer Todd Reed’s studio and showroom is a destination that embraces contemporary elegance. “My designs are inspired by nature, feelings and moments in time,” the self-trained artist says. Reed’s cultural gems are all fabricated in 18-karat gold, palladium, platinum and silver and feature raw, rough-hewn diamonds. “Each piece of jewelry is one of a kind. I love getting to know a client and making a custom piece.” Gold, sterling silver and diamond cuff, $15,620 2015 PEARL STREET; TODDREED.COM

UNION STATION In Denver, the lure of luxury train travel has been reborn thanks to the restoration of downtown landmark Union Station. Inside are new shops and restaurants from Denver’s top talent—including Mercantile Dining & Provision by chef Alex Seidel and Stoic & Genuine by chef Jennifer Jasinski—as well as a new hotel called The Crawford. 1701 WYNKOOP STREET; DENVERUNIONSTATION.ORG

Philanthropist Gina Murdock and her husband, Jerry, recently founded The Aspen Yoga Society, which hosts free yoga and meditation sessions in parks around town. The couple also sponsor the Murdock Mind, Body, Spirit series at the Aspen Institute. “We support three to four events per year, and all of our events and activities give back to the community,” Gina says of the series. Speakers have included Deepak Chopra and Goldie Hawn.

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Stretching the Mind

ON THE HUNT

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BIRDS OF A FEATHER

THE INNOVATIVE DESIGN TEAM BEHIND REMI CANARIE TAKES CENTER STAGE

pointment only at their Wabash Avenue showroom. DuJour gets the lowdown from the duo. ON STARTING A FASHION LINE IN CHICAGO When we were at the school of the Art Institute, [CFDA-awardwinning Chicago fashion label] Creatures of the Wind was getting

national attention, and all of a sudden it seemed possible to come out of this city and make it on a more global level in the fashion industry.

ON THEIR AESTHETIC We loved the idea of Americana but wanted to figure out what the true spirit of that was, and how we could add to it.

ON WORKING TOGETHER We used to be each other’s biggest competition in college and we still have that attitude and use that energy.

ON THE REMI CANARIE CUSTOMER We are designing for ourselves, and for women who are ambitious and fearless. REMICANARIE.COM

EAT, DRINK, REPEAT

Two new spots sure to have you craving seconds

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MOMOTARO Though the Japanese aesthetic is usually less-is-more, at Boka Restaurant Group’s new Japanese eatery in the West Loop, more is more, thanks to fresh fish from around the globe and seasonally driven Japanese food, including ebi tempura, cedar-roasted kurodai, prawns and scallops from the coal oven and wasabi fried rice: small plates done big. 820 WEST LAKE STREET; MOMOTAROCHICAGO.COM LEGHORN CAFÉ When Chef Jared Van Camp launched Leghorn Chicken last year, the fried-chicken-sandwich shop sold out of its signature dish within hours each day. Now a new café in the former iconic Ohio House Coffee Shop starts with breakfast, where the early bird truly does get the worm—or at least the buttermilk breakfast biscuit with cheddar tots. 600 LASALLE STREET; LEGHORNCHICKEN.COM

The Plant Chicago

Imagine this utopian vision: a 93,500-square-foot meatpacking plant repurposed to house indoor vertical farms, local food producers and a year-round farmers’ market, operating completely off the energy grid. This vision is a reality at The Plant Chicago. Founded by John Edel of Bubbly Dynamics, construction is ongoing and already 11 tenants are producing food on-site. Working with Edel is nonprofit organization Plant Chicago. We chatted with Ryan Wilson, president of the board of directors. 1400 WEST 46TH STREET; PLANTCHICAGO.COM

WHAT IS THE MISSION OF PLANT CHICAGO? Our role is to help tenants reduce waste production and energy consumption, all the while making good, healthy food. TELL US ABOUT THE TENANTS Greens & Gills produces microgreens that sell in local Mariano’s stores; we have The Plant Chicago mushroom project, Pleasant House Bakery, an aquaponics farm and the wholesale distributor Great American Cheese Collection. The Plant is projected to provide 125 full-time jobs; the hope is that it can support a lot of smaller businesses. WILL THERE BE A RETAIL SIDE TO THE PLANT? The nonprofit was awarded a USDA farmers’ market promotion grant, which will allow us to build out a year-round weekly farmers’ market at the property. HOW WILL THE PLANT BE NET-ZERO? We will be taking waste destined for a suburban landfill and processing it within city limits to generate our own energy. To get to net-zero, we need the anaerobic digester [which converts waste into energy]. We are one of the first projects to use this great agricultural technology in an urban environment.

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Lisa Panza and Liz Patelski met when they were students at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and in 2013, the 27-year-olds launched their own line, Remi Canarie. The collection of women’s wear is freshly minimal in silhouette with rich colors and printed fabrics. The well-priced line is available by ap-

CHICAGO

Net-Zero Local Hero


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THE NEW YORKERS ARE COMING! BIG APPLE FAVORITES ARE GETTING READY TO INVADE CHICAGO—AND SOME ARE ALREADY HERE

WARBY PARKER Hipster-favorite eyewear purveyor Warby Parker knows Chicago: The brand brought its Class Trip (a traveling store in a school bus) to town in 2012, and it’s since been a block away at Bucktown’s Apartment Number 9, but this spring the shop will move into its own Lincoln Park storefront.

RAG & BONE It’s hard to remember boots before the Newbury boot. Scratch that. It’s hard to remember fashion before Rag & Bone. Marcus Wainwright and David Neville’s line of elevated basics has become a staple for fashion-forward men and women all over the world. With a new Gold Coast shop, now there’s 4,000 square feet of the duo’s coveted clothing right here in Chicago. 25 EAST DELAWARE PLACE; RAG-BONE.COM

SAN FRANCISCO

Calling the creative class: The Lake FX Summit + Expo conference (April 16–19) is a chance for artists and entrepreneurs to participate in workshops, panels, seminars and an artisan marketplace.

BROOKLYN BOULDERS The City of Big Shoulders could become the City of Big Boulders thanks to the arrival of this fitness import in the West Loop. Its massive 25,000-square-foot facility offers rock climbing terrain as well as spaces for weight training, cardio and capoeira classes and even a yoga studio. If that isn’t enough, there’s also a café, a shop and available shared workspace. 100 SOUTH MORGAN

851 ARMITAGE AVENUE; WARBYPARKER.COM

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SHAKE SHACK You may not believe that there’s room for another restaurant in River North, but who could say no to NYC’s coolest burger joint? Certainly not us when the menu boasts items like the SmokeShack burger (topped with bacon and cherry peppers), crinkle-cut cheese fries and hand-spun chocolate “concretes” (a.k.a. frozen custard).

STREET; BKBCHICAGO.COM

66 EAST OHIO STREET; SHAKESHACK.COM

Like a Virgin

It’s Sir Richard Branson’s first time. Opening a hotel, that is. For his Virgin Hotel, on Wabash Avenue, the travel, entertainment and aerospace titan partnered with chef Rick Gresh on five restaurants, including a rooftop bar with izakaya tapas. Virgin’s signature style is infused throughout its 250 “chambers” (there are also 40 suites and two “rock star” rooms). Clearly, Branson wants ; . Virgin’s first to be your best. 203 NORTH WABASH AVENUE VIRGINHOTELS COM

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GAME OF STONES “I got into the jewelry business by accident,” says designer Laura Pierson. For the Texas native, it all started when she rediscovered her old rock collection. Once she was reminded of her partiality to pebbles, it wasn’t long before Pierson was acquiring stones. “When I had my first cabochons in my hands, I just knew I was supposed to be making jewelry,” says Pierson, who hails from a family of jewelers. Her baubles are crafted using minerals, rocks and fossils—including dinosaur bones! THELAURAPIERSON.COM

Anteks Home Furnishings has specialized in rustic decor since opening in the Design District in 1985. Not only does it sell home wares, but the self-taught designer and owner Jason Lenox also furnishes houses and lodges across the country with his signature outdoorsy aesthetic. In late 2014, Lenox added a second store, Anteks Curated, in the Plaza at Preston Center. “It’s a distilled version of the first store with less furniture and more accessories as well as menswear,” Lenox explains. “This is an extension of what we do at the big store with an updated interpretation.” With this unique perspective, Lenox has thrived. “There aren’t any stores in Dallas selling hand-cut crystal stag barware, bespoke hatchets and an interesting selection of vintage one-of-akinds,” he says. “Call me crazy, but I think it’s cool.” 4004 VILLANOVA STREET; ANTEKSHOME.COM

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WHAT’S NEW IN FASHION

CALIFORNIA DREAMING MEETS SOUTHERN CHARM

A California native now living in Dallas, Nicole Musselman, the creative director behind the line KOCH, draws inspiration for her designs from the laid-back spirit and polished beauty of the West Coast. “Everything we do is about bringing together contrasting elements,” says Musselman, who started by designing handbags and leather goods. The now full-fledged collection, featuring pieces with names like “Sexiest Tomboy Ever” and “Seven Days in Capri,” is known for oversize cashmere cardigans, boyfriend blazers and printed tees, among other wardrobe staples. And while her influences come from all over (handprinted textiles recall Bangkok’s silk prints, while her most recent resort collection took its cue from Italy’s exotic culture), she keeps the production close to home—most of the fabrics are made by local Texas artisans. “I’ve always loved the way people from Texas live life to the fullest, with guts,” she says. “They aren’t afraid to try new things, wear color and dress up. It’s a fantastic place to design.” SHOPKOCH.COM


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THE SWEET LIFE A culinary-school grad looking for the perfect job, Dallas local Kate Weiser took a temporary “chocolate gig,” as she puts it. “It was then that I fell madly in love with chocolates.” This past summer, Weiser’s gourmet boutique opened its doors at Trinity Groves and currently doles out hand-painted bonbons that look as good as they taste—in flavors like key lime pie, strawberry basil and hazelnut latte.

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Parisian-born Dallas resident Jessica Barouche just introduced OuiPlease, a subscription delivery service of curated French goods, with fashion, beauty and home products. Each parcel is valued at $400 but costs just $150. OUIPLEASE.COM

3011 GULDEN LANE; KATEWEISERCHOCOLATE.COM

CULTURE SHOCK

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“BETWEEN ACTION AND THE UNKNOWN” Relive the careers of two influential Japanese artists, Kazuo Shiraga and Sadamasa Motonaga (above, his Piron Piron, 1975), through an exhibition of 60 paintings, drawings, photos, films, sculptures and installations, many of which have never been seen in the U.S. Begin tracing their trajectory with the selection of early efforts; fast-forward to their 18-year stint with the Gutai Art Association, an avant-garde group of postwar Japanese artists; and finally browse more recent pieces. At Dallas Museum of Art. February 8 through July 19. DMA.ORG

“THE COLLECTION OF NANCY LEE AND PERRY R. BASS” Marvel at the 30-plus works from the collection of husband-and-wife Texas philanthropists Nancy Lee and Perry R. Bass. Ranging from Impressionism to the postWWII era, the show includes paintings and sculptures from artists such as Monet, Renoir, Matisse, Chagall, Rothko (his masterpiece Untitled (Orange and Red), 1961) and Rodin, as well as two rarely seen works from Vincent Van Gogh and one of Picasso’s iconic still lifes, Fruit Dish, Bottle, and Guitar (1923). At the Kimbell Art Museum. March 1 through May 24. KIMBELLART.ORG

SOLUNA: INTERNATIONAL MUSIC & ARTS FESTIVAL This May, the Dallas Arts District will be brimming with culture—from visual art to music, film and more—thanks to the new Soluna: International Music & Arts Festival. Spanning several venues across the city, the inaugural threeweek event will host local and international artists alongside concerts and performances. The lineup also includes the world premiere of ReMix: Hollywood Exile, Swiss artist Pipilotti Rist’s video collaboration with the Dallas Symphony Orchestra. May 4 through May 24. MYDSO.COM

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ONE-STOP SHOPPING

One of the most significant additions to the nation’s fourth largest city is the four-years-in-the-making River Oaks District—a sprawling, 14-plus acre multi-use development positioned between the Galleria and Highland Village. “The raison d’etre is to provide a world-class market that speaks to a chic global audience,” says Hanna Struever, principal of Retail Portfolio Solutions. Just inside Loop 610 on Westheimer Road, the 650,000-square-foot development will round out the neighborhood’s luxury shopping with a slew of walkable hotspots, like a Tom Ford boutique to showcase the Texas-born designer’s womenswear, menswear, beauty, eyewear and accessories. The tree-lined streets are also home to Etro, Intermix,

Dolce & Gabbana, Cartier and Hermès. Developer OliverMcMillan’s River Oaks District would not be complete without its plaza, canopied by majestic Texas oak trees and surrounded by a diverse quintet of restaurants, including Fort Worth’s American Food and Beverage, Le Colonial (French-Vietnamese) and Toulouse Cafe and Bar (Belgian-French). “Our goal is to create a beautifully curated place in a lush, landscaped environment,” says Dene Oliver, CEO of OliverMcMillan. And there’s more: iPic Theater (a movie theater with a bar and lounge), office space, 279 contemporary residences and an Equinox gym. 4444 WESTHEIMER ROAD; RIVEROAKSDISTRICT.COM

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MANNING UP

H-Town Proud Hamilton Shirts debuts a clever spring

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collaboration honoring Houston

It started in 2008, when David Hamilton, co-owner of Houston’s Hamilton Shirts, first learned about the “Houston. It’s Worth It.” campaign, a grassroots crusade giving Houstonians a platform to express their passion for the city. “It really resonated with me as a clever, accurate representation of the city and what makes it special,” Hamilton says. He sought out HIWI co-creator Dave Thompson in praise of his concept and the pair kept in touch, resulting in prominent real estate for HIWI books in the Hamilton storefront and, more recently, a quirky idea to play around with a logo-style shirt. “We [wanted to make] something unexpected,” he says. “The more we played with that idea, the more we realized it was inspired by the HIWI campaign.” HIWI for Hamilton Shirts was born as part of the spring collection. Hand-cut and sewn in the USA, the tailored, 100-percent Italian cotton, button-down collar shirts are a “subverted take on a preppy classic and an homage to the HIWI campaign,” Hamilton says. Each $265 shirt is made-to-order with engraved mother-of-pearl buttons, a single pocket and embroidered logos (like a mosquito or an oil derrick) personally stitched at Hamilton’s Houston factory. Bonus: A portion of the proceeds go to Get Out Here Houston, a city alliance of more than 15 nonprofit groups. 5700 RICHMOND AVENUE; HAMILTONSHIRTS.COM

Plenty of guys take baths, but most proper tub accoutrements are frilly and femininely fragrant. This scarcity of man-friendly bath salts and soaks is what prompted Manready Mercantile owner and Texas native Travis Weaver to launch a line of grooming goods out of his apartment. “John Wayne took baths,” Weaver says, admitting that he himself also takes soaks with a whiskey in hand. That may explain why Weaver’s allnatural line includes whiskey bottles filled with Tub Soak and Tub Elixir. The goods are now sold in 120 retailers nationwide— including C.O. Bigelow—and online. In less than three years, Weaver has further developed a collection of American-made products (from jerky to small leather goods) and opened a store in a historic Heights building. “We support local, well-made goods with a great story,” he says. “And, ironically, women want to use our products even though they’re made for men!” 321 WEST 19TH STREET; MANREADY.COM


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DERBY DAZE!

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May marks the 20th anniversary of the nationally acclaimed Keels & Wheels Concours d’Elegance—a weekend-long classic car and vintage wooden boat show at Lakewood Yacht Club in Seabrook. The event has raised more than $1.4 million for local charities and draws thousands of spectators annually.

You don’t have to leave for Louisville to get lucky at the 141st Kentucky Derby. Hot Washington Avenue hangout Julep is a sure bet as it gears up for its debut Derby celebration in May. And since the restaurant and the derby’s signature cocktail share a name, it’s only fitting that Julep owner and master mixologist Alba Huerta (above) share the recipes for a pair of her top-selling signature juleps. “The Spiced Julep is my favorite,” she says. “It looks really gorgeous and smells amazing because you light it on fire and smell it while you make it!” As for what’s on tap during the most important horse race of the year, four julep variations will be flowing, along with dozens of other Southern specialties and small seafood plates. Serious revelers, however, will have to bring their own oversize hats. 1919 WASHINGTON AVENUE; JULEPHOUSTON.COM

SPICED JULEP

5 allspice berries ½-inch cinnamon stick 5 cloves .5 oz. overproof rum 12 mint leaves 1.5 oz. Laird’s Bonded Apple Brandy .5 oz. Ed Hamilton Pot Still Rum .5 oz. turbinado syrup Dash of angostura bitters Lemon zest Crushed ice Powdered sugar Fill a round spice ball with five allspice berries, ½-inch cinnamon stick and five cloves, then soak in overproof rum. Place mint leaves and turbinado syrup in the bottom of a glass and lightly press with muddler. Add rum and brandy. Rinse the muddler. Light the spice ball and drop it into the julep. Dash angostura bitters over the fire and zest lemon into flame. Add crushed ice and stir to dilution (about 20 times). Add a dome of crushed ice and garnish the drink with lemon zest, a sprig of mint and a sprinkle of powdered sugar. “It’s a burnt spice julep based off the Jersey Lighthouse Cocktail and the three spices used in a Tom and Jerry Cocktail,” Huerta says.

SPARKLING JULEP

12 mint leaves .5 oz. turbinado syrup .75 oz. cognac 2.5 oz. FRV100 Sparkling Gamay Crushed ice Powdered sugar In a Collins glass, place mint at the base of the glass and add turbinado syrup. Lightly press with a muddler, and then add cognac and FRV100 Sparkling Gamay. Remove muddler and add crushed ice. Stir to dilution (about 20 times) with a bar spoon, then garnish with a sprig of mint and a dusting of powdered sugar.

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Sticking Point The New Beauty Needle

Dr. Shelena Lalji is offering a new beauty boost at her medical and wellness spa: intravenous therapies. “Most people only receive around 15 percent of the active nutrients in oral supplements,” she explains. But a vitamin IV bypasses the digestive system, “allowing 100 percent of the supplements to be absorbed into the bloodstream.” Dr. Shel offers three IVs (High Dose Vitamin C, Myers Cocktail and Glutathione) said to target everything from fatigue, headaches, colds and allergies to chronic illnesses. 1437 HIGHWAY 6; DRSHEL.COM

KEELS & WHEELS CONCOURS D’ELEGANCE: JOHN BURGOYNE; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

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TAO Group, The Butter Group, EMM Group, SBE and The Light Group. “A New Yorker landing in Milan might need to go through five different people before he has any sense of the city’s hot spots,” says co-founder Gideon Kimbrell. “InList removes these obstacles.” Here he explains the concept. HOW DID YOU COME UP WITH INLIST? We were frustrated by the lack of an app providing the best events in each city. We saw a need for a global tool

that could revolutionize the booking process for the nightlife industry. WHAT VENUES MADE THE CUT? All of our team’s favorite nightclubs are ones you’ll find on the app! Part of our curation is knowing that each one brings a different quality each night. What a person likes is often a matter of preference, but what’s consistent about all of our venues is that they are a truly great experience.

WHAT’S NEXT? Many of our clients are global citizens, and we want InList available in every major nightlife capital they touch down in. We have a slate of new cities coming soon [the app currently operates in Las Vegas, Los Angeles, London, Paris and São Paulo, among others]. INLIST.COM

All the world’s a stage, especially in this town. Take in some Bard on the Boulevard with the Las Vegas Shakespeare Company, which recently opened a new rehearsal and performance space, complete with a gallery and dining area, following a $45 million expansion. LVSHAKESPEARE.ORG

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The latest advancement blowing up Sin City’s entertainment scene is InList, a new mobile app poised to revolutionize nightlife. The easy-to-use app takes the hassle out of booking reservations at carefully curated venues in Las Vegas and around the world, ensuring that nightlife veterans are well-connected on every continent. InList is partners with all the top nightlife brands, including

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IN THE KNOW

TESTING OUT INLIST, NIGHTLIFE’S MOST INNOVATIVE NEW APP

TOUR THE CITY’S BLUE-CHIP ART SCENE Check out Peter Lik photographs at Mandalay Bay, then head to the Wynn and Encore to see Jeff Koons’ Popeye and the magnificent Eiffel Chandelier, designed by Gustav Eiffel. Continue on to the Bellagio for the special exhibit “Fabergé Revealed.” Finish by viewing two James Turrell light installations at The Shops at Crystals. “It truly transformed our tram station as light saturates the space,” says Crystals senior VP Farid Matraki. + MORE ON LAS VEGAS

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BOULEVARD BREAKOUTS FROM CELEBRITY CHEFS TO OVER-THE-TOP BRUNCHES, SPRING’S GUIDE TO WHAT’S HAPPENING ON AND OFF THE STRIP

CAESARS PALACE EXPANDS AN EMPIRE Earlier this year, Caesars Palace opened the doors to Omnia, a 75,000-square-foot multi-level nightclub that boasts an energetic dance floor, a lounge and a rooftop garden with panoramic Strip views. Open next door is the new Searsucker Las Vegas, chef Brian Malarkey’s outpost for laid-back American comfort cuisine, also run by Hakkasan Group.

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3570 WEST LAS VEGAS BOULEVARD SOUTH; CAESARS.COM

HEATING UP SUMMERLIN WITH HEARTHSTONE The standout feature of the Red Rock Casino Resort & Spa’s recent $35 million investment may be Hearthstone Kitchen & Cellar. Headed by Brian Massie, executive chef of The Light Group, the restaurant serves rustic American food using simple, sustainable ingredients. Wood-burning ovens maximize flavor and offer a visual feast in the main room, but the chef’s table in the private boîte provides the ultimate luxury. 11011 WEST CHARLESTON BOULEVARD; HEARTHSTONELV.COM

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BRUNCH GOES BOTTOMLESS “Less is more” is never true in Vegas, even when it comes to brunch. Lavish offerings include a butler-style brunch from La Cave Wine & Food Hideaway at Wynn Las Vegas (wynnlasvegas.com), spectacular fountain views at the Bellagio’s Fountains Brunch at Jasmine (bellagio.com), Rose.Rabbit. Lie’s $100,000 tower of champagne at the Cosmopolitan (cosmopolitanlasvegas.com) and a jazz brunch at MOzen at the Mandarin Oriental (mandarinoriental. com), complete with a make-your-own wonton soup station. Bottoms up!


tastic pool.

The pool at Mandarin Oriental, Las Vegas. So cool when it’s so hot. Located on our 8th floor, the pool deck boasts lush cabanas and dining at the Pool Café.

2015 AAA Five Diamond Award and 2015 Forbes Travel Guide Five-Star Award winner. Located at the heart of the Las Vegas Strip. 3752 Las Vegas Boulevard South, Las Vegas, NV 89158. For reservations, visit mandarinoriental.com/lasvegas or call +1 (888) 881 9578.


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The Malibu spa and wellness center The Ranch at Live Oak debuts its first cookbook, The Ranch at Live Oak Cookbook, featuring its signature artful organic recipes, on March 17. THERANCHMALIBU.COM

TRIPLE THREAT

ALL THREE BEAUTY GURUS, THE STREICHER SISTERS TAKE UP RESIDENCE AT THEIR FIRST BEVERLY HILLS SALON

Always in demand thanks to their red-carpet and editorial beauty services for a celeb clientele (including Lea Michele, Anne Hathaway and Emily Blunt), sisters Jenn, Ashley and Kristie Streicher (above, from left to right) are making their services available to the public at Striiike, their new Beverly Hills studio. “There’s not the frenetic energy of a salon; it’s more of a space to hang out and also make people look good,” says Jenn. “We’re bringing this intimate redcarpet experience to the masses, with everything we need here to get someone ready for a big event.” Their in-house specialty: a 15-minute mini-makeover called the Lightning Strike. “We’re not taking off your makeup or wetting down your hair—we’re starting with what you have and giving it what we call a zhush.” 9278 CIVIC CENTER DRIVE; STRIIIKE.COM

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Luxury makeup purveyor Hourglass is expanding beyond cyberspace for its first brick-and-mortar outpost, on Venice’s chic Abbot Kinney Boulevard. The store, designed by L.A. architecture firm Standard (Maxfield, James Perse, Jenni Kayne), is just as gorgeous as you’ll look after a visit. 1351 ABBOT KINNEY BOULEVARD; HOURGLASSCOSMETICS.COM

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FRESH OUTPOSTS FOR ELITE EATERIES OPEN ACROSS LOS ANGELES

Haute Health

Achieving a mind-body balance has never been easier—or more inviting

THE PALM

Decidedly anti-dogmatic in its pioneering approach to drop-in, drop-of-a-hat guided meditation, UNPLUG MEDITATION—the brainchild of former Vogue and Glamour fashion editor Suze Yalof Schwartz and her team of all-star gurus—offers 30- to 45-minute check-in/check-out sessions focused on easy-access meditative escapes. “I had no idea it would be this powerful when I opened up,” says Schwartz. “Honestly, I made it for myself so that I could go, and the next thing I know we are helping people with severe chronic pain, anxiety, addiction and fertility issues.” 12401 WILSHIRE BOULEVARD; UNPLUGMEDITATION.COM

After launching its intense, innovative workouts and body reprogramming culture in laid-back, seaside Marina del Rey, THE STUDIO (MDR) brings a second location to Culver City, where celeb clients like Rosario Dawson can squeeze in workouts closer to their studio shoots. “There are a lot of people who find it difficult to come all the way west and brave the beach traffic,” says founder Lisa Hirsch. “We are about becoming the best that you can be and knowing that your best may not be a size 2.” Next up for the brand is a Playa Vista location. 13357 WASHINGTON BOULEVARD; THESTUDIOMDR.COM

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JOAN’S ON THIRD

It’s now just a few steps from Rodeo Drive to the ocean—or at least a taste of it. Sumptuous seafood supper club Ocean Prime’s new Beverly Hills outpost is its splashiest yet: The space at the apex of Wilshire Boulevard—which can accommodate 350 power diners—has already hooked the 90210 elite.

OCEAN PRIME

Dr. Christopher Vincent and his athletic-trainer brother, Paul, have specialized in shaping the peak-performance physiques of A-list athletes and actors with sports therapy and physical-training sessions for years. Now they’ve brought together a team of therapists, doctors and trainers to share their carefully cultivated approach to total health at their world-class wellness center, the ALTUS SPORTS INSTITUTE in Santa Monica. “Our vision is to bring a higher level of health and fitness—a level that professional athletes need and can be utilized by all,” says Christopher, citing the in-depth, multi-angled Olympic-level physical and mental assessments provided at the start of patient treatments.

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When The Palm’s legendary West Hollywood location of nearly 40 years moved to an upgraded 6,000-squarefoot Beverly Hills berth, regulars worried what would become of the long tradition of showbiz-centric caricatures—over 2,300, including Johnny Carson, John Wayne, Gregory Peck, Cher, Reese Witherspoon and even King Kong—drawn onto its walls by various members of the artistic Bird family, as well as other cartoonists of the time, over the years. “People were honored to be put on the wall,” says Bruce Bozzi Jr., the fourthgeneration family member overseeing the brand’s restaurants. “Those walls were a real time capsule, reflecting almost 40 years of life, of movie stars, studio heads, business people, music people. We put the word out: ‘If you’re on our wall and you want your picture, we’re gonna try our best to cut it out and wrap it up for you.’” Power players like Ron Meyer and Brad Grey made arrangements to have their images delivered, and Bob Newhart, Barbara Eden and Jerry Weintraub were among the devoted diners who claimed 800 of the caricatures, carefully chiseled out of the walls. “It was so emotional,” says Bozzi. “People were celebrating and crying—it was their dad, it was their mom, it was them when they were younger.” Five originals—including cartoony portraits of Jack Nicholson and Warren Beatty and couple images of Robert Wagner and Natalie Wood and Lee Majors and Farrah Fawcett—line the walls of the new Canon Drive locale, and Bozzi ponders who’ll be the first among a new era of caricatures. “If I launched with 50, two thousand would be offended,” he chuckles. 267 NORTH CANON DRIVE; THEPALM.COM

Talk about a first-class delivery: L.A.’s beloved catering company and gourmet marketplace is branching out. First, into a former Studio City post office to dole out its signature upscale-yetcozy fare and then to the Westside, just a block from the Pacific, at Santa Monica’s new luxury residences The Waverly. JOANSONTHIRD.COM

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NOSHING IN NEW NEIGHBORHOODS


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Ugo Colombo at the Brickell Flatiron sales gallery

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Amid the canyons of construction cranes that are transforming Brickell into a metropolis overnight lies the lot for Julian Schnabel’s Southern sanctuary. The New York-based artist with a knack for interior design has been tapped for Brickell Flatiron, a 64-story residential tower that will be among the tallest buildings in Miami (700 feet!) upon completion in 2017. Its common areas will be decorated with custom treasures inspired by Schnabel—who designed the Palazzo Chupi residential building in Manhattan’s West Village—such as shark’s tooth–shaped bronze light fixtures, an oversized biomorphic mantle and a vintage sofa upholstered in peacock fabric and fringe. “Every white marble lobby here started to look the same to me,” says the project’s Ugo Colombo, founder of CMC Group, a Miami development firm known for quality design long before starchitects infiltrated the landscape. “His style has a Spanish flair, too, that speaks to Latin Americans.” But will Miami Beach–favoring New Yorkers come? Colombo is pulling out all the stops, starting with a rooftop pool with 360-degree views. A glass exterior, solid wood doors and Snaidero kitchens with Miele appliances also compete with their contemporary counterparts across the bay. “I think what will appeal to urbanites most, though, is being able to walk outside and have so much within a single block,” he says. 1001 SOUTH MIAMI AVENUE; BRICKELLFLATIRON.COM

Miami gets even glitzier thanks to Tiffany & Co.’s new store in the Miami Design District. Under the eye of new design director Francesca Amfitheatrof, the brand has launched a successful T-themed collection of minimal everyday jewelry that comes in sterling silver and gold (above). “This store is our first freestanding, street-facing store in Miami,” says Jonathan Bruckner, the brand’s regional vice president. The new bi-level boutique carries the gamut alongside artwork by contemporary artists, hand-picked by the new designer. 114 NE 39TH STREET; TIFFANY.COM

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Sunny Centennial: Miami Beach celebrates its 100th birthday with a massive oceanfront concert on March 26.

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Luminaire saluted its 30th anniversary by commissioning Italian architect Piero Lissoni to revamp its 15,000-square-foot flagship in Coral Gables, nearly half of which is now dedicated to B&B Italia. “No other dealer in the U.S. owns a showroom built from the ground up that reflects their philosophy,” says the showroom’s president Nasir Kassamali. In addition to being a perfect setting to showcase the designer furniture maker as its official Southeast partner, Kassamali said his Bauhaus-inspired building’s interiors needed an update. 2331 PONCE DE LEON BOULEVARD; LUMINAIRE.COM

IN THE MEX

PIZZA PIZZA PIZZA

With a taqueria opening on every corner, Miami is beginning to resemble SoCal.

Miami has a palate for Neapolitan pies that use premium flour.

BODEGA TAQUERIA Y TEQUILA brings the street stand inside: the roomy restaurant’s kitchen is in an Airstream trailer. Choose from South Beach veteran toque Bernie Matz’s eight homemade hot sauces for tacos, like braised pork belly and guajillo pepper.

Dough rises 18 hours before baking in a 900-degree oven at PROOF. The oxtail topping has been the boîte’s biggest hit so far. 3328 NORTH MIAMI AVENUE; PROOFPIZZA.COM Located in a hip art and design compound, IRONSIDE also shows the love to vegans and gluten-free diners. Don’t miss its artichoke, pine nut and Parmesan salad.

1220 16TH STREET; BODEGASOUTHBEACH.COM

TAQUIZA grinds its own Mexican corn for blue masa tortillas and chips made daily. Adventurous tacos are Mexican truffle, which grows on corn stalks, and beef tongue simmered in Victoria beer. 1506 COLLINS AVENUE; TAQUIZAMIAMI.COM A homesick California girl launched COYO with an emphasis on natural ingredients. Healthier standouts are charred octopus and pickled jalapeño tacos and quinoa croquetas. 2300 NW SECOND AVENUE COYOTACO.COM

1220 20TH STREET; ANATOMYAT1220.COM

7580 NE 4TH COURT; PIZZAIRONSIDE.COM

Part of the Miami River’s burgeoning cuisine scene, cozy CRUST focuses on New York-style pizza in combos like prosciutto, fig and blue cheese. 668 NW 5TH STREET; CRUST-USA.COM Order a margherita or gorgonzola-and-pear pizza at the bella cavernous CIBO WINE BAR, while the suspended wine fairy grabs your bottle of Barolo. 200 SOUTH POINTE DRIVE; CIBOWINEBAR.COM

It was about time Miami got an over-the-top private gym, but at Anatomy at 1220, workouts are only the beginning. In addition to tapping interior designer François Frossard (The Forge, LIV), founders Chris Paciello, a nightlife impresario, and Marc Megna, a sought-after strength and conditioning coach, spared no expense. Members receive a full medical review and regular care like B12 shots at their onsite FITTLab and recovery treatments including massages and cold plunges. “It’s a one-stop shop for fitness,” says Paciello, of amenities that pump up even the most jaded gym rats. “Using the stationary bike and treadmill in the altitude chamber simulates working out in the mountains. It makes performing at sea level very easy after.”

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BEAUTY BLACK BOOK Spirit Fingers It’s time to nail down your appointment, because Dior Beauty is partnering with Vanity Projects, the Lower East Side’s high-end beauty atelier, to offer five graphic manicure designs (using Dior lacquers) inspired by the French house’s archives. The looks range from haute-couture funk to classic feminine, with designs including Mitzah’s Leopard Print (at left), Houndstooth Check and Impressionist Florals. “We wanted to stay rooted in Dior’s history but present a range of options

A LABOR OF LOVE

MAC’s new makeup collection clears the floor

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that were fresh and appealing to all ages,” says Vanity Projects founder

MAC Cosmetics has collaborated with fashion’s

Rita Pinto. DIOR.COM, VANITYPROJECTSNYC.COM

most passionate power couple, Isabel and Ruben Toledo, who have been a team creatively and personally for 30 years. The 45-piece makeup collection is smattered with golds and

PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION

50 CENTRAL PARK SOUTH LAPRAIRIE.COM

signature bold red lip, in whimsical black-andwhite packaging. “I like to be able to mix my reds and paint them,” Isabel explains. “If you dab it on, it’s just like you ate a fruit, or as if your blood has started to rise and you have that little bit of color in your lip.” Ruben created the ink illustrations that adorn the packaging, and Isabel, whose clothes are a favorite of Michelle Obama’s, had a vision for that too. “I wanted it to feel like paper and ink. Very graphic, simple, clean—and then have

SISLEY’S DOWNTOWN DEBUT Luxury French beauty brand Sisley has opened its first freestanding boutique in New York City. Located on Bleecker Street, the elegant shop features a spa room where patrons can enjoy one of 11 phyto-aromatic facials and a private makeup area that can be reserved for a makeup lesson or a special event. This oasis comes complete with a library where patrons can read art books and relax, as the brand wanted to evoke the feel of a modern Parisian apartment more than a mainstream boutique. With hand-drawn botanical wallpaper designed by Marthe Armitage, a bespoke chandelier created by Lindsey Adelman and a special light-gray-toned oak floor, it’s clear Sisley’s vision has come to fruition. 343 BLEECKER STREET; SISLEY-PARIS.COM

all the emotion and textures inside, so there would be a big contrast.” MACCOSMETICS.COM

ISABEL & RUBEN TOLEDO: JON GURINSKY; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

It’s no secret that the harsh winter months aren’t always kind to our skin. Luckily, this spring La Prairie at the Ritz-Carlton Spa takes control of the chill with its Cellular Swiss Ice Crystal Facial ($350). With the help of clear and rose quartz crystals and a lomi lomi massage, this relaxing 90-minute facial will clear away your stress and your dry skin. For more crystal magic at home, try the brand’s Cellular Swiss Ice Crystal Emulsion ($300) and Eye Cream ($225), launched this February, which provides ample hydration that supports anti-aging and leaves under-eye skin looking supple and renewed.

cool blues, along with variations of Isabel’s


RIFLESSI LUXURY EUROPEAN BRANDS AT NEW YORK‘S LOWEST PRICES

WEST 57 STREET (BETWEEN 5TH & 6TH AVE) NEW YORK, NY 212 935 4747 RIFLESSI.US

PHOTOGRAPHY RUPRECHTSTUDIOS.COM CREATIVE DIRECTION MAALIKOBASI.COM


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MILAN TAKES MANHATTAN For the past 50 years, Tincati has been synonymous with Milanese fashion, and fortunately it has translated well. Since the brand launched in 2010 in the U.S., it has become a favorite among discerning American men, who have taken a shine to the suiting, outerwear and accessories. And while Tincati has developed a dedicated following thanks to its presence on the Upper East Side—a charming boutique on East 67th Street opened just last fall—third-generation executive Roberto Tincati says that’s only the beginning. “We’re planning to go around the U.S.,” he says of the company’s new trunk shows, which will introduce its upscale Italian design to a whole new group of buyers

in cities including Miami, Chicago and Los Angeles. “We are able to create a fine product that works for all types of people, so why not bring it to them?” While the brand is used to customers coming to them— fans have been known to make a pilgrimage to the New York store to stock their wardrobes—Tincati says the trunk shows exhibit the daring, unfussy nature that’s apparent in the company’s outlook and its products. “Even in our classic suiting, there’s always a twist— something making it modern,” he says. “And that really appeals to the American customer.” 20 EAST 67TH STREET; TINCATIMILANO.IT ANTONIO TINCATI AND SON ROBERTO

Hide and Seek

Leather lovers are, well, having a cow over the debut of Valextra’s first freestanding boutique in New York City. The brand’s new Madison Avenue store features all of its signature leather goods and accessories, bespoke service and a new capsule collection made in collaboration with renowned designer Martino Gamper. The collection, exclusive to the Valextra’s two stores, features a distinct and colorful leather patchwork with geometric details on wallets and handbags. As executive director Marco Scarpella explains, “Our clients are more inclined to wear a brand that expresses itself through luxurious appeal in small details instead of a blaring logo. They would prefer to be recognized by those in the know.” The new store shares that sensibility. In creating the two-story space, Italian architect Marco Costanzi used materials like Ceppo di Grè stone, brass and the brand’s own leather to evoke the sleek minimalism of its designs. Shoppers can also customize accessories in a private salon upstairs, punctuating the Italian leather purveyor’s dedication to craftsmanship. 833 MADISON AVENUE; VALEXTRA.COM

Leather crossbody bag, $1,920, VALEXTRA, 646-649-5336

ANTONIO & ROBERTO TINCATI: WIREIMAGE; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

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A LOOK INSIDE THE EXPANDING TINCATI APPAREL EMPIRE


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Downtown shopping emporium Castor & Pollux is adding a green beauty space called CAP Beauty. It will sell synthetics-free products from organic beauty brands like Intelligent Nutrients and Tata Harper and offer facials and body treatments. CAPBEAUTY.COM

Surf & Turf

GARR POWER

WHAT DO NEW YORK’S MOST HIGH-PROFILE SPLITS HAVE IN COMMON? THIS HARD-CHARGING MATRIMONIAL LAWYER, WHO’S AS CHARMING AS HE IS SMART

GARR: GROOMER: SUSAN PHEAR; CAP BEAUTY: JOHN BURGOYNE

Photographed by KATHRYN HURNI

When Ivana Trump quipped

forties, joining the exclusive

This kind of cordiality is

“Don’t get mad, get every-

circle of New York’s top

something Garr’s often

thing” in the 1996 comedy

matrimonial attorneys. “I

recognized for.

The First Wives Club, she

was the same lawyer,”

wasn’t kidding. The original

recalls Garr, “but all of a

who was able to deal with

Mrs. Trump’s 1992 divorce

sudden was getting clients

Donald and whom Donald

from The Donald made

with more zeros.”

liked and respected,” says

headlines, but what people

Like News Corp. chair-

“Ira was the one attorney

Ivana Trump. “He can be

didn’t know was that Ivana

man and CEO Rupert

very engaging and charm-

had a secret weapon:

Murdoch, who, when he

ing.” Garr’s easygoing

attorney Ira E. Garr.

split from Wendi Deng in

demeanor belies an acute

2013, hired Garr to repre-

intelligence. “I get asked

sent him.

very often by women

“Ira was constantly coming up with different ideas to resolve any issues

After a quick settlement

clients, ‘Can you be tough

that evolved,” Ivana says

agreement and court

enough for my husband?’ ”

of working with Garr. “He

appearance in November

he says with a grin. “And I

made me feel he had my

2013, the press noted that

always ask them the ques-

best interest at heart.”

at its end Deng crossed

tion: ‘Do you want tough

ZUMA: 261 MADISON AVENUE; ZUMARESTAURANT.COM;

The high-profile divorce

the courtroom to thank

or do you want smart?’ ”

HUNT & FISH CLUB: 125 WEST 44TH STREET; HFCNYC.COM

led to Garr, then in his early

her husband’s attorney.

— PAUL BIEDRZYCKI

+ MORE ON NEW YORK CITY @ DUJOUR.COM /CITIES

211

Midtown’s certainly cooking these days. Japanese devotees are flocking to London and Miami import Zuma for Chef Rainer Becker’s izakayastyle eats (above) and inventive cocktails. At Hunt & Fish Club, former Porter House New York chef Jeff Kreisel is serving classic cuts, shellfish towers and succulent sides alongside caviar, oysters Rockefeller and bone marrow French onion soup.


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BLADES OF GLORY

FLYBLADE.COM

SAN FRANCISCO

Juice Press has taken its first step out of New York with its 20th store, opening in Greenwich, Connecticut, on Greenwich Avenue. The Yankees’ Mark Teixeira, who’s also an investor, is a local resident. JUICEPRESS.COM

IN THE TRENCHES

212 WHITE HART INN: LEE CLOWER PHOTOGRAPHY; JUICE PRESS: JOHN BURGOYNE; TRENCH: BRIAN FERRY; VAVRA: VANESSA TIERNEY; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

PA L M B E A C H

Polyamide trench , $495, LE TRENCH, le-trench.com

Aviation app Blade is lifting off in a big way. The service, which uses, among others, the fleet of Eurocopter A5350 equipment from Liberty Helicopters (run by CEO Drew Schaefer and Patrick Day, Sr.), offers local travelers the ability to crowdsource flights or purchase seats on crowdsourced flights. And the company, which launched last Memorial Day weekend with NYC-Hamptons helicopter service, is only growing. As of early this year, Blade (founded by Warner Music Group’s Rob Wiesenthal) offers service between New York City and Connecticut’s Mohegan Sun casino, and its Bounce Service is giving well-heeled commuters another lift, from Teterboro Airport and JFK Airport to Manhattan—a ride that takes all of five minutes.

TRI-STATE

ORANGE COUNTY

A BEAUTY EXEC ON THE VINTAGE PARISIAN COAT THAT STARTED A CRAZE

OHEKA CASTLE

WHITE HART INN

Home Away from Home OHEKA CASTLE The grandeur of Oheka Castle is carried through in the hotel’s new bar and restaurant concept, a roomy space modeled after French châteaus. “Given Oheka’s European architectural roots, the restaurant made perfect sense,” says Gary Melius, the property’s owner. “Plus, it saves me a lot in airfare.” The menu features a mix of classic European dishes and homey American staples like veal-chop saltimbocca and four-cheese mac and cheese. “I want our guests to feel like they are in Europe right here in America,” says Melius. 135 WEST GATE DRIVE, HUNTINGTON, NEW YORK; OHEKA.COM

WHITE HART INN A casual winter stroll to the White Hart Inn turned out to be a life-changing experience for Redbook editor-in-chief Meredith Rollins and her husband, Conley. The two immediately fell in love with the property and quickly decided to reopen the centuries-old historic hotel, which had been closed for four years. “All of a sudden what seemed like a lark began to look crazy, but possible,” explains Meredith. The two took it upon themselves to transform the shuttered countryside hideaway into an elegant home away from home. “People’s free time is at such a premium, you’ve got to be spending it on something worthwhile,” Meredith says. Indeed, today the original Matthew Patrick Smyth–designed interiors (with a few updates from designer Bill Katz) host an array of guests against the scenic backdrop of the Appalachian Trail. 15 UNDER MOUNTAIN ROAD, SALISBURY, CONNECTICUT; WHITEHARTINN.COM

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Dianne Vavra, the senior vice president of public relations at Dior Beauty, didn’t think much of the chic leopard-print trench coat that she purchased in the Marais district of Paris—that is, until she got back to the States. “Women would stop me on street,” the Long Island resident recalls. “A Barney’s buyer ran up the escalator stairs to ask me about it and Bill Cunningham chased me down the street to take my picture. I felt like I had something.” Soon after, she isolated her favorite parts of the coat—including its bracelet-length sleeves and perfectly poppable collar—and her own Le Trench line was officially born this past fall. Stars from Sharon Stone to Charlize Theron have been spotting wearing Vavra’s water resistant, machine-washable polyamide overcoats, which come in black-and-white snakeskin, red or black. LE-TRENCH.COM


promotion

SPOTLIGHT

new york

The art of the smile NYC’s Real-Life Tooth Fairy Promotes Dental Health, One Piece of Art at a Time When Dr. Lee Gause arrived in Man-

who would normally go without dental

hattan nine years ago, he made it a

care due to financial constraints.

point to deliver the highest quality dental care with a focus on advanced technology and patient care. The exceptional service and its results have been winning over patients—many even fly across the country for an appointment. But his proudest achievement is the newly launched Smile

Monthly art shows are curated specifically for Smile Design Gallery, with 100 percent of the value of art sold matched in free dental care for those in need. To date, over $200,000 of charitable dentistry has been provided to over 500 patients.

Smile Design Manhattan is located at 24 West 57th Street between 5th and 6th Avenues and specializes

Design Gallery. Working closely with artists

Participating artists and galleries include:

and galleries, Dr Gause merges a passion

Takashi Murakami, Swizz Beats, Chi Modu,

for art with dental philanthropy. He has

Salvador Dali, Marc Chagall, Ron Agam,

successfully tapped the art market to pro-

URNY, the Martin Lawrence Gallery and

212.421.3418

vide much needed funds to treat patients

Klein Sun Gallery.

smiledesignmanhattan.com

in general, cosmetic and implant dental care.


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FAR EAST FEASTS DIN TAI FUNG

COSTA MESA WELCOMES A PAIR OF ASIAN FAVORITES

Taiwan’s internationally renowned Din Tai Fung restaurant brings its signature Taipei-style xiao long bao soup to South Coast Plaza with one of its most epic outposts to date, an 8,000-square-foot expanse highlighted by a central exhibition kitchen devoted solely to the creation of delicately steamed dumplings. 3333 BRISTOL STREET; DINTAIFUNGUSA.COM

Popular East Hampton, New York, eatery Babette’s Kitchen has opened a location in Newport Beach’s Crystal Cove Shopping Center. The all-day restaurant will serve hearty yet healthful fare like sweet potato gnudi and local-vegetable tagines alongside fresh-pressed juices. BABETTESOC.COM

Grrrl Power

850 SAN CLEMENTE DRIVE, NEWPORT BEACH; OCMA.NET

SAN FRANCISCO

FITNESS FANATICS

With a legacy of exquisite, distinctively flat, wide and curly noodles dating back nearly six decades to a local eatery in the small northern Japanese town it’s named for, Kitakata Ramen Ban Nai has landed in the ramen-crazy O.C. with its first-ever U.S. restaurant. 891 BAKER STREET; RAMENBANNAI.COM

The early ’90s feminist movement that became known as Riot Grrrl carved out its own unique place in the creative and sociopolitical landscape. Given Riot Grrrl’s deep SoCal roots, it makes sense the Orange County Museum of Art is staging “Alien She”—running from February 15 through May 24— a multimedia exhibition spotlighting seven artists tied to the movement, including Tammy Rae Carland, Faythe Levine and Miranda July (above left).

PA L M B E A C H

Newport Beach’s new buzzy brands

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KITAKATA RAMEN BAN NAI

ORANGE COUNTY

SOUP DUMPLINGS AT DIN TAI FUNG

ORANGE COUNTY

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RAISING THE BARI Considering New York magazine dubbed Bari Studio’s high-intensity combination of sensory dance cardio, trampoline work and muscle sculpting “NYC’s best hybrid workout,” it’s no surprise that a West Coast branch of the fitness firm founded by Alexandra Bonetti Pérez has emerged to tone local beach bods.“Newport Beach is a healthy and fit community that would love our product,” says Bari’s method director Kara Griffin. 2125 SAN JOAQUIN HILLS ROAD; THEBARISTUDIO.COM

OUT-À-PORTER Just because you’re ready to work up a sweat doesn’t mean you can’t do it in style, as //Out Incorporated has proven with its luxe line of fashionable fitnesswear. Helmed by former Sephora execs Leah Hundsness, Libby Amelia and Lauren Gill, the activewear brand offers sports bras, bodysuits, tissue-thin tanks and perspiration-resistant accessories, which, the founders agree, allowed them to hit the gym “minus the motivation motifs and lime-green detailing.” OUTINCORPORATED.COM

BABETTE’S KITCHEN: JOHN BURGOYNE; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

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On January 17th, Palm Beach Modern Auctions held a sale of a few dozen pieces of personal correspondence (rarely seen at auction) by Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, along with photographs of the former first lady in Palm Beach. The lot sold for $28,400.

GET AN INSIDE LOOK AT THE BREAKERS RESORT’S NEW FITNESS FACILITY. GENERAL MANAGER TRICIA TAYLOR TALKS TO DUJOUR ABOUT ITS CORE ATTRACTIONS THE SPACE “The 6,000-square-foot, indoor/outdoor oceanfront facility raises the bar on what travelers expect of hotel fitness. The layout and utilization of space was meticulously planned with expansive 10-foot-tall windows showcasing ocean views, as well as a terrace for outdoor workouts.”

THE CLASSES “We offer 60 different classes, ranging from the basics to twists on the classics, covering all fitness levels. Highlights include Beach Boot Camp Stretch, Paddleboard Yoga, Sunrise Meditation, Hooping and more. There are also fitness classes for children available, such as Yogi Kids.”

THE EQUIPMENT “Ocean Fitness provides the most advanced equipment available on the market.” This includes Life Fitness’ Synrgy360, Technogym’s Kinesis One and Technogym’s Artis Collection, in addition to the crème de la crème of strength and cardio equipment.”1 SOUTH COUNTY

A Stroke of Genius

ROAD; THEBREAKERS.COM

Nestled in Via Mizner is a new location for the St. Tropez–based A BEACHY BOUNTY swimwear line Vilebrequin. Vilebrequin finds a home off of Inside, shoppers will find— Worth Avenue along with signature tropical decor—collections for men, women and children that include classic swimsuits, resortwear and accessories. “The theme of the spring collection is ‘the tale of the four seasons,’ ” explains the brand’s President of the Americas, Brian Lange. “You will find flowers and fruits as Swimsuits, from $170, VILEBREQUIN, us.vilebrequin.com well as sea life.” 33 VIA MIZNER

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As a Palm Beach habitué since the age of three, art collector Beth Rudin DeWoody has an immense appreciation for the sunny city. “My grandparents went there probably in the 1940s, and I started to go down with my parents for spring break every year,” explains DeWoody, who spends half her time at her West Palm Beach home and the other in New York City. “The Palm Beach Country Club was always really fun in those days. I remember being 10 years old at the cabanas and I saw John F. Kennedy there, smiling at me.” Now DeWoody is smiling on Palm Beach as the Norton Museum of Art hosts “The Triumph of Love: Beth Rudin DeWoody Collects,” an exhibition of her extensive art collection, from February 8 through May 3. Cheryl Brutvan, the Norton’s curator of contemporary art, has her own approach to the material. “It’s always great to have another set of eyes look at the collection,” says DeWoody. “It’s not easy to choose.” Indeed, DeWoody says picking pieces herself would be too difficult. “I’d love to see everything in the show, but obviously, that’s not possible. I’m hoping that my Jack Pierson word piece floor sculpture made it in.” And she’s always on the hunt for new acquisitions at local galleries, adding that, “Sarah Gavlak’s gallery is my favorite but I’ve bought from Paul Fisher and Holden Luntz galleries over the years.” 1451 SOUTH OLIVE AVENUE; NORTON.ORG

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TKTKTKTKTK PHOTO CREDITS STYLE?

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MODERN AUCTIONS: JOHN BURGOYNE; NORTON MUSEUM OF ART, TOP: COLLECTION BETH RUDIN DEWOODY, MONICA MCGIVERN PHOTOGRAPHY; BOTTOM: © BENJAMIN ARTWORKS, REPRODUCED BY PERMISSION, MONICA MCGIVERN PHOTOGRAPHY; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

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SF-based Benefit Cosmetics is attempting to top its best-selling They’re Real! mascara with its new Roller Lash product. The lashgripping brush, modeled after old-school velcro rollers, features rubber hooks to grab and curl lashes. BENEFITCOSMETICS

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.COM

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TASTE THE FLAVOR

Restaurant discovery app Flavour helps discerning diners uncover the most notable—and sometimes under-theradar—restaurants in San Francisco. Backed in part by Scripps Networks Interactive and developed by veteran techies Emily Keeton, Rohit Gupta and Khalid Meniri, the app’s platform isn’t ranked by user reviews or paid advertising. Instead, its restaurant list is distilled from critics’ picks and input from industry experts. Here, Flavour’s team of developers shares their local favorites. GETFLAVOUR.COM

DAVID AND SHELLEY SINEGAL

PLIN “While the chef’s lineage couldn’t be more local, Plin [in the Mission] is making its mark outside city limits too,” says Gupta. “The Raviolo al Uovo is excellent.”

IN VINO VERITAS

PLINSF.COM

LA PALMA MEXICATESSEN “Everyone knows how important Mexican cuisine is to the streets surrounding Mission and Valencia, and this place remains the unsung hero,” says Meniri. “With their daily produced masa, we’d put just about anything on their tortillas.”

GOOD BUSINESS RUNS IN THE FAMILY. DAVID SINEGAL, SON OF FORMER COSTCO CEO JAMES SINEGAL, MAKES A NAME FOR HIMSELF WITH A LAVISH NEW WINERY

estate-grown Cabernet Savignon and Bordeauxstyle blends. His inaugural releases will include two exclusive bottlings: 2013 Sinegal Estate Cabernet Sauvignon ($90, only 750 cases produced), and 2013 Sinegal Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon ($195, only 300 cases produced). The release of Sinegal Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon will follow in spring of 2016. Local firm Signum Architecture oversaw the remodel of both the tasting room and produc-

tion facility. “The new owners wanted to respect the historical winery and introduce a fresh energy with new technology and enlightened organization,” explains the firm’s partner architect Juancarlos Fernandez. Guests to the property can also enjoy paddleboats on the two-acre private lake and tastings on the estate’s hillside vista or at the classic poolside cabana retreat. 2125 INGLEWOOD AVENUE, ST. HELENA; SINEGALESTATE.COM

LAPALMASF.COM

COI “Fine dining at its apex in the Financial District. Regardless of what other sources and lists may say, Coi will remain one of our favorites,” maintains Keeton. COIRESTAURANT.COM

+ MORE ON SAN FRANCISCO @ DUJOUR.COM /CITIES

STATE BIRD PROVISIONS “Stuart [Brioza] and Nicole [Krasinski]’s dim sum service has taken the Bay Area by storm,” says Keeton of the Western Addition James Beard award winner. “Every time I return for those sourdough pancakes the whole experience is more amazing.” STATEBIRDSF.COM

BENEFIT COSMETICS: JOHN BURGOYNE; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

Historic St. Helena property the Inglewood Estate is being preserved under the direction of winemaker David Sinegal, who purchased the famed parcel in 2013. Now Sinegal Estate, the 30-acre retreat situated at the base of the scenic Mayacamas Range has started production. “This is a quintessential wine country destination that celebrates the area’s original spirit of adventure and exploration,” Sinegal says. Sinegal focuses on


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SAN FRANCISCO ART NEWS

100 34TH AVENUE; FAMSF.ORG

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GALLERY GUY

Aimé Maeght opened the original Galerie Maeght in Paris in 1945 with an exhibition of drawings by Henri Matisse. Seventy years later, Maeght’s grandson Jules has brought the family’s unparalleled eye for quality and skill for nurturing artists to Hayes Valley. His gallery’s inaugural show, “Art in Motion,” which opened in November 2014, included works by Pol Bury, Alexander Calder and Vassily Kandinsky alongside those of local talent like Tracey Snelling and Kal Spelletich. Housed in the historic Gough Street studio of legendary San Francisco inventor Rube Goldberg, Maeght’s gallery continues his family’s legacy and commitment to artists and creative experimentation. 149 GOUGH STREET; JULESMAEGHTGALLERY.COM

50 HAGIWARA TEA GARDEN DRIVE; DEYOUNG.FAMSF.ORG

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UNZIPPED

Fashion is flourishing with the opening of “High Style: The Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection” at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco’s Legion of Honor Museum (March 14 to July 19). Tracing the evolution of fashion from 1910 to 1980, the collection of more than 60 ensembles is comprised of seminal pieces by some of the 20th century’s most notable American and European designers (Jeanne Lanvin, Elsa Schiaparelli, Christian Dior, Charles James and Madeline Vionnet). “This is a unique opportunity to celebrate masterworks of both American designers and early 20th century French couturiers,” says Curator of Costumes and Textile Arts Jill D’Alessandro.

Art is always in bloom, particularly with the arrival of “Bouquets to Art” at the de Young Museum on April 14. In its 31st year, the annual weeklong exhibition pays tribute to works in the de Young’s private collection as local floral designers create extraordinary arrangements inspired by the museum’s masterpieces. Visitors can participate in a myriad of events, including demonstrations by prominent designers and hands-on art activities for children. Proceeds benefit the education programs at the de Young and the Legion of Honor.

SAN FRANCISCO

Smell the Roses


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THE IN CROWD

Watch Out

ADRIANA LIMA AND LENNOX LEWIS

WHO: Georges Kern, Emily Blunt and Karolina Kurkova WHAT: Dinner and cocktails during Art Basel Miami Beach for IWC’s “Timeless Portofino” photography exhibit WHERE: W South Beach Hotel

RUSSELL SIMMONS AND JASON BINN

JAN MILLER

SAMMY SOSA AND EDOUARD D’ARBAUMONT SOLANGE KNOWLES PASCALINE SERVAN-SCHREIBER AND TONY ROBBINS

GEORGES KERN, JASON ALEXANDER AND MICHAEL BAY

KEN KURSON

KAROLINA KURKOVA AND EMILY BLUNT

CAROL BURNS AND TONI HABER

JENNINE GOURIN AND HOWARD LORBER

RON KRAMER AND NEAL SROKA

RACHEL AND RICHARD ASH AND DARREN LISITEN

NICOLE OGE AND MICHAEL LORBER

TONY ROBBINS AND DONNA KARAN

v

Rockin’ Robbins WHO: Tony Robbins, Donna Karan and Howard Lorber WHAT: A release party for Robbins’ book “Money: Master the Game” WHERE: Catch Roof in NYC

JASON BINN AND SAGE ROBBINS

GABE TESORIERO, LAURA SWANSON AND NEAL GIBEAU

WIREIMAGE

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JAMES MARSDEN


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PALOMA TEPPA, BARRY STERNLICHT AND YAIR MARCOSCHAMER ALEX RODRIGUEZ

MEGAN MULHOLLAND

BRUCE WEBER

STARWOOD CAPITAL’S LIUBASHA ROSE AND JULIA CHRISTOPHER

MAYOR PHILIP LEVINE AND ROMERO BRITTO

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LISA BYTNER AND ELLIOT WRONSKI

LANCE BASS

MICHAEL TURCHIN

BARRY AND JAMES K. STERNLICHT

ALONZO AND TRACY MOURNING

JON SECADA

RICHARD LEFRAK AND CAMILLE DOUGLAS

TERI BENN AND THE MIAMI HERALD’S EVAN BENN

THE SHRIVER FAMILY VERNE TROYER

MARCUS GRAY

STACY POWELL

MISS UNIVERSE GABRIELA ISLER

Beach Buddies

ANTHONY SHRIVER

CHRIS GAY

WHO: Bruce Weber, Anthony Shriver and Alonzo Mourning WHAT: The 18th annual Best Buddies Miami Gala WHERE: Fontainebleau Miami Beach

ONE LOVE: WORLD RED EYE; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

THE IN CROWD

One Love

WHO: Richard and Harry LeFrak and Barry Sternlicht WHAT: Brunch with designer and architect Debora Aguiar WHERE: 1 Hotel & Homes in South Beach


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FAMOUS LAST WORDS

Opera star Renée Fleming’s handwriting hits an ambitiously high note

Notice her exquisite spacing. The text is nicely laid out, like a painting surrounded by a wide margin. There is an artistry to everything she does.

Her handwriting flies, forging ahead. She’s busy, on the move.

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The word “of” looks like a musical note. People with a musical affinity often write that word so it looks that way.

There are many sharp angles in this handwriting. Look at the word “unique.” Angles denote the strong worker: decisive, driven, and focused.

Her signature is larger than the text. People who are used to being the center of attention often show a certain largeness in their signature.

F

or Renée Fleming, the four-time Grammy Award–winning soprano—and arguably the world’s most celebrated opera singer—the past year has presented a series of larger-than-life fi rsts. Fleming performed the National Anthem at the Super Bowl in 2014, and this spring she’ll make her inaugural appearance on Broadway in the upcoming Living on Love. Her handwriting above sheds some light on her momentum. “In terms of the speed at which she writes, she reveals herself to be highly dynamic,” says graphologist Annette Poizner. “She thinks fast, and likes to keep the show moving.”

Fleming says this quote, by the legendary choreographer Martha Graham, has been a source of inspiration to her over the years. “For those of us who are interpretive performers, we’re taking someone else’s creative effort and expressing it to the world, while adding a little bit of our own to it,” she says. “For singers to remember that your artistic statement is completely your own is an extraordinary gift.” Fleming will be putting her own stamp on Living on Love, a comedy about an opera diva and her maestro husband who fall for their younger assistants. The singer says she’s thrilled by the

opportunity to try something new. “I’ve spent my entire career playing women who are victimized or are tragic,” she explains. “I’ve never been able to do comedies but have always loved making people laugh.” Poizner thinks it should come as no surprise that Fleming is excited by the prospect of a new experience. “If this was the handwriting of a male, we would call him ‘a renaissance man.’ She is a renaissance woman,” she says. “There is a certain intensity about her. Imagine that you are so bright and there are so many things you can and want to do. The moments are hardly enough.”—FRANCES DODDS


FLÂNEUR FOREVER

Hermes.com

Spring 2015  

Jane Fonda reveals secrets of the spotlight; discovering the reinvented American socialite; the best spring accessories and more.

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