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FA L L 2 014

SEVEN DOLL ARS

CHIC A G O // D A L L A S // HOU S T ON // L A S V E G A S // L O S A NGE L E S // MI A MI // NE W YOR K // H A MP T ON S // OR A NGE C OUN T Y // S A N F R A NCI S CO DUJOUR .COM

DUJOUR.COM

FALL 2014

The reawakening of

KATIE

HOLMES DREE ALSO RISES: HEMINGWAY &

FALL’S BEST FASHION IN SPAIN GYM WARS? THE SECRETS BEHIND THE FITNESS EMPIRE FEUDS

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BEHIND THE SCENES

TO HAWAII, WITH LOVE

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D

uJour’s fall issue gave us the opportunity to explore Hawaii through the eyes of two prominent residents; in the process, we found ourselves entrenched in a passionate love affair with the Aloha State. First, we spent time getting to know one of the most promising young guns in politics, Democratic congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard—who calls Oahu home and still relishes the chance to take a dip in the ocean every evening after work. Then, just 70 miles west, we paid a visit to Pierce Brosnan’s hideaway on the North Shore of Kauai, where he and his wife, Keely Shaye Brosnan, go to escape the whirlwind of life in Hollywood. The property’s sweeping ocean views were a picture of paradise, rivaled only by the vistas at The St. Regis Princeville, a 251-room resort that overlooks Hanalei Bay. It was there, over breakfast at t he hot el’s Ma k a n a Ter race, that we fell even harder for the islands. As we indulged in fresh squeezed juice a nd t a r o p a n c a ke s , a p e r fe c t ly fo r m e d double rai nbow ap pea red , li ke mag ic, o v e r t h e b a y. T h e property, too, is special in its own right: Li ke a ny St. Reg is, the accommodations were luxe and the staff exceedingly helpful, but it also offered a surprising sense of authenticity that’s uncommon at big hotel outposts. We tried ou r best to capt u re each of t hese spe cial moments with engaging nar ratives and striking images throughout the issue. —LINDSAY SILBERMAN

Clockwise from left: Sunset at The St. Regis Princeville’s Makana Terrace; photographer Eric Ray Davidson captures Brosnan’s beachy side; the actor revisits his signature 007 style; Gabbard rides the waves off Oahu.

Tuxedo, $9,490; Dress shirt, $1,220, KITON, 212-813-0272. Ready to Wear bow tie, $95, THOMAS PINK, thomaspink.com.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: COURTESY OF THE ST. REGIS PRINCEVILLE RESORT; ETTA MEYER; ERIC RAY DAVIDSON; COURTESY @TULSIGABBARD INSTAGRAM

Adopting an ethos of island living with Pierce Brosnan and a powerful politician


contents

Art collector Sarah Wolkowitz at home on her B&B Italia sofa in front of Lee Ufan’s Dialogue (2007)

The next J.R. Ewing

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Picture perfect

STYLE

BODY

age before beauty  |  45 Fashion has a new muse, and Lynn Yaeger finds she’s aged to perfection

bright eyes  |  82 Highly pigmented shadow is back (again), but this time the look is bold, not pretty

well coated | 48 Thanks to oversize silhouettes and plush fabrics, this season’s most coveted coats are also the most comfortable

feeling the burn  |  84 As the high-end fitness market gets ever more competitive, Kayleen Schaefer finds that some gyms are resorting to child-like tactics

style news | 54 Tailored suits for her; cashmere socks for fall; a swinging ’60s throwback; must-know streetwear players; three new purse designers who have got it in the bag

safety in numbers  |  86 A comfortable shave has fueled the safety razor’s resurgence. Check out a group of sculptural blades that are a cut above

LIFE truth or dare | 63 In a new memoir, Gail Sheehy takes on the challenge of writing about herself vienna redux | 66 A batch of new properties is heating up the hotel market in the Austrian capital. Plus, your Great Britain bucket list a fad buys the farm | 68 Is the rustic, recycled, borderline ridiculous farm-totable trend finally over? Alexandra Peers forecasts a return to fancy foods creature feature |  72 Fur is all the rage in fashion. And it’s getting more social media traction than you A home at the end of the world |  76 Forget mansions and penthouses, for a certain set of buyers, the ideal house is buried deep underground a hotel to call home |  78 Lindsay Silberman explains why so many high-end buyers are purchasing permanent residences within the walls of five-star properties

PLAY flying objects, identified  |  88 Consumer drones now deliver bottles of champagne and help realtors sells homes. Lindsay Silberman discovers that’s just the beginning drinking in the scent  |  90 Jacqueline Detwiler finds the latest crop of floral cocktail additives has a lot more in common with iconic perfumes than you might expect need for speed  |  92 Ferrari’s Corso Pilota is the ultimate driving academy. Paul Biedrzycki gets schooled cabin fever | 96 These chic, prefab pods offer a new way to enjoy the great outdoors

WORK

the gifts of gabbard  |  104 Hawaiian Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard has already made a name for herself on both sides of the aisle. Matthew Cooper surfs the waves of her popularity rocket men | 108 After making their fortunes here on Earth, these moguls are aiming for the stars—literally modern trance  |  110 As social-media users shrug off violations of their privacy, the author of a new book takes a close look at Facebook through the rise and fall of a would-be rival

CULTURE photo finish  |  114 A world-class collection of vintage and modern work finds its setting. Lorraine Glennon admires the view Design within reach | 124 As collector and jewelry designer Federico de Vera prepares for his fourth show for New York’s Neue Galerie, he and Lisa Cohen delve into the world of Egon Schiele

thick as thieves | 100 Police Commissioner Bill Bratton and legal dynamo Rikki Klieman might be New York’s most law-abiding power couple

art and commerce | 126 With sales projected to more than double over the next five years—to $3.8 billion—there’s no denying the online art boom is upon us

desk for success | 102 With the revival of retro desk accessories, the 1960s-style office is making a major comeback

fall culture |  128 Billy Idol’s deep, dark secret; two decades of rich kids on TV; inside the twisted mind of Gillian Flynn

left to right: kyoko hamada; getty images

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contents

FEATURES the flip side of katie holmes |  132 For an actress who became famous for playing to type and then even more famous for marrying against it, the “new” Katie Holmes is surprisingly well adjusted. You might even call her normal. By Lauren Waterman; photographed by Cedric Buchet the incredible fulk | 138 Ken Fulk is the man responsible for some of the world’s most talked-about events and interiors. Get a peek behind the curtain of his “magic factory.” By David Nash; photographed by Douglas Friedman The new face of Oil | 144 In small towns across America, a new wave of investors is betting hard on drilling—and winning. But as this investigation of an Ohio community proves, every boomtown has its shadows. By Charles Butler; photographed by Alex John Beck

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child’s play | 152 Fall goes subversive with clothing and accessories in the brightest colors and most unexpected textures. Photographed by Jean-Pacôme Dedieu holiday in spain |  160 Dree Hemingway poses with Spanish matador José María Manzanares in this season’s best looks. By Alyssa Giaccobe; photographed by Sean Thomas la casa de trasierra |  170 High above Seville, Trasierra is a 16th-century villa rooted in the principles of good food, good company and the luxury of truly being away from it all. Photographed by Sean Thomas the rebirth of vikram chatwal | 174 Fresh from his latest stint in rehab, the hotel magnate swears this time he’s left his party past behind. By Adam Rathe; photographed by Kyoko Hamada The Next Jenner-Ation | 178 The youngest members of the world’s most famous family as you’ve never seen them. By Lindsay Silberman; photographed by Bruce Weber

The writing’s on the wall

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Marlene dress, $1,795, ALTUZARRA, saks.com.

cedric buchet

The aloha man | 194 At home on Kauai, Pierce Brosnan shares his casual side. Photographed by Eric Ray Davidson


contents

Viva España

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Razor’s edge

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CITIES Chicago | 202 The best in locavore eating, drinking and shopping; inside Soho House with CEO Nick Jones Dallas | 204 Alexander Wang on Balenciaga’s move to Dallas; 25 years of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra Houston | 206 A perfect day with designer Chloe Dao; the latest on Houston’s bustling beer scene Las Vegas | 208 Seven reasons to love Vegas, from The Cromwell’s arrival on the Strip to Sisley’s first U.S. boutique

22

Los Angeles | 211 The best eats in L.A.; exciting shopping destinations; the latest in local salons and spas Miami | 214 Getting to know Mayor Philip Levine; checking into Miami’s hot new hotel

Right: Coat, $7,000; Pants, $1,550, CÉLINE, 212-535-3703. Tote bag, $1,595, STELLA MCCARTNEY, 212-255-1556. Sneakers, $1,395, CHANEL, 800-550-0005. Saya-Mini chair, price upon request, ARPER, arper.com.

Toy story

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hamptons | 224 Montauk’s year-round destination; the best wine in Sagaponack tri-state | 226 Stuart Weitzman expands to Garden City; a Brooklyn favorite grows in New Jersey Orange County | 228 Stunning local jewelry; Wende Zomnir’s O.C. San Francisco | 229 Fall in San Francisco with Tom Dolby, a new Equinox and chic shops in Union Square

On the cover: Dress, $3,500, DOLCE & GABBANA, 212-249-4100. Love bracelet in 18-karat yellow gold with diamonds, $10,700, CARTIER, cartier.us. Sweet Alhambra bracelet in 18-karat yellow gold with mother of pearl, $1,350, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, 212-896-9284. Pumps, $1,250, TOM FORD, 212-359-0300. Santa Monica armchair, from $3,750, POLIFORM USA, poliformusa. com. Photographed by Cedric Buchet; styled by Anne Christensen.

parties | 231 DuJour kicks off summer in Sag Harbor and celebrates Ivanka Trump in Las Vegas

BACK PAGE Famous Last Words | 232 It’s no miracle: Music legend Smokey Robinson’s handwriting gives us a glimpse into his soul

clockwise from top left: sean thomas; christine blackburne; jean-pacÔme dedieu

New York | 219 Must-have fall watches; in the studio with mogul James Dolan


© D.YURMAN 2014

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Letter from the cEO

Jason BInn

26

W

hile at two years old, DuJour might not still be considered a start-up, I can tell you that things around here certainly never seem to slow down. I n May, I wa s for t u n at e t o sit a c r o s s f r o m C N N ’s o w n Wo l f Blitzer to discuss DuJour’s breaking news on the subject of North Korea and Kim Jong Un, as our exclusive i nt e r v iew w it h Den n i s Rod man revealed the dict ator’s obsession with America. I found it comical that Kim’s favorite song is from Rocky, considering Sylvester Stallone was on the cover of our summer issue. And of course there was the hubbub around my phone conversation with embattled Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling—the f irst interview, just days after the story about his regrettable comments showed up on the web—which was talked about in news outlets around the world. I n t h i s n e w a ge of m e d i a we know that, to advertisers and readers, content is king and your audience is pr iceless. To su r vive, all industries, not just publishing, need to created what I call “POD,” or point of differentiation. Looking toward fall, I’m so excited about the growth of DuJour.com, which is always ahead of the curve and has continually been acknowledged for excellence with awards including a Webby, the Oscars of the Internet. Recently the site debuted new web, e-mail, social and mobile platforms, refined search features, better social networking and more of the exclusive online content we’ve become known for. On a personal note, I’m thrilled about the story on my former intern (“Binntern”) Nicky Hilton and the major step in her career: publishing 365 St yle, which shares her fashion knowledge, acquired after years on the red carpet. In regard to the fall print issue, it’s g reat to see my f r iend K at ie Holmes on the cover and inside the magazine discussing her multiple new movies and launches. Katie’s

continued to keep her br a nd a nd ca ree r at a very high level and remains an A-list talent; be sure to check out her great work in her latest project, The Giver. I can’t forget about Photo by Bruce Weber in the people who are alEast Hampton, ways forgi ng ahead New York. and growing their businesses, like Richie Notar, whose new Sag Harbor restaurant, Harlow East, hosted my annual summer kickoff party, during which guests enjoyed gourmet pizzas by Kalamazoo Outdoor. Later in the summer, we worked with my longtime friends Ivanka Trump and Geof frey Hess to debut Ivan ka’s eye-popping line of jewelry at club king Jesse Waits’ Tryst nightclub at the Wynn Las Vegas during the Couture Jewelry Show, and we celebrated our cover star Bill Maher at Up & Down, the New York hot spot from nightlife titans Scott Sartiano and Richie Akiva—who run L.A.’s favorite club, 1OAK. You can check out phot o s f rom b ot h soi r e e s i n DuJour Cities. Later in the summer, we feted our July cover star, multit alented model and chef Chr issy Te i ge n , w it h Fe n d i Ti m e pie c e s and Moët Ice at New York’s NYY Steak house, a steak house established as a joint vent u re bet ween the Yankee Global Enterprises and Hard Rock International. Of course, we all know and love New York’s Estiatorio Milos, and there’s nothing quite li ke having dinner in their private glass room. On one recent night to remember, D u Jo u r d i n e d t h e r e a lo n g w it h NetJets and Remy-Mar tin’s super exclusive Louis XIII. And we were also th r illed to host the openingnight par t y for TimeCrafters, the world’s premiere luxury watch show, which took over the Park Avenue Armory. Don’t miss the next one! Thanks for an amazing summer, a nd a s always big ge r a nd b et t e r things are set to come for all of us.

park hyatt’s fearless leader, ernie arias

Lupita nyongo with dujour editor nicole vecchiarelli

Baha Mar’s Gena Conroy, Mike Collins, Lisa Poggi & Philip Day with trent fraser, susan magrino & neal srok a

melissa k atz, clare laverty, tara solomon & brian williams at swire properties in miami With IWC Schaffhausen President of North America Edouard d’Arbaumont

EstÉe Lauder’s john demsey & Veronique Gabai-Pinsky # binnsandwich

bella hunter & hayley byrnes light up cipriani

perry farrell, etty farrell & restoration hardware’s gary friedman at the Mondrian L.A.

behind the velvet rope

BInnshots

Follow on Twitter and Instagram @JasonBinn liberty helicopters’ patrick day, kourtney k ardashian, brielle day, kim k ardashian & christine brown chopper to NYC from the hamptons


WOMAN IN MOTION See the film at DONNAKARAN.com


dujour’s party for cover star bill maher

with bono, grooving on blue at a black-tie affair

behind the velvet rope

BInnshots

Follow on Twitter and Instagram @JasonBinn Moroccanoil’s Emily Lohnrman wwd editor james fallon

Guy Forestier-Walker & Kelly Fitzgerald

with Sunshine Sachs’ Shawn Sachs

handpicked

Diesel’s Tommaso Bruso, Katja Douerdari & Erin Smolinski

downton abbey ’s Michelle dockery

28

with bruce weber

time Inc.’s norman pearlstein & jane boon

fashion great ralph rucci

john “rock” howard

caesars entertainment’s philip auerbach Related Companies’ Joanna Rose & Nicki Berlyn Katz

The blind side’s Quenton Aaron & tv personality jordan duffy with Giorgio Armani’s Graziano De Boni & Style.com editor Dirk Standen at sean Macpherson’s margaux

with David Yurman’s Billy Paretti & Carol Pennelli. # pennellisandwich

Adam Sandow Andrea Correalea Andrew Saffir Ben Carter Bridget Russo Carl Cohen Carol Boyd Claire Laverty Damien Dernoncourt Dan Galpern David Grutman Diane Briskin Eddie Parsons Ernie Arias Eva Lorenzotti Eyal Lalo Graziano de Boni Guy Chetwynd Heidi Hayden Henri Bourdjian Iesha Reed Ina Treciokas Jamie Mark Jason Atkins Jeff Hirsch Jill Fairchild Joakim Wijkstrom Brandon and Miles Makenzie Katie Kinsella Kenny Dichter Larry Mullin Dr. Lee Gause Ludivine Pont Marc Lotenberg Maria Tiu Marlene McDade Marshall Brown Matthew Berglass Matthew Hiltzik Melanie Brandman Melissa Beste Mira Sorvino Neal Sroka Pauline Brown Peter Bonell Peter Lichtenthal Peter Malachi Peter Webster Philip Auerbach Prosper Assouline Robert Chavez Sally Morrison Scott Flexman Steve Birkhold Steven Peterman Stewart Bain Tim Crout Todd Hanshaw Tracey Spiegelman Vincent Sabio Wendy Maitland William Lee

Newmark’s Jeffrey Roseman and shirley Ramos

TW Steel’s Joe Romulus

Ana Martins and Andrew Koris

onion crunch’s nick loeb

Bill Maher & New York’s It couple, Scott Sartiano & Allie Rizzo, at up & down

Nick & Toni’s a-team, Bonnie Munshin & Mark Smith

e! news’ terrence jenkins. here’s to you! icm’s adam schweitzer & christoph waltz with nightlife guru Eric Milon

Bulgari’s Alberto Festa Navy Beach’s Franklin Ferguson

Richard & Roe Glasser with Weinstein Co. coo david glasser


1.855.44.ZEGNA | ZEGNA.COM


The Incredible Fulk

PAGE 138

A MOMENT WITH THE EDITOR

THOUGHTS DUJOUR

PAGE 174

’m one of those people who always get a lit-

frank interview, writer Lauren Waterman looks

tle blue at summer’s end. The heat lifts, the

back at Holmes’ much-discussed marriage

leaves fall, the breezy dresses go away for

while the actress makes a case for moving

another year (or at least until vacation, which

forward. Even so, as Waterman points out, in

seems a long way off). Even more than the first

her recent career choices—a series of films in

of January, it’s the start of autumn that always

which she plays a variety of robotic charac-

has me feeling reflective—maybe a bit melan-

ters—Holmes seems to be winking at the

choly—about the passage of time. Wasn’t it

image she shouldered during her marriage to a

yesterday that September meant new classes,

man Waterman describes as having gone a bit

new experiences, my whole life ahead of me?

“insane… with love.”

Now it’s about watching my daughter return

and this issue—isn’t all doom and gloom.

that she hardly gives the moment—never mind

There are, after all, the clothes. To counter

me—a thought. She skips off to the recess yard

some of the weightiness going on around

as I’m left to marvel at how quickly life goes by.

here, we got extra playful with “Child’s Play,”

30

So maybe I shouldn’t have been entirely

The Next JENNER-ation

PAGE 178

But I realize: Dying foliage or not, autumn—

to school, so excited to see her friends again

a fashion story showcasing some of fall’s most

shocked when the mood of this issue took on a

colorful accessories. David Nash’s profile of

sort of seriousness. Turns out I’m not alone in

San Francisco interior designer and events

my seasonal despondency, or at least seasonal

planner Ken Fulk offers a peek inside the home

desire for reflection. In “Truth or Dare,” a can-

of a man known to decorate an event with live

did conversation with longtime

puppies (something the subjects of “Creature

friend Patricia Bosworth, legend-

Feature,” on page 72, would surely endorse).

ary journalist Gail Sheehy shares

We travel to Hawaii with Pierce Brosnan and

some of the most painful mo-

Spain with Dree Hemingway; nothing to

ments of her life, many of which

complain about there. And lastly, in “The Next

she faced for the first time while

Jenner-ation,” ever-cheery photographer Bruce

writing her memoir, Daring: My

Weber presents a portfolio of Kendall and Kylie

Passages. In his first interview

Jenner that is at once chic and cheeky and,

post-rehab, eccentric hotelier

true to the girls’ claim to fame, entirely real. If

Vikram Chatwal does the same

there’s one thing the extended Kardashian clan

with writer Adam Rathe.

excels at, it’s making an art of having fun, no

On a lighter note, Alexandra Peers grouches about the farm-

matter what sort of mood is in the air. If they can do it, so can I.

to-table trend in “A Fad Buys the Farm,” while “A Home at the End of the World” looks at how some of the country’s top earners have begun planning for Armageddon with upscale underground bunkers and state-ofthe-art panic rooms—complete with five years’ worth of food and water—designed not for if, but when disasters strikes. You’ll want one of these. Kendall Jenner wears TOMMY HILFIGER, ARAKS, BUCCELLATI, and ARIAT.

And, of course, there’s cover actress Katie Holmes. In her

Nicole Vecchiarelli NV@DuJour.com Instagram: editor_nv

LEFT, TOP TO BOTTOM: DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN. KYOKO HAMADA. BRUCE WEBER. RIGHT: THOMAS WHITESIDE.

I

The Rebirth of Vikram Chatwal


Editor in Chief Nicole Vecchiarelli

CEO/Publisher Jason Binn

Art Director Stephanie Jones

Sales

Executive Editor Nancy Bilyeau

Chief Marketing Officer Alan Katz

Executive Vice President, Global Sales Marc Berger Associate Publisher John Clarkin

Editor at Large Alyssa Giacobbe

Staff Writer Lindsay Silberman

Executive Directors Cat Dewling Phil Witt Janet Suber (Los Angeles) Sylvie Durlach, S&R Media (France) Susy Scott (Italy) Alison Zhuk (Florida)

Research Editor Ivy Pascual

Project Manager Isabelle McTwigan

Features Deputy Editor Natasha Wolff (Cities)

Features Editor Adam Rathe

Senior Executive Assistant Brianna Calabrese

Associate Editor Natalia de Ory

Sales Assistant Jennifer Lentol

Home Editor Lisa Cohen

Marketing Director Julia Light

Automotive Editor Paul Biedrzycki

Marketing Manager Jen Goldenberg

Art + Photo

Designer Jason M. Szkutek

Photo Editor Etta Meyer

Chief Advisor Monty Shadow

Senior Designer Sarah Olin

Executive Vice President Cynthia Lewis

Fashion + Beauty

Production

Senior Market Editor Sydney Wasserman

Vice President, Production Shawn Lowe

32

Associate Fashion/Market Editor Paul Frederick

Senior Pre-Media Manager John Francesconi

Editorial Assistant Frances Dodds

DUJOUR Cities

Systems Administrator Julio Gonzalez Print and Paper Management CALEV Print Media

Regional Editors

Finance

Anna Blessing (Chicago), Holly Crawford (Houston), Sam Glaser (Las Vegas),

Financial Controller Stephanie Cabral-Choudri

Holly Haber (Dallas), Rebecca Kleinman (Miami), Lesley McKenzie (Los Angeles and Orange County),

Senior Financial Analyst Michael Rose

David Nash (San Francisco), Chadner Navarro (New York, Tri-State)

DUJOUR.com Contributors

Chief Digital Officer Ashley Parrish

Patricia Bosworth, Dori Cooperman, Grant Cornett, Arthur Elgort, Douglas Friedman, Henry Hargreaves,

Digital Director Dave Sorenson

Ros Okusanya (Casting), Jeffrey Podolsky, Mickey Rapkin, Rhonda Riche, Bruce Weber, Thomas Whiteside, Lynn Yaeger

Digital and Social Media Editor Eden Univer

Contributing Editors

Senior Web Developer Devario Johnson

Lauren Waterman (Features), Antoine Dozois (Copy),

Web Developer G. Leo Fulgencio

Nick Earhart (Copy), Melanie Carnsew (Art), Joanna Scutts (Copy), Dacus Thompson (Research)

Interns Rachel Epstein, Madison Fressle, Yukiko Fujii, Cara Gordon, Meaghan Hartland, Christina Kwiek, Stephanie LaGalia, Eli Schneider, Jordan Solano-Reed, Meghan Sullivan, Etoro Umoren

Director of Editorial Operations Haley Binn

Senior Web Producer Julianne Mosoff

Chief Financial Officer Dominic Butera

Executive Vice President Caryn Whitman

Co-Chairman James Cohen

Co-Chairman Kevin Ryan

General Counsel John A. Golieb Chief Advisor Dan Galpern

DuJour (ISSN 2328-8868) is published four times a year by DuJour Media Group, LLC., 2 Park Avenue, NYC 10016, 212-683-5687. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. The publishers and editors are not responsible for unsolicited material and it will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication subject to DuJour magazine’s right to edit. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, photographs and drawings. Copyright Š 2014 DuJour Media Group, LLC. For a subscription to DuJour magazine, go to subscribe.dujour.com, call 954-653-3922 or e-mail duj@themagstore.com.


contributors

Getting to know some of the talent behind this issue—lunch order and all

annette poizner

Handwriting analyst, “Famous Last Words,” p. 232 Soup duJour: squash

It’s amazing what handwriting can say about a person, and no one knows that better than Annette Poizner, who is a Columbia-trained psychotherapist. “It’s like a first impression,” she says. “I weave together the composite parts of their personality to tell a story.” Poizner has been analyzing script for more than a decade and has also written a book on clinical graphology.

kyoko hamada

Photographer, “Photo Finish,” p. 114, and “The Rebirth of Vikram Chatwal,” p. 174 What impressed Kyoko Hamada the most during her shoot with entrepreneur Vikram Chatwal was the venue: the iconic Plaza Hotel. “A great location makes all the difference,” says Hamada, who has shot for Newsweek and the New Yorker. The team worked guerrilla-style to make the most of the space. “We were running around so everything was shot instinctively, but it worked out.”

Illustrator, “Feeling the Burn,” p. 84 Soup duJour: green pea

“I enjoy drawing naked people,” explains Dennis Eriksson jokingly. The Swedish animator, whose work can be seen in publications and galleries worldwide, chronicled the intense rivalries between high-end fitness studios with a series of illustrations. ”Gym aesthetics are easy,” he says, “because people really expose themselves in a way that they would never otherwise do in public.”

matthew cooper Writer, “The Gifts of Gabbard,” p. 104 Soup duJour: chicken tortilla

lea journo Hairstylist, “The Aloha Man,” p. 194 Soup duJour: french Onion

Although it was Lea Journo’s first time working with actor Pierce Brosnan, she felt like the actor was a lifelong friend. “The shoot was very comfortable and lots of fun,” says the veteran stylist, who tends to some of Hollywood’s most handsome heads, including Orlando Bloom and Brad Pitt. “He made us feel so welcome in his home; we even shared a glass of champagne!”

When Matthew Cooper, who has worked for Time and Condé Nast Portfolio, visited congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard’s Hawaii office, there were plenty of island touches throughout, including a paddleboard made for her by local kids. “She’s a bit of a celebrity, but she has a good sense of how to get ahead and use that to help promote the Democratic party.”

*du jour [doo zhoor] adjective [from French: of the day] Example: What is your soup du jour?

all images courtesy

34

Soup DuJour: miso

dennis eriksson


www.domperignon.com ENJOY DOM PÉRIGNON RESPONSIBLY. DOM PÉRIGNON CHAMPAGNE © 2014 IMPORTED BY MOËT HENNESSY USA, INC. NEW YORK, NY.


contributors

Getting to know some of the talent behind this issue—lunch order and all

sean thomas

Photographer, “Holiday in Spain,” p. 160, and “La Casa de Trasierra,” p. 170 Soup duJour: gazpacho

Several years ago, when Sean Thomas discovered the Trasierra estate in Spain, he immediately thought of his friend Dree Hemingway: “The setting tied in perfectly with her family legacy.” For this month’s issue he returned to the site with his muse. Thomas, who has shot for Vogue, British GQ and Interview, also trekked the streets of Seville with Hemingway in search of the perfect backdrops. “She’s such a joy to shoot with; it was like a dream.”

charles butler Writer, “The New Face of Oil,” p. 144

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Soup duJour: new england clam chowder

ALEX JOHN BECK

Fracking has affected many Americans in recent years, and Charles Butler, a business-journalism professor and former Smart Money editor, wanted to understand the multiple points of view on America’s oil and gas boom. “There’s been so much pro and con to this issue, but for these farmers, many of whom were badly hit during the recession, it offers an economic opportunity as well as a chance to secure their futures.”

Photographer, “The New Face of Oil,” p. 144 Soup duJour: pasta fagioli

anne christensen Stylist, “The Flip Side of Katie Holmes,” p. 132, and “The Next Jenner-ation,” p. 178 Soup duJour: Gazpacho

“I’m trying to remember if I was ever that nice to my sisters,” says Anne Christensen of Kendall and Kylie Jenner, whom she outfitted for their first shoot with famed shutterbug Bruce Weber, in Montauk. “They’re good friends and great-looking girls, so it was fun to watch them interact with the guys.” The stylist, whose work has been featured in Glamour and Vogue Italia, adds, “The whole family is such a phenomena; it was interesting to be part of that pop-culture moment.”

all images courtesy

Driving along the rural roads of eastern Ohio at night can be daunting. Just ask Alex John Beck, who traveled there to photograph the new oil players. “It was pitch black and quite hilly and every other car was a huge truck—meanwhile, I’m in my tiny rental Kia,” he recalls. Thankfully, everything turned out fine for Beck, who is happy to report that new fortunes haven’t changed the locals all that much. “They’re genuine people who take pride in their work; pretty solid characters.”

*du jour [doo zhoor] adjective [from French: of the day] Example: What is your soup du jour?


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COLUMN

AGE BEFORE BEAUTY Fashion has a new muse, aged to perfection. Lynn Yaeger celebrates the Class of 2014

Charlotte Rampling in photo split: A shot taken circa 1970 and now, at 68, as she takes on the NARS campaign.

HUTTON WAS THE FIRST MODEL TO SIGN AN EXCLUSIVE BEAUTY CONTRACT ; HER 1973 DEAL WITH REVLON NETTED HER SIX FIGURES A YEAR , AND CHANGED THE INDUSTRY.

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ABOVE: GETTY IMAGES. BELOW: CONTOUR BY GETTY IMAGES /PHOTO ILLUSTRATION STEPHANIE JONES

L

et me ask you something—can you recite all the lyrics to the Monkees’ theme song (not just the first four words)? Do you know the difference between hi-f i and WiFi? Did your first TV get only seven channels? Even if you are willing to close your eyes, clench your perfect white teeth, and admit that yes, yes and yes, you can indeed shout out those deathless stanzas, there is, believe it or not, still time for you to become a model. This is not a joke. In the last little while, oppressively juvenile fashion icons—like Elle Fanning, barely in high school, and Miley Cyrus (OK, she may be 21, but she still looks and acts like the poster child of pre-pubescence)—have been replaced by a roster of muses who can tell you with clarity how much fun it was when you could smoke on airplanes. We are speaking here of the louchely elegant Marianne Faithfull, at 67 the new face of Saint Laurent, a half century after she was a teenager palling around with Mick Jagger, now gleefully defying the maxim that if you wore these 1960s-inflected Saint Laurent styles the first time around, you are too old to revisit them now. And here is Charlotte Rampling—remember, she had that baby she didn’t want and gave to Lynn Redgrave in 1966’s Georgy Girl? Infuriatingly still sexy at 68, she is currently serving as the fall face for NARS. And what of Jessica Lange, 65, doing a similar service over at Marc Jacobs Beauty? Not to mention the folks at the beleaguered American Apparel, who have enlisted 62-year-old model Jacky O’Shaughnessy; or 70-year-old Catherine Deneuve’s gig at Vuitton; or Lauren Hutton, the same age as Deneuve, still showing that fetching space between her teeth for Lucky Brand. So pronounced is this trend that you will soon be able to buy what is billed as the fi rst “mature woman doll”—a miniature silver-haired rendering of Carmen Dell’Orefice, now 83, a Vogue cover girl in 1947. (Cont’d on p. 46)


LIFE

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Age Before Beauty (Cont’d from p. 45)

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Lauren Hutton, 70, strikes a pose for Lucky Brand.

Even Kate Moss, who started in the business at the age at which most are just hoping to find a date to the junior prom, remains a busy working model at 40. The mysterious, taciturn Moss is ju st a yea r you nger than Winona Ryder, who’s been tapped for Rag & Bone’s current campaign, because, according to Marcus Wainwright, one of the line’s designers, the actress has a “beautiful, timeless quality.” What is going on here? Well first off, let us candidly admit that dramatic advances in plastic surgery have made us all, at least in dim light, appear pretty much the same age. Whittled waists and chiseled chins, toned

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to include a gorgeous (but not fat!) older person. Asked why his company chose to feature Charlotte Rampling, François Nars insists that “age was not a factor. Beauty is not a question of age. We put labels on thinking beauty is only about being young. Wrinkles are beautiful. I want to f ight the convention that you have to be young to be beautiful. Women with character, who are smart and have strong personalities, are beautiful to me.” Of course, it is also possible that the impetus on the part of fashion companies is purely practical: After all, the more years you have on you, the more money you are likely to have to spend. And if you are going to buy that $23,000 hand-painted python Lanvin coat, you might appreciate seeing it modeled by someone who can vote. Which may be why, for his fall 2012

“I want to fight the convention that you have to be Young to be beautiful.” –François Nars arms and taut tummies, are no longer the exclusive province of youth. I mean, how many times has this happened to you: You are walking behind a lovely lass, her blond ponytail swinging, her perky rear-end perking, and then you catch a glimpse of her face and it is clearly not young e x a c t ly — b u t , u m , on the other hand, it is certainly not old, in the sense of your g r a n ny’s f a c e wa s whe n she wa s t h i s bopper’s age. If we c a n lo ok 20 — OK , 30-ish—when we are 6 0, w hy s h o u ld n’t t h is ext r a ord i n a r y feat be celebrated by the fashion industry? A nd t he n agai n , Jessica Lange, 65, is modeling for Marc Jacobs Beauty. perhaps we are finally expanding our ideas about what is beautiful to include people who have kicked around a bit. If our notions of gender have radically changed, if 19 states have declared the inalienable right of all of their citizens to love and marry, maybe our notions of attractiveness are elastic enough

advertising campaign, Alber Elbez selected a number of “real people,” some of whom were clearly on the far side of 50. Catherine Deneuve, 70, has appeared in several Louis Vuitton campaigns. I w ish t he se olde r la d ie s would show up on catwalks more. Right now, one often f inds oneself sitting at a fashion show and thinking, sure, this ensemble looks fabulous on the sulky, tattooed 15-year-old Miss Thing wearing it, but will it look as good on anyone over the age of consent? How different the whole scope of women’s history would be if this new conception of beauty had taken hold decades ago! Just imagine: Had she only been born 50 years later, a splendid creature like the actress/chanteuse/war hero Marlene Dietrich, who was so ridiculously stunning all her life that—fun fact!—she had illicit sex with JFK when she was in her sixties, might have made a few extra bucks encasing her splendid derriere in a pair of Guess jeans. Perhaps even Eleanor Roosevelt, who observed—eons before the word celebutante was coined—that women in public life needed to “develop a skin as thick as a rhinoceros hide,” could have had a tiny bit of plastic surgery (not too much, of course, just enough to make a better Eleanor) and ended up shilling for Chanel.

in 1946 , carmen dell’orefice , then 15 , signed her first modeling contract, for $7.50 an hour . she’s still working today, at 83 ( for , one presumes , considerably more ) .

all images: Courtesy

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outerwear

Well Coated

Thanks to oversize silhouettes and plush fabrics, this season’s most coveted coats are also the most comfortable

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PHOTOGRAPHED by david brandon geeting Styled by Sydney Wasserman

On her: Padded coat, $9,150; Scarf belt, $710, CHLOÉ, 212-717-8220. Tunic, $1,990, DEREK LAM, Barneys New York, 212-8268900. On him: Coat, $3,990; Trousers, $900, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO, 866-337-7242.

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STYLE

Above, on her: Coat, $1,300, DEREK LAM 10 CROSBY, dereklam.com. On him: Coat, $2,890, VALENTINO, valentino.com. Trousers, $1,341, LOUIS VUITTON, louisvuitton.com. Capeland watch, $4,350, BAUME & MERCIER, baume-et-mercier.com. Top right, on him: Ritchard coat, $2,540, DRIES VAN NOTEN, Bergdorf Goodman, 212-7537300. On her: Chirico Wrap coat, $2,995, ALTUZARRA, saks.com. Dior VIII Montaigne watch (worn throughout), $18,100, DIOR TIMEPIECES, dior.com. Petite Metro bracelet, $2,950, DAVID YURMAN, davidyurman.com. Right, on her: Coat, $6,400, CÉLINE, A’maree’s, 949-642-4423. Blouse, $650, PORTS 1961, ports1961.com. Pants, $870, JIL SANDER, jilsander.com. Wisteria bangle, $14,500, DAVID YURMAN. Diamond Wire rings (left hand, worn throughout), from $330, MINOR OBSESSIONS BY FINN, minorobsessions.com. Marta Double ring (right hand, worn throughout), $1,500, PHYNE BY PAIGE NOVICK, saks.com. On him: Coat, $2,580; Sweater, $895; Pants, $885, MARC JACOBS, marcjacobs.com.

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Above, on her: Coat, $2,123, OFF-WHITE C/O VIRGIL ABLOH, off---white.com. On him: T-Neon coat, $2,195, BOSS, hugoboss.com. Pants (worn throughout), $745, LANVIN, 212812-2866. Top right, on her: Coat, $4,300, HERMĂˆS, hermes.com. Culottes, $3,590, DEREK LAM, Barneys New York, 212-826-8900. Marta Collar necklace, $2,200, PHYNE BY PAIGE NOVICK, saks.com. On him: Coat, $1,998, JOHN VARVATOS, johnvarvatos.com. Vintage mechanical watch, $15,800, FRANCK MULLER, franckmuller.com. Right, on her: Coat, $7,790, MARNI, marni.com. On him: Coat, $5,580, CANALI, canali.com. Models: Natalia Teresa Wowczko at Major. Valente Kevon. Casting (male model) by Ros Okusanya.

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BAUBLES

ROCK STARS

Once the sole province of hippies (and Etsy), crystal jewelry gets an upgrade this season, courtesy of luxury brands like Louis Vuitton and Vionnet PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHRISTINE BLACKBURNE

Look Book

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The in-demand hairstylist Guido Palau is known for his daring ‘dos; he’s spent several decades as one of the biggest names in fashion, collaborating with everyone from Calvin Klein to Prada. But his work stands alone in his new book, Hair, a 192-page monograph for which he created 70 different looks—each of which were photographed on a topless model in front of a spare background by David Sims. This isn’t, by any means, a how-to. Rather, it’s a chance to marvel at the talent of an artist who, he says, thinks of hair “as a designer would think of a piece of material, or a milliner would proportion a hat.”

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From top: Trivelling rings, $600 each, LOUIS VUITTON, louisvuitton.com. Pendant necklace, $375, UNEARTHEN, unearthen.com. Stud Earrings, $3,840, MONIQUE PÉAN, Barneys New York, 212-826-8900. Ring, $462, VIONNET, vionnet.com.

DURING NEW YORK FASHION WEEK , SNOOPY CAN BE FOUND WEARING THE DESIGNS OF K ARL LAGERFELD , ISABEL MARANT, RODARTE AND MORE , IN

“SNOOPY & BELLE IN FASHION” AT THE NEW MUSEUM .

COURTESY

French Boots, 1900–20

Through February 15, 2015; more information at brooklynmuseum.org.

Noritaka Tatehana, “Atom,” 2012–13

as sculpture; after all, some of the looks seen on runways (and pop stars) seem far more suited to being perched atop a pedestal than placed under a moving foot. So a fall exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum, called “Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe,” makes sense: 17th-century French chaussures are displayed alongside Chinese platform slippers from 200 years later and current-season Louboutins. (Six artists, including Marilyn Minter and photographer Steven Klein, were asked to create short films, so the show isn’t all about shoes.)

Salvatore Ferragamo, 1938

HIGH ART It’s not much of a stretch to think of certain especially-vertiginous stilettoes


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tk

IN SEASON

BUSINESS-LIKE LIKE

A

ll too often, the womenswear suit is regarded as a kind of necessary evil, an unstylish uniform that is required by certain professions, but one that its wearer is quite happy to remove at the end of the workday. This fall, Max Mara seeks to change that with the introduction of the Tailored Suit Project, a capsule collection consisting of four different jacket styles—including single- and double-breasted options—with coordinating

pants and skirts, available in a variety of weights and (neutral) colors. The idea, it seems, is to create versatile yet impeccably chic options for the legions of lawyers, politicians and businesswomen who are required to wear suits anyway. But thanks to their sharp, slim cuts, luxurious fabrics and exceptional fit—the jackets are ready-towear, but can be further customized in-store—the Italian brand might just convert a few new fans to the fold.

Bare-ankle season is all but over, making now the ideal time to stock up on some new socks. Consider these colorful, cashmereblend crew socks, the product of a collaboration between Soxiety and menswear designer Michael Bastian; the classic design was inspired by old-school Ivy League sport styles. Score! Socks, $40, SOXIETY FOR MICHAEL BASTIAN, soxiety.com.

THROWBACKS

A GOOD VINTAGE

E

ven half a century later, the swinging ’60s have a certain allure, particularly for the style-obsessed. This season, fashion labels as diverse as Valentino, Versace and Louis Vuitton packed their runways with trapeze coats, abbreviated A-line skirts and patterned mini-dresses that seem more than a little bit inspired by the era. (And they

weren’t the only ones—Gucci showed a veritable parade of knee-high boots in a variety of subtly groovy colors, while Miu Miu and Saint Laurent featured metallic threads and appliqués, lamé and sequins.) But the shopping site Farfetch, in collaboration with the Los Angeles vintage store Decades, offers an even more direct option: Beginning this month, they’re selling more than 100 original pieces from the iconic British brand Biba, which thrived from 1964 to 1975. The im-

mense cache, which was assembled by a London-based collector identified only as “Pari,” features peasant tops, pyramid shift dresses and printed maxi-coats and mini-skirts, all designed by the brand’s Polishborn founder, Barbara Hulanicki. Of course, these rare items are so well-preserved that they aren’t quite as affordable as they were the first time around, when Biba thrived on Kensington’s High Street: Prices start at around $275, and go all the way up to $2,200.

Classic: At far left, a customer considers a hat at Biba during the shop’s heyday. Near left, one of the surprisingly timeless dresses available now.

ALL IMAGES COURTESY. EXCEPT: SOCK ILLUSTRATION: DAVID SPARSHOTT. VINTAGE BIBA: GETTY IMAGES.

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LOOK SMART


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noticed

the new power players of streetwear

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Treat Yourself to a

brand

Tired of waiting in line to shop at Supreme? Sample the new lines and collaborations from these up-and-coming style stars

New

Off-White c/o Virgil Abloh Designer: Virgil Abloh. Location: Milan. About: Abloh is a trained architect and worked as creative director for Kanye West; his first limited-edition line, Pyrex Vision, was a hit. This fall, he launches his first women’s collection. Signature piece: Jeans with white diagonal lines, $706.

Designer: Stephane Ashpool. Location: Paris. About: Ashpool, who opened a multi-label shop in Paris in 2008, is a connector in the European streetwear scene. After a successful collab with Nike in the spring, Pigalle is set to release two versions of their Air Raid sneakers. Signature piece: A simple hoodie with the Pigalle logo, $145.

County of Milan Designer: Marcelo Burlon. Location: Milan. About: A wellconnected party organizer, Burlon created a line of graphic tees in 2012. This season, he’s launching full collections for men and women, collaborating with Eastpak and making helmets, skateboards and basketballs. Signature piece: Snake-print T-shirt, $275.

Kith NYC Designer: Ronnie Fieg. Location: NYC. About: Fieg opened his sneaker store (which often serves as a showcase for his collaborations) in 2011. This season, his Puma kicks are being sold at Dover Street Market, alongside a new ready-to-wear line. Signature piece: A military-inspired pant with elastic cuffs, $135.

PHOTOGRAPHED by christine blackburne

With the launch of the hybrid purse/backpack she designed for Mulberry, model/actress Cara Delevingne is officially a triple threat. But she’s not the only new kid on the block: John Guidi, formerly of Barneys and Ralph Lauren, is launching a new accessories line under the name Etelka, and Christopher Kane is likewise debuting his first handbag collection this season. From top: #11 bag, $1,750, CHRISTOPHER KANE, thebay.com. Big E clutch, $475, ETELKA, etelka.com. Cara Delevingne bag, $1,990, MULBERRY, 212-256-0632.

in recent decades , streetwear has gone global ( and been co - opted by high fashion ) , but it traces its roots to the surfer / sk ater culture of 1970 s southern california .

courtesy

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“I

had to go places inside myself I found unendurable,” Gail Sheehy tells me, looking tiny and incredibly

JOHN BRYSON © 2014 BRYSON PHOTO

HINDSIGHT

TRUTH or DARE

In her new memoir, groundbreaking journalist Gail Sheehy takes on her most painful challenge: writing about herself. Longtime friend Patricia Bosworth, who’s had a front-row seat on Sheehy’s life and work, reveals the price of honesty

SHEEHY AND FELKER WERE FAMOUSLY SOCIAL . IN FACT, FELKER WAS ONCE QUOTED BY HIS FRIEND TOM WOLFE AS SAYING ,

“I ONLY ATE DINNER AT HOME

EIGHT TIMES LAST YEAR ! ”

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Gail Sheehy and Clay Felker, on vacation in London, 1980

vulnerable. We’re sitting in her cluttered office/apartment on Manhattan’s Upper West Side, eating tuna salad as we discuss the writing of her memoir, Daring: My Passages. The phone never stops ringing; a dog barks angrily in the kitchen; assistants scurry around. Suddenly Gail realizes there is no coffee for us, so she sprints out to Starbucks. It is, perhaps, a way for her to take a break from talking about those painful places. Gail has written 15 best sellers, including the landmark 1980 nonfiction book Passages, which offered a road map to adulthood, as well as biographies of Hillary Clinton and Mikhail Gorbachev. She’s promoted books for decades and is a recognized master at it. But Daring, which describes her own journalistic struggles and triumphs as well as her two marriages, is different. After she returns with the coffee, Gail confides, “I’m nervous.” I knew very well how difficult it was for Gail to write this memoir, a type of book that was, to her, like “fi nding a different language.” To fi nd her voice, she’d taken a course with Roger Rosenblatt in the MFA program at Stony Brook University’s Southampton campus. He told her, “You have to become editor of your own life. It’s all about digging into your buried past.” The course helped, but Gail still struggled with the writing. She told me, “When you’re a journalist, you’re so busy reporting, you rarely stop and ask yourself, What does this all mean?” In early 2013 Gail decided it might help her process if we conducted a joint lecture on memoir writing at Rancho La Puerta in Mexico. (I’d published a memoir in 1998, Anything Your Little Heart Desires: An American Family Story, and was beginning work on a second memoir called The Men in My Life, forthcoming from HarperCollins.) When preparing our lecture in Mexico, I wanted to improvise, but Gail insisted we “script” it. We started writing at 7:30 A.M. and spent the day arguing. At one point, the power failed and Gail was forced to lug her computer down the mountain to get it fi xed while I stayed behind, scribbling notes. At the end of this marathon, we were unsatisfied, and so that night, in the auditorium, I read from my published memoir and Gail read from a rough draft of Daring. “Nobody has ever heard this,” she began tremulously. “The sudden memory so sharp it’s painful.… This is the mentor who sculpted my career, the lover who haunted me for decades, the husband who shared my life for 24 years, a man who never had time to sleep.”


When she finished, everyone in the auditorium was in tears, and Gail had discovered the heart of her book: the bittersweet experiences of life with her husband, the visionary editor Clay Felker. Now, sippi ng cof fee i n Ma n hat t a n , Gail delved into that marriage. “When I met Clay, I was 24. I was plucky, selfish and determined to be a journalist.” Clay was “a big-shouldered man with a booming voice and piercing gray eyes.” He founded the hugely successful New York magazine. “He intimidated me, but we challenged each other with our ideas.” By the late 1960s, Clay was nurturing an unruly tribe of ambitious young writers: Gloria Steinem, Tom Wolfe, Richard Reeves, Gail and myself, among others. Clay kept pushing us to bat out stories deconstructing celebrity, documenting pop culture, speaking out against the Vietnam War. That’s when Gail and I became friends. We’d hang out at Clay’s huge apartment on East 57th Street. The door was always open: Clay would be lounging in a big chair by the fireplace calling out, “Look who’s here!” when anyone came in. It could be Jimmy Breslin or Nora Ephron. We all talked a mile a minute about our pieces. Clay had me write about the then-unknown Dustin Hoffman, whom I’d discovered in an off-Broadway show; Clay also sent me to London to interview the Beatles. As for Gail, Clay insisted she cover Robert Kennedy, who in 1968 was running for president. “I’d neve r w r it t e n a p ol it ical story before, but Clay said, ‘You can do it.’ It was my first big dare. I was terrified. But as luck would have it, a huge storm came up. Nobody wanted to get on a little plane that would be flying up over the Cumberland Mountains. So I got to sit next to [Kennedy] in the plane. It was the day before he was assassinated. I got the last interview.” “Were you nervous?” I ask. “Yes, but Bobby made me feel comfortable.” She remembers he was shivering; it had been raining hard when he was campaigning. He asked someone to hand him “Jack’s coat.” Five years after the assassination, Bobby was still mourning Jack’s death, wearing his brother’s clothes. The storm got worse; “all of a sudden we see this other plane coming at us. The plane plummets 1,000 feet —I’m screaming—and Bobby jokes, ‘I knew Gene McCarthy [his presidential rival] was desperate, but I didn’t think he was that desperate.’ ” Her assignments varied widely. Gail wrote a controversial series on prostitutes and their pimps, “Redpants and Sugarman.” She also covered the bloody civil war in Ireland, where she confronted

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Clockwise from left: Gail Sheehy, hitting the lecture circuit in 1977, the year after Passages was published; Clay and Gail attending a black-tie event, the same day Clay was diagnosed with cancer; one of Gail’s water-cooler cover stories; Gail with Hillary Clinton, whom she profiled in a book revealing details of Clinton’s childhood and college years.

death for the first time when a young boy was shot in front of her. “I’ve never forgotten that image of his face being blown away.” When she and Clay fell in love, they were both leery of commitment; they lived together on and off. Gail, divorced, was conf licted about feminism. “I wanted to hold on to my femininity, but I wanted to be independent.” Her most popular book, Passages, came out of her need to understand life’s changes. The book was a megahit, on the New York Times best-seller list for three years and published in 28 languages. Gail went into high gear: She became a regular on TV talk shows and lectured constantly. Meanwhile, Clay’s fortunes had shifted. In 19 7 7 h e l o s t N e w York magazine in a br ut al t a keover by Ruper t Mu rdoch, and although he continued in journalism, Clay never regained the power or success —gail sheehy he’d experienced at New York. But now Clay wanted to settle down. In 1982, at his prompting, Gail adopted a Cambodian refugee girl named Mohm, and in 1984 Clay and Gail finally married: “the happiest day of my life.” For more than seven years they lived what she called an idyllic existence, raising Mohm and seeing a lot of Maura, Gail’s daughter from her first marriage. “We were really a family.” Then came a phone call: A cyst on Clay’s neck was malignant. “I wasn’t prepared. It began to dawn on me that my life was about to change drastically.” For the next 17 years Gail functioned as Clay’s primary caregiver, somehow managing to write five more books and a play that my husband, Tom Palumbo, directed at the Actors Studio. Called Chasing the Tiger, it was about Clay and Gail battling with his cancer. The way they handled themselves was amazing—with dig nit y and grace. But at such a cost.

“It dawned on me that my life was going to change drastically.”

“What was it like for a supersuccessful woman to be so battered by tragedy?” I ask. “What did that do to you?” “It was like the stages in Passages,” she says. “The hardest transition was when I faced the fact that Clay was never going to get well.” She began drinking; she even had an affair but told the man immediately that it couldn’t work, “because I love Clay.” Gail joined Alcoholics Anonymous. “Everybody attacked their problems with ferocious self-will. When that didn’t work, fear overtook them, or resentment, or both. I knew those feelings. In a fever to ‘save’ my husband, I was losing the ability to manage my own life.” After Clay Felker died in 2008, Gail went through a hell of grief. Yet, once again, she found release from the pain in writing. The result is Daring: My Passages. As part of the book’s promotional campaign, Gail created the Daring Project online: She will encourage women to share their stories about achieving goals by moving out of their comfort zones. “Is this your philosophy?” I ask my friend. “Absolutely. Fear freezes you. When you dare, you take action and it frees you. And that’s what I’ve always done.”

the cult- favorite film grey gardens was based on sheehy ’s story, which she happened upon by meeting her east hampton neighbors , relatives of jacqueline bouvier kennedy.

clockwise from top left: getty images; @2014 Bill cunningham; courtesy of new york magazine; courtesy of the author. ticker: getty images.

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“RADAR-ENABLED” THROUGH THE EYES OF THE LEXUS LS AND PHOTOGRAPHER GILES REVELL.

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Options shown. *Advanced Pre-Collision System is designed to help reduce the crash speed and damage in certain frontal collisions only. Driver Attention Monitor is designed to alert the driver if a potential hazard is detected ahead and the driver’s face appears to be turned away. The Active Pedestrian Detection System is designed to help reduce the impact speed and damage in certain frontal collisions only. They are not collision-avoidance systems and are not substitutes for safe and attentive driving. System effectiveness depends on many factors. See Owner’s Manual for details. ©2014 Lexus.


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C U LT U R E ROUNDUP

DESTINATION

VIENNA REDUX

A batch of new properties is heating up the hotel market in the Austrian city. Darrell Hartman strolls the banks of the Danube to find out more

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isitors to central Vienna’s Am Hof square will see genteel lemon-cream facades and hear the clip-clop of hooves on cobblestones. More than other European cities, the Austrian capital—particularly the well-preserved nucleus known as the Innere Stadt—retains a distinctive feeling of the Old World. The 17th- and 18th-century buildings are remarkably intact, pensioners and professors sit in charmingly ancientseeming cafés reading the morning papers and the air is alive with the high art and society of yesteryear. There are abundant museums, opera houses, students ducking into violin lessons and (during the season, of course) fancy-dress balls. It’s an illusion, though, that time stands still here. Some of the best views of the Am Hof come from the plush suites at the city’s brand-new Park Hyatt. When it opened in June, the 143-room hotel

became the latest major player i n a l u xe d - u p neighborhood called the Golden Q u a r ter. T he recent modernization of the area has also revitalized classic establishments: As m ajo r f a s h io n b r a n d s started to move into historic digs, the influx of well-heeled visitors breathed new life into relics like Zum Schwarzen Kameel, a restaurant that opened in 1618. The Park Hyatt is housed in a comparatively new building—a mere hundred years old—and guests can enjoy a decadent meal of succulent veal goulash with fresh cream and herb spaetzle at the Bank restaurant. Many original details, in the city’s turn-of-the-century Wiener Werkstätte style, shine throughout the hotel, while the brick-shaped tiles that line the pool floor contain actual gold. Other hotels have sprung up to accommodate what looks like a gilded phase, including the 39room Guesthouse, with window alcoves offering views of the famous opera house. Topazz is a sexier option, with sleek Werkstätte-inspired rooms, while Urbanauts is trying an intriguing concept of transforming old storefronts into hip “street lofts,” with complimentary city bike rental and free stocked minibar included. Another trendy arrival is Heuer am Karlsplatz, a bar and restaurant that opened earlier this year just south of the Ringstrasse. It has its own garden, shelves lined with house-pickled condiments—and, in a retro twist, the DJs that spin a t t h e h o t el m u s t confine themselves to the on-site record col le ct ion , wh ich e n s u r e s a c on sis tency of style that is likely much appreciated by those who f ind themselves at d raw n to this classic city. FOR A VIDEO OF VIENNA, PRODUCED FOR DUJOUR BY TRAVEL FILMMAKERS JUNGLES IN PARIS, VISIT DUJOUR.COM

Five of the most exclusive, life-altering offerings to experience across the pond

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Shack up at Cromlix House, a newly renovated 15-bedroom mansion set on 34 lush acres in the Scottish countryside. C ROM LIX .COM

3. DRIVE a CLASSIC CAR through the COTSWOLDS

Warwickshire, England Get behind the wheel of a vintage Jaguar E-Type Roadster to navigate the Cotswolds, a rural enclave just two hours outside of London that’s frequented by A-listers like Kate Moss and Damien Hirst. TH EO PENROAD.CO.U K / WARWIC KSHIRE

4. HOST a COCKTAIL PARTY with its own POSTCODE

Covent Garden, London Book the six-bedroom Grand Manor House Wing at the new Rosewood London and have the hotel’s concierge arrange a chic soirée in the only suite that boasts its own postcode. ROSEWOODHOTELS.COM

5. TOUR a WHISKY DISTILLERY that’s CLOSED to the PUBLIC Speyside, Scotland

Score a private tour of famed whisky distilleries that are closed to the public—like Glenrothes, among others—through The Whisky Dog, a bespoke service with unique insider access. TH EWHISK YDOG.COM

—LINDSAY SILBERMAN

TOP TO BOTTOM: COURTESY OF THE GUESTHOUSE; COURTESY OF MATTHEW SHAW; MONIKA NGUYEN

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Left: The Guesthouse. Below, from top: Park Hyatt; Urbanauts.

THE BUCKET LIST GREAT BRITAIN


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DIGESTED

A Fad Buys the Farm

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Is the rustic, recycled, borderline ridiculous farm-to-table trend finally over? Alexandra Peers forecasts a return to fancy foods and fine dining

Consider this description, from the foodie news site Eater, of trendsetter Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s A BC K itchen in New York, one of the eateries that started it all: “Market-driven foods, 100 percent recycled paper menus, thrifted staff u n ifor ms”—who k new t h r if ted was a verb?—“locally designed ceramic dishware, barnyard wooden beams.” We ate it all up: It won Restaurant of the Year in 2010. (By the way, the food was great, too.) Suddenly, there was a gastronomical fetish for serving odious pieces of the animal and calling them delectable. Actually, offal is gelatinous, funny-looking and tastes like hooves, especially if it is. But if you’re not a fan, you’re seen as ignorant, uninformed, even anti-farmer. This is all about politicizing the polenta. If you don’t want to know how the sausage is made, too bad—your server is going to tell you. Taking butcher/farmer to the extreme, superstar Danish chef René

Redzepi has broken down animals tableside in the dining room and even served ants as a garnish. This got him the cover of Time magazine, instead of a timely intervention by the people who love him. “We cook our landscape,” he told me at the launch of his cookbook.

wagon, listing where menu items are from.” Menus, she adds, are getting to be “longer than the Constitution.” After a while, some diners started to notice that “grass-fed beef has a cer tain f lavor —gamy,” unlike the grain-fed kind, says Tim Graham, chef of Chicago’s Paris Club,

“This is all about politicizing the polenta” Like Monet, capt u r ing the light of the sun by the Seine on a single afternoon, he said, “The food we serve could only happen right now, on that day.” So much for leftovers. The age of far m-to-table has also brought with it an oversharing of vegetables and crazily detailed menus. As much as she applauds the movement, Susan Ungaro, president of the James Beard Foundation, who sees trends come and go, says “Everyone’s jumping on the band-

who also opened Travelle in the Langham hotel last year. Now, he says, people are looking for a return to luxury, but a certain kind of luxury. “No rigor. People don’t want to feel like they’re someplace they don’t belong.” For the chef’s table at Travelle, Graham, eager to serve serious food in a light way, came up with a playful menu mimicking a cruise ship’s ports of call along the Mediterranean. “There are no menu items (Cont’d on p. 70)

britain is urging the u.s to overturn a 43 -year ban on scotland’s national dish, haggis — a delicacy made of sheep’s heart, liver and lungs with onion.

getty images. photo illustration: stephanie jones.

I

t seems like every time you go out to a nice dinner these days, t here’s a n egg on you r plate. You’l l f i nd t he m on pi z z a . O n pasta. On sandwiches after noon. On steak. Sometimes, it’s from a brand name chicken: Niman Ranch or Spruce Farms. And sometimes, God help us all, it’s from a quail. W hat’s going on? T he far mto-table movement is everywhere, marked by buzzy phrases like “local sourcing,” “culling the harvest,” “respecting the protein” and “honoring the farmer.” At first glance, this is certainly a nice, even noble idea: Chefs have been the celebrities long enough, so why not salute the cute guy (or girl) in the overalls or the butcher’s apron doing the heavy lifting? But t he fa r m fad has spread like wildfire, as chefs coping with a downt ur n realize that sustainable foods can be sold for a premium. A nd by now, hasn’t it all gotten just a little bit…ridiculous?


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Moët & Chandon ® Champagne, © 2014 Imported by Moët Hennessy USA, Inc., New York, NY. Celebrate Responsibly.


A Fad Buys the Farm (Cont’d from p. 68)

it was just ahead of its time. Now, the shift in tastes is coming from the chefs themselves—why go to school for 10 years and car ve up hundreds of potatoes just to put an egg on spaghetti? Especially once everyone else is doing it. At this fall’s New York Wine and Food Festival, a veritable convention of tasting trendspotters, there are seminars on fois gras, going “Beyond the Butcher Block” and, yes, the French bistro. Celebrity chef Jose Garces this spring opened Bar Volver in Philadelphia, a caviar and champagne lounge. The cheapest caviar order—American Sturgeon—star ts at $65, climbing to $190 for Ossetra. And Daniel Boulud, who ferrets out trends like a pig sniffs out truff les, cancelled plans to open a satellite of his sausagefest eatery DBGB in Las Vegas. Instead, he subbed in a mash-up that includes elements of his swanky DB Br a sse r ie. So, f l ip t he egg. It’s done. About time.

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longer than a paragraph,” he promises. As far as buzzwords go, “authentic” is the new “sustainable.” Not e d It a l i a n ch ef a n d Fo o d Network star Giada De Laurentiis opened her fi rst restaurant, a nearly 300-seat eatery, in Las Vegas’ new Cromwell hotel this summer. She features no farmers on her menu, instead calling out family members’ favorites and naming cocktails for her producer grandfather. Her concept isn’t quite fancy food but “dinner and a show, with the restaurant being the show.” Guests take a tour of the place, see many of the dishes they could order being cooked, and can check out others on iPads. The trend now, she says, is “accessible food, elevated.” And, “we’re really busy,” she adds. It’s not quite a return to the good old days. The most luxurious launch in recent memory—Villard Michel Richard at the Palace Hotel—was pilloried for its excess. But perhaps

BODY

(ULTRA) MODERN ART Earlier this year, a Harvard graduate unveiled a device that uses 3D printing to produce custom cosmetics—literally giving consumers the ability to “print” their own makeup. It almost seemed too far-fetched to believe. That is, until this past April, when a Chinese company used a giant 3D printer to build 10 houses in a single day. For London-based artists Rob and Nick Carter, the futuristic technology presented a novel way to reinterpret the past. The couple created an intricate sculptural interpretation of Van Gogh’s classic Sunflowers painting, using wax bronze and a 3D printer. Their intent? To re-engage art lovers with historical works through new media. —LINDSAY SILBERMAN

P L AY

ONE PERCENT

WORK

DILEMMA DUJOUR

C U LT U R E

PONY TALE

At lunch at the Simone, I often see the same otherwise well-dressed, grandfatherly type with his hair pulled back into a ponytail. If women should not wear miniskirts past 40, at what age should a man lose the elastic and get a haircut—and how do I tell him so? Everyone knows that male tails are for retired actuaries now “working the land” in Vermont, Argentinian footballers, and Karl Lagerfeld (and that three out of three of those groups don’t give a hoot what you think of their ‘do). More deleterious to your cause is the fact that, while most men do look better shorn—even Demichelis cut off his famous pony after making the World Cup team—the notion of fashion having rules is outdated, especially when it comes to age. Plenty of septuagenarians I know (and not just women) can rock a mini. Perhaps the pony is an expression of a midlife crisis, but better a hair rebellion than a trip to Burning Man with an underage girlfriend and a trunkful of bath salts, no? I’d say, all the good sense. Take it and run.

KISS & TELL?

I spotted my best friend’s fiancé in a cozy tête-à-tête with his ex-wife in the Four Seasons lounge. She won’t believe me if I tell her, but I think she needs to know. What are your thoughts on anonymous notes? That the same rules apply as to signed ones, darling: They must speak of your class, like, you know, Gwynnie and her collaboration with Paperless Post. All correspondence must be sent on cardstock that’s both watermarked and substantial—115 gm, at minimum—with dye-stamped lettering. Which means I’m not sure how you’re going to go about the anonymous bit. On that: Why even be coy, or, for that matter, waste time with inferences? One woman’s “cozy” is another woman’s chilly. You’ve no idea the true climate of that rendezvous. Just say to her, “It was so fun running into William last Tuesday night at TY Bar. SoulCycle is really doing wonders for his physique. He’ll look amazing in your Instagram shots from Le Sirenuse! Just curious: Have you paid in full for that?” Dilemma DuJour welcomes your social-misfit questons. E-mail us at askdilemma@dujour.com

3D ART: COURTESY. DILEMMA: CONDE NAST ARCHIVES/CORBIS.

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HBO GO® is only accessible in the US and certain US territories. ©2014 Home Box Office, Inc. All Rights Reserved. HBO® and related channels and service marks are the property of Home Box Office, Inc.

THE FINAL SEASON

SEPTEMBER 7 9PM OR WATCH IT ON


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Lap of Luxury

Creature Feature

Fur is all the rage in fashion. And it’s getting more social media traction than you

Blu & Lupo

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Roberto Cavalli’s parrot & German Shepherd “I do prefer you to that hateful monkey but you must stop asking me if I want a cracker.” Find us: instagram.com/robertocavalli

ASIA

BART

Grace Coddington’s Persian cat “WHATDIDYOUSAY? ICANTHEARYOU! I think I have hair in my ears.” Find me: instagram.com/therealgracecoddington

CHOUPETTE

NEVILLE

Marc Jacobs’ Bull Terrier “I do a baller Stallone impression, check this out: ‘Yo, Adrienne!’ Sorry, I only date models.” Find me: instagram.com/nevillejacobs

CECIL

Lady Gaga’s French Bulldog

Karl Lagerfeld’s Siamese cat

Cara Delevingne’s bunny

“I am a slave to fashion. Black goes with everything and, well, I was born a bitch.” Find me: instagram.com/ladygaga

“The original fashion cat: Siamese by provenance; French by design. I’m sorry, who are you again? I don’t care. Tell me I’m pretty.” Find me: instagram.com/karllagerfeld

“I won’t get out of my Mulberry Cara bag for less than 10,000 carrots a day. Measurements: 5-3-5. Yes, the ears are real.” Find me: instagram.com/cecildelevingne

wild lil ramblin ’ rose , a teacup poodle from georgia , beat out 1,000 other pooches to be named america’s top dog model for 2014 .


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TANK & BAMBI

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Nicola Formichetti’s Pomeranians “He’s Tank, I’m Bambi. Hey guys, did you know that if you stare at the leaf long enough it becomes real? Guys?” Find us: instagr am.com / tanknbam bi

BERT

Lara Stone’s Border Terrier “Yes, I own a tuxedo. Doesn’t everyone? I have self-respect. I know, the media reported when I got fixed. That was mortifying. Still. Do you like cheese? I like cheese.” Find me: instagram.com/lara_stone

BODY

P L AY

REMY

W Beauty Director Jane Larkworthy’s Standard Poodle “Bearing the burden of looking amazing in clothes. Did have to draw the line at mascara. Yes, even the colored kind.” Find me: instagram.com/dailyremy

MAUDE

Valentino Garavani and Giancarlo Giametti’s Pug “San Pellegrino, served flat, with a bacon garnish, per favore. And an eye pillow. Also, when can I let my owners out of their crates?” Find me: instagram.com/privategg

WORK

C U LT U R E

PORKCHOP

Joe Zee’s Chihuahua “This is me as Elián González last Halloween at my house in the Hamptons. I made it to America. There was dinner.” Find me: instagram.com/porkchopadventures

BULLET

Gucci Westman’s Maine Coon “Me-ow, my head. This never happens with the good rosé. I may be ill— where’s the nearest rug?” Find me: instagram.com/gucciwestman

cruella de vil , the 101 dalmatians villainess who planned to use the film ’s titular puppies for their fur , is said to have been based in part on actress tallulah bankhead .


N E W YORK

BOSTON

CHI CAGO

CO R AL GAB LES

FUR LA. CO M

SHO R T H IL L S

H A W A II


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ARMAGEDDON

A HOME AT THE END OF THE WORLD

Forget mansions and penthouses. Adrienne Gaffney uncovers that, for a certain set of moneyed buyers, the ideal house is one buried deep underground ILLUSTRATION BY BEN JONES

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c onom ic c ol lap se, natural disasters and terror attacks are only a few of the concerns cur rently on the minds of America’s top ear ners. And while the idea of someone prepping for Doomsday may conjure the image of a conspiracy theorist with a shed full of canned goods, a frightening global climate has made it so that even members of the one percent are getting serious about planning for a disaster. From underground missile silos converted into fullservice condos to custom homes with panic rooms designed to trap an intruder, options for an upscale end-of-days scenario are as diverse as the range of potential catastrophes fueling their purchase. “If you have the money and the means to protect your family, who wou ld n’t? ” a sk s Tyle r A l le n , a Florida-based developer who is in negotiations to purchase a multimillion-dollar unit in an underground condominium complex that boasts a movie theater and a full-scale gym. “Going to this facility would be like waiting out the apocalypse in a fivestar hotel,” he says. Developer Lar r y Hall uses the term “life assurance” to refer to his Kansas compound, built in a former Atlas missile silo, where units—including the one Allen is purchasing—start at more than $1 million and where common luxury-building perks are supplemented with extras like five years’ worth of food. De spit e t he se r iou s nat u re of t he s e dom ici le s , H a l l , who h a s worked for defense cont ractors, talks about the units as blithely as

one might a new pied-à-terre. “We decided to make them ultra modern, with all of the problems sought out and solved,” he says. “It was a turnkey solution of a high-end property people could use as a getaway. And it doubles as a survival shelter.” To date, Hall has sold 13 units in his fi rst facility and is taking orders for a second, third and fourth, now in development. The fi rst building is ready for occupation, with security and maintenance staff already hired and trained. Medical services are on more of a cooperative basis: Doctors, nurses and dentists who own units have agreed to provide care for their neighbors. Meanwhile, some among the concerned and comfortable have opted to build protection into their primary homes. Hardened Structures, a Virginia-based firm, builds custom homes complete with reinforced walls and built-in shelters. Working for clients including celebrities,

at h let e s a nd CEO s , t he company creates what look like typical mansions but possess ballistic-resistant exteriors, panic rooms and secret passageways leading to underground shelters, with walls designed to withstand blast pressure. They’re also equipped for off-the-grid living: no water, no power, no problem. The homes’ overriding feature is discretion. Principal Brian Camden, currently at work on houses in New York, California and Texas, explains that because their assets are so well couched, Hardened Homes have an advantage over their rivals. “W hen we inter view the client s to f i nd out what they want, we tell them, don’t tell anybody,” he says. “It’s all need-to-know from that point on. Operational security is incredibly important to these people.” Emotional wellbeing is another factor to consider, given that a longterm stay in a confined space can incite anxiety and depression. Many shelters feature exercise equipment and wall art that mimics windows. Despite the amenities, there’s a challenge inherent in marketing somethi ng people hope never to use. Some developers have worked around that by packaging the shelters as year-round resorts that just happen to have the added benefit of being able to protect against disaster. The idea that these homes can save lives is critical to buyers, no matter the cost. For those with the funds, it’s another way of providing for the ones they love. “If someone considers family his most important asset, these homes are asset protection,” Camden says. “It’s that simple.”

PREP

Roughing It For survivalists without million-dollar bunkers, all is not lost. Survival Academy, an immersive training experience launched by former Man vs. Wild star Bear Grylls, offers programs that typically accommodate 10–12 participants and range from 24 hours to five days in locations like Yosemite National Park, the Scottish Highlands and Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe. Here are the skills participants can expect to learn:

1. SHELTER Build an A-frame shelter that houses up to four people by cross-hatching sticks and using ferns to waterproof and insulate.

2. FOOD Explore outdoor delicacies like protein-packed mealworms and grubs, then set a spring-loaded trap to catch a rabbit—which you’ll skin, gut and roast over a fire.

3. WATER Identify fresh water by seeking out a clear, fastmoving stream, or sterilize impure water using a sock, charcoal, grass and sand or iodine tablets.

4. FIRE No flint? No problem. Learn to start a fire using a battery and steel wool.

5. TRAVERSE After mastering how to tie a bowline and slipknot, you’ll be able to rappel down steep inclines, zip-line and cross a river gorge. PRICES VARY BASED ON COURSE LOC ATION AND LENGTH. FOR MORE INFORMATION , GO TO BE ARGRYLLS SU RVIVAL AC ADEMY.COM.

—LINDSAY SILBERMAN


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or a certain kind of t r avele r, t he best part of vacationing isn’t lounging on the beach, lingering over dinner or spending hou rs i n the spa — it’s the luxury of being looked after in five-star fashion. So it’s no surprise that an increasing number of jet-setters are opti ng to t a ke up residency at their favor ite fancy properties. “We’re definitely seeing a rise in the number of luxury branded residences on offer, and we’ve also seen a rise in demand from buyers,” says Charles Weston Baker, head of international residential at the global real estate firm Savills. In New York, the Baccarat Hotel began selling its residences in March 2013, while the building was u nder const r uct ion. Wit h i n six months, half of the 59 units had been purchased sight unseen, for prices starting at $3.95 million. The concept itself isn’t new— people have been t u r ning hotels into extended-stay homes fo r d e c a d e s — bu t n ow, a slew of high-prof ile properties are making the idea of hotel living more entici ng t h a n eve r. At t he St . Regis Bahia Beach Resort in Puerto Rico, prospective homeow ners have the option of purchasing a two- or three-bedroom oceanfront condo or building a house of their own on one of six

A typical view from one of the villas at Amanzoe, a resort on Greece’s Peloponnesian coast. (The private swimming pool is, of course, included.)

an equivalent premium on rentals and resales. Says Weston Baker, “Buyers feel conf ident that their purchase will hold its value, and they know exactly The latest trend in luxury travel? Moving in! what levels of service they Lindsay Silberman explains why so many high-end can expect to enjoy.” buyers are purchasing permanent (if part-time) Another major selling residences within the walls of five-star properties point, adds Price, is what h a p p e n s w h e n ow n e r s aren’t there. “You have the security of knowing that the building is being mai nt ai ned a nd looked available lots. Either way, they’ll be prospective buyers. Amanzoe, a lav- after. Of course, you can still have afforded access to the St. Regis’ sig- ish Aman resort on Greece’s Pelo- that by hiring your own managenature butler service, in-residence ponnesian coast, has seen prices of ment team, a per manent resident spa treatments and personal chefs. its on-property villas double since g uardian, someone to make sure Elsewhere in the Caribbean, the Do- they came to the market in 2013. the pool is cleaned—but it’s costly, minican Republic’s Casa de Campo They’re now going for $9.5 million. and ultimately, you’re forced to pay Resort has a f leet of helicopters at The reason, says one expert, has a closer attention,” he says. The hassle-free lifestyle is parthe ready for villa owners, plus an lot to do with being attached to a international airport and private jet name. “People recognize the value ticularly desirable in cities, where terminal on the premises. And be- of an established brand. It gives branded high-rises offer all the amecause convenience is key, most resi- them a degree of comfor t and fa- nities of a luxury apartment builddents carry a courtesy card to use in miliarity,” explains James Price, a ing, and then some. At The Peninsulieu of a credit card (or cash) around partner at international real estate la Shanghai, owners of the hotel’s 39 the property—from the Equestrian consult ancy f i r m K night Fran k. riverside apartments have access to There is, of course, a premium in- chauffeured Rolls Royce Phantoms, Center to the spa. Aside from the perks, there’s also volved—typically a mark-up of 20 to a refrigerator restocking service, an interesting value proposition for 30 percent—but owners tend to see dog walkers and more. “The idea of five-star service is that if it’s legal, we take a permanent vacation can make it happen,” says Larry Kruysman, the senior sales director of New York’s Baccarat Hotel & Residence s. Set t o op e n lat e r t h is year, the property recently listed its five-bedroom penthouse for $60 million, which, some might say, is a St. Regis Bahia Beach Peninsula Shanghai casa de campo resort small price to pay for perPuerto Rico China Dominican Republic manent pampering.

celebrities arguably pioneered the trend of hotel dwelling : coco chanel spent nearly 40 years in a two - bedroom apartment at the hôtel ritz paris .

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THIS ONE’S FOR THE DOGS. AS MAKERS OF HANDCR AF TED GOODS, WE BELIEVE THAT AMERICAN LUXURY SHOULD BE DEFINED THROUGH AMERICAN QUALIT Y. INTRODUCING SHINOL A PET ACCESSORIES. OUR L ATEST PET PROJECT. THIS SEASON’S COLLECTION CREATED WITH MANY A DOG’S BEST FRIEND, BRUCE WEBER.

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C U LT U R E Blazer, $2,450, SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE, 212-980-2970. Right hand: Kiss ring, $5,550, VHERNIER, 310-273-2444. Left hand, from left: Berbère Module ring; Berbère Module ring set, both price upon request, REPOSSI, Barneys New York, 212-450-8700. Ring, $3,935; Boheme bangle, $11,900, MONTBLANC, montblanc.com. LVCEA watch in 18-karat pink gold, $7,950, BULGARI, bulgari.com. For more gold inspiration, visit lovegold. com. On eyes: Color Design eye shadow in Drama and Center Stage, $20, LANCÔME, lancome-usa.com. Eye & Brow Maestro, $34, GIORGIO ARMANI, giorgioarmanibeautyusa.com. On lips: Pure Color Envy sculpting lipstick in Discreet, $30, ESTÉE LAUDER, esteelauder.com. On skin: Fusion Ink Foundation in Almond, $60, YVES SAINT LAURENT, yslbeautyus.com. Shade & Illuminate duo in Intensity One, $77, TOM FORD, tomford.com. On nails: Nail polish in Take It Outside, $9, ESSIE, essie.com. Manicure: Ana-Maria for CHANEL Beaute. Talent: Madison Headrick at the Society. Casting: Ros Okusanya. Photographed on location at Hairstory, NYC.

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Highly pigmented shadow is back (again), but this time the look is bold, not pretty: Think the sneakily aggressive blocks of color that Twiggy sported in the 1960s, not subtle washes of pastels that are altogether too demure for fall PHOTOGRAPHED BY RAF STAHELIN STYLED BY SARAH SCHUSSHEIM MAKEUP BY GINA BROOKE

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TURF WARS

Feeling The Burn

As the high-end fitness market gets ever more competitive, some gyms are resorting to tactics that seem better suited to elementary school playgrounds than million-dollar businesses. Kayleen Schaefer reports from the front lines of the workout battlefields illustrated by dennis eriksson

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a s t y e a r, p e r s o n a l t r a i n e r A ndy Sp e e r q u it h is job at Equinox in New York City’s SoHo a rea to open h is ow n g y m, SoHo St reng th Lab, just f ive blocks away. Over the next few months, some of his client s followed h i m to t he new place…a nd so did a not ice f rom E qu i nox accu si ng Speer of v io lating his non-compete agreement , a nd say i ng t hat he ha d to close his gym immediately or they would sue. The lawsuit is still being th reatened today. “T hey felt like we stole their clients,” Speer says, “but ever yone can do what they want. It’s kind of a pain in the ass, but we’re not wor r ied about anything on our end, or about bei ng shut dow n . It’s a n u n for t u-

nate side of the business, but it’s just the way things are.” The way things are in the fitness industr y, it seems, is super competitive (and not just over who can

achieve the best muscle definition or lowest body-fat percentage). An industry that was once about chasing good vibes, endor phin highs and killer abs has become centered around gyms and studios clinging to their territory and fighting off all other comers. Boutique firms, like SoulCycle or Tracy Anderson Method, along with the big guys, like Equinox or Bally Total Fitness, are squabbling over everything from locations to clients to t raining st yles, all in the hopes of staying in business in what’s become a ver y crowded space. “ T he re’s f it ne ss on eve r y corner,” says Jennifer Johnson, who founded JJ Dancer in Los Angeles and trains Jessica Alba and Jenna Dewan-Tatum. “It’s all about whoever comes out with some thing new. Like, say, there’s a new shoveling-your-sand workout, and then it’s, ‘Oh my god, have you been shoveling?’ ” But with memberships that can cost anywhere from $250 to $950 a month, or up to $40 per class,

workout spots can’t afford to have cl ie nt s r u n n i ng t o t he nex t big thing whenever they feel like it. So gyms—and, in many cases, their most devoted members — are engaging in tactics that at times seem more suited to playg rou nd sk i rmishes than to professional rivalries. Some black out their doors so rivals can’t peek in; others ban the competition from taking their classes or tease clients for wearing another brand’s gear. (“We might say, ‘We sell shirts here too,’ and have them buy something else,” a former dance cardio studio employee recalls.) Likewise, there are trainers who (falsely) tell clients that other workouts are bad for them. “Ever y trainer and company will have their own views and creed,” Johnson says, “and there might be a good reason why certain clients shouldn’t go, say, spinning. But generally speaking, I feel like it’s just manipulation.”

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n May, Bar r y’s Bootcamp instructor (and chief operating officer) Joey Gonzalez attended a SoulCycle class; later, he got a voicemail from a SoulCycle lawyer telling him he couldn’t come back. “He essentially said, ‘We have a policy at SoulCycle where instructors at other group-fitness studios a re not al lowe d t o t a ke cla ss ,’” Gon zalez told f it ness website Wel l + G o o d . “ He s e e m e d h a l f embarrassed.” And at Tracy Anderson Method, a former employee says, “We had a couple of incidents where former trainers would try to come to take a class, and they were nicely asked


GStarFit. “Gyms hire people with entertainment backgrounds. They want people with pizazz. There’s a guy here who teaches for Barry’s Bootcamp: He was a frustrated college athlete who didn’t make it as a pro, and now he’s the man. Everyone packs his class. He became a fitness instructor overnight. Before that, he was working in finance.” Perhaps because of how charismatic certain instructors are, some particularly devoted clients have begun to act as though they have a stake in their businesses. “Some of the women who train at these very high-priced gyms are normal, but some are lunatics,” says a former

Some Gyms black out their doors, or tease Clients for wearing another Brand’s Gear.

in 2012 , tracy anderson said her ex- employees really can ’t compete with her .

boutique gym employee, who tells stories about clients who’d cry or th row t ant r u ms if they could n’t work with a cer tain trainer. “It’s all they do. T hey plan thei r day around when a cer tain t rainer is tea ch i ng. T hey br i ng t hei r k id. They get caught up with the drama in the studio, like who’s sleeping with whom.” Clients become protective, too, if they see something they think their trainer should know about, like if a fellow client “friends” a different trainer on Facebook, or if an instructor at their studio is also teaching a class elsewhere. Some have even started Facebook pages t hat a re specif ically de voted to criticizing another workout; SoulCycle followers lashed out against the Tracy Anderson Method after Anderson told Redbook that spinning will “bulk your thighs.” Gifts, like luxur y trips or lavish dinners, are also common. “These women become obsessed with these t rainers,” the insider says. “When their whole body changes they become ver y indebted to them and grateful.” Sometimes, in fact, they become too gratef ul. “There was a point where I had a Single White Female sit u at ion ,” Nu nez says. “She was, like, everywhere I was. If I was at the super market or at a party, she was there. It became uncomfortable. I’m not your guru.

“i have been smart, like coca- cola , and

I’m n ot yo u r go d o r m a s t e r. I f you’re counting on this one thing to make you happy, you’ve taken it too far.” Along the same lines, Annbeth Eschbach, the owner of Exhale, a bar re studio in New York known for its core fusion classes, points

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to walk away.” When one former Anderson instr uctor came to the brand’s Hamptons studio, other clients—and not the gym’s management—recognized her and asked that she be turned out. “Tracy is a little bit more sensitive to people leaving her,” the former employee explains. “People have burned her.” Practices like this might be commonplace in, say, the notoriously secretive and sometimes savage f i na nce i ndu st r y, but some f itness professionals think they have no place in a business that’s supposed to be dedicated to making customers feel great about themselves. “It’s very tacky to close your doors,” says Ary Nunez, Rihanna’s trainer and founder of Ary’s America. “No one’s trying to steal your stuff. I shun that. If you’re amazing and incredible, you don’t care if someone’s trying to compete with you. If you’re hiding your st uff because you think you’re that great, you must be insecure. It’s tacky, and you’re making a poor statement about your brand.” The fitness business has indeed become increasingly personality driven, and more about the brand than what’s making you sweat. “A lot of it is about the ‘you’ factor,” says Gregg D’Andrea, an indoor cycling instructor in Boston who runs

out that those in the fitness industry should think well beyond whatever happens to be the brand or wo r ko u t of t h e m o m e nt . “ T h i s thing is bigger than all of us,” she says. “Well-being is something everyone needs. It’d be very sad if we tore each other apart.”

didn ’t teach them how or why i move the way i do .”


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GROOMING

SAFETY IN NUMBERS

A comfortable close shave has fueled the safety razor’s resurgence. These sculptural blades are a cut above. PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHRISTINE BLACKBURNE

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EDITED BY PAUL FREDERICK

From left: Safety razor, $60, BAXTER OF CALIFORNIA, baxterofcalifornia.com. Burl wood double edge razor, $45, PC WOODCRAFT, badgerbrush.net. Buffalo horn razor, $60, CLASSIC SHAVING, classicshaving.com. Safety razor, $60 for a 6 piece starter kit, BEVEL, getbevel.com. 45R enamel razor, $33, PARKER, classicshaving.com. Paint: Farrow & Ball in Nancy’s Blushes.

WELL-HEELED BEAUTY When Christian Louboutin brushed a coat of nail polish onto the bottom of his first prototype in 1992, he never imagined that the red sole would eventually become a ubiquitous status symbol for the fashion set. Now, the French shoe designer is paying homage to where it all began with a line of glossy nail lacquers, giving devotees a chance to wear the brand from tip to toe. —LINDSAY SILBERMAN Beauté nail colours, $50 each, us.christianlouboutin.com

DEMOCRATIC NOMINEE ADLAI STEVENSON HAS BEEN QUOTED AS SAYING ,

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Rolling Spider Minidrone Parrot’s latest palm-size release is significantly smaller than its drone predecessors. It comes with a camera for still images and removable plastic wheels, which allows the device to roll on the ground and scale walls. Rolling Spider MiniDrone, $99.95, Parrot, apple.com

Ph a ntom 2 Vision+ The Phantom 2 Vision+ can reach altitudes up to 900 feet, at speeds maxing out at 35mph, making it arguably the most advanced consumer drone on the market. The WiFi-enabled drone and its integrated 14 megapixel camera are controlled through a corresponding mobile app.

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Phantom 2 Vision+, $1299.99, DJI, atlantahobby.com

FUTURE TENSE

FLYING OBJECTS, IDENTIFIED

Consumer drones are being used to deliver bottles of champagne, take impressive aerial selfies, help realtors sell homes—and that’s just the beginning. Lindsay Silberman provides a bird’s-eye view of the rising trend ILLUSTRATed BY MARk weaver

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f you’ve ever dreamed of having a chilled bottle of champagne delivered to you by a small flying robot (and who hasn’t, really?), then you’re in luck: A luxury hotel in California is using drones to transport bubbly to high-paying guests. The devices are also popping up at weddings, where they’re being used to shoot drone selfies, or “dronies,” an eye-roll-inducing term coined by nerdy tech folk several months ago. These consumer-friendly copters, which can be anywhere from palm-

size to three feet wide, are inching their way into the zeitgeist. Even Amazon is getting in on the action— the company recently announced its plans for Prime Air, a delivery system that relies on aerial vehicles to bring customers their packages in 30 minutes or less. Because the drone phenomenon is so new, government regulations surrounding their commercial use are still being developed. In the meantime, the Federal Aviation Association says that hobbyists can

conservationists are enthusiastic about the prospect of using drones as a surveillance measure against wildlife poachers in africa .


A R.Drone 2.0 Elite Edition Controlling the drone is simple— just download the accompanying “Free Flight” app on any iOS or Android device, and watch it take flight up to 164 feet in the air. While flying, the drone’s built-in HD camera streams live video directly to the connected smartphone or tablet. AR.Drone 2.0 Elite Edition, $299.95, Parrot, apple.com

For novice pilots, operating the LA100 is completely fool-proof—the drone flies itself. Mount a GoPro (not included) on the top or bottom of the wing, select from one of the device’s pre-programmed flight paths and then launch it by hand to capture five minutes of aerial video. LA100, $990, Lehmann Aviation, lehmannaviation.com

iris The 2.8 pound quadcopter from 3D Robotics comes fully assembled out of the box and is designed to accommodate a GoPro HERO 3 (sold separately). It takes off with the press of a single button and promises a flying time of 7 to 15 minutes. Iris, $750, 3D Robotics, 3drobotics.com

after unveiling the company ’s plans to deliver pack ages via drone , amazon ceo jeff bezos told 60 minutes ,

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fly them under certain guidelines, like keeping the drone in sight of the operator—which means you could use one to film your kid’s soccer game, canvas the area for a missing dog, shoot an aerial video of your new house to share with friends or, you know, see what your neighbor is BBQing for dinner. With an increasing number of companies making user-friendly devices, owning a drone is becoming more tempting than ever before. Here are five we have our eyes on.

L A100

“i know this looks like science fiction . it ’s not.”


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NOTEWORTHY

Drinking in the Scent

Mixer

Kina L’Avion d’Or white aperitif based on the Cortese grape

Iris sweet floral liqueur with flavors of violet

Hammer and Tongs Sac’Resine sweet vermouth made with 13 botanicals

Pavan vin de liqueur based on Muscat grapes

LeJay Cassis dark red liqueur made from black currants

Fragrant Ingredient

Sandalwood

Iris rhizome (orris root)

Myrrh

Neroli (bitter orange blossom)

Cassis buds

Perfume

Guerlain Samsara

Le Labo Iris 39

Yves Saint Laurent Opium

Tom Ford Neroli Portofino

Chanel No. 5

Cocktail

Negroni d’Oro (gin, Kina L’Avion d’Or, Dolin Rouge vermouth) at Fiola in Washington, DC

Blessed Days (cachaça, mezcal, Iris, grapefruit and lime juice, seltzer, tarragon sprig) at Raven & Rose in Portland, Oregon

Harvey Wallbanger (barrel-aged Genever gin, Sac’Resine, caramelized orange gomme, “Galliano sachet”) at Billy Sunday in Chicago

Pavan Pirate Punch (navy strength gin, Pavan, Sauvignon blanc, apple cider and fresh lemon) at Blackbird Ordinary in Miami

Rio Royale (cachaça, LeJay cassis, mint, lime and champagne) at the Hawthorne in Boston

Fun Fact

Kina Lillet was the original third ingredient in the Vesper, the vodka and gin cocktail made famous in the James Bond novels.

Myrrh has been valuable as a fragrance for so long that it was one of the three gifts presented to the baby Jesus.

When This American Life host Ira Glass tracked down what he believes is the original recipe for Coca-Cola, the soft drink was said to contain neroli oil.

Though Iris rhizome can be a top note, it is used in many perfumes as a fixative to balance other scents.

The wholesale price of cassis buds increases for everybody when Chanel No. 5 sells well.

STILL LIFES: GETTY IMAGES. PHOTO COLLAGE: SARAH OLIN

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Jacqueline Detwiler discovers that the latest crop of floral cocktail additives has a lot more in common with iconic perfumes than you might expect


The benefits of owning here go well beyond the exquisite setting. residences@bahamar.com I +1.678.620.9490 I BAHAMAR.COM NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS

Not intended as an offer of or solicitation to buy real estate where prior qualification is required. Void where prohibited by law. Illustrations are conceptual renderings (or photographs included for illustrative purposes only) that may not reflect the project as currently designed or ultimately be constructed. Plans, specifications, features and pricing and are not complete and are subject to change without notice. English shall be the controlling language regarding interpretation. Any purchase of a Residence should be for personal use and enjoyment and should be without reliance upon any potential for future profit, rental income, economic or tax advantages. No legal or financial advice is being offered. Consult with your own legal and business advisors. THE COMPLETE OFFERING TERMS ARE IN AN OFFERING PLAN AVAILABLE FROM THE SPONSORS. FILE #s: CD13-0215, CD13-0216, CD13-0217. SPONSORS: BAHA MAR, LTD., BAHA MAR LAND HOLDINGS, LTD., BMP GOLF LTD., BMP THREE LTD. - BAHA MAR BOULEVARD, CABLE BEACH, NASSAU, N.P., THE BAHAMAS. OBTAIN THE PROPERTY REPORT REQUIRED BY FEDERAL LAW AND READ IT BEFORE SIGNING ANYTHING. NO FEDERAL AGENCY HAS JUDGED THE MERITS OR VALUE, IF ANY, OF THIS PROPERTY. Š 2014 - Baha Mar Ltd. - All rights reserved. Equal Housing Opportunity.


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VROOM

NEED for SPEED Ferrari’s Corso Pilota is the ultimate driving academy. Paul Biedrzycki gets schooled

A CHALLENGING (AND ADDICTIVE) COURSE WITH A QUIRKINESS THAT MANY CIRCUITS LACK

THE MOST EXPENSIVE CAR EVER SOLD WAS A 1963 FERRARI 250 GTO RACER , WHICH CHANGED HANDS LAST YEAR FOR $52 MILLION .

PAUL BIEDRZYCKI

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nzo Ferrari always had reservations about selling his automobiles to the public. Faced with the reality of running a business, he at least tried to keep it an exclusive club, making an art form out of playing hard to get. But these are cars meant for more than show: An idle Ferrari, collecting dust as a status symbol, is nothing less than sacrilege. So, for the lucky few who have the means to own a Ferrari, the natural question post-delivery is “Now what?” For safety as well as appreciation, a primer in how to rein in all that Italian horsepower seems advisable. Several manufacturers have their own driving schools, but they can often feel like thinly veiled “pop-up” testdrives safely out of the range of a radar gun. Ferrari’s school, Corso Pilota, is an entirely different experience: a family reunion or trial by fire, depending on the intensity you bring to it. O pen on ly to cu r rent owners, the various twoday programs cost around $12,000—a fraction of the car’s quarter million—and introduce the nuances of Ferrari driving to both casual motorists and those eyeing Ferrari’s full-blown owner racing program, Corse Clienti. Ferrari offers three locations for Corso Pilota in North America—a winter-driving course in Aspen, a program at Austin’s Circuit of the Americas (scheduled in November to coincide with the U.S. Grand Prix) and an extensive schedule at its North American “home track,” Circuit Mont-Tremblant, a 2.65 mile gem in the hills of Quebec. While the village of Tremblant has the cobblestone charm of a European ski town, and all the luxury amenities Ferrari owners would expect, it is the circuit itself that warrants the trip. Historically the track was nicknamed “the hump” due to the tendency of cars to become airborne as they crested over a few harrowing points, and it boasts a fluid mix of swooping curves, tight turns and numerous elevation changes. It’s a challenging, quirky (and addictive) course, impossible to perfect despite its relative shortness. Pierre Savoy, a well-known Canadian racing instructor at Corso Pilota, still finds a great deal of pleasure at Tremblant. “I have done thousands of laps around here, and every time I do a lap it’s… wow,” he says, while cruising down the back straight at over 120mph with a light grip on the wheel of a 458 Speciale. “It’s got a rhythm that is just beautiful.” The introductory course caters to drivers of all persuasions and aspirations, and a recent class was sur-


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prisingly diverse. In addition to the speed addicts and father-son duos there were several husband-andwife teams, including one speedy grandmother whose only difficulty, it seemed, was fitting the helmet over her coif fed hai rdo. W h ile some owners have their sights set on racing a field of competitors one day, others are simply looking for a unique experience as an alternative to reading the instruction manual. The instructor-student ratio is often one to one, ensuring that everyone gets the personalized attention needed to find their own rhythm, first learning the basics of car control on the skid pad, then putting it all together on the track during an immersive two-day program. One particularly fast learner opted to stay out on the track during that first lunch break, blazing down the front stretch as the rest of the class enjoyed Caprese salads and espressos in the control tower. Much to the delight of the students (and instructors), the mystery

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Auto pilot: Enzo Ferrari

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Sweet Ride: Circuit Mont-Tremblant, Ferrari’s North American “home track”

student was two-time world champion Formula One Ferrari driver Fernando Alonso, who had just happened to stop by and couldn’t resist the opportunity to take one of the school’s 458s out for a spin. While the program will surely improve a student’s driver rating, the real value of the Corso Pilota is that it’s a big, welcome-to-the-family hug from a historically reclusive manufacturer that is now fostering appreciation through inclusion. Enzo’s daunting legacy will always loom over Ferrari, but he simply wanted his automobiles to be appreciated for what they are: rolling objets d’art. And turning patrons into lifelong aficionados benefits both sides. For buyers first lured in by the trademark red paint job, or the unmistakable exhaust note of a revving Ferrari, a few days spent at the Corso Pilota at Tremblant only sets the hook deeper. As one participant casually mentioned while waiting to practice spinouts, he’d just bought his 19th Ferrari, drives them all regularly and sees no end in sight—just the type of fer vor that might make the ghost of a stoic patriarch in dark sunglasses crack a smile.

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THE WELL-DRESSED SPORTSCAR: A NEW MASERATI, DESIGNED BY ZEGNA

Despite their very different métiers, Maserati and Ermenegildo Zegna have quite a bit in common: They’re both century-old Italian companies who specialize in designing exclusive products with incomparable style. So it makes sense that the two brands have teamed up to create the Limited Edition Quattroporte Ermenegildo Zegna. The car’s interior features ultrafine leather in dark brown and greige alongside Zegna’s luxurious fabrics, including a silk chevron weave that mimics the look of the house’s menswear. Naturally, because this is fashion, there are accessories—a 19-piece Owner’s Collection, also designed by Zegna, featuring personal items and small leather goods, will be made available to the lucky 100 people who purchase this unique car.

Shades of Grey: The car is available in an exclusively designed color called “Platinum Silk.” RAPPERS MAY BE MASERATI ’S MOST GENEROUS VOLUNTEER ADVERTISERS , CONSIDERING HOW OFTEN THE WORD IS USED IN RAP SONGS — PERHAPS BECAUSE IT RHYMES SO WELL WITH PAPARAZZI .

SPEED CONT’D, TOP TO BOTTOM: GETTY IMAGES; PAUL BIEDRZYCKI. WELL-DRESSED, RUNWAY: IMAXTREE.COM. ALL OTHERS: COURTESY.

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These chic prefab pods offer a new way to explore the great outdoors. Lindsay Silberman sizes up the growing world of “microarchitecture”

The Wedge model cabin by Wheelhaus

king-size bed and a gas fireplace. The cabins typically range in dimension from 100 square feet (the Bunkie, below left) to Wheelhaus’s 400-square-foot Wedge model (above), and are priced accordingly—Bunkie’s units start at $21,900, while Wheelhaus’ go for $89,500 and up. Most of the pods arrive pre-assembled. (The Bunkie is constructed at your chosen location in 2-3 days.) If you love the concept but camping’s not your cup of tea, we suggest installing one in your (big) backyard; They make great guesthouses, and are a perfect place to park your in-laws when they come to town.

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re-pitched canvas tents stocked with lush linens are so last year. The latest in “glamping”—a portmanteau used to describe camping in its most glamorous form—is decidedly more luxurious, thanks to the advent of prefab portable cabins. These miniature pop-up abodes are delivered directly to your own little corner of the woods and boast thoughtfully designed interiors that make even the most upscale tents seem primitive, at best. In the case of Jackson Hole–based Wheelhaus, features include a bathroom with a glass shower, stainless-steel appliances and rooms spacious enough for a


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THICK AS THIEVES

Police Commissioner Bill Bratton and legal dynamo Rikki Klieman might be New York’s most law-abiding power couple. Adam Rathe takes an arresting look PHOTOGRAPHED BY MARK PECKMEZIAN

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Police Commissioner of New York and Boston, who would go on to hold the position of police chief in Los Angeles before returning to New York—when things took an unexpected turn. “He rose, we exchanged business cards, we kissed on the cheek,” she recalls now, “and he said—at 8:15 in the morning— ‘You look so beautiful; if you were single, I would marry you.’ My response to that was, ‘Perhaps you should call me for lunch.’” Bratton did just that and the two, who married in 1999, have been together ever since. It’s a partnership that brought the duo

tion League meeting Bratton has no memory of attending and the second was in 1993 in a Boston College parking lot when Klieman, a criminal defense lawyer, surrendered her client— 23-year veteran of the FBI’s most wanted list Katherine Ann Power—to then-Commissioner Bratton and a bevy of federal agents. That morning at the Regency, things were a bit more relaxed. Klieman says she stopped by Bratton’s table to say hello and earn brownie points with her boss—Bratton was, after all, the former

from New York to Los Angeles, where Bratton served as the city’s top cop from 2002 through 2009, and back again. And while living in L.A. didn’t disagree with the couple—“We’re both movie buffs, so being in Hollywood and getting to meet actors, producers and directors, many of whom are now good friends, was a great experience,” Bratton says—they’re glad to be back in New York, where Bratton is Mayor de Blasio’s Police Commissioner and Klieman works as a legal analyst for CBS

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ike so many of New York’s most successful mergers, this one began over breakfast at the Regency. It was late 1997 and Rikki Klieman, a CourtTV anchor recently relocated from Boston, was dining with her new boss at the Upper East Side eatery, where captains of industry hash out billiondollar deals over $28 plates of salmon benedict. Across the room, she spotted a familiar face. William J. Bratton wasn’t a close friend, but he and Klieman had crossed paths before. The first time was at an Anti-Defama-

NEW YORK ’S OTHER MOST FAMOUS POLICE COMMISSIONER , JAMES GORDON OF BATMAN FAME , IS COMING BACK TO TV THIS FALL CARE OF ACTOR BEN MCKENZIE IN FOX ’S NEW SERIES GOTHAM .

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and sits on the board of directors of the Police Athletic League. For Bratton, being New York’s Police Commissioner has higher stakes today than during his previous stint. “The job now is very different than it was in 1994 because of the issues of terrorism; that was not a significant part of policing back then,” he says, alluding to the street crime that plagued his first stint in the job. Still, he’s glad he returned. “As much as people talk about California weather,” Bratton says, “we were really looking forward to coming back to live and work in New York.” It’s understandable, considering the couple—who now split their time bet ween Man hat tan and Hampton Bays on Long Island— are able not only to do the work they’re passionate about, but to do it side by side. “Bill is out the door at dawn and we are usually not home until about 11 o’clock at night,” Klieman says. “I tend to join him at one or two of his evening events. And those events run the gamut: They could be a community meeting or an assembly of the fraternal groups in the department or a Police Athletic League event,

high achievers who not only adore but also challenge one another. “We exchange a lot of ideas about policing and defending,” Klieman says, “I go to his speeches and critique them and he does the same, which is very important because it’s constructive and is there to make us better.” Still, there’s more than work to this socially active pair. “The nice thing about New York City is that it keeps getting better,” says Bratton. “Look at the reenergizing of Brooklyn. As much as we love restaurants in Manhattan, you’re just as likely to find us in an outer borough. The city is expanding all the time and it’s great to be a part of that.” Despite having the safety of the city in his hands, Bratton also seems to revel in some quotidian New York pleasures. “A really good day would include a walk across Central Park,” he says, “an early movie and maybe lunch at Cafe Fiorello, where they have a great antipasto bar. Then we’d catch a second movie and have dinner with friends at one of the East Side Italian restaurants we like—Elio’s is a favorite—and go home to watch Masterpiece Theatre.”

Police Commissioner Bill Bratton and his wife, Rikki Klieman, in Bratton’s 14th-floor office at 1 Police Plaza

where I am on the board and Bill is the honorary chairman. That creates a synergy for us.” That synergy is key for the pair, who keep in contact throughout the day via BlackBerry Messenger (antiquated, maybe, but secure for government officials) and whose work and personal lives are intricately intertwined. Sitting with them in the Commissioner’s Lower Manhattan office, it’s clear that these are two

PRESIDENT THEODORE ROOSEVELT SERVED AS NYC’S POLICE COMMISSIONER FOR TWO YEARS , FROM

And while a bad day for Bratton could include any number of unthinkable events, Klieman says she loves how her husband approaches each one as if it’s going to be his best. “Bill’s glass isn’t half-full,” she says, “it’s overf lowing. Each morning he wakes up in this state of ecstasy—he gets to go to work and that makes him a happy person. For me, that’s a great person to wake up next to.”

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WHEN HE HOPELESSLY BATTLED THE CORRUPTION AND VICES OF THE GILDED AGE .


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DESK for SUCCESS With the revival of retro desk accessories, the 1960s-style office is making a major comeback

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HOUSE HUNTERS NeueHouse, a shared working space, opened in 2013 on an unremarkable Manhattan block, and almost immediately, the 50,000-square-foot, David Rockwell– designed compound—which boasts a screening room and recording studio—earned a following among in-the-know entrepreneurs, including fashion designers. Angelenos needn’t feel left out: An L.A. outpost is set to open in early 2015. www.neuehouse.com

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the gifts of gabbard

Hawaii’s Democratic congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard has already made a name for herself on both sides of the aisle. Matthew Cooper surfs the wave of her hard-earned popularity PHOTOGRAPHED by Marco Garcia

Gabbard, shown here on Oahu’s Kailua Beach

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t all started with toffee. When Hawaii’s Tulsi Gabbard came to Congress in 2013, she sent boxes of her mother’s macadamianut toffee to each of the 434 other members— an aloha gesture if ever there was one. If that weren’t generous enough, she sent an additional 435 bigger boxes around for congressional staff. “Mom was stirring pots two at a time,” she says. For those outside the Beltway such sugary diplomacy might seem trivial, but it’s the kind of thing that can get a freshman representative noticed. “I didn’t want to wait 20 years to get things done,” Gabbard says when I visit her cramped congressional offices, the type newbies are st uck with until they move up the ladder. “This was a small but important gesture, and I found members walking across the aisle asking, ‘Who is that Tulsi Gabbard?’”

Hawaii is not only America’s paradise but also its crucible of interracial harmony. It was the first “majority-minority” state, and almost one-fourth of current residents say they’re of mixed race. It’s where our current president was born to a Kansan mother and a Kenyan father. So it makes sense that Gabbard, the f irst Hindu in Congress—swor n in on the Bhagavad Gita—hails from Oahu and not, say, Omaha. Wholly Hawaiian, Gabbard, 33, still plunges into the ocean as soon as she gets home—“every time, without fail,” she says. She proudly surfs a 6-foot-1 shortboard and recalls that she resisted wearing shoes much of her childhood. In Washington, Gabbard’s striking looks make her a standout against Congress’ tableau of white men in dark suits. Kyrsten Sinema, a young Democrat from Arizona, was im-

pressed the first time they met, at an event honoring women leaders under 40. “She’s beautiful, of course,” Sinema recalls. “But I was struck by how calm she is, and super cool.

“I didn’t want to wait 20 years to get things done” — Rep. Tulsi Gabbard

She really represents her state.” But Gabbard isn’t all gentle breezes. She’s making a name for herself on foreign policy and defense and f inds herself at odds with

gabbard regularly takes part in representative markwayne mullin ’s famed , eponymous workout, a mix of crossfit and circuit training .

hair and makeup: Crystal Pancipanci; produced by harry brennan at blue river productions

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An interest in the military comes naturally to Gabbard. In 2004, she left her campaign for a second term on the state legislature and was deployed by the National Guard for a tour in Iraq. It was a transformative experience, in no small part because she saw firsthand the problems of women in the military. Gabbard also says that the militar y’s diversity made her more sensitive to individual rights and that she came back from Iraq supporting same-sex marriage—a topic she now has lengthy dinner-table discussions about with her family, including her state-senator father, who doesn’t share her views. Still, she says, “we hug at the end of the night.” Gabbard continues to serve in the National Guard and should be promoted soon from captain to major. If Gabba rd’s prog ressive move on s a m e - s e x m a rher president. She’s an Iraq combat veteran, one of riage puts her in line with two female veterans in Congress now and one of fellow Democrats, she’s also just a few members of either gender ever to serve. done plenty to reach out to When the Islamist group ISIS took over a large Republicans. With conserswath of Iraq this summer, Gabbard vociferously vative Rep. Aaron Schock objected to President Obama’s idea to send hun- she formed the Future Caudreds of advisers to backstop the Iraqi Army. For cus, which focuses on issues

“I was struck by how calm she is, and super cool. She really represents her state.” — Rep. Kyrsten Sinema

Gabbard, who served in Iraq, the right number to send was zero—a position she says elicited no reaction from the White House but quiet “atta girl”s from her colleagues in the Democratic caucus. Given her interest in defense and foreign affairs, it’s no surprise Gabbard serves on the House Armed Services Committee and the House Foreign Affairs Committee, both befitting Hawaii’s large military presence and the island chain’s position in the Pacific. On a recent congressional delegation trip to East Asia, Gabbard impressed her GOP colleagues and went right to the Korean Demilitarized Zone, a bizarre place where South and North Korean troops are sometimes yards apart. That’s no small thing considering that Kim Jong-un has threatened to lob a missile into Hawaii. “In Honolulu we don’t see it as a situation of someone saying something crazy,” Gabbard says. “It’s very real.”

that impact, or will impact, t he m illen n ial generat ion and attempts to solve these problems. “She’s a n awe some person, and we’re great friends,” says Schock, who’s Gabbard with Georgia Representative Doug Collins. also Gabbard’s exercise buddy. “We came here to share problems and come up with solutions.” Gabbard’s 6 a.m. workouts, long days and almost 10-hour commute home—which she makes at least once a month—mean little socializing outside of work. Instead of living in one of the Alpha Houses favored by representatives, she lives with her sister, a U.S. Marshal, and brother-in-law near the capital. There’s no dating and Gabbard claims not to partake in much of D.C.’s social scene. “I don’t have the time,” she says. “Not a single moment.”

in the current 113 th congress , only 19.4 percent of the members have served in the military, down from 77 percent in the 95th congress that followed the vietnam war .

clockwise from top left: Getty images (2). courtesy of @tulsigabbard instagram

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PAUL ALLEN

THE JET SET

ROCKET MEN After making their fortunes here on Earth, these moguls are aiming for the stars—literally. Adrienne Gaffney counts down to ignition

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ome made their names in the Wild West of the early web while others climbed the peaks of the Forbes list, but what’s next for today’s most forward-thinking magnates? Try the final frontier. For CEOs who have already mastered the known universe, space is the next logical region to conquer, and there’s a legion of tycoons duking it out to become the most important guy on and off the planet. Here are the most promising players.

Known For: Cofounding Microsoft; philanthropic largesse. Earthly Possessions: A stable of sports teams (including the Seattle Seahawks); Octopus, the 414-foot super-yacht where Allen hosts celebrity-packed soirees; an estimated net worth of $16 billion. Shooting for the Stars: Allen’s Stratolaunch Systems plans to build an aircraft carrier that will vault satellites into space. And he’s no newcomer: Allen previously funded SpaceShipOne, which in 2004 became the first privately funded vehicle to leave the atmosphere. Commencing Countdown: A test flight is set for 2016.

JEFF BEZOS

RICHARD BRANSON Known For: The monolithic Virgin Group, which includes airline, hotel and mobile communications arms. Earthly Possessions: Necker Island, the private British Virgin Islands retreat populated with nearly extinct animals, and a fortune said to exceed $5 billion. Shooting for the Stars: The most commercial, and thus accessible, of the ventures, Branson’s Virgin Galactic is steadfastly determined to give just about anyone (with $250,000 to spare) the chance to buy a trip to space. Commencing Countdown: A tentative 2010 deadline came and went, but Branson has serious plans for liftoff by the end of the year.

Known For: Creating Amazon.com. Earthly Possessions: The Washington Post; a rumored $32.8 billion fortune; the 10,000 Year Clock, a massive timepiece currently being built on a remote mountain and meant to keep time for the next 100 centuries. Shooting for the Stars: Bezos has said he wanted to “build space hotels, amusement parks, yachts and colonies.” Now his company Blue Origin is working on launch systems that could transport professionals and tourists into outer space. Commencing Countdown: Blue Origin was hoping to begin missions to the International Space Station after 2018, but a recent brouhaha with NASA could delay blastoff.

ELON MUSK Known For: Cofounding PayPal; serving as CEO of Tesla; frequent comparisons to Iron Man alter ego Tony Stark. Earthly Possessions: A fortune estimated at $9.1 billion; the Lotus Esprit “submarine car” driven by Roger Moore in The Spy Who Loved Me. Shooting for the Stars: Musk is behind SpaceX, the first private venture to send a vehicle to the International Space Station. Now he’s challenging the federal government to consider bids from SpaceX over those from the defense establishment. Commencing Countdown: A May unveiling of a sleek capsule, designed for manned missions, makes Musk’s professed dream of colonizing Mars all the more likely.

THE FIRST SPACE TOURIST WAS 61-YEAR - OLD AMERICAN BUSINESSMAN DENNIS TITO . HE PAID $20 MILLION FOR HIS 2001 FLIGHT TO THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION ABOARD A RUSSIAN SOYUZ SPACECRAFT.

GETTY IMAGES. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: SARAH OLIN.

ROBERT BIGELOW Known For: Owning the low-cost motel chain Budget Suites. Earthly Possessions: Utah’s Skinwalker Ranch—the site of numerous reported UFO sightings—and a rumored $700 million. Shooting for the Stars: Bigelow has said his childhood, spent in 1950s Las Vegas, made him so passionate about space travel that his real estate career was fueled by the desire to fund Bigelow Aerospace, which is now making inflatable habitats for astronauts. Commencing Countdown: Bigelow has a NASA contract for a test of his expandable module on the International Space Station, set to take place in 2015.


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Q&A

MODERN TRANCE

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nspired by a 2010 lecture at New York University exposing just how far Facebook had gone in its “commercial surveillance,” four undergraduates decided to build a new kind of social network. They vowed to find a way for people to connect online without being tracked. Once the fou rsome’s budding proje ct , cal le d Dia sp or a , h it K ick s t a r t e r for f u nd i ng a nd whipped up some suppor t, an award-win ning w r iter for the N e w Yo r k T i m e s n a m e d J i m Dw yer w rote an ar ticle about them. T hat media at tent ion helped triple the funding, and the four young men found themselves the talk of Silicon Valley. But in late 2011, when the money ran out and bad decisions piled up, Diaspora fell apart and one of its founders, Ilya Zhitomirskiy, committed suicide. Now, Dwyer has written a book on Diaspora with the cooperation of its surv iv i ng member s called More Awe some T ha n Mone y: Fo u r Boys and Their Heroic Quest to Save Your Privacy from Facebook (Viking). We caught up with the author to find out more about the unsettling reality of social media. —NANCY BILYEAU DUJOUR: What was your reaction to the news reports that Facebook was performing secret psychological experiments on nearly 700,000 users, flooding pages with negative stories to see how people reacted? JIM DWYER: It’s shocking. They do not seem to have a boundary that they won’t push against. And they could easily have been doing this and much worse without anyone knowing about it. The only reason we know now is someone disclosed it. DJ: Are other kinds of manipulations going on? DE: It’s come out that Facebook is following what you write but then withdraw. If you start to express this in a post or a direct message—“You know, I never really loved you”—but then you delete it, they have still tracked it. They say they have the permission to track these thoughts by virtue of the terms of service agreements. Their sense of presumption is virtually unlimited. DJ: It’s hard to believe they don’t need permission. JD: It’s absurd—these terms-of-service agreements are so dense and complicated, no ordinary person can take the time to decipher what they mean. Even lawyers can’t figure them out. DJ: When Diaspora was born, were most people aware?

JD: Every six or nine months, Facebook pushes the boundaries a little further of where they’re planting the flag with your personal data. In spring 2010, that was one of the first times they did it that shook people up. They were telling you r f r iends what you were reading on other websites. DJ: To take their position, they are trying to find ways to monetize these millions of users happily interacting with friends for free. JD: That’s very fair. DJ: But is it working for them? JD: Well, Facebook is successful economically, and they’re a technically adept and powerful group. Think about the ability and the standards to produce a pict u re f rom any where in the world within milliseconds, right on your screen. That is a superb piece of engineering and they are clearly providing connectivity—personal connectivity—at a level that people desire. DJ: So what is the greatest harm? JD: I thin k it’s kind of a blithe cor r upt ion of t he ecosystem of human interaction. We just have no awareness. It’s as if the water had been polluted and you’re drinking from this polluted reservoir and you don’t realize it. Because you’re drinking from it, everyone assumes you’re OK with the pollution. But you’re not. DJ: The four students who started Diaspora were not OK with it. JD: They were idealists and they were working hard to build something better for the world. DJ: After Ilya’s suicide, what happened to Diaspora, to the goal of a social network without privacy violation? J D : T h e s i t e i s s t i l l o n e of t h e m o s t a c t i v e o p e n s o u r c e projects in the world. A dedicated group of users who are builders and hackers constantly try to evolve it. They want to keep going with what these guys started. Whether it will ever have the prairie fi re of Facebook, I can’t say. DJ: So are you on Facebook now? JD: You mean this minute? DJ: No, I mean, in general. JD: Yes I am. I grew up on a street in New York and most of us from that street have moved away and yet I still have affection, feelings, for many of the people there—and somebody on the block started a group, a private group on Facebook. It’s just right for me. Facebook is great for those lightweight connections.

FIFTY- SEVEN PERCENT OF ALL AMERICAN ADULTS ARE ON FACEBOOK , AND 73 PERCENT OF AMERICANS AGES 12–17. THE AVERAGE PERSON WITH A SMARTPHONE CHECKS FACEBOOK 14 TIMES A DAY.

GETTY IMAGES

As social-media users shrug off violations of their privacy, the author of a new book takes a close look at Facebook through the rise and fall of a would-be rival


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Teeth of The Dog


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A world-class collection of vintage and modern work finds its ideal setting. Lorraine Glennon admires the view

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Entryway: Gary Wolkowitz stands near the entrance of his apartment. On wall at left: Man Ray’s Untitled (1932), vintage silver print.

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s you enter the Park Avenue apartment of Gary and Sarah Wolkowitz, it’s almost impossible to imagine that the couple once surrounded themselves with oversize pop art and color-field paintings by the likes of Andy Warhol and Kenneth Noland. Of course, that was back in the 1970s, in a different life and a different home—a three-story townhouse on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. By contrast, this serene, sparsely furnished aerie on the opposite side of town, complete with some 1,800 square feet of wraparound terraces, was delib-

HENRI CARTIER - BRESSON ONCE SAID ,

“TO ME , PHOTOGRAPHY

erately designed by architect Michael Gabellini as a flexible exhibition space for the collection of vintage and modern photographs the couple has amassed. At the same time, Gabellini created, in his own words, “a frame for living”: a warm and comfortable domestic sphere in which the two can pursue their daily lives. Whether it’s paintings or photography, the collecting impulse runs deep in this couple, perhaps because their lives have always been steeped in art. They met 50 years ago—Sarah was 15, Gary 16 —as students

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Living Room, from left: Hiroshi Sugimoto’s Radio City Music Hall (1978); Paul McCarthy’s White Snow Balloon Dog (2013); Noh Sang-Kyoon’s For The Worshipers Buddha–Rainbow (2003); vintage prints by Edward Steichen, Walker Evans, E.J. Bellocq, Paul Strand, Man Ray, Edward Weston and Man Ray. B&B Italia sofa; Poul Kjaerholm easy chairs and daybed; Michael Gabellini coffee table.

at Manhattan’s High School of Art and Design (other notable alumni include Art Spiegelman, Calvin Klein and Lorna Simpson). “He saw me going up the escalator, and I saw him going down,” recalls Sarah, a six-foottall blonde who undoubtedly made quite an impression on that adolescent boy from the Bronx. “We’ve been together ever since.” The two married in June 1970, and by Labor Day, they’d hatched their business. Their idea—to put colorful, arty designs on the lowly sock (“hot pants were big at the time,” says Sarah, “so we thought, Why not hot socks?”)—took off like a shot. The Hot Sox brand became the licensee for Polo Ralph Lauren’s hosiery collections, and its success allowed them to start buying the modern paintings they loved. It’s no surprise that their son, Bryce,

parents on to photography. As a teenager, he went off t o O x fo r d Un ive r sit y t o study it one summer and fell in love with the medium. He k new h is pa rents had stopped buying paintings and missed collecting. Their Upper West Side townhouse “was lovely but narrow,” says Gary, currently the chief creative officer of Hot Sox-Ralph Lauren Hosiery. “Once the walls were filled with these enormous paintings, there wasn’t an inch left to acquire more art.” When they’d decided to focus on vintage photography, the Wolkowitzes threw themselves into learning everything they could. The couple’s first purchase was Henri Cartier-Bresson’s Rue Mouffetard (1954), an iconic shot of a happy-go-lucky Parisian boy walking with a wine bottle cradled in each arm. They quickly established themselves as top-notch

“theirs is an absolutely exquisite way to live with art” —JEFF ROSENHEIM born in 1973, was an art aficionado from infancy. After all, as Sarah notes, “there was a Warhol Marilyn hanging beside his crib.” Indeed, it was Br yce, now the owner of the Bryce Wolkowitz Galler y i n Chelsea, who t u r ned his

Study: Barbara Kruger’s Face It (2007); Airan Kang’s Illuminated Books LED lights; Donald Judd chair; Michael Gabellini table with Robert Currie’s Black and Red Filament Plexiglas vitrine (2013).


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collectors. “Sarah and Gary are connoisseurs; that’s the backdrop for that aesthetic. Gabellini reoriented the space key,” says Jeff Rosenheim, head photography curator at (originally two apartments that divided in the middle of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where Gary has served the current living room) to give it the light-suffused feel on a patrons’ committee for the past 15 years. “The pic- of what he calls “a horizontal terrace,” cleverly equipped tures they buy all have that ‘best in class’ quality—the with moving panels that allow the apartment to expand form and texture, the exquisite printmaking, the way or contract for public or private use. The furniture is they’re installed.” Vintage still for ms the core of the collection. Among the couple’s most treasured works are an Edward Weston pepper, a Paul St rand por t rait of his wife Rebecca and a Josef Breitenbach nude whose face reminds Sarah of her mother. But in recent years the Wolkowitzes have ventured into more contemporary works, buying what Gary calls “wow” pieces by some of the most interesting visual artists working today— Ci n d y Sh e r m a n , T h o m a s D e m a n d , Edward Burtynsky, Thomas Struth—as well as the occasional sculpture that appeals to them, such as a witty riff on Jeff Koons’ metallic balloon dogs by Paul McCarthy. The Wolkowitzes rotate often. “It’s about assembling suites of images that we feel work together,” Gary says. “What we add or subtract really depends on our mood.” What they strive to maintain is a minimalist aesthetic. T h e i r P a r k Av e n u e a p a r t m e n t , Kitchen: Custom stainless-steel kitchen by Michael Gabellini. Dining room: Thomas Demand’s Room (Zimmer) (1996); Michael Gabellini brushed stainless-steel and Vermont blue stone table; George Nakashima chairs. purchased 17 years ago, provides a perfect

in 1981, hot sox rocketed into the spotlight with its brightly colored , multipatterned leg warmers , going on to define the quintessential 80 ’s trend .


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Master bedroom: Zhang Huan’s To Add One Meter to an Anonymous Mountain (1995); Eileen Gray daybed. Below: Robert Mapplethorpe’s Lydia Cheng (1987); custom Michael Gabellini bed.

simple and low to the ground; colors are a neutral palette of whites, beiges and blacks that, appropriately enough, replicate the tones of a vintage photograph. “I find it reassuring,” says Gabellini, “that this space has managed to adjust accordingly as Gary and Sarah’s photography collection has moved from infancy to maturity.”

“these pieces will live on far longer than we will.” —gary wolkowitz Like most collectors, the Wolkowitzes relish the hunt. Yet neither finds any particular thrill in ownership per se. “These pieces will live on far longer than we will, so it’s kind of pointless to say we ‘own’ them,” Gary says. “But what’s wonderful about having art in your home versus viewing it in a museum is that the pieces really fill up your life in an intimate way. When I take my coffee in the morning, I’m looking at images I’ve lived with for 10 or 15 years, but I see something new all the time.”

michael gabellini is a national design award - winning architect, whose work includes david yurman ’s madison avenue townhouse and the aria boutiques at citycenter las vegas .


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Good and Evil (in which the “Hostess City” is practically a main character) and, later that same year,

residents and great restaurants, clubs and shops have made Sa-

Forrest Gump (the park bench upon which the Tom Hanks char-

vannah a top destination for vacationers (quite a few of whom

acter sat, telling his life story to everyone who’d listen, was situ-

have fallen so in love with the place that, like Carter, they’ve

ated in Chippewa Square).

moved there). “When he founded the city in 1733, General James

But the city has much more to offer than history, even if it

Oglethorpe laid it out as a grid that featured buildings around

does have plenty of that to spare. Proponents like Ben Carter,

park-like squares,” Carter explains. “The concept was a city that

founder of the commercial real-estate firm Ben Carter Enterpris-

could grow and prosper organically and efficiently.”

es, point out that the mixture of gorgeous architecture, gracious

Today there are 22 squares, and Carter says that each one is

A popular local shop, the Savannah Bee Company, sells both “artisanal” and “everyday” honeys, as well as a range of balms, creams and lotions made from the sweet stuff.

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like “an oasis.” (Forsyth Park, a 30-acre green set in the middle of

shopping districts boast a unique mix of local and national options,

the Savannah Historic District—which, combined with the Sa-

including the beloved honey-and-beauty-purveyor the Savannah

vannah Victorian Historic District, is one of the largest National

Bee Company, the century-old Globe Shoe Company and newer ar-

Historic Landmark Districts in the United States—offers another

rivals like L’Occitane and J.Crew. (Soon Carter’s company plans to

alternative for those seeking sanctuary.) Dotted throughout the

open the Grid, a shop/incubator similar to New York City’s Dover

city, and surrounded by businesses and private residences, they

Street Market that will feature young designers, including many

function as neighborhood hubs and are a big part of what makes

who attended the nearby Savannah College of Art and Design.)

Savannah so walkable.

Factor in the lively music scene, the annual film festival and

Visitors can book rooms at luxurious local hotels such as the

the Jepson Center for the Arts, which was completed in 2006,

Bohemian, the Mansion on Forsyth Park and the Marshall House

and it’s clear the city, which is also known for its air of romance,

(which first opened back in 1851) or at the Savannah outposts of

is having a moment. But, as Carter points out, one can’t quite call

upscale chains like the Hyatt Regency and the Andaz. Can’t-miss

it a renaissance because—as the many historic buildings and

eateries include Garibaldi’s Café, A.Lure and Leopold’s, an ice

long-standing businesses prove—Savannah has been thriving

cream shop that’s celebrating its 95th birthday this year. And the

for centuries.

The culture of Savannah is incredible,” says Carter. “On any given night, I can listen to jazz, go dancing, go to the theater, see an independent movie. And it’s a sub-tropical climate, so the weather is beautiful year round.”


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ON DISPLAY

DESIGN Within REACH

As collector and jewelry designer Federico de Vera prepares for his fourth show designed for New York’s Neue Galerie, he and Lisa Cohen delve into the dark world of Egon Schiele

W

hen he was a child in the Philippines, Federico de Vera collected shells and driftwood on the beach, and often glued his found objects together to fashion unique key chains and other one-of-a-kind trinkets. Today, the celebrated jewelry designer and collector still works in much the same vein, although his current pieces are more likely to feature antique gold filigree beads, Victorian cameos and imperfect—or, as he calls them, “rotten”—pearls. “Things don’t have to be precious to be beautiful,” he explains. “I like designing things that you can have forever, pieces that aren’t just transient or trendy.” Nevertheless, de Vera—the proprietor of two curiositystuffed Manhattan boutiques (frequented by customers with a keen design eye, including Valentino Garavani, Marc Jacobs, Bruce Weber and Met Costume Institute head Harold Koda)—is also becoming known for his work as an installation designer, a sideline in which his own contribution is, inherently, temporary. On October 9, the Neue Galerie will open an exhibit of the dark, erotic and provocative works of Austrian painter Egon Schiele, arranged by de Vera. It’s the fourth show he’s designed for the museum, which is housed in a century-old building on the Upper East Side that was once owned by the Vanderbilts. “This one is going to be very graphic,” he says of the exhibit, “because Schiele’s work is always contained in a box and his figures seem to be contorted; that’s why I’m trying to contain everything in the frame on a white background.” He’s envisioned a salon-style hanging of the portraits, so that the “paintings can talk to each other. I want there to be a rhythm, an ebb and f low.” In a certain sense, the work isn’t so different from what de Vera does as a shop owner and jewelry designer. In each case, he says, “the question is how to present these works in a modern way.” Whatever the medium, he adds, “For me, the design has to be just so. That’s why I’m sometimes difficult to work with —because if it’s just okay, then it’s not good enough!”

From top: Colored stone necklace designed by de Vera; the designer in front of Egon Schiele’s Man and Woman I (Lovers I) (1914) at the Neue Galerie; vitrines and objects at the De Vera boutiques in NYC.

STORE AND JEWELRY IMAGES COURTESY

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY MARC ANTHONY


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WEB-SIGHTED

ART and COMMERCE

With sales projected to more than double over the next five years—to $3.8 billion—there’s no denying the online art boom is upon us. Lindsay Silberman bids on the industry’s top players.

ARTSPACE Direct-sales platform that allows users to purchase pieces immediately, rather than during an auction. Specializing In: Contemporary artworks and artist-designed objects averaging $1,500. Shown Here: Brain/ Cloud (With Seascape and Palm Tree) by John Baldessari, which sold for $2,500. Differentiator: The site offers a platform for collectors to resell and consign pieces from their own collections. Priciest Piece Sold: A Jenny Holzer work for $150,000.

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Auctions and sales with pieces curated around themes or by notable tastemakers. Specializing In: Contemporary art and design in the $1,000 to $100,000 price range. Shown Here: Andy Warhol’s After The Party, estimated at $8,000 to $12,000. Differentiator: Paddle8 partners with nonprofits for benefit auctions and works with influencers—everyone from Tracey Emin to Tory Burch—to curate special online sales. Priciest Piece Sold: A Jeff Koons egg for $900,000.

SAATCHI ART The LA-based online arm of London’s famed Saatchi Gallery. Specializing In: Paintings, drawings, photography and sculpture from new contemporary talent. Shown Here: Auction Advertisement by Peter Vahlefeld, which sold for $15,600. Differentiator: A free Art Advisory service that pairs customers with an expert to offer personal recommendations and advice. Priciest Piece Sold: A work by Zil Hoque for $25,000.

ARTSY A hybrid of e-commerce and art education. Specializing In: More than 1,000 categories, including one of the largest online collections of contemporary art in the world. Shown Here: Good Talk (3/16/14) by Andrew Kuo. Differentiator: Aside from its sales business, the site is a robust database of historical pieces (like the Rosetta Stone) and modern and contemporary works by artists like Pablo Picasso and Willem de Kooning. Priciest Piece Sold: The company won’t disclose, but works up to $10,000,000 have been listed.

CHRISTIE’S The e-commerce platform of the largest auction house in the world. Specializing In: Fine art, jewelry, watches and wine. Shown Here: Pamuk by Richard Serra. Differentiator: The site’s Christie’s LIVE feature enables customers to bid on pieces in real time during Christie’s auctions worldwide. Priciest Piece Sold: Richard Serra’s Pamuk sold in May 2014 for $905,000.

SOTHEBY’S IS ALSO DIVING INTO THE DIGITAL WORLD. STARTING THIS FALL , THE COMPANY WILL LIVE - STREAM A PORTION OF ITS NEW YORK AUCTIONS ON EBAY, THE BIDDING SITE WITH

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TIME LINE

ON HEIR

TV trends come and go, but the unscripted antics of uber-rich kids remain perennially popular. As the phenomenon enters its second decade, we take a look back

Laguna Beach

The Premise: A suspiciously slick look inside the lives of SoCal rich kids. The Real Draw: The Mean Girls–style behavior, sexually explicit conduct and excessive profanity of supposedly sophisticated kids that—according to one study—increased the crime rate in its titular Orange County town.

2004

2003 The Simple Life

The Premise: BFF badgirl heiresses Paris Hilton and Nicole Richie travel the country, experiencing life as the less fortunate do. The Real Draw: Offthe-wall behavior the girls definitely didn’t pick up at finishing school, such as the time Richie found herself arm-deep in the business end of a cow.

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“I AM HOPELESSLY DIVIDED BETWEEN THE DARK AND THE GOOD, THE REBEL AND THE SAINT, THE SEX MANIAC AND THE MONK, THE POET AND THE PRIEST, THE DEMAGOGUE AND THE POPULIST.”

— Billy Idol writes in his compelling autobiography, Dancing With Myself, out this October. Idol shares his life story, from his rise to fame during the punk-pop revolution to “intimate details” about sex + more @ and drugs. Rebel yell indeed. DuJour.com

FILM

LIVING IN FLYNN

Two of this fall’s most compelling films, Gone Girl and Dark Places, sprung from the mind of mystery master Gillian Flynn. Which bloody blockbuster will be right for you? Find out below

DARK PLACES

GONE GIRL The Director

Award-winning French filmmaker Gilles Paquet-Brenner

The Mystery Libby Day, who survived a massacre as a child, begins to believe the man accused of the crimes—her own brother Ben—might actually be innocent.

On her fifth anniversary, an unhappy Amy Dunne inexplicably disappears from her home, casting suspicion on her husband, Nick.

The Plucky Protagonist Charlize Theron as Libby Day

Rosamund Pike as Amy Dunne

What She Said “I like complicated characters,” Theron’s been quoted as saying. “And there’s something about Libby—she doesn’t make it easy.”

“This girl had dark secrets, but she also wanted to be adored,” Pike has said. “Until Amy, I don’t know that I’d ever seen that combination in a character.”

2014

The Prime Suspect Corey Stoll plays Ben, the cold Kansas man who seems perfectly capable of massacring his family in a Satanic ceremony.

Ben Affleck takes a dark turn as Nick, whose roving eye and hair-trigger temper make it easy to believe he could have something to do with his wife’s disappearance.

The Book Dark Places was a New York Times best seller and won numerous awards from mystery writers’ associations.

Gone Girl has sold over 6 million copies and spent eight weeks in the number one spot on the New York Times best-seller list.

Flynn’s Involvement Flynn takes a turn on-screen in this adaptation, making a brief cameo and sharing a scene with Theron.

Not only is Gone Girl adapted from Flynn’s novel, but she also wrote the film’s screenplay—including a new third act that’s different from the book’s.

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The Premise: A gaggle of twentysomething millionaires shop and shoot selfies throughout L.A.’s most famous zip code. The Real Draw: E.J. Johnson, the flamboyant offspring of basketball great Magic Johnson, whose eclectic fashion sense and biting wit are the show’s greatest assets.

2007 Keeping Up with the Kardashians

The Premise: A blended family of boldface names shares—or overshares— the intimate details of its extravagant world. The Real Draw: Drama not confined to TV, including more marriages, divorces and scandal than one show can contain—which explains the endless spin-offs.

Zodiac and Se7en director David Fincher


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The FLIP SIDE of

For an actress who became famous for playing to type and then even more famous for marrying against it, the “new” KATIE HOLMES is surprisingly well-adjusted. You might even call her normal

WRITTEN BY LAUREN WATERMAN

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STYLED BY ANNE CHRISTENSEN


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resemblance to the dead-eyed automaton she was so often accused of being. Instead, she’s warm, bright and remarkably at ease. At her suggestion, we’ve met at a very collegiate-seeming Chelsea café, the kind of place where you order at the counter and choose your own table, and where macaroni and cheese is sold as an entrée, with “a cute salad” on the side. Holmes gets a coffee and two bread-plate-size chocolate-chip cookies—one of which, she reveals at the end of the interview, is for me. (It’s the second time in as many weeks that she’s spontaneously offered me some kind of cookie-related item, the first being a business card for a bake shop on Commerce Street.) She even agrees to sit at a sidewalk-adjacent two-top, which I’ve picked because it’s quiet, but which I was sure she’d reject because of its proximity to passersby and to any (theoretical, as it turns out) paparazzi. “I just try to live in a way that makes me happy,” she explains when I ask how she copes with the still-intense level of attention paid to her personal life. (She’s often been “linked” to various co-stars, and this year

“There’s definitely an awareness of the fact that people have camera phones and that your privacy is sometimes invaded.” rently has four movies finished and awaiting release; add to that a fifth, The Giver, which is in theaters now, and that’s only one film fewer than she made during the entirety of her seven-year relationship. Holmes says that she was attracted to The Giver, an adaptation of a much-loved children’s novel, in part because of the cast, which includes Jeff Bridges and Meryl Streep. “Meryl is just spectacular, so lovely. I wanted to ask her a million questions, like, ‘What was that set like? How did you come up with that character?’ but I thought, maybe not while we were working.” Holmes’ performance, like those of several of the actors in the dystopia-set movie, is purposely emotionless, verging on robotic, and could almost be seen as a send-up of the way that she was perceived during her marriage. As the young protagonist’s mother—called, simply, Mother—she’s almost too perfectly cast. (She’s also oddly affect-free at the start of an upcoming indie, Miss Meadows, in which she plays a prim-and-proper substitute teacher who happens to moonlight as a guntoting vigilante.) In person, though, the 35-year-old star bears little

tabloids have alleged romances with both Jamie Foxx and Jason Segel, although her publicist has issued the requisite denials.) “There’s def initely an awareness of the fact that people have camera phones, and that your privacy is sometimes invaded, but that’s something that I think everyone has had to adjust to,” she says. “Even early on, when I was a young actor and all of a sudden people knew who I was, my dad told me, ‘Don’t let that change how you live your life.’ I’ve always sort of approached it that way. You have to continue to do the things you want to do and not let outside forces dictate.” Certainly, she appears to be embracing this ethos with regards to her work. Her upcoming projects are remarkably varied: Aside from The Giver and Miss Meadows, she’s also star ring in Mania Days (produced by Spike Lee) as a poet hospitalized for bipolar disorder, who falls in love with a similarly aff licted rapper. In Woman in Gold, based on the true story of a Holocaust survivor seeking to reclaim a painting seized by the Nazis, she appears opposite Helen Mirren and Ryan Reynolds, playing the wife of Reynolds’ lawyer

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ne doesn’t know quite what to expect from Katie Holmes. At the beginning of her career, she was the typical ingénue, best known for her portrayal, on Dawson’s Creek, of the literal girl-nextdoor. Even in her “edgier” big-screen projects, like Go and Pieces of April, an air of wholesomeness clung to her like dew. But that all changed in 2005, when Holmes fell hard for one of the biggest movie stars in the world. Or rather, it changed when he fell for her and seemed to go a bit insane with—well, no one was quite sure what, but let’s be generous and call it love. It’s a testament to the weirdness of that situation that getting married and having a baby—albeit in not exactly that order—tarnished her reputation, and that her decision, in 2012, to leave her then-husband helped to bolster it. But that’s exactly what happened. Now the actress—who spent the years she was married to Tom Cruise dabbling in everything from jazz dance to fashion design—is working to re-establish herself in the field that first made her famous. She cur-


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character. She says she relished the chance to portray “a happy married couple, because it’s rare to see that.” Perhaps most intriguingly, she joins an ensemble that includes Cherry Jones, Allison Janney, Jean Reno, William Hurt and Mark Rylance in actor Christian Camargo’s directorial debut, Days and Nights, a 1980s-set drama inspired by Chekhov’s The Seagull. “We shot everything at this old theater camp in Connecticut,” Holmes says. “It was a wonderful, creative time with all of these brilliant actors. Everyone gave themselves over to the story, which is sad but very beautiful.” Yet Holmes brushes off the suggestion that these movies represent a concentrated effort to reclaim her career in the aftermath of her divorce. “It’s the life of

older you get, the more life experience you get, you start to understand storytelling better. So you’re a little bit more confident going in. You’re not afraid of getting fired: You just want to contribute.” To that end, Holmes says that she’d like to try her hand at directing—she recently completed a short-form documentary, produced by Killer Digital for AOL. “I interviewed several women, including Jill Abramson [for merly of the New York Times], Jane Rosenthal from Tribeca Films, Renee Robinson from Alvin Ailey [American Dance Theater] and my friend Jeanne Yang.” (Yang was, until February, the co-designer of their shared fashion line, Holmes & Yang, which the pair decided to close because, Holmes says, “We felt

“The older you get, the more life experience you get… you’re a little bit more confident going in. You’re not afraid of getting fired.” an actor,” she says lightly. “We don’t really have a lot of choice in the matter. You have dry spells, and then you have times when there is a lot of opportunity.” Holmes does concede that she wasn’t as interested in acting for a few years there, but she attributes that to the arrival of her daughter—whose name, like that of her ex, remains unspoken throughout our 90-minute dialogue. (In the case of Suri, the motive seems to be an almost reflexive stab at discretion; she does refer to her often, but only as “my little one.” In the case of Cruise, though, it’s obvious that she’d prefer the subject not come up at all, although it’s impossible to tell whether she feels that way all the time or only when she’s on the record.) “I totally admire women who go back to work six weeks after giving birth,” she explains, “but when she was little, I was not ready. I was a very nervous mother—like, sleeping next to her crib—and I was in that mode for a long time.” Still, it hardly matters whether her sudden f lurry of films is intentional or not; either way, Holmes might just be on the verge of a resurgence. And if she is, she’s ready. As she says, “I think I’ve gotten more comfortable with acting over time. Early on, I could never get out of my head. I’d be thinking, ‘I have to get the job.’ And even when I had the job, I was afraid that I was going to get fired, or I just had the mentality of, ‘I need to be good enough.’ But the more projects you do, the

like it had run its course.”) She explains, “I sat down with each of them for an hour and talked about how being a woman has affected their career, what advice they’d have for girls moving to the big city. How they got through difficult times, how they learned.” It’s easy to see why she’d be attracted to that topic. So what did they tell her? “One thing that was very consistent was that things might not always happen exactly when you want them to. You have to be patient.” It’s a message that she seems to have taken to heart. “I’m going to keep practicing directing,” she says, and she’d like to produce again, having enjoyed the experience on 2010’s The Romantics. But until then, she’s happy to keep on as a player in the company. “I could rehearse for years,” she says. “I love it. I’ve been doing this for a long time, but every experience is so different, based on [whom] you’re working with. I always try to go into a project with a goal in mind of what I want out of it for myself, in terms of what I want to learn.” A few moments later, Katie Holmes muses, with some understatement, “It’s been an interesting journey. Even when I was young, I was like, ‘I hope I’m taking all of this in.’ When I was working with Michael Douglas [in 2000’s Wonder Boys], I was like, ‘Am I fully appreciating all of this?’ But I don’t know how you ever measure that, and I’ve always been kind of calm about it. I just want to be inspired.”


Jacket, $3,900; Pants, $1,250, DIOR, 800-9293467. Besame pumps, $695, BRIAN ATWOOD, brianatwood.com. Hair: Ben Skervin at the Magnet Agency. Makeup: Gucci Westman for Revlon. Manicure: Lexi Martone. Stylist assistant: Rachel Pincus. Prop master: Jarred Metz. Photographed on location at Penthouse 3, 93 Worth, New York, 93worth.com. Developer: IGI-USA. Sales: CORE.

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The Incredible

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Ken Fulk is the man responsible for some of the world’s most talked-about events and interiors. Here, a peek behind the curtain of his “magic factory”

written by David Nash

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t isn’t always easy to describe the projects Ken Fulk is toiling over, but when pressed to explain the work he does, Fulk sets the record straight, saying, “We create experiences.” Of c ou r se, t h at’s somet h i ng of an understatement. Fulk, 48, is w idely considered to be Sa n Francisco’s secret social weapon. He’s the man tr usted by society swells and Silicon Valley heavyweights alike to help plan perfect par ties, decorate jaw- d roppi ng homes or curate any aspect of their ra ref ied lives. Ru n n i ng a team of 49 out of his studio—a 1920s building in the SoMa neighbor-

PHOTOGRAPHED by Douglas Friedman

hood that once housed an S&M leather factory—Fulk has thrown parties for the likes of Jean-Paul Gaultier (who celebrated his 2012 de Young Museum exhibition with an event featuring Dita Von Teese a nd a me ch a n ical bu l l) a nd he overhauled the home of tech power couple Michael and Xochi Birch to include an old pub imported to California from the U.K. While the work that Fulk does requires a highly trained eye, his is not the product of a classical design education. Founded in 1997, Ken Fulk Inc. was what could be called a happy accident. “A friend was selling her home in San

Francisco,” Fulk explains. “She called me and said, ‘I had some idiot over here who was going to stage [the house], and I told him not to touch a ny t h i ng a nd t hat you’d be right over to do it.’ Suddenly it was apparent to me that this was what I was supposed to be doing.” Very quickly, Fulk booked similar jobs as news of his talents spread. “I was sor t of li ke th is house whisperer,” he says. In the nearly two decades since the Virginia native settled in San Francisco, his interior-design work gradually morphed into something altogether broader. “I had never been trained as a designer,” Fulk


Antique English chandeliers salvaged from a boarding school in New Hampshire; French chairs from the 1920s; vintage yacht dining table; vintage bird vitrine (on table); antique lead greyhound statues; antique Khotan rug.

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points out, having instead graduated from the University of Mary Wa s h i n g t o n w i t h a d e g r e e i n English and history. “I never wanted anyone to tell me what kind of business I was supposed to have because it might limit me,” he adds. Fit tingly, Ful k’s business has grown to encompass not only what he plans to do when he sets out on a project but also what he discovers that he loves to do along the way. He explains, “Someone once said to me, ‘No wonder you love your job; you’re a serial entrepreneur. Everything you do is a new challenge.’ ” At the inception of any project, Fulk’s creative process is always the same. “I equate it to a movie i n my hea d ,” he explai ns i n h is enthusiastic but always well-mannered fashion. “Whether it’s for a house or an evening, a restaurant or hotel, I ask myself, What’s the point of view and what makes the story worth telling?”

This attention to detail isn’t lost on Fulk’s clients or their guests. “Ken i magi nes desig n li ke a n old-world theater director,” says Alexis Swanson Traina, a Fulk pal and creative director at Swanson Vineyards. “Every single detail is a rich, sensory experience that tells a piece of a great story.” Li ke ma ny show men before him, Fulk has become known for over-the -top product ions. Ta ke, for example, the lavish—and now infamous—2013 Big Sur wedding of tech guru Sean Parker. Fulk took charge of the immense fairy-talelike visual design elements, which included a nine-foot wedding cake, a lou nge a re a w it h f u r- cove re d b e d s a nd more t h a n 350 g ue st s gussied up in medieval garb. The wedding generated an avalanche of media at tention and gar nered glowing accolades for Fulk from the generally reserved Parker. “Ken is t he g re at e st l iv i ng ge n iu s of

photo credits teekay

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Left: 1918 Steinway grand piano; animal heads from Deyrolle in Paris; Gio Ponti chair; Grosfeld House desk and pair of chairs; 1940s Italian mahogany cabinet. Below: Custom Alex Randall chandelier; pair of 1940s sconces; 19th-century French dining chairs; 19thcentury palace mirror; vintage lockers from the Bank of Paris.


19th-century plaster torso; 1960s Italian brass chandelier; 1970s plaster bust (above window); ostrich from Deyrolle in Paris; pair of vintage 1960s orange suede sofas; antique French metal work table; antique French chinoiserie chairs.

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Below: Vintage mug-shot photographs (on left wall); 1940s brass bar cart; vintage projector light; life-size replicas of David (on built-ins); 19th-century English lanterns; custom fir and blackened steel cabinets; Tolix barstools.

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interior design and architecture,” the billionaire Napster co-founder says. “I don’t speak this way about anyone. I micromanage every detail of every project I work on, but there is no one in the world but Ken I t r ust to execute with complete artistic autonomy and the highest level of artistic integrity.” It’s often that extra something that separates the work Fulk does f rom t hat of h is compet itor s. Take, for example, the time Cornelia Guest swept into San Francisco to promote her book Simple Pleasures, and Fulk’s studio laid the groundwork for a memorable evening. A shared passion for animals inspired Fulk to round up a litter of adoptable puppies, accompanied by volunteers from the local SPCA, to be part of the event. “Ken is incredibly curious, which is one of my favorite qualities,” Guest says now. “I think that’s why he is so good at what he does.” Fulk agrees with that sentiment, albeit in a slightly more hu mble

Right: Skull image from the Oakland Museum; Robert Stivers ostrich photograph; antique ironwork table embossed in crocodile; Panton chairs.


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Above: Timorous Beasties wallpaper; antique Buddha; 1940s Lucite coffee table; Grosfeld House chairs; custom linen sofa; pair of Maison Jansen lamps. Below: Fulk in an Alexander McQueen jacket.

way. “We’re perceived to be theatrical and outlandish,” he says, “but I think the important thing is that what we do is always rooted in good

restaurant from the team behind Italian hot spot Carbone. Acknowledging the dedication and resourcefulness of the people

“Ken is the greatest living genius of interior design and architecture.” —sean parker

design, in good taste, with a strong point of view.” Over-the-top events aside, Fulk a nd h i s t e a m of e m ploye e s a r e working hard to keep up with their growing roster of clients, which includes San Francisco’s new private club the Battery, Sonoma winery Three Sticks Wine and a New York

who work for him, Fulk is quick with praise. “I’m proud of the work and the people who do these extraordinary things,” he says. “They work tirelessly and have enormous creativity and a belief that we can make it all happen—we seldom, if ever, say no to our clients. That’s why I call this the magic factory.”


The NEW FACE of WRITTEN BY CHARLES BUTLER PHOTOGRAPHED BY ALEX JOHN BECK

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In small towns across America, a new wave of investors is betting hard on drilling—and winning. But as this investigation of an Ohio community proves, every boomtown has its shadows

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he Core club in Manhattan is quiet on this summer morning, with just a handful of members filling tables in the wood-paneled restaurant. Hedge fund managers and real estate billionaires and high-powered sports executives pay a $50,000 initiation fee and $15,000 in annual dues for access to the club’s amenities—the spa and salon, the Zoomtion fitness center—and the privacy afforded so they can talk big business without worry of prying ears. Farid Guindo is sitting at a corner table with a view onto East 55th Street. In a casual navy blazer, open-collared oxford and jeans, he seems more ready to trade movie scripts than stock portfolios. Don’t let the casual attire mislead. He has his sights set on someday, and someday soon, being a master of the universe just like many of his fellow Core club members. In 2011, he was just two years out of McGill University when Ospraie Management, run by the renowned hedge fund manager Dwight Anderson, hired Guindo away from the energy desk at Barclays to its Park Avenue headquarters as a portfolio analyst. He was 23—23—and working for one of the men he had been lionizing since he first picked up Market Wizards as a teenager. And yet he was already planning ahead. “I always wanted to be an investor,” he says between bites of breakfast, scrambled eggs garnished with salmon. He envisioned being the next Dwight Anderson, not working for him. Over the next 22


months, Guindo—impatient, laser-focused— made the needed connections, spotted the target of his future fortunes and, more important, cultivated the money that would get him to where he wanted to go. A good portion of that seed money, he says, came about when, in 2012, he took a bet on a company called Africa Oil Corporation. A fellow analyst had put him on to the stock. Having worked on several billion-dollar deals while with Barclays, Guindo already had an affinity for the oil and gas area. He crunched the numbers on Africa Oil and liked what he saw. He pitched the stock as an option for the Ospraie portfolio but got rebuffed. Through a slight chuckle, Guindo ticks off the reasons his boss rejected it: “Small oil and gas company, sub-billion-dollar market cap. A hard sell. Plus, I was a junior. I was eight or nine months in.” Guindo still liked Africa Oil. He put $100,000 of his own cash in the stock as a personal investment. “The downside,” he says, “was that

they drill a couple of wells and it doesn’t work. The downside is, it goes from $1.50 to $1.20 (per share).” He pauses. “The upside is, it goes through the roof.” Africa Oil went through the roof. Guindo sold when the stock had climbed to around $9. He grossed close to a million dollars. And his confidence as an investor—an investor in oil and gas—soared. “I felt comfortable in my own shoes to say, W hat is out there?” he recalls. “How do you act ually make money?” A few months later, he left Ospraie. He took his money and looked beyond New York City. For something even bigger. He thinks he has found it—in Appalachia of all places, in an Ohio town with fewer than 3,300 residents, in a town where the most popular restaurant, Donna’s Deli, closes after the noontime rush. In a town of five streetlights and with a mayor who’s also a minister and who sometimes preaches on Sundays about the virtue of frugality. In a town that knows poverty and is only now

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TRANSFORMATION Far left: An oil rig pumps on the land of Bryan Shaw, a longtime Carrollton resident. Left: Hose used for hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking.” Carrollton lies on top of the Utica Shale, the source of millions of barrels of oil and natural gas.


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BELIEVERS Above: Farid Guindo and his oil-worker hotel. Below: Carrollton businessman Bryan Shaw, who benefited from the oil boom.

trying to figure out wealth. In a town without hedge funds, or a Core club. What does it have? It has, the locals only recently realized, oil and natural gas, and lots of it—and everything that comes with an oil boom, including dreamers like Farid Guindo.

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pur red by hydraulic fract uring, which over the past decade has unearthed onceun k now n oil and nat u ral gas reser ves deep underground, America’s energy industry is now pumping at historic levels. Experts predict that the United States will be the world’s largest producer of oil by 2015 and that by 2040 50 percent of the country’s natural gas will come from the shale-rock formations igniting the current surge. This energy craze has touched all regions of the country, producing a rush to profit from it—and to debate its merits. Previously offthe-beaten-path locales like Williston, North Dakota, and Moundsville, West Virginia, now rival traditional oil cities in Texas, Louisiana and Oklahoma as boomtowns, with scores of locals suddenly made rich through the leasing of their land to drillers. But wealth at what cost, some wonder. Seismologists are now researching whether fracking (as the drilling process is commonly called) is the cause for the series of earthquakes shaking Oklahoma. Environmentalists and health advocates rail against fracking and what else it might do: contaminate water tables, pockmark landscapes and increase the likelihood

of lower birth weights. What can’t be debated, though, is that the boom has created a new wave of speculators and entrepreneurs and businesspeople, each hoping to be, if not a new oil baron in the tradition of John D. Rockefeller, then just richer when the dust settles, whenever that will be. Yes, the Exxons, the ConocoPhillips, the Chevrons still dominate the upper tier of the energy landscape. And a glance through their annual reports display upper-management portraits with seemingly xeroxed profiles: CEOs in their fifties and sixties with 25-plus years of experience, all male, all white. But booms produce more than oil. They produce fresh faces. Guindo looks nothing like J.R. Ewing. He’s outwardly reser ved, he’s young, he’s the son of a U.N. diplomat from Mali and, well, he’s black. And he feels confident that in today’s energy play—a business that continues to expand, evolve, relocate, drive dreamers—he has a formula that will let him strike it rich. Drill Capital is the name of his company. Sounds like it will be pumping crude from sunrise to sundown. Not so, or at least not right now. Guindo saw a different way to make money on the oil boom, and Drill Capital—his nascent asset management f ir m—is his vehicle. And Carrollton, Ohio, the county seat of rural Carroll County, is his first stop. It’s in Car rollton, a few blocks from Donna’s Deli and near a Chevrolet dealership, that

Guindo has recently opened an 80-room extended-stay hotel, the Microtel Inn & Suites by Wyndham. For $115 a night, visitors get a bed, a TV, a cup of coffee and a hot breakfast. His market is the 1,000 or so workers—drillers, pipeline fitters, construction crews—transplanted to Carroll County because of the oil play. In Guindo’s plan, a good number of these transient folks will make the Wyndham home—for three, six, nine months, whatever it takes to keep the county’s 235 wells (the most in all of Ohio, with 423 permits approved statewide) pumping. Compared with the billions of dollars oil drillers like Chesapeake Energy and Rex Oil are pumping into Carroll County, Guindo’s $5 million investment is a drop in the oil bucket. But $5 million is a lot when you’re just 26 years old and you’ve asked family members and well-funded friends to bank roll your dream to be a player in the oil business. “The psychological burden of putting that much money at risk, both personally and from investors, and hoping your thesis comes true, is huge,” Guindo says. “A huge burden.” Why take it then when you could be working at Ospraie, enjoying year-end bonuses, enjoying the big city? And why Carrollton, Ohio, a speck somewhere between Pittsburgh and Akron, where 0.3 percent of the population is black, where the town has done fine with just a Days Inn for years and where, until recently, most people earned on average just $30,000 a year and unemployment was as high as 14.9 percent? For one, Guindo says, there is money to be made in the Utica Shale, a geologic formation of sedimentary rock containing oil and natural gas that only recently has been tapped with rela-


strategy is somewhat conservative—essentially, he is investing in real estate and in the hotel business versus a single oil rig that can cost several million dollars to construct and comes with no guarantee of hitting its intended mark. Yet like the drillers, Guindo has done his research,

“IF ANYONE TELLS YOU THIS IS NOT ABOUT the MONEY, THEY ARE A LIAR.” —oil investor Chris Faulkner

ing to the region that will pump more millions into the economy and create upwards of 500 new construction jobs—and likely more demand for hotel beds. But more so than the desire to make a buck (or several), Guindo says he’s entered the Utica play to prove to himself that he has the skills and the stomach to make it as an investor. He admits his

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tive ease through fracking. The Utica can be as thick as 1,000 feet, and it extends from Quebec through New York state and eastern Ohio and on to eastern Tennessee. Already, locals in Carroll County gossip that between 500 and 1,000 area folk—many of them farmers—have made at least $1 million by leasing land to the oil companies. And there’s talk that a new power plant is com-

and success in Carrollton will legitimize his oil expertise—and his prospects for future success. “What drives me is being right,” Guindo says. “The feeling of being right is an overwhelming feeling of accomplishment.” The oil and gas business has always seemed to attract entrepreneurs, risk-takers, speculators. In 1959, when Ruth Sheldon Knowles published The Greatest Gamblers, a look at the early American oil explorers, she wrote: “The greater the gamble, the more it inflames the imagination and the more helpless the explorer is to resist it. He knows the rewards for success are in proportion to the risk involved.” The same holds true today. W hile Guindo stakes claims in Ohio, other oil investors seek similar riches elsewhere. Like Chris Faulkner. Faulkner has a roundish face and a scruffy beard. He’s also only 37, a relative kid in the oil business. In so many words, he’s been told, he doesn’t fit the profile of an oil company CEO. He won’t listen. Faulkner started a technology company in 2000 that provided drillers with 3D seismic imaging software. Using the software, drillers would have a more accurate subterranean picture. The more Faulkner worked with oil companies, the more intrigued he became with that side of the business. Eventually he decided to get into the action as well. In 2004 he leased land north of Dallas and had a rig constructed. The day the drill cut through the ground, bound for pay dirt, Faulkner stood atop it and heard the news no budding oil baron wants to hear: “It’s dry.” But he hit with his next well, and today Faulkner’s company, Breitling Energy, has drill sites dotted around Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas and North Dakota. Revenues last year came in at $26 million, double those of 2012. On paper it sounds like Faulkner is a player in the business. But the reminders come all too often of what it takes to be recognized as one. A couple of months ago he took his mother, Carole,


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to lunch at the Dallas Petroleum Club, a Core club of sorts for oil titans in Big D. Lunch had barely been served when Mrs. Faulkner looked around and then said to her son, “You do realize these people are twice your age.” More recently, a Wall Street analyst told Faulkner that his bank would stop following his company (whose stock price has hovered below $1 a share for much of the past year) until he hired “someone who was older” to work with him. “I was taken aback,” Faulkner says. “Shit, when I was in [high tech], I had guys ten times as smart as me who were 14 years old.” So what did he tell the analyst? “Basically, we’re going to [manage] our way. If you don’t want to cover us, that’s fine with me.” Such confidence—such youthful cockiness, as it were—is essential to making it in the oil and gas business. Faulkner admits he has his sleepless nights, and he won’t forget that dry well from years ago. But the vagaries of the field feed his risk-taking nature. “Money is nice, I get that. If anyone tells you this is not about the money, they are a liar,” Faulkner says when asked about his personal motivation. He takes a sip of a late-morning espresso. Then, in his next breath, he drills deeper. “It is about success. It is about the challenge. This space feels a lot like what technology did back in the ’90s. You got guys who are rolling the dice, pushing the boulder up the hill, which is not easy to do.” So even though Chris Faulkner has never met Farid Guindo, he can understand his drive to be right. Told that Guindo is 26 and trying to start a hotel business in rural Ohio, Faulkner shakes his head. Then he says, “He may have challenges, but I hope he is successful. We need

“There is always the fear: will this all go away?” —BUSINESSMAN Bryan Shaw

more of him, more of me, and less cigar-smoking 60-year-old guys at the Dallas Petroleum Club.”

F IMPACT ”It used to take five minutes to go through the center of town at noon; now it can take 30,” says a local.

arid Guindo was born in 1987 in the Central African Republic but by the time he was 14 he had lived in 12 different countries. His father, Adama, a native of Mali, worked for the United Nations. The work took Farid, his mother, Edith, and sister, Mariam, to Chad, Namibia, Madagascar and the Dominican Republic, to name a few. Wherever the travels led him, the young Farid brought, apparently, a curious eye. “In Madagascar one day [Farid] was playing


QUESTIONER Paul Feezel heads up Carroll Concerned Citizens.

They signed the deal; they were richer than they ever dreamed. With the windfall, Kiko took his wife on a three-week vacation to Hawaii. He bought some new farm machiner y. And he guaranteed the farm would stay in the family. “A lot of farmers paid their farm’s debt off, and guys the same age as me started letting their sons take over,” says Kiko, now semiretired; he milks cows in the morning, just not in the evenings. “It was a very opportune time for a generational adjustment.” The leases soon brought the drillers, pipeline workers and construction crews from as far away as Texas and Mississippi. Roads around Carroll County got redone. Business started to pop. In 2012, sales tax revenue increased more than 30 percent and in 2013 another 28 percent. Something was percolating in Carroll County, Ohio. From his base in New York City, Guindo followed the action and what it could mean to him and his dream. Since his first days of college,

But by 2010, Kiko’s luck started to change. Milk prices rebounded, for starters. And one day he noticed large trucks pounding the ground on the highway near his farm. It turns out they were doing seismographic testing. “That made us wonder,” Kiko recalls. Around the area, word spread that land men working for Chesapeake Energy and Rex Oil, the two primary drillers eyei ng Car roll County, were scouting farms and offering to lease land for f ut u re d r i l l i ng sit e s. L e a s i n g w a s n’t u n h e a r d of. Back in the 1980s, K i ko leased some of his land to an oil compa ny for $2 to $3 a n acre. Even though the d r il le r s neve r ca me, says Kiko, “that money paid some t axes.” Kiko talked to a friend in West Virginia, who told him farmers there had gotten upward of $1,0 0 0 f rom d r iller s exploring the MarcelSWEAT EQUITY Workers wait for a truck. The unemployment rate was 15 percent before the boom. lus Shale, another oil and gas play stretching through much of West Virginia and Pennsyl- he had been reading books on Warren Buffett, vania. Kiko’s neighbors were hearing similar George Soros, Edward Lampert. Guindo was the stories, but they also heard that some oil drillers vice-president of portfolio management for the already had made deals with locals in Carroll McGill Investment Club. He read Institutional County for as little as $10 and $20 an acre. The Investor religiously. “I always read the rankings farmers decided to team up and negotiate with of the hedge fund managers and how much they the land men. As bids came in for $100 an acre, made in a year,” he says. “In 2008, I was fas$500 an acre, $1,000 acre, the farmers held out. cinated by John Paulson and how much money Kiko and his partners waited until Rex Oil of- he had made. Everyone was losing their shirts, fered $3,500 an acre, along with royalties equal- and he was raking in $2 billion to $3 billion ing 20 percent of the gross on future oil returns. paychecks. How do you do that?” He wanted to

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in the garden and he was collecting grasshoppers. He was so fond of grasshoppers in those days,” says Adama Guindo, who is now retired and living in Montreal. “I remember his mama was so mad. ‘What the hell are you doing bringing these things into the house?’ she said to him. He was trying to dissect them to understand how these things feel and were built.” With similar precision Farid Guindo, from his energy desk first at Barclays and later at Ospraie, learned to dissect the oil and gas world. He prepared valuations analysis for several major transactions, including the multi-billion-dollar breakup of Encana Cor poration in 2009. He went to conferences around the country, building a roster of energy sources and getting tips on where the oil, and the money, was f lowing. “From an oil and gas perspective Farid is extremely passionate,” says Tony Wu, a former colleague at Ospraie. “He does research outside the wheelhouse of the normal way of thinking and gets very excited about finding unique opportunities that other people don’t look for.” Like the one he came upon in Carrollton. “It’s a needle in a haystack,” Guindo says of the town whose nearest Walmart is 30 miles away. Hayst ack is appropr iate consider ing that farms dominate the landscape of Carroll County. Still, the area knows the value of natural resources, experiencing booms with coal and clay mining on and off through the years. Around 2010, fracking began in the Ohio portion of Utica Shale. Speculators had visions that it could be like the Bakken Formation in North Dakota and Montana. Five years ago, the Bakken produced 200,000 barrels of oil a day; today the daily haul is more than a million barrels, or more than 10 percent of the U.S. daily production. With those figures as benchmarks, Carroll County became ground zero for the next potential boom. Such a possibility caught Roger Kiko by surprise. He’s owned farmland north of Carrollton since 1978. Besides planting corn and soybeans, he has had 50 to 100 dai r y cows produci ng much of his income. But in 2009, milk prices across the nation fell. “The consensus was that anyone who milked cows lost between $500 to $1,000 per cow. We milked 100 cows and we lost $50,000,” says Kiko, 65, who owns about 300 acres. “If we had another one like that, there would be nobody milking cows in the United Stated today. That spooked ever ybody.” The downturn came as Kiko started thinking about retiring. It worried him that he would have to sell his farm rather than pass it down to his son.


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FUTURISTIC Eighteen months ago, it was a field. Now the Scio Facility processes gas pulled from the Utica Shale.

build assets and manage them—he just needed an expertise in something, and more and more he concluded oil and gas was it. Winning the bet on Africa Oil proved it. “The stars were aligning,” says Guindo. “So I was like, I need to start going down a path of my own.” That path took him to Carrollton, Ohio.

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ill Newell has lived in Carrollton all of his 52 years. He took over a real estate company his father started in the 1960s. One afternoon last summer, he was at his desk when Guindo unexpectedly stopped in and inquired about buying a couple of acres of land. “I saw a young, good-looking guy who seemed very smart and mature for his age,” Newell says of his client. “He is magnetic. He is a guy you want to get to know and do business with.”

Guindo had done his homework on Carrollton. He k new the number of drillers coming into town. He had called the Days Inn—his wouldbe competitor—several times checking on room availability and regularly finding it was booked to capacit y. He lear ned that processing, not just drilling, would be taking place in the area, ensuring even more local business. When he scouted the region on different occasions, he had a map of Carroll County marked with drill sites; he drove along the country roads abutting farms, looking for drill pads, and making sure what he saw on his map matched what he saw from the roadside. He did all this so when he went into Bill Newell’s office, he was ready to buy. After handshakes, Newell took Guindo and his traveling partner, Rob Mentnech, a development officer from Wyndham Hotels, to see a 2.2-

acre plot. “It used to be a used-car lot,” Newell says. Guindo looked at it. Within an hour, he had agreed to buy the plot. “I’m very impatient,” says Guindo, “and I try to use it to my advantage. If I believe in something and I have done all of my work and my due diligence, then there should be no reason I shouldn’t take that bet in a big way.” Like Guindo, a number of entrepreneurs have recognized the business potential in Car roll County, with more than a dozen new businesses having opened since 2012. Bryan Shaw has one of them. He grew up around Carrollton, wrestled for the high school, and for years has owned several different local companies, including a publisher of Yellow Page directories. He made a nice profit when he sold that business in 2005. He also owns 1,400 acres, much of which he leased to the oil drillers for $2,500 an acre. He won’t say how much he has cleared, just that he has been “very fortunate.” He will say, “I am an opportunist. But at the beginning of the oil play I had no idea. Nobody did. If they did, they’re lying. Because if you actually would have known, you would have been out buying ever y thing under the sun.” But for Shaw, the windfall has also given him a chance to invest in Car roll County and his neighbors, in small ways and large. Consider, for instance, his gesture at Carrollton’s first Oil Baron’s Ball in 2013, which was held to raise money for the the Carroll County Arts Center. The gala drew 200 guests, with some of the men in ten-gallon hats and cowboy boots and many of the women in gowns seemingly off the set of Dallas. During the event’s auction, Shaw bid $5,000 on a necklace for his wife—even though she told him she didn’t want it. “The money goes to the arts center,” he said over her protests. On a grander scale, in 2012, an erosion-control company, contracted to reseed and groom land disturbed by drilling and pipeline companies, shut down suddenly, costing several locals their jobs, including Shaw’s brother Brandon. Shaw looked into the prospects of star ting a similar company, and since opening in January 2013, the business has hired 40 areas residents, with plans to hire more. Right now business is good for many in Carroll County. Some residents with wells pumping on their properties receive monthly royalty checks of $5,000 to $10,000. With a couple of wells, Shaw has collected such checks, and he is happy to get them. But as a business person, he also has to look into the future. “There is always the fear: Is this a f lash in the pan? Will this go away?” he says. “The drill business seems to be


getting more and more confident that it’s not, but if you talk to them they still say this is in the beta stage and things are not proven out yet.” He takes a breath, then asks, “Will the wells fizzle out in three years or will they run for 30?”

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the potential downsides of fracking and the oil and gas boom to the area’s quality of life. While he understands the allure of drilling to the local economy—he too has leased part of his land to the drillers—Feezel worries that the increase in Carroll Country crime, traffic and noise could permanently scar the area’s charm. “When my

When the farmers signed the deal, they becamE richer than they ever dreamed. wife and I moved here, this was like going back to the 1950s. People not only left their car windows open, but they left their keys in, too,” says Feezel, whose full-time work is in information technology. “That was the kind of community we used to have. It is not the kind we are becoming.” Another concern to share? That maybe there is a better oil play out there, somewhere beyond Carroll County, and that their area, suddenly, becomes yesterday’s news. Guindo knows that is a possibility. He is a student of the oil business. He’s aware of cycles, and he sees what is taking place in Pennsylvania. But right now he is confident of his play in Carroll County. That’s why he left New York City and moved to Ohio. “Even when I was working in the investment world,” he says, “I wasn’t chasing the rabbits; I was after the elephants.” And if his plan works in Ohio, then Guindo has thoughts of extending his hotel chain KING Chesapeake is the second largest U.S. producer of natural energy. throughout the country, to other oil and gas areas. And if that works.... well, then, maybe one local. “Now it can take 30.” Crime is up too. it will be time to start drilling and live up to his The Carroll County sheriff reported 374 felony firm’s name. “I am always looking for the next arrests in 2013, up from 149 in 2012. And the evolution,” he says. potential impact of hydraulic fracturing extends In the dining room of the Core, a waiter beyond county lines. As in Oklahoma, where clears Guindo’s plate. He’s ready to move on increased fracking has coincided with a signfi- to his next meeting and then to the airport. But cant increase in earthquakes since 2009, Ohio f irst he makes a point about what separates has experienced an uptick. The flurry of seismic him from many of the people he has left beactivity recently prompted a state agency to link hind. “My peer group, they want to stay in New it to fracturing. Geologists believe the sand and York. It is really hard psychologi+ more @ water injected underground during fracking cally to start and run a business, put duJour.com may have increased pressure to microfault areas. your money into it and cross your As a result, drillers near known faults now face fingers. Most guys just want to be at the bigname shop. It is more comfortable.” He takes more stringent permit regulations. Paul Feezel moved to Carroll County 15 years a second to consider his next words. “I have ago and owns 80 acres of land, part of which second thoughts all the time, but I have to stick he uses to grow organic blueberries. He also to my instincts, which are pointing me toward heads Carroll Concerned Citizens, an advocacy staying in the deep end.” group that seeks to educate the community on And hunting for elephants in Appalachia.

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he future. Sometimes it’s hard to look ahead when you are 26, and busy, and building a hotel, and hoping—expecting—to fill it every night. But Guindo knows he must. He’s working with not only his money but other people’s, too. Besides the $5 million going into the hotel in Carrollton, he broke ground recently on a property in a county south of Carroll. There’s talk that another boom will soon be setting off there. He also has plans to open a hotel southwest of Carroll County. In total he has $11 million under management. Friends and family have invested in him because he told them he had a plan: to make money on the oil play. Now he knows he has to deliver a return. He sees no reason he won’t. “You went from three to seven wells in 2011 being drilled [in the Utica] to over 800 and then 1,000, so things are moving in the direction I would have hoped, if not better,” he says. Yes, the sun, right now, seems to always be shining in eastern Ohio and in Carroll County. But talk to the folks in Midland, Texas, or Houston, or Tulsa, Oklahoma—areas that are back to good times but only after booms brought busts that erased riches and jobs and caused hotels to go dormant. Or just go over the border to Pennsylvania, where many residents continue to enjoy their f irst-ever oil and gas rewards, but others, suddenly, know the bitter side. Like those in Carroll County, farmers in Bradford County, Pennsylvania, in the northeast cor ner of the state, went from fear of losing their land to becoming millionaires when drillers leased their property and drilled th rough the Marcellus Shale for oil and gas. But recently, as natural gas prices have dropped, so too have the monthly royalty checks. Some property owners also are complaining that one company, Chesapeake, is deducting costs from royalty checks that they had not anticipated. In some cases, checks are one-fifth less than what they had been. As a result, residents are considering taking legal action against the company. The unexpected highs and lows make budgeting for services tricky—and leaves people wondering. Robin Smith, secretary of the board of supervisors in Athens township, says she doesn’t know why the drilling slowed down.

“We are fairly new to this,” she admits. “We’re learning as we go.” They’re learning as well in Carrollton. Ever since the boom, tankers and other heavy-duty trucks have made for traffic nightmares near Carrollton Square. “It used to take five minutes to go through the center of town at noon,” says


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PHOTOGRAPHED by Jean-Pac么me Dedieu Styled by Lester Garcia

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Sweater, $2,770, CHRISTOPHER KANE, luisaviaroma.com. Shorts, $850, 3.1 PHILLIP LIM, 31philliplim.com. Metropolis Crossbody bag, $298, FURLA, furla.com. Big Bang watch, $10,900, HUBLOT, hublot. com. Gloves, $695, MISSONI, 212-517-9339. Pumps, $1,450, DIOR, 800-929-3467.


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Coat, $1445, MIU MIU, miumiu.com. Motocross dress (worn underneath), $698, MARC BY MARC JACOBS, 212-924-0026. MacramĂŠ bracelets, from $16, CRUCIANI C, crucianic.com. Suitcase, $4,085, SIMONE ROCHA, simonerocha.com. MultiBuckle boot, $1212, ATTILIO GIUSTI LEOMBRUNI, agl.com. Knee-highs, $31, WOLFORD, wolford. com. Side chair, $1,100, LUCAS MAASSEN FOR KINDER MODERN, kindermodern.com.


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Jumpsuit, $1,499, ASHISH, Susan, 415-922-3685. Necklace, $620, SIMONE ROCHA, simonerocha.com. Melody of Colours Collection ring in 18-karat white gold, price upon request, DE GRISOGONO, 212-439-4220. Bag, $4,800, CHANEL, 800-550-0005. Houry pumps, $895, JIMMY CHOO, jimmychoo.com. Risom Child’s Amoeba table, $486; Risom Child’s Side chair, $262, KNOLL, knoll.com.


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Blazer, $1,330; Trousers, $560, VIVIENNE WESTWOOD RED LABEL, viviennewestwood.com. Necklace, $3,800, CHANEL, 800-550-0005. Unique Cocktail ring in 18-karat yellow gold, $20,000, ROBERTO COIN, Neiman Marcus, 888-888-4757. Clutch, $7,995, DOLCE & GABBANA, dolcegabbana.it. Pumps, $950, CARVEN, 646-684-4368. Hi-Fi toy box, $399, THE LAND OF NOD, landofnod.com. Bertoia Child’s Diamond chair, $723, KNOLL, knoll.com.


Cape, $5,590, SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE, 212-980-2970. Dress, price upon request, DIOR, 800-929-3467. LVCEA watch in 18-karat pink gold, $10,900, BULGARI, bulgari.com. C’est Ahh box-bag, $1,001, YAZBUKEY, The Webster Miami, 305-674-7899. Sandals, price upon request, PRADA, prada.com. Risom Child’s Amoeba table, $486, KNOLL, knoll.com. Children’s stackable chair, price upon request, FRITZ HANSEN, 212-219-3226.

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Sweater, $2,950; Pants, $2,500; Sunglasses, price upon request, CHANEL, 800-550-0005. Dress, $3,190, SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE, 212-980-2970. Necklace, $485, MISSONI, 212517-9339. Crazy Carats watch, $5,800, FENDI TIMEPIECES, fendi.com. Isabella Rossellini bag, $8,500, BULGARI, 212-315-9000. Lug Sole bootie, $1,395, ROCHAS, rochas.com. Panton junior chair, $150, VERNER PANTON, vitra.com.


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Dress, $1,405, SIMONE ROCHA, simonerocha. com. Gloves, $111, KTZ, kokontozai.co.uk. Mini Peekaboo bag, $3,900, FENDI, 212-759-4646. Boots, $1,385, ALEXANDER MCQUEEN, alexandermcqueen.com. Knee High socks, $44, FALKE, Harry’s, 212-874-2035. Children’s Dining set, $450, OTTO, bloombaby.com. Set design: Amy Taylor. Manicure: Ana Maria for CHANEL Beaute. Talent: Vera Casagrande. Stylist assistant: Melody Huertas.


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Vintage Levi’s, Hemingway’s own (which once belonged to her aunt Margaux). Jewelry throughout, Hemingway’s own. Manzanares wears his own traje de luces.


Written by Alyssa Giacobbe

PHOTOGRAPHED by Sean Thomas

Styled by Ondine Azoulay

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t was Sean Thomas who suggested photographing his friend Dree Hemingway in Spain. The country was, after all, a lifelong muse to her great-grandfather. “Spain was Ernest’s inspiration for The Sun Also Rises,” says Dree, “but what I love about it is the passion the people there have for food, entertainment and just life in general.” Dree is now in London waiting to become a godmother to Thomas’s first child. “I’m so excited!” she says. Although Dree has spent the last few years forging her own name as a model and actress in films like Starlet and the upcoming Noah Baumbach project While We’re Young, it’s hard not to talk Papa, and so it goes on location in the hills of Andalucía. Turns out José María Manzanares, the Spanish bullfighter who makes a guest appearance here opposite Dree, had two generations worth of Hemingway tales: His grandfather had been friends with Ernest and his father with Margaux. “There was a huge language gap but to hear his stories about bullfighting was incredible,” says Dree. “He’s very dedicated to his practice. It’s an art.” Dree’s not a writer, she’s quick to admit, but she’s not without the Hemingway drive to create. In March, she was named Global Ambassador by Cole Haan, a partnership that suits her less-is-more aesthetic. A print campaign launching this fall was a collaboration in which she had a hand in all stages, from choosing the creative team (“it felt like making a family,” she says) to determining the shoot location (Idaho, where she grew up). A line of shoes and handbags will follow. “I like all aspects of what I do, so being able to get involved in more than just the modeling was exciting, with clients actually asking for and wanting my input,” she says. “I think we created something amazing together, which is exciting and nerve-wracking. It was a great adventure,” she adds, sounding like a Hemingway, indeed.


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In the town center of Cazalla de la Sierra. Shirt, $640; Skirt, $730, MIU MIU, miumiu. com. Boots (worn throughout), $1,595, GUCCI, gucci.com. Sunglasses, Hemingway’s own.


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Sweater, $1,200; Flare pants, $1,200, MARC JACOBS, marcjacobs.com. Gerusia vest, $550, MAX MARA, 212-879-6100. Embellished sunglasses, $720, SONIA RYKIEL, Bloomingdale’s, 212-705-2000. Sandal, $1,150, CÉLINE, Bergdorf Goodman, 212-753-7300.


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Blouse, $895, ROBERTO CAVALLI, 212-755-7722. Tights, $4,100; Boots, $1,550, CHANEL, 212535-5505. On skin: Radiant Fluid foundation, $125, CLÉ DE PEAU, saks.com. On eyes: Dual-Intensity eyeshadow in Himalia, $29, NARS, narscosmetics.com.


A view of La Giralda from the rooftop of the Hotel Doña María. Top, $1,550; Pants, $1,550; Muff, $1,150; Sandals, $1,150, CÉLINE, Bergdorf Goodman, 212-753-7300.

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Dress, $6,800, GUCCI, gucci.com.


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The entrance to the Plaza de Toros de la Real Maestranza, one of the oldest bullfighting rings in the world. Zip-front dress, $850, CARVEN, carven.com.


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169 Opposite page: Brightly-colored tiles line the walls of the Casa de Pilatos, a 15th-century palace that is the permanent residence of the Dukes of Medinaceli. Dress, price upon request; Belt, $870; Revival boots, price upon request, LOUIS VUITTON, louisvuitton.com. This page: Sweater, $3,495, AGNONA, agnona.com. Vintage jeans, Hemingway’s own. On eyes: 5 Couleurs palette in Carré Bleu, $60, DIOR, sephora.com. Grandiôse mascara, $32, LANCÔME, lancome-usa.com. Hair: Ben Skervin at the Magnet Agency. Makeup: Janeen Witherspoon at Julian Watson Agency using M.A.C. Stylist assistant: Florie Vitse.


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Left: José María Manzanares is a thirdgeneration bullfighter who has also modeled for Givenchy. Here, his traje de luces rests between two terracotta amphorae from the original Trasierra mill.

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ome 50 miles nor th of Seville, Trasier ra was opened to guests with the motto “nothing flashy,” and f lashy it isn’t: The 18-room Spanish estate is all understated glamour, in the form of whitewashed stone interiors, uneven f loors, unruly grapevines and the occasional bird flying across the cavernous drawing room. British interior decorator Charlotte Scott, who was born in Madrid, had dreams of raising a family in the Spanish countryside when she found the property in the late 1970s with her then-husband: a run-down, 16thcentury former mill on 3,000 acres of olive and orange groves. Twenty years and many renovations later, her four children mostly grown, Scott converted the home into a guesthouse built on the principles of simple,

homey luxury: “a hotel for people who don’t like hotels.” There’s no room service, telephones or TVs, and that’s entirely the point of staying here. (There’s also no English-speaking staff, though Scott and a few of her children are often on hand to help translate.) What there is: long days by the pool, evening dancing by the fire, simple but impeccably presented meals made with local ingredients (courtesy of Scott’s daughter, Gioconda, who trained as a chef in Florence), an abundance of comforts and service that is only as friendly and in-your-face as you want it to be. The air smells of oranges, and not from the scented candles. Fashionable f r iends and fans like photog rapher Bruce Weber, musician Bryan Ferry, and designer Anya


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Left: A view of the tower that was remodeled and is now part of the Scotts’ private residence. Below: Hemingway and Manzanares relax in the living room that once served as a chapel. Below left: The picturesque courtyard entryway of the property is lined with palm trees and cypresses.

Hindmarch have helped Trasier ra collect a diverse word-of-mouth clientele while remaining under the radar, a best-kept secret tucked into the Sierra Morena mountains. Guests come to eat, drink, hike, do yoga, do nothing at all. Photographer Sean Thomas found the place through his in-laws, longtime friends of Scott’s. “Spain is one of those places I’ll always be drawn to, and Trasierra is really special,” he says. “I was instantly in love with Charlotte’s way of life there. It’s a bit like Neverland. You can do whatever you want, whenever you want, and time kind of stands still.” The city of Seville itself is a photographer’s dream, rife with Moorish and Spanish inf luence and plenty of natural beauty, with seemingly no off-season (though the best time of year to go is spring and summer). “And God, do I love

Don Quixote—who doesn’t?” Thomas says. “What a dreamer—he’s so inspiring. Crazy, but inspiring. Most inspiring people are a bit crazy, though, aren’t they?” But the greatest charm of Trasierra, he admits, may lie in the other guests who are drawn to it. Although the

days are long, they are never dull. “There’s always different people coming in and out, and they’re always interesting,” says Thomas. Dinners on various terraces and on corners of lawn throughout the property are served late and run long: drinking, eating and laughing marathons during which strangers often become fast friends. “It’s massively fun,” he says. “And then, every night before I go to sleep there, I grab what’s left of the Rioja on the dinner table, sit outside by myself, and watch the stars—you can see millions there—and the cypress trees blowing in the wind. It’s magical.”


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Seville 411 How to get there: AirEuropa makes it easy with daily direct flights from JFK to Madrid and train transfers to Seville’s Santa Justa station. For more information go to aireuropa.com.

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Right: Guests can enjoy a cocktail by the pool or on one of the flower-filled terraces that surround the villa.


The rebirth of

VIK≤M CHATWAL

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WRITTEN BY ADAM RATHE

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY KYOKO HAMADA

his past June, an invitation was sent by e-mail, beckoning a select group of desirable New Yorkers to frolic by the glassbottomed swimming pool—a basin flanked by 4,800 square feet of imported sand and private cabanas—at Dream Downtown, a sceney hotel that’s perhaps better known as a nightlife destination than a place to book a room. The invite came from the hotel’s owner, the modeldating, movie-producing international party fixture Vikram Chatwal, the 42-year-old socialite Sikh whose love life and legal woes have made New York tabloid headlines for years. But this time the bash he was throwing wasn’t a raucous all-nighter or bacchanal for boldface names: It was a birthday party for a seven year old. That’s quite a departure for the guy known for his insatiable appetite for nightlife, torrid romances with catwalk icons—Kate Moss and Gisele Bündchen haven’t been immune to his charms—and, more recently, an arrest at a Florida airport when he was reportedly discovered carrying heroin, cocaine and prescription pills hidden, in part, down his pants. But according to Chatwal, after a recent year of rehabilitation his focus is on his family and his business and making it known that these days he’s anything but a playboy. “A turning point for me was when I had my daughter,” Chatwal, cleareyed, collected and clutching a venti Starbucks cup, explains from across a table at a private Manhattan club. “I was a raging individual for a long while, but that love I have for my daughter made me prioritize my life in certain ways.” Despite his colorful past, plenty of which occurred after the birth of his child, Chatwal does indeed seem to have turned a corner. He’s the founder of the lifestyle division at the family-run Hampshire Hotels, and his stable of hotels—including branches of Dream in New York, Miami, India and Thailand, as well as a stake in Manhattan’s iconic Plaza Hotel—are popular and, Chatwal says, profitable. In the coming months, he’ll be renovating the Dream hotel on West 55th Street, and, in addition to his work in the

PRODUCED BY JASON BINN

hospitality industry, he’s moonlighting as a film producer and collaborating on projects with big names, including Spring Breakers director Harmony Korine and literary lion Martin Amis. “For the past 16 years I’ve been in the hotel industry, but how do I venture into the next phase,” asks Chatwal, who cites Ian Schrager’s career as one he admires. “When my business started off, we had only two hotels and I grew Dream to be a billion dollar company. Now, I’m just trying to evolve my brand.” Of course, hotels aren’t just Chatwal’s brand, they’re in his blood. Born in Ethiopia to Indian parents, Chatwal moved in 1982 to New York City, where his father, Sant Singh Chatwal, would go on to own the series of restaurants (including high-end Indian chain Bombay Palace and Beefsteak Charlie’s) and hotels that allowed him to provide the best for Vikram and his brother, Vivek. The family lived on the Upper East Side—“comfortable and luxurious,” is how he has described his childhood—and Vikram attended the United Nations International School before heading to the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. “When I grew up, we were very much just a restaurant family, and I grew up in them in the summers: I was a bartender, a waiter, so I always had that knack for service and being a good host,” Vikram recalls. “When I went to Wharton all they talked about was working on Wall Street and investment banking, so after school I went to Morgan Stanley and worked at a private equity shop. I did not want to get into the family business.” The family didn’t feel quite the same. In the 1990s, Chatwal père had acquired a pair of distressed hotels on Manhattan’s west side and offered his son the chance to work with him without giving up his independence. “When I got there I just wanted to do things a bit differently,” says Chatwal, who finally joined the family business in 1996. And he did: Upon opening, his Night Hotel was described by the New York Times as having “a fresh coat of black paint, an orgy of black leather and erotic black-andwhite photographs that vaguely recall Madonna’s Sex book”; Dream’s


+ more @ duJour.com

175 Vikram Chatwal in the Oak Room of the Plaza Hotel, New York City, on July 15, 2014.


HISTORY

CHECKERED PAST

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An affair with Esther Cañadas ended in litigation

Caught in the act: Chatwal and Lohan

With rumored love Padma Lakshmi

Alongside ex-wife Priya Sachdev

ever it is. You can be labeled 100 things that are not true.” Some people around Chatwal don’t remember all the negative energy coming from the outside. “I don’t know that he was ever drunk, but he was always hazy and glassy-eyed,” a former associate says. “His dad was at his wit’s end and felt like he had to clean up his messes.” Despite his issues with substances, friends remember the young Chatwal as an exciting, magnetic presence who seemed to be in all the right places. “We met years ago on the New York scene, sometime in the ’90s, when Vikram was going out all the time and dating models and we would run

“I WAS A RAGING INDIVIDUAL FOR A LONG WHILE.” —VIKRAM CHATWAL

into each other in restaurants or at parties or events,” says fashion photographer Antoine Verglas. “For me, he was a good-looking guy always surrounded by beautiful women.” Chatwal never hesitated to give the wags or gossip columnists what they were looking for. His 2006 wedding to model Priya Sachdev lasted 10 days, spanned three cities and cost a rumored $20 million, and, thanks to its ostentatious scope and guests including Bill Clinton, garnered breathless coverage in outlets around the world. And while almost every story about the marriage (which would produce daughter Safira but end in a separation followed by divorce) mentioned Chatwal’s past—“I was just enjoying life and friends and, well, being a bit of a hedonist,” he told the Times—his subsequent behavior gave no indication that he had truly changed his ways. There he was in the tabloids, reportedly getting stitches after a night out with Greek shipping heir Stavros Niarchos III, hitting the town with Sean Combs, dating Padma Lakshmi or skulking outside Manhattan hot spots in the wee hours alongside Lindsay Lohan—a friendship that brought Chatwal to the TMZ-reading masses. Earlier this year, Chatwal reportedly sued his former fiancée, model Esther Cañadas, for failing to return a $300,000 engagement ring after their split. As someone who formerly worked for Chatwal now says, “The hotel company had a lot going for it, but its namesake was impeding everything.” The disconnect between being a businessman and a par ty animal wasn’t lost on Chatwal. “There are two different tracks, the partying track and the getting serious,” he has said. “And it’s hard to balance those two things. You have to do one thing or the other. And my life has been a tricky balance.” Like plenty of other well-heeled night owls, there was one more place Chatwal was no stranger to: rehab. In 2007, he did a stint in the celebrityfriendly Minnesota treatment center Hazelden; in 2011, he admitted himself to Malibu’s Promises to deal with an alcohol addiction; and after his Florida arrest, he completed a court-mandated one-year program in New York City. Vikram’s not the only member of his family with problems. In April of this year, Sant Singh Chatwal—a major fundraiser for Hillary Clinton—pled guilty to witness tampering and violating federal campaign contribution laws by funneling almost $200,000 in illegal contributions to political candidates. Despite this trying period for his family, Vikram

TOP TO BOTTOM: GETTY IMAGES (2); © ROCKE/TURGEON/SPLASH NEWS/CORBIS; GETTY IMAGES (2)

Chatwal’s mug shot from a 2013 Florida arrest

design team included boundary-pushing photographer David LaChapelle. Working at such glamorous properties also bolstered the young hotelier’s social standing. “People always li ke associating themselves with the owner,” Chatwal says. “That started happening in the late ’90s, I was just the man about town. I was very much into the party scene—you’re throwing parties in the hotel and going to parties all over New York, how could you ignore that?” As a social acquaintance of Chatwal’s recently said to DuJour, “If I ever left my house, I would run into him. He was always out. I would see him at Double Seven, Bungalow 8 and Rose Bar back in the day. He was always super fucked up. It was scary. He was that guy you were nervous wouldn’t survive.” Indeed, it’s during that time that Chatwal got a tattoo to commemorate his romance with Bündchen, tooled around town in an Aston Martin with a cadre of inter national par tygoers and paid a reported $26,000 for a John Galliano–designed dress at a fundraiser only to later quip, “I bought it and I was going to give it to the right girl, and I really haven’t found the right girl yet.” Still, as his career blossomed and he found himself making inroads into Hollywood—Chatwal has appeared in nine films, including Zoolander—he found himself the target of unwanted attention, even from those closest to him. “The problem right now is he’s only spending 30 percent of his time towards business,” his father said in 2002. “The day he star ts spending 70 percent of his time, within two or three years he’ll make it.” No matter how he divided his time, however, Chatwal says those days in the social swirl were exhausting. “It’s hard to keep up with it sometimes,” Chatwal says of his lifestyle. “When you get that attention you appreciate it, but also there is certain negativity that comes along with it. People are very quick to identify with you as a partier or an attention seeker, what-


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Chatwal says this time his rehabilitation will stick—if not just for himself, he says, for his daughter. “I got married because I wanted to have children, and I think it’s a very respectable way to live,” he says. “But I had my child and still I partied too much and I had to go to rehab. You can see it as a pinnacle of my being reckless, but it was actually a turning point in my life. It turned out to be a blessing.” To hear Chatwal tell it, the whole of his colorful past has lead up to his current state of mind. “You have to learn to cleanse yourself physically and mentally,” he says. “You will attract the goodness or the support that you need in life when you’re true and genuine to yourself—that’s one thing I’ve learned.” Holding on to that Panglossian outlook, especially in the sometimesseedy world of nightclubs, restaurants and hotels, isn’t always easy, and despite his sobriety, Chatwal’s had to learn to work around ever-present enticements. “When you’re around it, it’s tempting—it’s like [negotiating] with the devil, but you have to live and learn,” he says of the drugs and alcohol around him. “When I was opening these hotels and I was the popu+ more @ duJour.com lar guy because of what I was doing or who I was dating, it was great. I just thought I could go on forever. But your body catches up with you—your mind and your karmic duty catch up to you. I’ve been sober for a while, so I’m seeing life in a different way.” It’s a change colleagues say they’ve spotted as well. “Vikram always owned hotels, but these days he’s positioned himself as more of a lifestyle hotelier. He’s definitely serious about work, but he also has a lot more projects now,” says Noah Tepperberg, the nightlife titan whose Tao Group runs the dining and nightlife programs at Dream Downtown. “When I see Vikram these days, our conversations are always about the next three cities he’s expanding into. He’s become a formidable developer of hotels.” Just look at Chatwal’s current slate of projects: The renovated Midtown Dream is set to re-open early next year, and Chatwal’s developing another Manhattan Dream property, this one near Times Square, slated for 2017. Additionally his 15-year-old Time Hotel is undergoing an extensive renovation, to be completed in spring 2015, meant to refresh the property for a new generation of luxury-minded travelers. “There are plenty of examples of people in the hotel industry taking missteps, people who’ve failed and gotten up and back in the game,” says Jeff Weinstein, editor-in-chief of the hospitality trade magazine Hotels. “The hotel industry tends to be understanding; when you’re involved in hospitality, late nights and what comes along with them are something of an occupational hazard. But of course there are second acts—if he’s able to get past his troubles, be on top of his game and focus on the job at hand, he can rebound.” Verglas, the fashion photographer, says, “In the past two years I’ve seen a tremendous change in Vikram’s personality. It’s nice to see a friend get out of trouble and make new decisions. That’s why he has been so successful: When he decides to do something, he can stick with it. There’s always a chance to go out and party, but he’s decided to change.” Still, there’s part of Chatwal that enjoys a night on the town—even if that means something different now than it once did. “My vice now is definitely coffee, and I still like going out late,” he admits. “I like to go to my own venues, like the Electric Room on Monday nights. It’s so cool, but then again it’s a Monday night, and come Tuesday, my whole week is kind of shot.”


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(On Kendall) Coat, $4,145; (on Kylie) Coat, $4,370, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI, 212-627-9202.


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On Kendall: Corset, $795, DOLCE & GABBANA, dolcegabbana.it. Bamboo Collection cuff in 18-karat yellow gold, $6,900; Classic Chain Collection bracelet in 18-karat yellow gold, $10,500, JOHN HARDY JEWELRY, johnhardy. com. On Kylie: SLVLS Fit and Flare dress, $468, DIANE VON FURSTENBERG, 646-486-4800. Juste un Clou bracelet in 18-karat yellow gold (worn throughout), $7,200, CARTIER, cartier. us. Stud earrings (worn throughout), price upon request, CHOPARD, chopard.com. On him: Ludlow jacket, $425, J.CREW, jcrew.com. Slim Fit shirt, $250, BURBERRY LONDON, burberry. com. Vintage hat, Melet Mercantile, meletmercantile.com.


THE NEXT

JENNER-ation PHOTOGRAPHED BY

WRITTEN BY LINDSAY SILBERMAN

STYLED BY ANNE CHRISTENSEN

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t’s incredibly hard to impress a pair of seen-it-all teenagers—especially when said teenagers are Kendall and Kylie Jenner, the youngest members of the Kardashian clan—unless, of course, you present them with five jaw-droppingly attractive male models. When that happens (and it did, one recent summer evening), the habitually unfazed sisters become wide-eyed and giddy, in the exact same way any “normal” high school girl might. They’ve just arrived at a hotel in Montauk, New York, for a pre-photo-shoot fitting, and they’re an hour late, wearing bathing suits that appear to still be wet. Their pale faces—more youthful in person than their ultra-polished Instagram snaps let on—are dusted with a fresh coating of sun-induced freckles. “I’m so sor r y, we got caught up with… f ilming and stuff,” says 18-year-old Kendall, the elder and more outgoing of the two. She’s referring, of course, to their long-running reality-TV series Keeping Up With the Kardashians. The show, which chronicles the highs and lows of their polarizing Hollywood family, catapulted them into the limelight when it first premiered in 2007. At the time, Kendall and Kylie were in the throes of adolescence, so they’ve now spent a significant portion of their lives being watched (at least intermittently) by millions. “I don’t think we really remember a time before the cameras,” says Kylie, 17. Her sister adds, “Even before the show, when we were babies—four or five years old—we’d be walking red carpets with our dad [Olympian Bruce Jenner].” It’s the unconventional world they’ve become accustomed to, and today is no different. Just consider their manager’s matter-of-fact explanation for their tardiness: “They were off on a yacht somewhere, and I couldn’t get in touch with them.” At the fitting, the girls begin to dig through rack upon rack of designer clothes, which are splayed out inside the hotel’s 10,000-square-foot ballroom. Kendall, who’s recently modeled for the likes of Marc Jacobs, Givenchy and Chanel, is immediately drawn to a pink tweed suit, while Kylie—an aspiring designer—slips on a formfitting black cocktail dress. It soon becomes apparent, though, that the clothes, however gorgeous, can’t compete with the pull of a group of strapping young men waiting in the wings to introduce themselves. Soon enough, the Jenners are holding court, with five sets of eyes ogling every move they make. It’s a feeling they’re used to but are not always comfortable with. “I’ve gotten anxiety,” Kylie explains, speaking of her life under the microscope. “I feel like everyone’s always staring at me, so I get weird around people now.” The girls often think about how different life would have been without “the Kardashians.” “I wonder about it all the time,” says Kendall. “It’s hard to imagine a day when the cameras won’t be there, because it’s all we know.” She continues, “I don’t foresee there being a point where we say, ‘OK, this all has to go away,’ because,”—she smiles—“I mean, it’s not the worst job in the world.”


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Gown, $8,490, OSCAR DE LA RENTA, oscardelarenta.com. Bamboo Collection cuff in 18-karat yellow gold, $6,900; Classic Chain Collection bracelet in 18-karat yellow gold, $10,500, JOHN HARDY JEWELRY, johnhardy.com. Chuck Taylor Classic sneakers, $55, CONVERSE, converse.com.


On Kendall: Jacket, $8,100, CHANEL, 800-5500005. Shirt, $148, DIESEL, diesel.com. Pizzo bra, $404, LA PERLA, laperla.com. Jeans, $118, BUFFALO DAVID BITTON, buffalojeans.com. South Sea cultured-pearl necklace, $44,000; Cultured pearl necklace, $14,000, ASSAEL, assael.com. Bear-tooth hat, $70, STETSON, stetson.com. Scarf, stylist’s own. On Kylie: Jacket, $8,850, CHANEL. Boyshirt, $80, MADEWELL, madewell.com. Jeans, $238, J BRAND, nordstrom.com.

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On Kendall: Shirt, $148, DIESEL, diesel.com. Pizzo bra, $404, LA PERLA, laperla.com. Jeans, $118, BUFFALO DAVID BITTON, buffalojeans. com. South Sea Cultured pearl necklace, $44,000; Cultured pearl necklace, $14,000, ASSAEL, assael.com. Cotu Classic shoes, $77, SUPERGA, superga.com. On Kylie: Boyshirt, $80, MADEWELL, madewell.com. Jeans, $238, J BRAND, nordstrom.com. Love bracelets in 18-karat yellow and white gold (right arm, worn throughout), from $6,600 each, CARTIER, cartier.us. Chuck Taylor Classic sneakers, $55, CONVERSE, converse.com. On guys, from left: T-shirt, $20, LANDS’ END, landsend. com. Silverlake jeans, $258, ROBERT GRAHAM, robertgraham.us. Chuck Taylor Classic sneakers, $55, CONVERSE. Shirt, $345, ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA, zegna.com. 770 Jeans, $98, J.CREW, jcrew.com. Vintage belt, $650, VICKI TURBEVILLE, southwesternjewelry.net. Billy boots, $278, FRYE, thefryecompany.com. Rib tank, $28 for three, U.S. POLO ASSN., uspoloassn.com. The Graduate jeans, $178, ADRIANO GOLDSCHMIED, agjeans.com. Chuck Taylor Classic sneakers, $55, CONVERSE. Shirt, vintage. Jeans, $89, GUESS, guess.com. Vintage belt, $525, VICKI TURBEVILLE. Billy boots, $278, FRYE.


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Opposite, on Kendall: Corset, $795, DOLCE & GABBANA, dolcegabbana.it. On Kylie: SLVLS Fit and Flare dress, $468, DIANE VON FURSTENBERG, 646-486-4800. Headwraps, DUKA, dukashop.com. (On skin) Cellumination Aurabright Illuminating Essence, $160 for 1 oz., SK-II, sephora.com. (On hair) Pure Argan Oil, $50 for 1.7 oz., MOROCCANOIL, moroccanoil.com. This page: Jacket, $12,245, KITON, kiton.it. Surplus shirt, $70, DENIM & SUPPLY RALPH LAUREN, macys.com. Jeans, $1,025, PHILIPP PLEIN, plein.com.


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On Kylie: Tank top, $15, LANDS’ END, landsend.com. Bra, $98, HANRO OF SWITZERLAND, hanrousa.com. Chuck Taylor Classic sneakers, $55, CONVERSE, converse.com.


On Kendall: Top, $30, UNITED COLORS OF BENETTON, benetton.com. Lumière Monica brief, $140, ERES, net-a-porter.com. On Kylie: Jamie jacket, $1,580, IRO, iroparis. com. Ella dress, $698, DIANE VON FURSTENBERG, 646-486-4800. On guys, clockwise from top left: Shirt, vintage. Silverlake jeans, $258, ROBERT GRAHAM, robertgraham.us. Daily Business shirt, $399, PHILIPP PLEIN, plein.com. Rib tank, $28 for three, U.S. POLO ASSN., uspoloassn.com. Belt, $650, VICKI TURBEVILLE, southwesternjewelry.net. The Graduate jeans, $178, ADRIANO GOLDSCHMIED, agjeans.com. James Sharp suit pants, BOSS, hugoboss.com.

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On Kendall: Dress, $4,390, VALENTINO, valentino.com. On Kylie: Dress, $4,390, VALENTINO. Ari pumps (above), $675, JIMMY CHOO, jimmychoo.com. On Kris: Cady dress, $886, ETRO, 212-317-9096. On guys, from opposite left: James Sharp suit, $895; Jenno shirt, $145, BOSS, hugoboss.com. Vintage Bolo tie, $950, VICKI TURBEVILLE, southwesternjewelry.net. Rib tank, $28 for three, U.S. POLO ASSN., uspoloassn.com. Vintage hat and shirt. Silverlake jeans, $258, ROBERT GRAHAM, robertgraham. us. Above, on him: Modern Trucker jacket, $328, 7 FOR ALL MANKIND, 7forallmankind.com. Ludlow pants, $225, J.CREW, jcrew.com.


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On Kendall: Jacket, price upon request, ROBERTO CAVALLI, 212-755-7722. Tank top, $15, LANDS’ END, landsend.com. Pants, $109, BEBE, bebe.com. Fearless boots, $230, ARIAT, ariat.com. Vintage belt, MELET MERCANTILE, meletmercantile.com. On him: Slim Fit shirt, $250, BURBERRY LONDON, burberry. com. Dress pants, $498, JOHN VARVATOS, johnvarvatos.com. Harness boots, $270, STETSON, stetson.com. Hair: Thom Priano at Garren New York for R + Co. Makeup: Regine Thorre at 1+1 Management. Production: Dawn Boller. Casting: Gwen Walberg. Prop stylist: Tara Marino at Ray Brown. Stylist assistant: Rachel Pincus. Male models: Mark Fischer, Kenneth Guidroz, Bryce Thompson, Bentley Hudson all at Soul; Frankie Cammarata at Chosen. Photographed on location in Long Island, NY.


Photo Assistants: joe digiovanna, chris domurat, jeff tautrim, john chambers, sean jackson. Production photo credits teekay assistants: luke adler, ed hardin, ron gibbs, javier cuevas.

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PHOTOGRAPHED by ERIC RAY DAVIDSON Styled by paul Stura


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Sweater, $750, BALLY, bally.com. Gunnar tee, $26, GUESS, guess.com.


“This island, this home that my family and I found here 13 years ago, is a very powerful landscape of ancient Hawaiian culture. It has great mana, but it’s not for everyone. It’s paradise but that’s something of an illusion. You have

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to work hard to be here.”

Lifestyle coat, $3,660, PRADA, prada. com. Shirt, $325, MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA, barneys.com. 501 Original jeans, $68, LEVI’S, levis.com.


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“There are different types of spies, from the James Bond type to a John le Carré type to the character I play

Sweater, $285, VINCE, 800-777-0000. Brokenin tee, $25, J.CREW, jcrew.com. Pants, $275, ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA, zegna.com. Sunglasses, $360, PERSOL, sunglasshut.com.

in The November Man . Spies get away with a lot, but the real spies I’ve met over the years are kind of boring. They get to know the local bank manager and the local people and they live a quiet existence.”


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“I have so many memories from this beautiful house. When we came here it was nothing but jungle, but we made it into this gorgeous oasis. That has been a great gift, literally—we’re in the shadow of a mountain called Makana, which means ‘the gift.’ ”

Coat, $2,350, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO, 866-337-7242. Dress shirt, $250, BELSTAFF, barneys.com. 501 Original jeans, $68, LEVI’S, levis.com. Royal Oak Chronograph watch, $24,300, AUDEMARS PIGUET, audemarspiguet.com. Necklace, Brosnan’s own.


Sweater, $670, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO, 866-3377242. Dress shirt, $250, BELSTAFF, barneys. com. Becket sunglasses, $390, OLIVER PEOPLES, oliverpeoples.com. J-Class Resilience watch, price upon request, SPEAKE-MARIN, speakemarin.com. Grooming: Lea Journo, Four Seasons/Beverly Wilshire Hotel. Stylist assistant: Drew van Diest. Photographed on location in Kauai, Hawaii. Special thanks to The St. Regis Princeville Resort and Keely Shaye Brosnan.

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“I formed my production company with my good friend Beau St. Clair right after Goldeneye for the pure intention of having some control over my career. The

November Man took us fi ve years to make. We go from fi lm to fi lm slowly, but there’s no need to rush. I enjoy bringing people together, fi nding the story, raising the money, putting together the cast and crew and putting together an environment that’s creative, friendly, open, energizing, dangerous and exhilarating.”


TRAVEL

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A whole latte love! DuJour contributing photographer Henry Hargreaves has a fondness for coffee cups from the world’s best cafes. “I love the ritual of to-go coffee and don’t feel I get the full experience unless there’s a considered design on the cup,” he says. So the Brooklyn-based lensman launched a blog to celebrate the vessels he’s picked up along the way. “Over the past year, I’ve collected cups from my travels and photographed them to see how it’s done around the world.” Here, he shoots some of his favorites. coffeecupsoftheworld.tumblr.com


CHICAGO

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SAN FRANCISCO

FANTASTIC VOYAGE

CHICAGOAN STEVEN FISCHER DOESN’T TAKE HOMEGROWN HANDIWORK LIGHTLY. HIS LUXURIOUS OVERNIGHT BAG (PRICED AT $10,000) IS ENTIRELY AMERICAN MADE, DOWN TO THE LAST STITCH. FISCHERVOYAGE.COM

Zipper custommade by a specialist in Rolling Meadows, Illinois

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Handle and shoulder strap constructed by a Midwestern harness maker

The MCA is the only U.S. stop on the international tour of “David Bowie Is,” a retrospective of the performer’s career organized by London’s Victoria and Albert Museum. Through January 4. MCACHICAGO.ORG

Leather supplied by Horween Leather Co. in Chicago

TAKE A PHOTO

MEASURE YOUR SPACE

CHOOSE YOUR ART

SEE IT ON YOUR WALLS

Art App-reciation Cari Sacks just did you a big favor. With her new app, Curate, Sacks is taking the guesswork, legwork and hard work

out of buying and hanging art. The idea was born when the collector enlisted the help of her photographer sister, Patti

Bartelstein, to Photoshop images of her empty walls, in order to virtually rearrange her art collection. During the tedious process, the sisters decided there had to be an easier way, and together they conceived Curate. “I wanted to be able to take pictures of my walls and put them in my pocket to have with me traveling, at art fairs and in galleries,” Sacks says. The idea was that users could snap pictures of any piece they wanted to buy—or to hang—and be able to see what it would look

like on their walls. Soon enough, what began as a great idea for collectors turned into a marketing tool for galleries. During the app’s testing, Sacks realized sellers could use it to catalogue collections and shows, allowing buyers to virtually hang art for a more informed purchase. Since then, Sacks has drafted some of Chicago and New York’s most notable galleries to participate, and says she hopes Curate will be used by all of the galleries at this year’s Expo Chicago.

+ MORE ON CHICAGO

@ DUJOUR.COM

/CITIES

MCA: DAVID SPARSHOTT; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

Wool lining from Fishman’s in Chicago


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When farmers’ markets go into hibernation for winter, locavores will descend on this massive new Bucktown market, dedicated to stocking the best of the Midwest, from meat and produce to dairy. It’s the first retail endeavor of the beloved wholesale purveyor of Chicago-area food. LOCALFOODS.COM

Soho House CEO Nick Jones shares five favorite parts of his new Chicago compound INVENTIVE FURNITURE

“Creating the lobby in Chicago was a lot of fun. The chandeliers were originally hung in a hotel in Paris. We are always scouring the world for new, unique pieces to incorporate into our sites.”

EAT

House of Style

DRINK

SHOP

UNION HANDMADE LAGUNITAS BREWING CO.

The fresher the beer, the better. With that in mind, Lagunitas founder and Chicago suburbs native Tony Magee just brought his cult California suds to the city with a new 300,000-square-foot brewery and taproom in Douglas Park, providing local craft-beer lovers with crisp, brand-new brews. LAGUNITAS.COM

A FAMILIAR SEAT

“The Chesterfield sofa has become a signature piece within our houses—it’s classically British. Soho House in Chicago is home to a 30-foot-long sofa, which was custom-designed for us. It was so big that we had to ship it to Chicago in pieces and assemble them together on site.”

LAGUNITAS: MCT VIA GETTY IMAGES; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

THE LIVING HISTORY

“The building dates back to 1907 and was the original factory for the Chicago Belting Company. I love the exposed concrete and original brickwork throughout the space. We have tried to restore as much of the personality and history from the original building as possible, offset by our own pieces. It’s sort of grit meets glamour.”

A FLAWLESS RING

“One of my favorite aspects of Soho House in Chicago is the boxing ring we’ve created within the gym. It’s a first for us, and the design process was a lot of fun. We worked with a group of Chicago boxers to make sure it was authentic and set up in a way that makes people want to use it.”

THE PERFECT BIRD

“Chicken would be my last meal—it’s my favorite thing to eat, so I wanted to get it exactly right. The Chicken Shop restaurant does just that. I recommend you grab a friend to share a whole chicken with crinkle fries and finish off with our homemade apple pie.”

MANN MADE

Two of Chicago’s brightest talents—interior designer Kara Mann and chef Brian Huston (Publican)—happen to be friends as well as Evanston natives, which makes their recent work together on Evanston’s new Boltwood a homecoming of sorts. Here, DuJour speaks with Mann about her first restaurant project. WAS THERE AN INSPIRATION FOR BOLTWOOD’S INTERIOR?

DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE ELEMENT?

“I used Brian’s intent with the food as a guide. Simple, clean, like you are in someone’s home.”

“The tile behind the cook line. It was a last-minute find and an unexpected star. Oh, and the marble on the bar, of course!”

WHAT WERE THE PARTICULAR CHALLENGES IN CREATING A RESTAURANT SPACE?

“From a functional standpoint, restaurants take an incredible beating, so material choices need to reflect that. There is a constant push and pull between design and operation.”

WAS THIS PROJECT MORE PERSONAL BECAUSE IT WAS IN YOUR HOMETOWN?

“Yes, definitely. When so many people you grew up with are going to be eating somewhere, it sets a different standard.”

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Clothing designer Leigh Deleonardo invites local artists, designers and jewelers to fill her atelier and shop with the handmade and artisanal, like the Auntie Oti collection of colorful printed and handwoven textiles, and Chicago-manufactured garments from Kelley Jordan. UNIONHANDMADE.COM

LOCAL FOODS

THE REAL ESTATE WAR CRY HAS ALWAYS BEEN ABOUT LOCATION IN TRIPLICATE, BUT THESE DAYS CHICAGOANS ARE HEARING ANOTHER CHANT FROM NEIGHBORHOOD BUSINESSES: LOCAL, LOCAL, LOCAL. HERE ARE A FEW OF THE RESTAURANTS AND SHOPS KEEPING IT CLOSE TO HOME.

CHICAGO

KEEP IT LOCAL


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CHANEL GLOSSIMER LIP GLOSSES “As a lip-gloss addict, I have probably purchased every color Chanel has ever produced. Unscented and unflavored, they just feel very luxurious and are longer lasting than most glosses.”

CLÉ DE PEAU SILKY CREAM FOUNDATION “I use Clé de Peau’s foundation for a rich, extremely smooth and radiant finish. I recommend it to my clients with dry skin. It’s a splurge but a little goes a long way.”

BOBBI BROWN LONG WEAR GEL EYELINER IN BLACK INK “I like to call this the bulletand-tear-proof eyeliner, plus it comes in tons of great colors.”$24, bobbibrown cosmetics.com

$120, cledepeaubeaute.com

$30, chanel.com

Cue the Quartet

LAURA MERCIER SHIMMER BLOCS “I use these as blush, highlighter, eye shadow, or even as a body glow. Depending on the type of brush you use to apply the ‘blocs,’ you can create more or less shimmer.” $40, lauramercier .com

SISLEY GLOBAL PERFECT PORE MINIMIZER “Great as a primer for skin with larger pores. It helps to achieve a more refined and smooth finish. It truly does what it is supposed to do.” $210, sisleycosmetics.com

This year, the Dallas Symphony Orchestra will be celebrating the 25th anniversary of its home at the Meyerson Symphony Center, designed by I.M. Pei. The week beginning September 6, the orchestra will offer free concerts, open houses, discussion panels and luncheons, and will wrap up with a black-tie gala featuring a performance by famed violinist Itzhak Perlman. 2301 FLORA STREET; MYDSO.COM

“ I love to introduce my

hometown to friends from other countries. When I learned my good friend Michael Bentley, the longtime general manager of Claridge’s Hotel in London, would be visiting Dallas, I arranged a dinner party for him and Dallas patrons of the hotel. Appropriately for Michael, who greeted his guests in tails at the hotel, the evening was a formal affair at my home with white-glove service and Texas BBQ, with all the fixings, served on antique sterling platters. I’ll never forget Michael’s face as he devoured those BBQ ribs.

—TRISHA WILSON, chairman of Trisha Wilson Global, a hospitality design firm, and its charitable arm, The Wilson Foundation

BALENCIAGA STORE: NAHO KUBOTA; TESAR: KEVIN MARPLE; STANLEY KORSHAK: DAVID SPARSHOTT; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

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A FRESH FACE IN TOWN

Mayra Rams-Sanabria, the magnetic make-up artist behind popular Dallas glam squad My Fabulous Faces, is a local favorite thanks to the personalized looks she’s created for clients including Olympic gold medalist gymnast Carly Patterson. Here, the make-up guru shares her five must-have products. MYFABULOUSFACES.COM


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Balenciaga Moves In

11 HIGHLAND PARK VILLAGE; BALENCIAGA.COM

CHEF JON TESAR’S FAVORITE EATS

Dallas mainstay Stanley Korshak has undergone a $2 million, 5,000-square-foot expansion. New offerings include Suitsupply’s first ever shop-in-shop concept in the men’s courtyard as well as an expanded bridal salon complete with a Vera Wang salon.

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Balenciaga, now helmed by artistic director Alexander Wang, has opened a boutique at Highland Park Village. Designer Ryan Korban created the shop’s aesthetic with materials such as dark green marble—a Wang signature—polished chrome, cracked resin limestone and suede. A black-and-white tiled floor, an homage to the classic tiles used by Cristóbal Balenciaga in Paris, has been updated with the addition of polished steel cabochon tiles. The setting is ideal to show off the brand’s fall/winter collection, which focuses on sculpted knits (which are folded, bonded, shaped, embroidered, laminated and twisted) and handcrafting. Standouts include structured leather dresses, asymmetrical embroidered coats, cable-knit raincoats and tailored canvas trousers. Wang sees the new space as “a salon in the couture tradition, which encapsulates all of the symbols of the new design concept.” For a contemporary store, it’s got something of an old soul. “I’m inspired by its sense of intimacy and how all of the contrasting materials come together to link history and future in a beautiful way,” he says.

STANLEYKORSHAK .COM

The proprietor of Spoon Bar & Kitchen and Knife is one of Dallas’ most prominent chefs. Here, he walks us through a perfect day of local dining DINNER “The cuts from 44 Farms that we serve at KNIFE are outstanding. These are cuts people don’t generally think of when ordering steak, but they are so tender and flavorful. I also love our Magic Burger, served on an English muffin. Otherwise, my favorite spot is definitely TEI-AN. I let Teiichi prepare an omakase for me and I drink sake.”

LUNCH “R+D KITCHEN in Preston Center is good,

fast and consistent. It’s a perfect place to have meetings. My favorite dishes are the sushi rolls, tuna salad or crab cake.”

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BREAKFAST “I don’t eat breakfast since I don’t go to bed until 4 A.M. For brunch, I go to SMOKE and order pancakes or the pulled pork eggs benedict.”

LATE NIGHT “After I get off work, I’ll go to VICTOR TANGOS, GEMMA or VERITAS WINE for charcuterie and a glass of wine.”

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VIOLET PEACOCK

HEIGHTS NEIGHBORHOOD

THE TAO OF DAO

KATA ROBATA

DUJOUR SPENT A DAY WITH LOCAL DESIGNER CHLOE DAO— AND HERE’S WHAT WE LEARNED FROM THE PROJECT RUNWAY WINNER CHLOE DAO

LOCAL LOVE CULTURE FIX “I try to support “I love talking to Houston designers creators about their as much as I can. I work. On Saturdays, like Temple Street for some Houston artists jewelry, Violet Peacock open their Summer for hats and Elaine Street and Winter Turner for shoes and Street studios. Gethandbags.” ting to see them in action is a wonderful way to spend a day.”

DOWNTIME ”I enjoy taking long walks with my husband, Ken, in our Heights neighborhood. I love to look at all the quirky and cute bungalows. I also go to Barnes & Noble by myself and stockpile all the magazines.”

DAO CHLOE DAO

FUELING UP HANGING OUT MAKEUP SKIN CARE “Right now I’m on “Shade in the Heights “I have two favorite “I have tried all sorts an Italian kick. My is my go-to restaurant brands: Laura Mercier of products, but I am favorite cooking for business meetand Tarte. I probably old school and keep show, Extra Virgin, ings. It’s wonderful have every product going back to the on the Cooking food close to home from both brands. basics, like Johnson’s Channel has inspired and has unbeatable I am willing to try Baby Oil Body Wash. me to cook delicious service. I don’t drink anything but it has to I love the smell and meals that make a lot, but I do enjoy a be quick and simple.” the hydration. On my me feel like I’m in a good lychee martini face, I use Cetaphil Fellini movie. Pasta, at Kata Robata.” cleanser and Tarte anyone?” Pure Maracuja Oil.”

You’ll Be Sweet on These New Bakeries Talk about getting baked! Houston’s undergoing a sugar resurgence, as a slew of new bakeries has recently opened inside the Loop—and pastry chefs like Rebecca Masson of FLUFF BAKE BAR (FLUFFBAKEBAR.COM) and Elissa Bateman of ELDERFLOWER BAKERY (ELDERFLOWERBAKERY.COM) are working to open their own shops soon. Local favorite Triniti Restaurant may have kicked off the sugary craze with its pastry chef Samantha Mendoza’s POP UP BAKERY every Saturday, but it’s not the only game in town. Roy Shvartzapel debuted a bakery case and exposed kitchen in his COMMON BOND CAFÉ & BAKERY in Montrose in May (1706 WESTHEIMER ROAD; WEARECOMMONBOND.COM) and RED DESSERT DIVE & COFFEE SHOP (1045 STUDEWOOD STREET; RED-HOUSTON.COM) has opened in the Heights. Inspired by her favorite New York bakery, Magnolia, owner Jessica Lusk walked away from an architecture career to peddle sweets in the neighborhood her family’s called home for generations. And Red is not just a place for baked treats—it also serves coffee, beer and wine. Sure sounds sweet to us. COMMON BOND

HEIGHTS NEIGHBORHOOD: COURTESY HOUSTON HEIGHTS ASSOCIATION; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

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With microbreweries moving in and craft beer bars opening at a rapid pace, the Houston beer scene is exploding. One prime example is the three-year-old Karbach Brewing Co., which is in the midst of a $15 million growth spurt. The expansion began in March and includes a tasting room, event space and facility for brewing 60,000-plus barrels of suds annually. In the meantime, the brewery is celebrating its annual “Karbachtoberfest” with German-style beers, including a rich ale brewed with pumpkin, cinnamon, nutmeg and allspice. “It makes a perfect complement to the fall season,” says Karbach’s David Graham. 2032 KARBACH STREET; KARBACHBREWING.COM

has an extensive selection—from bags and bangles to home decor—in over 40 shades of shagreen and python. If it’s stingray you want, Gina Cartwright of Charmed Circle (sold in Henri Bendel) offers chic pieces with A-list approval, including a whimsical jewelry collection featuring stingraywrapped chain-link arm candy and collar necklaces in several colors. However you show it off, it’s clear that these days, skin is most definitely in. Clockwise from top left: Python clutch, $1,400, BAIRD & BAIRD, bairdandbairdonline.com; Stingray collar necklace, $1,125, CHARMED CIRCLE, charmedcircle.com; Python clutch, $1,400, BAIRD & BAIRD, bairdandbairdonline.com; Python clutch, $450, PRESMER, presmer.com; Alligator purse, price upon request, ALEXANDRA KNIGHT, alexandraknightonline.com; Python clutch, $495, BAIRD & BAIRD, bairdandbairdonline.com.

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GOLF COURSES: DAVID SPARSHOTT; SNAKES: GETTY IMAGES (3); SKINS PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY CHRISTINA KWIEK; OTHER IMAGE COURTESY

Brew News

Everything’s bigger in Texas, so it’s par for the course that Houston has 174 golf courses within a 50-mile radius of downtown.

Leather accessories are a Texas trend as old as time, and now a handful of Houston designers is putting the exotic into the equation with luxe python, crocodile, ostrich, alligator and stingray creations that beg to be seen all year round—not to mention on red carpets. Fashion editor turned designer Alexandra Knight, whose eponymous line is rich in vibrant alligator pieces, is a favorite of the Hollywood and Houston elite—Lynn Wyatt, Hilary Swank and Sandra Bullock are fans. Meanwhile, Game of Thrones star Emilia Clarke carried a Baird & Baird python clutch with mother-of-pearl clasp to the Golden Globes. “A skin accessory can make an outfit, even jeans and a tank top,” says Annsley Popov, whose Presmer line

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SKIN IN THE GAME

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TARTUFO

Los Angeles pizza franchise 800 DEGREES is firing up its ovens in Las Vegas at the Monte Carlo Resort and Casino. At the Neapolitan-style pizza spot, guests can build their own pies or indulge in favorites like the Tartufo (above), dotted with truffles, roasted garlic and arugula. 3770 LAS VEGAS BOULEVARD SOUTH 800DEGREESPIZZA.COM

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As Las Vegas is known for being over the top, especially when it comes to hotels, The Cromwell is a decidedly refreshing addition to the Strip. With just 188 rooms and suites, the property is significantly more intimate than its neighbors—Caesars Palace, just across the street, has 3,960 rooms. But in keeping with Vegas tradition, The Cromwell boasts a 40,000-square-foot casino, a 65,000-square-foot beach club/nightclub and a namesake restaurant from chef Giada De Laurentiis. A Parisian theme is woven throughout the property, from the parlor-style lobby to the limestone exterior with black awnings, inspired by

Hôtel Costes in Paris. The rooms themselves also have a distinctly French feel—they’re designed to mimic the apartments found in Paris, with distressed hardwood floors and vintage luggage used as furnishings. Giada’s restaurant takes guests beyond Paris to Italy, with a Roman-style menu that features dishes like eggplant rollatini, Marsala herb chicken meatballs and lemon spaghetti. As for the entertainment, nightlife impresario Victor Drai is at the helm of Drai’s, the hotel’s club. For one of the smallest hotels in Vegas, The Cromwell is already making a big impact. 3595 LAS VEGAS BOULEVARD SOUTH THECROMWELL.COM

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In Vegas, less is rarely more—until now. Japanese chef Takeshi Omae, who trained under Iron Chef Masaharu Morimoto in Tokyo, is coming to town with an intimate 12-seat omakase boîte. The only thing big about this place is going to be the line. 3650 SOUTH DECATUR BOULEVARD

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The Cosmopolitan is putting a Vegas spin on the supper club with Rose. Rabbit. Lie., a nightlife hybrid. It’s an experience filled with luxe offerings like an eight-foot-tall, 500-crystal-coupe cascading tower of Louis Roederer champagne for $25,000. 3708 LAS VEGAS BOULEVARD SOUTH; ROSERABBITLIE.COM

CHAMPAGNE TOWER: GETTY IMAGES; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

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TheShopsAtCrystals.com • Located next to ARIA Resort & Casino • Clothing and accessories provided by Donna Karan • Jewelry provided by Bulgari ®


1 oz mint-infused Hendrick’s gin ½ oz fresh lime juice 1 oz Lillet Rosé ½ oz simple syrup 1 oz watermelon juice Rose petal to garnish Pour all ingredients into a cocktail shaker (with ice). Shake, strain and pour into a snifter glass; garnish with a rose petal.

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Black Rose Precious Face Oil, $235, SISLEY, 702-891-0545

Talk about lighting up a room. You can now rent out the two-acre Neon Museum— which is home to more than 150 classic signs—for private events. NEONMUSEUM.ORG

Since its launch in the late 1970s, French beauty brand Sisley has managed to cultivate a fiercely loyal American following—despite not having a single storefront in the U.S. Now the familyowned brand has opened its first stand-alone boutique at The Shops at Crystals. The 750-square-foot space will treat customers to a “highly sensorial” shopping experience, which means the store is much more than just a retail outlet. It also offers shoppers private skin consultations, makeup application and more. “Our boutique

features a private spa cabin for facials, which are an excellent way for customers to experience our skincare range,” explains Jim Maki, the U.S. executive vicepresident. The store’s service menu features 14 different facials, including anti-aging treatments and a men’s facial. “At the boutique, we can truly showcase the d’Ornano family’s Parisian aesthetic,” he says, “including a Saint Louis crystal chandelier selected by [Sisley founder] Isabelle d’Ornano.” 3720 LAS VEGAS BOULEVARD SOUTH CRYSTALSATCITYCENTER.COM

WYNN LAS VEGAS’

acrobatic spectacle Le Rêve–The Dream has been captivating audiences for nearly a decade. In honor of the show’s ninth anniversary, the hotel is introducing a VIP package that offers guests prime seating, a bottle of champagne and chocolate-covered strawberries. 3131 LAS VEGAS BOULEVARD SOUTH WYNNLASVEGAS.COM

NEON MUSEUM: DAVID SPARSHOTT; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

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Sushi YELLOWTAIL

Vegas’ go-to sushi spot, Yellowtail Restaurant & Lounge, is making its way from one iconic Strip to another and landing on a celebrated stretch of Sunset Boulevard. Professional snowboarder turned chef Akira Back— who cut his teeth working under the likes of Masaharu Morimoto and Brian Nagao—helmed the kitchen at Nobu in Aspen before unveiling the Yellowtail Restaurant & Lounge concept at the Bellagio Hotel. Now Los Angeles’ most savvy sushi fans can experience Back’s innovative modern Japanese food with a Korean twist, including lobster carpaccio and salmon serrano.

The Best

Cocktail

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The Best

FAITH & FLOWER

Downtown has no shortage of noteworthy restaurants, but this newcomer has a cocktail program as inventive as its fare. Mixologist Michael Lay (who helped open Vegas’ sceney Rose.Rabbit.Lie) is shaking things up with 1920sstyle drinks, a potent milk punch and a digestif-for-dessert tableside Amaro cart. 705 WEST 9TH STREET; FAITHANDFLOWERLA.COM

8768 WEST SUNSET BOULEVARD; LIGHTGROUP.COM

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The Best

Breakfast Sandwich

Views TERRAZZA

A GUIDE TO LOS ANGELES’ MOST BUZZWORTHY NEW RESTAURANTS

In-the-know Westsiders have already discovered the to-die-for dishes at Venice’s new Superba Food & Bread. Standouts include freshly baked pastries, pork sausage banh mi on house baguette and a breakfast sandwich featuring a slow-cooked egg, linguica (Portuguese sausage) and kale. Now that’s a hangover helper. 1900 SOUTH

Sweeping vistas and fresh Mediterranean-inspired fare go hand in hand at the newly debuted Terrazza restaurant inside the Casa Del Mar hotel. Nibble on chef Sven Mede’s small plates, including Dungeness crab crostini and Maine lobster crudo, while soaking up 180-degree panoramas of the Pacific ocean through the floorto-ceiling windows.

LINCOLN BOULEVARD; SUPERBAFOODANDBREAD.COM

1910 OCEAN WAY; HOTELCASADELMAR.COM

SUPERBA FOOD AND BREAD

FORK: GETTY IMAGES; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

The Best

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Hidden Gem

CAVATINA A long-time favorite with rockers, the Sunset Marquis hotel is known as a plush, private retreat off the Sunset Strip. With the arrival of chef Michael Schlow’s Cavatina restaurant, there’s one more reason to stop in. Snag a seat indoors or on the secluded patio, and enjoy a California-meets-Mediterranean seasonal menu, including Schlow’s award-winning burger. 1200 ALTA LOMA ROAD; SUNSETMARQUIS.COM

The Best

In-Demand Reservation MAUDE Since he opened the jewel-box restaurant in the spring, celebrity chef Curtis Stone’s new eatery, Maude, has been packed to the gills. The 25-seat space dishes up a seasonally inspired prix-fixe menu that rotates monthly and keeps die-hard fans of the fine-dining spot coming back for more—if they can snag a reservation, that is. 212 SOUTH BEVERLY DRIVE; MAUDERESTAURANT.COM

The Best

Design BEACH NATION RESTAURANT

Why hit the beach when you could visit West Hollywood’s Beach Nation? Designed by Thomas Schoos, who crafted the Mondrian’s Herringbone, this adult playground has earned a loyal fan base with its sand pit, chaise lounges and freshly baked goods from L.A.’s own Röckenwagner bakery. 8289 SANTA MONICA BOULEVARD; BEACHNATION.COM


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Teardrop Glass Filament 27-Cord Chandelier, from $1,275, RESTORATION HARDWARE, restorationhardware.com

THE FEKKAI FIX Damaged hair? It’s Fekkai to the rescue! If you’re in need of deep conditioning after a summer in the sun, head to the tress tamer’s salon on Melrose Place for the newly debuted Reconstructure add-on treatment, aimed at restoring moisture and shine to your locks.

Santa Barbara cult classic McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams brings its organic treats—in flavors like double peanut butter chip—to L.A.’s Grand Central Market. MCCONNELLS.COM

8457 MELROSE PLACE; FEKKAI.COM

STREET SMART SOFAS, SWIMSUITS AND CHANDELIERS, OH MY! THE RETAIL NEWS TO KNOW NOW

SALON & SPA NEWS

RESTORATION HARDWARE The interiors megabrand makes a highly anticipated debut on Melrose with a two-story building complete with a ground-floor courtyard and rooftop terrace outfitted in the latest offerings from the store’s outdoor collection. Don’t miss the label’s greatest hits, along with new offerings such as this 1920s-inspired Parisian club chair.

JONATHAN REYMAN’S SPOKE AND WEAL

vs.

Bad skin and hair have met their match with these two celebrityapproved beauty destinations. Here’s what to expect.

8564 MELROSE AVENUE; RESTORATIONHARDWARE.COM.

Parisian Leather Chair,

$2,395, RESTORATION HARDWARE, restorationhardware.com

WHO Hollywood skin expert Marianne Kehoe, known for her facials, opened an eponymous spa in Studio City.

VILEBREQUIN The French swimwear brand has popped up at the oceanfront Fairmont Miramar Hotel & Bungalows in Santa Monica. The store is the brand’s fourth in the Los Angeles area, joining its Rodeo Drive flagship, a Topanga Canyon boutique and a newly minted Malibu Lumber Yard outpost. Talk about making a splash!

Aveda’s former artistic director Jon Reyman and color pro Christine Thompson teamed up to debut a sleek new salon.

101 WILSHIRE BOULEVARD; 310-899-8576

THE VIBE

Modern and minimal.

Sun-soaked retreat.

BACCARAT CHANDELIERS While you shop on Rodeo Drive this holiday season, you’ll enjoy an installation of 16 sparkling Baccarat crystal chandeliers (each valued between $41,000 and $71,000) in the street medians from South Santa Monica Boulevard to Wilshire Boulevard. The City of Beverly Hills is celebrating its centennial while the crystal brand is feting its 250th anniversary. BACCARAT.COM

THE TREATMENT Opt for the electrode IDERM Galvanic facial that decreases inflammation.

Seek out Reyman’s precision cuts or lustrous color using botanically derived products.

THE FANS Kehoe has tended to Jeremy Scott, Eli Roth and Liberty Ross. 4383 TUJUNGA AVENUE MKSKINSTUDIO.COM

Reyman has styled Lana Del Rey, Sienna Miller and Fergie. 8211 WEST 3RD STREET SPOKEANDWEAL.COM

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PIAGET The countdown clock is ticking towards the opening of Piaget’s Rodeo Drive flagship. The Beverly Hills space will be a reflection of the brand’s new global boutique concept, welcoming watch enthusiasts with a modern, open floor plan and flourishes including goldleaf floral-embossed Japanese wallpaper. 323 NORTH RODEO DRIVE; PIAGET.COM

FEKKAI: TIME & LIFE PICTURES/GETTY IMAGES; MCCONNELL’S: DAVID SPARSHOTT; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

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MARIANNE KEHOE SKIN STUDIO


promotion

Of the Day

Ulrich Wohn, TAG Heuer’s USA President and CEO Jim Kerwin, Kerwin Communications, President & CEO Matt Space, LVMH Watch & Jewelry Consultant

Jason Binn, CEO & Publisher of DuJour Isabelle Boudringhin, TimeCrafters General Manager Eric Dumatin, TimeCrafters Project Manager

Adam Craniotes, Timepiece Collector and Journalist Philippe Bonay, Jaeger-LeCoultre North America’s President

T ime T o C elebraTe

DuJour kicked off the third edition of TimeCrafters, America’s Premier Luxury Watch Show at the historic Park Avenue Armory. Atmosphere Hublot

Mario Buatta, Interior Designer and Author Ronda Rice Carman, Founder & CEO of Ronda Carman Fine Fabrics Alexa Hampton, Owner and Featured Designer of Mark Hampton LLC Alex Papachristidis, Interior Designer and Author

Industry leaders, brand ambassadors and passionate collectors convened to celebrate the fine art of watchmaking and enjoyed special exhibits including a display of vintage timepieces and jewelry from Christie’s.

Ralph Simons, Frederique Constant USA’s President Zaida Zamorano, Frederique Constant USA’s Director of Sales Richard Gellman, Tourneau’s Vice President for Advertising and Marketing

Atmosphere Zenith

Jean-Marc Jacot, Parmigiani Fleurier’s CEO Marcia Mazzocchi, Parmigiani Fleurier’s General Manager of the Americas Jim Kerwin, Kerwin Communications, President & CEO

Pierre Jacques, De Bethune’s CEO Caroline Childers, Author

Fan Dance presented by Catherine Galasso, choreographer and artist

Reg Brack, Christie’s VP and Director of Private Sales, Watches Henri Richter-Werner, Connor’s Co-Founder and Creative Director

Gaetan Guillosson, A. Lange & Söhne’s Brand President of North America

Phil Ogle, Christophe Claret’s Commercial Director Wolfgang Sickenberg, Christophe Claret’s COO

Photos by Erik Puotinen/PatrickMcMullan.com.


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On a warm summer day, Miami Beach Mayor Philip Levine set out to walk 87 blocks along his town’s famous sand. Taking the place of his regular morning jog, the five-hour feat was a personal thank you to Ocean Rescue lifeguards, whom he greeted in their pastel-painted stands along his way. “I told them, ‘You’re the front line, the ambassadors to the beach, our greatest asset,’” says Levine. The thoughtful gesture received hundreds of likes and comments on his Facebook page. Here was a mayor getting out into a community often considered too cool to care. It’s a sign that Miami Beach politics, allegedly mired in corruption and ineptitude for years, have turned around. “My motto is ‘Just get it done,’” Levine, 52, says from his office, where an entire wall is papered with a photograph of President John F. Kennedy delivering his 1961 inaugural address and emblazoned with that president’s famous quote about what one can do for one’s country. “We hit the ground sprinting and want to accomplish so much,” Levine says of his time so far in office. “They call me the impatient mayor.” If the Boston native is indeed impatient, it’s a quality that has served him well. In 1989, he founded a media company that

person of interest

the levine machine

dynamic new miami beach mayor philip levine is walking the walk with an ambitious plan to revitalize his town Written by REBECCA KLEINMAN Illustration by KATRIN FUNCKE

catered to the cruise industry. After luxury-goods titan LVMH purchased it, Levine became CEO of Royal Media Partners for Royal Caribbean Cruises. Additionally, he has the ear of both President Obama, as a U.S. tourism adviser, and President Clinton, as a participant in the

Clinton Global Initiative. Levine received Clinton’s endorsement during his election race in 2013, which he won with just 50.48 percent of the vote. “I’m a big proponent of politicians showing solid leadership skills in another field, whether it’s medicine or business, before

serving in the public sector,” he says, citing America’s founding fathers as his role models. So far, Levine’s campaign initiatives are on track. A new water drainage system along Alton Road will mitigate “sunny day” flooding said to be caused by climate change, and plans for Miami Beach Convention Center’s redesign include a sevenacre park, the city’s largest new green space. Instead of becoming another Las Vegas or Orlando, Levine’s Miami aims for quality over quantity and hopes to play host to more events like the tony Art Basel art fair. Another focus is North Beach, an overlooked section of town that hasn’t yet prospered through gentrification like South Beach. Recent additions are a dog beach that draws residents from all walks of life, a new satellite art fair during Art Basel and an annex for a regional university yet to be selected. The reinvention of North Beach follows Levine’s overall vision of what the city signifies. While many people come to Miami to let loose, the mayor thinks the city has a higher calling. “It’s a magical place where people can reinvent themselves,” says Levine, who lauds Miami Beach for its mix of lifestyle, diversity and culture—with tax advantages to boot. “It’s Manhattan,” he says, “meets Monaco.”


E X T E N D PA R A D I S E _ FROM SEPT 1 NOV 30, 2014 S TAY 2 N I G H T S A N D GET 3RD NIGHT AT 5 0 % S AV I N G S OCEANFRONT SUN AND SAND SWIMMING POOLS NIGHTTIME FUN FINE AND CASUAL DINING LUXURY SHOPPING S PA A N D F I T N E S S C E N T E R F O N TA I N E B L E A U MIAMI BEACH F O N TA I N E B L E A U .CO M


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East End

For a hotel brand named East, it makes sense to debut a U.S. outpost (its third worldwide) on the East Coast. Parent company Swire Properties plans to do just that at its pending Brickell City Centre development, in the downtown financial district just south of the Miami River. “We selected this lifestyle hotel because it focuses on creating fantastic experiences, and Swire has a proven track record of operating in large, mixed-use developments,” says Clare Laverty, director of brand communications for Swire Hotels. Designed by architecture firm Arquitectonica with interiors by New York-based Clodagh Design, the hotel will feature 263 rooms and 89 residences. In line with the hip amenities at its China-based sister properties, East Miami introduces La Huella, a South American-flavored stop on the foodie pilgrimage, as well as a rooftop bar on the 40th floor. 801 BRICKELL AVENUE; SWIREHOTELS.COM

THE DEE’S KNEES Perhaps it was all those years spent living out of a suitcase as a working model, being a busy mother, or jet-setting as part of her more recent role as Mrs. Tommy Hilfiger, but Dee Ocleppo knew she had to build a better bag. Remembering a cherished, simple design with interchangeable covers from her girlhood, the budding fashion mogul thought she could adapt its versatility for the 21st century. Her prototype premiered on HSN in 2012. She’s since followed it up with a new collection of luxury handbags in exotic materials sourced from the finest mills in Europe. “Each bag comes with a reversible cover to achieve three looks,” says

Mustique bag in python, $6,000

Miami clutch in calf hair, $595

Portofino bag in leather and ostrich, $2,995, all available at deeocleppo.com

Ocleppo. “You are never locked into just one look.” In addition to enjoying the success she’s found in her career, Ocleppo is also settling into her new oceanfront digs in Golden Beach. (Her husband purchased the iconic Raleigh Hotel, and plans to transform it into a private club.) She’s already a regular at Art Basel, the Bal Harbour Shops and Scarpetta at the Fontainebleau, all places where she can see her bags fitting in perfectly. “Miami attracts such a wide range of people from all over the world, so anywhere on South Beach, you are bound to see interesting people,” says Ocleppo. “It is certainly one of the best places to peoplewatch in the world.”

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ACCESSORIES DESIGNER DEE OCLEPPO IS JUST GETTING WARMED UP


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Restaurant News

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Chef MICHAEL SHIKANY has debuted a namesake restaurant in Wynwood. For

fall, he’s smoking venison osso buco with white pine, and fans can enjoy a 10-course degustation at the communal table. SHIKANY.COM / Like the movie Chef—but without the food fight—Blue Collar proprietor Daniel Serfer teamed up with a local food critic to open MIGNONETTE oyster bar, which also serves prime rib and clams casino for those who don’t like a raw deal. MIGNONETTEMIAMI.COM / Named for Miami’s geological underpinnings, OOLITE also nods to chef Kris Wessel’s Florida roots. His healthy menu is enlivened with tropical bounty—conch, jackfruit, lychee. OOLITERESTAURANT.COM

Who says Miami is all scene and no substance? The annual Miami Book Fair International celebrates its 30th anniversary this year. From November 16–23, 200,000 attendees can see and hear over 400 authors, including Anne Rice and Nicholas Kristof. MIAMIBOOKFAIR.COM

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DANIELLA KRONFLE: A TRUE SPARKLER

The daughter of a prominent jewelry designer, Daniella Kronfle grew up surrounded by diamonds. The exposure must have worn off as Kronfle has not only founded her own fine jewelry collection—now 10 years old—but serves as an official tiara maker for beauty pageants. This over-the-top glamour is just one of her many facets. “I’m experimenting with different gold tones and opaque stone combinations, like onyx and tiger’s eye with diamonds and sapphires,” says Kronfle, who also suggests mixing and matching her bangles in rose gold and champagne diamonds. “There are no rules on mixed materials anymore.” In fact, there is little that her unconventional jewelry doesn’t complement. Although her Florence training lends itself to Old World techniques, she has fully embraced the 21st century by launching a smartphone app for clients to customize charms for bespoke pieces. 36 NE 1ST STREET, SUITE 134; DANIELLAKRONFLE.COM

GILDED AGE

BAL HARBOUR HAPS

RAG & BONE Rag & Bone goes big for its first Florida foray. Along with men’s and women’s ready-to-wear, denim and shoes, it carries new Bradbury and Enfield styles inspired by equestrian and motorcycle bags. The boutique’s industrial design incorporates a range of furnishings from modern (Mies van der Rohe leather sling chairs) to traditional (Persian rugs).

The Bass Museum of Art, which turns 50 this year, is celebrating its golden anniversary with—what else?—an exhibit devoted to the precious metal. The exhibit, Gold, runs through January 11, 2015, and includes nearly two dozen contemporary artists’ uses of the element from tactile forms, like fibers and dust, to heady symbolism. The theme is especially fitting since the museum shares its anniversary with the James Bond classic Goldfinger. 2100 COLLINS AVENUE; BASSMUSEUM.ORG

9700 COLLINS AVENUE; RAG-BONE.COM

+ MORE ON

MIAMI @ DUJOUR.COM /CITIES

CHARLOTTE OLYMPIA For its third U.S. boutique, Charlotte Olympia shows off lively decor including a striped canopy and brass paneling stamped with tropical flora. This couldn’t be better timing for the oceanside boutique, which stocks products like velvet and patent panda pumps and peacockfeather perspex clutches. 9700 COLLINS AVENUE; CHARLOTTEOLYMPIA.COM

MIAMI BOOK FAIR: DAVID SPARSHOTT; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

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WHITTEMORE HOUSE SALON

NUNZIO SAVIANO

vs.

These NYC salons have garnered fashionable followings. ZIP codes aren’t their only difference.

Co-owners and colorists Victoria Hunter and Larry Raspanti

Nunzio Saviano, owner and head stylist

THEY’VE WORKED WITH

Bumble & Bumble and Guido Palau for Marc Jacobs

Oscar Blandi and Sally Hershberger

ATMOSPHERE A Victorian oasis in a West Village town house

An airy Upper East Side duplex

PERSON OF INTEREST

BETWEEN ROCK & A HARD SPOT

IN THE STUDIO WITH MADISON SQUARE GARDEN HONCHO JAMES DOLAN Written by ADAM RATHE Photographed by WESTON WELLS

SIGNATURE TREATMENT They’re pioneers in the art of hair painting.

Saviano doesn’t believe in “signature” cuts.

FAN BASE Plenty of executives have interests outside the office, but very few can pull off running a major company while moonlighting as a touring rock musician. For James Dolan, CEO of Cablevision and executive chairman of the Madison Square Garden Company, it doesn’t seem to be a problem. “I do my job during the day with the computer and the phone, and then, around three o’clock in the afternoon, I switch over to musician mode,” Dolan says, during a break from recording a forthcoming fifth album with his bluesy rock band JD & The Straight Shot. “They balance each other out.”And while owning three New York sports teams—the Knicks, the Rangers and the Liberty—has helped Dolan develop the thick skin necessary to withstand his share of heckling, the

Long Island–based father of six says that nonchalance doesn’t translate to his musical life. “I want to try and please as many listeners as I can, and I am sensitive to criticisms,” he says. “When my audience is happy with what we’re doing, I feel good about it, and when I’m not inspiring them, I’m feeling that too.” Inspiring audiences is something he should have plenty of opportunities to do. Dolan, who’s toured as an opener for the Eagles (their guitarist, Joe Walsh, is producing Dolan’s new album), says he’ll focus on playing locally to support his as-yet-unnamed release, due out this fall. “This is the record I’d really like to push out to the public because I feel like it’s the best stuff I’ve done,” he says. “Hopefully they’ll agree.”

Anjelica Huston and Brooke Shields

Models Karen Elson and Daria Werbowy

MOTTO “We’re the antithesis to the factory feel of some of the larger salons in New York,” says Raspanti. 45 GROVE STREET WHITTEMOREHOUSESALON.COM

“We strive to achieve a custom style via innovative cuts that make each client look and feel good,” says Saviano. 130 EAST 65TH STREET NUNZIOSAVIANO.COM

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ELSON: LARRY BUSACCA/GETTY IMAGES; WERBOWY: GEORGE PIMENTEL/WIREIMAGE; HUSTON: ALBERTO E. RODRIGUEZ/WIREIMAGE; SHIELDS: CHANCE YEH/FILMMAGIC; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

THE PLAYERS

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Splitting Hairs


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The Time Keeper Ruediger Albers, the president of Wempe, the Fifth Avenue watch and jewelry emporium, talks to DuJour about his favorite pieces for fall

ROLEX OYSTER PERPETUAL GMT-MASTER II

700 FIFTH AVENUE; WEMPE.COM

“This is the timepiece that is on everyone’s must-have list. The watch will only be produced in 18-karat white gold and few are expected to be available this year, but luckily we’ll be the first to offer it in New York City.”

L.Raphael, the Swiss skin-care brand known for its anti-aging rituals, is helping to reduce wrinkles stateside with a new spa at the Four Seasons hotel. The spa offers facials using ultrasound, oxygen and ultragravity therapies. L-RAPHAEL.COM

CALIBRE DE CARTIER DIVER IWC AQUATIMER

“A cool limited-edition chronograph (only 500 are being made) that celebrates scientific achievements in the Galápagos archipelago, which are supported by IWC. The automatic watch features a rubbercoated stainless-steel case on a rubber strap, and its luminous blue hands create a unique look.”

AUDEMARS PIGUET ROYAL OAK OFFSHORE

“I can appreciate the degree of engineering that went into the development of this timepiece, including the in-house movement. The stainless-steel bracelet adds to the masculine feel of the watch. My advice: buy the bracelet version and get the rubber strap separately for utmost versatility.”

JAEGER-LECOULTRE RENDEZ-VOUS NIGHT & DAY

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HEINZ MACK’S ILLUSTRATION FROM ZERO VOL. 3 (1961)

“Instantly recognizable by its iconic octagonal diamond bezel beautifully adorned with diamonds, this timepiece is turning heads. Equipped with a supple rubber strap, it makes it the perfect companion for the beach, boat or bar. The only challenge will be the limited availability.”

“The detail of the meticulously crafted celestial bodies indicating the night-andday function is a feast for horological connoisseurs. The mother-of-pearl dial, with its diamond chatons, gives the watch (available in stainless steel or gold) a touch of whimsical flair.”

LESS THAN ZERO

+ MORE ON NEW YORK CITY @ DUJOUR.COM /CITIES

“ZERO: Countdown to Tomorrow, 1950s–60s” is the first large-scale survey in the U.S. dedicated to the German artist group Zero, founded by Heinz Mack and Otto Piene. The multimedia exhibit, which opens at the Guggenheim October 10, features more than 30 artists who attempted to transform art after WWII and explores movements such as Land art, Minimalism and Conceptual art. 1071 FIFTH AVENUE; GUGGENHEIM.ORG

L-RAPHAEL: DAVID SPARSHOTT; MANZONI: © 2013 ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS)/SIAE ROME; MACK: © 2013 ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK/VG BILD-KUNST, BONN; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

NEW YORK

PIERO MANZONI’S ACHROME (1961)


RIFLESSI LUXURY EUROPEAN BRANDS AT NEW YORK‘S LOWEST PRICES

WEST 57 STREET (BETWEEN 5TH & 6TH AVE) NEW YORK, NY 212 935 4747 RIFLESSI.US

PHOTOGRAPHY RUPRECHTSTUDIOS.COM CREATIVE DIRECTION MAALIKOBASI.COM


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Champagne Campaign

Fans of Dom Pérignon, including Martha Stewart and Sarah Jessica Parker, have a new reason to raise a glass. The champagne maker’s latest bubbly, objet d’art, P2-1998, launched stateside this summer with a party at Stewart’s home in the Hamptons, hosted by Nicole Ruvo and Trent Fraser. The champagne, which is aged for 16 years, is the only vintage the French brand will release this year. $375, domperignon.com

FINE AND DANDY

The Neapolitan masters behind Caruso, the tailored menswear label best known for madeto-measure jackets and high-tech fabrics (for fall, think four-ply Supers in the 180 range), are set to open their first U.S. flagship store in midtown Manhattan. The 4,500-square-foot space features a limestone baroque-style entryway and fitting rooms designed to provide clients with a “style itinerary” on how to construct the ideal wardrobe. “It will be a custom experience as seen through the eyes of an Italian gentleman,” says the brand’s CEO, Umberto Angeloni. 45 EAST 58TH STREET; CARUSOMENSWEAR.COM

Leather jacket, $1,595; Shearling bag, $1,300, COACH, coach.com

UNDERNEATH IT ALL

American Woman

For his debut collection, Coach’s Stuart Vevers was inspired by 1970s American cinema. That inspiration is at play in the leather jackets, wedge shearling boots and cross-body bags that Vevers, who formerly worked at Mulberry, has created. “I wanted it to feel like American fashion and not like what I’ve done before in Europe,” the creative director explains. COACH.COM

With backgrounds in finance and marketing, college friends Lauren Schwab and Marissa Vosper are set to revolutionize the underwear industry with their new e-commerce site, Negative Underwear. Seeking to produce uncomplicated lingerie sets for under $100, the duo aims to fill the void between cheap-but-functional T-shirt bras and fussy, impractical high-end lingerie. “We wanted to produce underwear you can wear all day without thinking about it,” says Vosper. NEGATIVEUNDERWEAR.COM

DOM PERIGNON: TODD EBERLE; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

WHAT’S NEW IN THE RETAIL REALM

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promotion

SPOTLIGHT

new york

The art of the smile NYC’s Real-Life Tooth Fairy Promotes Dental Health, One Piece of Art at a Time When Dr. Lee Gause arrived in Man-

who would normally go without dental

hattan nine years ago, he made it a point to deliver the highest quality dental

care due to financial constraints. Monthly art shows are curated specifi-

care with a focus on advanced technology

cally for Smile Design Gallery, with 100

and patient care. The exceptional service

percent of the value of art sold matched

and its results have been winning over

in free dental care for those in need. To

Smile Design Manhattan

patients—many even fly across the coun-

date, over $200,000 of charitable dentistry has been provided to over 500 patients.

is located at 24 West 57th

try for an appointment. But his proudest

photo: Jerritt clark

achievement is the newly launched Smile

Street between 5th and 6th Avenues and specializes

Design Gallery. Working closely with artists

Participating artists and galleries include:

and galleries, Dr Gause merges a passion

Takashi Murakami, Swizz Beats, Chi Modu,

in general, cosmetic and

for art with dental philanthropy. He has

Salvador Dali, Marc Chagall, Ron Agam,

implant dental care.

successfully tapped the art market to pro-

URNY, the Martin Lawrence Gallery and

212.421.3418

vide much needed funds to treat patients

Klein Sun Gallery.

smiledesignmanhattan.com


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A Merlot Moment

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Longtime Montauk resident and pro surfer Tony Caramanico is joining forces with U.S. champion surfer Joel Tudor to create a line of custom surfboards with Caramanico’s artwork under the glass. TONYCARAMANICO

.COM

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Organic, coldpressed juices and raw foods from NYC-based Juice Press have been spotted all over the THE JUICE IS Hamptons this summer. LOOSE The good news is that the brand’s locations in Southampton and its new Main Street, Bridgehampton, spot will stay open through the fall, providing healthy treats as the . weather cools off. JUICEPRESS COM

The location of the Wölffer Estate Vineyard, less than three miles from the ocean in Sagaponack, provides ideal Bordeaux-like conditions. The 55-acre winery, overseen by winemaker Roman Roth, boasts Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir and Cabernet Franc varietals but its beloved rosé blend, Summer in a Bottle, might be the most popular—it sold out by the Fourth of July. For fall, the vineyard isn’t resting on its laurels: Rich aromas of cassis and sandalwood are on display in its latest offering, Lambardo Merlot 2011 ($35). “Our 2011 Lambardo shows why Merlot is king on Long Island,” says Roth.

WEEKEND at GURNEY’S

THE RESORT’S TRANSFORMATION MAKES MONTAUK A YEAR-ROUND DESTINATION

Thanks to a $5 million makeover by designer Michael Kramer that has refurbished 71 existing rooms, suites and cottages and added 38 new guest rooms to the property, the once-tired Gurney’s Inn was transformed this summer and rebranded as Gurney’s Montauk Resort & Seawater Spa. The decor in the newly renovated guest rooms feels fresh, airy and modern while still offering a sense of place. The stretch of beach at the resort is unparalleled, and the property’s location just before the hectic Montauk strip makes for a quiet, tucked-away feeling.

139 SAGG ROAD; WOLFFER.COM

HAMPTONS IN MOTION

Fans of Anna Kaiser’s high-intensity AKT in Motion workout—including hard-bodied celebrities like Sarah Jessica Parker and Kelly Ripa—won’t have to miss her hour-long dance-based interval training sessions when they head to the Hamptons this fall. They can take part in group classes at the Hamptons Gym Corp. in Sag Harbor or enjoy a private session in East Hampton. “It was easier to offer two locations rather than asking our clients to make it to only one studio,” says Kaiser who, along with instructor Emily Mara, will be teaching on weekend mornings. “I’m extremely committed to making sure clients don’t lose their results or momentum on the weekends.” AKTINMOTION.COM

LOS ANGELES

+ MORE ON THE HAMPTONS @ DUJOUR.COM /CITIES

Hospitality guru Jennifer Oz LeRoy and executive chef Seth Levine have revamped the food and beverage program, and the Beach Club at Gurney’s has also been overhauled, with new daybeds, a beachfront restaurant and bar and a beach concierge. A new sand-filtered saltwater pool and the 30,000-square-foot Seawater Spa with 40 treatment rooms round out the new offerings. “It’s been an exciting journey watching this new vision unfold over the last year,” says Gurney’s owner George Filopoulos. 290 OLD MONTAUK HIGHWAY; GURNEYSINN.COM

TONY CARAMANICO: DAVID SPARSHOTT; FRUIT: GETTY IMAGES; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

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Top Chef contestant Dale Talde is bringing his signature Asian-American fare (think Korean fried chicken and pretzel-chive-andpork dumplings) to Jersey City with an outpost of his Park Slope mainstay, Talde. TALDEJERSEYCITY.COM

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Ciao, Milano

Italy won’t seem so far away now that Emirates airlines offers nonstop flights between New York’s JFK and Milan’s Malpensa. “It will bridge the gap between two centers of commerce and tourism,” says Jim Baxter, Emirates’ VP for North America. “Our hope is to encourage a greater exchange.” What else is new for the brand’s U.S. growth plan? Middle East and European service from new gateways like San Francisco, Houston and . Chicago commencing later this year.

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HARBORSIDE BEAUTY

For the first time, French luxury skin-care brand Biologique Recherche’s facials can be experienced in Connecticut, thanks to a new collaboration with the Delamar Spa. Seven transformative treatments exclusively feature the brand’s lotions, potions and serums (Sofia Coppola and Ashley Olsen are devotees), which are packed with perfume-free ingredients, such as skinbalancing amino acids and short peptides. Pampering services here include the Luxury Facial ($375), a customized anti-aging ritual that uses microcurrents to do away with fine lines. 500 STEAMBOAT ROAD DELAMARGREENWICH.COM

EMIRATES COM

PRODUCTS TO TRY

STUART WEITZMAN EXPANDS IN LONG ISLAND

The shoe designer, who’s been in the business for 25 years, owns shops around the world, but none is more meaningful to him than the sleek new store inside Garden City’s Roosevelt Field Mall. The store will showcase the brand’s complete collection of boots (including the best-selling 5050 style), flats and statement stilettos, which have devoted fans like Jennifer Aniston, Kate Middleton and Anne Hathaway. “It’s near where I grew up,” Weitzman says of the label’s first Long Island location, “So in many ways it feels like a homecoming.” Boot, $535. 630

OLD COUNTRY ROAD, GARDEN CITY;

Quintessential Serums, $55, BIOLOGIQUE RECHERCHE, biologique-recherche.com

STUARTWEITZMAN.COM.

Lotion P50, $57, BIOLOGIQUE RECHERCHE, biologiquerecherche.com

+ MORE ON TRI-STATE

@ DUJOUR.COM

/CITIES

MILANO: GETTY IMAGES (2); TALDE: DAVID SPARSHOTT; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

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YOU DON’T NEED TO KNOW

A PICKOFF from A CUTOFF TO BE A FAN OF

G R E AT S TE A K .

Join us at Midtown Manhattan’s most invigorating twist on a traditional steakhouse. And revel in Yankees legends, past and present.

7 West 51ST Street, New York, NY 646.307.7910 (Our Newest Location) Yankee Stadium - Gate 6, One East 161 ST Street, Bronx, NY 646.977.8325

Always in season.

5550 NW 40TH Street, Coconut Creek, FL 954.977.6700

All New York Yankees trademarks and copyrights are owned by the New York Yankees and used with the permission of the New York Yankees.


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URBAN LEGEND

AS THE FOUNDER OF NEWPORT BEACHBASED URBAN DECAY COSMETICS, WENDE ZOMNIR HAS HER FINGER ON THE PULSE OF NOT ONLY THE LATEST BEAUTY TRENDS BUT ALSO WHAT’S HAPPENING IN HER HOOD 1

PLACE TO PAMPER “The Spa at the Montage Laguna Beach. I love the treatments and the set-up—you can be naked and outside if you want!” 2 ALFRESCO DINING ”I like to throw down a blanket on the grass at Bear Flag and have a picnic of poke, ceviche, guacamole and seaweed salad with my boys. Crow Burger Kitchen is delicious if you want to sit at a table outside. I order to go for Angels games.” 3

CULTURAL HIT ”OC culture? That would be the beach. You can usually find me at a beach in West Newport on the weekends, playing

6

volleyball, throwing a baseball, surfing or swimming.”

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Men wanting to upgrade their grooming game should look no further. Costa Mesa’s LashSpot Spa now offers eyelash tinting and extensions specifically tailored to the male customer. LASHSPOTSPAS.COM

4 BRUNCH SPOT “Brunch is a no-no for me. There’s always too much food. But I love Eat Chow on Pacific Coast Highway for breakfast with friends.”

Nautical by Nature

5 SHOPPING “A’maree’s. I love the in-store experience, but with a couple of kids, work and a husband, online visits to Net-A-Porter happen a lot more often.”

Get ready to spend the oyster months (anything with the letter “r” in it) at Ways & Means, a classically inspired seafood house in historic Old Towne Orange. Here, sustainably caught fare gets top billing alongside prime meats and a diverse selection of East and West Coast oyster varietals—best chased with a house cocktail or a selection from the extensive, shellfish-friendly wine list. 513 EAST CHAPMAN AVENUE; WMOYSTERS.COM

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WORKOUT “Crossfit Balboa classes, plus long, sweaty tennis lessons with Paul Jenkins at The Tennis Club.”

PICTURE THIS

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GOLDEN GIRLS

Jewelry junkies have taken a shine to Smith + Mara, the bijoux brainchild of best friends Mara Rothbart—whose family has had roots in the jewelry world since the 1920s—and Sara Smith. Standouts include the earlobe-grazing swoosh-shaped Skimmer earrings, the Infinity ring and the heavenly Constellation necklace, which packs some serious jewelry star power—naturally.

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+ MORE ON ORANGE COUNTY @ DUJOUR.COM /CITIES

Diamond and 14-karat gold stackable rings, $975, SMITH + MARA, smithandmara.com

Contemporary art gets its moment in the spotlight at Costa Mesa’s Dax Gallery, a 4,500-square-foot space showcasing both established and up-and-coming talent. Founder and OC native Alexander Amador opened the gallery to provide local collectors with access to new and inspiring work from the likes of graffiti artists Risk and Cryptik and father-and-son photography team Estevan and Eriberto Oriol. 2951 RANDOLPH STREET; DAXGALLERY.COM

NEWPORT BEACH: GETTY IMAGES; CROW BURGER: CHRISTINE LYNN; EAT CHOW: DANA GRANT; TENNIS: MICHAEL DUVA/GETTY IMAGES; LASHSPOT SPA: DAVID SPARSHOTT; OYSTERS: NEIL LANGAN UK/GETTY IMAGES; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

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WHEN THE BAY AREA’S UNPREDICTABLE AUTUMN ARRIVES, YOU’LL BE GRATEFUL FOR A BEVY OF EXCITING ACTIVITIES TO CHOOSE FROM

BRUNELLO CUCINELLI

CH CAROLINA HERRERA

Mink backpack, $7,830, brunellocucinelli.com

Zebra-print dress, $570, 415-986-3000

CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN Patent leather pump, $625, christianlouboutin.com

SAN FRANCISCO

NEW WAYS TO FALL FOR SAN FRANCISCO

OLIVER PEOPLES

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Cabrillo frames, $280, oliverpeoples.com

Four luxe brands (and many more on the way) are popping up around the Union Square neighborhood

WITH HOUSEWARES FROM

MAKER & MOSS TOM DOLBY’S LATEST FILM PROJECT

ALL IMAGES COURTESY

LAST WEEKEND Novelist turned filmmaker Tom Dolby’s transition to writing for the screen came effortlessly. “Before I write a novel, I do a lot of character development,” explains the 39-year-old, “so I found that when I started on page one of the screenplay, it flowed naturally.” For the San Francisco native, the inspiration for the film Last Weekend (which hits local theaters Labor Day weekend) was close at hand: his own family and their vacation home on the west shore of Lake Tahoe. “The location is certainly autobiographical, and the set-up of the family was as well—successful father, sophisticated mother, gay older son, straight younger son,” says Dolby. “But beyond that, it spun out into fiction.” Dolby isn’t the only talent in his family. His father, Ray, founder of Dolby

Laboratories—who passed away in 2013—was a pioneering engineer whose sound developments had a major impact on the television and film industry, earning him two Academy Awards, Emmys and a Grammy. His son’s directorial debut stars Patricia Clarkson and Zachary Booth as members of the Green family, who spend a long Labor Day weekend at their summer home, confronted with what may be the end of an era. The dark comedy also features a superb supporting cast, including Mary Kay Place and Judith Light. Through his newly formed Water’s End Productions, Dolby is already hard at work on developing a number of new projects. “If we can have half as much fun as we did making Last Weekend,” he says with confidence, “I think we’ll do just fine.”

Matt Bissinger’s passion for design is clear in the unique home furnishings at his Hayes Valley shop, which stocks artisan goods including pendant light fixtures and utilitarian tableware from Roost Tasting Spoons. 364 HAYES STREET; MAKERANDMOSS.COM


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with

SAN FRANCISCO

earth tu face Bay Area residents Sarah Buscho and Marina Storm met at herbalism school in Berkeley and bonded over their love of growing medicinal herbs. They teamed up to found Earth Tu Face, a line of all-organic, non-GMO plant-based skin-care products—serums, face balms, skin sticks, face washes, lotions and body butters—that come in recycled glass bottles. “Whatever you apply to your skin, you absorb into your body,” says Storm. “What’s the point of eating healthy food and then putting chemicals all over our bodies?”

This July, Napa Valley’s Festival del Sole featured music, food and wine, and celebrated Sophia Loren’s 80th birthday at Far Niente Winery in Oakville, with Robert Redford playing master of ceremonies. festivaldelsole.org

earthtuface.com

equinox union street

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at the new

Cow Hollow’s historic Metro Theater has become a “multistory playhouse for fitness.” The Bay Area’s newest Equinox club features state-of-the-art yoga, cycling, Pilates and personal training studios in addition to more than 30 classes, a store, spa—featuring Kiehls products in the locker rooms—and cafe. Working with creative firm AvroKO, Equinox’s VP of design, Aaron Richter, preserved a number of original Art Deco elements at this landmark building, including a members’ lounge inspired by the theater’s history. “We’ve worked for years to develop locally inspired design within iconic facilities,” says Richter. 2055 union street; equinox.com

at one of these sonoma wineries

simi winery

Producing wine in Sonoma County since 1876 with four operating estate vineyards, Simi continues its tradition with yet another anticipated vintage (“Landslide”) and a collaboration with jam-making guru Kevin West.

15401 sonoma highway; hamelfamilywines.com

16275 healdsburg avenue; simiwinery.com

brisket and chicharrones at

4505 burgers & bbq

Ryan and Cesalee Farr invite guests to pig out on favorites like spice-rubbed pulled pork shoulder or smoky BBQ spare ribs from their wood-fired pit. We suggest dropping by their patio for a frosty beer and unforgettable meal. 705 divisadero street; 4505meats.com

+ more on san francisco @ dujour.com /cities

Festival deL sole: David Sparshott; all other images courtesy

hamel family wines

Vintner George Hamel, Jr., his wife Pam and his sons have launched their new winery and are celebrating with limited-production wines, including a 2010 Estate Cabernet Sauvignon and 2012 Estate Zinfandel.


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Holiday at Harlow JILL AND COOPER STEINBERG CARLOS ROSILLO

JANE AND RICHIE NOTAR CHRISTINE DE SAINT ANDRIEU

ALLIE AND GERALD LEFCOURT

PAUL DE LEON AND EMILY SMITH

MEREDITH BLACKER

MASSIMO AND NATASHA CARONNA ANNA CAPPELEN AND DYLAN ECKARDT KIMBERLY PARK

WHITNEY FAIRCHILD

GEOFFREY HESS

SALLY AND MARK EIN

JUDY STONE

CHRISTINA AND LARRY SANDS

JONATHAN AND LIZZIE TISCH

IVANKA TRUMP WITH THE NEIMAN MARCUS TEAM

STEPHANE BARRAQUE

RICHARD JOHNSON

JASON BINN, CARL COHEN, TRUMP AND FARID MATRAKI

Couture Jewels WHO: Ivanka Trump, Jonathan and Lizzie Tisch, Carl Cohen WHAT: A cocktail party to celebrate Trump’s fine jewelry line WHERE: Tryst nightclub at Wynn Las Vegas

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JIM KERWIN

RAY, VERONICA AND GREG KELLY

HARLOW: JANETTE PELLEGRINI/GETTY IMAGES; WYNN: BRYAN STEFF/GETTY IMAGES

JORDY COBELENS

FRANK AND NINA COOPER

BRAUN FRANKEL AND MELISSA BESTE

HARRIET HUNTER

THE IN CROWD

WHO: Jon Steinberg, Ray Kelly, Eric Villency, Richie Notar WHAT: A Memorial Day summer kick-off party WHERE: Harlow East in Sag Harbor


FAMOUS LAST WORDS

Rock & Roll Hall of Famer Smokey Robinson has been penning iconic songs for over half a century, but his handwriting gives us a deeper glimpse into his soul Note his large capital letters. Robinson has a sense of dignity and poise, and pays special attention to how he appears.

Take a look at the letter n and some of the sharp letters in other words. This angularity shows another side to his personality—mental toughness and assertiveness.

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He is conscientious about details: Note all of the proper punctuation, carefully placed.

He writes closer to the right margin than the left. The right margin is associated with the outer world and engagement with it. He’s active— interested in doing things and meeting new people.

The first initial of his name is simplified writing, showing good physical coordination and above-average intelligence. His script is steady, and doesn’t show the effects of aging. He’s resilient.

A

nyone who has ever fou nd t he word s, “I don’t li ke you, but I love you,” spi n ning like a record through their mind probably wouldn’t be surprised to hear Smokey Robinson say, “I write poetry all the time.” Credited with penning more than 4,000 songs, Robinson, 74, is undeniably one of Motown’s most prolif ic songwriters and performers—a man Bob Dylan once referred to as “America’s greatest living poet.” His lyrical sentiments flow so naturally, in fact, that the thought he jotted down above was merely a passing rumination. “It’s something that I wrote off the top of my head,” he explains. “It’s what I feel. It’s a general thought for the world. I

wish we all knew that we’re all the same, except for color. Bigotry is probably the most uncalledfor emotion that we have as people.” I n he r a nalysis of Robi n son’s st atement , Toronto-based graphologist Annette Poizner suggests that Robinson sees himself as “being of service to society.” Furthermore, she points out that Robinson writes in “copybook” style. “This means that he doesn’t deviate from the handwriting he learned in elementary school. He shows willingness to comply with social norms, prefers cooperation to conf lict and has conventional tastes—his music, too, could be called ‘middle of the road.’ ”

It’s true that, over the course of his 59-year career, Robinson’s melodies have consistently appealed to the masses, and his latest album is no different. Smokey & Friends, released in late August, boasts duets with artists like Elton John and James Taylor. His ability to line up such a star-st udded roster of guests matches another of Poizner’s observations—as does his successful 27-year tenure as vice-president of Motown Records: “Occasionally he makes these really sharp strokes, highly angular,” she says. “Angles show us that he’s sharp, analytical and has the ability to be assertive and dynamic. He’s not a pushover.”—FRANCES DODDS


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Fall 2014  

Katie Holmes on her life in the limelight; Pierce Brosnan gets casual; the most luxurious cabins for camping and more.

Fall 2014  

Katie Holmes on her life in the limelight; Pierce Brosnan gets casual; the most luxurious cabins for camping and more.

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