Page 1


E AC H D R O P O F H E N N E S S Y X .O I S A N O DY S S E Y

PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY. Imported Cognac Hennessy ®, 40% Alc./Vol. (80˚). ©2017 Imported by Moët Hennessy USA, Inc., New York, NY. HENNESSY is a registered trademark.


®ROBERTOCOIN

NEW BAROCCO & CENTO COLLECTIONS | robertocoin.com


W e lc o m e to t h e Fa m i ly

Celebrate Life Responsibly

CĂŽROC French Vanilla. Made With Vodka Infused With French Vanilla And Other Natural Flavors. 35% Alc/Vol. Imported by CĂŽroc Distilling Company, Norwalk, CT.


WINTER 2017

CONTENTS

ON THE COVER Front Cover: Coat, $3,650, CÉLINE, 212-535-3703. Bodysuit, $1,195, DOLCE & GABBANA, select boutiques. A Cheval earrings with diamonds in 18-karat yellow gold, price upon request, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, vancleefarpels.com. Back Cover: Bodysuit, $1,195, dress, $3,775, DOLCE & GABBANA, select boutiques. Photographed by MAX ABADIAN, Styled by MICAELA ERLANGER

Couple up with intimate winter fashion

16

THOUGHTS DUJOUR

Letters from our Editor-in-Chief and CEO

27

STYLE NEWS

A peek at Louis Vuitton’s new exhibition, Hublot’s tattooed timepiece and Paul Andrew takes over Ferragamo

40

JEWELRY

Dark jewels cast a magical shadow

41

BEAUTY

The purest new products and a step-bystep guide to makeup party looks

LIFE 42

DECADE OF FEED

20

MASTHEAD

Lauren Bush Lauren’s charitable cause celebrates 10 years

22

CONTRIBUTORS

44

MEET YOUR MUSIC MAKERS

These are the artists to watch in 2018

50

Madam C.J. Walker and her historical estate

54

SWIZERLAND SLIM

In the Alps, the secret to beauty is in the water

56 57

HANNAH BRONFMAN

The New York influencer shares her tips

COLLABORATIONS

Victoria’s Secret model Sara Sampaio gets personal and Steve Aoki goes gold

SAIL AWAY

The most prestigious yachts of the Panerai Challenge

51

52 THE WONDER OF VILLA LEWARO

BEYOND THE BUBBLES

The exquisite taste and effervescence of fine Champagne

On Mina: Top, price upon request, NO. 21, numeroventuno.com. On Mariano: Blazer and pant, $2,295, shirt, $445, GIORGIO ARMANI, armani.com.

P H O T O G R A P H BY M I K A E L S C H U L Z

98

STYLE


WINTER 2017

CONTENTS

Bodysuit, $1,195, dress, $3,775, DOLCE & GABBANA, select boutiques.

CULTURE 58

INSIDE ART BASEL

Welcome to Miami’s sprawling artistic affair

62

CINEMATIC WOMEN

A reflection on DuJour’s favorite women in film and the movies putting them in awards contention today

66

PURE GALANOS

Personal stories on the legendary late designer

FEATURES 76

FADE IN

Our cover star Diane Kruger shares her passionate performance for In The Fade BY ADRIENNE GAFFNEY PHOTOGRAPHED BY MAX ABADIAN STYLED BY MICAELA ERLANGER

70

LIVING LUXE IN NEW ZEALAND

The perfect two-week itinerary

84

LUXURY GIFT GUIDE

DuJour’s over-the-top gift list for the person who has everything PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEFFREY WESTBROOK

94

NEW ENERGY

These actors bring youthful enthusiasm to the big and small screen WRITTEN BY SAMUEL ANDERSON

Fade in on Diane Kruger

COUPLE UP

Get intimate and cozy with men’s and womenswear PHOTOGRAPHED BY MIKAEL SCHULZ STYLED BY CARRIE WEIDNER

108 MASTER PLAN Venus Williams serves up another ace for our DuJour.com December cover BY ATALIE GIMMEL PHOTOGRAPHED BY VICTORIA STEVENS STYLED BY ASHLEY PRUITT

P H O T O G R A P H BY M A X A B A D I A N

76

98


WINTER 2017

CONTENTS

113

CITIES 113

CASCADING CUISINE

DuJour Cities takes you on a lap of luxury

Bevy at Park Hyatt is the quintessential New York dining experience

114

ASPEN

Snowmass Ski Area celebrates its 50th anniversary

116

CHICAGO

Ace Hotel arrives in the Midwest; a new generation shakes up a design mainstay

118

DALLAS

A retro icon returns; The French Room opens its doors, helmed by a Daniel Boulud veteran

119

40

Dark jewelry invites the magic

HOUSTON

The fitness class for the adventurer; House of Harper’s founder shares her fashionable haunts

50

120 LAS VEGAS The Rolling Stones take Sin City; inside a Gatsby-style supper club

122

LOS ANGELES

An Italian classic makes its way to the West Coast; LACMA reveals a vibrant period in Mexican history

124

Sail away to Nantucket for the Classic Yachts Challange

MIAMI

Inside the new Aston Martin residences

126

NEW YORK CITY

128

ORANGE COUNTY

Rodeo Drive meets the desert; the shoe brand loved by Gwyneth Paltrow

129

PALM BEACH

Historic accommodations get kid-friendly additions; an eclectic shopping experience with European flair

130 SAN FRANCISCO Christian Louboutin shares his love for the bayside metropolis

132

PARTIES

134

BINNSHOT

ARTIFACT 136

THE RACKET OF JUSTICE

Billie Jean King’s match-winning racket goes up for auction

14 DUJOUR

58

Art Basel brings the art crowd to Miami Beach

28

Louis Vuitton’s “Volez, Voguez, Voyagez” exhibition

I N T E R I O R : S T E V E N V I S N E A U . A R T B A S E L : L A U R I E S I M M O N S WA L K I N G C A K E 1 9 8 9, C O U R T E S Y O F M A RY B O O N E GA L L E RY. YAC H T S F R O M T H E PA N E R A I C L A S S I C YAC H T S C H A L L A N G E : C O RY S I L K E N / C O U R T E S Y O F PA N E R A I . T R U N K : C O L L E C T I O N LO U I S V U I T T O N / PAT R I C K G R I E S .

A new way to get your coffee fix; nightlife expands at Manhattan hotels


D E S I G N PO R T R A I T.

Ray, seat system designed by Antonio Citterio. www.bebitalia.com B&B Italia Stores New York: 150 E. 58th Street - 135 Madison Avenue Other B&B Italia Stores: Washington DC - Austin - Dallas - Houston - Miami - Seattle Los Angeles - San Francisco - Sun Valley - Mexico City - Belo Horizonte - Sao Paulo Please call 1 800 872 1697 - info.usa@bebitalia.com Time_Less Program: select B&B Italia pieces now in stock: www.bbitaliatimeless.com


ED LETTER

Thoughts DuJour

16 DUJOUR

Judith Bernstein’s Anthurium Blue will be on display at Art Basel Miami Beach. Top left: two perfect gifts, Fendi’s Fun Fair Gelato Cone Charm and Tic-Tac-Toe from the Ermenegildo Zegna’s Toyz collection

Renee Lucas Horan

P O RT R A I T: V I C TO R I A ST E V E N S . A RT: CO U RT E SY O F T H E A RT I ST A N D T H E B OX , L A ; P H O T O G R A P H E D BY F R E D R I K N I L S E N S T U D I O

H

oliday issues are my favorite to put together. My typically minimal taste takes a step back and makes way for the sensational: bold, over-the-top accessories and objet d’art, which abate in appropriateness as the year winds down. It’s as if my intuitive style knows another year is behind us and it might be the last chance to unleash some inner glitz and glamour. This season’s gift guide is a study of presents that are perfectly unnecessary (Byredo’s lotion roller) and thoughtfully bighearted (a Swarovski-encrusted S’well bottle). Zegna’s toctac-toe game is on my list, and as for the gifts I’ll give—I run a thin line between the kitsch of a Fendi ice cream cone keychain and the timelessness of a pair of Bottega Veneta gloves. This is also our awards issue and it’s been a privilege to highlight DuJour’s history of celebrating decorated actors and actresses. We’ve taken a look back at our cover story with Nicole Kidman and features with Carrie Mulligan and Octavia Spencer, and followed their careers to the present day as they sit on the cusp of more nominations. It was a pleasure to photograph Diane Kruger shortly after her Cannes Film Festival Best Actress win for our cover—and get to know young actors like Daniel Kaluuya and Fionn Whitehead before they become household names. Another ace as we close out the year is our December digital cover shoot with Venus Williams. Somehow she is simultaneously considered to be at the peak of her career and also a legend—and she does it with poise both on and off the court. Working with her was inspiring and memorable; I’ll recall it fondly when I pick up my racket in the spring.


ZENITH, THE FUTURE OF SWISS WATCHMAKING

www.zenith-watches.com

DEFY I El Primero 21 1/100th of a second chronograph

Tourneau Time Machine New York, New York

Swiss Fine Timing Chicago, Illinois

Bhindi Glendale, California

Horologio, Las Vegas, Nevada

Vagu Miami, Florida

Govberg Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Westime Sunset West Hollywood, California

Watch Connection Costa Mesa, California


CEO LETTER HANDPICKED Jane Hertzmark Hudis Ward Simmons Kiyo Taga Venus Williams Adam Miller Elaine Wynn

Elaine Wynn

Julien Tornare Benoit Vulliet Howard Lorber Simon Sproule

Gerber Group’s Rande Gerber, Cindy Crawford, Gerber Group’s Scott Gerber

Dana DeVito Gina Folin Ward Simmons Emily Schneider and Katharina Plath of Head and Hand PR

President of Wempe Rüdiger Albers

Gene Simmons, Dr. Richard Firshein

Gary Friedman Lauren Snyder Gene Simmons Jane Hertzmark Hudis Michael Shvo Steve Aoki Sean Walsh Larry Silverstein

Tonya Lewis Lee, Aisha McShaw, Al Sharpton, Kevin Liles

Venus Williams

I

18 DUJOUR

Louis Cona Allison Shafii Rob Goldstein Kenneth Wyse Greg Calejo

CEO and Publisher of The New York Post Jesse Angelo and Rubenstein’s Steven Rubenstein

Nick Cannon

Charles Koppelman Lepa Roskopp Keren Eldad Mastin Kipp Susan Duffy Ana Martins Nick Cannon Stewart Bain Greg Calejo Jeff Mancini Katharina Plath Veronique Gabai-Pinsky

Fairchild Fashion Media’s James Fallon and Joseph Abboud

Andrea Correale Stacy Woods

Cece, Oscar and Penny Binn

Richard Gossett Andres Arellano Michael Baruch Vincent Panzanella Gillian Beck Robert Diamante Michelle Ranieri Renee Horan and Baccarat’s Ward Simmons

Michael Satsky Mark Warfel Sheldon Brody Carol McGuinness

Uma Thurman

Christine Childs Tom Mastronardi

Benoit Vulliet and CEO Julien Tornare of Zenith

Maye Musk

P H O T O G R A P H S BY G E T T Y I M AG E S

Robert Vecsler P H O T O G R A P H S BY G E T T Y I M AG E S

f you can believe it—because I barely can—it’s time to talk holiday. And regardless of what you’re celebrating this season, there’s no doubt it’s a festive time filled with family, winter getaways and most of all: amazing gifts. Not that I’m one to only focus on material things, but it was especially fun for our team to put together this year’s gift guide, which features everything from an Aston Martin to a beautiful Fabergé egg. But before we get into what I’m asking for this year, it goes without saying that there were more than a few happening moments worth mentioning this past fall. For one, New York Fashion Week was as much a whirlwind as it was an amazing time to reconnect with some of my most fashionable friends. For DuJour’s annual fashion week celebration, my longtime friends Cindy Crawford and Rande Gerber hosted an unforgettable night at one of the Gerber Group’s hottest spots, Mr. Purple on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. The happy couple—and parents to next-generation supermodels Kaia and Presley—hosted an evening that was truly fit for the city’s most stylish set, and the Casamigos tequila didn’t hurt either. Throughout the rest of the week, I also got the chance to spend quality time with my partner-in-crime Gene Simmons. And although not all our activities can be mentioned here, I can definitely say this year’s NYFW was one for the books. Richard Mille’s The Bridge event was also the perfect excuse to make one last trip to the Hamptons in September. The event combined contemporary art with amazing automobiles—a kismet pairing—and was held at the former Bridgehampton Race Circuit. And not too much longer after fashion week, the DuJour team also had the special opportunity to celebrate our Fall 2017 cover star Uma Thurman (and her Broadway debut) at the Magic Hour rooftop at the newly opened Moxy Hotel. Good friends and notable attendees included Real Housewives of New York’s Dorinda Medley and Ramona Singer, Baccarat’s Ward Simmons, David Yurman’s Maria Valim and actress and Page Six’s Tashara Jones—per usual, a great turnout for yet another gorgeous cover star. Of course, it wouldn’t be the Winter issue without our annual Oscars predictions. I pride myself and DuJour on our ability to pick out the best-of-the-best before the buzz hits the awards circuit. This year, we’ve rounded up some of our favorites actresses including Nicole Kidman for Killing of a Sacred Deer, Carey Mulligan for Mudbound and Lily Collins for To the Bone. They say that only time can tell, but in our case, time means team Du Jour. And speaking of, we’re so excited to welcome team member Cameron Chalfin to our circle. A force of nature, team DuJour continues to prove itJason Binn Twitter/ Instagram: @jasonbinn self as unstoppable in every way.

Marty Burger

Keenan Towns Andy Masi Christine Meagher, Rolls-Royce’s Michael Snell and Sabine Brown, Araceli Franco, Keenan Towns

Alberto Junco Stewart Bain Lauren Picciano Stefania Girombelli Andrew Rosen Thomas Mastronardi

Denise De Luca

DUJOUR 19


E D ITO R I N CH I E F

CEO/PU B LI S H E R

Renee Lucas Horan

Jason Binn

A RT D I R EC TO R

PH OTOG R A PHY D I R EC TO R

S E N I O R SA LES LE A D

Alexander Wolf

Catherine Gargan

Araceli Franco SA LES LE A DS

CU LTU R E E D ITO R

Samuel Anderson

Cameron Chalfin Christine Meagher E XECUTIV E AS S I STA NT

Ryan Byrne

AS SOCIATE E D ITO RS

Rachel Barber Atalie Gimmel

I NTEG R ATE D SA LES PL A N N E R

Alexandra Schwab

CO NTR I B UTI N G CO PY CH I E F

Svetlana Kitto CO NTR I B UTI N G FAS H I O N R ES E A RCH AS S I STA NT

Maura Aleardi

INTEGRATED MARKETING D I R EC TO R O F I NTE RG R ATE D M A R KETI N G

Courtney Collyer C A M PA I G N M A N AG E R

Andrew Prasad D ES I G N E R

D I R EC TO R O F O PE R ATI O N S

William Pelkey

Chelsea Hernandez

DUJOUR.COM

PRODUCTION

WE B PRO D U CE R

IT M A N AG E R

Kasey Caminiti

Luis Luquis PR I NT CO N S U LTA NT

PA PE R SO U RCI N G

Calev Print Media

The Aaron Group

CITIES R EG I O N A L E D ITO RS

Amiee White Beazley (Aspen), Carly Boers (Chicago), Holly Crawford (Houston), Holly Haber (Dallas), Jeremy Kinser (Los Angeles, Orange County), Rebecca Kleinman (Miami, Palm Beach), David Nash (San Francisco)

CO NTR I B UTO RS

Alex John Beck, Patricia Bosworth, Cedric Buchet, Grant Cornett, Arthur Elgort, Kyoko Hamada, Henry Hargreaves, Michael Oh, Victoria Stevens, Bruce Weber, Lynn Yaeger

FINANCE F I N A N CE M A N AG E R

CO NTRO LLE R

John Domingo

Dahlia Nussbaum

CH I E F F I N A N CIA L O FF I CE R

BOA R D A DV I SO R

Stephanie Cabral-Choudri

Jonathan Greller

I NTE R N

G E N E R A L CO U N S E L

Mary Andriotis

John A. Golieb

DuJour (ISSN 2328-8868) is published four times a year by DuJour Media Group, LLC., 530 7th Avenue, Floor M1, NYC 10018, 646-679-1687. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. The publishers and editors are not responsible for unsolicited material and it will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication subject to DuJour magazine’s right to edit. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, photographs and drawings. Copyright © 2017 DuJour Media Group, LLC. For a subscription to DuJour magazine, go to dujour.com/free, call 800-783-4903 or email custsvc_dujour@fulcoinc.com


OFF-PREMISE CATERING & EVENT DESIGN for your HOME, BUSINESS or VENUE Southampton 631 324 9825 · Glen Cove 516 676 8500 · Manhattan 212 991 0078 · ElegantAffairsCaterers.com


CONTRIBUTORS MAX ABADIAN Ever since he was a child going through his mother’s fashion magazines, Abadian has always had an appreciation for images and a penchant for all things aesthetic. Picking up a camera came naturally to Abadian. At the age of 10, he started documenting his life, picture by picture. This evolved into a career as a photographer, which has allowed Abadian to collaborate with a variety of artists. His unequivocal eye and fastidious attention to detail have been the keys to his success in fashion and celebrity photography, and this is all perfectly displayed in our cover story with actress Diane Kruger. Abadian has shot many known faces such as Lady Gaga, Bella Hadid, Kate Hudson and Jennifer Lawrence.

SERGE NORMANT

MICAELA ERLANGER A self-declared glamour-girl, stylist Micaela Erlanger’s inspirations vary from modern art to classic Hollywood film. For our cover story with Diane Kruger, her styling directly drew from those aesthetics. She has worked with such international talent as Lupita Nyong’o, Jared Leto, John Boyega, Meryl Streep, Common, Jennifer Hudson, Hillary Swank, Winona Ryder and Michelle Dockery. Her editorial work has been featured in top publications such as Elle, Vanity Fair, Vogue Thailand, Marie Claire, GQ and Esquire, and she has collaborated with many noted photographers and directors: from Patrick Demarchelier and Alexi Lubomirski to Kathryn Bigelow, Jon Watts and Francessco Carrozzini.

22 DUJOUR

Undeniably one of the leading hairstylists in the fashion industry today, Normant regularly works with Harper’s Bazaar, W, Allure, Elle and Vogue, and a roster of famous photographers including Richard Avedon, Patrick Demarchelier, Steven Meisel, Herb Ritts, Irving Penn, Annie Leibovitz and Mario Testino. For our cover story, Serge created the edgy and magical looks on Diane Kruger. He is the founder of his eponymous transformative line of hair-care and styling products and is the co-owner of The Serge Normant at John Frieda salons in New York.


CALIBER RM 037

RICHARD MILLE BOUTIQUES ASPEN • BAL HARBOUR • BEVERLY HILLS • BUENOS AIRES • LAS VEGAS • MIAMI • ST. BARTH • TORONTO


CONTRIBUTORS VICTORIA STEVENS Brooklyn-based photographer Stevens concentrates her talents on portraits and reportage of some of today’s most prolific actors, directors and artists. For this issue, she photographed our DuJour.com digital cover with tennis legend Venus Williams. Her work has been featured in W, Interview, The New York Times and T Magazine. When she’s not in the studio, you can find her surfing in Rockaway or belting out her favorite Celine Dion songs during late-night karaoke.  

DAVID NASH

Nash’s contributions to this issue of DuJour include a personal profile on fashion designer John Galanos and an interview with shoe legend Christian Louboutin. Nash began his career in the television industry, and his editorial work has been featured in Town & Country, TATLER Russia, Harper’s Bazaar, Elle .com, Elle India and the San Francisco Chronicle. He served as Project and Exhibition Director for “Extending the Runway: Tatiana Sorokko Style,” which debuted in 2010 at the Russian Fashion Museum, in Moscow, and later opened in the U.S. at the Phoenix Art Museum. Several important garments from Nash’s own vintage collection are currently on view at the Phoenix Art Museum’s exhibition “A Tribute to James Galanos.”

LANE NIESET Nieset is a freelance journalist from Miami who currently calls the Côte d’Azur home. From her base in Nice, France, she covers a mix of lifestyle, food, wine and travel for publications such as National Geographic Travel, Travel + Leisure, Jetsetter and Vogue.com. For this issue, she got the skinny on a secret spa in the Alps in “Switzerland Slim.” She has also appeared in BBC Travel’s “RSVP Abroad” series in Cannes. While she’s on the road, she can be found sipping espresso at a cafe or hunting down the perfect vintage bag.

24 DUJOUR

CARRIE WEIDNER Born and raised in rural Wisconsin, fashion stylist Weidner moved to New York City after studying at the University of Wisconsin and La Sorbonne in Paris, and spent several years honing her experience in fashion as assistant to top talents including Tom Van Dorpe and Patti Wilson, on photo shoots all over the world for such respected names as Vogue Italia, Christian Dior and Document Journal. For this issue she styled our fashion story, “Couple Up.”


IS WHERE LUXURY LIVES Connect with the most affluent individuals where they LIVE, WORK and PLAY

Bevy at Park Hyatt New York


STYLE Evening bag, $4,995, ALEXANDER WANG X JUDITH LEIBER, alexanderwang.com. Lipstick, $14, L’OREAL PARIS COLOUR RICHE X BALMAIN, Barneys New York and barneys.com.

Making Ends Meet

The best collaborations are the unexpected ones PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEFFREY WESTBROOK Alexander Wang’s urban ease meets Judith Leiber’s meticulous detail with this limited-edition piece designed to look like a roll of $100 bills. Beyoncé carried the bag to her husband Jay-Z’s Tidal X Brooklyn party, while Kim Kardashian has been spotted by paparazzi on the West Coast clutching it harder than if it was real cash. More than 10,000 Swarovski crystals encase the couture money roll, which takes an artist a full week to bead. Now that’s priceless. —RENEE LUCAS HORAN

DUJOUR 27


STYLE

FUSION

EXHIBITION

STYLE

A Tattooed Timepiece

Maxime Büchi, the Swiss tattooist, partnered with Hublot for an all-new Big Bang timepiece BY KASEY CAMINITI

T

BY JOSHUA GLASS

W

e have long been seduced by tales of journeys, from Homeric epics to fables of the wild American west. Whether for education or entertainment, these stories invigorate the everyday with grandeur and discovery. “Volez Voguez Voyagez,” an exhibition by Louis Vuitton at the American Stock Exchange Building in New York City this fall, considers the luxury fashion house’s own journey through some of its most iconic symbols and objects. Starting with the house’s eponym, the exhibit details Louis Vuitton’s 280-mile sojourn to Paris, which he made on foot from the mountainous forest of his home in Anchay at the age of 13, as well as his son Georges’s 1893 cross-Atlantic sail to attend the Chicago World’s Fair. The multiroom experience also traces the evolution of the brand’s designs, from the prototype of the infamous LV trunk, later used by the likes of Charles Lind-

28 DUJOUR

bergh and Ernest Hemingway, to its status as a must-have travel accessory. Curated by the noted art historian Olivier Saillard, director of Paris’s Palais Galliera and a frequent collaborator of Tilda Swinton’s, the show is both biographical, recalling the Vuitton family’s roots as carpenters, and fashion-forward, examining the legacies of its latter-day creative directors like Marc Jacobs and Nicolas Ghesquière. From train to plane to sea, countless stories unfold, highlighting the fabulous design as well as the globe-spanning voyages that have ensued as a result. Timed with the U.S. opening of “Volez, Voguez, Voyagez,” which first premiered in Paris in 2015 and then moved to Tokyo last spring, Louis Vuitton will also host a special pop-up at Brookfield Place until March 2018, boasting a carefully curated assortment of fine goods and leather pieces. Combined, it’s a new kind of journey that you won’t want to end. “VOLEZ, VOGUEZ, VOYAGEZ,” 86 TRINITY PL, NEW YORK, NY 10006

C O U R T E S Y O F H U B LO T

Louis Vuitton unveils an enchanting new exhibition

Vignettes from the “Volez, Voguez, Voyage” exhibition featuring the chauffeurs kit in Vuittonite canvas, classic trunks, medical cabinet in natural cowhide leather and a trunk bed in Damier canvas

1 9 0 4 W O R L D ’S FA I R : © LO U I S V U I T T O N M A L L E T I E R A R C H I V E S . A L L O T H E R I M AG E S : C O U R T E S Y O F LO U I S V U I T T O N

The Art of Travel

he tattooed man in front of me is explaining the cultural significance of watches to his native country, Switzerland, while wearing a watch on each wrist. “Even if you’re not passionate about watches or interested from an artistic point of view, you know people who work in the little workshops for the brands,” he says of growing up in Jura, Switzerland, the heart of the watch industry. Maxime Büchi, founder of the famed Sang Bleu London tattoo studio, was recently named an ambassador for luxury Swiss watch brand Hublot. Bringing a unique fusion of technical and creative innovation, Büchi has redesigned the classic Hublot Big Bang timepiece in his signature geometric style. The watch’s new look, down to the numerals that were created for the piece by Büchi’s own typeface design agency SwissTypefaces SARL, has Büchi’s unique stamp all over it. A graphic designer and typographer-turned-tattooist, Büchi grew up with a penchant for watches, which, he says, made this partnership effortless. “Watches are something meaningful that you pass on in your family and are important to Swiss people,” says Büchi. His polygonal designs, for both timepieces and his tattoos, may emphasize structure and function, but when working on any subject, the Büchi takes an intellectual approach. “My studies in arts and design made me able to understand the context of a tattoo; not how to do a tattoo, but why,” Büchi explains. He tells me how it wasn’t until his late 20s that he spent three years in a tattoo apprenticeship, working seven days a week, earning less than minimum wage. “It wasn’t an easy transition to go from graphic designer to tattooist, but it was a natural evolution.” On gaining such prominence in the tattoo world later in life, he jokes, “I blame myself for giving a lot of graphic designers the wrong impression that you can easily become a tattooist.” Büchi believes that while anyone could theoretically do a tattoo, “the act of tattooing is the most minimal part of the competence you have as a tattooist.” Büchi believes tattooing from an aesthetic point of view and, more importantly, how you as an artist fit into the work, are the most crucial characteristics of a tattooist. “It’s not that difficult to do a tattoo. My duty is to teach someone all the rest,” says Büchi, who now teaches his own apprentices. Büchi believes that morally, young tattooists should go through the hardships he went through to learn the craft but admits that practically speaking, the art form has evolved to be such a popular act that paying your dues may no longer be necessary. “Tattooing has expanded from a subculture where a very small amount of iconography existed for a specific population, to multiple populations becoming interested in it,” he says. Büchi celebrates this cultural shift, how it’s led to more variety of tattoo styles and the fact that they are less taboo. “It’s a means of expression; although you can still absolutely offend people with tattoos, you can also get tattoos that go completely unnoticed.” If a tattoo isn’t quite your speed, opt for the Hublot Big Bang timepiece that echoes Büchi’s tattoo style instead—you’ll be sure to get noticed.

Clockwise from left: Hublot Big Bang Unico Sang Bleu in Titanium, $37,300. The gold version is $843,000; Maxime Büchi sketching his original Sang Bleu design; Büchi in his studio


STYLE

R U N WAY

LEGACY

Artist DeJ Loaf and Maria Buccellati at the Faith Connexion flagship opening in Soho, NYC; Below, right: A look from Faith Connexion’s SS17 collection

The Next Generation London Jewelers is looking to pass the torch and carry on its legacy

Instant Connexion

BY ATALIE GIMMEL

L

Already a favorite amongst the ‘in’ crowd, Maria Buccellati is ready to share her brand’s language with the world BY ATALIE GIMMEL

30 DUJOUR

R U N WAY I M AG E S : C O U R T E S Y O F FA I T H C O N N E C X I O N . A L L O T H E R I M AG E S : A N G E L A P H A M / B FAC O M

I

t started immediately,” president of Faith Connexion Maria Buccellati says at the opening of her first New York store with the same aura of cool that her clothing brand exudes. “Kanye came in and sat in our office and immediately told me he liked our creatives. Then we had Swizz Beatz and Alicia Keys, Future, Rihanna ... .” She pauses to think. “And Rita Ora. There is a real appetite for the style of the brand,” she adds. It’s that style, not to mention the celebrity clientele, that has helped the brand achieve a next-level cool factor. The night of the f lagship’s opening party, VIPs like rapper DeJ Loaf and DJ Sunnery James (Doutzen Kroes’s hubby) were in attendance. “What could be better?” beams Buccellati. As the scion of the Buccellati jewelry empire, she straddles the worlds of high fashion legacy brands and youth-focused streetwear. For the past seven years, Buccellati, with CEO Alexandre Allard, has built Faith Connexion to embody street with a couture twist, utilizing a client list of cultural power-players. “Swizz Beatz came in the day before we opened our store and bought [so many] pieces. He’s also gifting me a speaker for the DJ zone downstairs,” Buccellati says. “And Alicia customized five pieces for her concert tour.” When it came to the brand’s two-f loor Soho f lagship, Buccellati enlisted Rockwell Group alum and ASR Design founder Anne-Sophie Rosseel to renovate the space to reflect the “world of Faith,” as Buccellati puts it. “It’s not easy to just go find an architect. They have to speak our language,” she says. For inspiration, Rosseel looked to the textile factories and streetscapes of turn-of-the-century New York. The result is luxury done the Soho way: blackened steel and brass fittings in the in-house atelier, beautiful silk carpets, and rough cement walls. Meanwhile, spray-painted workshop counters mark the presence of “Faith by Me,” the brand’s contemporary, bespoke element, and the service used by Alicia Keys for her one-of-a-kind tour pieces. “As president of this company, I’ve worked in a creative way, not in a corporate way,” Buccellati says. This collaborative environment, which Buccellati calls her “creative hub,” includes Austin Blaisdell, Faith Connexion’s 22-year-old designer known for combining minimal fashion concepts with accents of distress and destruction. “Here, it’s really freestyle,” Buccellati says, “and that’s heaven.” This atmosphere has also fostered creative partnerships between Faith Connexion and labels like denim brand NTMB (Never Too Much Basic) and the Italian athleisure company Kappa. For Faith’s most recent partnership, the brand linked up with inf luencer and Rihanna-approved model Sita Abellan for a capsule collection of nine “techno-princess” pieces. It’s fashion, it’s street and it’s got a story—and part of that story is Buccellati’s continued desire to take the brand where it’s never gone before. “The new season has particularly been the most complicated collection,” Buccellati admits, in light of all the changes the brand saw during its Soho expansion. But, she suggests, isn’t change and a little bit of discomfort the surest sign of growth? “At the end, [change] is where our best inspiration comes from.”

STYLE

ondon Jewelers was founded in 1926 by Charles London, a European watchmaker who settled in Glen Cove, Long Island. London became the Gold Coast’s go-to watchmaker, visiting the estates of the aff luent (think: the Vanderbilts, Whitneys, Pratts and Morgans) in the area to fix and rewind their grandfather clocks. It didn’t take long for London’s services—and eye for fine pieces—to grow in demand, eventually leading him to open his own watch and jewelry shop. Hence the birth of London Jewelers, the premier luxury retail jeweler in the U.S. Today, London’s grandson—Mark Udell—runs the company alongside his wife and president of London Jewelers, Candy Udell, and the pair have carried on a four-generation, family-run legacy that currently boasts six fine jewelry retailers, the newest of which is Oculus in the Westfield World Trade Center, Manhattan. Now, 90 years after its inception, the company is looking to pass the torch to a fourth generation and carry on its legacy. “I know my children have the passion for the business,” she says. “While they’re still learning the many mechanics of the business, their heart and soul is in it.” Scott Udell, 33, personally heads up the brand’s millennialgeared fine jewelry brand TWO by London, while also leading the company’s diamond-buying, e-commerce and social-media initiatives. “He’s helped my husband and I become more adaptable to the changing conditions in our market and within our in-

dustry because he has tremendous vision,” Candy says of her son. Randi Udell-Alper, the pair’s 37-year-old daughter, is more on the creative side. “She has the wherewithal to make customers happy, build relationships with companies and clients, and she’s creative and trendy,” Candy says. Candy’s nephew, Zach Udell, 31, mostly deals with the business end of things, while also heading up some of London Jewelers’ biggest watch initiatives. So what’s the number-one lesson she hopes to teach the next generation of London Jewelers, for them to harness as well as pass on to the next one? “Work ethic, heart and integrity, because those are truly the three things that make a business successful.”

GREY GARDENS REVISITED A family pays tribute to its beloved matriarchs

Scarves designed by Alli Arnold are inspired by Little Edie

Left to right: Runway looks from Faith Connexion’s SS17 collection; Artist Swizz Beatz at the Faith Connexion flagship opening in Soho, NYC

Charles London in front of his fi rst store in Glen Cove, NY, in 1926.

“The story of Grey Gardens is an important American story,” explains Eva Beale. “Rich with so many layers.” Immortalized in Albert and David Maysels’ 1975 documentary Grey Gardens, two Ediths—one “Big” and the other “Little”—have fascinated the world for over 40 years. The pair, an aunt and first cousin to Jaqueline Bouvier Kennedy, were peculiar figures in the history of a storied family. “After Little Edie passed away in 2002, we reviewed the family archives that [she] herself collected,” said Beale. “The photographs were all about the past.” The trip down memory lane inspired Beale and her husband, Bouvier Beale, Jr.—Little Edie’s newphew—to publish Edith Bouvier Beale of Grey Gardens, A Life in Pictures, in 2008. The year before, Eva began a passion project that has become Grey Gardens Official—a luxury lifestyle brand celebrating Little Edie’s eclectic style. With Big and Little Edie as their muses, and with Little Edie’s fashion sense as their inspiration, Grey Gardens Official focuses on pieces that can be enjoyed and passed through generations. “Recently we added a collection of scarves ($125) designed by artist Alli Arnold, who really captures Little Edie perfectly,” says Beale. Bouvier has helped broaden the heritage brand through the addition of Grey Gardens Wines. “The premiere vintage of Grey Gardens’ new Long Island wine project—a 2016 Dry Rosé—was released in May,” says Bouvier, who serves as master blender. Made with 100% North Fork of Long Island grapes, it comes from established vineyards grown by one of the region’s oldest wine-growing families. The winter will see the release of their first blended red wine, a 2016 Edie’s Red. greygardenswines.com

DUJOUR 31


STYLE

DESIGNER

Bloom Tradition

For Ferragamo’s Resort footwear collection, Paul Andrew looked to the past. And then he went flower shopping BY JOSHUA GLASS

N

ot too long ago, Paul Andrew, the British shoe designer who now lives in New York City, found himself sitting in a large Gothic palace in Florence, Italy, almost entirely filled with shoes. “There were over 15,000 pairs,” he recalls, still bemused. Frescos— faded from time but no less transcendent— sprawled above his head, while gilded moldings decorated nearly every nook and cranny in sight. It was the Palazzo Spini Feroni, a medieval mansion originally built in 1289 by the merchant Geri Spini that now houses the archives of Salvatore Ferragamo. Last September, the creative, who has brownish blond hair neatly combed in the gentlest quaff, joined the fashion house as its new design director overlooking women’s footwear. A year later, he’s become creative director across all ready-to-wear, accessories, and leather goods, and the like. Born in rural England, Andrew recalls an early interest in style. His father worked as an upholsterer for the British Royal Family, while his mother delighted with him in the glamour of Christian Lacroix and the like. In the young boy’s spare time, he’d digest copies of Vogue. Later, while studying at the Berkshire College of Art & Design, a professor suggested footwear as his focus. Andrew’s first realized collection debuted at London’s Graduate Fashion Week, seizing the attention of veteran fashion buyer Yasmin Sewell and leading to an apprenticeship for Lee McQueen. Soon after, Andrew journeyed to NYC, where he launched Narciso Rodriguez’s footwear line, worked for Calvin Klein, and designed for Donna Karan for nearly a decade. In 2012, Andrew began his own namesake line of ladylike, single-sole shoes that offered a timeless edge with red-carpet grace. Two years later, he became the first shoe designer to win the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund, and has since been nominated twice for the Swarovski Award for Accessory Design, taking it home the second time around this past year. At Ferragamo, Andrew’s task has been reinterpretation. How can one revisit the past in new and compelling ways? “Everything I do is based on what I’ve discovered from the archives,” he explains. “The challenge is distilling these very personal notions

from 80 years ago and making them very modern for today.” The house’s eponym was famous for many things—Hollywood interest, exaggerated drama, Florentine charm—but perhaps nothing is more relevant to this than his innovation in design. Salvatore Ferragamo’s work was architectural and revolutionary, from the crocodile stilettos he made for Marilyn Monroe (“it’s quite humbling to hold those,” laughs Andrew) to the iconic F-shaped heel, for which the founding designer won the Neiman Marcus Award in 1947. First introduced as a sandal, the design references its maker’s name, but also mimics the curvature of the letter “F” in cursive. “The way the heel defies gravity, people look at it and ask if it’s even possible to be worn!” says Andrew, who rendered the shoe in a new version for the house’s 2018 Resort collection. Based on an original drawing by the founder, the reinvented style is slightly more underslung and sits a bit higher, says Andrew. “Salvatore was only able to cover the heel with a seam because it was such an extreme curve that leather couldn’t be molded over the shape. I had a bit more help through today’s technology.” Andrew’s new F Heel joins a seasonal line that very much ref lects his ultimate effort for the fashion house: reconciling the future with the past. As a creative, Ferragamo was often fascinated by f loral motifs; in homage Andrew revisited the Covent Garden flower markets of his youth to find Resort inspiration. The photographs he took there became the basis of the graphic printed silks in the collection, meant to also reference the house’s own iconic scarves. Andrew also reconsidered Ferragamo’s 1939 Flower Heel silhouette. “It’s become the most major inspiration to me,” he smiles. “The heel proportion has been reworked and now comes in stiletto and block heel versions. It’s also being used on buttons in ready-towear and on bags..” With lively purples and lush greens, Ferragamo’s color palette this season is more vibrant than ever. The iris f lower, which details Andrew’s prints, is a symbol of Florence, yes, but perhaps also is emblematic of the fashion house in this new chapter. “I’m honing in on sophistication,” says the designer, “but also amusement. Salvatore was such a brave designer. There is so much history in his incredible shapes, and I’m really having so much fun reintroducing them.”

SALVATORE FERRAGAMO, from left: Flower Heel Sandal with gold hardware detail, $1,190; Flower Heel Slipper with floral print, $495; “F” Wedge in blue satin and gold galvanized heel, $1600. Available at Salvatore Ferragamo boutiques

32 DUJOUR

C O U R T E S Y O F S A LVAT O R E F E R R AGA M O

“THE WAY THE HEEL DEFIES GRAVITY, PEOPLE ASK IF IT’S EVEN POSSIBLE TO BE WORN”

DUJOUR 33


STYLE

VISION

C E L E B R AT E

Zenith’s Modern Legacy

TOAST OF THE SEASON

e e a inko dishes on her handon ali ornia collaboration and holiday party attire

CEO Julien Tornare shares his vision for the brand’s future

T

his winter, the best holiday party accessory is a bottle of sparkling wine. Fashion designer Rebecca Minkoff, known for her eponymous clothing and accessories line, collaborated with Chandon California for a second year in a row on a bottle design perfect for any festive fête. The Winter Collection bottles come in two limited-edition variations: sparkling rosé and brut, both outfitted in glamorous gold and rose gold packaging, inspired by Minkoff ’s classic use of hardware in her line. Says Minkoff, “We’re known for our hardware and our signature stud. This is a little more abstract. I wanted to make something that was recognizable for my customer but would also speak to the holiday in a way that would make sense for Chandon.” Minkoff loves to entertain during the holidays and her number one tip for holiday entertaining? “Don’t go crazy with decor,” she recommends, “but put your money into beautiful food, versus decking the place out in tinsel and stuff you’re going to throw away.” As for what to wear, Minkoff is a fan of abandoning the predictable, glitzy holiday look. “Don’t go for the typical short dress, high heels,” she suggests, “Expand your horizons with a great long dress and velvet booties or faux fur topper. Go against what you think a holiday party means.” —RACHEL BARBER

34 DUJOUR

T

he Swiss watchmaking industry is very traditional, which is very good in one way,” Julien Tornare, CEO of Zenith Watches explains. “But on the other hand, tradition can live only if there is something new going on—only if we build on it through the future.” For a brand with 152 years of rich history, Zenith continues to strive towards keeping things fresh and innovative. “I strongly believe that a brand like Zenith can only live as a brand if we project ourselves into the future,” Tornare says. “And how does one do that while still respecting your DNA and what you’ve done in the past?” The formula to success, he says, includes staying in line with your history. The Defy Lab and Defy El Primero 21 are two of the company’s newest releases, and stylistically they rank high amongst the modern designs of today. Yet their technicalities—including the Defy Lab’s premiere oscillator—outdo even their own expectations. Granted, Tornare is relatively new to the legacy brand. It was just this past spring that he was tapped by Head of Watchmaking at LVMH Jean-Claude Biver to lead the company, and ever since Tornare has made it his mission to awaken what he saw as a “sleeping beauty.” The opportunity to take the company forward, he explains, was one he simply couldn’t pass up. “This was the kind of project I was looking for.” And given their success as of late, Tornare is adamant about staying true to the Zenith brand. “We’ll follow our path,” he says. —ATALIE GIMMEL

A Cut Above EMMA STONE 2014

Z E N I T H : J Ü R G S T R E U N . L U P I TA N YO N G ’ O : M A R K S AG L I O C C O/G E T T Y I M AG E S . E M M A S T O N E : R AY TA M A R R A /G C I M AG E S . K AT E M I D D L E T O N : DA N N Y M A R T I N DA L E / W I R E I M AG E

Wempe is best known for carrying some of the world’s most prestigious luxury watch and jewelry brands—but a true jewelry connoisseur should learn that Wempe has its own special diamond-cut: aptly named the WEMPE-Cut. The development of the cut took two years, and has 137 facets—80 more than the classic brilliant cut. First, the diamonds are found in the mines of Botswana and certified by the Kimberley Process before journeying to Bangkok, where a team of diamond cutters are based exclusively for the WEMPE-Cut. The stones are then sent to Belgium, where the diamonds are certified by one of the leading international diamond institutes, Hoge Raad voor Diamant (HRD) in Antwerp. The WEMPECut diamond is now available set in the brand’s exclusive The aptly jewelry line, Splendora titled Wempe BY KIM. cut diamond

STYLE

LUPITA NYONG’O 2016

TRAVEL THROUGH TIME Max Mara’s Street Style Exhibition

CATHERINE, DUCHESS OF CAMBRIDGE 2012

In 1947, Achille Maramotti began his career as a couture designer. Four years later, Maramotti officially established the House of Max Mara (“Mara” stemming from his own surname and “Max” a reference to a chic local named Count Max) and went on to give some of the industry’s most prominent designers their starts, from Karl Lagerfeld and Narciso Rodriguez to Jean-Charles de Castelbajac and Dolce & Gabbana. The staple of Max Mara has long been its exquisite outerwear pieces, and the new street style exhibit “Wrapped in Luxury” showcases exactly that. The

traveling show has already made its way to Chicago, New York City, San Francisco and Beverly Hills. The images on display span from 1991 to present day, featuring iconic stars including but not limited to Reese Witherspoon, Taylor Swift, Jennifer Lopez, Lupita Nyong’o, Elle Fanning, Gigi Hadid, Kate Middleton, Eva Longoria, Kate Hudson, Susan Sarandon and Karlie Kloss wearing none other than Max Mara. The remaining stops on the “Wrapped in Luxury” tour include Miami, Palm Beach and Houston. And if the exhibit inspires you to buy a Max Mara coat, you need not look far: all shows will take place in Max Mara stores. And considering that winter is coming, it would certainly be reasonable and even responsible to wrap yourself in luxury for the pending low temperatures. —MARY ELIZABETH ANDRIOTIS

DUJOUR 35


STYLE

BIG BUSINESS

I N FLU ENCER

The Man at the Top

PVH Chairman and CEO Manny Chirico sits at the top o the o pan responsi le or the nan ial s esses o al in lein and o il ger BY RENEE LUCAS HORAN

C

alvin Klein and Tommy Hilfiger are household names with global recognition and mass appeal, cutting across generations and social classes with their iconic marketing campaigns, quality goods and on-brand messaging. At the top sits Emanuel Chirico, chairman and CEO of Calvin and Tommy’s parent company PVH—which earned $8.2 billion in 2016 alone. Chirico has put in over 20 years at PVH, taking over as chairman and CEO in 2007. Since then, he’s seen the retail powerhouse through multiple evolutions, most notably the acquisitions of Tommy Hilfiger in 2010 and Warnaco in 2013 (Calvin Klein was acquired in 2003). Thanks to his financial savvy and ability to orchestrate winning business transactions, PVH is a retail, wholesale and licensing conglomerate covering all major global markets—a long way from the company’s 1881 beginnings, when it was known as Philip Van Heusen. While most consumers may recognize PVH by its iconic marketing campaigns, which have featured everyone from Brooke Shields to Justin Bieber, it’s the behind-the-scenes culture that distinguishes the company. “PVH was always a place where the financial person sat next to the business leader. In this industry, the way you get in trouble is with great ideas that don’t make financial sense or haven’t been fully financially vetted,” Chirico told DuJour at his Manhattan office this fall. “That’s always been a premise of the company and we’ve kept that going. We strive to make sure that the business leaders sit next to financial partners, that they make the decisions together and understand the balance. Being a public company, our first responsibility is to the people who own the company; giving them the appropriate

financial return and protecting the business.” A critical task during Chirico’s time at the company has been adapting to the way people shop. “It can’t be what it was 10 years ago with big shops with hard walls and product and posters. Today its much more digital, it’s much more connected,” he says. “You want them to spend time with your brand. They then create an emotional connection with it, and there’s a comfort level with going back to the brand.” In regards to the legacy brands’ celebrity endorsements and headline-grabbing campaigns, Chirico says that’s only part of the equation. “Lightening strikes when lightening strikes, and you can have these magic moments in a brand’s life,” says Chirico, citing Calvin Klein’s partnerships with Shields, Bieber, Marky Mark, and Kendall Jenner, as well as Gigi Hadid’s partnership with Tommy Hilfiger. “But you can’t count on that every year—it just doesn’t work that way. That’s why when you have something that really works, you must ask whether you can keep it going. And if it does have legs, how much can you drive it and still be fresh with the customer?” As PVH looks toward 2018, they will soon announce new strategic partnerships for the spring that will undoubtedly bolster PVH—with Chirico at the helm—for the future. While he controls the company, and puts trust in the brand managers, Chirico ultimately leaves it up to consumers to determine the brand’s cultural impact. “Will there be magic moments like there were with Brooke Shields or Justin Bieber? I don’t know,” he says. “The consumer decides that.”

Jane Hertzmark Hudis in her New York City off ice Manny Chirico is the businessman behind successful brands like Calvin Klein and Tommy Hilfi ger

Beauty Queen

Estée Lauder Group President Jane Hertzmark Hudis is the woman r nning o r a orite os eti lines

36 DUJOUR

J P H O T O BY J O H N M I D G L E Y

T O M M Y H I L F I G E R S H O W : N I K L A S H A L L E ’ N / A F P /G E T T Y I M AG E S . M A N N Y C H I R I C O : GA RY G E R S H O F F / W I R E I M AG E

BY RACHEL BARBER

ane Hertzmark Hudis, group president of Estée Lauder, is fascinated by storytelling. As she describes her business strategies for the eight brands she oversees globally—that’s Estée Lauder, La Mer, Bobbi Brown, Aerin, Origins, Aveda, Darphin and Bumble and bumble—she talks about each as if they’re a person with an individual story to tell. “Each has their own DNA, their own point of view,” she says excitedly, “their own identity and purpose.” As group president, a main part of Hudis’s job is to be both a storyteller, making sure each brand’s story is communicated correctly, and a listener, being attuned to the consumer’s story to better understand her needs. In order to discover what that consumer wants, Hudis dedicates herself to seeking out her story, constantly travelling to connect with beauty users around the globe. With her brands available in over 150 countries, Hudis recognizes that each potential buyer comes with her own unique perspective. “The way we connect,” she explains, “what consumers are interested in, is

STYLE

different in every single country in the world.” While one woman in the United States may end her day with a routine involving one or two skincare products, a woman in China might use seven or eight. “There’s a connection that all women have, all over the world, and that’s the language of being a woman,” she says, “but the tailoring of this to each country is critical. Storytelling is king—or should I say queen?” she laughs. The age of social media is the perfect time for a storyteller to be at Estée Lauder’s helm. Hudis seems partial to Instagram for this. “You can be in Russia and know what’s happening in New York. You can be in Paris and know what’s happening in Dubai. It’s the great connector,” she says. “It has made for understanding and making consumer connections all around the world, and it has made for a super visually exciting and entertaining platform.” YouTube also affords new opportunities for telling stories. “From all the video content and the how-to’s, it’s really taught women how to use beauty products,” Hudis explains. “We create media for YouTube. We’re inspired by YouTube, and we raise the level of our game because of YouTube.” Hudis seemingly feels no nostalgia for a pre–social media era. No longer are marketers focusing all of their energies on print or TV campaigns, which take months, or even years, to produce. “Brands are posting four, five times a day, constantly creating media for this new world,” Hudis says. Her eight brands are active across Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, Pinterest, Twitter, Snapchat and Weibo in China. With Estée Lauder’s brands creating content 24/7, Hudis goes so far as to say that the company has evolved from a solely product-driven company to a media company as well. The storytelling doesn’t stop with the brand though. Hudis recognizes the importance of influencers in contributing to each brand’s narrative. She elaborates, “My Bobbi Brown brand just celebrated the launch of Crushed Lip Color, and we hosted a three-day global influencer activation in New York City leading up to Fashion Week. We invited twenty-five top beauty and fashion inf luencers with a combined reach of over 25 million in 16 f lagship markets to experience the city through the eyes of interesting and influential women—including designers, entrepreneurs, chefs and mixologists—who are the brand’s ultimate ‘girl crushes.’” For Hudis, being at Estée Lauder Companies isn’t just about driving the performance of her brands—although that is something she does quite successfully—it’s an opportunity to connect with women across the world and to be a visual storyteller. Formerly an Art History major at Vassar College, Hudis has always had a love of culture, history and visuality. She sees beauty as an art form. “I think that art and beauty are fundamentally connected. They’re intimately connected,” she says. “Interestingly enough, I see many people in this industry who started as art history majors. We are very visual, we’re storytellers.” And Hudis is committed to continuing to hear, and tell, the beauty buyer’s story.

Jane’s Essentials

The beauty picks she won’t travel without Crème de la Mer, $170, LA MER, cremedelamer.com. Advanced Night Repair, $95, ESTÉE LAUDER, esteelauder.com. Crushed Lip Color $29, BOBBI BROWN, bobbibrowncosmetics.com.

DUJOUR 37


STYLE

2

B E AU T Y

CREATE THE PERFECT BASE

6

“For a smooth, natural and breathable finish, spritz a sponge with rosewater first and use that to apply foundation,” advises Chantecaille’s Eddie Hernandez. “Let the first layer dry momentarily before going back over areas that need more coverage.” Guild and Emmy-nominated makeup artist Kerry Herta continues, “The ideal way to achieve a fullcoverage f lawless look without layering tons of foundation on the skin is to first diffuse undertones with colored correctors. Follow up with a moisturizing concealer that will cover problem spots, but not look dry and caked on. As for foundation, something that treats the skin and provides coverage is best, such as a foundation with light-diffusing minerals that treats while it covers, or a powder foundation that brightens while minimizing pores.”

Party People

Express yourself in color this holiday season with a look that keeps heads turning — no matter how many cocktail parties are on your agenda BY SARAH JOY

1

Huile De Jasmin Facial Oil, $120, CHANEL, chanel.com.

3

From left: Perfecting Loose HD Powder, $68, CHANTECAILLE, chantecaille.com. Rose Water, $68, CHANTECAILLE, chantecaille.com.

MAKE UP FOR YOUR MAKEUP

THE BLANK SLATE

“The face is like a canvas,” says celebrity makeup artist Kimberly Rosenberg. “Keeping it hydrated, especially in the busy winter months, is the first step to creating the best version of you. “Everything starts with a good moisturizer and when you are running around from party to party, it’s important to up the ante. The key to good skin lies in what you put on it the night before the party and what you put on before the makeup.”

5

“I love adding a couple of drops of facial oil to foundation to get a great glow without looking greasy,” divulges Chanel makeup artist Cyndle Komarovski.

SHINE ON GET CHEEKY “Finishing up with a cheek color with a hint of peach and pink, such as a coral pink, will bring back a natural healthy color to the skin while remaining neutral enough to add any colors to the lips or lids,” adds Kerry Herta.

38 DUJOUR

“Layer makeup and add texture to the face in an unexpected way such as glitter on the lips and on the sides of the eyes, or by swiping a gloss over a dark lip, and playing with colored mascaras,” adds Chanel makeup artist Cyndle Komarovski.

From left: Lipstick N9 in Burgundy, YSL Sephora. $37, YSL, Extra Dimension Eyeshadow in Starry, Starry Nights, $20, MAC, maccosmetics.com.

7

From left: Overexposed Glow Highlighter, $42, NARS, narscosmetics. com. Touche Eclat, $42, YSL, Sephora.

P O R T R A I T : N O R B E R T K N I AT / T R U N K A R C H I V E . C O M

From Left: LX Night SK-II Cream, $385, SK-II, SK-II.com. Charlotte’s Magic Cream, $100, CHARLOTTE TILBURY, charlottetilbury.com.

GOOD TIME, GUARANTEED

“Radiance makes skin look healthy, “ explains NARS Global makeup artist Jenny Smith. “Many women use highlighters to enhance their skin. The question that always comes up is, ‘How do I create a natural-looking glow without looking like I’m wearing highlighter?’ One of my number-one tricks with highlighter is to apply it to high points of the face before foundation, so that it looks like a glow from within.”

TEXTURE AND COLOR

“Holiday makeup is about a juxtaposition of texture,” says MAC Cosmetics senior artist Keri Blair. “Pairing deep and matte red and burgundy tones with frosted and metallic shades in one makeup look, especially when done in subtle strokes, gets you in the mood.”

GOING DAY TO NIGHT

Maifanshi Cheek Color, $35, KOH GEN DO, kohgendo cosmetics.com.

4

From left: Nagoya Velvet Eyeliner, $24, MAN RAY FOR NARS, narscosmetics.com. Ambient Metallic Strobe Lighting Pallete, $62, HOURGLASS, Bergdorf Goodman. Huge Exreme Lash Mascara, $23, STILA, stilacosmetics.com.

From left: Snowball Pigment And Glitter Kit, $29.50, MAC, maccosmetics. com. Le Volume Mascara In Character, $32, CHANEL, chanel.com.

8

The most challenging part of party season is getting through an entire day and then making that quick change to nighttime glam. “Eyeliner will instantly define your eyes and take you from day to night,” adds NARS Global makeup artist Jenny Smith. “Define your top and bottom lashline or smudge over a bare lid for drama.” Sarah Lucero, Stila Global Executive Director of Creative Artistry’s trick to “instant babe” is to apply an extra coat of mascara and add highlighter all over the cheekbones, brow bone, shoulders and legs. MAC Cosmetics senior artist Keri Blair adds, “If your lips have gone from matte to flat – pump them up with a touch of gloss right in the center of your pout!”


STYLE

J E W E L RY

Sterling silver and 18-karat gold stone ring, $1,370, KONSTANTINO,, neimanmarcus .com

Panthère de Cartier High Jewelry necklace, price upon request, CARTIER, cartier.com

Marquise chrysalis ring, $3,400, ANNA SHEFFIELD SHEFFIELD, annasheffi eld.com

Dark Magic

David Webb Chevron ring, $26,500, DAVID WEBB, available WEBB, at David Webb, New York & David Webb, Beverly Hills

18-karat gold and black bead bracelet, $4,000, LAGOS, lagos.com

Heloise diamond shield ring, $11,000, POLLY WALES, shopesqueleto .com

Labyrinthe ring, price upon request, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, vancleefarpels.com

EDITED BY ATALIE GIMMEL

E M I LY R ATA J KO W S K I : O L E G N I K I S H I N / E P S I LO N /G E T T Y I M AG E S

We’re simply drawn to these dark and magical pieces and their ability to capture the season’s early shadow. Black is beautiful and bold, and these jewels carry us into the winter season to conquer style in its most agni ent or


BE INSPIRED TO

Swim laps in the 75-foot pool in the 50th-floor Aquatics Center with panoramic views on three sides.

Enjoy the best in leisure and entertaining on the 51st floor with a chef’s kitchen and wine tasting room, golf club lounge featuring a simulator, club room, private dining suites and lounges with Hudson River views.

Craft memorable meals in exquisite, chef-inspired kitchens with your choice of two interior design palettes.

Experience the restaurant collection at Hudson Yards featuring 25 dining and casual eating options to suit your taste.

Enjoy 14 acres of new parks, plazas, and playgrounds within Hudson Yards, located where the High Line and Hudson River Park meet a dynamic new Public Square and Gardens.


BE INSPIRED TO

BE INSPIRED BY AT H U D S O N YA R D S

Experience Fifteen Hudson Yards, located amid 14 acres of new parks, plazas and playgrounds. Explore over 100 shops and 25 dining and casual eating options, The Shed - New York’s new center for artistic invention - and Vessel, the new design centerpiece by Heatherwick Studio. Designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with Rockwell Group, Fifteen Hudson Yards features breathtaking views of the Hudson River and the city skyline, with over 40,000 square feet of entertainment, leisure and wellness amenities, all located on the High Line and just moments from the energy of West Chelsea. Be a part of it. Spectacular two- to four-bedroom residences priced from approximately $3.9 million to over $30 million | Sales gallery open 7 days per week

Construction under way for 2018 occupancy | Follow our progress on Instagram @_hudsonyardsnyc +1 (917) 634-5574 | FifteenHudsonYards.com Exclusive Marketing & Sales Agents: Related Sales LLC & Corcoran Sunshine Marketing Group

All images, artists’ renderings, representations and interior decorations, finishes, appliances and furnishings are provided for illustrative purposes only and have been compiled from sources deemed reliable. Through information is believed to be correct, it is presented subject to errors, omissions, changes and withdrawal without notice. Sponsor reserves the right to make changes in accordance with the offering plan. The complete offering terms are in an offering plan available from the sponsor. File No. CD15-0325. ERY South Residential Tower LLC, c/o The Related Companies, L.P., 60 Columbus Circle, New York, New York 10023. File No. CD15-0325. Equal Housing Opportunity.


B E AUT Y

White Out

STYLE

These winter-white products work together to brighten, reduce redness, improve texture and protect skin for a more youthful, luminous complexion. Plus, their sleek packaging will look pristine on your countertop. BY RACHEL BARBER PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEFFREY WESTBROOK

Clockwise from top left: Crème Ancienne Supreme Eye Serum, $165, FRESH, fresh.com. Natural Radiance Facial Moisturizer Cream, $110, PILI ANI, piliani.com. Illuminating Pearl Infusion Brightening Serum, $520, LA PRAIRIE, laprairie.com. Cleansing Clay Scrub, $65, CLE DE PEAU, cledepeaubeaute.com. Face Protectant Broad Spectrum SPF 50, $75, TOM FORD, tomford.com. GenOptics Spot Essence Serum, $225, SK-II, sk-ii.com. White Marble Dual Phase Vitamin C Peel, $100, ERNO LASZLO, ernolaszlo.com.


LIFE Decade of Feed Lauren Bush a ren refle ts on growing her respe ted philanthropi rand and the an ilestones that got her to this point BY ATALIE GIMMEL

42 DUJOUR

P H O T O G R A P H S BY C H R I S T I N A E M I L I E

T

en years is a long time. Since her bag company FEED’s inception in 2007, CEO and cofounder Lauren Bush Lauren has seen three presidential administrations (one of which was led by her uncle, George W. Bush), earned a spot as one of Forbes’s 30 Under 30 Social Entrepreneurs, married David Lauren and had one child. When you consider that in addition to all those accomplishments, Lauren has provided tens of millions of meals around the world, ten years feels like an impressively small amount of time after all. Lauren founded FEED at the age of 23 to create products that would engage people in the fight against hunger in a tangible, transparent way. To this day, each FEED bag features a stamped number signifying the amount of meals or micronutrient packets its purchase makes possible—allowing consumers to be part of the solution to a crisis that affects 795 million people across the world. “We know you’re living a busy life, and you have many things you care about,” Lauren explains. “So here’s some-

thing that you can do that’s very quick, measurable and easy, and that really will make an impact on a child’s life. It’s an emotional sell, but first and foremost people are buying products that they love. That’s sort of the recipe of success for FEED.” That, and FEED team members whom Lauren credits with the company’s success, like VP and General Manager Kristina Fell, who joined the team nine years ago when it was still a tiny operation. “Lauren and I joke about the early days working out of her apartment with our Visa debit cards and P.O. box,” Fell recalls. “But the foundation that Lauren laid for the brand back then has truly made FEED what it is today.” To date, FEED, in partnership with organizations like the UN World Food Programme and Feeding America, has provided over 100 million meals worldwide. But with over 42 million Americans experiencing food insecurity, and countless children who might depend on their daily school lunch as their only meal, there are still myriad challenges in the fight against world hunger— which FEED continues to tackle head on. How has it been to face these issues on a day-to-day basis for ten years? “You can’t help but get frustrated and discouraged; like what you’re doing is just a drop in the bucket, at times,” Lauren says. But it’s also not the impossible feat one might be overwhelmed into thinking it is. “Progress at a macro level has been made, so it’s not an insurmountable issue,” she says. “We know the solution to hunger, it’s just about access to nutritious food, and making sure everyone has that as a human right. It’s closely linked to gender issues, to global warming issues—hunger is at the core what it is to be human.” Though not an impossible cause, the fact that solving hunger is connected to many of the world’s most pressing issues is staggering in itself. As part of their initiative, directly interfacing with the cause is a must for Lauren and her team. “I do generally take a trip every year,” Lauren says of her travels to each country in which her company is involved, “and the one this past June was really special because my entire team and I went.” Travelling to Mozambique and then to Madagascar, Lauren spent this trip overseeing FEED’s contribution to local school feeding efforts—a mission with which she says she felt an even deeper connection after she became a mother herself. “The trip was my first since having James, who’s one and a half,” Lauren says about her son. “I was even more emotional.” And with good reason: research shows that when children are given school meals, attendance doubles and performance greatly improves. Specifically, when girls have just a few years of education, they have fewer children, have them later in life and are overall better equipped to care for and educate them. And given hunger’s relevance to good performance in school and just about everyt h i n g e l s e — i t ’s g e t t i n g h a r d e r f o r anyone—not just Lauren Bush Lauren—to ignore the call to action. “I really do feel like there has been a rise in the conscious consumer movement,” Lauren says. “People are really more thoughtf ul about where they ’re spending their money, and the values of the companies that they’re aligning with. If anything, FEED is sort of a badge of honor that many wear as a way to say, Hey, I’m a global citizen and I care enough to buy this bag versus another one.” As tenacious a problem as it is, hunger is also farreaching cause—meaning those who care about issues surrounding gender, education and equal opportunity and access to

Lauren and FEED during her travels to Mozambique and Madagascar

basic rights will find an ally in FEED. Under the Obama Administration, the fight against hunger found its own ally in First Lady Michelle Obama, whose “Let’s Move!” initiative focused on the topics of nutrition, physical activity and healthy eating, as well as childhood obesity. Her cause, some could argue, made the topic of food “cool again.” According to Lauren, however, the fact that causes rotate in and out of fashion is real. “Issues become trendy and then not,” Lauren says with a light chuckle, “and hunger has unfortunately never been trendy since I’ve been dealing with it over the last ten-plus years. But yeah, I obviously think it’s amazing when people with a platform, like former First Lady Michelle Obama, really turn their attention towards nutrition. I do think that makes a difference in terms of impact.” However, it works to FEED’s benefit that the only truly political thing about the company is Lauren’s maiden name. “I think if we were more of a non-profit or lobbying organization, it might be different,” she says of relying on one administration versus the next. “In a way what we’ve done is different and outside of leaning on or needing institutional support, which has been freeing in a way. What FEED has brought to the hunger-fighting landscape is different, and more consumer-facing and product driven.” But what about, let’s say, this administration? Does FEED feel its mission is equally ref lected or supported? “Of course, you can’t not pay attention to it,” Lauren says, rather diplomatically. “And you try to align and form allies where it makes sense, but for the most part we really try to focus on what we do best: creating products that help feed the world.”


LIFE

MUSIC

Meet Your Music Makers From newcomers to comeback kids, these are the artists to watch in 2018 BY KASEY CAMINITI

THE ROMANTIC RAPPER

POP’S PARTY GIRL

G-Eazy opens up about his most vulnerable album yet, The Beautiful & Damned

Charli XCX is a champion of female artists and a good house party

44 DUJOUR

P H O T O G R A P H BY B E L L A H O WA R D

referring to his ever-growing musical success and celebrity. That duality is the subject of his forthcoming third studio album The Beautiful & Damned—that, and the overindulgent lifestyle that comes with it. “There are distractions that come along with the dream like, not to be cliché but, being surrounded by liquor, sex and drugs 24/7 and leaning on some of those things too much,” he says. “The album’s about waking up one day and realizing that things have gone way too far.” Eazy, born Gerald Earl Gillum, has been chasing the fantasy of making music since he was a kid growing up in California’s Bay Area. The spirited rapper fully realized his musical dream in New Orleans during college, as well as his love for whiskey, which recently blossomed into a partnership with Stillhouse Whiskey. His rebellious image jibes well with the unique nature of Stillhouse, offering an authentic pairing. Following the success of his last album When It’s Dark Out, Eazy took a moment to look at himself and ask, “Am I still Gerald? It’s difficult telling personal stories on a hugely public platform,” he admits. “But, that’s the duty of an artist, to be vulnerable and get naked in front of an audience.” As far as getting personal goes, Eazy can’t help but giggle when I mention his girlfriend and fellow artist Halsey. “Halsey is … my girlfriend, and I’m really excited for her and proud of her,” he says. “She works harder than any artist I’ve ever met in life,” he says, before correcting himself. “She works harder than anyone I’ve ever met in life. I love to support her.” Listeners can expect a track to feature Halsey, one that Eazy describes as “a Romeo and Juliet, star-crossed lovers, Bonnie and Clyde type of song.” He adds, “She sounds incredible on it. She has a really unique voice and it’s effortless. She’s very powerfully her.” With authentic collaborators and artistic risks, G-Eazy is pushing the envelope with this new album, while staying true to his introspective spirit.

P H O T O G R A P H BY B O B BY B R U D E R L E

“There are highs and lows,” says rapper and producer G-Eazy,

Remember back in the 1990s when Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera were in a constant media-spun battle for the title of “Princess of Pop?” Fast forward to today: Those days of bubble-gum fresh, manufactured pop stars rivaling for an imaginary tiara are long gone. Cue music’s newest pop sensation Charli XCX, the selfproclaimed party girl and outlier in a sea of musical stereotypes. With a raspy voice that attests to her reputation as a nightlife enthusiast, she performs catchy hits like “Boom Clap,” “Break the Rules” and her pro-women single, “Boys.” Hailing from the English countryside outside of London, the 25-year-old singer, born Charlotte Emma Aitchison, grew up on ’90s pop music, specifically the Spice Girls and Britney Spears. The starlet credits girl-pop as her introduction to music, casually admitting, “All the things people think of as guilty pleasures, I naturally love.” Charli’s 2017 mixtape, Number 1 Angel, is an ode to her love of catchy pop mixed with full-throated female empowerment. “I like working with friends. I like the natural energy of making music with people you want to, not because of their profile or your label asking you to,” she says of her close-knit network of female collaborators, which includes CupcakKe, MØ and Uffie. Despite her provocative performances and colorful stage presence, Charli says she actually prefers being off camera, recently writing and directing the video for ALMA and French Montana’s song “Phases.” And for her most ambitious collaboration to date, Charli took a step behind the camera as the codirector on the video for her effortlessly catchy single “Boys.” For the song’s viral video, the songstress employed more than 60 men, including

G-Eazy, Diplo and Panic! at the Disco’s Brendan Urie. In the video, Charli’s squad of famous boy-friends playfully populate sterotypically sexy scenarios: Joe Jonas suggestively eats stacks of pancakes drizzled with syrup; Charlie Puth washes a car; The Vamps engage in a pillow fight; and Josh (The Fat Jew) splashes around in a kiddie pool of rosé—all against a millennial pink backdrop, naturally. “The guys were really into it. They completely got the vibe and that was really encouraging,” she says. On being a feminist, the singer says, “The more we speak about feminism in music, the bigger the conversation becomes. I’ve always been seen as someone who champions women in music. I think that’s always been a part of who I am.” Though her feminist identity may be at odds, somewhat, with pop music’s long history of objectification of women, Charli has found a way to weave her values seamlessly into her career, both in and out of the recording booth. While the champagne-drinking Brit is celebrated as an explicit party girl in the industry, her unapologetic lifestyle is also a major source of inspiration; she suggests that house parties are sites for growing up and making memories. “So much cool stuff happens at parties,” she says. “Whether you’re really happy and having the time of your life with your friends or you’re breaking up with someone, falling in love or missing someone, there are so many interesting dynamics going on at parties.” By embracing feminist politics, her sexuality and, of course, her right to party, Charli XCX has poised herself for icon status. Simultaneously, she’s cultivating a female-centric following and pioneering the next generation of pop stars, who root for each other’s success both onstage and at the after-party.

DUJOUR 45


LIFE

MUSIC

A SULTRY STORYTELLER a rina la dio s s ooth a

in sed so nd is re ned e ond her ears

On a first listen of Sabrina Claudio’s songs about heartache, romance and the passage of time, it’s hard to believe the Miamibred crooner is just 21 years old—until you get her on the phone. “Girl, I started writing when I was 14 and was writing as if I was 20,” she says. “Now that I’m 21, I’m writing like I’m 40.” Claudio draws lyrical inspiration from her close-knit group of friends and their storied lives. “People never believed that I could write about love that I never experienced,” she says. “But a lot of the songs I write are stories from people in my life. Though the stories become very personal to me, most of the time I didn’t experience them first-hand.” In the half-Cuban and half-Puerto Rican songstress’s household growing up, R&B music buzzed in the air at all times, and traces of it can be heard in her smooth sound. Claudio also cites her grandfather as a major inf luence; he later turned her onto

jazz and bossa nova music. On her newest project, About Time, the follow-up to her debut EP, Confidently Lost, Claudio explores the concept of time, with each song offering a different interpretation or idea on the subject: losing time, not having enough time, having too much time or giving someone else too much of your time. As a songwriter, Claudio strives to have listeners relate to her music. “I have so many stories from the different people in my life, [so] I’m assuming a person can relate to at least one song. I just want people to listen to About Time and have the stories resonate with them,” she says. As a bonus track on About Time, Claudio employed rapper 6LACK on a remix of her powerful single “Belong To You,” which itself was perfect timing: Claudio will be joining 6LACK on tour this fall.

AN EXPLICIT FRONT MAN

Tyson Ritter of the All-American Rejects on sex and new music

46 DUJOUR

PEOPLE NEVER BELIEVED THAT I COULD WRITE ABOUT LOVE THAT I NEVER EXPERIENCED.

P H O T O G R A P H BY N I K KO L A M E R E

to the table hungry and without expectations.” So far, the music on the menu consists of “Sweat,” an adrenalized and sexualized anthem, and “Close Your Eyes,” an atmospheric ballad. The songs are products of a writing process that Ritter colorfully compares to being in the porn industry: “You walk into a building and get emotionally naked with a stranger. Hopefully it’s this awesome bit of sex that yields something the world can collectively come together to watch.” The two songs exist on opposite ends of the musical spectrum, offering a kaleidoscope of sounds. “As far as the next record, this is the A and the Z,” he says of the scope of music. The 11-minute video tying the songs together, directed by Jamie Thraves, stars Ritter as the two contrasting protagonists, Robert and Betsy. Robert is a straight-laced man facing an identity crisis while Betsy serves as his fantasy, a cross-dressing prostitute. Ritter lives out his own fantasy on stage, bringing the sex and spectacle back to rock and roll. “I really charge the audience with pulverizing intentions,” he says of his eccentric on-stage persona. “You either want to love me, hate me or have sex with me. When I step on stage, people like to tweet about how much of an asshole I am but that’s not me,” he says. “And I win if I evoked something in you that made you tweet about it. I’d rather be boiling hot or ice cold. No one is going to sit in a bathtub that is tepid.” With Ritter’s middle finger to majority rule firm as ever, The All-American Rejects are ready to serve up an album that may not satisfy the usual cravings, but is sure to fill you up regardless.

P H O T O G R A P H BY PA I G E W I L S O N

Tyson Ritter sits down with an endearingly blasé attitude and makes himself comfortable, outstretching his lanky legs from a pretzel position with ease. His disheveled (read: sexy) hair, grungy black sneakers and severely sculpted jawline make me feel like I’m 15 years old again, belting out the All-American Rejects song “Dirty Little Secret” alone in my bedroom. The All-American Rejects emerged in 1999 when Ritter was 17 years old. Hits like “Swing, Swing,” and “Move Along,” immediately cemented them as a core pop-punk band of the early aughts. It’s been five years since the band, comprised of front man Ritter, guitarists Nick Wheeler and Mike Kennerty, and drummer Chris Gaylor, released their last album, Kids in the Street. “We used to be like the four Lost Boys from Peter Pan, stuck on the road together for a decade,” Ritter says of the band’s hiatus. “Over the past five years, we gained a lot of individualism and our new music feels genuine and honest.” Now, at 33, Ritter sits across from me and breaks it all down with a few choice words: If someone wants to keep the band in a time capsule, they can “go listen to the first album.” He recognizes that die-hard fans may hold onto assumptions of who the All-American Rejects should be, but with two new songs, a longform video and their forthcoming fifth album, Ritter refuses to dwell in the past. “This isn’t a pack of Lunchables. We’ve been cooking this meal for a while,” he says of the new music. “It’s not the same shit we might have fed you 10 years ago. I hope everyone wants to come

DUJOUR 47


LIFE

MUSIC

SURPASSING MEDIOCRITY

Fall Out Boy’s Pete Wentz on their anticipated seventh studio album MANIA

Pete Wentz may be best known as the follically gifted bassist of Fall Out Boy, but he also serves as the band’s main lyricist, penning anthems like “Sugar, We’re Going Down Swinging” and “Dance Dance” that propelled their 2005 breakthrough as well as 2017 releases, like the electro-tinted “Young and Menace” and irreverent “Last of the Real Ones,” which have solidified the band as an everlasting fixture on the charts. Fall Out Boy vocalist Patrick Stump, bassist Pete Wentz, guitarist Joe Trohman and drummer Andy Hurley have always maintained high expectations for themselves, which accounts for their award-winning videos, progressive sound and dedicated fan base. Those standards are what led to their much-anticipated seventh studio album, MANIA—and to its delayed release. “The truth is, I think we felt like the songs were headed towards mediocrity, which is basically the worst thing of all time,” Wentz says. “It’s like having no opinion. It’s not terrible and it’s not great, it’s just forgettable.” After announcing a January 2018 release date, Wentz took the opportunity to revisit the album’s lyrics with a new perspective. “Sometimes you’re so close to something that you don’t realize by adding all these colors, the rainbow is now brown,” he says. Initially addressing everything from the neurosis of daily life to the manic times we are living in right now, Wentz shifted his focus to what he believes connects us as human beings. “I want people to walk away from listening to MANIA and no matter what you do, if you make music, play a sport or make memes on the internet, be the most excellent version of that you can be,” Wentz says. “Don’t shoot for the participation award.” As an entertainer, Wentz feels obligated to give back to the community. Instead of complaining about the “mania” we’re living in, he wants to be proactive–which is why on the band’s 2018 Mania Tour they’re introducing a Champion of the Mania initiative, selecting a fan in each city who is “helping to change the world for the better” and making a donation in their name to a charity of their choice. Needless to say, Fall Out Boy is still swinging.

THE UNAPOLOGETIC SHOWSTOPPER

48 DUJOUR

P H O T O G R A P H BY E M M A H O L L E Y

SOMETIMES YOU’RE SO CLOSE TO SOMETHING THAT YOU DON’T REALIZE BY ADDING ALL THESE COLORS, THE RAINBOW IS NOW BROWN.

P H O T O G R A P H Y BY M A R C U S M A S C H W I T Z

Tove Lo talks new music, new relationships and her glitter-infused performances It’s been three years since the world was officially introduced to Tove Lo (and the cloud of glitter that surrounds her) through her exhilarating, badass hits “Habits (Stay High)” and “Not on Drugs.” Lo, born Ebba Tove Elsa Nilsson in Sweden, is a fasttalking pop singer who combines whimsical stage presence with bold lyrics—mostly about love, drugs and sex. When I talk to her, she openly admits to growing up as a privileged white girl who sought trouble and found it on numerous occassions—which is the first of many moments in our conversation that I feel truly bonded with Lo. Little did I know I would relate even more to the narrative behind her new album, Blue Lips. “There’s that feeling of never being satisfied,” Lo explains. “Always needing something to feed my adrenaline rush, but the more you get, the more you need.” This insatiable feeling led to Blue Lips, her equally cheeky follow-up to last year’s hugely successful Lady Wood. “That’s the bigger metaphor but it’s also a fun way to say ‘blue balls,’ like when you don’t reach sexual satisfaction,” she says with infectious laughter. The album’s lead single, “Disco Tits,” touches on her new relationship status and was released with a video featuring a puppet as Lo’s love interest. “It’s genius, funny and weird but still maintains a deeper message of being in control and losing control while in a relationship,” Lo says of the sexually explicit

video. Lo says that she, for the first time in her life, is in a relationship with someone with whom she can see a future. The tattooed wild child (actually, she’s 29) has been celebrated for her sassy sex appeal and feminist ideals (the same qualities that make her my personal hero) but on Blue Lips, a more mature voice emerges. “Lady Wood had one soundscape and every song was connected to the next,” she says. “Blue Lips is a dramatic curve from the brightest, most naïve days of love to the pitchblack moments.” With two chapters, “Light Beam” and “Pitch Black,” Blue Lips will serve as the wiser, older sister to Lady Wood. “There was anger and a refusal to take responsibility on my last album. This is me accepting that I have faults,” Lo says of her new narrative. A notoriously spontaneous performer, Lo invites listeners to join her on an emotional journey during live shows, no matter what the circumstances. “Even if it’s a Monday night, I want people to let go and feel whatever you need to feel. If you’re having the best night of your life and dancing, or if you just have to cry— if you wake up covered in glitter, you’re good,” she decides. On Blue Lips, the rawness of songs like “Cycles” matched by the shimmer of “Disco Tits,” present Tove Lo in an unapologetically honest light, the perfect soundtrack for a glittery Monday night of raving or romance—or both.

DUJOUR 49


LIFE

SPIRITS

YAC H T S

SANTANA

P

assionate billionaires from all over the world sailed into Nantucket Sound this August for the Opera House Cup at the North American Panerai Classic Yachts Challenge, a regatta held by the luxury Italian watchmaker during Nantucket Race Week that attracted some of the world’s most historic yachts, from Humphrey Bogart’s 1935 yacht The Santana to the 1958 America’s Cup winner Columbia. “Panerai has always had a tie to the sea, as the brand’s beginnings can be traced to manufacturing watches for the Italian Navy,” says the company’s CEO Angelo Bonati. “This innate link to the nautical world is a part of our history and the shared values of beauty, design, craftsmanship and excellence make for a natural affinity between Panerai and the world of sailing and racing.” Around 65 classic sailing yachts in four different classes (Vintage Grand Classics, Vintage Corinthian, Vintage Day Racer and Grand Prix—Spirit of Tradition) competed in the 45th annual Opera House Cup regatta for the top prize: a Panerai timepiece along with a silver plate trophy. “I can say with great pride that our commitment to safeguarding and fostering classic sailing is both unparalleled and unprecedented on an international level,” says Bonati. “This is our 13th consecutive year to sponsor the circuit and we have seen many extraordinary events f lourish and witnessed the rebirth of some stunning vintage craft as a result of the commitment and passion of many enthusiasts.” To celebrate this collaboration, the timepiece brand has debuted two new f lyback chronographs (two new Luminor Flyback watches, the PAM 653 and PAM 654) appealing to watch-lovers and seafarers alike.

Sail Away

Beyond the Bubbles

Humphrey Bogart’s former boat, a.k.a. “Bogie’s Boat,” was built in 1935 by famous design team Sparkman & Stephens with an interior that was recently restored. The Santana won the 1938 Newport to Bermuda Race and the schooner trophy.

Not to be overshadowed by its ele rator rep tation ne Champagne should be respected for its exquisite taste and e er es en e WRITTEN AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY WILLIAM PELKEY

C

hampagne has become more of an idea and an image than a superlative and sublime sparkling wine. People love the sound of corks popping, the showmanship of a bottle being sabered, and the sight of golden bubbly cascading over a tower of coupe glasses. They forget what it is that made Champagne synonymous with celebration in the first place: its exquisitely rich, effervescent taste. A true connoisseur takes time to appreciate what goes in the bottle, not just what the bottle symbolizes. Champagne is a sparkling wine that is produced from grapes grown in the Champagne region of France—this is a must if a bottle is to be called “Champagne.” The secondary fermentation of the wine in the bottle gives it that special structure and notes that only a great Champagne can achieve. Most Champagnes use a blend of pinot noir and chardonnay grapes, with some brands adding a percentage of Meniere to that blend. If you are wondering why Champagne is not red in color from the Pinot Noir grapes, it is because the grapes are skinned first, leaving just the sweet and supple fruit behind. Classification comes into play depending on what your palate desires; that is, the amount of residual sugars per liter. The most common classifications in the U.S. are Brut (less than 12 grams) and Extra Brut (less than 6 grams). Whether you are a rock ’n’ roller, celebrating your wedding anniversary, or winning Wimbledon, one thing is for certain: you will never be disappointed by a fine vintage Champagne. But if you are one who always seeks more and wants to try new things, like taking that delicious bubbly and adding some botanicals, fruits or other spirits to create a mélange of great f lavors, then you would be well-suited to checking out some of the great Champagne-based cocktails—the French 75, the Bellini and many other enhanced versions of this classic—or try creating one of your own.

COLUMBIA

The 12-meter 1958 America’s Cup winner, Columbia, also sailed in the America’s Cup in 1962, 1964 and 1967. In 1997 she was returned to Newport (now her home port) to be restored where she is anchored today. She was designed by Sparkman & Stephens.

See the six most prestigious vessels of the Panerai Classic Yachts Challenge

Owned by Zabynek Zak, Eleonora is an exact replica of the 1910 schooner Westward, arguably one of the most famous and best known schooners in the world. Eleonora was built at the Van der Graaf shipyard in Holland and was launched in March 2000.

50 DUJOUR

C O RY S I L K E N /C O U R T E S Y O F PA N E R A I

BY NATASHA WOLFF

THE ELEONORA

LIFE

CHAMPAGNE SWIZZLE ½ oz. St. Germain ½ oz. Brockman’s Gin ½ oz. freshly squeezed lemon juice 3–4 oz. Moët Chandon Imperial Brut • • •

In shaker, combine St. Germain, Brockman’s Gin, lemon juice Add ice and shake vigorously for 20 seconds Strain into chilled Champagne flute and top with Champagne

Clockwise, from top left: KRUG Grande Cuvee, $210. Dom Perignon 2009, $170. MOËT & CHANDON Imperial 2008, $80. PEIRRE-JOETTE Époque 2007, $170. DOM PERIGNON 2009, $170. VEUVE La Grande Dame, $190.


LIFE

E S TAT E S

Even then, neighbors were incredulous. “They assumed that she was the maid coming to check on the property,” says A’Lelia Bundles, historian and Walker’s great-great-granddaughter. But Walker was determined to make her presence known. “The property originally went all the way back to the river, but she built the house close to the street so that everyone on their way to Albany would see it,” says Bundles. “She wanted to make a statement.”  In 1918, the 35-room home was complete. Designed by Vertner Tandy, New York’s first black architect, the 16,000-square-foot Italianate-style main house boasted four floors, gold interior columns, a grand dining room with high, curved ceilings and murals reflecting the wealth and power of its owner.  But from almost the outset, Villa Lewaro’s survival was uncertain: a year after her home was completed, Walker died of kidney failure. Under A’Lelia Walker’s care, the house initially served as a lively clubhouse for the Harlem Renaissance. Black elites like Paul Robeson and Alberta Hunter rippled in from Manhattan for A’Lelia’s parties, which were “filled with guests whose names would turn any Nordic social climber green with envy,” according to Langston Hughes’s autobiography. While Madam Walker left the home to A’Lelia, and intended it to be party-friendly (The organ room, solarium and outdoor terrace were specifically designed to entertain), she stipulated that upon A’Lelia’s death, the house would be bequeathed to the NAACP. However, when A’Lelia died at 46 in 1931 amid the Great Depression, the NAACP liquidated the home to ease its own financial woes. “The proceeds were very small because it was hard to find a buyer in that economy,” says A’Lelia Bundles.   The buyers, an archaic women’s society called Companions of the Forest, would use the home for five decades as an assisted living facility for their small, aging population. By 1980, when Bund les, who g rew up in India napolis, f irst saw inside her great-great-grandmother’s home, the grand estate’s pulse was faint. “I was in Westchester for a conference, so I walked over and knocked on the door. They were very reluctant to let me in,” Bundles says. “When I walked in, there were a couple older ladies sitting in chairs in the entertaining space. It almost had the feeling of one of those residences for women like the Barbizon Hotel; not very fancy and not very bright.”  By this time, locals knew the property as an old age home rather than a bustling hub of black virtuosity. “From the ’30s to the ’80s, Madam Walker’s legacy was pretty much invisible to the local community,” says Brent Leggs, project manager for the National Trust. While its cultural significance may have been obscured, the property’s decades-long stasis under the Companions of the Forest served to save much of Madam Walker’s original construction. “They covered some of the f loor with linoleum, which is really horrible,” Bundles laughs. “But it meant that it preserved the beautiful hardwood floors. They left the original crystal chandeliers there. The beauty was that [the ladies] didn’t have a lot of money to make changes.”  If it weren’t for such sedentary tenants, the changes that could have been made to the home were virtually limitless. While it received National Historic Landmark status in 1976 as part of the American Bicentennial celebration, the home still lacked protection against demolition or adverse alterations to the property. In the ‘80s, when the house hit the market for the first time in 50 years, one developer planned to pave over it with condominiums, but was thwarted by two 250-year-old trees protected by city ordinances. The property’s next owners, the Appel family, hoped to start an eating disorder clinic there, but in 1993, sold the home

to Helena and Harold Doley – Villa Lewaro’s current owners and the architects of its future.  Harold Doley, a Louisiana-born retired investment banker and former United States ambassador, long aspired to call Villa Lewaro home. While training to become a broker on the New York Stock Exchange, Doley would travel north to visit the grounds, quietly dreaming of acquiring it. After negotiating with the Appels for three years, the Doleys bought Villa Lewaro for an estimated $7 million. “There’s only been one home that I’ve ever wanted to own and this is it,” Doley told Jet magazine in 1995.  Originally, Helena Doley resisted the purchase. “The property was in terrible condition, and that’s putting it mildly,” she recalls. “The kitchen was in its original state. No cable, no telephone service. When it rained, we were literally a bucket brigade.”   Over the next two decades, the Doleys would restore the home to its golden age splendor, tearing up the linoleum and reinstating the original Italian tile roof, which had been sold off. But the upkeep wasn’t easy. “We put it on the market a few years ago,” says Helena. “Our son has a young family and isn’t interested in spending so much time on it.”  Ultimately, no buyer stuck. But this past May, after joining forces with the National Trust, the Doleys took measures to protect the house in case one ever does. “The first step was to establish an easement, which is a somewhat underutilized tool for properties that are rich in African American history like Villa Lewaro,” says National Trusts’s Germonique Ulmer. “We all know that Harpo Studios were demolished in Chicago – that’s a place that could’ve been protected by a preservation easement. It wasn’t until we established this relationship with [the Doleys] that they were aware that this could be done.”   Once a site of hard-won revelry and glamour, the home’s sweeping scale signifies a collective struggle of equal proportions. With the easement for Villa Lewaro finalized earlier this year, and a television show about Madam Walker’s life starring Octavia Spencer announced in August, it appears that struggle won’t soon be forgotten. But for now, the Doleys say, the next generation of Villa Lewaro stewards is still to be determined. “It’s very difficult for [my husband] to part with the house,” says Helena. “But he knows that it is time for us to move on, and to entrust it to someone who loves the house as much as we do.” Until then, she, Harold and the house will, just like Madam Walker, persevere.

THEY ASSUMED THAT [MADAM WALKER] WAS THE MAID COMING TO CHECK ON THE PROPERTY.

From its completion, the fate of the house of haircare mogul Madam C.J. Walker was uncertain. Here’s how it survived and stayed true to its roots BY SAMUEL ANDERSON

O

M A DA M WA L K E R FA M I LY A R C H I V E S / A ’ L E L I A B U N D L E S

The Wonder of Villa Lewaro

ne night, Sarah Breedlove, a young widow and single mother working as a washwoman in Louisiana, saw in her dreams a secret formula for hair oil. The child of freed slaves, Breedlove had hopes of escaping hard manual labor. Her husband, whom she married at 14, died in a race riot when she was 20. Her hair had been a relatively minor source of pain—she had lost much of it in the 1890s, an age in which most African-Americans had little access to haircare, due to a chronic scalp condition—but one she resolved to conquer.    In 1905, Sarah moved to Denver, married a newspaperman named Charles Joseph Walker, and developed Madam Walker’s Wonderful Hair Grower, a sulfuric remedy to dandruff and other skin infections. Before long, Madam C.J. Walker, as she came to be known, was a national presence. She trained women to be ambassadors to market her brand of tonics, opening the Walker College of Hair Culture in 1908 (Mary Kay Ash, who used similar marketing techniques to built the Mary Kay cosmetics empire, wouldn’t be born for another decade). By 1910, Walker and her team of predominantly female executives were manufacturing and distributing her products on an industrial scale.   After establishing her corporate headquarters in Indianapolis, Madam Walker and her daughter A’Lelia moved to New York in 1913 during the nascent Harlem Renaissance. It was there that Walker decided to build a monument to her success—a mansion in the exclusive village of Irvington, New York, which at one time was the most expensive zip code in the United States.   “Perseverance is my motto,” said Madame Walker in a 1917 New York Times Magazine interview entitled “Wealthiest Negro Woman’s Suburban Mansion.” “It laid the Atlantic cable; it gave us the telegraph, telephone, and wireless. It gave to the world an Abraham Lincoln, and to a race, freedom.” The construction of her Babylon on the Hudson was an illustration of that perseverance; despite discriminatory realtors who charged double the price of the land in an effort to dissuade her purchase—a tactic called “black dollar”— Walker secured a prime four acres down the way from Jay Gould’s Lyndhurst estate.

P O R T R A I T : M A DA M WA L K E R FA M I LY A R C H I V E S / A ’ L E L I A B U N D L E S . C A R : G E T T Y I M AG E S

Villa Lewaro’s terrace Below: Madam Walker’s agents attend a sales conference at her home

Below, left: A’Lelia Walker, Madam Walker’s daughter, in Villa Lewaro’s music room. Below, right: Madam C.J. Walker at the wheel during a business trip

DUJOUR 53


LIFE

S PA

Admire views of the Swiss peaks from The Chedi Andermatt’s indoor pool. Below, right: Deluxe rooms at The Chedi Andermatt are draped in traditional alpine wood and feature fireplaces and murals inspired by European master Peter Paul Rubens

S

The Club House sits at the foot of the 18-hole golf course and shows off sweeping views of the Gemsstock and Furka Mountains. Below: The Courtyard at The Chedi Andermatt doubles as an iceskating rink during winter.

In the Swiss Alps, the secret to beauty is in the water BY LANE NIESET

54 DUJOUR

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

Switzerland Slim

tepping into my chalet-inspired suite, the first thing I notice is the green smoothie sitting delicately in a bucket of ice, presented in similar fashion as a bottle of Champagne. The expansive wine cabinet is wiped clean and the espresso maker is noticeably lacking espresso. The mini bar is just as free of temptation, a basket of fruit replacing the typical chocolate and chips. I shouldn’t have been surprised, considering I was about to embark on my first “slimming” retreat. Located in the tiny town of Andermatt in the Swiss Alps, about an hour’s drive from Zurich, the five-star Chedi Andermatt couldn’t be a more perfect place to hit the “reset” button. Inspired by Asian healing traditions, the Chedi’s spa weaves elements of its alpine exterior into rejuvenating treatments, with oils crafted from plants and fruits found in the surrounding mountains. The spa is also looking to the nearby peaks as a natural playground, converting old military bunkers into boot camps and bringing Buddhist monks from Tibet to lead mindfulness meditations— followed by spa sessions, of course. In the spring the spa will host another kind of alpine experience as French-based wellness icon Les Thermes de Brides-lesBains resort heads to the Swiss hideaway with the ultimate detox program. One of the main highlights: pure Swiss Gotthard water weaved into massages and aqua rituals designed to not only remove cellulite, but also leave your skin looking smooth. While massages take inches off your waist, diet and fitness help with weight loss, creating the perfect trifecta for the Swiss slim-down. “We want to implement the same program we have in France here in Switzerland without altering it,” explains Les Thermes’s dietician, Nathalie Négro, who is working with Chedi’s culinary team to create a balanced menu that stays true to the heart of Swiss cuisine. Menus start with a velouté of peas and grapefruit, topped with just the right amount of foam, microgreens and orange pansy petals. Twin chili-roasted langoustines lie on a bed of vanillainfused celery cream next to health-food favorite forbidden rice. Even dessert is cleverly disguised and deceivingly sweet, like the

slow-baked meringue f loating in strawberry and balsamic vinegar sauce, crowned with yellow flower petals. “After guests try their first meal here, they’re surprised by this type of ‘healthy’ cuisine because they imagined dishes like steamed vegetables without sauce,” explains Sébastien Roux, executive chef of the Golf Hotel’s restaurant in Brides-les-Bains. For the Brides team, balance is more important than calories. Restriction is not a word you’ll find in their vocabulary. The retreat may place a glam squad of top-notch dieticians, personal trainers and chefs at your disposal, but it’s the Chedi’s tucked-away locale— and water-infused treatments—that’s the main draw. As you cruise through Andermatt some of the stunning mountain passes may seem slightly familiar. In 1964, this is the spot where James Bond zipped in his Aston Martin after Goldfinger— in the film’s famous chase scene along the Furka Pass. Besides Bond, Andermatt was once home to the Swiss Federal Army headquarters and known more for its bunkers than boutique hotels. That is, until the five-star Chedi Andermatt moved into town four years ago. Boasting more fireplaces than rooms, the Chedi Andermatt is a nod to the village in its heyday when the pre-jetset crowd would flee Switzerland’s cities for these mountains come summer. Tourism slowly shifted to cater more to the military crowd, but now the village is stepping up once again as the understated alternative to f lashy Zermatt or St. Moritz. You won’t find a Chanel lining the village’s main street—but that’s not the point. Once you take a glance at the lit-up hotel come nightfall, you’ll see why the Chedi lives up to its name, which means “alpine temple” in Thai. The apartment-style suites are certainly relaxing enough—and feature the world’s most expensive bed, the $50,000 Swedish Hästens mattress—but it’s the 26,000-squarefoot spa that’s worth the international flight alone. After days of triple spa treatments and meals better than some Michelin-starred restaurants, I barely missed my morning espresso. I could give up coffee and sweets, but to celebrate the end of a successful detox, I indulged in the best way possible: curled up with a glass of wine in front of my fireplace, staring out at the picture-perfect view of the Urseren Valley unfolding below.

DUJOUR 55


LIFE

COLL ABOR ATION

SOCIAL

Hannah Bronfman’s Influence

Oil for Angels

A er ears o keeping the lt a orite oro anoil reat ent in her ea t arsenal s per odel and i toria s e ret Angel ara a paio was na ed the rand s ea t A assador this ear. n honor o the new partnership a paio spills the ea t se rets she s learned oth on set and o . —RACHEL BARBER

The founder of HBFIT talks the renaissance of her brand and the city that raised her

What is your daily beauty routine? For skincare, I love to add a few drops of Moroccanoil Pure Argan Oil onto my face and body creams for extra hydration and anti-aging benefits. My makeup is very low maintenance. I believe less is more when it comes to your skin, I use a toner, serum and a moisturizer daily. When I’m not working, I like to let my skin breathe, so I’ll use either no makeup or I’ll do very simple light make up, some concealer, mascara, highlighter, and I’m good to go.

BY ATALIE GIMMEL

H

56 DUJOUR

What’s the number one beauty tip you’ve learned from being on sets? I love a red lip, so learning how to use a lip liner to really draw your lips was one of the best beauty tips I’ve learned. Also, when you’re just not looking and feeling your best, I’ve learned that a little bit of highlighter can really brighten up your face.

Surf ’s Up

STEVE AOKI GOES GOLD

Aurae Releases the DJ’s Card Design

Top: Hannah Bronfman, founder of HBFITtv. Left: Bronfman also moonlights as a DJ

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

and about, that it’s almost been nice to be able to pick and choose what you go to versus it being overwhelming.” It’s all, she agrees, par t of what’s now the “age of the influencer.” “I do think that the society stuff has calmed down and it is more about supporting your friends and making meaningful connections,” she says. The generation that used to worry itself about debutantes and smoking clubs has given way to a new guard—one that’s much less concerned with pedigree and more with their online social footprint. Bronfman herself, for example, recently announced a partnership with Brooklyn-based, female-led juicery Grass Roots for a limited edition collection of nine health-conscious drinks, bars and “rawnolas.” Clearly, today’s celebrity youth culture—defined by health- and eco-conscious entrepreneurship—has replaced the hard partying and DUIs of the mid-aughts influencer. Even if the city’s scene has changed, Bronfman says some things will never fade. “My favorite thing about the city during winter is how quiet it gets,” she takes a slight pause, “and when Park Avenue is lit up with all of the beautiful trees and lights, it’s iconic.” And although one might be tempted to turn on the fireplace and cozy up on the couch, Bronfman’s secret is to do the exact opposite. “The winter does allow for a little more hibernation,” she says, “but at the same time it also allows for exploration—a lot of people aren’t going out to restaurants because it’s cold and people want to canoodle, but that just means more opportunity to go to those restaurants that you’ve been meaning to hit and that have a month-long wait list.” And judging by Bronf man’s ability to make a living off her knack for being in the know, we think we’ll take her word for it.

l s hand painted s r oards are aking wa es at Atlantis Paradise Island

If Aurae’s goal to become “The World’s Most Innovative Credit Card” wasn’t enough, the company has just announced its latest endeavor: the chance for card users to gain access to the lifestyle of famed DJ and entertainer Steve Aoki. “I was amazed and impressed at the detail in the graphics,” Aoki says, “and I’ve never seen a card like this before.” Just like in his shows, the card’s diamonds swirl in energetic waves as straight lines cut through like the technology that contributes to Aoki’s signature sound. “It reminds me of space and the feeling to explore the unexplored and take on new adventures in life,” he says. Members who use this particular limited edition Aurae card will soon come to realize the simple fact: it’s truly experiential luxury at its finest. F R O M T O P : A L E J A N D R O M A R T I N LO R E N Z O . T H E O WA R G O/G E T T Y I M AG E S F O R N Y C W F F

annah Bronfman has become an entrepreneur in her own right thanks to founding her content platform HBFIT, which melds her passions for beauty and health—not to mention occasionally serves as a window into her life as an influencer and newlywed. Now, the 29-year-old DJ, model and heiress (and native New Yorker) is further extending her influence with her new video channel HBFITtv, which offers fans a new way to navigate the ever changing landscape of wellness and the new rules of being #social. With the launch of HBFITtv on YouTube and HBFIT.com, Bronfman is poised to reach a larger audience than ever. But to get to the root of Bronfman’s influencer props, one must go back to her days at Bard College, located two hours north of the city in Annandale-on-Hudson. “Because I’m from New York, a lot of my college friends would ask me where to go—whether they needed a dentist or a dermatologist,” Bronfman says of her days upstate. “I was their go-to person for that.” Today the same goes—give or take 400,000+ followers who would also like her expert recommendations. Being her cohort’s go-to lifestyle guru comes as naturally, but she says that it didn’t hurt growing up with the greatest city in the world as her backdrop. But that backdrop, she notes, is changing now more than ever. Take New York Fashion Week. According to Bronfman, that—like much of New York’s social scene—has evolved. “There were so many events this year,” she says. “All the shows f lew to Paris and everyone did a party here. It was so much more about being out

LIFE

Sold exclusively at The Cove at the Atlantis Paradise Island Resort, Lulu de Kwiatkowski’s vibrant hand-painted surfboards are making waves. As a Manhattanite with a residence in the Bahamas, Lulu DK also designed the resort’s new poolside cabanas, daybeds and lounge chairs inspired by Paradise Island’s breathtaking white sand and the spirit of the country.

DUJOUR 57


CULTURE

Left: “Gone but not Forgotten” by Damien Hirst, the centerpiece of Faena Hotel’s Art Basel parties. Right: “Wire Madonna” by Thomas Bayrle, part of ICA Miami’s site specific commission at Miami Design District

Party at Art Basel Miami Beach, 2016

WELCOME TO MIAMI:

Returning for its 16th year, Art Basel Miami Beach continues its successful reign as the premier art celebration in the country BY SAMUEL ANDERSON

58 DUJOUR

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

Inside Art Basel

O P P O S I T E PAG E : N I C H O L A S H U N T /G E T T Y I M AG E S F O R S O H O H O U S E & C O . G O N E B U T N O T F O R G O T T E N : G E T T Y. W I R E M A D O N A A : F R E D R I K N I L S E N ST U D I O. M I K A ROTT E N B E RG : J E S S I C A C H O U. D E S I G N D I ST R I C T: R A H AU S

A

t the first hints of Hurricane Irma back in early September, Miami’s Faena Hotel braced for impact by encasing its most prized attraction—the $15 million, goldplated woolly mammoth skeleton by Damien Hirst that greets guests on the hotel steps—in a weather proof glass case. The gilded woolly sur v ived the storm’s relatively benign lashing unscathed, but the need for such protections illustrated the seemingly paradoxical fact that Miami’s growth as an economic and cultural playground dances on, even as intensifying weather and political drama gathers around the city. Never is the giant metaphorical bubble around Miami more airtight than during Art Basel Miami, returning for its 16th edition on December 7 through 10. Miami art week’s tent-pole bacchanal will bring 268 galleries representing 4,000 artists to the Miami Beach Convention Center, along with a head-spinning array of parties, pop-ups and satellite exhibitions across the city—all part of a sociocultural flashpoint as tough as any weatherproof glass.

From the outside, art fairs can appear to be citadels of blind wealth and excess. After all, “There are more private jets in Miami in December than anywhere else in the world at any one time,” gallerist Michael Kohn once said. But despite the bells and whistles, Art Basel Miami Beach remains one of the greatest energy sources for contemporary art today—if you know where to look. Here, we break down the fair’s most anticipated attractions and speak to those closest to the action—from the fair’s president to a gallerina who took her first steps at Art Basel. The art inside the walls of the MBCC is only a sliver of the citywide apparatus that is Miami art week. Timed to the festival, two major contemporary arts institutions in the city will introduce public-facing expansions: a $10-million renovation at The Bass and an all-new home for the Institute of Contemporary Art in the recently designated, $22-billion Miami Design District neighborhood. ICA, opened in 2014, will unveil a new permanent home in the landmark Moore building in Miami’s Design District—a sleek crush of cultural and shopping destinations located in downtown Miami. In addition to Rag & Bone, Prada, Aesop and Alexander Wang outposts, the neighborhood will offer a rotating outdoor sculpture program, beginning with two 20-foot high sculptures by Minimalist godfather Sol Lewitt to be unveiled in November. The Bass, in addition to its renovation, will debut an exhibit by Argentine artist Mika Rottenberg, and conduct tours on its front lawn, a.k.a. Collins Park, which will be occupied by large-scale outdoor installations selected by Art Basel’s new public arts curator Phillip Kaiser. “The public exhibition, entitled ‘Territorial,’ will be ambitious in scale, focusing on works that claim space or territory through size, scale, intensity or sound,” Kaiser says of

Above: Artist Mika Rottenberg. Bottom left: Palm Court at Miami Design District

DUJOUR 59


ART

60 DUJOUR

WHEN IT STARTED, IT WAS A REALLY SMALL CLUB OF DEALERS ... VERY MUCH UNLIKE TODAY In addition to politics, a healthy dose of levity will also be on display. Galerie Gmurzynska’s booth will showcase the work of photographer and playboy philanthropist Jean Pigozzi, who was dubbed the “Undisputed King of the Celebrity Selfie” in a September Vanity Fair profile. “He’s always in the places where everybody, from Mick Jagger to Elton John, goes,” says the gallery’s third-generation owner Isabelle Bscher, whose booth will offer some of Pigozzi’s most exuberant works yet. The series of canine portraits entitled Charles and Saatchi, the Dogs was inspired by Pigozzi’s friendship with advertising mogul Charles Saatchi, who “wrote a text about wanting to be reincarnated as one of Jean Pigozzi’s dogs,” Bscher explains. For 40 years, Pigozzi, a Harvard-educated heir to an Italian motorcar fortune, has pointed his lens at his own high-rolling social scene, interlaced with celebrity, excess and an animal-esque hedonism (one exemplary shot shows Naomi Campbell leading two dogs named “Mick” and “Bono” after his two famous friends). “He’s able to take photographs because people are not cold [around him]. They’re very natural,” explains Bscher. An art collector himself, Pigozzi has also photographed the likes of Larry Gagosian and the late Leo Castelli—architects of today’s highflown transcontinental art market. While Pigozzi’s photos may embody the latter-day glamour and glitz of Art Basel Miami, Galerie Gmurzynska, one of two galleries to have participated in every Art Basel since its founding in 1967, defines the fair’s international history. “The gallery was started in 1965 by my grandmother who came from Poland to Cologne, Germany, without a lot of business knowledge,” says Bscher, who today handles the estates of everyne from Yves Klein to Wifredo Lam, among others. “One of her friends was the legendary gallerist Ernst Beyeler, who founded Basel and asked her to take part.” “When it started, it was a really small club of dealers and was, my mother tells me, very much unlike today,” continues Bscher, who took over the family business in 2015. “There was less competition. There was more of an environment of friendliness and people trying to help one another. It was like a small club of gallerists and collectors—who you would never suspect of having the most phenomenal collections at home. They would arrive with Birkenstocks and the most low-key clothes.” But by the time Art Basel reached Miami Beach, Galerie Gmurzynska was a well-connected, international enterprise itself; the first year in Miami, the gallery brought Karl Lagerfeld as its guest of honor. “We did this party with him at a club called B.E.D. At the time, it was very fashionable,” Bscher recalls. “It was a new concept—people lying down. And Karl walked in with Ingrid Sischy and said, ‘I don’t want to eat here.’ He didn’t want to eat lying down. So we had to bring him something.” Fifteen years later, Bscher says, the gallery intends for the art to be higher concept than the parties. “We’ll have an opening party at the Faena Hotel—mostly it’s friends coming to support their friends,” she says. “[But] I’m sure there will be some interesting people coming to see the art.”

Clockwise from top left: “Charles and Saatchi, the Dogs” by Jean Pigozzi; “IKB 240” by Yves Klein; “Donald Trump in Florida” by Peter Saul; “Hole” by Julian Hoeber; “Anthurium in Color XIV” by Judith Bernstein

Karl Lagerfeld and Ingrid Sischy at the fi rst Art Basel Miami Beach in 2002

C H A R L E S A N D S A AT C H I , T H E D O G S : GA L E R I E G M U R Z Y N S K A . “ I K B 2 4 0 ” : GA L E R I E G M U R Z Y N S K A . “ D O N A L D T R U M P I N F LO R I DA ” : M A RY B O O N E . “ H O L E ” : J E S S I C A S I LV E R M A N . “A N T H U R I U M I N C O LO R ” : T H E B OX

his curation, which includes a piece by Manuela Viera-Gallo that incorporates the testimony of 12 domestic violence survivors. Public art is integral not both the city of Miami and to Art Basel at large, according to Art Basel Americas Director Noah Horowitz. “Each fair either has its own sector or special projects dedicated to public art,” he says. “Our fairs accommodate [both] the ways artists work and how the public realm plays an important role in artistic practice today.” Art Basel Miami, the American offshoot of the Swiss original begun in 2002, unfolds from one man: Noah Horowitz. As Art Basel Americas director, a position he originated in 2015, the 37-year-old historian and art fair veteran has worked to expand the fair’s scope beyond the New York and Los Angeles art markets to those across North and South America. As such, contrary to conceptions of the fair as insular and inaccessible, Art Basel Miami Beach has lately began to take on global events, and virtually in real time. “It was certainly interesting to witness the extent to which many galleries at the 2016 show in Miami Beach were responding to the current political climate at that time—particularly the U.S. presidential election—by br ing ing works to the fair that addressed these issues head on,” Horowitz tells us. As the political events of last year continue to reverberate in 2017, it’s safe to say ABMB will ref lect even more potent social and political themes this year—particularly those around immigration and globalism. Mexico City gallery Proyectos Monclova, for example, “will present a new video and performative work [that explores] how the political promises of modernity within Mexico and Latin America are perpetually unfulfilled,” says Horowitz, while New York gallery Tyler Rollins Fine Art will show “new works by Manuel Ocampo exploring the interconnections between immigration and colonialism.” Art on view will also tackle domestic issues—from racial and gender equality to the President. Peter Saul’s “Donald Trump in Florida,” for instance, on view at Mary Boone Gallery, directly references Trump’s Mar-a-Lago Club, and the political powers that be, just two hours north of the fair. Meanwhile, L.A.-based gallery The Box will show the early paintings of Judith Bernstein, whose work explores power and aggression associated with masculinity (and whose recent Drawing Center solo show, Judith Bernstein: Cabinet of Horrors, was in response to the Trump administration). Other hyper-relevant highlights include three historic works by Judy Chicago: “Bigamy” (1964), a one-of-a-kind precursor to the iconic Dinner Party ceramic series; “Submerge/ Emerge” (1976), an example of Chicago’s famous “central core” imagery; and “Childhood’s End #1” (1972), an abstract grid representing “gendered voids.”

K A R L A N D I N G R I D : GA L E R I E G M U R Z Y N S K A

CULTURE

DUJOUR 61


CULTURE

AWA R D S

Cinematic Women

n honor o awards season we refle t on how o r a orite a tresses areers ha e agni ed sin e DuJour rst o ered the and wh the re a k in s ars ontention toda

KATE WINSLET

BY SAMUEL ANDERSON

WONDER WHEEL

& SAORSIE RONAN M U L L I GA N : E L L E N VO N U N W E R T H . R O N A N & W I N S L E T : J E R E M Y L I E B M A N

LADY BIRD

Despite their differences in age, Kate Winslet and Saorsie Ronan are kindred spirits. Daughters of actors from across the pond, both came out of the gate swinging as scene-stealing, highbrow teen thespians—Winslet as a murderess in Peter Jackson’s Heavenly Creatures at 17 and Ronan at 13 with her Oscar-nominated turn in Atonement. Their career highs seem to be synced: both appeared in our 2015 “Great Performances” portfolio, shot by Jeremy Liebman, and are back in the awards race this year—Winslet as the disaffected ’50s wife of a Coney Island carousel operator in Woody Allen’s Wonder Wheel, and Ronan as the titular role in Lady Bird about an angst-y, dyed-hair mid-aughts teen—a role Winslet might have once played herself given Lady Bird’s striking resemblance to her Oscar-nominated turn as Clementine in 2005’s Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind—one favored by both the Academy and Winslet herself: “I’d love to play [Clementine] again because it was so much fun,” she told audiences at NYFF. We’re willing to bet that Ronan’s latest role, a departure from her more serious fare, much like Clementine was for Winslet, will garner her an Oscar nod too. And if there ever is an Eternal Sunshine 2, we know who’d have our vote to play Clementine’s daughter.

CARRIE MULLIGAN MUDBOUND

NICOLE KIDMAN

In 2012, Nicole Kidman graced DuJour’s sophomore cover, shot by Patrick Demarchelier. Though she sizzled on the beach in all white, even then it was clear Kidman wasn’t all sunshine. “[Kidman is] drawn to the darkest of terrain,” wrote Patricia Bosworth of Kidman’s tendency toward difficult material—which has notably led Kidman to a 2017 Emmy-winning role as the battered woman Celeste in HBO’s Big Little Lies, and most recently to that of the wife of an anesthesiologist with Handmaid’s Tale–like tastes in November’s The Killing of a Sacred Deer. Another hypnotic disturbia from Yorgos Lanthimos (The Lobster), the film could be just the kind of startling vehicle to add to Kidman’s already-crowded trophy case.

62 DUJOUR

P H O T O G R A P H BY PAT R I C K D E M A R C H E L I E R

THE KILLING OF A SACRED DEER

Put her in a sweeping period piece, and sharp-witted, dimple-cheeked Carey Mulligan will feel right at home, from her first film Pride & Prejudice set in Elizabethan England to the roaring American 1920s in Baz Luhrman’s The Great Gatsby, for which DuJour photographed her in 2013. Her latest film, Mudbound, takes Mulligan where she, and most audiences, have never gone before: the tail-end of Mississippi’s sharecropping economy, which lasted from post-slavery to the mid–20th century. Mulligan stars as Laura McAllan, a landlord’s conflicted wife who gives a sharecropper’s wife Florence Jackson (Mary J. Blige) a job as her housekeeper. Their bond is tested when the Jacksons’ son, just returned from WWII, becomes the target of bigotry from within the McAllan clan. Initially, says Mulligan, she wasn’t looking to plunge back into the past. “I had done a couple of period films right before, and I was sort of nervous. I wanted to do something contemporary, and so I was resistant to the idea of doing another period drama,” the actress told DuJour at the New York Film Festival. “But I thought it was perfect storytelling and deeply emotional without being sentimental. And I just wanted to be a part of a Dee Rees film,” Mulligan says.    The film’s unflinching look at the U.S.’s legacy of racism arrives right on schedule given the country’s current political climate, as does the character of Laura in Mulligan’s personal timeline. “It was the first time I played a mom and actually was a mom,” she told the NYFF audience. “So that was interesting. I had played mothers before but when we filmed this I had an eight-month-old so that was a change.” And while Mary J. may be best known as a fixture on the American charts, she and her British counterpart hit it off. “Working with Mary was really extraordinary. She’s unbelievably open and honest and vulnerable,” Mulligan said. “There was a sisterhood to it that was really powerful.”  

DUJOUR 63


CULTURE

AWA R D S

OCTAVIA SPENCER THE SHAPE OF WATER

“I was always cognizant of the fact that I was portraying a real human being who suffered a tremendous loss,” said Octavia Spencer of her character Wanda Johnson in Fruitvale Station for DuJour’s 2013 “Great Performances” feature. “I can tell you what resonated with me: the simplicity and heartbreaking humanity of the story.” In 2017, Spencer has injected that trademark humanity into two out-of-this-world scripts; first as God in the melodrama The Shack and then in The Shape of Water, a fantastical romance directed by master surrealist Guillermo del Toro. Spencer plays Zelda, a mute woman’s fast-talking coworker at a top-secret research facility that comes into possession of an Amazonian water monster. Zelda is garnering Spencer heaps of buzz, and if she’s nominated, she’ll join a rarified species herself: actresses who have earned three Supporting nominations in a single decade.

IT WAS AN ABSOLUTELY LIFE-CHANGING, FREEING EXPERIENCE.

LILY COLLINS

P H O T O G R A P H BY E L L E N VO N U N W E R T H

P H O T O G R A P H BY DAV I D R O E M E R

TO THE BONE

Some actors are chameleons, contorting themselves to the contours of each character. Others play to their strengths, drawing on empathy and substance from within. Lily Collins proved she could be both in the Netflix-acquired Sundance hit To the Bone, based on writer-director Marti Noxon’s real-life battle with anorexia and bulimia. Collins shed pounds from her already-petite 5’ 5” frame for the role of Ellen, a transformation that hit close to home. “Because of my history with eating disorders, I was able to understand Ellen’s mindset and internal struggles on a much deeper level,” Collins tells us. “Despite my histor y with the f ilm’s subject matter, there was still a lot I wanted to learn in preparation for filming. I spoke with doctors as well as nutritionists and even attended an eating disorders anonymous group. It was an absolutely life-changing, freeing experience.” Collins has portrayed women preoccupied with perfection before. In last year’s Rules Don’t Apply, for which DuJour profiled the 28-year-old, she played Marla Mabrey, a “virtuous beauty pageant winner” and aspiring starlet with whom Collins possessed certain parallels as well. “Marla had wanted everything within her control to be ‘just so’ in order to catch the eye of Howard Hughes.  It was important to her to look a certain way and behave in a particular manor in order to fit in, based on common traits she saw among the other girls she was competing with,” says Collins, who, as a one-time deb at Paris’s aristocratic Bal de Débutantes, has survived her fair share of pageantry. “Both women, Marla and Ellen, wanted others to accept them in some way but they had different ways of expressing it,” she adds. “Ellen’s just manifested itself in a more harmful way and was more psychologically challenging to portray.”

DUJOUR 65


CULTURE

FA S H I O N

The designer with Nancy Reagan in the mid-’80s; A view of the exhibition in Phoenix Art Museum’s Ellman Fashion Design Gallery. Opposite page: David Nash with James Galanos in Napa Valley in 2008; “Fontana” column gown, spring/ summer 1963, lent by Nash.

Pure Galanos

A comprehensive museum exhibition celebrates the legacy of the iconic contemporary American fashion designer

66 DUJOUR

York emporium, which led to a series of jobs including part-time sketch artist under Jean Louis at Columbia Pictures, and later assistant to the couturier Robert Piguet in Paris. In 1952, he opened Galanos Originals in Los Angeles, where his first readyto-wear collection was ordered by Saks Fifth Avenue. Fashion mavens like Diana Vreeland and Eleanor Lambert took notice, solidifying Galanos’s reputation as a master craftsman. When Galanos passed away in October of last year at age 92, his friends worried that he would be remembered simply as Nancy Reagan’s favored designer rather than as a visionary and artist in his own right. Reagan, whose deep friendship with Galanos continued until her death eight months before his own, wore his designs to all four of her husband Rondald Reagan’s inaugural balls: the first two when he was elected Governor of California in 1967 and 1971, and later to both presidential inaugural balls in 1981 and 1985. The designer may be forever linked to the late former First Lady, but Phoenix Art Museum’s exhibition “A Tribute to James

G O W N : K E N H O W I E . P O R T R A I T : C O U R T E S Y O F DAV I D N A S H

F

or over half a century James Galanos desig ned clothes with the skill of a Paris couturier. From his exacting fabric selection to impeccable construction and finishing, his standards emphasized elegance and simplicity. “A black dress,” he said, “reveals everything—line, cut, drape, seaming. It must be perfection.” Born in Philadelphia in 1924, Galanos was the only son of Greek-born parents and a self-described “loner” growing up in New Jersey, where his father ran a restaurant. He began sketching at an early age and his three sisters, whom whe would design dresses and ensembles for, served as his first muses. In a 1980 People magazine article, he recalled, “As a young boy I had no fashion influence around me but all the while I was dreaming of Paris and New York.” After high school, Galanos enrolled at New York’s Traphagen School of Fashion. His real entrée into the industry was in 1944 as an assistant at the milliner and evening wear designer Hattie Carnegie’s New

GA L A N O S & R E GA N : C O U R T E S Y O F DAV I D N A S H . E X H I B I T I O N : CO U RT E SY P H O E N I X A RT M U S E U M

BY DAVID NASH

Galanos,” on view until January 7, has quelled fears that Reagan would define Galanos’s legacy. The first dedicated show since his passing, the retrospective details Galanos’s work from the 1950s through the 1990s with over forty ensembles, of which just one belonged to Reagan. “Mr. Galanos had a solidly defined style, and vast body of work, for three decades before the Reagan era,” explained Dennita Sewell, the Jacquie Dorrance Curator of Fashion at Phoenix Art Museum. The venue of the show is one personal to Jimmy (as he was known to friends), whose travels brought him to Arizona. Impressed by the archive at the Phoenix Art Museum, which houses the Arizona Costume Institute’s collection of garments, accessories, and shoes from the 18th century to the present day, he began donating his pieces to the museum in 1990. “His clothes

stand out, even in a world-class collection, for the quality of the fabrics, construction and timeless appeal,” said Sewell. “The way they were finished inside and out was on the level of French couture, but with a purely contemporary American sensibility.” By the time I met Jimmy in 2005, he had been retired from designing for seven years, having closed his atelier in 1998 at 74 years old and still at the top of his game. We were introduced by ’90s supermodel-turned-fashion editor Tatiana Sorokko, whose husband, art dealer and publisher Serge Sorokko was helping direct Jimmy’s second act as an abstract photographer. On the evening of his 82nd birthday in September 2006, Jimmy had his art world debut with an exhibition of 60 mostly large-scale photographs at Serge’s eponymous gallery in San Francisco. In fashion, Jimmy was renowned for his unorthodox mix of colors, fabrics and textures, and the same unorthodoxy could be seen in his photography. To achieve his highly abstracted works, he would transform the kitchen of his 1940s Hollywood home on Sunset Plaza Drive with lamps clamped to cupboard doors, illuminating an array of fabrics, paper cut-outs and other objects that he had arranged into various configurations. He’d play with the lamps to create dimension and adjust the levels of light and shadow. The trick to creating one of his favorite effects was to photograph his subject matter through a Lalique bowl, which created a sort of liquid distortion to the image. When Jimmy explained this homespun technique to me, I thought to myself: “He’s an absolute genius.” During our decade-long friendship, I had the pleasure of spending time with him in San Francisco, Los Angeles and Phoenix, and across the globe on a memorable trip through Moscow and St. Petersburg. Jimmy’s highly cultured sense of style was rivaled only by his wry sense of humor. Generally self-effacing and sometimes self-deprecating, he once told me that, as a child, he felt he “resembled an asparagus with eyes.” He taught me how to see the importance in the smallest details—and how to properly twist, not fold, a pocket square. When I would visit him at home, he’d have gone through his closet in advance and pulled things to give me that he could no longer wear—for instance a pair of crisp, pale blue custom-made dress shirts with white French cuffs and collar. On the chest of each I noticed “JG” modestly embroidered in a contrasting blue. “You can wear these under a nice blazer,” he explained. This was followed by one of his favorite phrases, “Or what have you.” In addition to these gifts, I also began to collect and preserve his work. A selection of garments from my personal collection are in the PAM show, including two gowns that appeared on the July 1963 cover of Harper’s Bazaar. The complementary looks, photographed by Melvin Sokolsky, were described by the magazine with the utmost reverence: “Galanos sets off a whole new way to shine in one’s private world with fantastically colored, neoclassic columns of wool jersey. Exuberant Roman candle stripes shoot skyward on the skirts, mists of silk chiffon veil the tops.” Another of my dresses, also from his 1963 Spring/Summer collection, was featured that March in editorials shot by Milton Greene for LIFE, and full-page by Hiro for Bazaar, in which it was described as “a column of crepe—cocoa brown asymmetrically printed with lightning strikes of pale beige and jet black— completely covering, supple, clinging … the most contemporary look possible.” What no one ever realized, Jimmy explained to me, was that the dress was an homage to Italian artist and founder of Spatialism, Lucio Fontana, whose work he greatly admired. Again, I thought to myself, “He’s a genius.” This seminal combination of fashion and art predated Yves Saint Laurent’s

DUJOUR 67


CULTURE

FA S H I O N

Archival editorial materials showcasing the work of James Galanos on display in the Ellman Fashion Design Gallery of Phoenix Art Museum. Below, from left: Three Galanos ensembles on display: Emerald green evening dress, 1964; lace and silk chiffon evening ensemble, 1988; silk fringed evening jacket and silk dinner dress, 1988.

68 DUJOUR

MY CLIENTS ARE WORLDLY LADIES. YOU SEE THEM IN LONDON, PARIS, ROME. CLOTHES REPRESENT WHO THEY ARE. duced everything in the United States from his factory on Sepulveda Boulevard in Los Angeles.” Rucci adds, “It was simply staggering—his beading and embroidery looked as though it came from Lesage in Paris.” “James Galanos was the only person who would travel twice a year across the country for presentations with fifteen to twenty 11-foot trunks on wheels,” explains Rucci. “The garments were hung perfectly on hangers, each wrapped with generous amounts of tissue so they wouldn’t press against each other—and he did it all himself. It was ready-to-wear shipped as haute couture.” Jimmy will forever be distinguished by his contributions to the establishment of a contemporary American style for five decades. His ability to evolve and remain relevant all those years is extraordinary, but his reputation for quality is unsurpassed.

CO U RT E SY P H O E N I X A RT M U S E U M

celebrated Mondrian collection by two years, and Jeff Koons’s collaboration with Louis Vuitton, emblazoning masters’ works on the brand’s leather goods, by over 50 years. In fact, the dress has been immortalized multiple times; it was featured in an image titled “Iris on Vogue” by Sokolsky, which was recently displayed at the Fahey K lein Galler y in Los A ngeles, and an identical copy—and the only other known to exist—is in the permanent collection of The Met. Other pieces on display at PAM were lent by formidable collectors including Sorokko, artist Suzy Kellems Dominik and Houston socialite Susanne Byram (née Dawley). Byram, who cofounded the Costume Institute of the Houston Museum of Fine Art, was a friend and client in the ’80s and ’90s, and presented Jimmy with the museum’s inaugural Silver Slipper award for Design Excellence. “My clients are worldly ladies,” Galanos explained in a 1985 interview for Connoisseur magazine. “They go to the grand restaurants. You see them in London, Paris, Rome. Clothes represent who they are.” Until his retirement, Jimmy faithfully designed clothing, sumptuous furs and accessories for his discerning clientele—and served as an inspiration to his peers. “He was a legend—a success,” says Galanos’ confidant and fashion designer Ralph Rucci. “He never looked back on the past.” Rucci first met Jimmy in 1989 and formed an immediate bond with the elder designer. “He would come to every show I had in New York and Paris,” explains Rucci. “He would come earlier to sit through the fittings. There was one very special collection in Paris – spring 2005 couture—and I had a faille dress in alabaster with a belt that I was struggling with,” he says. “Jimmy was sitting silently sketching in the corner watching my struggle. Calmly he stood up and asked, ‘Can I help?’ He took a pair of scissors and with two cuts he had the problem solved.” “When you look at his overall career, nobody else in American fashion achieved what he did,” says Tatiana Sorokko. “He pro-


Clopay ® Reserve® Wood Collection Limited Edition Series

®

your home reinvented. Uncover the beauty of your home with a stylish Clopay garage door. With so many distinctive choices, you can rejuvenate your home with a dramatic entrance that makes a bold statement. Imagine what you can do with Clopay! Owned and made in the U.S.A. © 2017 Clopay Building Products Company, Inc., a Griffon company.

For a FREE consultation, call 800.225.6729. imagine.clopay.com


CULTURE

T R AV E L

M

Living Luxe in New Zealand

THE NORTH ISLAND

Unfinished hardwood lines the striking living room of the Gabriel Residence at The Landing

The new Helena Bay Lodge, as seen from Helena Bay, boasts magnificent sunrises and dramatic skies

he o th a i o ntr is ast e o ing the es ape or A eri an tra elers and international t oons nan iers. ere s the per e t two week ew ealand itinerar BY NATASHA WOLFF

70 DUJOUR

But it’s not hard to see why travelers, affluent or not, would be keen to visit. “The nature in New Zealand is still relatively untouched,” says Cooper, the executive chairman of Cooper and Company (the company behind Britomart shopping mall in Auckland). “Its massive coastline, great scenic diversity, public spaces, sophisticated urban centers and top food and wine attract new thinkers who embrace its values.” With a population of four and a half million people, you can go days without seeing anyone and large protected areas of conservation are easy to find. The area’s friendly, unaffected and informed Kiwis and its indigenous Maori heritage give it a distinct culture and a stable, progressive government makes foreigners feel safe. The country boasts millions of farms (with countless sheep and cows always in sight) and a robust dairy, wool and meat exports. Within the last three years, the country has also benefited from a significant increase in airline service, with more international carriers f lying to Auckland than ever before (we f lew on Emirates airlines from New York City with a pitstop in Dubai). Air New Zealand’s new nonstop flight from Houston, Texas, also makes the trip from the Midwest and East Coast easier. New Zealand is a multistop destination offering seasonal year-round activities. From the winterless North to the snowy peaks of the South Island, there really is something for everyone’s holiday itinerary. From North to South, here’s how to do New Zealand justice in two weeks’ time.

Helena Bay Lodge, an over-the-top, eight-room resort that just opened on 800 acres in November in Hikurangi (a two-and-ahalf-hour drive from Auckland), faces east onto Helena Bay— making for magnif icent sunrises and dramatic skies. From rolling pastures and natural bush areas to more manicured, formal gardens, verdant greenery is everywhere you look. “The lodge has a kind of old-world feel about it from the moment you arrive that makes you naturally relax and unwind,” says general manager Neil McFarlane. “It has a strong sense of community spirit that makes you feel part of the ebb-and-f low of life here.” No expense has been spared in the sensational (and massive) rooms and common areas; the 25-meter pool faces lush mountain farmland, while the spa boasts a cold plunge pool, sauna and steam room. “When building the property, we tried not to encroach too much on Mother Nature’s intentions,” says McFarlane. The Lodge at Kauri Cliffs is set on a gorgeous location near Matauri Bay. The panoramic views of Cape Brett, the Pacific Ocean and Cavalli Islands are easily seen from the private porches of each of the 22 cottage suites, the main lodge and award-winning, cliff-top golf course. This was the first property that developer Julian Robertson and his late wife, Josie, opened in 2001 after falling in love with the country, and the property’s whitewashed New England look is truly memorable. “From the lodge, guests can enjoy picturesque views of the award-winning championship golf course, hike through an ancient kauri forest or relax on one of three private beaches,” says chief operating officer for the Robertson hotel group Euan Taylor. “Plus, some of the best island-hopping sailing is found in Northland.” The estate is spread out over 6,000 acres of rolling hills farmland and guests also have access to Robertson’s personal helicopter which can be rented for ecological and heritage tours of the area and to see the remaining ancient kauri forests of New Zealand.

H E L E N A B AY : C H R I S M C L E N N A N . I N T E R I O R : C H R I S W I L L I A M S

any American’s knowledge of New Zealand is limited to The Lord of the Rings trilogy. But what they may not know is that the humble, honest and understated style of New Zealand coupled with the lack of language or cultural barriers has been a huge draw for international tourists over the past decade. With its wide-open spaces, dramatic coastlines, Californiaesque climate and delicious food and wine, New Zealand’s diverse natural environment is a traveler’s dream. “Easy access to the ocean, mountains, lakes, beaches, streams, water and land activities, and great little cities and communities are just a few of the selling points,” says Matt Lines, a founder of New Zealand luxury-travel company Seasonz. The country is safe, easy to navigate, uncrowded and incredibly beautiful. The island’s quiet luxury is also a huge draw. “The pace of life, the natural environment, the rich cultural history and the climate make it an ideal setting for luxury destinations,” says Neil McFarlane, general manager at New Zealand’s Helena Bay Lodge. “Traveling through the country is an emotional and visceral experience.” Last but not least, the diversity of the landscape is unlike anywhere else in the world. “In Northland, for example, you might look across sandy beaches toward the Pacific, while down south a view of alpine lakes accounts for some of the world’s most dramatic mountain scenery,” explains Hall Cannon, managing director of the Otahuna Lodge outside of Christchurch. There is a discreetness that appeals to visitors, especially families and famous faces (Mick Jagger was spotted in the Bay of Islands recently). Maybe it’s that you can land a G4 at several airports, including Auckland and Christchurch, and then hop in a helicopter to the front lawn of a lodge without being seen by anyone but the pilot. Tiger Management founder and New Zealand pioneer Julian Robertson has owned three luxury lodges in the country (Matakauri Lodge, Kauri Cliffs and The Farm at Cape Kidnappers—the last two of which feature world-class golf courses) since 2001. Real estate financier Ric Kayne focused his energies on building the most expensive, members-only golf course in the country, the Tom Doak-designed Tara Iti Golf Club just north of Auckland. Newport Beach-based, New Zealandborn retail tycoon Peter Cooper continues to expand his stunning development The Landing in the Bay of Islands on the North Island with luxury villas to rent, a vineyard, boathouse and fitness and spa facility.

DUJOUR 71


CULTURE

T R AV E L

THE SOUTH ISLAND The 19th- centur y Vic tor ia n estate of O ta huna L odge, a 30-minute drive from Christchurch on the South Island, overlooks an ancient volcano and a 150-year-old botanic garden, originally laid out by a team trained at London’s Kew Gardens. “The absence of global, five-star chain properties has meant that independent hoteliers have been able to start from scratch and develop highly unique, deeply atmospheric lodges,” says Hall Cannon, managing director of Otahuna, who, along with his partner Miles Refo decamped from New York City to the South Pacific in 2005. “At Otahuna, we are able to show off our deep love for fantastic, locally sourced foods in a unique heritage environment.” The 30-acre estate is so special that it’s listed on the New Zealand Historic Places Trust. Robertson’s Matakauri Lodge—located on the South Island in Queenstown, known as “the adventure capital of the world”— offers striking views of Lake Wakatipu and rugged mountain peaks. The 12 individual, alpine-style bungalows face the Remarkables mountain range and offer jaw-dropping views from every room. “With stunning views across the alpine lake and rugged mountain peaks from f loor-to-ceiling windows, guests can enjoy uninterrupted views from any vantage point on property, allowing nature to take center stage,” says chief operating officer Euan Taylor. Don’t leave without booking a scenic helicopter ride through Milford Sound. “The f light takes you over alpine lakes, rivers and forests, and through glacial valleys and over ice capped mountains” says Taylor. “Plus, a chance to land directly on a glacier is a true New Zealand experience.”

A cliff-edge fairway perched 500 feet above sea level at The Farm at Cape Kidnappers’ golf course. Below: the country kitchen at Wharkeauhau where breakfast and lunch are served

72 DUJOUR

NEW ZEALAND’S MASSIVE COASTLINE, GREAT SCENIC DIVERSITY, PUBLIC SPACES, SOPHISTICATED URBAN CENTERS, AND TOP FOOD AND WINE ATTRACT NEW THINKERS WHO EMBRACE ITS VALUES

WINE COUNTRY WORTH VISITING New Zealand’s wine regions consistently produce fabulous white and red wines, many of which come from small, lesser-known vineyards. Discovering these gems and pairing their offerings up with the fabulous produce the country has to offer is a unique part of the journey. Cloudy Bay in Marlborough produces the country’s most famous sauvignon blanc and is one of the oldest wineries in the region. Craggy Range in Hawke’s Bay’s onsite restaurant Terrôir is gorgeous and delicious, serving local produce alongside the vineyard’s varietals set to the background of the Te Mata Peak mountain range. Gibbston Valley outside Queenstown features classic Central Otago wines in a stunning setting and is a great day trip from the city.

A GOLF COURSE UNLIKE ANY OTHER

M ATA K U R I LO D G E : M I Z WATA N A B E

The Landing in the Bay of Islands offers a different setup from a traditional lodge: four luxury villas to rent (which can accommodate four to 12 guests each), with a common vineyard, boathouse and fitness/spa facility exclusively for guests. The development is situated on Wairoa Bay and has its own jetty and beach, home to gorgeous 360-degree views of 144 islands—hence the name Bay of Islands. The historically significant land around the property features archaeological sites, restored wetlands, regenerated native bush and bird sanctuaries. For a pasttime that’s peak New Zealand, try nighttime kiwi bird–spotting around the bay. Located in the heart of Hawke’s Bay wine country and positioned above 6,000 rolling acres with views to the Pacific, the 24 suites at The Farm at Cape Kidnappers may be the most grand— and yet also down-to-earth—farm in the world. “The lodge’s design suggests a working farm for a more authentic experience, and affords views of the award-winning golf course carved alongside a dramatic cliffside that plunges into the ocean below,” says Taylor. The lodge is located in the heart of cabernet and chardonnay wine country, and the property is surrounded by a native Manuka bush sanctuary. Set above Palliser Bay, the secluded Wharekauhau Country Estate’s 13 freestanding cottage suites offer unparalleled vistas— some of which can be viewed from their massive bathtubs. An hour-and-a-half drive north of Wellington, Wairarapa is known for its vibrant farm life (you’ll find far more sheep than people), and its proximity to wine-growing regions. The Edwardian estate is set on a 5,500-acre working sheep and cattle farm with pastures, rivers and forests, as well as on a remarkable stretch of coastline. The property’s three-bedroom cottage was compelling enough for the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, who brought then eight-month-old Prince George with them for a visit to the island nation in 2014.

Top: The view of the Craggy Range vineyard from Te Mata Peak; sheep in New Zealand outnumber people six to one. Right: Breakfast on the patio overlooking Lake Wakatipu at Matakauri Lodge

The Tara Iti Golf Club, co-owned by Ric Kayne, opened in 2015 and has already solidified its reputation as the island’s most exclusive-and most expensive-course; membership, estimated to cost between $10,000 and $20,000 per year, is by invitation only. “The natural beauty and amount of open space also lends itself to terrain for great golf,” says partner Jim Rohrstaff, who oversees all of the real estate and membership activities for the property. “The course is playable year-round with a moderate climate and is a stunning coastline. There is very little true links land left like this anywhere in the world.” The green played host to the recent wedding of Los Angeles art dealer Maggie Kayne (Ric’s daughter) and Pressed Juicery co-founder Hayden Slater, which was attended by the Olsen sisters, who also designed the bride’s dress.

DUJOUR 73


P H O T O G R A P H BY M I K A E L S C H U L Z

WINTER 2017 Diane Kruger’s emotional and passionate performance for In The Fade inspires DuJour’s cover story and breathtaking images. Men’s and women’s fashion are intimately presented in o e s o r ry i ide gives you perfect present ideas for the friend who has it all.

On Mina: Dress, $4,400, GUCCI, gucci.com. Shoe, $1,095, CHRISTOPHER KANE, christopherkane.com. Earring with white diamonds in 18-karat gold, $21,000, necklace with white diamonds in 18-karat gold, $80,000, ring, with black diamonds in 18-karat white gold, $9,500, MISAHARA, misahara.com. Ring, with diamonds in 18-karat gold, price upon request, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, vancleefarpels .com. Ring, $9,700, ROBERTO COIN, 212486-4545. On Mariano: Jacket, $2,400, pant, $850, shirt, $1,250, boots, $1,550, GUCCI, gucci.com. Watch, $4,700, ZENITH ELITE, zenith-watches.com.


DIANE KRUGER BRINGS PASSION AND RAW EMOTION TO HER FIRST MAJOR STARRING ROLE ADRIENNE GAFFNEY PHOTOGRAPHED BY MAX ABADIAN STYLED BY MICAELA ERLANGER BY

76 DUJOUR


Top, $2,295, pant, $2,695, JASON WU, Saks Fifth Avenue. Previous spread: Coat, $4,920, dress, $1,590, LANVIN, 646-439-0380.

EATED ON A SLEEK HOTEL SUITE SOFA AND ENSCONCED IN a plush robe, Diane Kruger seems an impossible distance away from the f ilm role that earned her a Best Actress Award at Cannes and whispers of an Oscar nomination. But the brutally painful role remains within her. “It was like a wall and I still feel it,” she admits. The part was Katja Sekerci, a scrappy wife and mother whose life is upended when her husband and child, both of Turkish descent, are killed by a terrorist bomb, in director Fatih Akin’s film In the Fade. It’s Kruger’s first major starring role. It’s also her first time acting in a German production, which took the 41-year-old back to the country she left as a teenager. The first seeds of the project were sown in 2012 when Kruger approached Akin, the celebrated German director of The Edge of Heaven, at a Cannes Film Festival party, telling him she dreamed of working with him. “I’ve been waiting for a part from Germany,” she explains. “I left a long time ago, 25 years, and I wasn’t an actress when I left. I don’t know anyone in the movie industry there.” In the time away from her home country, Kruger had studied ballet in London, become a model for brands like Chanel, Armani and Christian Dior, and acted in films like Troy, Inglorious Basterds and The Infiltrator as well as the acclaimed FX television series The Bridge. Despite the breadth of her experience, the role that Akin crafted was one that departed starkly from anything Kruger had worked on prior, or even seen on screen. “When I got the script I was like, how is he thinking about me? Obviously it’s not really something I get offered all the time. I was really scared of the role and I was really scared of being home. I definitely had started feeling a little foreign in Germany,” she says. Despite her hesitation, Kruger realized the significance of the part and was willing to go in deep to make it happen. On Akin’s insistence, Kruger relocated to Germany four months prior to filming and immersed herself in preparation. In the Fade follows Katja from the murder of her family by neoNazis, through a criminal trial and her overpowering desire for revenge in the months and years afterwards. The script is remarkably prescient, speaking not just to the violence of our time but also the horrifying waves of anti-immigrant sentiment wreaking havoc around the world. “I’ve never met such a concentrated person in my whole set life,” says director Akin. The moment she’s on set, the moment she’s acting, there’s nothing else existing than the character and the work. She’s very focused. She’s acting with no fear. That was my prejudice; because she’s a former model, I expected that she would be much more scared about the acting and I’d have to lead her more but that was not the case. She seemed to be not

afraid about anything.” Readying herself for the part was a process that included speaking to mothers who had lost children, many to murder. “I met maybe 25 people, and that energy and what I heard and listened to and what I saw, it just shaped me and made me a different person. It’s very difficult to explain because it’s an energy,” she says. Working in Germany, with a German director and actors, made for an awakening for Kruger, who reconnected to parts of herself she’d been away from for so long. “It really brought me back to my roots, I have to say. There was an obviousness to the character, a cultural obviousness, that was just so ingrained within me and I had forgotten about,” she says. “I felt in my place. I knew this person. I grew up with this person.” Kruger’s experience filming was difficult, both on and off set. She calls 2016 “a really dark year.” Her beloved grandmother passed away and later, while she was making In the Fade, Kruger’s stepfather of 25 years also died. “I was dealing with playing grief all day long everyday and would come home and feel an immense grief and my mom being alone,” she recalls. “I felt like I was drowning. I don’t have great memories of making the movie because it was really dark, and you’re in Hamburg and it’s freezing and gray.” Those feelings have been hard to shake. In the Fade has garnered a very warm reception and was chosen by Germany as the country’s official Oscar selection; the nature of the film, however, makes it hard to celebrate the accolades. Attending the Cannes Film Festival, where Kruger was honored for the role, was a particularly conf licting experience. “I really felt like I paid. Something in me went with this movie on a personal level. I hadn’t been able to work since, I couldn’t get out of this part. I was dealing with family issues,” she says of that time. While Kruger was attending the festival, an attack at a Manchester Arena Ariana Grande concert left 23 people dead, many of them young girls. That the film related so fiercely to reality made her award a mixed blessing. “I was really overcome with emotion and then at the same time it felt so bizarre to be congratulated about that particular role,” she says. “It felt like, Oh, my gosh, how do you speak about this movie, how do you promote this movie? It was very mixed emotions, really. Wonderful and amazing but definitely not just like, yes! For this kind of thing, I really felt the responsibility and I felt those mothers that lost their kids.” It seems a foregone conclusion that Kruger’s savagely intense and painfully compelling performance will put her on the Hollywood radar in an increased way, though she is circumspect when asked about it. She realizes that her career, whic has

DUJOUR 79


Dress, $11,500, Les Ateliers du Cosmos earrings with blue crystals, price upon request, DIOR, 800-929-3467. Ring in pink gold with diamonds and tanzanite, $4,480, SELIM MOUZANNAR, Elyse Walker boutiques. Opposite: Sweater, $530, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO, 866-337-7242.

DUJOUR 81


THE MOMENT SHE’S ON SET, THE MOMENT SHE’S ACTING, THERE’S NOTHING ELSE EXISTING THAN THE CHARACTER AND THE WORK. SHE’S VERY FOCUSED. SHE’S ACTING WITH NO FEAR.

included both American and French films (she’s a f luent speaker and lives much of the time in Paris), blockbusters and indies, has taken an unorthodox path. While she’s avoided landing in a niche and been able to develop a full-bodied slate of diverse performances, she sometimes wonders if that has come at the expense of other, bigger opportunities. “It was always my dream to be able to work in different languages and in different cinemas, families of cinemas. I think sometimes that has worked to my advantage because people don’t really know what I am, if I’m an American or if I’m European,” she says. “Then sometimes I think it was to my disadvantage. I definitely wanted to make a French movie and turned down maybe an opportunity that I would have had here and vice versa.” Coming up in November, Kruger will appear the film Tout nous sépare, alongside Catherine Deneuve. She’s also been cast in the biopic of John Kennedy Toole, author of A Confederacy of Dunces, called a Butterfly in the Typewriter and in JT Leroy, a narrative account of the notorious literary hoax, as well as in director Robert Zemeckis’s upcoming fantasy The Women of Marwen. Kruger has also recently optioned the book Hedy’s Folly by Richard Rhodes, which looks at the screen star Hedy Lamarr’s secondary career as an inventor, creating radio technology that later became the basis for Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, and will produce a miniseries based on it. She hopes that the smash success of Hidden Figures is alerting the powers that be of the appetite for stories about women working in science. “I consider myself fairly intelligent, functioning; I can get from A to B. I read and I’m interested in what happens in the world, but I’m not book smart. I didn’t go to university. I didn’t study anything that could change the world,” she says of her intense enthusiasm for the story. “I love that she was someone who thought outside the box and was given an opportunity to just make things, imagine things. I want girls to be encouraged to do that. You don’t have to go to Harvard.” Iv y League or not, Kruger in person is strikingly bright, thoughtful and warm. While her personal life has been the source of much coverage—the 2016 end of 10-year partnership with the actor Joshua Jackson and her new relationship with Walking Dead star Norman Reedus both making headlines—she convincingly describes herself as a homebody who’s most interested in hosting dinners with close friends like the designer Jason Wu or watching episodes of the comedy series Eastbound & Down. Another companion is her cat Hobbes, a gray and white beauty that’s posed with her in the pages of fashion magazines, who she says is at once sweet and a source irritation. “I’ve become this actress that travels with a frigging cat!” she declares with exasperation. “I was shooting in Vancouver and I was like, Nope, I

82 DUJOUR

have to bring the cat. I’m there for weeks. So I’m the girl with, like, the cat out of the carrier going through security. Everybody’s like, Ugh, and I’m like, Oh, God, I’m that actress.” Like many of those whom the public rabidly seeks out private tidbits, Kruger has to balance what to reveal and what to hold close. To that end, Instagram has become a much appreciated outlet. “I love sharing certain aspects of my life. I’m a very visual person so it’s not just selfies, it’s stuff I like or stuff I find funny. It seems to me that for the first time, I have really great contact with people who like my work or just like me,” she says. Her posts aren’t always generating praise, but she welcomes the dissenters, as well. “Sometimes I post stuff and shit storms happen but it doesn’t matter. That’s what I stand for.” That online candor has helped reveal a new image of Kruger, showing that while she might be beautiful and impeccably styled, she’s far from a hothouse f lower: quick with four-letter words, sharp jokes and grunge-music recommendations. While her half a million–plus followers are well-acquainted with Kruger’s keen sense of humor, it’s a quality that has rarely been explored in her film roles. She had a unique opportunity to show it off this summer when Funny or Die recruited her to play Kellyanne Conway in a video for the site. “At first I was kind of offended like, What, do I look like her? And then I was like, No, absolutely you have to do it,” she recalls. The finished product, a two-and-a-half-minute trailer for a fictitious Lifetime movie where Kruger portrays the Trump hired gun guzzling wine, spinning his Access Hollywood tape and choking Mike Pence while threatening him to “get onboard or you go home to your fucking farm cow Indiana.” Kruger loved the experience and is eager to do more, recruiting me to get out the message that she’s in the comedy game. “I’d love to do more comedy. I’d love that. Throw it out there, I’m counting on you.” It’s likely that Kruger will soon have her pick of projects. In the Fade is the kind of project that, depending on its roll-out and reception, has the potential to transform an actor’s reputation and life. Still weeks away from its release, she’s focused much less on the fanfare than on the connection it sparks within those who are grieving. The constant barrage of deadly incidents happening around the world reminds her that countless Katjas are being created every day. “I really hope that on a human level people can connect. I can only speak for myself, but sometimes you look at what is happening, all the terrible things that happen on TV, with people being reduced to numbers; then you move on to the next,” she says. “I think we forget sometimes what it really creates on an everyday level; what injustice and those kinds of things do to people.” ■

Coat, $3,650, CÉLINE, 212-535-3703. Bodysuit, $1,195, DOLCE & GABBANA, select boutiques. Shoe, $895, CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN, Christianlouboutin .com. A Cheval earrings with diamonds in 18-karat yellow gold, price upon request, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, vancleefarpels.com. Hair: Serge Normant using Serge Normant Hair Care at STATEMENT Artists. Makeup: Hung Vanngo at The Wall Group using Marc Jacobs Beauty. Manicure: Casey Herman for La Prairie at The Wall Group. Location: Jewel Suite at the Lotte New York Palace.


DUJOUR’S LUXURY

GIFT GUIDE ni

Celebrate the season of giving with elevated, e nds that o r riends and a il will o et ore er FEATURE PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFFREY WESTBROOK

VALENTINO GARAVANI Resort 2018 Rings, $495, Valentino Boutiques

FENDI Fun Fair Gelato Cone Charm, $700, fendi.com

BOTTEGA VENETA Thyme Gloves in Refi ned Shearling, $770, bottegaveneta.com/us

FURLA Metropolis Jungle Mini, $428, furla.com

JO MALONE LONDON Limited Edition Advent Calendar, $440, jomalone.com

BURBERRY The Doodle Tote, $850, burberry.com

LOUISE ET CIE Anyi Flat, $110.00, louiseetcie.com

Fashion & Style Gifts

As a tr e ashion lo er o ll ha e to think o tside the loset or the per e t present. his season endi r err and alentino ring s so e o o r a orite gi s 84 DUJOUR

Star Light, Star Bright Giuseppe Zanotti’s exclusive capsule collection lights up the holiday season with a striking array of crystalembellished metal-star appliques. Handcrafted in rose-gold and silvermirrored leather as well as black patent, the capsule boasts a high-heel, pictured here. A flat sandal and matching clutch are also available. Harmony Star Gold Three Strap Sandal, $1,150, giuseppezanotti.com


Mixed Metals

Gifts that Give Back

Handcrafted by refugee artisans from Burkina Faso, these bronze, copper and aluminum bowls are hammered, filled and polished by women before being coated with traditionally tanned leather. The proceeds go to Global Goods Partners, a nonprofit committed to providing sustainable jobs for women to aid in community development and family wellbeing. $120, globalgoodspartners.org

ra e the spirit o the holida season with these harita le gi s that keep on gi ing

BOMBAS Crew Striped Four-Pack, $46, buy a pair, donate a pair to homeless shelters in the U.S., bombas.com APOLIS Wine Tote, $88, a co-op of artisan women in Bangladesh create the bag, which is then fi nished in California, apolis.com

WARBY PARKER + DARCEL monocle, starting at $50, a buy a pair, give a pair philosophy to alleviate the problem of impaired vision, warbyparker.com

HAND IN HAND Travel Size Sea Salt Bar Soap, $3, one bar sold provides a bar and a month of clean water to a child in need, handinhandsoap.com

PROSPERITY CANDLE Color Brilliance Candle, $36, providing jobs to women artisans in the U.S., prosperitycandle.com DELLA Symmetry 13” Macbook Case, $48, providing jobs, education and skills training in West Africa, dellala.com

ALEJANDRO DÍAZ hand-painted ink on clay large skull, $50, proceeds go to benefi t master artisans throughout Mexico, lazo.global

POPINJAY Adele Silk Scarf, $118, offering women in China a path to self-suff iciency, popinjay.com

S’WELL Swarovski Brilliance Collection, $150, for the (RED) organization, swellbottle.com

BADALA Carala Tassel Pillow, $50, offering employment programs to women in East Africa and Central America, badala.org

i

ide 2017

DUJOUR 87


Gifts for the Home Entertainer te the holida season in per e t st le as o wel o e e er one into o r ho e

MAISON 24 Lit Linen Cocktail Napkin, $40, maison24.com

BACCARAT Atlantic Service set, $7,500, baccarat.com

GREY GOOSE Flour Tin, $48, reservebar.com

TOM DIXON Bump Teapot, $145, tomdixon.net

EMILIO PUCCI FOR ILLY Art Collection Mug set, $55, illy.com

CLARIDGE’S The Cookbook, $40, amazon.com

RESTORATION HARDWARE 1950s Milo Bar Cart, $895, restorationhardware.com

88 DUJOUR

MOOD BY CHRISTOFLE 24-Piece Flatware Set for Six in 24-carat Gold Gilded Metal, $12,000, christofl e.com

RIEDEL Fatto a Mano Glasses, $100/each, riedelusa.net

i

ide 2017

Bar None Stocking a bar cart is more fun when it comes from Restoration Hardware. Here we’ve gathered our favorite sparkling spirits—perfect for spreading that holiday cheer. Absolut Elyx — Single Estate Handcrafted Vodka, $94, elyxboutique.com; Palmes d’Or Brut 2006, $153, nicolas-feuillatte.com; Champagne Armand de Brignac, Gold Brut, $300, sherry-lehmann.com; Opihr Oriental Spiced Gin, $30, opihr.com; Hennessy Paradis Impérial, $3,000, hennessy.com. All items photographed on the RH, Restoration Hardware, 1950s Milo Bar Cart, $895-$1095, RH.com.


Loud and Clear Listen up as the Beosound 2 from Bang & Olufsen hits you with amplified 360-degree sound quality. Its sleek, rock-solid aluminum design makes it more of a centerpiece than the usual, hidden-away speaker, and at $1,995, you’ll want to show it off. bang-olufsen.com.

Tech Savvy Gifts

or o r riend who alread has the i hone tr an alternati e that an te hnophile will o sess o er

LACIE Bolt 3 Thunderbolt Solid-State Hard Drive, $1,999, adorama.com

SHINOLA The Runwell Turntable, $2,500, shinola.com

SAJE AROMATIME White Ultrasonic Diffuser, $189, saje.com

LG 65” OLED Wallpaper TV, $6,999, crutchfi eld.com

AURA FRAME Jonathan Adler Edition, $399, auraframes.com and in select Jonathan Adler stores

MOLESKINE Smart Planner, $29, us.moleskine.com

APPLE WATCH HERMÈS Series 3 Stainless Steel Case with Noir Gala Leather Single Tour Rallye, $1,299, applewatchhermes.hermes.com

i

GUESS Glitter iPhone Case, $22, shop.guess.com

ide 2017

NATIVE UNION Eclipse USB-C Fast Charging Hub, $79, nativeunion.com

DUJOUR 91


For the person who has Everything ow do o shop or a riend who has it all o a o e and e ond with these rare and re arka le gi s

SUGARFINA 24k Gold Champagne Bears, $150, sugarfina.com

SWAROVSKI STAR WARS Darth Vader, $10,250, swarovski.com

LLADRÓ Ivy & Seed Chandelier, $9,500, lladró.com

FABERGÉ Rococo Egg Objet, price on application, sales@faberge.com

BYREDO Hand Cream Squeezer, $330, byredo.com

MERT ALAS MARCUS PIGGOTT, book, $700, taschen.com

92 DUJOUR

DAMIEN HIRST & LALIQUE Eternal Beauty Signed Panel, $31,500, Inquire at lalique.com

ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA Dominos, $1,195, zegna.com

PORSCHE DESIGN Solid Gold Fountain Pen Limited Edition, $29,000, porsche-design.com

ASTON MARTIN DB 11, Volante, $ $216,495, Available at Aston Martin Dealers

i

ide 2017

All Fun and Games The spinning top is an ancient game reinterpreted here by Armani using ebony, maple and enamel while keeping it fun and amusing. The colored spinning tops move on a square board where the shiny round concavity contrasts with the matte frame, all handmade in Italy. The price for the Armani/ Casa “MOON” tabletop game is $2,010 and is available in both Armani Casa’s Los Angeles and New York showrooms.


THESE ACTORS ARE NOT NECESSARILY NEW TO HOLLYWOOD, BUT THEIR CURRENT ROLES ARE BRINGING YOUTHFUL ENTHUSIASM TO THE BIG AND SMALL SCREENS

NEW ENERGY

BY SAMUEL ANDERSON

Fionn Whitehead

94 DUJOUR

P H O T O G R A P H BY B R O O K L I N R O S E N S T O C K

Ross Lynch

P H O T O G R A P H BY R O K A S DA R U L I S

WHEN HE WAS CAST AS THE LEAD IN CHRISTOPHER NOLAN’S behemoth war f lick Dunkirk, 20-year-old Fionn Whitehead hadn’t spent much time as a struggling actor—but his resumé suggested otherwise. “I was a barista and a childminder,” he says, “and a boat driver on the River Thames in London.” The theaterkid son of a jazz musician, Whitehead left high school at 17 with the intention of attending drama school—to no avail. “I applied to loads of different schools, really kind of desperate to get in,” he says. “I was told to reapply but didn’t have enough money.” But Whitehead wasted little time paying his dues in odd jobs, searching casting calls online. “I was just logging on at work whenever I had free time [to send] my crappy, homemade CV with a really grainy photo taken on my laptop,” he says, “and getting no response.” But onward he slogged. “Once I left college … I kind of knew that I wanted to do it. It’s kind of hard to describe. But it’s just an urge or a compulsion. So I just pursued it on my own; quite viciously, I suppose.” Then, a monumental break: after appearing in the UK miniseries Him, he scored an agent who arranged his Dunkirk audition. “It was a series of very lucky events in a strangely small space of time,” says Whitehead, who beat out thousands for the top-billed role of Tommy. For the five-week shoot, Whitehead immersed himself in Nolan’s sweeping set. “There was very little postproduction, so a lot of it was real and rigged to look as real as possible on camera and in the moment,” he says. “To be on the beach with real spitfires overhead and 1,300 extras dressed as soldiers. … It was really incredible.” Like the effects, there was nothing fake about the bond that developed onset between his band of brothers, which included Harry Styles and Barry Keoghan: “We were the middle of nowhere so you kind of have to let people in, otherwise you’ll go insane.” But unlike most 20-year-olds, Whitehead abstains from social media. “I think that my absence on [it] is just a ref lection of my own slightly awkward shyness,” he says. “I’ve always been kind of a private guy and it would be nice to keep it that way.”

WHEN IT COMES TO TRANSITIONING FROM CHILD TO ADULT actor, some make a complete one-eighty; take Former Mouseketeer Ryan Gosling, who had played a teenage serial killer and a neo-Nazi by the time he made The Notebook. That said, when it comes to molting one’s Disney exterior, Ross Lynch may be the most extreme case study yet. If you’re familiar with Lynch’s previous work, you are probably a tween; Lynch, 22, is best known as one half of the musical duo from Disney Channel’s series Austin & Ally. But for his first feature film role, Lynch chose the gonzo, gore-tinged coming-of-age tale My Friend Dahmer—in which he plays the titular role. Based on a graphic novel by one of Jeffrey Dahmer’s real-life high school classmates, the film tracks the killer’s rocky adolescence just before his 17-victim spree began. Most young actors might have resisted the prospect of humanizing a serial killer, but not Lynch. “I made a self-tape[d audition] with my band 5R’s tour photographer, and he was like, ‘You’re going to get this; that was really good,’” says Lynch, who had never heard of Dahmer before reading the script. “The self-

tape was just sort of an exploration. I just put myself in the headspace and took a whack at it.” And despite his high profile as Austin (who inspired a wax figure in the character’s likeness at Madame Tussauds Orlando), the character of Dahmer was harder to detach from once he started filming. “Dahmer’s harder to shed then most of the other characters that I’ve played. I found myself going home at night and just sitting in the shower for a little longer than usual to sort of decompress and steam out,” he says. “I had this hair dye in my hair everyday, which I use as a metaphor. When I watched the hair dye going down the drain, that was my version of my shedding Dahmer from the day.” Next up, Lynch will return to lighter fare as the lead in Status Update, a teen comedy from the team behind 17 Again. But, he says, he wants to keep audiences guessing. “I like being one of those guys where you can’t really predict what I’m going to do next,” says Lynch. “I think that’s kind of cool, whether it’s a teen comedy film or an indie film where I play a serial killer. I like that.“

DUJOUR 95


Daniel Kaluuya IT WAS A BALMY LATE FEBRUARY, A TYPICALLY SLEEPY season for film releases, when the comedy-horror parable Get Out set the internet ablaze with its highly meme-able commentary on the perils of well-meaning white liberalism. The film centers on a young black man meeting his Caucasian girlfriend’s family, whose overeager reception betrays a terrifying agenda. While the main target of the film’s satire was Obama-era white magical thinking (“Racism solved!”), the critical and commercial rav ing ser ved as a salve for Trump’s presidency—and seemed to signal a turning point in Hollywood’s treatment of race: that weekend Moonlight won best picture and Get Out dominated the box office. But the film’s star, 28-year-old Londoner Daniel Kaluuya, doesn’t entertain fantasies about the impact one movie can have. “I feel what the film’s done is articulated an experience. It’s a touchstone where people can go, ‘Yeah, this,’ and feel like they aren’t crazy,” says Kaluuya. “But I can’t say it’s changed the political landscape.” Indeed, more chilling than any Hollywood horror was the real-life violence at the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville in August, which, came as no surprise to Kaluuya. “Everything that’s happened [this year], it’s like, yeah, racism exists. As a black person, you feel it.” But, says Kaluuya, blatant racism and social satire are two sides of the same coin: that any illusions of a post-racial America are gone. “[It’s] not that Get Out has brought [racism] to the fore, but it’s come to the fore because it’s there,” says the actor. “I just think the veil is slipping.” Kaluuya has always been interested in uncovering the truth. He wrote his first play at nine, and from 13 to 16 studied improv at a community theater. His big break was joining gritty British teen drama Skins as a staff writer at 18, drawing on his own experience growing up in London. Acting on the show followed, and Kaluuya eventually achieved crossover notoriety in the gut-punching second episode of sci-fi series Black Mirror, about a world governed by a Candy Crush–like VR game, when it hit Netflix. Next up, Kaluuya can be seen in Marvel’s highly anticipated, Afrocentric Black Panther followed by Steve McQueen’s Widows continuing his streak of high-impact, yet highly accessible, hits: “Someday I might feel like making 15 films that only Lithuanians watch,” he says. “But right now I feel like doing stuff for my friends.”

96 DUJOUR

previous generations of young actors, Sprouse subverts it (his Instagram account @camera_duels captures fans’ attempts to sneakily photograph him) and uses it to his advantage. “I think studios recognize that it’s fundamental to integrate social media into the success and the hype of a show,” he says. “Because the belief in a character is based on humanity and empathy, and I think all of us realize that we have to sell a little bit of that belief on social media. But it’s still kind of a wild west.” And like Jughead, there’s more to Sprouse than meets the eye. Even at Disney—that “Vaudevillian,” “very loud” acting school, in his words—he was attracted to dark, cerebral storytelling. “I grew up with a poster of The Twilight Zone’s [narrator and writer] Rod Serling,” he says of his inspiration for Jughead. He’s also a photographer, recently shooting Sam Smith for the cover of L’Uomo Vogue. With the CV of a Hollywood veteran and substance beyond his years, Sprouse’s potential is limitless. But like any good Millennial, he refuses to be boxed in: “I think if the work is quality then the work is quality. It doesn’t matter if it’s small or big screen.”

P H O T O G R A P H BY J E N N I F E R B A LC O M B E

COLE SPROUSE, STAR OF CW’S SUPERCHARGED ARCHIE Comics adaptation Riverdale, nurses a sly self-awareness that most child stars lose somewhere along the way. “I was never boxed in. It’s silly to even think I was boxed in,” he quickly volleys back when asked about the negative byproducts of growing up in the funhouse mirror that is Hollywood. “The opportunity I got to work in that environment was great. It’s just that after doing it for eight years, you have to learn what parts to take and what not to,” he adds, referring to his nearly decade-long Disney Channel run with his identical twin Dylan. To a certain generation, Cole and Dylan were the male analogs to Mary-Kate and Ashley, serving cuteness with preternatural comedic timing in 1999’s Big Daddy which led to full-blown Disney stardom on The Suite Life of Zack and Cody and Suite Life on Deck. But his role as the omniscient narrator and brooding best friend Jughead on Riverdale has already eclipsed Sprouse’s juvenilia. Like the character of Jughead, Sprouse stands out from the garden-variety hot people around him by outsmarting the system. While social media adds a layer of exposure unknown to

P H O T O G R A P H BY E VA A N K H E R A J

Cole Sprouse

[IT’S] NOT THAT GET OUT HAS BROUGHT [RACISM] TO THE FORE, BUT IT’S COME TO THE FORE BECAUSE IT’S THERE. I JUST THINK THE VEIL IS SLIPPING. DUJOUR 97


On Mina: Top, $495, skirt, $995, AREA, similar styles at Barneys New York. Coat, $1,195, FLEUR DU MAL, Fleur du Mal Pop Up Shop NYC. Shoe, $990, MIU MIU, miumiu .com. Ring with pink diamonds in 18-karat gold, $76,000, ring with diamonds in 18-karat white and pink gold, $25,000, ring with diamonds in 18-karat pink gold, $80,000, earring with diamonds in 18-karat white and pink gold, $25,000, J FINE, argylepinkdiamonds.us. On Mariano: Blazer, price upon request, pant, price upon request, LOUIS VUITTON, louisvuitton.com. Sweater, $1,700, ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA, select boutiques.

COUPLE

UP

Men’s and womenswear come together in our many-layered fashion portfolio — and you can’t deny the chemistry PHOTOGRAPHED BY

MIKAEL SCHULZ STYLED BY CARRIE WEIDNER


Dress, $3,000, socks, $730, shoe, $790, CÉLINE, 212-5353703. Earring, $445, REBECCA DE RAVENEL, rebeccaderavenel .com. Ring with diamonds in 18-karat yellow gold, $7,500, ring with diamonds in 18-karat gold, $5,600, MISAHARA, misahara.com. Pinky ring in 18-karat gold, $1,200, pinky ring in 18-karat gold, $1,100, ring with diamonds in 18-karat gold, $1,450, DAVID YURMAN, davidyurman.com. Opposite: Jacket, $4,500, shirt, $790, DIOR HOMME, 800-9293467. Pant, $595, VERSACE, select boutiques. Shoe, $895, VALENTINO, select boutiques.

DUJOUR 101


Dress, $13,500, panties, $930, DIOR, 800929-3467. Boots, $950, necklace with pearls, $350, FENDI, fendi.com. Hat, $198, JANESSA LEONE, janessaleone.com. Opposite, on Mina: Dress, $3,150, FENDI, fendi .com.Earring in 18-karat rose gold, $11,000, MISAHARA, misahara .com. On Mariano: Coat, $4,290, CALVIN KLEIN, calvinklein.com.

102 DUJOUR


Jacket, $3,695, shirt, $650, pant, $695, VALENTINO, select boutiques. Watch, $9,450, ROLEX, rolex.com. Opposite: Cardigan, $2,150, dress, $4,895, CHLOÉ, Saks Fifth Avenue. Shoe, $790, CELINE, 212-535-3703. Earring, CHLOÉ, similar styles available at Chloé boutiques. Ring with diamonds in 18-karat gold, $2,500, pinky ring in 18-karat gold, $1,100, ring with diamonds in 18-karat gold, $1,650, ring with diamonds in 18-karat gold, $1,450, DAVID YURMAN, davidyurman.com.


Dress, $2,595, CHRISTOPHER KANE, christopherkane.com. Boots, $1,275, VERSACE, versace.com. Beret, $276, CLYDE, clyde.com. Ring with white diamonds in 18-karat rose gold, price upon request, earring with white diamonds in 18-karat rose gold, price upon request, JACOB & CO., jacobandco.com. Opposite, on Mina: Cardigan and scarf, $2,795, skirt, $1,395, BURBERRY, burberry.com. Bra, $130, MAISON CLOSE, maison-close .com. Shoe, $685, AREA, similar styles available at Barneys New York. Necklace, with diamonds in 18-karat yellow gold, price upon request, earrings with diamonds in 18-karat yellow gold, $85,000, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, vancleefarpels.com. Ring with diamonds in 18-karat rose gold, $18,000, ring with diamonds in 18-karat yellow gold, $6,200, MISAHARA, misahara. com. Ring in 18-karat gold, $1,995 IPPOLITA, ippolita.com. Pinky ring in 18-karat gold, $1,100, ring with diamonds in 18-karat gold, $1,650, ring with diamonds in 18-karat gold, $1,450, DAVID YURMAN, davidyurman.com. On Mariano: Turtleneck, $1,150, blazer, $4,995, ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA, select boutiques. Pant, price upon request, NO. 21, numeroventuno.com. Watch, $20,390, BREITLING, breitling.com.

Hair: Benoit Moeyaert @TheWallgroup using Phyto. Makeup: Kajsa Svanberg using Chanel at Art Department. Models: Mina Cvetkovic/ Women Management NYC and Mariano Ontanon @ Next Model Management.

DUJOUR 107


Turtleneck, $2,245, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI, brunellocucinelli.com. Earrings with diamonds in 18-karat white gold, $4,200, DAVID YURMAN, davidyurman .com. Watch, $2,850, TAG HEUER, tagheuer.com.

DUJOUR.com

Master PLAN

PEEK INTO OUR DUJOUR.com DECEMBER COVER STORY WITH VENUS WILLIAMS WHERE THE LEGENDARY TENNIS PLAYER GIVES A GLIMPSE INTO HER NEW LIFE AS A DESIGNER BY ATALIE GIMMEL PHOTOGR APHED BY VICTORIA STEVENS STYLED BY ASHLEY PRUITT Dress, $1,275, jacket, $675, MAX MARA, Bergdorf Goodman. Ring in 18-karat rose gold, $2,900, DAVID YURMAN, davidyurman.com. RM 037 Ladies Automatic, $128,500, RICHARD MILLE, richardmille.com.

108 DUJOUR


Shirt, $50, ELEVEN BY VENUS WILLIAMS, similar styles available at elevenbyvenuswilliams .com. Pants, $845, MAX MARA, 212-879-6100. Jacket, $3,195, LANVIN, lanvin.com. Watch, $19,400, ROLEX, rolex .com. Earrings in 18-karat rose gold, $5,600, ROBERTO COIN, 212486-4545. Necklace with diamonds in 18-karat gold, $7,500, DAVID YURMAN, davidyurman.com. Hair: Nikki Nelms. Makeup: Johanna Rollins.

Sweater, $2,995, DOLCE & GABBANA, select boutiques. Shoes, $375, STUART WEITZMAN, stuartweitzman.com. Watch, $10,800, HUBLOT, 646-582-9813. Earrings with diamonds in 18-karat gold, $7,500, DAVID YURMAN, 212-752-4255.

VENUS WILLIAMS MAY BE FAMILIAR TO YOU AS AN ICON IN THE WORLD OF sports, but newer to her roster of achievements is a burgeoning career in the industries of fashion and interior design. The tennis star has launched two distinct companies—V-Starr and EleVen by Venus—and both stem from her lesser known passions for the worlds of design and entrepreneurship. And if you ask her about the pressure of having all eyes on her because of these endeavors, well, just imagine how the world’s fifth-ranking tennis player might view something as trivial as people’s expectations. “I’m so used to pressure in my life that I don’t think I could live without it,” Williams says. “Pressure is a privilege, and I’m okay with that. I thrive on it as a good thing.” But on the heels of preparing for the Australian Open, how will Williams balance the various hats she so expertly wears? “If you’re doing something that you love and enjoy, you also find joy in finding a way to make it work,” she says. This also includes attaining a master’s in interior design, which—by the way—is another thing she’s currently up to. For more from Williams on her latest endeavors, the inspirations behind her most inf luential work, and what exactly she has coming up next, be sure to see DuJour’s December digital cover.

DUJOUR 111


mermaids welcome

tropical oasis lounging iconic entertainment endless surprises seminolehardrockholly wood.com


ASPEN  CHICAGO  DALLAS

HOUSTON  LAS VEGAS  LOS ANGELES  MIAMI  NEW YORK CITY  ORANGE COUNTY  PALM BEACH  SAN FRANCISCO

P H O T O G R A P H BY J A M E S H A R R I S

CASCADING CUISINE The centerpiece of Bevy at the Park Hyatt hotel is the unique curved walnut stained bar. Once you’re there, order the Intertwined cocktail—a sultry mix of tequila, amaro, banana liqueur and cinnamon syrup topped off with a bay leaf. Executive Chef Sebastian Archambault perfectly executes the upscale American mix of a menu within the completely remodeled 80-seat space. The restaurant is crowned with a showstopper chandelier by Random International—the artists who brought you the ever-soimmersive Rain Room to the MoMA. bevynyc.com

DUJOUR 113


Aspen

ASPEN

CHICAGO

DALLAS

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

SNOWMASS HITS FIFTY

PALM BEACH

THE LITTLE NELL GETS A MAKEOVER palettes of blue, tan and gray to reflect the relaxed nature of Aspen. Key features include plush carpet in the guest rooms and corridors and details such as navy-blue ottomans and plush decorative pillows. New wall coverings behind the color-block headboards recall a mid-winter snowstorm— should guests not have had enough in their window views. thelittlenell.com.

WARM UP WITH WINTER WORDS Every year Aspen Words brings today’s most exciting authors to town for readings during its Winter Words series. One of the most anticipated is Tracy K. Smith, the Pulitzer Prize–winning poet and recently named U.S. Poet Laureate, who will be the opening speaker on Jan. 23. Other authors to include Orphan Train’s Cristina Baker Kline on Feb. 20, and William Finnegan, author of Barbarian Days, a Pulitzer Prize winner and New Yorker staff writer, on March 20. aspenwords.org

Awaken the Peace

S I X P E N N Y: G R A ZO P RO D U C T I O N

Inside The Little Nell’s makeover by Champalimaud Design

FURNITURE POPS UP IN THE MILE HIGH CITY

S N O W M A S S : J E S S E H O F F M A N . L I T T L E N E L L : S H AW N O ’ C O N N O R

Seen on a growing number Aspenites: wearable wellness jewelry created by Aspen gemologist and spiritual psychologist Katie Beckley. Raising one’s internal energy and vibration, Awaken the Peace bracelets, necklaces, charms and pendants are made of consciously sourced gemstones, precious metals and rare minerals. They are also generating quite the cult following of celebrity chefs such as Eric Ripert and Nobu Matsuhisa. Each design features a charm consisting of a propriety blend of metals, minerals and pure gemstones, composed to bring balance to its wearer. Sold exclusively in the Remede Spa at St. Regis Aspen Resort and online. awakenthepeace.com.

SAN FRANCISCO

 FOR MORE ON ASPEN, VISIT DUJOUR.COM /CITIES

Due in part to the House of Dior’s 70th anniversary last year, Dior exhibits are taking the world by storm, with recent stops in Paris, Melbourne, and Toronto. Now, “Dior: From Paris to the World” is coming to Colorado. The Denver exhibition will be the first major U.S. retrospective of the House of Dior and is set to open in November 2018 at the Denver Art Museum. It will feature a plethora of Dior treasures, including 150 couture dresses, accessories, photographs, runway videos, original sketches and a variety of other gems from the Dior archives. The House is also utilizing the exhibit to celebrate the works of its eight creative directors since the brand’s inception in 1946, up to the present day with Maria Grazia Chiuri, the first female to fill the role. — MARY ELIZABETH ANDRIOTIS

This winter marks the 50th anniversary of the Snowmass Ski Area

114 DUJOUR

ORANGE COUNTY

BON VOYAGE! DIOR IN DENVER

This winter, Snowmass Ski Area will commemorate its 50 th anniversary with a season’s worth of festivities. Celebrations include 1967-style pricing for lift tickets at $6.50 on Friday, Dec. 15, followed by an activity-packed weekend complete with a retro party at Elk Camp restaurant, fireworks, the return of Banana Days and an on-mountain celebration at Spider Sabich Picnic Area. The celebration continues throughout the season with new gold signs to mark original ski trails, monthly firework displays over Fanny Hill and a new mural in Base Village commemorating the history of Snowmass. aspensnowmass.com.

In time for winter, the Little Nell reveals a top-to-bottom renovation by New York–based luxury design firm Champalimaud Design. Refreshing the 52 guest rooms, 26 premium guest rooms, eight junior suites and all guest-floor corridors, the design was inspired by an “Authentic Aspen” motif. Champalimaud’s approach towards the project was to make the spaces fresh, light and welcoming, utilizing

NEW YORK CITY

Denver-based e-commerce home furnishing brand Sixpenny launched just last year, and already has a successful tour of pop-up shops under its belt. Now, following successful pop-ups in Los Angeles and New York City, Sixpenny is going back to its Denver roots. The shop is open in the Mile High City from November 2nd through December 31st. A place for shoppers to see products before purchasing them online, the shop’s Sip-N-Shop wine hours, flash sales and various events offer a unique look at the company’s vast selection of reasonably priced sofas, sectionals, arm chairs, ottomans, coffee and side tables, and more. With bonuses like free shipping, 30-day “no-fuss” returns and free, unlimited fabric and leather swatches, Sixpenny a userfriendly retail experience unlike any other. And what’s more: they donate 6% of net proceeds to charitable partners in the form of useful resources and supplies. Presently, their partner is Warren Village, a Denver-based non-profit organization that assists low income, single-parent families in achieving long-term economic stability. sixpenny.com —MARY ELIZABETH ANDRIOTIS

DUJOUR 115


Chicago

ASPEN

CHICAGO

DALLAS

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK CITY

A Family Affair

The new generation is shaking things up at furniture icon Walter E. Smithe

W

ith a 71-year history and 11 stores sprinkled throughout Chicago and the suburbs, Walter E. Smithe is a local furniture icon. Since 1945, the company has established itself as a reliable family-run retailer, with the second- and third-generation Smithe men at the helm. But now a new generation—sisters Meghan, Colleen, Maureen, and Caitie Smithe—is shaking things up in a big way. The Smithe sisters, all in their thirties, worked in the family business as teens but pursued different career paths in adulthood. By last year, though, each had returned to the company their great-grandfather founded. “We all trickled back in, and it happened really organically,” says Meghan of the industrious quartet, who collectively has 17 children. While their father and grandfather are still actively involved in the day-to-day, the women have taken over the company’s marketing, design, advertising and buying efforts—and immediately went about altering brand perceptions. “Nothing is left unchanged,” Meghan notes.

COMING UP ACES Following Viceroy Hotel’s suit, boutique chain Ace Hotels has opened its first Midwestern location. Located in an industrial concrete and glass building in the West Loop—which once housed an Italian-American The first order of business: ditch the longstanding, highly recognizable ad campaign featuring their father and two uncles. “It worked really well for a long time, but post-recession, we saw people’s sensibilities had changed,” says Meghan. “Customers were more concerned with what we were selling versus the people who were selling it,” she adds. The new campaign, dubbed “Smithe Family Makeovers,” showcases Smithe furniture in the homes of actual clients, revealing the handiwork of the company’s designers in HGTV-esque episodes. The campaign was inspired in part by a partnership with designer/house-

flipper Jeff Lewis of the Bravo show Flipping Out. Lewis teamed up with Smithe’s merchandising team to create in-store vignettes, and also featured the store on his show. Additional partnerships with the likes of Cynthia Rowley and Ellen Degeneres have exposed the company to a new customer base. “My sisters and I represent the viewpoint of our younger clientele,” Meghan says. But she’s quick to point out that the business is still very much a multigenerational effort, noting that their 81-year-old grandfather still regularly meets with clients. “We feel like we can now speak to the multitude of generations who shop with us,” she says. smithe.com

The Smithe sisters are working to expose the brand to a new customer base

ORANGE COUNTY

cheesemaking company—the hotel pays homage to the ever-evolving design history of the city. Its utilitarian design incorporates Midwestern craftsmanship, evoking Mies Van Der Rohe’s work at the Illinois Institute of Technology with clean lines, hand-woven textiles and muted hues. The spacious Loft room honors the designs of Arne Jacobsen and Richard Neutra with built-in plywood and linoleum furnishings juxtaposed with polished steel. Music lovers take note: select rooms include an acoustic Martin Guitar and/or a turntable with a curated selection of vinyl. acehotel.com

 FOR MORE ON CHICAGO, VISIT DUJOUR.COM/CITIES

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

KEY TO THE CITY

Billy Lawless Galway, Ireland, native Billy Lawless has five successful restaurants (Acanto, Beacon Tavern, Coda di Volpe, The Dawson and The Gage), a larger-than-life personality and a deep love for the city he’s called home for 20 years. When he scores a rare moment of downtime, here’s where he’ll likely be. CUP OF JOE

At Caffe Streets in Wicker Park, I chat with the owner, Darko, over a cortado. It’s also where I get the Metric coffee that we carry at a few of our restaurants. caffestreets.com POWER LUNCH

I’m usually hosting the power lunchers, but on the weekends I go to Spinning J in Humboldt Park, where the housemade breads, scones and quiches are fantastic. spinning j.com COCKTAIL HOUR

I don’t drink but if I did I’d go to Delilah’s, the best whiskey dive bar in the city. delilahschicago.com RETAIL THERAPY

I enjoy chatting with Alex and longing over the beautiful watches at Geneva Seal, a familyowned jeweler in the Gold Coast. genevaseal.com

116 DUJOUR

San Francisco–based Credo has introduced Chicago to what the company deems “clean beauty.” Their products— which range from skincare and makeup to fragrances—come from lines that are cruelty-free, environmentally friendly and loaded up with organic ingredients. The new Bucktown store also houses a spa that offers signature facials, waxing and makeup application. credobeauty.com

AC E H O T E L : S P E N C E R LO W E L L . B I L LY L AW L E S S : GA L D O N E S P H O T O G R A P H Y. C I T Y M O U S E : A N J A L I P I N T O

FRESH FACED

S M I T H E S I S T E R S : R O B I N S U B A R . C R E D O : K KO O N T Z

AMERICAN CLASSIC Boka Restaurant Group has made its Gold Coast debut with James Beard nominees and Boka Restaurant chefs Lee Wolen and Meg Galus. The décor of Somerset, Viceroy Chicago’s ground-floor tenant riffs on American country-club culture; the cuisine, fittingly, showcases classic American flavors. Wolen’s breakfast, lunch and dinner menus teem with local ingredients, while pastry pro Galus turns out a dizzying array of sweets. somersetchicago.com

FIELD TRIP

MIDWESTERN LOCAL

Chef Jason Vincent and his team from Logan Square hotspot Giant have opened airy, all-day restaurant City Mouse inside Ace Hotel. Vincent and executive chef Pat Sheerin (formerly of Trenchermen) serve up Midwestern pride, emphasizing locally produced ingredients—many sourced just feet away at the building’s 2000-square-foot rooftop farm—and recreating regional culinary staples. citymousechicago.com

We’re lucky the Art Institute is steps away from both Acanto and The Gage. I love popping over for a few moments when I have a break. artic.edu DATE NIGHT

For the past few years the go-to has been Avec, where my wife and I enjoy a late dinner. avecrestaurant.com HIDDEN GEM

I head to Red Square Spa, the Russian and Turkish Baths in Wicker Park. redsquarechicago.com

DUJOUR 117


Dallas

CHICAGO

DALLAS

HOUSTON

A Retro Icon Returns Nothing has been more eagerly anticipated by preservationists and hipsters alike than the Statler Hotel & Residences. Abandoned and forlorn for years, the downtown building is a midcentury modern landmark that debuted in 1956 as one of the most glamorous hotels in the world, the Statler-Hilton. A $225-million overhaul retooled it into a Curio by Hilton with apartments, restaurants, a concert venue, and a rooftop pool and bar with panoramic views. Doormen sporting black cowboy hats, boots and western suits usher guests into the sweeping white marble lobby, now highlighted by a 40-foot modern mural by Jack Lubin. Visitors and locals can savor dim sum and roast duck at Fine China, southern

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK CITY

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

ASPEN

1950s-era Statler-Hilton hotel. Bottom: The French Room at the Adolphus Hotel.

biscuits and farm-to-table diner fare at Overeasy, and craft cocktails at Bourbon & Banter or Waterproof, the rooftop lounge with a view. In addition, Scout sports bar presents craft beer with billiards and foosball. The Statler introduced elevator music to the world, a tradition gleefully reinvented as a Spotify channel of “retro forward” tunes by the likes of Leon Bridges, Otis Redding and Tony Bennett. statlerresidences.com

CHICAGO

DALLAS

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK CITY

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

TAKE IT OUTSIDE As 2018 nears and New Year’s resolutions come into focus, ’tis the season to rethink the old workout. A new Heights-area workout concept answers the call by encouraging its students to train for fitness challenges out in the world, whether that means hiking, running a marathon, biking to Austin or attempting an obstacle course. Method + Crew Fitness is an “adventurefocused fitness studio that empowers members to be active outdoors, equipping them with strong bodies,” explains owner and lead trainer and native Houstonian Aaron Holmes. “By keeping the workouts challenging in a supportive atmosphere, and making the lifestyle more accessible, we will see people reach goals they wouldn’t have thought possible,” he says. Classes include yoga, cardio kickboxing and monthly workshops like rock-climbing basics, camping 101 and gearing up for backpacking. methodandcrew.com

 FOR MORE ON DALLAS, VISIT DUJOUR.COM /CITIES

PARIS, TEXAS

C LO C K W I S E F R O M T O P : LOV E L E E . J E N N Y A N T I L L . K I M B E R LY PA R K . M O N I C A K R E

com/the-french-room

HIGH TIDES Set in a charming little bungalow, Field & Tides serves up Gulf Coast and Southern dishes focusing on locally sourced ingredients, plus can’t-miss craft cocktails. Field represents the land proteins while Tides represents the seafood. (Think pimento cheese fritters, scallops with shrimp and crab risotto, and a burger with IPA creole mustard on challah.) The restaurant also led the way post-Harvey, hosting several pop-up wine dinners to benefit locals who had to rebuild, and will continue to plan food-driven events to help Houston causes. fi eldandtides.com

F R O M T O P T O B O T T O M : F R O M T H E C O L L E C T I O N S O F T H E DA L L A S H I S T O RY & A R C H I V E S D I V I S I O N , DA L L A S P U B L I C L I B R A RY. S T E V E N V I S N E A U

The French Room, the Adolphus Hotel’s venerable restaurant, reclaims its spot as a crown jewel of Dallas dining. Shuttered in June 2016 for an extensive facelift, the elegant space glows with creamy Venetian plaster, gold leaf accents, twin Murano glass chandeliers and a green marble floor. Taste three, seven or 15 courses by Daniel Boulud veteran Michael Ehlert, who modeled the cuisine after foundational French chef Auguste Escoffier. It’s all part of a massive renovation of the 1912 Beaux Arts building on Commerce Street, a block from Neiman Marcus. adolphus.

118 DUJOUR

HOUSTON

PRIME SPOT Despite Killen’s STQ’s casual vibe, the “King of Meat” Ronnie Killen’s latest steak and barbecue joint has become one of the city’s hardest reservations to nab. A cozy, 60-seat comfort food joint with limitless good tastes, but limited space makes it seriously difficult to score a seat unless you book a few weeks in advance. To help meet demand, Killen added lunch service in November, but only Thursday through Saturday. killensstq.com

Houston

ASPEN

KEY TO THE CITY

Caroline Harper-Knapp Houstonian Caroline Harper-Knapp spent nearly a decade in fashion as a buyer for Neiman Marcus and Gilt Group. Then in 2014 she started her own online platform, House of Harper, which today draws nearly 100,000 page views a month with its winning blend of style, travel and parenthood-related content. Here’s where you’ll find her when she’s not having it all: POWER LUNCH

I love La Table. It’s conveniently close to home and the kids’ school, so it’s easy to sneak away for a healthy bite. The atmosphere is fantastic as well. latablehouston.com COCKTAIL HOUR

As a mom of two littles (Knox, 4, and Andrew, 2), cocktail hour is typically spent sipping wine with my husband on our patio after we put the boys to bed. If I do get out for a date night or girls’ night, Le Colonial is a great spot to grab dinner and a drink at the bar. lecolonialhouston.com RETAIL THERAPY

The Webster opened in the Galleria, and it’s so fun to browse all the latest trends. I love their merchandising and displays! thewebster.us DATE NIGHT

We typically go for sushi or somewhere that isn’t as family-friendly on our date nights. Kata Robata is our go-to, but my new favorite is Yauatcha. The dumplings are to die for. yauatcha.com HIDDEN GEM

 FOR MORE ON HOUSTON, VISIT DUJOUR.COM/CITIES

The Vintage Contessa, which sells authentic vintage luxury handbags and fine jewelry, is tucked in a discreet, high-security office building— where all of your Chanel and Hèrmes dreams await! thevintagecontessa.com

DUJOUR 119


Las Vegas

ASPEN

CHICAGO

DALLAS

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK CITY

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

KEY TO THE CITY

Claude Baruk

GIMME SHELTER IN SIN CITY

Rolling Stones exhibit opens in Las Vegas While The Rolling Stones may be on tour in Europe this winter, they’ll be in two places at once thanks to the traveling Stones-themed exhibit “Exhibitionism” which has made its way to Las Vegas after previous stops in London, New York and Chicago. On display at the Las Vegas strip’s Palazzo hotel, the largest hotel in the country, “Exhibitionism” opens with a vibrant red-hued display showcasing a new film about the Stones’ legacy. Visitors will be able to time travel to London in 1962 courtesy of a replica of the compact Chelsea flat where Mick and Keith lived with former band member Brian Jones. “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” is heard loud and clear all throughout, leading up to the last part of the show: a secluded room that features a 3D concert video of a performance of the iconic song. The exhibit is comprised of 500 artifacts, including the rosewood Fender Telecaster and the Maton guitar played by Keith Richards while recording “Let It Bleed,” tour costumes by Saint Laurent, Prada, Jean Paul Gaultier, Alexander McQueen, the notebook in which Mick Jagger wrote the lyrics for “Miss You,” and a recreation of a recording studio filled with original instruments belonging to the band. “It’s not going to be like walking into a museum,” Mick Jagger says of the exhibit, “It’s about a sense of the Rolling Stones. It’s something we want people to go away talking about it.” —MARY ELIZABETH ANDRIOTIS

When your business is on the Las Vegas strip, you are sure to see some major celebrities come through. Claude Baruk of Claude BARUK Salons at Wynn and Encore has styled Beyonce, Naomi Campbell, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Karl Lagerfeld and Diplo. When he’s not running his fingers through the hair of entertainment’s A-list, he enjoys all the highlights that Sin City has to offer. CUP OF JOE

Europeans are particular about their coffee, and Leoné Café at Tivoli Village reminds me of home. It is also in Summerlin and a local’s favorite. leonecafe.com POWER LUNCH

I have lunch at Terrace Pointe Café at Wynn almost every day, where they make me my own signature salad with grilled chicken, tomatoes, avocado, asparagus and quinoa. They keep me healthy! Overlooking the pool and gardens, it is very relaxed, yet refined. It makes business feel like vacation. wynnlasvegas.com RETAIL THERAPY

PARTY LIKE JAY GATSBY Located inside the Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas, restaurant and supper club Rose. Rabbit. Lie. is the kind of place Jay Gatsby would frequent. With tap dancers performing on a baby grand piano and lounge singers taking center stage, it’s certainly not your typical modern-day club. Newly appointed executive chef Steven Gotham fuses old and new taste with the restaurant’s 1950s and 1960s inspired dishes. Signature

120 DUJOUR

menu items include caviar tacos, oysters Rockefeller, and beef Wellington. With a delectable restaurant menu and a 1920s-esque club to match, Rose. Rabbit. Lie. is in a league of its own.

 FOR MORE ON LAS VEGAS, VISIT DUJOUR.COM /CITIES

I’m French, so my wife and I are both very into fashion. One of our favorites is Fashion Show Mall, where Neiman Marcus and Saks both have incredible collections. The mall also has several smaller boutiques where I like to shop. It’s just across the street from Wynn, so whenever I’m in the mood for something new, it is very convenient. thefashionshow.com HIDDEN GEM

Ask any local and they will tell you that Vintner Grill is one of the best restaurants in town. Located in Summerlin where it’s hidden in a business complex, it’s easy to miss, but once inside the dining room and patio are stunning. Plus, the food is fantastic—try the half-chicken with mac and cheese. vglasvegas.com


J JU JU USSSTTTTTTHH HEEERR RI G II G GHH HTTTAA AMM MOO OUU UNN NTTT

ofof WW WRR ROO ONN NGG G

T M T TMM

AA Aunique unique uniqueluxury luxury luxuryresort resort resort&& &casino casino casino


CHICAGO

DALLAS

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK CITY

ORANGE COUNTY

OPENING UP THE VAULT

KISS front man Gene Simmons gets personal with the release of a new book and his first box set

KEY TO THE CITY

Maye Musk Maye Musk might be the mother of famed entrepreneur Elon Musk, but the new face of CoverGirl has carved out her own success story. Mother to three and grandmother to 10, Musk is also an IMG supermodel with five decades in the industry, and an author and expert on all things wellness. Below, the top model shares her Tinseltown favorites: CUP OF JOE

I don’t go out for coffee often, but when I do, it would be Intelligentsia Coffee on Abbot Kinney in Venice. Delicious coffee, cool area and pleasant to walk around afterwards. intelligentsiacoffee.com POWER LUNCH

Cecconi’s in West Hollywood. It’s always fun and the food is delicious. My favorite drink is rum and diet coke, however I don’t drive after a drink, so I would use a car service. cecconiswesthollywood.com FIELD TRIP

Little Beach House/Soho House in Malibu which is an hour away from me and my daughter is a member. It’s really beautiful, by the water, and the people are nice. No photos are allowed so everyone can relax. My favorite dishes are their vegetable and fish dishes. sohohouse.com DATE NIGHT

As a grandma, my dates are usually my children and grandchildren. We like to go to Boa Steakhouse on Sunset Blvd. As it’s a steakhouse, I order a steak, and take home half to enjoy the next day. I’m not a great cook but I love to eat and need to keep portions moderate to maintain my weight and good health. innovativedining.com

122 DUJOUR

Gene Simmons is a businessman—and being a front man for KISS is only one part of that business. Of course the makeup, the tongue and the voice made him recognizable–but his business ventures, both related and unrelated to the glam rock band that brought him notoriety in the ‘80s, are what’s bringing him the power. Dey Street Books will release Simm ons’ On Power: My Journey Through the Corridors of Power and How You Can Get More Power in November. “Power exists for Hitler and power exists for The Pope. It can be used for good or bad,” he says. “It’s strictly currency. What you do with it has to do with your moral and ethical bent.” In the book Simmons shares stories from his own life and career but also talks about historical figures like Cleopatra and Napoleon Bonaparte, plus modern-day marvels like Elon Musk and Oprah Winfrey. In addition to the book, Gene also releases his fi rst box set this year, which includes a hand delivery to the buyer. The Vault is what Simmons calls a 50-year time capsule that serves as a soundtrack to his life, fi lled with songs he’s written, but has never released. The Vault also includes a new Gene action fi gure, an “In Gene We Trust” oversize commemorative coin, a deluxe book containing over 50,000 words and 160 pages of unseen photos from his personal collection. As for the signature glasses, don’t expect him to take them off anytime soon. “The sun never sets on planet cool. Don’t worry about what anyone else is doing—find your suit of amount that fits you, that enables you to be less vulnerable.“

A view of downtown Los Angeles awaits atop The Everly pool deck

Above: a new room at The Jeremy West Hollywood. Right: the La Peer Hotel pool in the Design District

Located in the prime spot once occupied by the Cat & Fiddle, the restaurant counts Jay-Z as an investor and Beastie Boys’ Mike D. as its sommelier. Comfort food connoisseurs will savor every flavorful morsel of the “down-home” cuisine at Soul Hollywood

(SoulHolly wood.com). This high-concept eatery by Yealang Smith, former personal chef for Eddie Murphy, and celeb chef Giulian Jones, every palate will be satisfied with small plates like smoked trout on toast with fennel slaw, and their spins on traditional Southern favorites like fried catfish.

SAN FRANCISCO

If it’s a room with a view you’re looking for, The Everly (everlyhotelhollywood.com) will exceed your wildest expectations. With 216 rooms, including 12 suites, all offering breathtaking panoramic vistas ranging from the Hollywood sign to the downtown Los Angeles cityscape to all the way to the Pacific Coast. With a fifth-floor pool deck that serves cocktails and light bites day and night, and Jane Q, a street-level restaurant offering a menu honoring the California slow food movement, the hotel has become the crown jewel of its Beachwood Canyon neighborhood. If you decide to go further west, don’t miss The Jeremy West Hollywood ( jeremyhotel.com), with nearly 300 rooms (including 50 suites and two penthouses), plus there’s a luxurious pool, café, restaurant and lobby bar, and spectacular 360-degrees views of the city. Speaking of panoramic views, you can also see everything the City of Angels has to offer on the rooftop deck of the just-opened La Peer Hotel (lapeerhotel.com), an elegant and intimate enclave anchored in the heart of West Hollywood’s celebrated Design District. This design-forward property offers 105 rooms and suites and a new restaurant concept created by celeb chef Casey Lane, acclaimed for Casa Apicii in New York City, as well as the Tasting Kitchen in Venice, California.

 FOR MORE ON LOS ANGELES, VISIT DUJOUR.COM /CITIES

TAKING RESERVATIONS Culinary master Mario Batali continues to dominate the gastronomic landscape with Eataly L.A. (eataly. com), the West Coast edition of his famed Italian-themed megamarket/restaurant complex. Three years in the making, the marketplace, filled with restaurants, food and beverage counters, bakery, retail items and even a cooking school, is scheduled to finally open in late fall. Hearth & Hound (thehearthandhound.com) is the first L.A. project from chef April Bloomfield and restaurateur Ken Friedman of NYC’s popular Spotted Pig.

PALM BEACH

New Rooms, New Views

M AY E M U S K : J A M I E M C C A R T H Y / W I R E I M AG E . S O U L H O L LY W O O D : DA R R E N S T O N E . B O O K : D E Y ST R E E T B O O KS , A N I M P R I N T O F H A R P E RCO L L I N S P U B L I S H E RS

Los Angeles

ASPEN

PAINTED SURFACE

When Mexico was still called New Spain in the 18th century, the country’s great painters experienced an incredibly vibrant period full of major stylistic changes and new iconographies. More than two centuries later, patrons of LACMA can experience this rich era of art history firsthand, with the exhibition “Painted in Mexico, 1700–1790: Pinxit Mexici.” The title reflects the phrase many of the artists in the region signed their canvases with, and the exhibit will showcase more than 100 paintings, many restored specifically for this showing, along with a fully illustrated publication filled with scholarly essays about the era. lacma.org DUJOUR 123


Miami

ASPEN

CHICAGO

DALLAS

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

RESIDENCE ROYALE

Driving an Aston Martin down Ocean Drive is a thrill that might only be surpassed by taking up residence in one of the luxury car company’s new condos. The Aston Martin Residences broke ground in downtown Miami in the fall and the 66-story waterfront tower is expected to be completed in 2021. Simon Sproule, Aston Martin’s vice president and chief marketing officer, said: “Aston Martin is on a growth trajectory globally and across the United States. Our partnership with G&G Business Developments forms an important part of that growth story and of our desire to bring our brand to new audiences across the world.” The price of a condo ranges from $600,000 to $50 million and the complex will feature a fitness center overlooking the ocean, virtual golf room, art gallery and two cinemas, as well as a full-service spa, a beauty salon and, of course, a garage. astonmartinresidences.com

MIAMI

NEW YORK CITY

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

NEW IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD

The Miami Design District will unveil its next phase of luxury retail and restaurants throughout peak season. Here are our top picks Brooklyn-born Roberta’s mobile pizzeria pops up in the Jungle Plaza for pies like the signature margherita and bee sting (mozzarella, soppressata, honey) through April. “The setup is like nothing we’ve done before,” said cofounder Brandon Hoy, of its two shipping containers and tented picnic tables. “It’s our twisted take on South Florida.” robertaspizza.com It’s a match made in manicure heaven. Vanity Projects, a nail art salon with video art programming relocated from nearby Little River to the same street as The de la Cruz Collection and Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami’s new permanent space. vanityprojectsnyc.com ERES’s second boutique in the Sunshine State presents a cruise collection that aptly references art galleries and vernissages. Art Basel attendees will appreciate a bandeau’s quirky mustard hue and a plunging, black one piece’s understated, textured jacquard. eresparis.com St. Roch Market’s Miami expansion doesn’t have the patina of its Victorian-era venue in New Orleans, but the fare is just as tasty. Among the dozen stalls are Itamae, a Japanese Peruvian hybrid, and Yuzu, serving pan-Asian dishes by an Alinea alum. The Mayhaw’s balanced craft cocktails and festive tiki drinks bridge both locations. Its elevated hot toddy blends Gin Mare, the house falernum, black tea, cardamom-infused honey and lemon. “In the spirt of the holidays, it’s called You’ll Shoot Your Eye Out,” said head bartender Derek Brumfield. strochmarket.com

A textured jacquard one-piece from ERES.

Nail art gets digital at Vanity Projects

New inventive cocktails at The Mayhaw

Calling All Latin Lovers GO WITH THE FLOW The Sacred Space, a holistic hub deep in the heart of Wynwood, recently added wellness shop Flow. The pint-sized jewel, decorated in crystals and wood, specializes in natural beauty lines and spiritual items, from dream catchers to smudging feathers. “It was a natural evolution,” said founder Karla Dascal, who discovered many of its exclusive wares during her travels. “People who come to our classes and workshops ask how to live healthier.” thesacredspace miami.com

124 DUJOUR

 FOR MORE ON MIAMI, VISIT DUJOUR.COM/CITIES BILTMORE + BABOR German skincare brand Babor launched its first beauty bar in the U.S. at the Biltmore Hotel’s spa. Its interactive, social concept departs from the traditional private spa experience. New 3-D Hydro Gel Eye Pads from the Dr. Babor Hydro RX line are a traveler’s best friend, according to spa director Charlotte Prescott. biltmorehotel.com

Michelin-starred Madrid chef Angel Palacios’s partners with the Pubbelly Group’s José Mendin and Sergio Navarro for Habitat. The trio met through a defunct outpost of Palacios’s Spanish restaurant La Broche in Miami. But don’t think their new venture is about haute cuisine’s foams and gelées. Grilled and raw dishes such as salads and ceviches are more like it. “We’re doing high-end healthy food,” said Mendin, of their flavorful approach versus bland brown rice. “So people leave feeling better than when they arrived.” habitatmb.com Despite his surroundings,

chef restaurateur Michael Schwartz hasn’t really explored Latin American ingredients. The 20-year omission stands corrected with his new Amara at Paraiso, where banana leaf– wrapped cobia and mashed yucca epitomize the Miami table. “I’ve been in denial of embracing those cuisines, so it’s about time!” amaraatparaiso.com Carlos Garcia, the El Bulli– trained, Venezuelan toque behind Caracas’s Alto, expanded with Obra Kitchen Table. The bucatini octopus carbonara appeal to his homesick countrymen. obramiami.com

DUJOUR 125


New York City

ASPEN

CHICAGO

DALLAS

HOUSTON

NEW BREW ON MADISON

HOME COOKED Feel at home at L’Appart in the Financial District Chef Nicolas “Nico” Abello first trained with culinary giants Gerad Vie and Pierre Gagnaire before working the kitchen at Manhattan’s DANIEL. Now the French native has become executive chef of the city’s latest hidden gem. Tucked away inside the Brookfield Place eatery Le District, the Michelinstarred L’Appart offers a unique take on fine dining with the personal experience of an intimate dinner party inside a bustling urban hub. Upon stepping into what seems like Abello’s own home, you’re transported into a bespoke culinary adventure, featuring flavors that embrace market availability and seasonality—and take you on an adventure of flavors. lappartnyc.com

Nespresso has opened its doors on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. The new location isn’t your average boutique,—it’s more of an upscale coffee shopmeets-tech store. Upon entering, coffee specialists greet you with a carefully selected tasting. Next, move on to a side-by-side tasting, where you can compare the aromatic profiles of two coffees, or venture to the lower level’s Lab Kitchen, where an expert can help you elevate your coffee creations with tutorials in latte making. If you really want to take your coffee knowledge to the next level, sign up for a Masterclass in the Lab Kitchen, where an expert

LAS VEGAS

will take you through a guided lesson in coffee development, brewing and tasting. The sleek store features a massive wall of greenery and places a major focus on sustainability. The design includes sustainably-designed materials, such as wood sourced from Nespresso

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

Downtown Haunts and Uptown Cool

Cachet and the Club

126 DUJOUR

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

Scott Gerber is the owner of Mr. Purple, located inside the Lower East Side’s Hotel Indigo

reforestation programs on coffee farms or tabletops made from used coffee grounds found at Nespresso’s Swiss factory. The store also showcases oneof-a-kind artworks by contemporary artists made completely from recycled Nespresso aluminum. nespresso.com.

Scott Gerber continues to bring a nightlife vibe to hotels

I N T E R I O R & D R I N K : N OA H F E C K S

B C AC H E T : T I M WA LT M A N

This November, the highly anticipated Cachet Boutique Hotel will open its doors in New York City. An escape from the bustle of Times Square, the luxury hotel boasts 2,000 square feet of outdoor and indoor gardens and decor by fashion designer Jay Godfrey. The urban oasis combines New York glamour with Asian influence, creating innovative accommodations that provide a contemporary respite for world travellers and New Yorkers alike. Cachet will feature two exclusive restaurants by celebrity restaurateur Chef David Laris: EDEN Local, a farm-to-table concept, and Bellbrook, a modern bistro serving reimagined takes on Asian classics. The hotel will also bring the iconic Playboy Club back to NYC, with the nightclub opening slated for early 2018. cachetboutiquenyc.com

NEW YORK CITY

efore, you’d really only go to a hotel’s bar if you had to,” Scott Gerber, the CEO and Principal of Gerber Group recalls of the time before his company opened its first property inside The Paramount Hotel in LA. “When we did The Whiskey it became a place people really wanted to go to. People wanted to come to a different environment, which is really just this small, cool bar where people can let their hair down,” Gerber says. “At the time there were no boutique hotels and no cool restaurants or bars in those hotels; then we got into this niche where we liked being in a hotel.” Starting in 1991, Gerber Group not only focused on properties within hotels, but also on securing nightlife business opportunities that traditional bars would

consider a lost cause—think Monday through Wednesday. But its properties drew an elevated crowd of curious locals and tourists alike. “What we started finding was that these hotels liked the idea of having interesting food and beverage as opposed to just a food and beverage outlet,” says Gerber. The company expanded, eventually opening 10 properties spanning from New York to Chicago, and making high-profile deals like its lucrative partnership with Starwood Hotels to develop the W Hotel brand. Despite its far-reaching success, New York is still the fi rst—as it so often is—to embrace Gerber Group’s evolving vision of premier nightlife. The group’s most recent opening, The Campbell, is as special in its design as it is a testament to Gerber Group’s mission, which includes opening properties in unassuming places. The Campbell Apartment had been a bar inside Grand Central for 15 years and was previously owned by the MTA. When a government agency owns a property, Gerber explains, they have to submit public requests for proposals—and eventually, they reached out to the Gerber Group. “We had been to the bar previously, and it’s an amazing room—it’s iconic,” Gerber says. “So then our vision became that you can’t rest on your laurels. We wanted to reinvigorate this historic space, and show off its original features in a refreshed way.” Today upon entering the revamped space, the painted ceilings and bespoke cocktails are two of the many luxuries one can still enjoy at The Campbell in 2017—only now it has the added Gerber Group touch of cool.

Speaking to the more casual clientele Gerber envisioned for the space, he says it’s all a reflection of the times. “People don’t live in a suit and tie anymore,” he says. Against a backdrop of decadence and old New York at The Campbell (designed by Randy Kemper and Anthony Ingrao nonetheless), a contemporary crowd is more than welcome to kick up its heels amidst an ever-changing social scene in the city. And the same goes for Mr. Purple, located inside the Lower East Side’s Hotel Indigo. Make one trip to Gerber Group’s downtown haunt and you’re just as likely to run into friends from Wall Street as you are to see your friends in fashion—and the undisturbed rooftop views of the Empire State building don’t hurt. “Our philosophy has always been to create a place where you want to go with your friends and have a good time,” he says. “That means a place where you can talk to your friends, where there’s good service, and where there’s hardearned value where you’re spending your money. And finally, there should be an eclectic crowd. I don’t think anyone wants to go somewhere where everyone looks the same, or dresses the same.”

 FOR MORE ON NEW YORK CITY, VISIT DUJOUR.COM /CITIES DUJOUR 127


Orange County

CHICAGO

DALLAS

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK CITY

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

ASPEN

CHICAGO

DALLAS

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK CITY

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

ROYAL WELCOME

KEY TO THE CITY

ON THE OTHER FOOT

Dr. T.Y. Steven Ip

George Esquivel and his rebellious side During his more than two decades as a designer of coveted custom-made footwear, George Esquivel has deservedly developed a reputation as a meticulous craftsman. Before he reached such lofty heights (like in 2009, when fashionista Anna Wintour declared him a Vogue Fashion Fund Finalist) Esquivel was forced to overcome an incredibly challenging childhood that saw his father in and out of jail. He now suggests this unfortunate situation might have unwittingly set him on his lucrative career path. “With my father spending all his money on drugs, there was a lot that we lacked,” Esquivel shares. “I remember being very envious of the kids that had the cool shoes.” Today the only envy comes from his myriad of fans, which include Emma Stone, Gwen Stefani and Gwyneth Paltrow. His fall/winter collection, named Rebel Yell, is inspired by current events and empowerment of women in this politically charged climate, and, Esquivel says, is dedicated to the women in his life. “I personally want to pay tribute to my mom and all the other women who have worked hard to help me get to where I am in my life now.” In fact, a portion of the proceeds from this collection will go to The Sheep Fold, a charitable organization that offers aid to battered women and their children. EsquivelShoes.com

 FOR MORE ON ORANGE COUNTY, VISIT DUJOUR.COM/CITIES DESERT ROSE Tired of that increasingly cool Pacific breeze and eager to luxuriate in the dry heat of the Coachella Valley where it’s sunny year-round? Go east for two hours, young person, and you’ll find just what you’re looking for at Hotel Paseo (opening in December). As the first luxurybuilt hotel in Palm Desert in more than three decades, the resort is unquestionably a stand out. “We set out to create a boutique property with design elements, amenities and experiences unlike any other hotel in the desert,” says Robert Leach, who developed

128 DUJOUR

With offices in Newport Beach, Beverly Hills and New York, Dr. T.Y. Steven Ip knows it all when it comes to coast-to-coast beauty. “The West Coast is more of a body culture. It’s warm, it’s sunny and people are more body-conscious—but the face work on each coast is pretty equivalent.” The board-certified plastic surgeon is the go-to expert when it comes to a perfectly natural and updated look. “Most people who are getting surgery are doing it for a good reason. People simply want to look balanced and better in their clothes. The look is more refreshed and more natural instead of overdone.” When he isn’t fulfilling beauty dreams in the office or operating room, he enjoys these hot spots around Orange County. tystevenipmd.com POWER LUNCH

Pelican Grill for impressive views, good food and a great atmosphere. RETAIL THERAPY

the hotel. “We are steps from world-class fashion, art and dining on El Paseo.” True, besides the 150 rooms and suites, which includes a historic 1950 Airstream Cruiser, there’s the AC3 Restaurant + Bar operated by award-winning

restaurateurs and an on-site spa which offers a rejuvenating 24-karat gold facial, plus in the immediate vicinity you’ll find vibrant art galleries and world-class shopping. No wonder El Paseo is often referred to as the “Rodeo Drive of the Desert.” HotelPaseo.com

Fashion Island—I love that it is outdoors so you can enjoy the beautiful SoCal weather while perusing all the best stores in one place. DATE NIGHT

Splashes Restaurant, with romantic vibes right on the sand. DON’T MISS

The Menil Collection is my personal favorite in the Houston Museum District, but the boys would vote for the Museum of Natural Science.

When Samantha David, head of WS Development’s Up Markets, set out to curate the tenant mix at its new Royal Poinciana Plaza in a restored, Fifties-era enclave designed by John Volk, she imagined a small European town with butcher shops, bakeries and boutiques. Her lifestyle approach resulted in an eclectic, delightful shopping experience, where one can buy a Birkin and a banana in one fell swoop. “Our goal was to create a place that would keep people coming back for more and that’s different from anything they’ve seen before,” said David, of nearly 60 restaurants, stores and services centered on tropically landscaped courtyards. Established local and international brands meet every whim. They have their choice of fast casual or fine dining, too—finger food from Miami’s popular Coyo Taco or $46 veal Milanese at Sant Ambroeus. Several names are new to the island, as Theory, Assouline, Saint Laurent, 100% Capri and many more make their debut here. The seductive setting even wooed Hermès to relocate from Worth Avenue and Sotheby’s to exhibit large-scale, outdoor sculptures in December. “We took Palm Beach’s charm and sprinkled a little pepper on it!” theroyal.com

Palm Beach

ASPEN

NORTH STAR What do athletes Michael Jordan, Ernie Els and Tucker Frederickson, winemaker Bill Terlato and philanthropist Patrick Park have in common? They’re all partners in 1000 North, a restaurant and invita-

tion-only private club overlooking Jupiter’s inlet and lighthouse. Besides access to the club upstairs, members receive concierge services and dockside privileges. 1000north.com

 FOR MORE ON PALM BEACH, VISIT DUJOUR.COM /CITIES

YOUTHFUL THINKING

Known for its cabaret shows and Carleton Varney interiors, The Colony Hotel celebrates its 70th birthday by doing what any respectable Palm Beach socialite would—pretending to be younger. Owners Andrew and Sarah Wetenhall introduced wellness amenities like poolside yoga, paddle boards and bespoke bikes. As the parents of three children, they also offer new kid-friendly activities and a welcome package, including a stuffed souvenir of mascot JB inspired by the late architect Addison Mizner’s pet monkey, Johnnie Brown. “We’re hosting a kids-only New Year’s Eve party, a treat for parents too,” said Sarah. thecolonypalmbeach.com DUJOUR 129


CHICAGO

DALLAS

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK CITY

ORANGE COUNTY

PALM BEACH

SAN FRANCISCO

THE WRIGHT SPOT

In time for its 60th anniversary, luxury menswear brand ISAIA has opened its first San Francisco location in the historic Frank Lloyd Wright building at 140 Maiden Lane. “It’s all about the space,” said third-generation CEO Gianluca Isaia. With 4,000 square feet of retail space, the challenge was to blend Wright’s original architecture with a luxury shopping experience. All the original fixtures and materials were maintained, including wall plaster, millwork, trim, bubbled ceilings, suspended planters and the brick and stone façade. The building, based on one of the original blueprints for New York’s Guggenheim Museum, now serves as the backdrop for Neapolitan sartorial tradition. “It was much like restoring a masterful piece of art to its glory while giving it a new personality,” said Isaia. Determining the right location was rooted in the brand’s commitment to open spaces in coveted locations combined with architectural integrity and intrigue. “We want each of our stores to have a setting where our guests can relax and escape,” explained Isaia. As a result, an iconic vintage Campari bar and red lacquered piano will be in residence, as well as a unique library devoted to Wright—not to mention a mix of sportswear, tailored clothing and made-to-measure services. isaia.it

 FOR MORE ON SAN FRANCISCO, VISIT DUJOUR.COM /CITIES

Italian Style Rome may not have been built in a day, but FENDI—one of Italy’s most iconic luxury Houses—debuted its first San Francisco brick-and-mortar location with relative ease (as is the Italian way). The boutique’s all window façade offers outsiders a full view of the maison’s offerings. Inspired by its Roman roots, the atmosphere is grandiose yet refined—reflecting the highest level of sophistication.

130 DUJOUR

The two-floor shop infuses Navona Traverine and Portoro marble in contrast to the opulence of gold stucco and other lacquered and metal finishes. A mix of vintage and bespoke furniture pieces are set throughout—including a Jasper Morrison sofa, 1920s-style vintage armchairs and a selection of pieces by Italian designer Cristina Celestino. The new store houses men and women’s ready-towear, fur, handbags, shoes and accessories, designed by Karl Lagerfeld and Silvia Venturini Fendi, as well as an area dedicated to FENDI books. Special sketches by Lagerfeld dot the walls to emphasize the brand’s unmatched fur craftsmanship. fendi.com

Red Soles by the Bay

Christian Louboutin shares his thoughts on Cardi B and designing for men at his San Francisco boutique BY DAVID NASH

H PORT OF CALL An elegant oasis has reemerged on Fisherman’s Wharf with the recently redesigned Hotel Zoe. After a multimillion-dollar update of its interior design, guestrooms, suites and courtyard space, the luxury boutique hotel is poised to be the destination for adventure travelers looking for an elevated Wharf experience. The interior décor was designed by David Lasker and Gino Castaño, the principals of San Francisco–based interior design firm Paletteur. Warm-wood tones, linear elements and a muted palette accentuate the crisp, clean interiors. The 400-square-foot Zoe Suite—the most luxurious—is modeled on a contemporary yacht with bold geometric gestures throughout. A full-size fireplace makes it perfect for a romantic getaway. The property’s newly constructed Bar Zoe, inside the main lobby, compliments the hotel’s existing modern Italian restaurant, Pescatore. hotelzoesf.com

C H R I S T I A N LO U B O U T I N P O R T R A I T : D E V L I N S H A N D F O R D R E W A LT I Z E R P H O T O G R A P H Y

San Francisco

ASPEN

is boutique visits are always highly anticipated events and Christian Louboutin’s recent stop into his San Francisco shop was no exception. Louboutin’s spacious Maiden Lane outpost was packed on this particular evening with a bevy of red-soled beauties—and, of course, I’m referring to both the guests and the 53-year-old French designer’s iconic footwear lining the store. Louboutin blew into town with no intention of sitting for interviews, only to see the boutique and some of his loyal local clients. Fortune smiled on me, however, and Monsieur Louboutin took some time to sit and chat a bit about his trip, his working style, current inspirations and being a regular pop culture reference. His fondness for San Francisco is no secret. “People here are warm and welcoming and are great hosts, which is very similar to the European mentality,” says Louboutin. I wonder if the city and its clientele feel much different to him than New York or Paris, and he’s quick to praise the City by the Bay. “The conversation in San Francisco revolves around wine and delicatessens, for which it is highly regarded and loved in Europe,” he explains. “And, of course, technology, which makes sense given its closeness to Silicon Valley.” I couldn’t help continually scanning the boutique’s sublime selection of footwear. His recent women’s arrivals like the Dolly Dola, May Wong and Mariposa are alive with vitality. I’m fascinated to know where he begins to conceptualize these virtual works of art. “It all starts with a drawing and my obsession with details,” says Louboutin. “In this case, the designs speak for themselves.” His men’s shoes

Christian Louboutin visited his luxurious Maiden Lane boutique this fall

are no exception. The Casano Flat and Mister Academy are a dandy’s dream, and I have to believe it’s more challenging to design for men. “Designing for men is a different attitude,” he explains. “Therefore, I don’t draw for men on the days when I’m working on women’s designs.” Just what, I wonder, are Louboutin’s current inspirations for his upcoming collections? “Right now, I’m concentrating on various collaborations that tie back to India, Bhutan and one,” he says, “specifi c to Northern California.” I’m struck by how often the luxury brand is referenced in pop culture—particularly in music. Jay-Z, Keri Hilson, Drake, Jessi Malay and Jennifer Lopez have all immortalized the designer in their lyrics, and I wonder how it makes him feel. “When people are paying homage to you, it’s hard to understand that your name is used in a way that belongs in pop culture,” Louboutin says. “In different parts of the world my name has been celebrated, but I can see that it’s always associated in an aspirational way and conveys empowerment and freedom.” I bring up Bronx rapper Cardi B’s

song “Bodak Yellow” and, specifically, her hit’s enemy-denouncing lyrics: “These expensive, these is red bottoms—these is bloody shoes.” “The name carries different values for different people in different parts of the world,” he says thoughtfully. “But, it’s not in my hands.” And, he’s quick to add, “There is nothing wrong with that.”

Men’s Monono Flat, $995; Paloma Small Tote Bag, $2,100; Trouble In Heaven 30ML Parfume, $135

DUJOUR 131


PARTIES EMMA SNOWDONJONES

ALVESTER MARTIN

UMA THURMAN DR. RICHARD FIRSHEIN

JASON BINN

LUCAS YANCEY JASON BINN

BENOIT VULLIET

AL APPLETON

GINA FOLIN

KRISTEN TAEKMAN

WARD SIMMONS

DuJour’s New York Fashion Week Party

CAROLE RADZIWILL

GENE SIMMONS

TASHARA JONES

LEIA SCOTT

WHO: Cindy Crawford, Rande Gerber, Scott

Gerber and Gene Simmons WHAT: A celebration of New York Fashion Week WHERE: Mr. Purple at Hotel Indigo

RENEE LUCAS HORAN

DuJour’s Fall Issue Cover Party

MARIA VALIM JASON BINN

WHO: Uma Thurman

WHAT: Uma Thurman celebrated her DuJour

cover before her Broadway debut WHERE: Magic Hour Rooftop at the Moxy Hotel RANDE GERBER

ARNIE COHEN

STACY SPIELMAN

CHARLES RESSLER

ARACELI FRANCO

JEFF MANCINI SHAYNE KUNZELMAN

JACLYN DIETL

132 DUJOUR

BRINKLEY SKYE TIRATH KAMDAR

BO DIETL A L L P H O T O G R A P H S BY G E T T Y I M AG E S

CINDY CRAWFORD

UMA THURMAN

GREG CALEJO

DOUGLAS REED

ANDREW BLOCK

DUJOUR 133


BINNSHOT Joyce Annett, Kiko Milano, Igor Credali and Jessica Letendre of Kiko Milano

President of HSWA Larry Pettinelli

Westime‘s John Simonian, Swizz Beatz

Amplify NYC’s Greg Calejo, Maxwell’s Chophouse’s Babette Haddad

NetJets’s Ajay Jain

Four Seasons’s Alex Von Bidder Pal Zileri’s Virginia Cademartori

Elaine Wynn at the Joan Weill Center for Dance

Perry Ellis’s Vincent Panzanella

California Secretary of State Alex Padilla, Elliot Dornbush

Kreps Demaria’s Laura Acker

Las Vegas Sands’s Rob Goldstein

CEO of Absolut Elyx Jonas Tahlin

Rolls-Royce’s Sabine Brown, Araceli Franco, Rolls- Royce’s Michael Snell Roche Bobois’s Daniel Lombardi PepsiCo’s Mauro Porcini

Van Cleef & Arpels’s Alain Bernard

Charles Koppelman

Sanjay Hathiramani and Nelson Elliot of Dolce & Gabbana Nick & Toni’s Mark Smith

Marigay McKee

Swizz Beatz, CEO of Bally Claudia Cividino, Keenan Towns

134 DUJOUR

CEO of Theory Andrew Rosen

CEO of OTB Group Stefano Rosso

CEO of Hermès Robert Chavez

Stacy King, Cindy Lawrence Pearlstein and Maria Valim of David Yurman GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

Stuart Weitzman’s Susan Duffy

President of Authentic Brands Group Nick Woodhouse

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

Silverstein Properties’s Marty Burger

Southern Glazer’s Wine & Spirits’s Wayne Chaplin, Jennifer Chaplin, PVH’s Kenneth Wyse

The Blond’s Julio Montero

Aston Martin’s Simon Sproule

President and CEO of The Corcoran Group Pamela Liebman

CEO of Perry Ellis Oscar Feldenkreis

DUJOUR 135


ARTIFACT

The Racket of Justice Billie Jean King achieved athletic glory and shaped the feminist movement with a Wilson Autograph BY SAMUEL ANDERSON

I

aspect of this is the cultural significance of that match,” says Bonhams’ Darren Sutherland. “There’s a quote from President Obama telling King that watching the match when he was 12 changed the way he raised his daughters. I think that’s more significant.” Fittingly, a portion of the proceeds of the auction in December will go towards King’s Women’s Sports Foundation. The model itself, a Billie Jean King Autograph made with wood, leather and catgut, also recalls King’s role as a trailblazing female brand-ambassador. The year following the Battle, King earned $1 million in endorsements from Colgate toothpaste, Sunbeam hair curlers among other brands. However, King lost those deals when she came out as a lesbian in 1981, and in 1983 she retired from competition. The Battle remains as relevant as ever given women in tennis’ ongoing fight for an equal playing field (Serena Williams earns tens of millions less than Roger Federer in endorsements). Until then, Riggs’s lesser auction lot is a consolation prize. “We haven’t heard from the Riggs estate,” says Sutherland.

B I L L I E J E A N K I N G : F O C U S O N S P O R T /G E T T Y I M AG E S .

n 1973, 55-year-old tennis player and self-professed “male chauvinist pig” Bobby Riggs wagered that he could defeat any woman player—namely tennis’ 29-year-old queen Billie Jean King, who had won 10 major singles titles and a Wimbledon championship. King accepted Riggs’s challenge and a televised spectacle dubbed the “Battle of the Sexes”—the subject of the namesake 2017 film starring Emma Stone and Steve Carell—ensued. On September 20, 1973, an estimated 90 million people watched King pummel Riggs, beating him 6-4, 6-3, 6-3 and, along with the 1972 anti-discrimination law Title IV, sparking a surge of women in sports. Almost 45 years later, the match remains a historic touchstone for the feminist movement. And while MCPs may be far from extinct, Billie’s court continues to win out when it comes to tennis memorabilia. On December 6, Bonhams will auction the Wilson tennis racket King used to beat Riggs that day, valued between $100,000 and $200,000. By comparison, a collectible Bobby Riggs racket, reportedly in “good condition,” recently surfaced on Craigslist.; the asking price was $65. Beyond being a symbolic lynchpin in athletic history, the racket literally promoted women in sports. After holding onto it for nine years, King auctioned the instrument off in 1982 to benefit the Women’s Sport Foundation, which she founded following the match. “Certainly it’s a sports item but to me the more important

Top: Billie Jean King at the “Battle of the Sexes” match against Bobby Riggs, September 20, 1973. Bottom: The tennis racquet used by Billie Jean King during the Battle

136 DUJOUR


TOURBILLON RM 38-01 BUBBA WATSON

RICHARD MILLE BOUTIQUES ASPEN • BAL HARBOUR • BEVERLY HILLS • BUENOS AIRES • LAS VEGAS • MIAMI • ST. BARTH • TORONTO


WINTER 2017

DIANE UP CLOSE

Winter 2017  

DuJour presents its annual awards predictions, Diane Kruger talks about her passionate performance in In the Fade, and for the holiday seaso...

Advertisement