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SUMMER 2017

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SUMMER 2017

CONTENTS 18

THOUGHTS DUJOUR

Letters from our Editor in Chief and CEO

24 MASTHEAD 26 CONTRIBUTORS

LIFE 46 WILL TRAVEL FOR BABY BLUES

27 DUJOUR.COM

The extreme plastic surgery trend that has people seeing green (or blue, or gray . . .)

Your 24/7 source for the latest in style, culture and luxury

48

28

A new hotel makes a travel destination out of a quiet Mexican beach town

IT’S BINN 25 YEARS

DuJour CEO Jason Binn looks back at his memorable tenure in publishing

STYLE 32

STYLE NEWS

Kitten heels get a sexy update; fashion mainstay Fivestory grows; an exhibit celebrates Iris van Herpen, couture’s quiet genius

38

THE NEW MEXICO

52 A BLUEPRINT FOR SEDUCTION Ultra high-end luxury towers are transforming Manhattan’s skyline

54 POSTCARDS FROM THE EDGE The unexpected timewarp joys of the post-college family vacation

BRIGHT LIGHTS, BIG CITY

Show-stopping sunglasses go to work with powerful jewels

42

GOLDEN AGE

Essentials for summer-ready skin

98 ON THE COVER Dress, $5,000, DIOR, dior.com. Photographed by Jason Bell, Styled by Victoria Bain.

CHRISTOPHER CHURCHILL

A view of Morocco’s Ourika Valley


800.929.DIOR (3467) DIOR.COM


SUMMER 2017

CONTENTS CULTURE 56

READING BURMA

A new novel takes on Myanmar’s decades of conflict from a female perspective

58 SUNDAY SCHOOL

60 GIRL ON FIRE Ingénue Kiersey Clemons prepares for superstardom

66

THE WOMAN BEHIND THE FRAME

HBO’s documentary doyenne reflects on her life in a new book

65 CELEBRATING THE WRIGHT WAY Frank Lloyd Wright sites across the nation ring in his 150th anniversary

FEATURES 70

LILY LOSES THE CORSET

Actress Lily James ascends to her throne: Don’t expect a dowdy reign BY BRIDGET ARSENAULT PHOTOGRAPHED BY JASON BELL STYLED BY VICTORIA BAIN

78

HIGH (IN)FIDELITY

How social media makes liars and cheats out of us all BY TANIA STRAUSS

82

MR. BRIGHTSIDE

The season’s menswear shines in full technicolor glory PHOTOGRAPHED BY JAMES BRODRIBB STYLED BY PAUL FREDERICK

90 CINDY AT EASE At 51, Cindy Crawford, America’s original supermodel, looks forward to the next chapter BY ADRIENNE GAFFNEY PHOTOGRAPHED BY PAMELA HANSON

98

MOROCCO MAJESTIC

Crossing Morocco on the world’s most scenic road trip BY ALYSSA GIACOBBE PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHRISTOPHER CHURCHILL

82 Menswear makes a statement Sweater, $345, PATRIK ERVELL, patrikervell.com.

JAMES BRODRIBB

British band London Grammar finds harmony in discord


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SUMMER 2017

CONTENTS CITIES

124

107 Southampton’s Parrish Art Center welcomes a multimedia exhibit

108

Patek Philippe’s “The Art of Watches”

ASPEN/DENVER

The most luxe camping accommodations; designer Barbara Glass’ favorite spots

110 CHICAGO The Talbott Hotel’s new look; garden party tips

111

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

NorthPark Center’s newest additions; a hidden gem for veggie lovers

112 HAMPTONS An installation at the Parrish pays homage to the ocean; the flavors of summer

114 HOUSTON The best of the burgeoning cocktail scene; outdoor accessories for balmy evenings

116 LAS VEGAS

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120 LOS ANGELES L.A. gets a Waldorf Astoria of its own; a new scent from fashion insiders

121 MIAMI Fashion icons take on real estate; a new museum for science

British trio London Grammar

124 NEW YORK CITY A rare watch exhibition from Patek Philippe; polo star Nacho Figueres on his local haunts

126 ORANGE COUNTY A museum show celebrates California; Filipino fusion comes to Santa Ana

128 SAN FRANCISCO Man-about-town Ken Fulk; a mansion from Restoration Hardware 130 TRI-STATE A new hotel ushers in a revival for Asbury Park; star chef Marc Vetri makes his Connecticut debut

132 PARTIES 134 BINNSHOT

ARTIFACT 136 COLLECTING DUST A space relic that’s been to the moon

38

Dress, $945; Scarf, price upon request, SPORTMAX, 212-6741817. MMoblo Sunglasses, $250, MAX MARA, solsticesunglasses .com. Hawaii earrings, in 18-karat yellow gold with lapis $6,000, BUCCELLATI, 212-308-2900.

128 The Battery in San Francisco

FROM TOP TO BOTTOM: COURTESY OF PATEK PHILIPPE. ROSALINE SHAHNAVAZ. DAVID URBANKE. COURTESY OF THE BATTERY.

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Hamilton comes to Vegas; a state of the art spin studio


D E S I G N PO R T R A I T.

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ED LETTER

Thoughts DuJour

W

arm breezes, light-dappled cocktails, golden limbs ...Those sunny, balmy, promise-f illed days of summer are finally upon us. Whether you’re f loating in the Mediterranean, lying on a cool patch of grass in Central Park or hiding in the bushes in D.C., we’ve aimed to have a little bit of escapism for everyone. Our cover features the British actress Lily James, the stunning star of the highly anticipated Baby Driver, the summer hit pegged to be her Hollywood breakout vehicle. James choppered up to London, from her current film set in Cornwall, to be shot by photographer Jason Bell. We also have the eternally gorgeous Cindy Crawford at home in Malibu; in the pack of ’90s glamazons, Crawford was “the bombshell”—the very idea of physical perfection. Decades later, not too much has changed, except she got the husband, the kids and the personal empire to boot. The details of a juicy cheating story never get old; it’s a heartache that seems to ring universal. What do they say, ‘anyone who’s never been cheated on just never found out ...’? I don’t know if I hold with that theory, but in the full-throttle digital

age of consta-communication, we might not have all become cheaters, but we are certainly spoiled for choice, and therefore a little more accomplished at hiding or investigating suspicious behavior. As writer Tania Strauss explores in “High (In)Fidelity,” who needs that old-fashioned notion of trust now that actual evidence is always f loating around in the ether? Technology has advanced so much, but sadly the heart is still the same oldfashioned beating muscle. And we tried to go a little more unexpected with our warmweather destinations this season (not to mention alliterative), with new spins on Morocco, Mexico and Myanmar—from luxury 4x4 road trips to lazing on the beach, here are summer journeys that can be as intrepid or slothful as you desire. Hedonism awaits—cheers to that. ■

Fiona Murray

MOROCCO: CHRISTOPHER CHURCHILL. BEAUMONT: COURTESY. PORTRAIT: GETTY IMAGES.

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Above: London’s coolest 5-star hotel, the Beaumont, was home base for our cover shoot. Right: A palm tree-lined street in the coastal Moroccan city of Essaouira.


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CEO LETTER Sean Stewart, Nixxi Entertainment’s Paul Kemsley

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T

wenty-five years ago, my first magazine, Ocean Drive, launched. Back in those days, I carried my Olympus Stylus around Miami and New York City, snapping pictures wherever I went. I thought I was a more guerilla version of Andy Warhol. I had no idea that a quarter of a centur y later, ever yone else would be doing the same thing with those ubiquitous little devices we call iPhones. I won’t go so far as to say I invented the Selfie, but you must admit that in the era of celebrity autographs, I was committed to capturing the visual version. To celebrate my silver publishing anniversary in this issue, I decided to share some of the more memorable, unAn early model of the Olympus Stylus camera filtered moments from my collection. On my 25th anniversary pages, for example, I’m attending the Grammys with Mariah Carey, hanging out with a young Leonardo DiCaprio (pre-Titanic!) in Donald Trump’s U.S. Open booth and partying with my good friend David Lee Roth (who performed at my wedding, by the way)—all adventures and memories I’m so glad I captured on film. As you’ll see in this issue, many of my most special moments have now come full circle. Just this past February, DuJour, along with Gilt and JetSmarter, celebrated the launch of my dear friend Tony Robbins’ book, Unshakeable, with a party at PH-D Rooftop at Dream Downtown. I first met Tony in 1997 at the Miami Arena for a George Bush event. The DuJour team also continues to move onward and upward, welcoming new business partners Dior and Whispering Angel this issue. We’re also excited to have new employees Betsy Jones from Möet Hennessy USA, Christine Meager from Gucci and my fantastic new assistant/magician, Ryan Byrne, on board. Welcome, everybody! I can’t wait to make the next generation of fantastic memories. ■

Stuart Weitzman’s Susan Duffy

Guess’ Andrea Chao

Andaz Mayakoba’s Carlos Orozco

Jason Binn

Twitter/ Instagram: @jasonbinn

Berggitte Yossi Maeser, Cosmopolitan Las Vegas’ Bill McBeath

The Peninsula hotel’s Offer Nissenbaum

Mastin Kipp, Jenna Love


TOURBILLON G-SENSOR RM 36-01 SEBASTIEN LOEB

RICHARD MILLE BOUTIQUES ASPEN • BAL HARBOUR • BEVERLY HILLS • BUENOS AIRES • LAS VEGAS • MIAMI • ST. BARTH • TORONTO


CEO LETTER HANDPICKED

Global Brands Group’s Jason Rabin

Gilt’s Alexandra Wilson, Kevin Ryan, Isabelle McTwigan, Guest

Coach’s Lauren Sicillia, Coach’s Dana Randall, Jetsmarter’s Antonio Cabanero, Guests

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Miles Watkins and Bulgari’s Karen Watkins

Sciame Development’s Frank and Fiona Sciame

LVMH’s Anish Melwani, Gilt’s Jonathan Greller Jamie Biden, Al Sharpton

Eric Lichtness, Heather Morales

Michael McCarthy Lisa Marie Benson, Simon Huck

Keith Berring, Kurt Kappaport, Gary Friedman, Gary Kosinski

Möet Hennessey’s Jim Clerkin

Alberto Junco Alex Levin Allie Kieva Andrew Ergas Andrew Heiberger Artie Rabin Ashley Priest Ashley Orfus Ashley Spitz Benoit Vulliet Bruce Schoenberg Caitlin Koles Celeste Fierro Chauncey Bell Christine Squilante Colleen Rizzo Dana Power Daniel Minkowitz David Newman Daymond John Ernie Arias Francoise Bezzola Gigi Ganatra Henri Barguirdijan Iesha Reed Jacob Entel Jacques Panis Jarod Webber Jason Morrison Jean Zimmerman Jennifer Connelly John Howard Jon Vogel Josh Gaynor JP Lind Julia Erdman Katie Kinsella Ken Wyse Kerry Sulokowicz Kristen Sosa Kristina Buckley Lauren Snyder Lepa Galeb-Roskopp Lizzie Grubman Maddie Gibbs Mark Patricof Marti Crampshee Mary Hamilton Matthew Pastorius Mattia Crippa Mauricio Xavier Solodujin Michael Delellis Micheal Shvo Michael Woodside Molly Enby Natalie Gilmore Natalie Johnson Natasha Vardi Nicola Richards Nicole Berlyn Peter Malachi Peter Webster Pierre Goyenetche Pooja Johari Richard Plepler Rob Ronen Robby Schnall Robert Souza Sarah Fleisher Scotty McPherson Shauna Brook Susan Silver Veronique Gabai-Pinsky Vinny Ottomanelli Virginia Cademartori Virginia Carnesale


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EDITOR IN CHIEF

CEO/PUBLISHER

Fiona Murray

Jason Binn

FEATURES DIRECTOR

CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER

Leslie Farrand

Anthony Rotunno ART DIRECTOR

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR

Alexander Wolf

SENIOR SALES LEAD

Araceli Franco

Catherine Gargan

FASHION MARKET DIRECTOR

Paul Frederick CONTRIBUTING MANAGING EDITOR

SALES LEADS

Betsy Jones Berggitte Maeser EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

Ryan Byrne

Alyssa Giacobbe

INTEGRATED SALES PLANNER SENIOR EDITOR

Alexandra Schwab

Frances Dodds CONTRIBUTING ARTICLES EDITOR

Adrienne Gaffney ASSOCIATE EDITORS

INTEGRATED MARKETING

Samuel Anderson Rachel Wallace

MARKETING MANAGER

Jennifer Lentol

Atalie Gimmel

MARKETING DESIGNER

CONTRIBUTING COPY CHIEF

Clinton Krute

Chelsea Hernandez EVENT COORDINATOR

Dominique DellaMaggiore

RESEARCH EDITOR

Maura Aleardi

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EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

William Pelkey

PRODUCTION IT MANAGER

Kevin Singh

DUJOUR.COM WEB PRODUCER

WEB ASSISTANT

PRINT CONSULTANT

PAPER SOURCING

Kasey Caminiti

Rachel Barber

Calev Print Media

The Aaron Group

CITIES REGIONAL EDITORS

Amiee White Beazley (Aspen/Denver), Carly Boers (Chicago), Holly Crawford (Houston), Holly Haber (Dallas/Fort Worth), Laura Itzkowitz (Hamptons, New York City, Tri-State), Jeremy Kinser (Los Angeles, Orange County), Rebecca Kleinman (Miami, Palm Beach), David Nash (San Francisco), Andy Wang (Las Vegas) CONTRIBUTORS

FINANCE FINANCE MANAGER

CONTROLLER

John Domingo

Dahlia Nussbaum

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

BOARD ADVISOR

Stephanie Cabral-Choudri

Jonathan Greller

Alex John Beck, Patricia Bosworth, Cedric Buchet, Grant Cornett, Arthur Elgort, Kyoko Hamada, Henry Hargreaves, Michael Oh, Victoria Stevens, Bruce Weber, Lynn Yaeger INTERN

GENERAL COUNSEL

Dee Usaha

John A. Golieb

DuJour (ISSN 2328-8868) is published four times a year by DuJour Media Group, LLC., 530 7th Avenue, Floor M1, NYC 10018, 646-679-1687. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. The publishers and editors are not responsible for unsolicited material and it will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication subject to DuJour magazine’s right to edit. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, photographs and drawings. Copyright © 2017 DuJour Media Group, LLC. For a subscription to DuJour magazine, go to dujour.com/free, call 844-385-6871 or email custsvc_dujour@fulcoinc.com


from the

Rainbow Room

F r i d a y , J u n e 2 3 rd

J A N E K R A KO W S K I To n y W i n n e r, E m m y N o m i n a t e d A c t r e s s a n d S i n g e r For tickets visit rainbowroom.com 30 Rockefeller Plaza, 65th Floor, | 212.632.5000 | @rainbowroomnyc


CONTRIBUTORS JAMES BRODRIBB

ALYSSA GIACOBBE

Photographer James Brodribb has worked with everyone from Ruby Rose to model Jordan Barrett, but his true claim to fame? “I was once high-fived by Ozzy Osbourne,” says the native South African. Despite his taste for heavy metal, Brodribb’s artistic style is unprocessed and naturalistic—well-suited for this issue’s men’s fashion story, “Mr. Brightside” (page 82), which pays homage to simple cuts and colors. And given Brodribb’s on-set philosophy, it’s no wonder he’s the high-fiving kind of guy: “My goal on this shoot was for everyone to enjoy themselves,” he says. “It’s nice to see people being real.”

“Morocco Majestic” (page 98) writer Alyssa Giacobbe embarked on a 300-mile road trip from central Morocco to its coast. The story marks her fifth DuJour collaboration with photographer Chris Churchill; previous assignments have taken them from Arctic Norway to Rwanda. “Morocco was both amazingly exotic and surprisingly easy to get around,” says Giacobbe. “There’s really something for every sort of traveler: desert adventure, shopping—lots of shopping— and design, camel rides on the beach . . . I only had a quick six days but could easily have spent three times that there.”

ANNINA MISLIN

JASON BELL Just as she will be to millions of Americans after the release of Baby Driver this summer, Downton Abbey alum Lily James was a familiar face to photographer Jason Bell (“Lily Loses the Corset,” page 70). “I have shot the cast and been on the set many times,” says Bell, who first photographed James for Vanity Fair’s all-U.K. Hollywood Portfolio in 2015. But for James’ first DuJour cover, Bell wanted to cast her in a new light. “We have seen Lily do the Downton Abbey thing a lot, so it was about doing something new, something much more modern and strong,” he says.

COURTESY OF THE SUBJECTS

For “Girl on Fire” (page 60), L.A.–based stylist Annina Mislin struck a chord with actress Kiersey Clemons, whose sunny disposition matched Mislin’s eye for warm colors and sleek silhouettes. “Kiersey was lovely—collaborative and down-to-earth,” Mislin says. She called on a variety of vintage textures and floral pops of color for the 23-year-old up-and-comer, set on achieving a look that was sophisticated yet youthful. “I tried to capture the ’70s, but in a modern way,” the stylist says.


YOUR DAILY DOSE OF STYLE, CULTURE, LIFE ... AND MORE

Good as Gold

REBECCA MILLER STYLED BY REBECCA CORBIN MURRAY

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SU M MER 2017

PHOTOGRAPHED BY

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Gown, price upon request, $1,190, ALBERTA FERRETTI, albertaferretti .com. Hyde earring, $402, JEZEBEL LONDON, jezebellondon.uk. Pearl 145 pumps, $875, JIMMY CHOO, jimmychoo.com. Bracelets and ring, Scodelario’s own.

DUJOU R .C OM

British actress Kaya Scodelario, who appeared on DuJour.com’s May digital cover, outshines costar Johnny Depp in Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales, now in theaters. Read more about Scodelario in our exclusive interview.


MILESTONES With Clinton and John McCain at the Capitol File magazine pre-launch party in Washington, D.C.

Endeliquid utes equ iature es acerruparinetur

Clinton with my daughter Penny in the Hamptons

With Hillary Clinton at Bill Clinton’s 50th birthday party

DuJour CEO Jason Binn takes a look back at his star-studded career, from the launch of Ocean Drive magazine in 1992 to today

With Sly, six months after he moved to Miami. My old boss, Michael Warren, “gifted” me this shirt before he invested in Ocean Drive

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It’s Binn 25 Years

In Donald Trump’s box at the U.S. Open—with preTitanic Leonardo DiCaprio

With Charlize Theron at the Doral in Miami (right)

GETTY IMAGES (2)

At the 2016 Golden Globes with our Winter 2015 cover star Alicia Vikander With Aretha Franklin at Bill Clinton’s 50th birthday party On a walk with the great Tony Bennett, my neighbor when I lived on Central Park South


Discussing DuJour’s 2014 interview with Dennis Rodman on “The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer”

At The Forge in Miami with Rodman, whose Chicago Bulls were in town playing the Heat

With Christy Turlington and Helena Christensen at Vogue’s 100th anniversary party in 1992

In St. Barts with Naomi Campbell over the holidays, right before the premiere of the video for Michael Jackson’s “In The Closet”

At a Hampton’s Magazine party 20 years later

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With BIlly Joel at News Cafe in Miami

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GETTY IMAGES (3)

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With the Kardashian family in the Hamptons, 2010

With Combs at the 2014 Golden Globes

With Sean Combs, Donald Trump and Lenny Kravitz at Trump Tower after the U.S. Open

Kim Kardashian on the cover of DuJour’s Spring 2013 issue and at the cover party at the Four Seasons in Los Angeles


MILESTONES

With Brooke Shields at my annual summer kick-off party at Bridgehampton Tennis and Surf Club in 2013

With Jack Nicholson on Fisher Island at an Ocean Drive party

At Spy in New York City with Ben Stiller, in town for SNL

With Elton John

With Mariah Carey at the Grammy Awards in 1992

With Shields

At a Gotham magazine party with Roth

With Jane Fonda at the 2015 Golden Globes

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With David Lee Roth, who performed at my wedding

With Tony Robbins

With Christie Brinkley at Palladium

With Robert De Niro at the premiere of A League of Their Own

With Jamie Foxx at the Los Angeles Confidential magazine Pre-Oscar bash

At the 19th Annual Elton John AIDS Foundation Academy Awards viewing party at the Pacific Design Center

GETTY IMAGES (5)

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Celebrating the 2006 holiday issue of Aspen Peak magazine at Hotel Jerome with Carey


John Legend and Chrissy Teigen’s DuJour cover, shot by Bruce Weber; with the couple at Kris Jenner’s Gatsbythemed 60th birthday bash

Celebrating DuJour’s 2013 summer issue, with cover star Julianne Moore

With fashion royalty Oscar de la Renta and Karl Lagerfeld DUJOU R .C OM

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With Bill Clinton

GETTY IMAGES (2)

With Michael Douglas

In February 2016 with Elle Macpherson

SU M MER 2017

At the 2014 Golden Globes with Michael Douglas

At an Ocean Drive party with Jon Bon Jovi

At Planet Hollywood with Christopher Reeve

With Steven Tyler and my daughters at a DuJour party

With Muhammad Ali

On the set of Donnie Brasco with Al Pacino in 1996

At Rex in Miami with Macpherson In Miami the year Aerosmith’s Nine Lives album was released With Brad Pitt


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STYLE SU M MER 2017

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Hello, Kitty

The stiletto’s prudish little sister, the coy kitten heel, is now playing provocateur BY ADRIENNE GAFFNEY PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEFFREY WESTBROOK

From left: Blare 60 slingbacks, $750, JIMMY CHOO, jimmychoo.com. Mules, $665, BALENCIAGA, 212-206-0872.

When Audrey Hepburn first donned the kitten heel on the cinematic stage, the shoe’s identity became an extension of her own: demure, gamine, innocent. Hepburn’s association with the heel was a result of logistics— costume designer Edith Head simply needed to ensure the actress didn’t tower over co-star Humphrey Bogart in the 1954 classic Sabrina—but that didn’t stop it from hitting a pop-culture nerve as well. The kitten heel was


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STYLE   

N E WS

embraced by a generation of women eager to shed the constraints of the sky-high pump. In the years since, the shoe’s appeal has remained much the same: It’s a more polished alternative to the flat, which has always lacked the sex appeal of the stiletto. The kitten heel’s staid reputation won’t plague it indefinitely though: The ladylike silhouette has undergone a perversion of late, which—like any story of a good girl gone bad—has ushered it right back into cultural relevance. Now, with designers turning the kitten on its head—swathing it in animal prints and neon, festooning it with dressmaker’s ribbon, spikes and fur— an altogether fiercer cat has emerged. ■

Pussy Riot

J’adior slingback, $890, DIOR, dior.com.

Madame Menodo heels, $1,195, CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN, Saks Fifth Avenue Houston, 713-627-0500.

Studded pump, $1,190, GUCCI, gucci.com.

Embellished heel, $1,250, MIU MIU, miumiu.com.

Kiddie mule, $395, 3.1 PHILLIP LIM, 31philliplim.com.

This summer, the fashion industry looks back on Martin Margiela’s influential period at Hermès BY RACHEL WALLACE

O

ne of fashion’s most elusive personalities, the J.D. Salinger– esque Martin Margiela, will be under the magnifying glass in the designer’s native Belgium through the end of August. The retrospective at Antwerp’s MoMu Museum will chronicle his shockingly unexpected tenure at Hermès, where he designed women’s ready-to-wear from 1997 to 2003. In an accompanying book, Margiela: The Hermès Years, a slew of insiders—rare souls who worked closely with Margiela during this formative period in fashion—reflect on the lasting impact of the minimalist, elegant work he produced for Hermès in the midst of the brand logos onslaught that defined the late ’90s and early aughts. The exhibit, curated by MoMu’s Kaat Debo, places Margiela’s Hermès pieces alongside garments from his more over-the-top namesake brand, Maison Martin Margiela. “I feel that there’s certainly a dialogue between these two worlds that at first seem very different—the world of luxury fashion and the world of avant-garde fashion,” Debo says. “But it’s really two different translations of one creative DNA.” And Debo actually solicited input from Margiela himself while working on the project. “Fashion designers I’ve worked with over the years have, in my opinion, been very visual,” she says. “Many don’t like trying to analyze their work in language, but Martin is very sensitive to words and how things are explained. . . . It was our task to add his work to fashion history.”

PORTRAIT: MARINA FAUST. ALL OTHER IMAGES: COURTESY

SU M MER 2017

Maison Martin Margiela A/W 1996–1997

A QUIET COUP

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This season’s kitten heels are screaming for attention


N E WS

   STYLE

Louis Vuitton’s new capsule collection for the 35th America’s Cup

Dream Boats

Louis Vuitton’s America’s Cup Collection— timed to this summer’s 35th America’s Cup Finals sponsored by Louis Vuitton and culminating in Bermuda—celebrates the brand’s deep ties to sailing. Apparel, accessories and leather goods feature graphic colors, nautical accents and sporty reinterpretations of the classic “V” logo, originally created by Georges Vuitton (Louis’ son) as his personal signature. louisvuitton.com

PORTRAIT: BRUNO STAUB. ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

COMPOSITIONS IN COUTURE

It’s no small secret that Kris Van Assche, Dior Homme’s Belgian artistic director, has long had a passion for music. For his FW15 collection, he unveiled an orchestra in the middle of the runway. His FW17 collection references gabba and rave, and heavyweight performers like ASAP Rocky and Boy George have been among the faces of his recent campaigns. It should come as no surprise, then, that the fashion pioneer has finally ventured into the world of audio design. This summer sees the release of four packages designed by Van Assche for the Dior Homme x Sennheiser Collection: the travel, daily, pocket and home solutions—all featuring special edition items like noise-cancelling and in-ear headphones with leather carrying cases and storage furniture. Each piece fuses Sennheiser’s advanced technology with Dior Homme’s unique signature style. Fashionable listening! Available in June at Dior Homme boutiques and en-us.sennheiser.com. —MAURA ALEARDI


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N Clockwise: Olshan on the staircase at Fivestory; the boutique’s shoe salon; ground floor shopping parlor.

The Height of Fashion The Upper East Side’s coolest designer showcase, Fivestory, is breaking higher ground BY SAMUEL ANDERSON PHOTOGRAPHED BY VICTORIA STEVENS

o one ever said building a store from the ground up would be easy—especially in 2010, when Claire Olshan first had the idea for Fivestory. “Oh, honey,” the 30-year-old recalls in a low, conspiratorial tone. “When we signed this lease, there was no Celine, there was no Lanvin, there was no Dolce. After the recession, Madison was such a sad, sad place to be. I wanted to breathe some life into it.” Olshan leans forward on a plush bench on Fivestory’s ground f loor as she speaks, her long, dusky blonde hair falling over her shoulder. Despite the flatlined economy and her lack of retail experience, Olshan—the daughter of a wealthy animal skins importer and a former gallery girl—dreamed of transcending garden-variety luxury. She made it her business to infuse traditional Madison Avenue with some personality by providing a curated selection of cult and couture brands like Off-White and Proenza Schouler. Thanks to her father’s patronage and a go-go attitude (she stuck with the name “Fivestory” despite being forced to settle for two floors after an initial lease fell through), Olshan’s dream prevailed: Amid a flurry of Mylar balloons and pre-Instagram “It girls,” Fivestory opened its doors in 2012. This year marks the store’s fifth in business, but don’t expect another celebratory bash: Olshan says she now considers such expenditures to be a “waste of money.” In lieu of a party, Olshan is investing in the future. In June, she will unveil two new f loors, making room for an atelier, an expanded shoe wall and space for wellness pop-ups. “In the last few years,” she says, “I realized that it has to be all about our clients. I’ve shifted most of my attention from products to people.” Just then, as if to prove her point, Olshan stopped to reassure a customer about the size of a longbacked jacket from her own line, Fivestory New York. The past few years have been groundbreaking for Olshan in more ways than one: Last summer she married her longtime boyfriend, financier Michael Olshan. “We had a lot of breakups while I was building this store,” she says. “It was not part of my five-year-plan . . . [but] marriage makes you feel more grown up.” And Fivestory seems to be growing up with her, with a few new stories to prove it. ■


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Iris van Herpen’s transformative, ethereal designs bring a bit of unconventionality to Dallas, Texas

Status car, meet statement watch: The newest timepiece collaborations from Swiss watchmakers marry two of our favorite luxury must-haves, blending the best in horological mechanics with the latest in automotive engineering and design. Go ahead and judge a man by the car he drives—and the time he keeps.

Techframe Ferrari Tourbillon Chronograph, HUBLOT, hublot.com.

Bugatti Aerolithe Performance, PARMIGIANI FLEURIER, parmigiani.com.

Breitling for Bentley Supersports B55, BREITLING, breitling.com.

RM 50-03 Tourbillon Split Secs Chronograph Ultralight McLaren F1, RICHARD MILLE, richardmille.com.

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Making Good Time

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Clockwise from top: Van Herpen; Hacking Infinity, 3D-printed crystal shoes, 2015; Knowles in Van Herpen at the 2017 Grammy Awards; Refinery Smoke, dress, 2008.

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PORTRAIT: COURTESY OF JEAN BAPTISTE MONDINO AND IRIS VAN HERPEN. SOLANGE KNOWLES: JASON LAVERIS / FILMMAGIC. SHOE: NORITAKA TATEHANA. DRESS: BART OOMES, NO 6 STUDIOS. WATCHES: COURTESY

ris van Herpen is perhaps the most acclaimed fashion designer you’ve never heard of—but not for long. The 33-year-old, Amsterdam–based fashionista’s singular creations—like the sculptural dresses, inspired by crows and crafted from brass umbrella ribs, that showed at Amsterdam Fashion Week in 2008—are the focal point of the Dallas Museum of Art’s just-opened Iris van Herpen: Transforming Fashion, on view through August 20. The exhibition, a survey of 45 extraordinary ensembles, premiered at Atlanta’s High Museum of Art and will subsequently travel to the Phoenix Museum of Art. Van Herpen’s time interning with Alexander McQueen was palpable in her work when she launched her label in 2007, after graduating from the acclaimed fashion program at the Netherlands’ ArtEZ University of the Arts. She went on to become one of the youngest designers ever invited to show at the couture collections. Van Herpen often uses unconventional materials and high-tech processes to create her handcrafted garments, which include a reptilian mini-dress assembled from undulating black acrylic tubes and a 3D-printed frock that Time magazine anointed one of the “50 Best Inventions of 2011.” Fans like Beyoncé, Lady Gaga and Björk have worn her dresses; earlier this year, Solange Knowles posed in sweeping van Herpen couture while hoisting her first Grammy award. The designer emphatically insists that her work, often described as futuristic and otherworldly, is of the present—and the time to see it is now. —HOLLY HABER


Bright Lights, Big City

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A sun-soaked metropolis is the perfect backdrop for directional shades, bold jewelry and eye-catching pieces PHOTOGRAPHED BY DAVID URBANKE  STYLED BY PAUL FREDERICK


Left: Mockneck, $925, VERSACE, versace .com. Sunglasses, $375, VERA WANG COLLECTION EYEWEAR, farfetch.com. Below: Titania dress, $1,695, ALTUZARRA, altuzarra.com. Hover sunglasses, $280, DION LEE, dionlee.com. MVSA earrings in 18-karat pink gold with blue topaz and rubellite, $11,600, BULGARI, bulgari.com. Opposite: Blouse, $1,700, HERMÈS, hermes.com. Satdha sunglasses, $510, BARTON PERREIRA, bartonperreira .com. Perlée earrings in 18-karat yellow gold, $2,650, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, vancleefarpels.com.


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Left: Shirt, $1,400, GUCCI, gucci.com. Lee sunglasses, $395, MORGENTHAL FREDERICS, 212-838-3090. Earrings in 18-karat yellow gold, $1,620, ROBERTO COIN, Saks Fifth Avenue, 877-551-7257. Below: Dress, EDUN, similar styles at edun .com. Sunglasses, $565, POMELLATO, pomellato.com. Hardware Link earrings in 18-karat yellow gold, $4,000, TIFFANY & CO., tiffany.com. Opposite: Jacket, $1,900, BOTTEGA VENETA, 800845-6790. Sunglasses, $870, BOUCHERON, boucheron .com. Door knocker earrings in 18-karat yellow gold, $6,000; Rolling bracelet in 18-karat yellow gold, $14,200, SIDNEY GARBER, sidneygarber.com. The Shirley Fromer watch, $900, GOMELSKY BY SHINOLA, shinola.com.

Hair: Gianluca Mandelli using Kérastase for Atelier Management. Makeup: Lindsey Williams at Kate Ryan Inc. using Dior Addict. Manicure: Yuko Wada using Chanel Le Vernis for Atelier Management. Models: Chen Lin @ IMG Models, Chiara Mazzoleni @ Marilyn NY.


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STYLE Golden Age

For many of us, a guilt-free tan is a distant memory (sigh). But don’t despair: With new age SPFs, luminous bronzers and contouring body creams, this season’s beauty lineup is your summer salvation

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BY MEG STORM

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Clockwise from top: Invincible Setting Powder SPF 45, $30, SUPERGOOP!, sephora.com. Bronzing Face Sheet Mask, $40, ST. TROPEZ, sephora.com. The Ultimate Bronzer, $110, TOM FORD, tomford.com. Belle de Teint Mosaic Palette, $45, LANCÔME, lancome-usa.com. Sun Designer Palette, $82, BY TERRY, byterry.com. Organic Set + Protect Micro Mist SPF 30, $36, SOLEIL TOUJOURS, soleiltoujours.com. Terracotta Bronzer, $53, GUERLAIN, saks.com.

The Look: Victorian Beauty

’Tis the season for a healthy, sculpted complexion. Backstage at Nina Ricci’s fall/winter 2017 show, makeup artist Janeen Witherspoon warmed up the face (and some moody looks) by applying a rosy blush from the apple of the cheek to the temple. Known as “draping,” the technique works with any blush, bronzer or highlighter and creates the illusion of a natural (think: not Kardashian) contour.

CROSS FIT Sweating it out at SoulCycle isn’t the only way to achieve smooth, toned legs. The latest body care offerings from Clarins, Sisley and ZO Skin Health use marine and botanical extracts like quince leaf, white ginger and plankton to provide an immediate firming effect and improve microcirculation and the appearance of cellulite over time. From left: Body Fit, $70, CLARINS, clarins.com. White Ginger Contouring Leg Oil, $190, SISLEY, sisley-paris.com. Oraser Cellulite Control, $95, ZO SKIN HEALTH, zoskinhealth.com.

MODEL/ ANDREA ADRIANI/IMAXTREE.COM. ALL OTHER IMAGES/ JEFFREY WESTBROOK

A TAN THAT CAN FIT IN A CLUTCH Achieving that just-back-from-the-beach radiance has never been simpler thanks to a new crop of beautiful bronzers and innovative SPFs. St. Tropez single-use bronzing sheet mask imparts a light, medium or deep tan in just 15 minutes, while vanity-worthy blush and bronzer palettes can be used on the face and body for a subtle glow. All the while, sunscreeninfused mists and setting powders from Soleil Toujours and Supergoop! make reapplying a cinch.


CALIBER RM 07-01

RICHARD MILLE BOUTIQUES ASPEN • BAL HARBOUR • BEVERLY HILLS • BUENOS AIRES • LAS VEGAS • MIAMI • ST. BARTH • TORONTO


Style Your Summer Up to 70% off a handpicked selection of designer finds and one-of-a-kind experiences—every day

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LIFE Will Travel for Baby Blues An obscure cosmetic surgery has patients trekking halfway around the world to change their eye color

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BY NICOLE PAJER

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oana Couto has always loved her grandmother’s green eyes. “Since I was a child, every time I’d visit her I’d just be mesmerized by them,” she says. “I wished I had her eyes.” And on November 15, the 32-year-old made her dream a reality when she flew to India to have artificial green irises surgically implanted. In the past, the naturally brown-eyed Londoner experimented with colored contacts, but had found the shades of green too Halloween-ish and the process of popping a lens over her cornea too uncomfortable. Desperate for a solution, she scoured the web for ways to permanently alter her eye color. Finally, she stumbled on a story about R&B singer Tameka “Tiny” Harris, who had her eyes surgically changed to “ice gray” by a company called BrightOcular. “I thought, ‘Wow,’” says Couto. “It’s actually possible.” She immediately picked up the phone and made an appointment. Since the first BrightOcular iris implant surgery in 2010, it has been performed over 3,000 times. The average cost of the procedure is $6,500, and in addition to India, the surgeries are currently offered in 14 countries around the globe. The most popular colors chosen by patients include ice gray and Couto’s choice of olive green. While the BrightOcular implants are a U.S. design, the FDA has yet to approve the procedure domestically—with case-by-case exceptions for certain eye complications like iris abnormalities— and the technology is currently undergoing the approval process for a CE mark in Europe. Spencer Vessa, a rep for the company, says they hope to commence trials with U.S. ophthalmologists in the next two to three years. But until then, patients seeking the elective surgery are flocking overseas to places like India, South Africa, and Latin America. On November 16, Couto landed in New Delhi and met with her surgeon, Dr. Udbhav Dorwal, MBBS, DNB, who performed a series of tests to confirm she was a viable candidate for the procedure. “We have to make sure there are no diseases in the eye and that there is enough space over the iris for us to put in the implant,” explains Dorwal, who notes that “not every eye can accept the implants.” Couto was sent back to her hotel with antibiotic

eye drops to prepare herself for the operation. Four days later, she arrived at IBS Hospital for her operation. The procedure was done using topical anesthesia, with Couto lying down on the operating table. Dorwal made a 2.8mm incision into each cornea and, using an injector, implanted folded artificial irises made of medical-grade silicon. “The entire process took 30 minutes, about 15 minutes per eye,” says Couto. An hour later, she was back at the Eros Hotel New Delhi ordering a Caesar salad from room service. The only restrictions were to avoid getting water in her eyes and to administer a series of drops until the incisions healed properly over the next three to four weeks. Four days after the surgery, Couto is back in London, eager to show off her new emerald features. “You probably think I’m crazy for doing this,” she says, as our Skype video chat loads. “But I’m really happy with it. It completely changed my face. I think it just looks so much better!” The Portuguese entrepreneur was experiencing post-surgery blurriness in her left eye, but Dorwal had reassured her that this was a normal part of the recovery and it has since resolved itself. Couto also admitted to being overly cautious about the healing process; she was wearing shades on a 24/7 basis. “I’m sleeping with sunglasses on—it’s quite funny!” she exclaims, laughing giddily. Her friends and family have joked that she looks like “a different person,” but in truth, Couto says she feels more like herself than ever before. “I can’t believe that what I had wanted for so long has happened,” she says. “It’s almost like I know myself in the mirror now. I can’t stop looking in the mirror!” She blushes a little, allowing for how it sounds. Toryn Green—the former front man of Fuel and New York– based rock band For the Taking—also underwent the procedure in 2015, and is equally happy with the results. “I’d needed vision

“I CAN’T BELIEVE WHAT I HAD WANTED FOR SO LONG HAS HAPPENED. I CAN’T STOP LOOKING IN THE MIRROR.”


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correction for most of my life, so I’d grown accustomed to being photographed in blue contacts during concerts or TV appearances,” he says. “After I had laser corrective surgery, I didn’t need contacts anymore, and I was back to my natural hazel eyes. BrightOcular gave me the opportunity to have the color I’d grown used to, without ever having to wear contacts again.” But not all stories of artificial iris implants have happy endings: Research shows that these types of surgeries have not always had the best track record. In 2013, Toronto–based ophthalmologist Dr. Allan Slomovic treated a 25-year-old patient who had undergone an iris implantation procedure in Panama that had left her severely visually impaired. “I saw her after she had bilateral advanced Glaucoma from the surgery and required several cornea transplants,” he explains. “She was an artist who ultimately had to abandon her profession because of this cosmetic surgery. She’s in misery!” And a 2011 study by the American Journal of Ophthalmology advises that anterior chamber iris implants should not be used for cosmetic indications. Dorwal, Couto’s surgeon, agrees that there are eye enhancement procedures happening a round the world he would advise against. For instance, some doctors use a laser to burn the melanin out of the eye as a means of lightening the iris. “That can lead to an increase in eye pressure and glaucoma,” Dorwal explains. “And that type of procedure is not reversible.” But after personally performing 137 BrightOcular procedures over the last two years, he maintains that these implants are a harmless and effective way to alter the color of one’s eyes. “I have not encountered a patient who has had any kind of reaction to the implant,” he says. “We are introducing something into the eye; we are not manipulating its physiolog y or the anatomy. So this is a very safe and reversible process.” For Couto, at least, the benefits far outweighed the risks. Two weeks after her surgery, she says she couldn’t imagine her life without green eyes. The entrepreneur—who is in the process of seeking investors for her upcoming dating app (called Pacebe)— says her new look has given her a boost of self-confidence, especially in the singles world. Over Christmas, she visited her grandmother, surprising her with her upgraded eye color. “Everybody was incredibly happy for me,” she says of her family’s first impressions. “And my grandmother made a comment about how my eyes are so much more beautiful than hers!” When we checked in a month and a half after the procedure, Couto was still beyond content with the outcome—so much so, in fact, that she’s even consider doing it again. “I’m thinking of changing the color already,” she admits. “My brother loved my eyes and is thinking of getting the surgery done. He wants to get smoky gray, and I will probably go back to match him.” But she’ll sit tight for “a few years,” she says. For the moment, she is enjoying seeing green. ■


The New Mexico Mere miles from party capital Cabo San Lucas, a lesser-known destination beckons BY RIMA SUQI

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n a clear morning, the Pacific Ocean looms large from the patio of the Hotel San Cristóbal Baja in Todos Santos, Mexico. The 6,000-person town, just 45 minutes north of Cabo San Lucas, couldn’t feel less like one of Mexico’s touristpacked vacation capitals. The coastline here is mostly untouched, save for a beach populated by fishermen and their small vessels. On an earlier visit to the Baja town, I certainly never imagined that the next time I would set foot on this glorious stretch of sand it would be to stay at an oceanfront boutique hotel, created by an award-winning American architecture firm and a hotelier known for attracting a particularly savvy set. One of Todos’ first boutique spots, it offers more rooms than any other hotel in town—surpassing Rancho Pescadero, the only other comparable property in the largely unspoiled region. But while the development boom has been celebrated by many, as with any dramatic shift, the changes underway have ignited some controversy amongst those who prefer that Todos Santos remains the way it’s always been. Over several weeks this spring, early visitors to the property included music industry executives, interior designers, landscape architects and photographers, many of whom were coming to the area for the first time. “There is something really magical about it,” says hotelier Liz Lambert, the brains behind the project. “I’ve always been drawn to the desert, but a desert on the ocean? It’s a game-changer.” Perhaps in more ways than one: The San Cristóbal is part of a controversial 1,100 acre mixed-use development called Tres Santos, which stands to add 620 houses on this quarter-mile stretch of shore and the surrounding hills, as well as 500 more inland, according to a 2016 report in the New

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REPORT FROM MEXICO CITY:

It’s Getting (More) Posh in Polanco

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Opposite page: Poolside at Hotel San Cristóbal. This page, clockwise from top: San Cristóbal offers plenty of upspoiled views of the Pacific Ocean; the dining room; one of the hotel’s 32 suites.

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York Times. Aside from the hotel, only nine inland units have been built to date (as of this writing, none have officially sold), but the project’s director, Ernie Glesner, confirmed plans to build on the beach, saying he “doesn’t have exact timing.” The initiative has proved extremely polarizing for the town. Long-time friends and neighbors are pit against each other over what this project is doing to a place that, somewhat miraculously, has avoided major development in the decades since it began attracting luminaries like former R.E.M. guitarist Peter Buck (who owns a home here), Jenny Armit (a British interior designer who relocated from Los Angeles 12 years ago and now owns a B&B called Hotelito) and Julia Chaplin (journalist and creator of Assounline’s Gypset series of coffee table books). Online reviews of the hotel include comments like “This hotel violates numerous environmental regulations,” and “I found out that it was built by violating local building codes and steamrolling the local population with a kind of economic imperialism.” Individuals I spoke with on the condition of anonymity agreed with some of these points, but just as many said they liked the design, appreciated another good restaurant and felt that the hotel would ultimately benefit the town. Lambert—founder of Texas-based Bunkhouse Hotels, the business behind Austin’s Hotel San Jose, Hotel Saint Cecilia, Austin Motel and Jo’s Coffee and the Fair Market, as well as the Hotel Havana in San Antonio and El Cosmico in Marfa—had not been to Todos herself before being tapped for this project. (Two years ago, it was reported that the Standard International Group bought 51 percent of her company.) With properties like Thunderbird Hotel, which Lambert renovated more than a decade ago before moving on to other projects, and El Cosmico, now home to the annual Trans-Pecos music festival (which has drawn the likes of Kacey Musgraves and Neko Case), the hote-

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FROM TOP TO BOTTOM: NICK SIMONITE. COURTESY. NICK SIMONITE

El Palacio de Hierro’s reputation for luxury has been over a century in the making, and the chain’s latest venture has been a transformation of their flagship—in the posh Polanco neighborhood of Mexico City—into a lifestyle destination. 2015 saw the completion of a $300 million renovation— designed by Mexican architect Javier Sordo Madaleno, TPG Architects and Gensler—and now, El Palacio is poised to become Latin America’s leader in luxury shopping. This summer, local museums will lend works by Yayoi Kusama, Cristóbal Balenciaga and Andy Warhol, while exclusive pop-up shops will welcome brands like Dolce & Gabbana. Mexico City’s beloved Prendes, the traditional Mexican eatery that attracts an international fanbase of elite foodies and cultural enthusiasts, will also find itself in a new, remodeled location at El Palacio. —ATALIE GIMMEL


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lier gave the cultured, stylish set that f locked to Marfa the hotels they wanted. With the San Cristóbal, Lambert is at it again, bringing her sought after brand of bohemian chic to a town that has been known since the 1980s for attracting an eclectic crowd of, per the New York Times, “surfers, artists, yogis, retirees, and the sort of scruffy Americans who look as if they took a wrong turn on their way home from an Allman Brothers concert.” In conceiving the 32-room San Cristóbal, Lambert referenced ’60s, ’70s and ’80s surf culture, the Baja Bug (Volkswagen Beetles modified so that their engines were exposed) and the Baja 1000—the legendary off-road race that started in the ’60s and went on to garner a major cult following including the likes of Steve McQueen, Paul Newman and James Garner. “We tried to capture the spirit of Baja, with a little bit of funkiFrom top: ness,” Lambert says of the overall aesthetic. The hotel itself, a Crudo of the day at Benno, San modern plaster structure designed by San Antonio-based arCristóbal’s Mexicanchitecture firm Lake | Flato, sits on a property awash in colorMediterranean ful, encaustic tile in shades of green, orange, red, purple and restaurant; farmwhite. Furniture and accessories come primarily from Mexico: to-table hotspot Hierbabuena. Oversized pillows are made of striped Baja blankets, hanging lamps and coffee tables were produced by a family-owned ceramics studio in Guadalajara and brightly colored traditional blankets custom made in Oaxaca cover Coco-mat beds (one of few imported furnishings, along with Sferra bedlinens and Malin + Goetz products). Most rooms have water views; some have an outdoor tub, or shower, or both; and all have outdoor space. Benno, the hotel’s restaurant, has a Mexican-Mediterranean menu of simply prepared dishes that change based on availability, including crudo and codorniz con picadillo, an unexpected and delicious roasted quail dish. There’s no spa, but a masseuse and shaman can be summoned to treat guests who feel the need for a massage or sunrise cleansing ceremony. Surfers take note: There are several bucket-list breaks in the area. The best is Cerritos Beach, but the no-longer-secret spot that originally drew the Endless Summer crowd is La Pastura.

Poolside at the Andaz Mayakoba on Mexico’s Riviera Maya

MY OH MAYA

Mayakoba is a tourist destination of a different caliber If Cabo San Lucas is the go-to tawdry tourist trap of Mexico’s West Coast, there’s no question that the East Coast’s version is Cancún. But just an hour south of the Yucatan’s notorious city of spring breakers and megaresorts is Mayakoba, the Caribbean-facing antidote to tackiness. Situated on the Riviera Maya district between Cancún and trendier Tulum, the superluxe master-planned community is home to four resorts that garner consistent buzz for being out-of-this-world: Fairmont, Rosewood, Banyan Tree and Andaz, the newest. And summer is decidedly, if perhaps unexpectedly, the perfect time to visit. Over July 4th weekend, Andaz will play host to a four-day whirlwind of sand, sun and sport including events like beach yoga and a 5K stand-up paddleboard race; several guest chefs will be on hand to help guests refuel. Elsewhere on site, Mayakoba boasts a Greg Norman-designed golf course, nature trails for hiking, excursions to area cenotes—the area’s famous underground swimming holes—and more. Recover from all that fun with some more low-key fun in the form of serious spa time or a glass (or three) of rosé on the beach. However you spend it, you’re set for a successful vacation. —RACHEL WALLACE

FROM TOP TO BOTTOM: NICK SIMONITE. COURTESY OF HIERBABUENA. COURTESY OF ROSEWOOD MAYAKOBA

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The dog-friendly hotel has also partnered with a local rescue organization to match dogs with hotel guests. Since opening, several guests—including a prominent Los Angeles-based interior designer and the founder of a modern furniture retailer— have left with foster pups, including Solito, a three-legged mixed breed and the hotel’s former unofficial mascot, now happily ensconced in his new northern California home. If the assumption is that development is inevitable for any breathtakingly beautiful corner of the globe, then Hotel San Cristóbal is likely a more palatable option for those who love Todos than many of the alternatives. There are few, if any, secret spots left in this world, and sooner or later, somebody was bound to do this here. When compared with Cabo—where a Four Seasons, a St. Regis and Ritz Carlton residences are set to open over the next couple years—the development footprint on Todos feels minimal. Despite the current drama, the town is one of those places that still feels authentic. Yes, there are expats who have made it their home. But as Armit told me, “you still get the feeling that the town belongs to the people.” You see kids walking home from school with their oversized backpacks on the cobblestoned streets. You might occasionally spot someone riding a horse through town. The best fish tacos (Taqueria El Parguito) and ceviche (Mariscos El Compa Chava) are both served at establishments generously described as shacks, with a hodgepodge of plastic and folding chairs arranged under roofs with no walls. But there are also two standout farm-to-table restaurants, Hierbabuena and Jazamango (the latter helmed by star Mexican chef Javier Plascencia), in addition to a selection of galleries, an annual music festival founded by Buck, a film festival and a well-regarded writers’ workshop. How the development plays out remains to be seen, but for now, the San Cristóbal is here to stay, and for now, it seems authentically in line with the area. One hopes it will remain that way. ■

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FROM TOP TO BOTTOM: KENNY VIESE. COURTESY OF JAZAMANGO

THERE’S SOMETHING REALLY MAGICAL ABOUT TODOS SANTOS.”

From top: The coastline of Todos Santos remains mostly untouched, for now; Jazamango, helmed by Mexican chef Javier Plascencia.


LIFE A Blueprint for Seduction

WATERLINE SQUARE One of the Upper West Side’s last parcels of undeveloped land, at the southern end of Riverside Park, will soon be the location of sleek towers designed by top firms: Richard Meier & Partners, Rafael Viñoly Architects and Kohn Pederson Fox Associates. The dream-team project comprises 263 luxury residences, starting at around $2 million.

The world’s best architects turn their talents to NYC’s residential skyline BY LAURA ITZKOWITZ

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ig-name architects, record-breaking prices, sky-high towers with helicopter views and amenities worthy of a fivestar hotel—it’s clear that sexy New York real estate is booming. To be fair, for some time critics have been asking if the Big Apple— specifically Manhattan—is becoming a home for the super-rich since 2015, when One57, on midtown’s West 57th Street, made headlines for closing a $100.5 million penthouse deal. Whether or not that’s the case, two things are certain: development of trophy towers borough-wide shows no sign of slowing, and all the new construction is changing both the face of Manhattan and its iconic skyline. Here, we take a neighborhood-by-neighborhood look at the new buildings that stand to make the biggest cosmetic impact.

520 WEST 28TH STREET It’s fitting that the first New York residence by the late Zaha Hadid, master of futuristic curvilinear architecture, resembles a space-age bubble. This 11-story, High Line–adjacent address— where the 39 residences start at $4.9 million, epitomizes the architect’s esteemed legacy of buildings that stand out from the crowd.

527 WEST 27TH STREET Indoor-outdoor living defines Jardim, Brazilian architect Isay Weinfeld’s first New York condo building, where units start at $1.96 million. Floorto-ceiling glass and private terraces combined with natural materials like oak, timber and quartz invite the outside in, and a lush garden between the two towers creates a private Eden amid the urban jungle. 514 WEST 24TH STREET Roman and Williams’ Art Deco–inspired Fitzroy—with 14 residences starting at $5.5 million—makes a sophisticated statement with a green terra-cotta façade and Italian copper-clad oak windows. Inside, reclaimed chevronpatterned wood floors, custom millwork and copper tubs are further nods to Jazz Age style.

70 VESTRY STREET Tribeca is already home to celebrities like Jay Z and Justin Timberlake, and the new project by Robert A. M. Stern—the man behind the luxe 15 Central Park West—is rumored to have drawn a new crop. Tom Brady and Gisele Bündchen have reportedly purchased a $32 million five-bedroom on the 12th floor of the building, which overlooks the Hudson and is set for a 2018 debut.

UPPER WEST SIDE

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215 CHRYSTIE STREET A collaboration between Herzog & de Meuron and Ian Schrager, this shiny building houses Schrager’s PUBLIC Hotel and is topped with 11 residences—starting at $4 million—with interiors by designer John Pawson. “215 Chrystie is both tough and refined,” Schrager says. “The ultimate expression of Uptown meets Downtown.”

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152 ELIZABETH STREET With his signature use of glass and poured concrete, Japanese architect Tadao Ando created a minimalist haven for his first New York City residence. Michael Gabellini’s interiors feature wide-plank Danish oak floors, Gaggenau appliances and dehumidification systems for art collectors. Units start at $5.7 million.

625 WEST 57TH STREET Danish starchitect Bjarke Ingels’ VIA—where rental units go for $17.5 thousand per month—boasts an impossible-to-miss silhouette, rising like a gleaming pyramid, that’s said to morph depending on the viewer’s vantage point. A massive courtyard inspired by Copenhagen’s urban greenery offers peeks from the street.

53 WEST 53RD STREET Jean Nouvel and Thierry Despont’s skyscraper will rise 1,050 feet above MoMA. The interiors of the residences, which start at $3 million, are works of art themselves, with bespoke touches like custom glass cabinetry by Despont and floor-to-ceiling windows with Central Park views. Purchase of an apartment includes a special MoMA membership.

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42 CROSBY STREET Annabelle Selldorf’s residential project made headlines for its million-dollar parking spots, which allow drivers to roll right up to an elevator that transports the car to the garage. The architect celebrates quintessential SoHo style with open-space units—only three of which are still on the market—starting at $8.4 million.

MAP ILLUSTRATION BY A.E. KIEREN

15 HUDSON YARDS Manhattan’s new neighborhood has something for everyone, with shops, restaurants and a new performing arts center. But only those with $3.8 million to spare can get keyless access to a spot at this 88-story address. Diller Scofidio + Renfro–designed apartments come with prime access to amenities.

520 PARK AVENUE Inspired by the Sherry Netherland, Stern’s second neighborhood tower features a lobby clad in marble from the quarries of Louis XII, a vaulted salon, an indoor pool and gardens that recall Gilded Age New York. “Each apartment is a city villa in the sky,” Robert A. M. Stern Architects partner Paul Whalen says of the units, which start at $18.2 million.

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565 BROOME STREET Renzo Piano is working on his first residential New York project in partnership with French interior design firm RDAI and developers Bizzi & Partners. 565 Broome, where units will start at $2.3 million, will be his most spectacular use of light yet, thanks to a special system of curved glass. “The building really is open and every corner of it breathes,” Piano says.

20 EAST END AVENUE For those who love pre-war architecture but also want modern amenities, Robert A. M. Stern’s original building features a porte cochere with a wall fountain and landscaped courtyard. Traditional details continue inside, with a dramatic spiral staircase, billiards room and oak and marble throughout the units, which start north of $4 million.


Postcards From the Edge For those courageous enough to brave the family vacation as full-grown adults and survive it, unexpected charms ensue BY ANTHONY ROTUNNO

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pon reaching a certain age—let’s say, 30—a lot of things that you had never imagined happening become all too real. Some are pleasant surprises: finding the perfect loft for you, your boyfriend and your hairless cat; managing to stay gainfully employed in media for nearly a decade. Some are less pleasant: sleeping on the same full mattress you’ve had since graduating college; scrounging leftover change from coat pockets to buy a loose cigarette or two. And others, like choosing to spend a week traveling with your parents and grown siblings, would seem downright unbelievable were it not for the hundreds of iPhone photos documenting your reenactment of a favorite National Lampoon’s plot.

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Power Tripping

Fashionable families who enjoy multigenerational getaways THE LAURENS Patriarch Ralph owns two homes at Montego Bay’s Round Hill Hotel and Villas and has hosted his nearest and dearest for decades: once it was his brother Jerry and his family, now it’s his grown children with spouses and offspring.

THE MISSONIS

THE MCCARTNEY CLAN Sir Paul McCartney and his wife, Nancy Shevell, have been known to show up in St. Barts alongside daughter Stella and her brood.

The Missoni family at play in Sardinia Above: The Lauren family.

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The family typically unites for the month of August, with up to 40-odd members gathering in Sardinia for a long stretch of bonding. They prefer Puntaldia, a sleepy spot on the coast where they’ve constructed a family compound. Earlier Missoni generations created the same kind of experiences during annual visits to Croatia.

THE LAUDER FAMILY The tight-knit clan likes to spend downtime together, often visiting Palm Beach, where late matriarch Estee’s beachside home (now owned by son Ronald) neighbors the Breakers. Aspen is another frequent destination: Granddaughter Aerin hosts the family at her mountainside retreat.

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ELISABETH ANDANSON/SYGMA VIA GETTY IMAGES. ADRIANO ALECCHI/MONDADORI PORTFOLIO VIA GETTY IMAGES

time spent under one roof—even if it’s just for a few days at a time. A perennial topic of conversation on our vacations is how they’re unsustainable: The time will come when marriage or children will prevent one of my siblings or me from separating from the new families we’ve started on our own. This knowledge outlasts any personal frustrations lingering after the trips and ultimately drives me to make new ones a priority. Yes, we bicker, and yes, we roll our eyes each time my mom whips out her tripod to take a family portrait in a public place. But the fact that we can pick up and travel is a luxury. And the fact that we continue to choose to do so together is rarer still. ■

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Like many adults of a certain age, I believed my family’s days of traveling as a core fivesome had run their course years ago. It seemed we outgrew the tradition on a 2009 visit to Paris when, quite literally, we went in different directions: my parents toward their churches (Sacré-Cœur and Notre-Dame), I toward mine (Colette and Ladurée) and my siblings toward whichever wouldn’t create a further rift. In the following years, my mom and dad began to take trips as a couple (as empty nesters do) and my brother, sister and I chose to travel with our significant others or friends (as independent twentysomethings do). But a 2015 pilgrimage to our homeland of Italy—during which we road-tripped Griswoldstyle from Lake Como to Venice to Florence to Siena to Cinque Terre in a rented van—resurrected our custom of traveling en famille. Every year since, much to my surprise, we’ve made the time to do it again. The majority of Americans have a finite number of vacation days, and medicated or not, the simple act of traveling from one place to another can be riddled with frustrations. As a result, most adults are inclined to keep holidays as stress free as possible—which typically means they don’t travel with family. A lot of people react with shock to the idea of our family vacations, particularly when they learn that neither my siblings nor I—all of whom are in serious relationships—travel with significant-others-as-buffers (my parents’ friends, all of whom have grown children of their own, are especially surprised). I myself am often among the non-believers; I vividly can recall thinking “never again” at the end of each of our last few trips. Don’t get me wrong: The itineraries themselves are spectacular, and the fact that my parents want to subsidize their grown children’s ability to see the world is not lost on me. We genuinely have a lot of fun together and, as my mom and dad approach their sixties, their zest for adventure and living life to the fullest is infectious, even to this jaded New Yorker. But psychologically, the trips can be exhausting. Awkward parent-child dynamics tend to creep back to the fore, and innocuous decisions my siblings and I make every day—from what to wear to where to sleep—are no longer our exclusive jurisdiction with our parents back in the picture. Take our recent trek to Arizona this spring. Before a planned bike tour of the Grand Canyon’s South Rim, I neglected to pack the appropriate headgear for temperatures at 6,800-plus feet above sea level in March. My mother, of course, insisted on buying me a souvenir hat to wear under my helmet. I assured her I would be fine—I was raised in upstate New York after all—but each time I thought the matter was resolved, she brought it up again. She couldn’t help herself, and neither could I; it recalled the tiffs we had over what I would wear to Sunday mass as a kid, the main difference being that I now had years—decades, in fact—of experience dressing myself appropriately. Ultimately, we compromised and I agreed to borrow my sister’s pom-pom-adorned beanie. While I can’t say my protected ears allowed me to better enjoy the scenery, I’d like to think they allowed my mom to. Throughout the trip, which included a stay in Sedona, the accommodations for all five of us consisted of no more than two bedrooms at any given time. This would have been ample space for several children, but it was not nearly what my siblings and I were used to inhabiting after living on our own for close to a decade. And frankly, it was pretty tight quarters for any five adults, related or not, traveling with at least two pieces of luggage each. Inevitably, one of us had to sleep beside or within earshot of our parents, and close quarters take their toll. But for every moment of discord, there are moments of deeper connection. Even though my family talks daily (our group text moves at an alarming rate), I’ve found that the trips give us a unique opportunity to re-forge the bonds that only come from


ACP/ TRUNK ARCHIVE.

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Reading Burma

As one of the world’s youngest democracies opens its gates to outsiders after half a century, travelers catch glimpses of a forgotten land—and a new writer offers an unprecedented account of Myanmar’s history BY ALLY-JANE GROSSMAN

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MARTIN PUDDY/ GETTY IMAGES.

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n Yangon, the former capital of Myanmar (formerly Burma), there is a lively booksellers district on Pansodan Street. Like the rest of the country, the street is a clash between the old Burma and the new. The majestic pastel façades of colonial buildings—once gleaming new offices and stores, now more than 100 years old—are crumbling. Shopkeepers young and old (who, locked away from the world for decades by a brutal military regime, gained access to the Internet only a few years ago) buy cheap SIM cards and smartphones to communicate with friends and follow political news on Facebook. Inside the tiny shops and their crowded shelves, it’s impossible to avoid stumbling on relics of colonialism: teak-foresting manuals from the 1920s, Burmese-English translations of Wuthering Heights, trashy Burmese-language romance novels. And if you keep browsing, some modern English-language classics might turn up—stories by some of the greatest writers of the last two centuries—set right in Myanmar, a country still mysterious to much of the Western world. For the most part, the English literary history of Myanmar has revolved around the British colonial experience. There’s George Orwell’s 1934 novel Burmese Days, based on his experiences working as a police captain in Burma (which scholars suggest is where he got his first taste of dystopia). More recently, Amitav Ghosh’s 2000 epic The Glass Palace traces the downfall and desolate exile of Burma’s last king. Richard Flanagan’s The Narrow Road to the Deep North, which won the 2014 Man Booker Prize, depicts the unspeakable horrors experienced by Allied prisoners in Burma during World War II. And of course, there’s Rudyard Kipling’s 1892 poem “Mandalay,” cemented in popular culture by Frank Sinatra’s “On the Road to Mandalay.” I found myself humming the campy tune as I sat in the teak-adorned Kipling’s Lounge at the Mandalay Hill Resort Hotel. These acclaimed works—though separated by decades—share one common thread: All of them are white male-centric narratives. But this summer, a female writer will cast her gaze on her mother’s homeland with the publication of a stunning new novel. Miss Burma, by Charmaine Craig—the daughter Below: A view of Sule Pagoda in Yangon. of famous Burmese-born beauty queen and Karen freedom fightOpposite: The pastel buildings of Yangon’s Pansodan Street. er Louisa Benson Craig—will give English-language readers an unprecedented glimpse into Myanmar’s culture and history—not only through the eyes of a woman, but also through those of the persecuted Karen people, who suffered for centuries in their country’s bloody ethnic conflicts. The political history of Myanmar in the 20th century is complicated. If you’re familiar with the country, you probably know that Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi and her party, the National League for Democracy, recently won control of the government after a half century of rule by a brutal military junta. Even the former name of the country, “Burma,” was a point of violent contention—it refers to the ethnic Burmese people, just

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one of the hundreds of ethnic groups who have long called the country home, including (among many others) the Karen, Mon and Kachin people. Miss Burma is the story of Craig’s mother, born to a Jewish man and a Karen woman in the opening days of World War II. Through the lens of historical fiction, we watch the lives of these characters unfold—the British leave after the war, infighting for freedom gives way to a coup and 60 years of authoritarian rule sets in. The book tells a story little known to English audiences, taking readers to corners of the country still largely inaccessible to foreigners. A significant portion of the novel takes place in the wild forests of central and northern Burma, which are areas of conf lict even today. Outsiders still need special permission from the government to enter huge swaths of the country, and are discouraged from leaving the modern cities. But the novel also provides readers and travelers eager to connect with the history of their surroundings ample landmarks to visit and begin exploring the country’s history. The story opens at Musmeah Yeshua Synagogue in Yangon (formerly Rangoon), where the story’s central couple struggles to understand each other’s language, culture and faith. The synagogue is still open to visitors and worshippers, despite Myanmar’s dwindling Jewish population. Today, Muslim caretakers maintain the grounds and protect the Torah, unconcerned with the religious and territorial conflict between the two peoples a few thousand miles away. You can still stroll across the lush green grass of Fytche Square, renamed Maha Bandula Park in 1935. In the novel, Craig’s grandfather crosses the park every day to visit government buildings to acquire permits for his various businesses. The park is adjacent to the sparkling gold Sule Pagoda, which is now encased in a traffic circle that requires real courage to cross on foot. The regime did little to improve infrastructure, and even the once-sparkling Jewish-owned stores of Craig’s grandfather’s youth are still standing, their imported Mancunian tile f loors now coated in dust. But the world is still catching up with the long-sequestered nation. Myanmar is a place of extremes: The great wealth in the ruling military class is contrasted with the dire poverty of the people who have been left behind. There are banks in the major cities with ATMs and plenty of kyats to dispense, though progress is slow—only a small handful of hotels accept credit cards. In more existential ways, progress is even slower. As the young democracy struggles to form a national identity, it needs heroes like Louisa Benson Craig—and stories like Miss Burma. ■


CULTURE Cool British sensation London Grammar gives lessons in musical meditation, but they have a few prayers of their own BY FRANCES DODDS

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY ROSALINE SHAHNAVAZ

From left to right: Dan Rothman, Hannah Reid and Dominic “Dot” Major in Ravenscourt Park, West London

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t’s been said that listening to British trio London Grammar is something of a spiritual experience. Were this listener to wax lyrical, she might say that lead singer Hannah Reid is like a cathedral choir of one—her ethereal voice soaring over aching electro beats, up into the rafters and out through the stained glass windows. Church is a place for confession, so maybe it makes sense that the members of London Grammar are known for making some candid admissions. In interviews, they’ve spoken at length about crippling performance anxiety, the destructive nature of touring, their fear of fame’s unforgiving spotlight—and this time around, how they underwent a kind of musical amnesia. “Making our second album was very difficult—harder than the first,” says Dan Rothman, the band’s charismatic guitarist. “Our tastes had developed and changed, and there’s just so much weird shit going on in the world. We’d also been on tour for so long that when we came back to the studio, we’d forgotten how to do it.” The tour in question was for the band’s first album, If You Wait, which debuted in 2013 with hits like “Hey Now” and “Strong,” and which won them the iTunes Album of the Year award—along with a frenzied cult following. Often likened to The xx (a comparison they’ve called “lazy”), their music is a medley of soulful piano riffs, restrained electronic beats and reverberating balladry evoking the quandaries of heartbreak, the pain of youth—along with the panic of it slipping away. In June, London Grammar releases its hotly anticipated second collection, Truth is a Beautiful Thing, which throws the doors open on their sumptuous style with a sound that’s altogether more expansive, orchestral and upbeat. But true to form, despite the album’s hype, the band still admits to some anxiety about its reception. “Generally, with your first album, you never consider the fact that anyone would actually listen to it,” says Dot Major, the trio’s keyboardist and drummer. Adds Rothman, “We’re not the kind of band, unfortunately, that can judge success on where we chart.” At least one fan would say that’s not the worst thing. As Elton John recently commented, “[London Grammar] is not the kind of music that gets in the charts these days, because there’s no room for intelligence in the charts.” So success must be measured in less quantitative ways. “I’m excited about playing festivals,” Rothman says. “I think that’s the real barometer of whether people have actually been listening to the new album. Either they’ll turn up to see us, or they won’t.” Even in the four years since they arrived on the scene, the music industry has changed dramatically, and the band says that navigating it often feels like a shot in the dark. “The Internet has been amazing for music,” says vocalist Reid. “But it’s changed how young people value it, because it’s so accessible. I hope streaming becomes monetized in a more ethical way for the artist. Especially for independent musicians.” Although London Grammar is signed to Columbia Records, independence of process is deeply integral to their DNA. While many of today’s younger artists are opting for fame with quickie collaborations, they’re hoping to land in the “longevity category,” as Rothman says. “I think a lot of artists now become defined by the collaborations they do,” he continues. “We haven’t done much collaborating. I think that’s probably because we needed to get our own shit together. It’s hard enough collaborating between the three of us. Maybe on the next album we’ll do it more. . . ” he pauses for a moment. “I think Hannah’s voice would sound great on a Drake track.” Let’s hope Drake joins the congregation soon. ■

GROOMING BY LAUREN REYNOLDS USING 3INA AND UNITE.

Sunday School


Jacob Sanchez Diagnosed with autism

Sensory sensitivity is a sign of autism. Learn the others at autismspeaks.org/signs.


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f 2015 was the year that put Kiersey Clemons on the map, it’s 2017 that will make her a bona fide star. Fresh off of Sundance hit Dope, a film that landed her name on the tongues of casting agents everywhere, the 23-year-old signed on to enough blockbuster and prestige projects to make herself a nearly ubiquitous presence this season. If all goes as planned, by the end of the year Clemons will have had at least five new films released in theaters. They range from star-studded major studio releases, like a reboot of the 1990 sci-fi f lick Flatliners and the mega-budget DC Comics superhero epic Justice League, to independent features such as An L.A. Minute, a satire about the cult of stardom. The journey to this pivotal career moment began for the actress at age 11, when her father’s job relocated the family from Pensacola, Florida, to Redondo Beach, California, a suburb of Los Angeles. The proximity to Hollywood helped Clemons realize that her love of storytelling and performing in local plays could be more than just a childhood hobby. “I just enjoyed getting attention,” she recalls with a throaty laugh. “It all kind of came together for me—maybe it was manifestation.” Exhibiting a rare tenacity, Clemons found her first agent online, made herself a fixture at auditions and wisely struck up productive relationships with casting directors. The actress’ versatility became apparent when she followed a recurring role in Disney’s popular series Austin & Ally with a guest spot on CSI, and eventually a breakout recurring role on Transparent, a program that was decidedly not “Disney-esque.” Clemons says working on Jill Soloway’s landmark series, which follows a family

Girl on Fire

Soon to be a superhero star, Kiersey Clemons braces herself for meteoric fame

BY JEREMY KINSER PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHRISTOPHER FERGUSON STYLED BY ANNINA MISLIN

reacting to their patriarch’s decision to come out as transgender, changed her on a personal level. “It definitely expanded my mind and my heart,” she says. “It was a really warm set to be on. I’m always going to seek out that feeling.” Around the same time, Clemons’ work in Dope—the 2015 Pharell Williams– and Forest Whitaker–produced Sundance favorite—provided a broader showcase for her talents. Clemons, who plays a lesbian teenager obsessed with early-’90s hip-hop culture, was careful to avoid leaning on any stereotypes in her portrayal. “I think when you let sexuality come into play it can be distracting because then you’re trying to make the sexual preference an entertainment, like it’s their party trick,” she says. “Being a lesbian is not a party trick.”  Dope’s strong reviews (Rolling Stone called her performance in the dramedy “crazy good”) helped open other doors for Clemons. She took a role in a mainstream comedy, the 2016 hit Neighbors 2: Sorority Rising, and more high-profile television gigs including guest spots on The New Girl and the Netf lix anthology series Easy. The adage “there are no small parts, only small actors” seems to be one that Clemons holds dear. While some young performers will accept a project based on the paycheck or box-office potential, Clemons insists she has a different motivation: “Mostly I look at who I am in the world of the movie. Do I believe that person exists? Are these people having real conversations?” Ultimately, Clemons’ career decisions are dictated by the strength of the scripts she sees. “You’d be surprised at how much shit I read that’s not believable,” she says. “I literally don’t know how I’ve ended up doing the amazing projects I’ve been able to be


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G IRL ON FIRE

a part of. Even if the outcome isn’t exactly what I expected, something amazing still comes out of it, like a good friend.” (Her cast friendships are well documented. When she and Disney Channel co-star Dove Cameron got coordinating tattoos, the celebrity blogosphere reported on it breathlessly.) Despite the career explosion that will inevitably accompany the release of Flatliners in September and Justice League two months later, Clemons is most excited about her work in The Only Living Boy in New York, an intimate drama headlined by Jeff Bridges, in theaters in August. Without revealing too much detail, she notes that her character Mimi is the one with which she’s felt the strongest connection lately. “It was very ironic because the character I was playing, I feel we were in the same boat,” she says. “I love when it works out that way.” Clemons is already getting ready to manage her growing fame, as well as preparing those closest to her for the moment when her recognition factor goes through the roof with Justice League. Clemons notes that her boyfriend, whom she doesn’t want to identify by name, is very protective of her. She, in turn, is looking out for her family members. “I’m not thinking about myself being harmed or boundaries being crossed, but I’m always thinking about my sister,” she says. “With social media, you can see how crazy people can get. You can see how people will find your relatives and your closest friends. It’s really bizarre and threatening.” Clemons’ relationship with social media—which she describes as sometimes “freaking terrifying”—is a fraught one. Although she seems to be refreshingly candid on her Twitter account—she’s detailed an unpleasant encounter with an Uber driver and expressed glee at the termination of Fox News host Bill O’Reilly— she claims she’s actually holding back. “There’s so much more that I could say,” she says, hinting that she doesn’t want complete strangers to feel too familiar with her. “Everyone has their social

“IT’S SO INTERESTING WHEN PEOPLE SAY ‘I LOVE WHAT YOU SAID ON TWITTER.’ I’M LIKE, ‘ME TOO. DON’T MAKE ME REPEAT IT.’”

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media version of themselves and I think mine is a bit more upfront and aggressive. [In person] I am probably a bit more quiet and shy and chill. It’s so interesting when people say, ‘I love what you said on Twitter.’ I’m like, ‘Me too. Don’t make me repeat it.’” To combat the increased pressure, Clemons likes to unwind by cooking and cuddling with her dog, a Jack Russell terrier named Booty. “I’ve found you have to be very present and comfortable with being alone in order to get things done,” she says. And if the stress is unbearable, Clemons has found an antidote: “If I am in a situation where it becomes overwhelming, I just have to shut up and breathe and realize I’m the luckiest bitch in the world.” ■


CULTURE

FALLINGWATER HOUSE, PA

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Urban monuments may be more frequented, but no structure is more representative of Wright’s otherworldly vision than the iconic Fallingwater, built deep in the Pennsylvania woods in 1935. The woodland masterpiece— which includes a gallery and café—will present a menu of Wright’s favorite food and a lecture series on the architect’s residential design legacy.

UNITY TEMPLE, CHICAGO

Celebrating the Wright Way Museums and exhibits across the country are honoring Frank Lloyd Wright’s 150th anniversary BY SAMUEL ANDERSON

THE GUGGENHEIM, NYC Touring architect Frank Lloyd Wright’s surviving oeuvre—over 400 structures in locales ranging from Japan to Wisconsin— would normally require a heav y dose of stamina and a passport. But starting June 12, a museum pass is all you’ll need. Spanning six decades, Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive brings 450 pieces of the prolific architect’s more portable work (model homes, architectural drawings, paintings, fur-

niture and films) to New York’s Museum of Modern Art. The items on display will be grouped to contextualize their role in Wright’s work and his role in the history of modern architecture. The showcase is just one of many in a nationwide blitz of open houses and never-before-seen renovations honoring Wright’s 150th birthday on June 8. But for a critical look at his artistic and engineering genius, MoMA’s exhibit is your one-stop shop. ■

At the epicenter of Wright’s birthday celebration is his unmistakable masterpiece, the Guggenheim Museum, which will offer guided tours on Sundays examining the museum’s spiral design, as well as reduced admission of $1.50 and free cupcakes on June 8. And of course, MoMA’s retrospective Frank Lloyd Wright at 150 is just down the avenue.

DRAWING: THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART / AVERY ARCHITECTURAL & FINE ARTS LIBRARY, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, NEW YORK. ALL OTHER IMAGES: GETTY IMAGES

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On June 8, the Frank Lloyd Wright Trust will host a day of events at sites around Chicago (including the Oak Park Home and Studio), culminating in a formal dinner and lecture on Wright’s relationship with Japanese art. In July, fans can tour the fully restored Unity Temple when the landmark reopens after a two-year, $23 million overhaul.


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The Woman Behind the Frame

In a new book, one of the most prolific and influential producers of documentary film, Sheila Nevins, reveals telling scenes from her own life BY FRANCES DODDS

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n the nebulous territory between fact and fiction—a dark wilderness we wander with increasing frequency—Sheila Nevins has long shone an unwavering light on the hardest of facts. At 78, Nevins has worked at HBO Documentary for nearly four decades (she’s been president there since 2004) during which she has produced over 1,000 films and won a staggering 26 Academy Awards. Lauded as a pioneer of the modern documentary, she’s been the force behind recent sensations like Citizenfour, Going Clear  and The Jinx, and has individually won more primetime Emmys (32) than any one person in history. So when Nevins finally sat down to write her memoir, she might have been expected to turn out something of a how-to manual for being the world’s most effectual human.  Delightfully, she took a slightly different tack: “Why don’t I write about Teddy the hamster?” she says she asked herself one night, before drifting off to sleep. “Why don’t I write about a facelift? Why don’t I write

about adultery? Why don’t I write about Viagra? People don’t talk about facelifts; people don’t talk about how old they are. So maybe I’ll be one of those people who does.” This statement suggests an honesty rarely heard from a woman of her accomplishments, but entirely in keeping with the truth-seeking work to which she’s devoted her career. The result of her musings and remembrances is You Don’t Look Your Age . . . and Other Fairy Tales, a collection of personal essays, poems, fictionalized anecdotes, modern parables and vignettes that add up to a deeply warm, funny and sharp portrait of a woman who has lived a full life, and is finally ready to talk about it. Nevins writes candidly about her history: the anguished decision to go under the knife, her sexual misadventures with bosses as a young woman, a conversion from the wisdom of Helen Gurley Brown to the teachings of Gloria Steinem and her particular proclivity for faux pas. She describes a harrowing incident of pet dismemberment in which she pulls the tail off her

PORTRAIT: BRIGITTE LACOMBE

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CULTURE


‘I’M IN MY UNDERWEAR HERE,’ I THOUGHT. ‘THIS IS DESPICABLE, THEY SHOULD ASK ME TO LEAVE!’ IT WAS HORRIFYING.”

POSTERS COURTESY OF HBO

CitizenFour: The True Story of Edward Snowden, 2007

The Jinx: The Lives and Deaths of Robert Durst, 2015

Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief, 2015

Bright Lights: Starring Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds, 2016

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Just the Facts: Nevins’ Greatest Hits Taxicab Confessions: The City that Never Sleeps, 1995–2008

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Age feels like a gift in this particular moment because of its attention to the mundane and the apolitical. It’s a reminder that life— with all of its comparatively frivolous existential crises—continues to happen to even the most competent among us. Between the moments in which the world is falling apart, and those in which we try to save it, the story goes on.  And a number of very interesting people seem to agree. A cast of megawatt stars—including Gloria Steinem, Meryl Streep, Judith Light, Lena Dunham and Martha Stewart—has volunteered to read for the audiobook. Still, despite all the love coming her way, Nevins says we shouldn’t expect another biographical tome from her anytime soon.    “I’ll be selling bras in Bloomingdale’s before I do this again,” she declares. And then, conspiratorially: “I’ll tell you one story. When I was a little girl and I got a good grade in elementary school, my mother used to say, ‘You know, your grandpa used to sell socks in a pushcart on Orchard Street.’ Then I went to the High School of Performing Arts and my mother said ‘Look, you got into the School of Performing Arts; your grandpa used to sell socks on Orchard Street.’ Then I got into Barnard and my mother said ‘Look, you got into Barnard; your grandpa used to sell socks on Orchard Street.’” As Nevins speaks, the comforting rhythm of her story takes on the shape of a folktale or a joke told just before someone pulls a quarter from behind your ear. You wait for the punch line. “Then I got into Yale, and my mother said, ‘Your grandpa used to sell socks on Orchard Street!’” She pauses for effect. “Well, you know what, now I’m selling books on Orchard Street. I’ve come back full circle to my immigrant origins.” That may be, but Nevins has never told tales for the sake of the sell. She knows the best stories are the ones no one knew they needed—but once they’ve been heard, it’s impossible to imagine the world without them. ■

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son’s beloved (and her reviled) hamster, and writes a heartbreaking letter to the great aunt who died in the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire. For more delicate topics she adopts the voices of other women, and in these personas she tells tales of adultery, struggles with weight loss, sleeping in separate bedrooms and addictions—stories of rich women who could never escape the poverty of their youths. “There were things I wanted to sort of slyly talk about, so I invented imaginary characters,” she says. “It’s a joyride because you’re going from one reality to another . . . . In the three hours it takes to read the book, it’s possible to go through a gamut of emotions and styles, and I wanted that because life takes you through a gamut of emotions and styles.” But throughout, the most persistent motif is the experience of growing older. Two years ago, Nevins produced a documentary about Nora Ephron called Everything Is Copy. In the film, Mike Nichols says of Ephron that, “In writing it funny, she won.” I couldn’t help but recall this sentiment when reading You Don’t Look Your Age—indeed, the subject of aging often finds Nevins at her funniest and most profound. And yet, there is the sense that while she wants dearly to accept the inevitable, she cannot quite. Even as she puts her affairs in order, the notion that she might have more to give before the curtains are drawn discernibly haunts her. She knows she has “won,” by all earthly standards, but Nevins didn’t get where she is by settling for standard. Aside from questions of life and death, merely promoting the book has put Nevins—no doubt accustomed to being the intellectual authority in most rooms she enters—in some unusual positions. “You know,” she says, “I sometimes feel very trivial in light of what’s going on in the world today. I think the personal sphere always has a place, so I kind of justify it that way. But I did the Charlie Rose show, and I was sitting with these political pundits and everyone was talking about the French election, myself included. Then it was my turn to go on, and I felt like a cosmetologist or something, like I was selling mascara. Can you imagine? There were all these great pundits—and there I was talking about hamsters. It was like I was the court jester. Here I am fighting for women’s rights, the world is falling apart, and I’m talking about getting old on 42nd street. ‘I’m in my underwear here,’ I thought. ‘This is despicable, they should ask me to leave!’ It was horrifying.”  But of course it wasn’t, and if anyone’s earned a hall pass to wax poetic on the joys of Xanax and the woes of never-ending dental work, it’s Nevins. In a strange way, You Don’t Look Your


H OT E L O P E N S S U M M E R 2 0 1 7 cach ethotels.com/cachet-boutique/nyc


SUMMER 2017

JASON BELL

British beauty Lily James has her Hollywood moment in this season’s Baby Driver and a luxurious road trip uncovers the mysteries of Morocco. Plus, a pop art approach to menswear. Welcome to the balmy, boundarypushing days of summer.


Lily Loses The Corset

AFTER A SERIES OF LACED-UP TURNS IN DOWNTON ABBEY AND CINDERELLA, LILY JAMES IS CLAIMING HER OWN TITLE AS A BOLD, ASSERTIVE ACTRESS IN SOME OF THE YEAR’S MOST ANTICIPATED MOVIES. DON’T LET THE PEACHES AND CREAM COMPLEXION FOOL YOU BY

BRIDGET ARSENAULT  PHOTOGRAPHED BY JASON BELL  STYLED BY VICTORIA BAIN


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ILY JAMES APPEARS TO HAVE IT ALL. AND I DON’T JUST mean the head-turning classic beauty or the rocketing Hollywood career. Those are a good start. I’m talking about a loving, in-demand boyfriend and a local pub that welcomes her warmly. “Ah, it’s Lily and Matt,” says a barman as the actress breezes in to the North London Tavern, where we’ve agreed to meet, hand in hand with her boyfriend of two-plus years, the actor Matt Smith. Smith (who, if you didn’t know for his role as the title character in Doctor Who, you would certainly recognize for his impeccable performance as Prince Philip in The Crown) leaves after we sit down—he has a wrap party for The Crown’s second season that evening. But because James has been shooting her latest film, the WWII-era Guernsey, in Cornwall, the pair has barely caught a glimpse of each other in weeks. She wishes him luck before calling out “Love you!”—a knee-jerk outburst—and then clamps her hand over her mouth and laughs. “Oh god, that’s so embarrassing. Sorry!” Dressed in jeans ripped at the cuffs, a black crop-top, a pair of black suede loafers and with simple gold jewelry circling her neck, wrists and fingers, James could pass for any off-duty twentysomething. Then you look a bit closer and notice that the unbuttoned trench topping the whole outfit is the latest from Burberry (she’s the face of the Burberry Black fragrance). After being drawn in by her alabaster skin—makeup free and f lawless—and her almond-shaped brown eyes, you can’t help but notice that taut waist, the source of much hysteria after the release of Cinderella. No really. Countless articles—analyses, think pieces, you name it— came out after the film, all questioning whether her “tiny waist” disqualified her from being a role model. “There were times when it really got me down because I was the lead character of this film all about kindness and goodness, and all that people seemed to talk about was my waist,” James remembers. “I was like, ‘This is so bizarre; you’re kind of missing the point.’” Despite that bewildering experience, James remains mostly unfazed by the Hollywood obsession with Mattel proportions. “We all have our insecurities and things we struggle with—we’re all human,” she says. “I think it’s frustrating, the unreal aesthetics we aspire to. They’re perpetuated by what we see and the image we give out. That’s why social media frightens me, because it’s this constant putting out of the best version of yourself.” But her emotional resilience and well-adjusted body attitude doesn’t negate the fact that criticism—no matter how unfounded—can sting. “There are still things I remember from the first time I was in the paper. I went through all the Daily Mail comments . . . ‘She’s not even ugly. She’s just plain.’ Or stuff about my acting where I was like, ‘Oh, God.’ I remember being on stage and doing The Seagull. I was doing a scene and thinking of a comment about how bad my acting was. That’s when I was like, ‘That’s got to stop!’”

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Dress, $5,000, DIOR, dior.com. Earrings in 18-karat white gold with diamonds, $2,550, DE BEERS, debeers.com. New Olympia bracelet in 18-karat white gold with diamonds, $178,000, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, vancleefarpels.com. Opposite: Coat, $5,060, ELLERY, ellery.com. Briefs, price upon request, DIOR, dior.com. Tights, $33, WOLFORD, wolford .com. New Olympia bracelet in 18-karat white gold with diamonds, $178,000, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS. Paloma pumps, $580, PIERRE HARDY, pierrehardy.com.


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Born Lily Chloe Ninette Thomson, James changed her name as a nod to her father, James Thomson, who died of cancer in 2008. Now 28, the actress was raised in the leafy county of Surrey, just 40 minutes from London, the middle child between two brothers. She grew up with a creative impulse and idolized her grandmother, the late American-born actress Helen Horton, among whose many roles include appearing as the voice of Mother, the ship’s consoling computer in Ridley Scott’s Alien. It makes sense, then, that it was actually James’ honeyed tones that first caught director Sir Kenneth Branagh’s attention when he cast her as Disney’s kindest princess. As a teenager, James attended a local performing arts school before studying at the Guildhall School of Music & Drama, where the list of alumni includes Daniel Craig, Joseph Fiennes, Damian Lewis and Michelle Dockery. After graduation, she was cast as the lead in Fast Girls—a big-hearted indie-drama about a women’s relay team. This was when she first embraced the label of “actor.” “I remember I had to dye my hair blonde, and I had just left drama school,” says James. “I really liked it because people would be like, ‘Oh?’, and I would say, ‘Yeah, I dyed it blonde because I’m an actor.’” She erupts into a contagious, full-bodied laugh. James’ relatable quality, her seemingly boundless confidence, makes her the ideal Deborah—the endearing female lead and love interest in Edgar Wright’s new full-throttle gangster film, Baby Driver. Wright, director of high-concept geek f licks like Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz and Scott Pilgrim vs. The World,

Winston Churchill. She is certainly grateful, but mostly unfazed by the caliber of talent she’s worked alongside. “What’s amazing is that by the time you get a part, you’ve either been auditioning or working with the director a long time, or you’ve spent time discussing the movie,” says James. “With Joe [Wright], he came and saw me in Romeo and Juliet [on the West End stage]. We had dinner and talked so much about the project, that by the time we shot the film, there was a sense of trust. I think every actor has a slight fear that they’re not going to ‘bring the goods,’ so it’s really comforting to know you’re backed by a great filmmaker.” But it wasn’t always so easy. Auditioning can be a daunting process, and James confesses that “no matter what time of day” she can still be known to down a Bloody Mary before stepping into a reading. “I always have to wear high-neck tops when I audition because I get this bright red rash. I just get so nervous,” she says. “And I do it and I feel slightly dirty after, like, ‘Oh I just had to give that,’ and then they’re like ‘Okay, bye.’ You walk out and you feel cheated.” The “dirtiest” experience came during an early audition. “It was for this Shakespearean TV show. I had to kiss the guy, and we’d just met—I had to do that with three different guys in one day,” James cringes. “I didn’t get the part, but I kissed three different Bill Shakespeares in one day. I wouldn’t do that now.” In fact, something James is working on now is asserting exactly what she wants—what’s working and what isn’t—throughout the entire filmmaking process. “I’ve noticed that when I’m acting I’ll be like ‘I want another take’ but . . . Probably because I’m in a vulnerable moment, I’ll say ‘I think I want to go again,’ and then I’ll try to explain myself. But when the camera [crew] wants to go again—because the focus or light was off—they’ll say, ‘One more,’ and just do it. So I think that’s what I’ll try to do,” she says. “We’ve all bought into this attitude of apologizing and being modest, so that now when someone is actually direct and says what they want, you think they’re rude. But they’re not, they’re just being clear!” The actress hopes this more direct approach will trickle down to her off-set life too, where she often strives to be more decisive. Behind that endless grin, James says she’s actually quite “pessimistic,” and she often tortures herself over weighty decisions. “My mum really wants me to stop being like, ‘I wish I had done that . . .’” she confides. “I almost bought my first f lat, which would have been great, but I chickened out at the last minute—it felt like such a big step, and it wasn’t quite right. I put a deposit down, and I lost money. I’m very indecisive.” That’s not entirely true though, as James is certain of one thing: She knows she loves acting—all 360 degrees of it. She’s driven by the thrum of working, having done so consistently since her teens. She’s proven herself in serious theatre—including Chekhov and Shakespeare—has dazzled in studio films like Cinderella and invested her talents in indie darlings like 2018’s Little Woods, developed by a first-time director at the Sundance Screenwriter Labs. “I’m definitely ambitious,” says James, “and I really love acting, so I want to keep working and getting better. I find it’s like a drug: It’s thrilling and addictive. Sometimes I think I’m tired, and I just want to go on holiday and not work. But then I read a script and I go, ‘Oh fuck! I’d love to play that part!’ I’d love to just be that and exist in that world—that is the best feeling.” ■

“I went through all the Daily Mail comments . . . ‘She’s not even ugly, she’s just plain.’ Or stuff about my acting where I was like ‘Oh, God.’” moves into darker, more mature territory in this new film. The ensemble cast also includes millennial heartthrob Ansel Elgort, with support from more established stars Kevin Spacey, Jon Hamm and Jamie Foxx. “Edgar is this kind of incredible demon on a film set—in the best possible way—because he doesn’t really sleep, and he doesn’t feel like he needs sleep,” she says. “We had really long days and night shoots, and he just has this relentless energy and passion for what he does—it was infectious. It was really exciting because there were cars and stunts; it was pretty cool.” The film is also a bit of a departure for James, who has stacked up a long résumé of period pieces and corseted dramas, from Downton Abbey to War & Peace. As a young actress, James has already shared the screen with heavyweights Cate Blanchett, Jim Broadbent and Christopher Plummer, to name a few. And she’s been directed by some of England’s finest, inlcuding Joe Wright, Sir Kenneth Branagh (twice) and most recently the indefatigable Mike Newell, best known for Four Weddings and a Funeral, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire and Donnie Brasco. Wright directed James in this fall’s highly anticipated war drama Darkest Hour, starring Gary Oldman as

Jacket, price upon request, VICTORIA BECKHAM, victoriabeckham.com. Lumière Lydia bra, $220, ERES, barneys .com. Hoop earrings in 18-karat white gold with diamonds, $1,450, DE BEERS, debeers.com. Hair: Jon Chapman at Carol Hayes Management using David Mallett. Makeup: Mary Greenwell at Premier for Laura Mercier. Manicure: Pebbles @ The Wall Group using Essie nail polish.


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ROMANTIC RELATIONSHIPS IN THE INFORMATION AGE ARE TOO INFORMED FOR THEIR OWN GOOD

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BY TANIA STRAUSS  ILLUSTRATION BY A.E. KIEREN

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AST FALL I MET A EUROPEAN MAN while vacationing on a Mediterranean island, and we hit it off like gangbusters. He had long golden eyelashes and one of those smiles that engaged his entire face, and within a few hours of meeting we s e eme d t o b e r e a d i ng e a c h ot her ’s thoughts. It all felt more like a Richard Linklater plot than real life, but there we were—and it was actually happening to cynical old me, no less. We went our separate ways just two days after meeting, but immediately began texting nonstop. Next came the Skype dates, which regularly lasted three hours. He talked me through a series of post-election meltdowns while he was on a business trip in Asia; I always had words for the things he couldn’t articulate, even in his own language. We began to discuss visiting each other, but as I became more intent on it, something suddenly seemed to be holding him back. I suspected that something was another woman. I wasn’t thrilled, but we had never defined our relationship. I myself was thinking of going out with a man in New York, in part to feel out my own investment in this trans-Atlantic romance. I figured I’d let things play out for a while, but then confirmation of his other not-quite-relationship came in the most irritating of ways: a whole series of blatantly flirtatious exchanges on Facebook, right there on his public newsfeed where I, and who knows how many of the site’s billions of users, could see it. I brought it up, first by asking if anything was going on that would explain his newly-reticent behavior; I wanted to see if he would volunteer anything. His response: nothing “regarding us.” This seemed like a bizarre statement—maybe not a lie, but certainly not the whole truth, since this other girl (cute, young-looking, a big fan of emojis) was already affecting how he treated me, to say nothing of my feelings “regarding us.” I asked more direct

questions, and he finally admitted that someone else had in fact just entered the picture. He’d been stressed because he didn’t like hiding it, but also didn’t want to tell me until he had a sense of how he felt about her. He was “afraid to lose me” but wasn’t comfortable with “expectations,” though he was openly upset when I raised the idea of cutting things off. Nevertheless, when the European left me a sweet, silly message for my birthday a few days later, I responded by telling him we should let it go. I was upset by the sloppy evasions he resorted to when confronted, and really grossed out at the idea of having a front seat to his dalliances on social media. The whole thing confounded me. Lying is nothing new, and neither is cheating, and neither are undefined relationships in which people screw up and hurt each other because they aren’t sure what the rules are. But the Internet—specifically the Internet of people and their interactions—has created seemingly limitless new ways to be careless with information, often without even realizing it. “I think [social media] is very harmful for relationships,” says Rachel A. Sussman, a New York City therapist whose work focuses on relationships. From her viewpoint, the rise of social media has taken a wrench to many nascent (and many mature, but more on that to come) romances. “People are watching their significant others, and if they’re talking to the wrong person it can definitely be a problem. . . . It’s easier to cheat than it’s ever been—there are just so many avenues to do it. And along with those avenues, there are so many ways for people to read into the wrong thing and think something is happening that actually isn’t.” She continues. “It’s also too easy for people to spy on their exes. Maybe someone isn’t planning on cheating but they go on their ex-girlfriend’s or ex-boyfriend’s Facebook page—and maybe it’s innocent, maybe it’s just human nature to wonder. But if your boyfriend, girlfriend, husband or wife finds that you’ve done that, they can be really hurt or confused.” Case in point: A friend recently told me about just such a scenario, in which her then-boyfriend went through his ex-f lame’s


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Instagram profile one night and liked a bunch of her selfies—an act which popped up on my friend’s activity feed. It made her uncomfortable, like he’d checked out his ex while she was standing right there. She didn’t bring it up at the time, but when it came up randomly in conversation several months later, he was caught offguard. “Oh yeah, that must have been weird,” he said. “I had no idea you could see that.” Whoops. People don’t bother to sort out that their “personal” transactions are actually public, bringing problems to a head in bizarre ways. Those of us on the receiving end have to figure out how to handle it without crossing over yet more boundaries. If no less than Beyoncé can be so overwhelmingly consumed by infidelity fears that she was able to spin them into a masterpiece album, what can the rest of us hope for? And frankly, the worst part is that our fears are far from unfounded. “[Technology] has affected infidelity, without a doubt,” Sussman says. “Forget texting—I’ve seen a lot of people conducting affairs on things like WhatsApp. It’s just easier. If things are really hard and really complicated there are some people who won’t do it. And there are other people who think, Well, if it’s this easy and I just had a fight with my boyfriend—girlfriend, husband, wife, whatever—I might just do that.” Atlanta attorney Elizabeth Green Lindsey specializes in family law and has witnessed the evolution firsthand. “It started with everybody reconnecting with their high school sweethearts on Facebook. That was the first big deal,” she says. “And then early on there were a lot of issues with chat-room dating. Social media turned the world upside down in terms of making cheating easier, and in proving it, because people don’t understand that their Internet usage might actually be discoverable. . . . Everybody who got busted with Ashley Madison thought they were going into these places anonymously and meeting people. It has the appearance of not being as visible, but finding that activity is a lot easier when you can grab the computer. These days the big evidence for infidelity is mainly coming from computer forensics as opposed to private investigators.” And the ways to be exposed are manifold. “One thing I see happening a lot is people sharing their iCloud accounts,” Lindsey says. “Apple updates are really a problem for people because the updates save all the pictures randomly and then they show up on people’s devices. I’ve seen some very horrific conduct turn up on someone’s kid’s iPad.” “Another thing that happens is that people will give their child their old phone without wiping it,” Lindsey continues. “Mom looks at it and finds out Dad has been texting someone. That happens frequently.” These days, catching someone cheating is often the ultimate experience of adding insult to injury: That a loved one could be so careless and lazy with their efforts at deception is almost as insulting as the betrayal itself. A last tale from my personal archive: A friend of mine recently spent a year stationed in an active conf lict zone for work, and began to suspect that his girlfriend back home was cheating on him. “She might not answer the phone or reply [to a text] but then she’d post a pic of something in a park, or at a social event,” he says of her behavior, which struck him as off because she had always been hyper-responsive. But my friend didn’t call her on it, in part because he was trying to learn to be more trusting. “There

APPLE UPDATES ARE SOME VERY HORRIFIC was a lot of suspicion suppression on my part,” he says. “The struggle for me was not confronting her.” But her statements about where she was, who she was with and why she didn’t have time to talk were often contradicted by what she was posting on social media. When he increasingly called her on these issues, he says, “She tried to lie about it, to do damage control.” Eventually the truth came out—as it is wont to do—that she was seeing someone else, and the relationship went boom. “It was the lying that was disrespectful,” my friend opines. “Especially because I wasn’t even spying or anything. These were literally just things she was posting on the Internet for all to see.” His was a fairly clear-cut situation, but it exemplifies a pattern with much broader implications. When universal relationship questions (whether someone is trustworthy, for example) meet careless Internet-age information sharing, the tug-of-war between reality and lurking insecurities becomes something even the most thick-skinned of us must constantly negotiate. The Internet, we are constantly told, is not real life. But it is. Social media means we’re bombarded with information about the very real people we want to trust with our feelings, and often that information exists in fragments that can be interpreted any number of ways. There’s often a sense of guilt around learning things that someone hasn’t explicitly told or shown you, and saying “I saw it on Facebook” can feel so . . . unseemly, somehow—even though that information is public. But in dating, where trust is fraught and has to be earned, you often need to act on these digital scraps for the sake of your sanity—let alone the health of your relationship. Everyone I’ve spoken to about this dilemma finds it agonizing. First you’re doing contortions over whether you have a “right” to be suspicious, and then over whether airing those suspicions will make you seem like an “internet stalker.” In this very non-private age, where people choose to publicize their most mundane activities, there is still a stigma around overstepping the bounds of privacy by digging—as well as confusion over what those bounds are. What’s suspicious behavior—a phone blowing up with texts at 1 A.M., an attractive coworker constantly commenting on an Instagram feed—and what’s just innocent, all-hours communication? Is the simple act of turning over a partner’s phone to read an incoming text a privacy violation—or just healthy curiosity? I have a couple of friends who, when faced with this problem, have sworn off connecting on social media at all until they feel like a new relationship is on very solid ground. Personally, I try to wait until there have been several dates. But this only awvoids the earliest potential pitfalls, and only then if you weren’t somehow already connected before you started dating. That leaves the option of swearing off social media altogether, but modern reality makes this increasingly difficult, if not impossible, to do. For the time being we’re all stuck maneuvering, investigating and bemoaning each other’s apparent lack of respect—and maybe even our own. ■


REALLY A PROBLEM FOR PEOPLE ... I’VE SEEN CONDUCT TURN UP ON SOMEONE’S KID’S IPAD. THE CHEATERS HALL OF SHAME

While new methods of detection are countless, illicit affairs are a time-honored tradition. From Old Hollywood to Congress, here are a few of the most captivating betrayals. —ADRIENNE GAFFNEY

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WEINER IMAGE: RICHARD B. LEVINE/LEVINE ROBERTS/NEWSCOM VIA ZUMA PRESS. ALL OTHER IMAGES: GETTY IMAGES.

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HUGH GRANT Shortly before the 1995 release of Nine Months, his first major U.S. film, Grant was discovered by L.A. police receiving oral sex in a car from prostitute Divine Brown and charged with lewd conduct. His shamefaced mug shot was beamed across the globe and his relationship with then-girlfriend Elizabeth Hurley underwent surveillance-like scrutiny. Grant bought himself valuable goodwill with contrite honesty in numerous television appearances.

EDDIE FISHER After Fisher’s best friend Mike Todd was killed in a plane crash, his consolation of Todd’s distraught widow, Elizabeth Taylor, took an untoward turn. Wife Debbie Reynolds learned of the affair when she called her husband at a New York hotel room and Taylor answered the phone. The subsequent breakup made for months of tabloid fodder and spelled the end of Fisher’s career.

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ANTHONY WEINER The scandal that ushered cheating into the social media age: All of America learned the difference between a direct message and a public tweet after the New York Congressman’s “Carlos Danger” was posted publicly, lighting up CNN over a previously sleepy Memorial Day weekend and resulting in his resignation from Congress.

INGRID BERGMAN The wholesome Swedish star, married at the time to an older doctor, saw her burgeoning career tripped up after a fling with director Roberto Rossellini—during the filming of Stromboli in 1950—resulted in a pregnancy and a horrifying public castigation. Colorado Senator Edwin C. Johnson went as far as to call for her to be blacklisted from Hollywood for her “moral turpitude.”


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SIDE

Mr. BRIGHT

WITH CLEAN LINES AND SHARP SILHOUETTES, THE SEASON’S HOTTEST MENSWEAR LETS COLORS DO THE TALKING—AND THEY’RE A LOUD BUNCH PHOTOGRAPHED BY JAMES BRODRIBB STYLED BY PAUL FREDERICK


Coat, $1,115, ISSEY MIYAKE MEN, tribecaisseymiyake .com. Charles sweater, $325, RAG & BONE, Barneys New York, 888-222-7639. Lux joggers, $335, TIM COPPENS, Barneys New York. Opposite: Trousers, $780, PRADA, prada.com.


Levi’s Trucker jacket, $720; Levi’s jeans, $684, OFF-WHITE, off---white.com.


Top coat, $2,925; Trousers, $995; Derby shoes, $750, ALEXANDER MCQUEEN, alexandermcqueen.com. Opposite: Coat, $2,595; Sweater, $1,850, VALENTINO, 212-355-5811. Grooming: Yuhi Kim using Bumble and bumble. Model: Jonas Kloch at Fusion.


at ease

BY

ADRIENNE GAFFNEY PHOTOGRAPHED BY

PAMELA HANSON

TRUNK ARCHIVE

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i N D Y


For decades, she idealized physical perfection. Then she evolved as a savvy businesswoman and it became clear: CINDY CRAWFORD is far more than just a pretty face. Today, at 51, the game-changing supermodel still encapsulates both Coco pajamas, $441, OLIVIA VON HALLE, oliviavanhalle.com. Blanket, price upon request, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI, brunellocucinelli.com.


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I N DY CR AWFO R D I S FOCU S E D O N TR AN S ITIO N S . Almost 30 years ago, she reinvented what a model’s career could become when she embarked on a spree of entrepreneurial ventures, including fronting a Pepsi campaign and hosting MTV’s House of Style. She followed that with a landmark fitness video and later, a successful furniture line. In today’s cultural landscape, it is a truism that a successful cover girl can become a mogul, but when Crawford blazed the trail, it was unthinkable. Today, she’s still committed to forging new paths. After turning 50 last year, and seeing her 15-year-old daughter, Kaia Gerber, named a fresh face in fashion, the supermodel is scanning the horizon for another new direction. “For me it was really hard; the idea of turning 50 was daunting. For so long I was the 20-year-old model on the cover of Vogue, or 25 or 30—and then all of a sudden my daughter is becoming that,” says Crawford. “My mother was here for Mother’s Day and I was talking to her about how I change the narrative for who I am at this age. I don’t want to spend my fifties trying to get back to where I was in my thirties. Even though, yes, maybe I would like my skin or my waistline to be the same, I’ve worked hard and evolved into this person.” Her first evolution began in 1992 when Crawford, unofficially christened the ideal of American beauty after gracing more than 200 fashion magazine covers, embarked on series of fitness videos with her trainer, Radu Teodorescu. The project was a success and had her thinking about what to do next. Crawford displayed an aptitude for choosing projects that, while seeming like gambles at the time, ended up propelling her career to the next level. Knowing how to make those decisions was not easy at first, as modeling is (for the successful, at least) a fairly paint-by-numbers endeavor. “Pretty much, your agent just picks up the phone, then people call you and say, do you want to work for Versace? Yes. Or do I want to work with Revlon? Yes,” she explains. Taking bigger chances—like signing on for House of Style or appearing in Playboy, two big risks that ended up paying off handsomely— was another matter. “For so long I kept thinking, I just want a business daddy—I kept looking for that person who was going to tell me, ‘You should do this,’ and, ‘You should do that,’” she says. “And then I realized I have to be my own business daddy, because no one knows my brand better than I do. When I started trusting that, I think it just got easier.” The results were projects, whether in fitness, style or home interiors, which feel organically Cindy.

Dress, price upon request, BAJA EAST, baja-east.com.


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Family photos adorn the mantle in the Malibu home where Crawford and Gerber have raised their children. Opposite: an infinity pool that overlooks the ocean.

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“I DON’T WANT TO SPEND MY FIFTIES TRYING TO GET BACK TO WHERE I WAS IN MY THIRTIES. . .I’VE WORKED HARD AND EVOLVED THIS PERSON.” One of the more remarkable things about Crawford is her refusal to stop moving and growing. Last fall she enrolled in a three-day financial boot camp for women at UCLA. The valedictorian of her Illinois high school who left college when fashion beckoned, Crawford wanted to become more comfortable asking the important questions in business meetings. “I loved being in the classroom again,” she says. “It was especially nice to do it with other women. You don’t want to be embarrassed, asking a stupid question, but I think we all felt we were in a safe enough environment.” Another benchmark of success, Crawford has been happily married to Rande Gerber for almost 20 years. An entrepreneur in his own right, Gerber has successfully owned and operated nightlife and hospitality businesses since he graduated from

college. He might even be on the cusp of his greatest success to date, along with business partners George Clooney and realestate developer Mike Meldman, in creating a much raved about tequila company Casamigos. The most recent business initiative for Crawford is her skincare brand, Meaningful Beauty. She recently traveled to Florida to shoot her two grandmothers—one aged 98, the other 94—for the line. “My 98-year-old grandmother is still giving her hairdresser a hard time because she has a very particular way that she likes her bangs cut,” Crawford explains. I was asking her, why does beauty still matter at this point?” And she said, ‘I feel better, I have more confidence.’ That’s a cue for all of us.” That confidence is apparent in the next generation of the lineage. Her son, Presley, 17, has a Calvin Klein campaign under


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“FOR SO LONG I KEPT THINKING, I JUST WANT A BUSINESS DADDY. .. AND THEN I REALIZED THAT NO ONE KNOWS MY BRAND BETTER THAN I DO.”

his belt, and Kaia is the face of Marc Jacobs Beauty. “It’s certainly not something I encouraged, nor did I discourage it. I think what I’m realizing, especially now that they’re graduating from high school, is a lot of kids end up doing what their parents do,” she says. “The fact they were interested in fashion shouldn’t be totally surprising. And because they’re my kids, they have an easy point of entry.” Craw ford, who attended Northwestern University on a chemical engineering scholarship, is also well aware that one’s teenage pursuits don’t necessarily foretell a lifelong career. “For my son, I think he’s more in it for the travel—for guys it’s different, it’s a nice finishing school for him,” she says. “For my daughter, she’s seen what an amazing career I’ve had, and how hard I work and how seriously I take it. But she’s only 15, so we’ll see what happens.” The fashion world her children inhabit is one that has changed greatly since Crawford first broke onto the scene in 1986 with a Richard Avedon Vogue cover. For someone whose name is virtually synonymous with the feminine ideal, she sees beauty as something that is much less narrowly defined than it was in the ’90s glamazon era. “Because of social media, you see that beauty isn’t rare. Beauty is everywhere we look—I think that’s very empowering for women,” she says. “Before we only had a handful of women who were appearing in magazines. Now you can go on Instagram and someone you’ve never heard of, who maybe only has one follower or maybe has nine million—you see they’re beautiful. Sometimes it’s the filter, but I think women are emerging through. I’m no stranger to filters, but women can recognize their own beauty.” ■ Larcin swimsuit, $334, ERES, eresparis.com.


MOROCCO

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MAJESTIC

THE NORTH AFRICAN COUNTRY, FAMED FOR ITS EXOTIC ANTIQUITIES AND SNAKE-CHARMING MYSTIQUE, REVEALS A MORE SWEEPING, SCENIC SIDE ON AN EPIC ROAD TRIP FROM THE DESERT TO THE SEA BY ALYSSA GIACOBBE PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHRISTOPHER CHURCHILL


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About halfway through our 4x4’s slow climb

Previous spread: Left, a Berber shepherd on the road from Skoura. Right: a doorway at Madrasa Ben Youssef, an ancient Islamic college, in Marrakech. This page: The ritual of serving Maghrebi mint tea is as revered as the drinking. Opposite page: The lunar-like sand dunes of Erg Chigaga.

over central Morocco’s High Atlas Mountains, somewhere around the 7,400-foot Col du Tichka pass and its notably non-existent guardrails, I was pretty glad I had decided not to get behind the wheel myself. Though I fancy myself a decent navigator, having mastered the art of defensive driving on New England’s formidable thruways (also, I wondered, is a road trip really a road trip if you’re being chauffeured?), the warnings about this particular journey were not mere hype. Breathtaking views of valleys dotted with sheep and their Berber herdsmen along with imposing kasbahs—ancient citadels perched atop cliffs high enough to block the sun—were delivered courtesy of blind spots, sudden stops and vertigo-inducing switchbacks. Add to that a backseat photographer whose personal catchphrase was, “Can we just pull over a second?” and it soon became evident that this was a road best commanded by someone who’d driven it before. The photo op requests were, of course, understandable. The creators of our itinerary, the founders of New York City-based luxury travel outfitter Epic Road, had long ago told me that the Atlas Mountains pass—part of the four-hour drive between the Moroccan Sahara and Marrakech—was one of the world’s most spectacularly scenic commutes, a geographically diverse stretch that shifts from desert to snow to city over the course of a few hours. I’d been thinking of it ever since. The guys at Epic Road also said the whole thing would be a hell of a lot more enjoyable if someone else was in charge of the actual driving. Now, I was relieved I’d taken their word for it. A road trip had seemed appropriate: We’d spent the previous four days bumping through the Sahara desert as spectators at the Rallye Aïcha des Gazelles, an all-women off-road car rally in which teams of two navigate from checkpoint to checkpoint over the course of eight days, using only topographic maps, a compass and the stars to guide them. Founded nearly three decades ago by French entrepreneur and car aficionado Dominique Serra, the rally is held every March, and is designed to promote female empowerment and camaraderie in a traditionally male-dominated sport—albeit in a country that doesn’t quite view women as equals (though whose does, these days). After watching the Gazelles conquer the course for no prize other than to satisfy their collective love of adventure, the open road called. We’d start a few hours from the rally’s finish


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line, in Skoura, a pre-Sahara oasis town filled with date palms. From there, we’d travel over the snowcapped mountains and down into Marrakech, eventually continuing on to the coastal town of Essaouira—a seven-hour journey that runs the topographical spectrum and ends on the shores of the Atlantic Ocean. Morocco has long enchanted travelers—and artists and dreamers, not to mention interior designers—for its offerings of craft, cuisine and culture that are both exotic and relatively accessible: The country is only nine miles by water from Europe, and six hours by air from New York. And there are plenty of reasons to go now—most notably the new Musée Yves Saint Laurent opening this fall at Marrakech’s historic Jardin Majorelle, along with a host of new luxury hotels throughout the country—even as the current U.S. administration would have Americans believe otherwise. We departed for Morocco three days after the announcement of a new regulation preventing passengers f lying from 10 Muslim-majority countries, including Morocco, from carrying on electronic devices—such as laptops and fancy cameras of the sort professional photographers rely on. Whether intentional or not, regulations like these discourage travel to these countries—particularly for leisure. But the truth is that while Morocco is nearly 99 percent Muslim, moderate Islam prevails. Though it can be hard to get a drink, it’s not impossible; headscarves for women are certainly optional; and people are friendly and overall seem very happy to have you there. I never once felt unsafe or unwelcome. Skoura is a Berber– and Bedouin–inhabited patch of olive, date palm and apricot trees and a serene, if slightly unlikely, home to one of Morocco’s most luxurious hotels. Tucked away at the end of a long dirt road, Dar Ahlam—roughly translated as “house of dreams”—is a restored 19th century traditional kasbah, a labyrinth of plaster tadelakt and candlelit halls, with corners full of pillows and poufs and a staff of 85 to care for no more than 30 guests at a time. Founded by a Parisian actor and events coordinator, Dar Ahlam feels less like a hotel than a magical guest house: Visitors come here for scenic 4x4 excursions and camel rides in the desert, as well as tours through the small Berber villages surrounding Skoura—but also for the element of surprise. Meals consider dietary preferences and restrictions but are based on the chef’s whim and take place in different on- and off-site locations each day, from picnic breakfasts in a hidden garden somewhere on the property’s nine acres, to champagne sundowners on rugs atop golden dunes. It is the sort of place that perfectly kicks off a vacation, getting you in the mood, Opposite, clockwise or provides its sentimental end. from top left: The After a single, short night at Dar Ahlam, we were on our way. Winding away from the pool at Dar Ahlam hotel along a route used for centuries by desert traders to transport gold, ivory, salt and hotel; Marrakech home interiors shop camels, the unique scenery unfolded before us: villages that have existed, in many cases Mustapha Blaoui; largely unchanged, for centuries; snowcapped mountains in view even as you feel the unone of several mobile forgiving heat of the desert on your back. Every so often there was water—detectable by camps outside the dunes of Erg a sudden sprouting of date palms, olive and pomegranate trees and Damask rose bushes. Chigaga; a bellman Those who opt not to drive over the Atlas in one go can detour to one of several renovated at Dar Ahlam, where kasbahs along the way, including Kasbah Du Toubkal in Imlil, and Kasbah Tamadot, staff outnumbers Richard Branson’s spot in Asni. Still, it’s hard not to want to press on to Marrakech. guests 85 to 30.

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ONE GETS THE SENSE THERE WILL NEVER BE ENOUGH TIME IN MARRAKECH; TOO QUICKLY, WE WERE BACK IN OUR CAR AND HEADING TOWARDS ESSAOUIRA.


As we entered

the city toward the end of the day, the gray light of the mountains turned pink and red. Marrakech is an aesthete’s heaven with no shortage of design master classes, starting with some of the world’s most beautiful hotels. The medina, or Arab quarter, is home to an estimated 1,000 riads, traditional courtyard mansions now operating as guesthouses, as well as most of the shops or “souks.” We opted to stay at Riad Mena, a tiny six-room riad about a 10-minute walk from the snake charmers and Barbary macaques of the famous Jemaa el Fna square. Run by art pundit and German expat Philomena Schurer Merckoll, Riad Mena is at once beautiful and homey, which might be expected, given that it was intended to be used as a private house for Merckoll’s retired mother. It turned out to be too pretty not to share with guests. To create the Moroccan-inflected mid-century modern interiors, Merckoll worked with friend Romain Michel-Meniere, a French-Swiss expat and one of the city’s best-known interior designers, largely calling on pieces found in the souks of the medina. A small staff maintains the day-to-day, always on hand to offer a coffee, a cocktail or a full meal should you so desire (they’ll also gladly arrange an en suite massage with Joel, who knows just what to do with tired feet). But back to the souks: The shopping in Marrakech, as one might expect, could enthrall an interiors fanatic for days—which sadly, we did not have. So we went the efficient route at Mustapha Blaoui, a one-stop, Westerner-friendly destination shop featuring multiple levels of the best the souks have to offer. You’ll pay a bit more, but the good news is that you’ll have time left over to catch the sunset over the square at the appealingly lowkey La Terrasse des Épices, one of the few spots in the medina to get a cocktail. If you have a few days, or are inclined to price shop, you can hire a guide who can help you focus (rugs, pillows, pottery, caftans, all of the above) and negotiate with minimal haggling, which can get exhausting. Mustapha Chouquir came highly recommended: He’s so indemand that he’s the basis of an upcoming guidebook. No matter what, don’t fall for the “women’s co-op” rug scam—if your guide takes you to a shop that up-charges by as much as 100 times and claims that profits benefit the Berber women’s cooperative making the rugs, don’t bite. In almost every case, the women receive a scant percentage. One gets the sense there will never be enough time in Marrakech, and too quickly we This page, top: A breakfast were back in our car heading towards Essaouira, a two-hour drive west through fertile and reading nook on the valleys, past fields of men (and a few women) preparing for Fantasia—a traditional ground floor of Riad Mena. Below: the courtyard horsemanship performance that’s sort of a cross between a rodeo and a carnival—and of Madrasa Ben Youssef. row after row of argan trees. Many of the trees, notably, have goats in them. The official line here is that the goats are mad for the argan nut, and climb the trees to eat as many of them as they can stomach. But coming upon a tree full of nine or ten goats standing on bare branches, with plenty of leafier and far more appetizing-looking trees containing not a single goat nearby, it was hard not to wonder if this tree-climbing act is less a quirky Moroccan goat habit than a source of profit for the handlers who mill around below, collecting tips from delighted tourists who stop to snap photos. (The goats are cute, though, and to be fair, did seem well fed.) The region is also a surprise, and surprisingly prolific, producer of wine. Leading the charge is winemaker Charles Melia, who left his family’s vineyard in Chateauneuf-duPape nearly 20 years ago to turn 86 acres of valley land into Les Domaines du Val D’Argan. It is now one of Morocco’s most productive wineries, and their product is set, it so happens, to be imported to the U.S. for the first time this fall. We only stopped for lunch, but a five-room guesthouse allows for much longer stays. Guests can linger among the vines or by the pool with a glass of house rosé, or learn the art of winemaking from one of several Muslim winemakers on site. They make great wine, even if they don’t get to taste it. Ten minutes later, you enter Essaouira, a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a working fishing port with the feral cat population to show for it. Suddenly, the air changes— you’ve arrived at the sea. Life here is a lot slower, the sun-bleached buildings a lot whiter than in Marrakech, and the people notably calmer (there are also far fewer of them). The medina is filled with shopkeepers selling spices, caftans and leather goods, but most of the action’s at the beach, where locals windsurf and camels give rides along the sand. In Essaouira, we stayed at Dar Maya, a hidden oasis of clean design in the center of the medina, owned by ex-Londoner Gareth Turpin, who also rents his charming Marrakech house through Airbnb (search “medinaRose”). For dinner, Turpin sent us to eat at the bar at La Table by Madada, where surprisingly stiff cocktails are paired with seafood so fresh you likely saw it pulled ashore earlier. The restaurant also offers cooking classes, and there’s a boutique hotel upstairs. The place has the laid-back feel, and the laid-back clientele, of an old favorite. It’s easy to feel at home—a fitting, and welcome, end to a whirlwind journey. Sometimes life begins at the end of the road. ■


Right: The sea wall in Essaouira, on the Atlantic coast. Below: A female Fantasia rider in a performance on the road between Marrakech and Essaouira.

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E

veryone loves the Greenbrier experience. A select few can live it.

Since 1778, The Greenbrier Resort has been a place of rest and relaxation. Now, with the addition of new homesites being offered, it can be your residence as well. To experience a lifestyle unique to those who call The Sporting Club home, schedule a private tour today.

Life As Few Know It

View new homesites by contacting 888.784.8220 or GreenbrierSportingClub.com.

Obtain the Property Report required by Federal law and read it before signing anything. No Federal Agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. This is not intended to be an offer to sell nor a solicitation of offers to buy real estate in The Greenbrier Sporting Club by residents of Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, and Oregon or in any other jurisdiction where prohibited by law. This project is registered with the New Jersey Real Estate Commission, N.J. Reg. No. 11-59-0002. This project is registered pursuant to New York State Department of Law’s simplified procedure for Homeowners Associations with a De Minimus Cooperative Interest and contained in a CPS-7 application available from the sponsor. File No. HO-00-0082. This project is registered with the Pennsylvania State Real Estate Commission, Registration No. OL-000654. Use of recreational facilities and amenities requires separate club membership.


ASPEN/DENVER  CHICAGO  DALLAS/FORT WORTH  HAMPTONS  HOUSTON  LAS VEGAS  LOS ANGELES  MIAMI  NEW YORK  ORANGE COUNTY  PALM BEACH  SAN FRANCISCO  TRI-STATE

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CLIFFORD ROSS STUDIO

Catch a Wave

The all-powerful ocean, digitally rendered by multimedia artist Clifford Ross, crashes in mesmerizing swirls of blue and white in an immersive LED installation at the Parrish Art Museum, Southampton. Inside, discover what else is rolling into the Hamptons this summer. parrishart.org — RACHEL WALLACE


ASPEN/DENVER

CITIES

Aspen goes whole-hog Americana at its Old Fashioned 4th of July Celebration, with a Main Street parade (cue the cowboys!), park-side picnics and a fireworks finale over Aspen Mountain. aspenchamber.org

KEY TO THE CITY

Barbara Glass

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CUP OF JOE

I love the open kitchen and chic industrial design at Victoria + Co. on Durant Street. You can’t beat the café’s proximity to the mountain, and its coffee is the best in town. aspenespressobar.com COCKTAIL HOUR

The Little Nell has an incredible wine list and I can bring my pug Willie into the dog-friendly lounge. thelittlenell.com RETAIL THERAPY

NAMASTE, NATURE

Anyone visiting Aspen has the great outdoors on her mind, and what better way to embrace the wilderness than sleeping under the stars? Fortunately, Colorado’s mountain towns have perfected the art of glamping. Five-star tents pitched by Collective Retreats (collectiveretreats.com) in Vail (and Aspen in 2018) are outfitted with Turkish towels, robes and other plush amenities. At Carbondale’s Cedar Ridge Ranch (cedarridgeranch.com), sleep, dine and sip wine on a working farm with views of Mt. Sopris, from your choice of a canvas tent or an exotic yurt. Those who’d rather eat al fresco can arrange for a chef at Elk Camp (aspensnowmass.com) to prepare a private, farm-to-table feast served in the shadow of Snowmass Mountain. If you’re seeking tranquility, commune with nature at a Mala Creation and River Blessing, a new program offered by Remède Spa at The St. Regis Aspen Resort (stregisaspen.com). After a one-onone consultation to set intentions and develop a personal mantra, participants receive custom Mala-bead necklaces before being escorted to the Roaring Fork River for Qigong meditation and a blessing ceremony for their bespoke jewelry.

I always stop into Paris Underground for vintage French furniture, lighting and accessories—every piece is unique. parisunderground.com FIELD TRIP

Because the Aspen Art Museum is free, it’s easy to pop in for a few minutes and visit a single room. If you have time, spend an afternoon on the gorgeous roof deck and lunch at SO Café. aspenartmusem.org

TAKING RESERVATIONS

DATE NIGHT

The Wild Fig’s bistro walls and lighting make it intimate and charming at night. I recommend the Fish in a Bag seasoned with herbes de Provence. It’s simple and delicious. thewildfig.com

Ê FOR MORE ON ASPEN, VISIT DUJOUR.COM /CITIES

At Aspen Kitchen, steaks (aged for up to 100 days), suckling pig and regionally sourced fish are just a few standouts on chef Matthew O’Neill’s menu. Also try the triple chocolate cookies dipped in Kahlua-spiked milk, served on the patio. kitchenaspen.com

Foodies are abuzz about the influx of newly opened eateries at the quickly expanding Willits Town Center in neighboring Basalt: Market Street Kitchen (markestreetkitchen.com), featuring Frenchinspired dishes like crepes and beef bourguignon; Capitol Creek Brewery (capitolcreekbrewery.com), serving beer brewed on-site and elevated bar food and Mezzaluna (mezzalunaaspen.com), the landmark Italian eatery’s second location.

BARBARA GLASS: EMILY MINTON REDFIELD. FOOD: ASPEN KITCHEN. TENT: COLLECTIVE VAIL.

Aspen’s most prodigious interior designer—queen of classic patterns and rustic elegance— shares the local haunts she can’t live without


CHICAGO

Wrigley Field is not just the home of baseball’s world champs—the stadium also hosts a hefty concert lineup (10 shows this season), with James Taylor, Billy Joel, Lady Gaga and Zac Brown Band on the bill. wrigleyfieldstadium.com

CITIES

Party’s Out Back

The partners—in business and life—behind one of Chicago’s trendiest bars offer an at-home tutorial on the art of the summer garden soirée

The Gold Coast’s iconic Talbott Hotel debuts a luxurious new look following a recent $20 million face-lift. After breaking a sweat in the just-added fitness center, there’s no finer place to unwind than a Studio King (one of 178 refreshed accommodations), an oversize corner room neatly tucked away from the urban bustle. jdvhotels.com

RACK REPORT

Birdseye Rule (birdseyerule.com) lends a feminine touch to Logan Square’s shopping scene. Helmed by a pair of sisters, the boutique takes its name from a beloved childhood summer vacation spot in northwest Michigan. Those sunny memories inspire the shop’s carefully curated collection of home goods, heritage-style women’s sportswear and rugged accessories for men. Over on the Mag Mile, California-based Les Lunes (leslunes.com) brings its ethically-sourced apparel to the Midwest. The collection includes women’s ready-to-wear, loungeand activewear and men’s underwear—all in ultrasoft bamboo-based fabric.

KEY TO THE CITY

Kevin Boehm The James Beard-nominated restaurateur—the man behind celebrated haunts like chef Stephanie Izard’s Girl & the Goat—launches his 18th restaurant, The Bellemore, this season. Here’s how he does downtime. bokagrp.com

POWER LUNCH

Sumi Robata Bar serves superauthentic, robatayaki in a small, discreet setting. Chef Gene Kato’s food is always beautiful and served with laser precision. sumirobatabar.com

DATE NIGHT

My favorite restaurant in the world, Alinea, accomplishes the rare feat of providing theatrics, hospitality and some of the best-tasting food on the planet. alinearestaurant.com

Ê FOR MORE ON CHICAGO, VISIT DUJOUR.COM /CITIES

RETAIL THERAPY

My house is pretty modern, so I like to balance that with items that are weird and vintage. I can find both at Architectural Artifacts, where it’s easy to kill hours. architectural artifacts.com

FIELD TRIP

Steppenwolf Theatre’s ensemble cast has an embarrassment of riches, and some of its premieres, like August Osage County, have gone on to worldwide fame. steppenwolf.org

ALL IMAGES COURTESY

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ROOM REQUEST

They run one of the country’s most beloved tiki bars, so it’s no surprise that Paul McGee and Shelby Allison throw a flawless backyard cocktail party. “Lost Lake (lostlaketiki.com) is a tropical party that happens nightly, and I use the same approach at home,” says Allison. From McGee’s annual birthday bash to impromptu campfire chill-outs, the quaint, peony-lined backyard of the couple’s Logan Square greystone buzzes all summer long. McGee says it’s a reprieve from his typical post behind Lost Lake’s bar. “We can relax more in our backyard—it doesn’t matter if there’s a straw on the ground,” he says. In fact, Allison and McGee let their friends do the bartending when they’re off the clock. “I set up a make-your-own drink station and let our guests get to work,” she says. McGee concurs: “It’s interactive, and allows Shelby and me to mingle.”


Get fitted for cowboy boots with custom artisanal details at Miron Crosby, a boutique specializing in western-with-an-edge accessories for women, men and kids opening at Highland Park Village in June. mironcrosby.com

DALLAS/FORT WORTH NORTHPARK’S NOUVEAU DESIGN

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TAKING RESERVATIONS

When two college students discovered a veggie void in Dallas’ culinary landscape, they recruited a chef from Nobu and harvested a hit: Pōk the Raw Bar. The casual eatery speedily serves creative bowls of raw seafood and vegetables paired with ceremonialgrade matcha beverages. poktherawbar.com Founded by the respected owners of Shinsei, Lovers Seafood & Market is making waves with lobster rolls, Thai mussels and other oceanic classics with a modern twist by veteran Abacus chef Aaron Staudenmaier. loversseafoodmarket.com

ALL IMAGES COURTESY

Lovers Seafood & Market

NorthPark Center has made a name by attracting in-demand retailers, and its recent additions are no exception to the rule. Rebecca Taylor arrived in Texas this April with a romantic, swoon-worthy boutique where the designer’s floaty dresses, sportswear and jeans are displayed amid blush plaster walls and a glittering, mirrorflecked marble floor. Those who prefer a more rugged take on luxury need only travel a short distance to the latest Texas outpost of Detroit-based lifestyle brand Shinola, which is stocked with a full array of American-built watches, jewelry, leather goods, stationery, bikes and gadgets like the Runwell hi-fi turntable. In conjunction with its June reopening in a luxurious new space, Coach will unveil an onsite “craftsmanship bar” offering complimentary leather cleaning, monogramming, repairs and other services emphasizing the brand’s focus on workmanship. Expect the boutique to be stocked with its share of covetable accessories, including the new 1941 Bandit handbag in pebble leather and exotic skin editions of the Dinkier Link crossbody clutch and Rogue Link tote. Lastly, each Aesop apothecary is custom-designed for its location. While specifics of its NorthPark debut are hush-hush, the boutique—which opens this season—will carry the brand’s extensive collection of carefully formulated hair, skin and bath balms—plus a unique “Texas kit” of unisex travel toiletries emblazoned with Davy Crockett’s storied quote: “You may all go to Hell, and I will go to Texas.” northparkcenter.com Clockwise from top: Jackie Kennedy Shinola watch; Rebecca Taylor dress and boutique.


HAMPTONS

CITIES

This summer, Bridgehampton’s Topping Rose House debuts communal Friday night dinner parties in its rustic barn. Expect passed appetizers and specialties like Parmesan-encrusted chicken and tuna tartare prepared by the chefs at the inn’s new Jean-Georges restaurant. toppingrosehouse.com

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ROOM REQUEST

What’s Coming in at The Parrish

Starting July 16, multimedia artist Clifford Ross installation Light | Waves takes over The Parrish Museum’s lobby, gallery and façade. For the piece, a meditation on the Long Island Sound, Ross developed a new way to digitally print his hurricane photographs on maple veneer. He pairs these with massive LED screens projecting all-encompassing visions of crashing waves. “I have been obsessed with the ocean my whole life, starting with my childhood on the beaches of Amagansett,” he says. “The waves and shifting light of the East End of Long Island are completely mesmerizing.” Following Ross show will be a 35-artist survey of photorealist paintings—some so vivid they’ll make you do a double take—opening on August 6. parrishart.org

TRIPTYCH: CLIFFORD ROSS STUDIO. CALISSA: COURTESY OF SOUND VIEW INN: MICHAEL FINE.

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Forget surf ‘n’ turf. This season the best Hamptons cuisine is all about fresh, European flavors. At EMP Summer House (empsummerhouse.com), an East Hampton pop-up by the Eleven Madison Park team opening in June, Daniel Humm and Will Guidara provide a fabulous new setting for seafood-centric dishes like grilled fish and bouillabaisse. Newly renovated, Oreya (oreyahamptons.com) reopens in Southampton’s Capri Hotel with a refreshed menu by 21-year-old wunderkind chef Greg Grossman (formerly of Alinea and Georgica), which includes a decadent foie gras hummus. The minds behind Manhattan’s Amali and Il Cantinori are set to debut Calissa (calissahamptons.com), in Water Mill, where Executive Chef Dominic Rice—an alum of Jean-Georges and Narcissa—brings a Greek flair to the leafy enclave. And at Sag Harbor’s just-opened Lulu Kitchen & Bar (lulusagharbor.com), chef Philippe Corbet serves up specialties like wood-fired pizzas and a grilled whole black bass. (Request a table near the open kitchen to see him and his team work their magic.)

With a fresh look by the up-and-coming Brooklyn– based design firm Studio Tack, the Sound View, located in the charming hamlet of Greenport, opens this season with fresh accents of rich woods and durable textiles. A waterfront restaurant, piano bar and private beach will make it a welcome stopover for oenophiles visiting the North Fork’s vineyards. soundviewgreenport.com


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CITIES

SIPPING PRETTY

While Houston’s restaurant scene struts its stuff, the cocktail crowd hits its stride Drink king Bobby Heugel’s downtown spot TongueCut Sparrow, an intimate 25-seat formal cocktail bar inspired by his travels across Japan, is a hidden gem entered by passing through his mezcaleria The Pastry War. “The focus is less on cocktail creation and bartender ego and more on refining every detail of our craft in a more minimal, focused manner,” Heugel says. “Our goal here is to create an incredible bar experience—cocktails are only a part of that pursuit.” The simple menu is comprised of classics: a highball or a Pimm’s Spritz, along with local brews, vino and bubbly. Expect elevated service and elegant gimlets. tonguecutsparrow.com. Newport Beach import Bosscat Kitchen & Libations is the latest addition to the Westheimer Road strip, sandwiched between the retail meccas of River Oaks District and Highland Village. Featuring nearly 100 whiskeys and potent cocktails like the bourbon-based 38 Special—to be paired with comforting seasonal dishes like bourbon chicken flatbread and Gulf shrimp and grits—the expansive, industrial-chic space’s highlight is a 2,000-square-foot patio just begging for toasts. The “Breakfast in Bed” shot is a must with brunch. bosscatkitchen-houston.com

RETAIL ROUNDUP

’Tis the season to celebrate longer days and steamy nights! Married couple Ford and Hillary Waters, who opened their showroom, METTLE, at the Silos on Sawyer last June, make entertaining easier with smart indoor-outdoor accessories like the 8” x 8” Itty Bitty Twiggy table ($125), handcrafted from wood and metal, from their line FMW|fablab. “I call these my ‘wine tables,’” Hillary says, “because they are supermobile, fit in any pocket and then come out when guests arrive.”

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And if you’re looking to accessorize your wine table, try hand-cut and embroidered Blooms & Stripes linen cocktail napkins ($120 for a set of 4) by Hibiscus Linens. The Houston shop uses Alice + Olivia cloth and was commissioned to create a needlework napkin line for Edie Parker on Madison Avenue. “They’re a great accent that elevates your patio dinner,” says owner/ needleworker Mariana Barran. “I like that they are all different, so they serve a double purpose by helping people identify their drink.” mettlebyfablab. com; hibiscuslinens.com

A burger and beer at Bosscat Kitchen & Libations

ALL IMAGES COURTSEY

HOUSTON

June 18 kicks off the annual week-long Wonderland-themed Pride Houston celebration, complete with parade, festival and parties aplenty. It’s the largest LGBTQ gathering in the Southwest, with nearly 1 million attendees, elaborate floats, costumes and performances. pridehouston.org


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LAS VEGAS

The Electric Daisy Carnival, a massive dance party that drew more than 400,000 electronic music fans last year, returns to the Las Vegas Motor Speedway June 16–18 with sets from more than 200 DJs. lasvegas.electricdaisycarnival.com

CITIES

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The luxe WOW Suite living room at W Las Vegas

The private El Cortez suite—which casino mogul and former owner Jackie Gaughan lived in for nearly 35 years—is now welcoming its very first guests following a necessary facelift. “It has never before been available to the public, and we wanted to honor Jackie’s legacy by keeping the look and feel of the space,” says El Cortez’s executive manager and partner, Alexandra Epstein Gudai. “The kitchen retains its retro microwave and fridge, and the inlaid carpeting and blush pink upholstered walls are original.” The singular space is available by application only. Prices are seasonal. elcortez.com

The Romper Room at El Cortez

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ROOM REQUEST

The new W Las Vegas hotel’s Extreme WOW penthouse suite was designed by Lenny Kravitz and is built for entertaining—or, as the rock star’s hit single suggests, “Dancin’ Til Dawn.” “You immediately feel the funky style when you walk in and see a grand piano,” says W Las Vegas general manager Mark Eberwein of the slick space, which is equipped with Sonos speakers throughout and decorated with lush upholstered sofas and sleek marble furniture. The walk-out balconies, with vistas of the city’s skyline and surrounding mountains, are an ideal perch for watching the sun set—or rise, as the case may be. wlasvegas.com


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LAS VEGAS

CITIES

Taking Reservations

Zuma

Two new hotspots-in-the-making land on the Vegas strip

People flock to Sin City for many things, but healthy living has rarely been one of them—until now. “I’ve lived in Vegas almost 29 years,” says Shannon McBeath, co-founder of the city’s hottest new cycling studio, The Ride. “It’s always been my dream to open the high-end fitness studio I feel Vegas deserves.” McBeath says the idea was born from visiting her daughter in L.A., and taking business trips to New York with her husband, Cosmopolitan Las Vegas CEO Bill McBeath, where she made a point of doing her research. “I would seek out the greatest fitness studios,” she says. Many spin classes later, The Ride—which McBeath opened with partners Mark Cornelsen and Milo Miloscia—is a studio worthy of its high-rolling locale. The luxurious 4,400-square-foot facility is centered around a semicircular cycling theater furnished with state-of-the-art Stages SC3 bikes arranged stadium-style in three levels. The partywhile-you-perspire vibe is enhanced by a sound system by Frankie Desjardins (the technician behind Celine Dion’s Vegas show) and high-tech lighting from Ronen Mintz (of the Electric Daisy Carnival and Life Is Beautiful music festivals). McBeath, a longtime philanthropist, also opens the doors of her studio to local charities. “Every four to six weeks, we let a charity fill the room,” she says. “To me, getting the community involved is the best part of what I do.” We’ll pedal to that! theridecycling.com

50 Eggs’ newest concept is Chica at The Venetian Las Vegas. Lorena Garcia, the first Latina chef to helm a restaurant on the Strip, makes a bold debut with exotic fare—think braised short-rib arepas and Meyer lemon rotisserie chicken with Peruvian purple-potato salad and chimichurri—that transports diners to the South American climes that inspire her cuisine. chicalasvegas.com

The bar at Chica

THIS PAGE: RIDE: JESSE J. SUTHERLAND. ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY. OPPOSITE PAGE: MORTON BROTHERS: DENISE TRUSCELLO. THE SMITH CENTER: STEVE HALL. HAMILTON: JOAN MARCUS

THE WHEEL OF WELLNESS

Zuma at the Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas raises the stakes when it comes to Sin City’s Asian cuisine. Pair Japanese whiskey cocktails with dishes from chef and founder Rainer Becker’s main kitchen, sushi counter and white-hot robata grill, which burns odorless binchotan charcoal and never fails to deliver mouthwatering plates of the handsome izakaya’s ultra-popular spicy beef tenderloin and jumbo tiger prawns with yuzu pepper. zumarestaurant.com


HAMILTON HITS THE STRIP

Las Vegas has never lacked for live entertainment, but since The Smith Center opened five years ago, there’s been more of a very specific variety. “People often say that Broadway is the longest street in America,” says The Smith’s president and CEO Myron Martin, “and now it runs through Las Vegas.” Martin, whose $470 million performance center has already staged nearly 2,000 Broadway shows, opens the 2017–18 season with Something Rotten, running August 8–13, and concludes it with Hamilton, May 29–June 3, 2018. “We go out of our way to get shows that will resonate with our audiences,” he says. The 20th anniversary of Rent and the revival of The Color Purple are the two Martin says he’s most looking forward to in the months ahead. thesmithcenter.com

KEY TO THE CITY

David and Michael Morton A pair of American hospitality royals—the brothers and seasoned restaurateurs behind MB Steak, the new temple of beef inside the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino—shares how they do Sin City in style. mbsteaklv.com CUP OF JOE

Truly the sickest cup of coffee I have ever had was at Prediction Coffee. 900 S. Las Vegas Blvd. —MM POWER LUNCH

FIELD TRIP

The National Atomic Testing Museum! It tells the history of the second half of the 20th century through a very specific lens, and the gift shop has Miss Atomic cards—no kidding. nationalatomictestingmuseum.org —DM HIDDEN GEM

If you can, catch “Conversations with Norm” at The Smith Center, where local celebrity columnist Norm Clarke interviews his subjects in person. thesmithcenter.com —MM DATE NIGHT

On this, we agree: Estiatorio Milos at the Cosmopolitan. cosmopolitanlasvegas.com —DM AND MM

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RETAIL THERAPY

I’m not much of a shopper, but I’ll go to Dee Berkley Jewelry for a gift for my wife. It is hidden in the back of a dance studio on Rainbow Boulevard, and everything is custom. deeberkleyjewelry.com —MM

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Las Vegas locals and industry folks give Herbs and Rye an “in the know” feel. Cocktail hour is a misnomer though—it’s hours, plural. herbsandrye.com —DM

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La Cave at the Wynn is the spot—and not just because it belongs to my brother: The patio is so pleasant a working lunch doesn’t feel like work, and if you order the Big Reds wine flight, you might just settle in until dinnertime. wynnlasvegas.com —DM


LOS ANGELES

CITIES

With downtown Los Angeles in full bloom, now is the time to try Cartwheel Art Experience. The guided walking tours—like the Obscura Day Experience in DTLA’s Arts District—uncover hidden pockets of creativity in the city and can be customized for a one-of-a-kind experience. cartwheelart.com

KEY TO THE CITY

Robert Gaskill The founder of Motev—a much buzzed-about, Tesla-only chauffeur service backed by actor Morgan Freeman—knows his way around the City of Angels better than most. Here, he gives us his backroads intel. motev.com CUP OF JOE

I consider myself a coffee nut and Intelligentsia, in Venice, is by far my favorite spot; I’ll buy freshly roasted beans in bulk for home, and a latte for the road. intelligentsiacoffee.com

Celebrity regulars of Dominick’s can now revive the custom at Verlaine (verlaine.la), which has taken up residence (above) in the location of its esteemed West Hollywood predecessor—a favorite of Monroe and Sinatra. The first U.S. restaurant by award-winning Mexican chef Diego Hernandez will honor the cuisine of his homeland with dishes like

FIELD TRIP

oven-roasted suckling pig with sweet potato and salsa madre. In Beverly Hills, a new outpost of Tatel (tatelrestaurants.com) serves up the authentic Spanish tapas and perfectly prepared steaks that have made the eatery a destination in Madrid and Miami.

Discerning vegans, rejoice! A new Golden Triangle location of Gratitude (cafegratitude. com) plates upscale renditions of the guilt-free favorites—like blackened tempeh bolognese—popular at Café Gratitude’s more casual locations.

The Getty Center offers one of the best views in L.A. Take the tram up and wander around for hours. getty.edu DATE NIGHT

When I want to make an impression on someone, I start at Playa Provisions, in Playa Del Rey. It has one of the freshest and tastiest menus in town. playaprovisions.com DON’T MISS

Aquarium of the Pacific, in Long Beach, is a favorite place to spend an afternoon seeing the animals and shows. aquariumofpacific.org

Flowery Alchemy

It’s not every day that a florist and a milliner get together to create a perfume. But that’s exactly what happened when Eric Buterbaugh, designer of arrangements for A-listers like Gwyneth Paltrow and Gwen Stefani, and Nick Fouquet, creator of bespoke hats for the likes of Madonna and Beyoncé, collaborated on the scent Nick’s Sunflower. The unisex fragrance is the product of a challenge they set themselves: to determine how a flower with no scent—the sunflower—might smell. “It’s a fresh, floral, happy scent,” Buterbaugh reveals. Fouquet adds that it encapsulates their idea of summer—“it’s subtle yet adventurous,” he says. The fragrance’s name emerged from a private joke between the two: Fouquet passionately adores sunflowers, while Buterbaugh vehemently dislikes them. No matter each man’s opinion of the bud, it’s safe to say they agree on how it might smell—sublime. ebflorals.com

HIDDEN GEM

I’ve always loved photography, so Century City’s Annenberg Space for Photography is a special place. Every few weeks it hosts fascinating new exhibits, like Generation Wealth, Puro Cuba, Refugee and New Americans. annenbergphotospace.org ROOM REQUEST

New York’s fabled Waldorf Astoria may be closed for renovations, but the brand’s first West Coast outpost picks up the gilded baton that has made its elder sibling a destination for presidents and Hollywood luminaries for decades. Each of the Beverly Hills locale’s 170 lavishly appointed rooms have unrivaled views courtesy of floor-to-ceiling windows opening onto private balconies. A La Prairie Spa, chef JeanGeorges Vongerichten’s first West Coast restaurant and boutiques that rival Rodeo Drive’s round out the opulent offerings. waldorfastoriabeverlyhills.com

VERLAINE: COURTESY. ROBERT GASKILL: TJ MANOU. FLOWER ALCHEMY: COURTESY OF. JASMINE: NEVODKA.

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MIAMI

Don’t miss the Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden’s 25th annual International Mango Festival on July 1 and 2. After brunch and a tasting, bid on prize specimens at the world’s only mango auction. fairchildgarden.org

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YACHTLAND

Art-collector-cum-restaurateur Tatyana Silva is bringing the gallery and concert hall to the dining experience at Forte dei Marmi. Originally private, the Arts Club is now open to the public to listen to jazz chanteuses, hear talks and more, all with a glass of bubbly. Admired for her impeccable taste, Silva also tapped Milan’s design darling Henry Timi for interiors and a Michelin-starred chef for

a healthy Italian seafood blend including Sicilian red prawn carpaccio and black cod confit in gazpacho. fdmmiami.com South Beach’s fish bowl just got a little more crowded with Lobster Bar Sea Grille, Atlanta-based Buckhead Life Restaurant Group’s new Miami foray. New Yorkers may catch a case of déjà vu, as the cavernous space is modeled after Grand Central Oyster Bar in Manhattan. The dining

room has a view of the raw bar and the fresh catch ranges from Nova Scotia lobster to New Zealandsourced red snapper. buckheadrestaurants.com

Forte dei Marmi

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Miami has an ongoing competition for the flashiest ride—and the rivalries go all the way from the street to the dockyard. Topping every luxury cruiser’s wish list is the Lexus Sport Yacht, which Toyota president Akio Toyoda unveiled on Biscayne Bay earlier this year. Sadly, the yacht is still only a prototype, so fast-lane locals will have to make do with its four-wheel counterpart, the LC 500, which launched in May. lexus.com

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ALL IMAGES COURTESY

ROOM REQUEST

The Diplomat Beach Resort Hollywood is giving Miami Beach a run for its money to the tune of a $100 million makeover. The staggering numbers keep coming: 1,000 guest rooms (opt for a 712-square-foot Corner Suite, with sweeping Atlantic views) and 10 restaurants, including chef and owner Michael Schulson’s Asian-themed Monkitail, with a hidden karaoke den. Trina Turk also applies her retro Palm Springs aesthetic to four exclusively designed cabanas. There are adventures galore for couples and families alike—from yoga on the beach to a sunset cruise on the Diplomat’s catamaran. diplomatresort.com


MIAMI

CITIES

Starchitects are so last year: Miami’s real estate market has officially moved on to fashion. Giorgio Armani, Karl Lagerfeld and the Fendi family are all involved with luxury residential towers along the coast. And these A-listers aren’t simply lending their names to projects. “We were surprised by how involved Armani gets,” says Carlos Rosso, of The Related Group, which is co-developing Residences by Armani/Casa in Sunny Isles Beach (rbacmiami.com). “He talks about ‘dressing’ rooms like he’s dressing women.” Whereas buyers can purchase Armani’s entire vision, including $200,000 of onyx for master baths alone, Lagerfeld is focusing on a set of lobbies for his condominium foray with The Estates at Acqualina (estatesatacqualina.com). His inspiration is piazza life in ancient Rome, and is centered around a dramatic fountain. “Lobbies are significant because they offer the first impression of the building,” he says, “and they are the spaces where people come to socialize daily.” Armani and Lagerfeld’s properties won’t be completed for a few years, but Fendi Château recently finished construction of the house’s firstever residences in the town of Surfside, next to Bal Harbour ( fendichateauresidences.com). It’s a true Fendi fantasy, from mother-of-pearl cabinetry to Calacatta marble in the bathrooms. “Our buyer is looking for brand,” says Manuel Grosskopf, CEO of Château Group. “The building has a wall piece that’s in Fendi stores around the world.”

SEASIDE SCIENTIFIC

Associated more with sin than with science, Miami isn’t the first city that comes to mind for world-class museums. But its proximity to marine life—from coral reefs to the Gulf Stream to the Florida Everglades with its alligators and avians—makes it a natural fit for Downtown’s new Phillip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science. “Miami has grown into much more than a leisure destination,” says a spokesperson. “Locals and visitors are looking for educational experiences.” Hammerhead sharks and devil rays swim among the residents of the museum’s three-level aquarium, with natural light providing an under-the-sea effect. The planetarium delivers the same immersive quality in its 67-foot dome, where galaxies feel within arm’s reach thanks to 3D projectors and a 16-million-color 8K visual system—one of only 13 worldwide. New York– based artist Matthew Schreiber’s LASERsHOW: Lights, Color and Geometry takes visitors on an immersive journey in the museum’s largest gallery. frostscience.org

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The Real Fashion Houses


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NEW YORK CITY

CITIES

EXHIBITIONIST WATCHES

Calling all horologists: The time is now to ogle exceptional timepieces! From July 13–23, 178-year-old Swiss watchmaker Patek Philippe’s The Art of Watches takes over Cipriani 42nd Street for an unprecedented exhibition. Stop by to see the current collection, artisan demonstrations and limited and antique pieces dating to the 16th century. patek.com

Patek Philippe yellow gold pendant watch, presented to Queen Victoria in 1851

Midtown’s hotel scene is booming, with new openings from NoMad to Central Park. The Life Hotel (lifehotel.com) debuts in the former home of the eponymous magazine, with 98 rooms and a basement bar inspired by the speakeasy once frequented by magazine staffers. “We knew we had something special since the day we stepped into this building,” BR Guest Hospitality founder Steve Hanson says.

“The team has worked together to peel back the layers while highlighting the property’s unique history.” A few blocks north of MoMA, the Whitby Hotel ( firmdalehotels.com)—the newest property by London’s Firmdale Hotels—comprises 86 colorful, quirky rooms and suites decked

out by Firmdale cofounder and interior designer Kit Kemp (above). And downtown, hospitality legend Ian Schrager opens the first iteration of his hip hotel brand PUBLIC (publichotels.com) in his native city, in a new Lower East Side tower by Herzog & de Meuron.

KEY TO THE CITY

Nacho Figueras The Argentine polo player returns to New York to kick off the season at the 10th Annual Veuve Clicquot Polo Classic. Here’s where you’ll find him when he’s not in the saddle. CUP OF JOE

I am not a big coffee drinker, but I do enjoy a cup of matcha—the powdered green tea is traditionally enjoyed by polo players before a match. My favorite spot is Chelsea’s MatchaBar. matchabarnyc.com

POWER LUNCH

The classic Italian menu at Sant Ambroeus SoHo is a favorite for my entire family. When the weather is beautiful, we prefer the outside dining area. santambroeus.com

COCKTAIL HOUR

New York City is all about the view, so I love a rooftop. You can find me sipping a Clicquot Rich cocktail with cucumber on the roof of Mr. Purple when the heat picks up. mrpurplenyc.com

FIELD TRIP

I like to venture outside of the city a bit and visit the Noguchi Museum, in Queens. I am a big admirer of his work, and the space itself is very peaceful. noguchi.org

DATE NIGHT

The food is amazing at The Polo Bar, and the crowd is always top-notch. When my wife, Delfina, and I meet friends here, we end up staying for hours. ralphlauren.com

NACHO FIGUERAS: J. COUNTESS / GETTY IMAGES. ALL OTHER IMAGES: COURTESY

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Panorama Music Festival returns to Randall’s Island the weekend of July 28–30 with a killer lineup featuring Solange, Frank Ocean, MGMT and more. Plus, this year’s fest debuts the Point: an open-air, all-day— and night—dance party. panorama.nyc

THE CITY’S MOST ICONIC RESTAURANT SPACE REBORN

Jean-Georges and daughter Louise Vongerichten, head of Chefs Club in Soho

New Yorkers who fretted over the fate of the Seagram Building’s landmark restaurant space after longtime occupant, the Four Seasons, shuttered last year, can now rest easy. The Phillip Johnson–designed multi-level dining complex is the new home of the Grill, the latest venture from Mario Carbone, Jeff Zalaznick and Rich Torrisi, “It-boy” restaurateurs behind Carbone, Parm, Sadelle’s and more. While the Grill comes complete with Mies van der Rohe’s cantilevered “Brno” chairs, staff clad in Tom Ford tuxedos and tableware inspired by JFK’s White House, the team didn’t stop there. This summer, a new restaurant called the Pool, and an additional bar, the Lounge, will be added, offering even more opportunity to enjoy a steak and a martini. thegrillnewyork.com

To U.S., Love U.K.

TAKING RESERVATIONS Where to dine and drink in the Big Apple right now

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The White Company Skincare Super Serum

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The city’s restaurant scene heats up this season—literally and figuratively. The team behind Chefs Club (with locations in Aspen and Manhattan) introduces a more casual version of their “rotating chefs” concept with the opening of Chefs Club Counter (chefsclubcounter.com) in SoHo. Inspired by vintage New York lunch counters, the bright, airy space gives busy New Yorkers an opportunity to indulge in haute comfort food made by an alternating roster of top chefs, including Jean-Georges Vongerichten and Alvin Cailan (the man behind L.A. cult favorite Eggslut). Japanese restaurant empire Nobu (noburestaurants.com) moves its Tribeca flagship a few blocks south to the Financial District, where David Rockwell has designed a sleek space worthy of the restaurant’s VIP patrons. New Yorkers up in arms when The Campbell Apartment—Grand Central’s hidden but not-so-secret cocktail bar—closed last summer can now return to their clubhouse. Reborn as The Campbell (thecampbellnyc.com), the watering hole is making a comeback courtesy of a revamp from new operators, the Gerber Group.

Get ready for all-white everything! Quintessentially British lifestyle brand the White Company opens its first U.S. store in the Flatiron District this season. The 3,000-square-foot boutique will be a one-stop shop for effortlessly chic clothes, home accessories and beauty products from across the pond. “I cannot emphasize enough how much love, care and attention goes into every item we make,” says founder Chrissie Rucker. “And I absolutely cannot wait to share this across the USA—beginning with our store in New York City.” us.thewhitecompany.com

The Botticino marble dining room at Nobu, designed by David Rockwell


ORANGE COUNTY

CITIES

This season, the luxurious beachside Montage Laguna Beach introduces Coastal Chords, a program to loan deluxe Taylor Koa GS Mini guitars to guests during their stay—and arrange weekend fireside performances to showcase their skills. montagehotels.com/lagunabeach

KEY TO THE CITY

Sunny Ravanbach White Lilac, Ravanbach’s Costa Mesa–based design firm, is where the elite—from royal families of Abu Dhabi and Dubai to luxury brands like Dior and Bulgari—go for planning over-the-top events. Here, she names the O.C. spots that cater to her every whim. whitelilacinc.com

A STUDY IN DECONSTRUCTION

The Orange County Museum of Art is building on its long-standing California Biennial exhibition (which opened in 1984) with the second CaliforniaPacific Triennial, on display through September 3. Of the decision to produce another large survey show, senior curator Cassandra Coblentz says, “We decided to shift toward a broader geographical focus on both California and the Pacific Rim.” The exhibition will showcase the work of 28 artists— many from the U.S., but a large number from 11 countries spanning Central America, South America and Asia—working in mediums ranging from sculpture and installation to drawing and photography. The show explores the meaning of home and displacement, and the preservation and destruction of societies, and according to Coblentz, is an examination of the “temporal precariousness of the built environment.” In other words: a survey of the overlap between architecture and art. ocma.net

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HIDDEN GEM

From emerging talent to established artists from around the world, DAX Gallery offers great finds at all price points. daxgallery.com POWER LUNCH

Poolside at Coliseum Pool and Grill at Pelican Hill. colisemnb.com RETAIL THERAPY

I love Cisco Home’s aesthetic, and am so happy it has opened a home furnishings branch in the O.C. ciscohome.net COCKTAIL HOUR

The Deck has uninterrupted ocean views and summer vibes all year round. deckonlaguna.com

TAKING RESERVATIONS

Award-winning chef Ross Pangilinan’s innovative menu at Santa Ana’s Mix Mix Kitchen Bar honors his Filipino heritage while fusing influences from French and Italian cuisines. The result is unique fare like chitarra carbonara

pasta and ceviche soaked in a cane-vinegar and coconut-lime dressing. Patrons with an appetite might opt for the “Oui Chef,” a reservation-only, five-course meal of Pangilinan’s favorite dishes. mixmixkitchenbar.com

INSTALLATION: ELISABETH BERNSTEIN; RAVANBACH: SAMUEL LIPPKE; FOOD:TALIA SAMUELS

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Salt Creek Beach is beautiful, serene and quintessentially SoCal. You’ll see whales, dolphins and surfers—and experience endless serenity. ocparks.com


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SAN FRANCISCO

Fans of crustaceans, live music and fresh air will be toting their shucking buckets over to Golden Gate Park on July 1 for the annual Oysterfest Music Festival. oysterfest.me

CITIES

HOUSE SPECTACULAR

Nestled among the rolling hills and vineyards of Napa Valley sits RH Eight Palms, the first completely designed and furnished Restoration Hardware residence. “The most pleasing environments are a reflection of human design,” explains Chairman and CEO Gary Friedman. “Eight Palms is a study of balance, symmetry and perfect proportions.” Friedman’s vision, now on the market, took two years to complete. The end result is a demonstration of the design platform the brand is building as they begin to conceptualize not only products, but the spaces that contain them. The main residence amplifies the vineyard views, pool, guesthouse and heritage trees. The walled-in compound’s entry leads into a majestic courtyard and private gardens. rh.com

ROOM REQUEST

The 170-room Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe is already San Francisco’s winter playground, and the new Lake Club, opening this summer, will make it an equally alluring warmweather destination. The lakeside addition will feature 4,200 square feet of amenities, including a ground-floor dining terrace and an unparalleled lawn area with direct beach access. Activities include parasailing, wake surfing and Formula yacht and sailing charters on the Sierra Cloud. Insider’s tip: Book the Lake Club package for club access. ritzcarlton.com

or the Bigoli al Sugo d’Anatra to start, and then take on the Maialino, a 13-hour slow-cooked Stone Valley Farm suckling pig with caramelized apple, lollipop kale, balsamic vinegar and green onions. belottirb.com

Ken Fulk

Though he spends a good part of the year traveling—often to his beach oasis in Provincetown or his new Manhattan “live/work” space located downstairs from photographer Bruce Weber—Ken Fulk still calls San Francisco home. When the magicmaking lifestyle-designer isn’t pulling taxidermized rabbits out of a Philip Treacy hat or re-imagining the perfect gentleman’s study for a new Bay Area billionaire, he’s soaking up the best his hometown has to offer. CUP OF JOE

Reveille in the Castro has great coffee and my favorite breakfast dish ever: shakshuka, a Middle Eastern stew with poached eggs and grilled bread. reveillecoffee.com POWER LUNCH

Get yourself an invitation to The Battery: This members only club offers an insider’s look at what’s really going on in The City. thebatterysf.com RETAIL THERAPY

Coup D’Etat is perhaps the best decorative arts gallery in the country. It offers a mix of vintage and contemporary pieces in a highly curated setting. coupdetatsf.com HIDDEN GEM

Heath Ceramics operates a factory and showroom tucked into the flats of Potrero Hill, and has been a staple of Bay Area chic for decades (heathceramics.com). The best bakery on the planet, Tartine Manufactry, just opened a cafe in the adjoining space. tartinemanufactry.com DATE NIGHT

If I could eat at one spot the rest of my life, it would be Zuni Café. Order a margarita “up” with a dozen ice-cold oysters. zunicafe.com

The rustic-chic dining room at The Battery

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ALL IMAGES COURTESY

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TAKING RESERVATIONS

Chef Michele Belotti, of Northern Italy’s Michelinstarred Ristorante Frosio, brings authentic regional fare to Oakland via his 45-seat spot, Belotti Ristorante e Bottega. Try the Gnocchi alla Bolognese

KEY TO THE CITY


DON’T BE DRIVEN BY SUCCESS

BE DRIVEN TO SUCCESS

PROUDLY CHAUFFEURING VISIONARIES, LEADERS, INNOVATORS, AND DISRUPTORS FOR OVER 30 YEARS empirecls.com

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(800) 451-5466


TRI-STATE

CITIES

Upstate New York’s North Branch Inn hosts a seasonal Supper Club series on select Sundays through October 8. Chef Erik Hill’s $89 per person menu includes five courses featuring delicacies from local farms, breweries and distilleries. northbranchinn.com

OPEN HOUSES

Art and architecture buffs have a lot to look forward to this season as residence museums across New York state reopen their doors. In Buffalo, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Martin House (darwinmartinhouse.org)—a National Historic Landmark—and nearby Graycliff Estate (graycliffestate.org) will each reveal multi-year restorations timed with the legendary architect’s 150th birthday. As the only houses Wright designed in New York State that are open to the public, their preservation is especially significant. In the Hudson Valley, about five hours south, the Thomas Cole House (thomascole.org), a National Historic Site in Catskill, gives visitors a glimpse into the home and studios of the painter regarded as the founder of the Hudson River School. A detail from Frank Lloyd Wright’s Martin House in Buffalo

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In Livingston Manor, Sims and Kirsten Foster— the husband-and-wife team behind the Arnold House and North Branch Inn—are at it again. Their newest jewel box of a property, the DeBruce (thedebruce.com), has 14 country-chic rooms in a building sitting on 600 acres within the boundaries of Catskill Park. It’s the perfect home base for exploring the region’s craft breweries, hiking trails and antique shops.

DOWN THE SHORE After decades of decline, the town that Bruce Springsteen made famous in 1973 is on the up-and-up. The year-old Asbury Hotel (theasburyhotel .com) put the LGBTQ-friendly Jersey Shore enclave back on the map thanks to a playful design and constant stream of events to draw in the community. “It’s not your average shore town. Arts, music, great food and a touch of quirkiness make this beach community truly unique,” says the Asbury’s owner and operator, David Bowd. Stroll along the Boardwalk (apboardwalk.com) and peruse boutique wares in the 1920s Convention Hall, designed by the architects of the Grand Central Terminal. Book a table at Pascal & Sabine (pascalandsabine.com) to enjoy French classics amid whimsical paintings by Italian artist Paolo Ventura, or head to Porta (pizzaporta.com) for wood-fired pizzas in an industrial-chic space that becomes a dance club after hours.

TAKING RESERVATIONS

Philly’s favorite Italian chef, Marc Vetri, is bringing his idiosyncratic take on Roman fare to Westport, Connecticut, with a new location of Amis Trattoria. Its seasonal menu celebrates the region’s bounty with dishes including traditional and contemporary antipasti and house-made pastas. Don’t miss the fettuccine with corn and scallions, a perfect summer plate. amistrattoria.com

MARTIN HOUSE: IMG_INK. ASBURY HOTEL: NIKOLAS KOENIG. AMIS: VETRI FAMILY (2)

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ROOM REQUEST

After buzzed-about openings in Vail and Yellowstone, experiential travel company Collective Retreats (collectiveretreats.com) brings glamping to the Hudson Valley. Nestled on a private apple farm a picturesque drive from New York City, Collective Hudson Valley’s luxe tents—equipped with electricity, private decks and bathrooms and wood-burning stoves—are the ultimate outdoor abodes.


TRAVEL

SMARTER Liberty Helicopters continues to fly clients to their desired destinations. Whether it’s a weekend in the Hamptons or an important board meeting, we have the ability to get you there. Our large fleet of ships, combined with decades of flying experience, makes us stand out against the rest. Corporate | Executive | Commuter | Casino Charters | Airport Transfers Courier Services | Sporting Events | Recreational Destinations

www.libertyhelicopterscharter.com


PARTIES Alia Davis

DJ Donna D’Cruz

Akissa Mendez

Lalisha Sanders Tony Robbins

Ronn Torossian Virginia Carnesale

Jairek Robbins

Tom Silverman

Mitchell Modell Mary Buckheit Jennifer Connelly

The Unshakeable Tony Robbins

A.J. Calloway

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WHO: Tony

Robbins, A.J. Calloway, Arianna Huffington The launch of Tony Robbins’ finance book Unshakeable WHERE: PH-D Rooftop Lounge at Dream Downtown PRESENTED BY: Gilt, JetSmarter

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WHAT:

Arianna Huffington Tony Robbins

Jason Binn Sage Robbins

Maria Valentino

Christina Valentino

THIS PAGE & OPPOSITE PAGE: GETTY IMAGES

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Amanda Andrzejewski


Lindsay Ellingson Brad Walsh

Olivia Palermo Fran Drescher

Christian Siriano

Paul Shaffer

Ashley Biden

A Lively Event for a Good Cause WHO: Ashley Biden, Joe Biden, Dr. Jill Biden, Olivia Palermo, Fran Drescher, Christian Siriano WHAT: The launch of Livelihood, Ashley Biden’s charitable apparel company, on Gilt.com WHERE: Spring Place, New York City PRESENTED BY: Gilt, Livelihood

DJ Mia Morretti

Dr. Jill Biden

Madison Headrick Jacquie Storch

Cora Emmanuel

Jerry Storch

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Joe Biden

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Chloe Norgaard

Al Sharpton


BINNSHOT Wynn Las Vegas’ Michael Weaver and Sean Christie

LLAC’s Lisa Long Adler

Darren Seilback, Meg Seilback, Jessica Harless, Guest, Danielle McLaughlin

Venetian’s Angela Wise

Dean Cain

5WPR’s Ronn Torossian, Tony Robbins, Gilt’s Jonathan Greller

American Media’s Chris Polimeni and guest

Rolls-Royce’s Sabine Brown

Miya Ali, Jacob Wertheimer, Spike Lee and Khaliah Ali Wertheimer

WWD’s James Fallon

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

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5WPR’s Ronn Torossian, Paul Wilmot, Cipriani manager Milton Calle


Sotheby’s Tad Smith

Elaine Wynn

Coach’s Dana Randall, Guest

Guest, Stan Rosenfield, Jetsmarter’s Edward Petrossov, New York Friars Club’s Michael Gyure

Simon Huck

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Tamara Grove, Manhattan Motor Cars’ Adam Weinstein, RollsRoyce’s Jaclyn Marie Johnston

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Teneo Holding’s Megan Shattuck

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

New York Post’s Jennifer Gould Keil

Hunter Handler, Rich Handler

InBev’s Lara Krug

Roberto Coin’s Peter Webster

FLY Communications’ David Warren

Stephanie Kramer, Meryl Poster, Ron Kramer

Vera Wang’s Veronique Gabai Pinsky and Priya Shukla

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John Varvatos’ Phillip Constantinides


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ARTIFACT

Collecting Dust

The world’s most valuable space relic has been to the moon and back

he moon has always been a marketable source of mythology and mysticism. Just last year the buzzy health brand Moon Juice managed to coopt Gwyneth Paltrow into drinking its luxe “moon dust” smoothie every morning. Of course, the active ingredient does not actually come from the moon, but the otherworldly allure of Earth’s glowing, constant companion has proven irresistible time and time again. Which explains why, on July 20th, Sotheby’s expects to fetch between $2 and $4 million with one auction item: a lunar pouch containing remnants of the first ever moon rock and dust sample, gathered by Neil Armstrong. While the Smithsonian houses nearly all of the equipment from Apollo 11, man’s first mission to the moon, the bag was somehow overlooked—only to be discovered over three

decades later in a property seizure. Around 12 inches in length, the humble pouch is made of the same fireproof, meteoroid-resistant material as Apollo-era space suits, which NASA developed after the deadly 1967 Apollo 1 launchpad fire. But the item’s true value lies in the exoticism of owning lunar material, given the legal limitations (even astronauts aren’t allowed to retain, let alone sell, pieces of the moon). “My client went to court in order to keep it,” says Sotheby’s Cassandra Hatton of the bag’s current owner, who snagged it at a small auction for $995 before having it authenticated by NASA. “She more or less won the lottery.” As it turns out, moon dust doesn’t possess any special nutritional properties, and would surely ruin a breakfast smoothie: “Anything you would find in moon dust, you would find on Earth,” says Hatton. “The grains are very angular and sharp. They stick to everything.” ■

COURTESY SOTHEBY’S

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BY SAMUEL ANDERSON


IS YOUR DAILY DOSE OF STYLE, CULTURE, LIFE ...AND MORE


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