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C H I C A G O // D A L L A S // H O U S T O N // L A S V E G A S // L O S A N G E L E S // M I A M I // N E W Y O R K // S A N F R A N C I S C O

SEVEN DOLL ARS

FALL 2012

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48 STYLE

Harriet Mays Powell reports from the front row at Paris couture, Kate Betts catches up with the FLOTUS’ favorite designer Jason Wu, the Belstaff Trailmaster jacket makes a luxe comeback and predictions after the shakeups at YSL, Dior and Jil Sander

LIFE

Francisco Costa on his first big art purchase, Carolyn Kelly checks out designer windows at Newel, Jeffrey Podolsky looks back on the scene at Le Cirque, Mickey Rapkin discovers a reason to leave his hotel room and Debra Scott checks into a fancy rehab in East Hampton

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B ODY

page 90

Lena Dunham’s SoulCycle obsession, Alyssa Giacobbe uncovers why “chinplants” are the new go-to procedure for the tech-obsessed, Beyoncé’s manicurist, Lisa Logan, shows off the singer’s favorite nail art and the runway’s best new face for fall

121 P L AY

American muscle cars get back in the fast lane, Joy Bryant on being a true risk taker, top CEO triathletes, Rolex collectors gather to talk and trade around the world and your champagne problems answered

132 W Or k

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Arianna Huffington opens the doors to her office, Anjelica Huston’s off-camera pursuits and The Launch Pad author Randall Stross explains the search for the next Mark Zuckerberg

page 182

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MIMI RITZEN CRAWFORD; COURTESY OF CAROLE BAYER SAGER; COURTESY OF SIMON AND SCHUSTER; RALPH LEE HOPKINS; JEFFREY WESTBROOK.

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152 Cult ur e

Bee Shaffer on this season’s must-see Broadway shows, Alexandra Peers rates the latest hires at top art museums around the country, new books and the need-to-know cultural happenings for fall

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t he M O D el M O M

A portrait of the supermodel as mother and activist By Liza GhorBani PhotoGraPhed By Bruce WeBer

One chauffeur’s outrageous account of transporting Saudi royalty around Beverly Hills By Jayne ameLia Larson

186 Cu lt u r es CO lliD e: M O r O CCO

Why the rich interiors and fashionable fans make this desert country an oasis for the eclectic world traveler. Plus, an in-depth guide to the best restaurants, shops and local markets from Fez to Tangier and beyond. introduction By maura eGan PhotoGraPhed By douGLas Friedman

200 t he sweD e life

Actor Joel Kinnaman moves from the small to big screen in the remake of RoboCop By BLaine zuckerman PhotoGraPhed By PauL Jasmin

page 169

On the cover: Custom crown, price upon request, JUAN JOSÉ HEREIDA, 305-742-9382. Technical wool tweed punched v-neck shift dress, $2,395, CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION, 212-292-9000.

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| CONTENTS

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N i g h T MO v E S

Sleek fall accessories for power couples hitting this season’s soiree circuit PhotograPhed by adrian gaut

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A R T i S T i N R E S i DE N C E

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ChARACTER BuilDiNg

The best fall runway looks are brought to life inside Richard Avedon’s former townhouse and studio on model Crystal Renn by Patricia bosworth PhotograPhed by thoMas whiteside

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E Y E S ON T h E P R i Z E

We get up close and personal with Cory Booker, the popular (on and offline) mayor of Newark, N.J. by alex bhattacharji

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ChiCAgO

How Ikram Goldman curated Target, April Francis’ rise to fashion fame and a major retrospective on filmmaker Steve McQueen page 216

THOMAS WHITESIDE

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Wendy Vanderbilt Lehman’s brightly colored sculptures finally get their close-up by Michael Martin PhotograPhed by douglas FriedMan


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DA L L A S

Getting to know singer Mina Chang—plus, local beauty finds and more from the heart of Texas

250 HOUS T ON

page 239

New restaurants to try for every meal, art previews and Henri Bendel at the Houston Galleria

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LAS V EGAS

Chanel throws down at the Wynn Hotel while a chic hotel and delicious restaurants open on the Strip

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page 309

273 MiAMi

A sleek new Lacoste store opening and the best in beachfront clubs and spas

page 186

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NEw YOrk

Richard Peña from the New York Film Festival, summer in the Hamptons, a dynamic chef duo and fashion and frolicking from New Jersey to Connecticut and Long Island

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SAN F rANCi SCO

Forget the Golden Gate Bridge—this city’s new shops and restaurants are quickly becoming its main attractions

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: MARIO TAMA/GETTY IMAGES; DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN; PAUL JASMIN; COURTESY OF HEATH CERAMICS.

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LOS A NGELES

Catching up with Michael Kors, Kelly Wearstler and Jacqui Getty


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JASON BINN A LETTER FROM THE CEO WHO:

Twenty years ago, I took a skill set I’d always had a passion for—marketing, branding, events and bringing people together—and moved down to South Beach, Fla., with $5,000 to my name and a dream of starting a magazine called Ocean Drive. (I cofounded the magazine, which ultimately moved under the Niche Media umbrella.) Eventually, I moved back to New York to relaunch Hamptons magazine and build upon what became a national network of publications. The brand and the business model were unstoppable. Over the next two decades, I was fortunate enough to conceptualize and bring to life, under the Niche banner, more than a dozen luxury lifestyle titles in top markets across the country. It was a wild ride, and I had the privilege to work with some of the most prominent individuals and prestigious brands in the world. But what could come next? As I grew up and started thinking about family and a deeper foundation, I wondered what would be next for me professionally, too. There were many suitors interested in buying my company, and Greenspun Media Group seemed the best equipped to respect Niche’s core values. When you sell, you sell. Your baby is no longer yours alone, so it became time to explore life’s many possibilities. In 2010 I was lucky to meet a man who would help me with the discovery. That man is Kevin Ryan, one of the foremost authorities on the digital environment and founder and CEO of Gilt Groupe. Kevin is second to none, not just in the business world, but also as a friend and family man. He had taken DoubleClick from a 20-person start-up to a company that was eventually sold to Google for $3.1 billion. As the CEO, he has led Gilt to more than $600 million in annual sales. There was

an immediate connection between us, and he became my mentor, as I entered stage two of my professional path. I became chief adviser to the brand, and because of Kevin, I learned to appreciate the Internet from a different perspective. I was exposed to a new level of engagement between consumer and marketer. All those buzzwords had been a big part of my vocabulary during my 20 years in print, but the Internet provided a whole new dimension to this experience. While I never thought print was going away, I realized that it needed to be refined and retuned. And that’s where DuJour comes in. By simultaneously creating this magazine and this digital product, we acknowledge that there is just as much of a desire to touch and feel pages filled with beautiful imagery and one-of-a-kind content as there is to have an engaging experience online. The print magazine can live on your coffee table for the next three months while the digital experience keeps it current, intimate and immediate. The transition between print, Web, tablet and mobile is seamless. Consumers will have the ability to click through every editorial and advertising page directly to our partners’ sites. I realized this model would win the hearts and minds of readers as well as top luxury brands around the country. It was at this time that I turned to a pair of friends and confidants of 15 years, Lisa and Jimmy Cohen: two people who have been an integral part of the publishing community as the owners of Hudson Media Group

and the largest shareholders in Dufry (leaders in global sales of luxury goods). I saw the perfect storm face me head-on and I would stop at nothing to sail into it. When I started Ocean Drive, it was my dream to have Bruce Weber shoot the cover of my first issue with Niki Taylor. That dream was never realized. So you can imagine how it felt to have Bruce agree, 20 years later, to photograph Christy Turlington Burns for the premiere issue of DuJour. As I wrote this letter, I received a note that was messengered to me by Bruce Weber. I can only smile when I read, “The My favorite Binn shot! girl who interviewed me from your magazine for the Contributors page asked me what my favorite soup du jour was—I laughed and said fresh split-pea (chilled)—but what I really want to say is that what DuJour means for me is hope. That things will be better for all of us for a new day.” P.S. Without the love and support of my wife, Haley, and my children, what you are about to see on these pages would not be possible. They are my partners for life.

PORTRAIT: SANTE D’ORAzIO

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WHAT:


Sun DY4090

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ASHLEY GREENE 76th & Madison New York City


thank you to My handpicked “extended faMily”...

Binn ShotS

Our CEO/Founder’s snapshots from meetings, parties, events and more

Brandon Ralph (with wife Adri), “the man with all the theories.” Mort Zuckerman, Charlie Rose and former UBS chairman Robert Wolfe. “News makers”

Guy Foriester-Walker and Trent Fraser, “Living the Dom Perignon life.”

Todd Rome and Jonathan Cheban. “Jetsetters.”

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Bobby Flay, Rosanna Scotto, Lisa Cohen. “It’s all about good taste.”

Melissa Pordy and Richard Lefkowitz “Power couple.”

“Kramer loves Kramer,” Stephanie and Ron Kramer

Pierre Keyser “And they lived happily ever after . . . ” George Kolasa and Justin Tarquino Crissy Barker with Jasmine Barker, Nigel Barker and Beth Ostrosky Stern.

Deepak Chopra and Seth Greenberg. “May they live Forever Young.”

Jane Hertzmark Hudis and Maureen Case. “Beauty Queens.”

Jordy Cobelens. “He did it his way. Built out of Steel.”

John Howard, Evan Yurman and Glen Senk. “Craftsmen.”

Alex Von Furstenberg Alexandra Wilkis Wilson Alexis Maybank Alicia Goldstein Alison Hill Alyce Panico Andrea Correale Andrea Hyde Andrea Sanders Andrew Heiberger Andrew Sasson Andy Masi Andy Pages Angela Arabo Anton Levy Arianna Huffington Atissa Tadjadod Benny Shabtai Bill Gould Bill McBeath The Binn Family Bob Rottenberg Brett Hammerman Brian Atwood Bruce Defiek Bruce Weber Carl Cohen Carol Boyd Carol Penelli Catherine Malandrino Cathie Black Celia Nichols Charles DeCaro Charles Layton Charlie Walk Chris Burch Chris Del Gatto Christine de Saint Andrieu Colin Cowie Colleen Rizzo Cory Booker Craig Rottenberg Dan Galperin Daniel Koren Daniel Mink David Lauren David Lipman David Siguaw David Strome David Yurman Derick Daniels Diana Taylor Dianne Rottenberg Diego Scotti Don Buckley Donna Faircloth Donna Rodriguez Dottie Herman Drew Schaefer Emily Coppock Eric Lichtmess Etty Farrell Eugene Remm Eyal Lalo Frank Castagna Galit Adler Gary Friedman George DeBolt Giorgio Guidotti Greg Cook Guillaume Alix Haro Keledjian Harvey Spevak Harvey Weinstein


CALL 800.429.0996, VISIT SAKS.COM OR FIND US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER, iTUNES AND SAKSPOV.COM

JIL SANDER


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Heather Vandenberghe Hratch Kaprielian Howard Lorber Ivanka Trump Izak Senbahar Jacalyn Bouza-Longaro Jack Zemer Jacob Arabo Jan-Patrick Schmitz Jane Weitzman Jared Kushner Jason Pomeranc Jason Strauss Jeff Blau Jeffrey Chodorow Jennifer Hoke Jennifer Sagem Jerry Powers Jim Gold Jim Kerwin Joe Romulus John Demsey John Varvatos Judd Rottenberg Judy Stone Jyothi Rao Karen Katz Karen Sinclair Kate Betts Katya Sorokko Kenny Dichter Kim Walker Lara Shriftman Lee Schrager Lida Burpee The Lieberman Family Linda Chodorow Lowell Kwait Luigi Carrogio Madeleine Arison Marc Jacobs Marcy Warren Mariel Hemingway Marisa Acocella Marchetto Mark Birnbaum Mark Hruska Mark Packer Mark Weber Martha Webster Matthew Blank Matthew Whitheiler Melissa Beste Michael Warren Michael Weaver Michelle Horowitz Mickey Drexler Micky Arison Monika Chiang Nan Bush Natasha Cornstein Nick Beim Nicole Levinson Nicole Oge Nicole Ruvo Nikki Hotvedt Noah Tepperberg Offer Nissenbaum Ori Zemer Pam Liebman Patrick Day Jr. Paul Lubetsky Paula Dirks Paula Sutter Pepe Fanjul Pepe Fanjul Jr. Perry Farrell Peter Guber Peter Nicholson Peter Webster

Kyle Maclachlan, Desiree Gruber and Stephanie WinstonWoloff with David Woloff.

Kevin Ryan and James Cohen. Feb. 15, 2012: “A day of signing.”

Anna Throne-Holst, Henri Barguirdjian and Marianne Lafiteau. “True gems.”

Debbie Bancroft and friend. “No people like show people.” Kimberly Guilfoyle and Cornelia Guest. “Headliners.” Joe Meli and Richard Kirschenbaum.

Thierry Prissert. “Up, up, and away!”

Randy Brandoff Randy Schindler Richard Dickson Richard Plepler Rick Meadows Ricky Sitomer Rocco Laspata Robert Chavez Robert Duffy Ron Frasch Ruediger Albers Sandy Zemer Sari Witover Levinson Scott Ballin Scott Sartiano Shenan Reed Stacey Cooper Stacie Henderson Stacy Misher Stefani Greenfield Steve Holtzman Steve Ross Steve Sadove Steve Wynn Steven Birkhold Stewart Bain Stuart Brownstein Stuart Weitzman Susan Duffy Susan Jaques Susan Lyne Suzy Biszantz Sybil Yurman Tal Zemer Terron Schaefer Terry Lundgren Terry Villani Thierry Chaunu Tony Giannini Tony Robbins Venanzio Champa Veronica Webb Veronique Gabai Pinsky Ward Simmons Wayne Kulkin William Lauder Zach Chodorow Zach Enterlin

Khajak Keledjian. “Always in the mix.”

Matthew Settle and Peter Malachi. “Men of style and substance.”

Richie & Jane Notar. “For reservations, call Nobu and say you’re Howard’s friend.”

Erica and Michael Karsch. “Always smiling.”

Debby and Neal Sroka, “Never met a picture they didn’t like . . . ”

Jennifer Miller, Hoda Kotb and Faith Kates. “Hyper-connected.”

Heidi Klum and Michael Gross. “Jacks of all trades.”


E N J O Y R E S P O N S I B LY

C h a m p a g n e , © 2 0 1 0 M o e t H e n n e s s y U S A , I n c . , N e w Yo r k , N Y


K eith PollocK : In the final hectic weeks leading up to launching this magazine you now hold in your hands, I found myself recounting one particular story over and over again to explain, perhaps, how I’d gotten here. Last spring, I received a late-night e-mail from Jason Binn, whom I had never met, asking if we could meet—right away. People who know Jason know that he is a frenetic Energizer Bunny of a person. He doesn’t sleep much. We met that night in a Tribeca steakhouse, chatting until nearly 3 a.m. about his idea to create a smart, beautiful, genre- and medium-busting magazine, and about the job of editor-in-chief that would ultimately become mine... to share? Nicole V ecchiar elli: It was an unconventional idea for sure: two editors-in-chief. But Jason argued it was a way to “divide and conquer,” so to speak, to be able to do all the things that can be too much for one editor. Not long before, I’d read an article in Women’s Wear Daily about how the role of the EIC has changed drastically. These days, editors focus much of their efforts on heading up a brand and are nostalgic for a time when they could be more creative and roll up their sleeves to work on the details of shaping stories. In building DuJour as a two-person team, though, we would get to do both. Keith and I each has skills the other does not: I’d spent my career working for print magazines that covered fashion and celebrity, including Details, Teen Vogue and InStyle. He was what we print editors called “a digital guy,” having headed up the websites for ELLE, Interview and Art in America. Like everyone else in publishing, I knew that online was

where everything was headed—if not already there—but I wasn’t ready to abandon print just yet. KP: I, meanwhile, was intrigued by the opportunity to create a magazine. It helped that Nicole and I hit it off instantly. The banter between us hasn’t really stopped since —it’s a combination of brainstorming, encouragement and a healthy dose of mockery. NV: Meeting Keith felt like being set up on a blind date, getting married and then having a baby the next day. Launching a magazine is a lot of work, and even more so when you have only a short time to do it. We got to know each other’s family and friends. We saw each other at our worst. We also saw each other at our best. And “divide and conquer” never really happened. Instead, we collaborated on every single story, and pushed each other to think bigger, aim higher and take risks. Together, and with an amazingly talented and hardworking team of editors, we created a magazine with contributions from people we’d always dreamed of working with—photographers like Bruce Weber and Paul Jasmin, writers like Kate Betts and Patricia Bosworth. KP: And there were surprisingly few situations in which we didn’t agree completely. I mean, I have better taste than she does, but... NV: I like to joke, “If it’s smart, it’s for Nicole and if it’s pretty, it’s for Keith.” KP: Now that it’s done, we think we’ve created something that’s both smart and pretty. We envisioned this magazine for people with expensive tastes—people who have money and like to spend it—but for whom money

Artist Juan Heredia made the crown worn by Turlington Burns on the cover (and by DuJour staffers around the office).

isn’t necessarily everything. For readers whose lives are never boring and can’t be typecast. Jason constantly forwards us notes of advice from within his vast circle of friends, anyone from Courtney Love to Katie Couric; people who might otherwise never be in the same sentence. But luxury isn’t about being predictable. Luxury also has a big personality as well as a sense of humor and curiosity—and so does DuJour. In fact, the name represents the expectation that we’ll offer you, our readers, what you need to know every day, whether that’s through our quarterly print version—which is substantive enough to fuel conversations for months—or our website. NV: In the end, it turns out Jason’s ideas—to hire two editors-in-chief, to marry print and digital from the beginning—wasn’t unconventional at all. Watching everything come together over these past months—from watching Bruce Weber shoot cover subject Christy Turlington Burns to meeting with Cory Booker—I have been utterly inspired. We both have. And we hope you are, too.

PorTrAIT: THoMAs WHITEsIdE; sTILL LIFE: HENry HArgrEAKs

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thoughts DuJour: a MoMeNt With the eDitors


NEW YORK SEOUL ISTANBUL MONTRÉAL


Co-Editor-in-Chief keith pollock

Chief Revenue Officer alan Katz

Co-Editor-in-Chief Nicole vecchiarelli

SaleS

Art Director

StePhanie JoneS

Executive Director

Executive Editor

Gayle Perry Sobel

nancy bilyeau

FeatureS

Executive Director Phil Witt

Deputy Editors

Executive Director

daryl chen (features), nataSha Wolff (cities)

ron Stern

Articles Editor

Project Manager

adaM rathe

iSabelle MctWiGan

Staff Writer

lindSay SilberMan

Executive Assistant to the CEO Kate hazelbaKer

Associate Editor

natalia de ory

Executive Assistant

art + Photo

caitlin hoSeK

Sales Assistant

Photo Editor

taryn SchWeitzer

Designer

Monty ShadoW

FaShion + Beauty

Executive Vice President

Sydney WaSSerMan

Vice President of Product Development

etta Meyer

Chief Advisor

Gina naStaSi

Senior Market Editor

cynthia leWiS

Max Mcdonnell

Assistant Fashion/Market Editor Paul fredericK

Editorial Assistant brooKe bobb

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coPy + reSearch Copy Chief

Production and technology Vice President, Production ShaWn loWe

Digital Strategy Director lindSay KaPlan

Jeff Perlah

Prepress Manager

Research Editor

Michael oh

iVy PaScual

Coordinator

duJour citieS

robert cohen

anna bleSSinG (chicago and San francisco), eVelyn croWley (los angeles), liza Ghorbani (Miami, dallas and houston), chadner naVarro (new york)

JoSePh el chaMy, nicholaS Mcdonnell, JeSSica roMe, John ValliS

Intern

Regional Editors

Correspondents

andrea bennett, annie criner, Sarah o’neill fernandez, SaM GlaSer, ariel Greene, alden haWKinS, hadley henriette, Michael hite, carloS loPez, SuSan MichalS, lindley PleSS, nicKi richeSin, debra Scott, Maxine troWbridGe

Contributors

Kate bettS, beth landMan, liSa cohen, dori cooPerMan, antoine dozoiS, douGlaS friedMan, caSSandra Grey, alexandra PeerS, Jeffrey PodolSKy, MicKey raPKin, rhonda riche, Michael SoloMon, lauren WaterMan, thoMaS WhiteSide, lee SchraGer

Print and Paper Management caleV Print Media

Finance

Assistant Financial Controller allie SchiffMiller

Founder/CEO

JASOn BInn

Interns

déJà turner, GWen beland, layla li

Cheif Financial Officer

CARyn WhItMAn Design Consultant Pcr&co

Director of Editorial Operations haley binn

Editor-at-Large

alySSa Giacobbe

Co-Chairman

Co-Chairman

KEVIn RyAn

JAMES COhEn

Web Design

code and theory

General Counsel John a. Golieb

copyright 2012 by duJour Media Group, llc. all rights reserved. reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. the publishers and editors are not responsible for unsolicited material and it will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication subject to duJour magazine’s right to edit. return postage must accompany all manuscripts, photographs and drawings. for a subscription to duJour magazine, please email your request to: subscriptions@dujour.com


MICHAEL KORS BEAUTY

BLOOMINGDALE’S SHOP MICHAELKORS.COM


CONTRIBUTORS

du jour [doo zhoor] adjective [from French: of the day] example: What is your soup du jour? Getting to know some of the talent behind this issue—lunch order and all!

haRRIeT MayS pOWell

WRITeR, “The COUTURe RevOlUTION” Soup DuJour: French onion soup au gratin One thing I wish I could do every day: “Hug my children.”

phOTOgRapheR, “a MOdel MOM” Soup DuJour: Split pea, with lots of lemon One thing I wish I could do every day: “Swim in the ocean with my dogs and take pictures of them.” When famed fashion photographer Bruce Weber shot Christy Turlington Burns for a Calvin Klein ad 20 years ago, he remembers the special glow she radiated while surrounded by the children on the set. “I wanted to keep that going,” says Weber about his inspiration for the cover shoot. “She almost becomes more beautiful when kids are around. She relates to their innocence, charm and spirit.” Weber first gained acclaim in the late ’80s with his Calvin Klein and Ralph Lauren ad campaigns. Since then, his work has appeared in Vogue, GQ and Vanity Fair.

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Low-key couture is here to stay, according to Harriet Mays Powell, who served as fashion director at New York magazine for six years. Designers are taking note, she explains, and appealing to “a new class of wealth that doesn’t need ball gowns or over-the-top opulence. Fashion is a funny thing. You see these trends emerging, and you wonder if they all went to the cafe and discussed it ahead of time.” Mays Powell is the founder of TheLookNow.com

BRUCe WeBeR

alex BhaTTaChaRjI

WRITeR, “eyeS ON The pRIze” One thing I wish I could do every day: “Swim in the Mediterranean.” Cory Booker is the rare New Jersey mayor who’s managed to become a household name. Says Alex Bhattacharji, executive editor of Details, “Booker is bigger than I expected—both in his personality and his physical presence. Yet not in an intimidating way at all. He’s incredibly disarming.” And given Booker’s manabout-town reputation, the writer was also surprised by the down-home demeanor he displayed during their time together in Newark. “It was striking that a mayor with a national reputation would be such a local guy as well. He stopped to shake hands with everybody from elderly women to kids at the local pool to security guards.”

FUlvIa FaROlFI

MakeUp aRTIST, “a MOdel MOM” Soup DuJour: Chilled carrot One thing I wish I could do every day: “Wake up at the same time— which I don’t. Around 6 a.m.” Famed makeup artist Fulvia Farolfi first worked with Christy Turlington Burns 18 years ago, and she says the model and advocate is just as gorgeous today as she was then. Inspired by Turlington Burns’ natural beauty, Farolfi took a minimalist approach to her face. “I think every woman around 40 looks best with a little less, rather than more,” she says. “There is very little to do. I just tried to enhance her beauty.”

POWELL: ANDREW POWELL; WEBER: “BRuCE AND TAI,” BY MICHAEL JOHN MuRPHY; FuLVIA: COuRTESY OF CHANEL; BHATTACHARJI: COLM O’MALLEY.

Soup DuJour: Lobster bisque


m a xm a ra .co m

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PatriCia bosWorth

Writer, “CharaCter building” Soup DuJour: Shrimp noodle One thing I wish I could do every day: “Look out at the Hudson River. It’s my favorite view and my favorite river, and it reminds me the world is a beautiful place.” Patricia Bosworth drew on personal experience for her story—Bosworth’s husband, the late photographer Tom Palumbo, had shared an apartment with Richard Avedon in the ’50s when they both worked at Harper’s Bazaar. She recalls bumping into the legendary photographer at parties: “He was the most energizing, hyper . . . almost manic character, running around talking,” says Bosworth, a biographer of Jane Fonda and Marlon Brando and contributing editor at Vanity Fair. “He was fascinated by people. And he wanted to get behind their masks. He was endlessly curious.”

Cassandra grey

Writer, “beauty beWare” Soup DuJour: Gazpacho One thing I wish I could do every day: “Sing like Beyoncé or eat fried chicken.”

CLOCKWISe FROM UPPeR LeFT: BOSWORTH: ANDReWCOPPA.COM; JASMIN: SeLF PORTRAIT; FRIeDMAN: COURTeSY OF DOUGLAS FRIeDMAN; GHORBANI: eVA DAHL; GReY: ROBIN BLACK.

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When entrepreneur Cassandra Grey moved from New York City to Los Angeles three years ago, she was so inspired by the Hollywood beauty culture that she launched Violet Grey, a combination private studio, style incubator and creative laboratory. Consulting with top industry talent—from makeup artists to manicurists—her team at Violet Grey take their expertise to these pages with their column. She says, “We’re serious about the artistry and about celebrating this culture of beauty, but we’re trying to bring some humor and humanity to the superficiality, too.” Grey is also a branding consultant, as well as a cofounder of C Atelier, a vintage-clothing line sold at Bergdorf Goodman.

Paul JasMin

PhotograPher, “the sWede liFe” Soup DuJour: Cream of broccoli One thing I wish I could do every day: “Stay home with my cat, Jack, because he hates when I go out all the time. He rules the house.” After shooting Joel Kinnaman, photographer Paul Jasmin describes the actor as a young Laurence Olivier: “There was something very old-school movie star about him. It was refreshing to meet someone who was not so impressed with himself.” Jasmin’s illustrious career as a fashion and art photographer spans four decades, and his work appears in Vogue, GQ and Interview. He currently teaches at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif.

liza ghorbani

Writer, ”a Model MoM”

Soup DuJour: Seafood bisque One thing I wish I could do every day: “Work on my novel.” When Liza Ghorbani spent the day with Christy Turlington Burns, she learned that our cover girl was more than just jawdroppingly beautiful. “I was impressed by how informed she is,” says Ghorbani, DuJour’s regional editor covering Miami, Dallas and Houston. “She’s not a celebrity just lending her name to a charity. She’s involved in all the day-to-day details, and she’s a very inspirational woman.” Ghorbani is a freelance journalist whose work appears in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and Elle.

douglas FriedMan

PhotograPher, “Cultures Collide: MoroCCo” and “artist in residenCe” Soup DuJour: Manhattan clam chowder One thing I wish I could do every day: “Take a nap.”

“Morocco is out of a storybook,” says photographer Douglas Friedman. “I’m such a jaded traveler, because I’ve been to so many incredible places. I wasn’t expecting to be so enchanted by somewhere new.” And even though he’s known her for 25 years, Friedman was also awestruck by Wendy Vanderbilt Lehman, the subject of his other story: “Her body of work is massive and across so many different types of media, but there’s this incredibly consistent point of view.” Friedman shoots regularly for magazines such as Harper’s Bazaar, InStyle and Vanity Fair.


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THE COUTURE REvoluTion In Paris, flash and

affectation have been replaced by a refreshingly classic attention to detail.

HarrIet Mays Powell

F

or the first time in a very long while, the Paris haute couture collections were unified by the mantra “less is more.” A mood of restrained elegance pervaded this fall; the clothes were startlingly wearable. Pants—generally thought of as too pedestrian for couture—were prominent. Gone were the fantasy and frivolity and, some unkind souls might say, selfindulgence of recent years. Everywhere, splashy red-carpet designs, bait for the paparazzi, were replaced by the intricate techniques of les petits mains—the “little hands” of the craftsmen and seamstresses returning to the traditionally hard and time-consuming work of beading and embroidery. The highly anticipated debut collection of Raf Simons for Dior, a continuation of the trail he blazed for three seasons at Jil Sander, did not disappoint. For years, Dior has been a house where the demarcation line between couture Chanel

It took four days to fill five salons with more than a million orchids, delphiniums, roses and peonies at the christian Dior couture show.

Chanel

couRTESy oF chAnEl

000

takes a seat


Valentino

Chanel

Christian Dior

Cacharel Atelier Versace

Christian Dior

Christian Dior

ALL PHOTOS: IMAxTRee.COM

Atelier Versace

Givenchy

000

and high-end ready-to-wear was blurred. In this particular instance, simplicity and skill trumped extravagance. Simons sought to update classic Dior looks, such as the hourglass silhouette from the immortal 1947 collection, with a thoroughly modern play on volume and proportion. A fitted black-mesh top was designed to go over a long full skirt, and a painstakingly embroidered mini ball gown with an exaggerated peplum was paired with slim black pants. The understatement continued throughout the week. At Valentino, designers Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pier Paolo Piccioli created a feminine collection that was infused with subtle sexuality. Strips of cutout velvet or sheer, pleated chiffon on floor-skimming gowns highlighted erogenous zones from neck to toe, while delicate lace and chiffon floral dresses, encrusted with cashmere appliqués of flowers and leaves, were inspired by dreamy Pre-Raphaelite paintings. Over at Givenchy, Riccardo Tisci used leather to create intricate mosaic patterns on a spectacular red-andblack cape. For his eponymous line, Giambattista Valli displayed similarly meticulous craftsmanship in ladylike,

garden-inspired flourishes and ruffles on collars, waistnipped skirts and evening coats. And though at first glance Karl Lagerfeld for Chanel appeared to have updated the house’s famous tweed suits, on closer inspection the “tweed” proved to be hand-embroidered tulle, some of the pieces having taken thousands of hours to make. Luxury was never so discreet. For the first time since her brother’s death, Donatella Versace returned to Paris and the Ritz Hotel—where Gianni presented his couture collections in the ’80s—with signature Versace details like chain mail and leather. Still, the clothes were ethereal and refined: A bustier woven from white leather topped a diaphanous skirt that seemed to float down the runway. So why this sudden change, this rejection of flamboyance and return to classical technique? Perhaps the influx of wealthy clients from China and Russia is driving the new

aesthetic—these customers certainly drive sales, which are up by more than 30 percent. For the newly rich, high fashion is no longer just for gala evenings but a status

“simplicity and skill trumped extravagance” symbol to be worn throughout the day. Although couture may be one of the last laboratories of pure creativity, an unfettered place to imagine something truly unique, times and economic circumstances have changed. What was once little more than a vehicle for attracting publicity is now a real paying proposition. The modern couture is imaginative and exquisite but almost low-key. Personally, I’m thrilled.

Russian clientele are the new leading buyers of haute couture, surpassing customers from China, France and the Middle east. According to Karl Lagerfeld, certain Russian clients have purchased as many as 35 Chanel couture outfits per season—ensembles that generally cost five or even six figures each.


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Jason WU WHO:

WHAT:

On the eve of a presidential election, the designer looks back at the dress that made him famous—and talks about what’s in store for the year ahead. KATe BeTTs catches up PHOTOGRAPHED bY DAniEL KinG

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t has been almost four years since the bitterly cold January evening when designer Jason Wu gathered a few close friends in his Midtown Manhattan apartment, ordered pepperoni and mushroom pizza from Domino’s and, like most of the rest of America, turned on the TV to wait for President Barack Obama and his wife, Michelle, to make their appearance at the first of several inaugural celebrations. When the first lady finally floated out onstage at the Neighborhood Inaugural Ball in Washington, D.C.’s Walter E. Washington Convention Center wearing the romantic, frothy, ivory silk-chiffon dress Wu had created for her, the designer was shocked. He had no idea she had chosen his dress for this historic moment. Within 10 minutes, CNN was calling and Wu’s in-box was flooded with congratulatory e-mails from as far away as Sydney and Taipei, his hometown. Television crews bombarded his small Garment District studio. Almost instantly, Wu’s career was transformed, and he became a household name.

A self-proclaimed cat lover, Jason Wu chose a French cartoon cat named Milu as his muse for his Target collection. He is also the proud parent of two felines: Jinxy and Peaches.


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Yet in many ways Wu, who was only 26 years old at the time, was prepared for the blitz of press and attention he received from that night. “I had to grow up really quickly, but in terms of doing the right thing with it, facing it head-on, dealing with the good and the bad and the crazy, I was ready,” he says. “I knew I didn’t want to be a media darling. I don’t want to star in anything. I’m simple, and I want to be as unassuming as possible. But they don’t teach you how to deal with that kind of situation in school.” The inaugural gown would not be Wu’s last piece for Michelle Obama. He continued to dress her in brilliant shades of fuchsia, lime and teal—in dresses that would appear on the cover of Vogue and travel to Buckingham Palace for private moments with the queen. Now, on the eve of another election, Wu has been thinking back on that moment and how special it was for him. “You can never really repeat it,” he says, days before previewing his latest collection, Miss Wu, a contemporary line designed with his friends in mind and to be sold exclusively at Nordstrom. “As a world and a country, we’re in a very different place now. That dress symbolized so much more than just the occasion; there was so much hope in that dress.” As well as personal promise. Since that night, Wu’s company and brand have taken giant steps forward: He has moved into a 10,000-square-foot showroom, launched a line of sunglasses with Modo and introduced a signature collection of color-block leather handbags and bright textured shoes. Earlier this year, he collaborated with Target on a collection of clothing and accessories, an experience, he says, that totally changed his perspective on fashion cycles, trends and the women who wear his clothing— not to mention his confidence in his creative abilities beyond the scope of fashion. The Target collaboration had him dabbling in design and brand development, creating a television commercial and print advertising campaign in which he starred alongside a mischievous black cat. “My grandfather always said there are two ways to learn: Take your time or put me on a bike and push me down a hill,” he says. “That’s what he did.” Although Wu may feel more comfortable behind the scenes, it’s virtually impossible to avoid the

spotlight when your fan base includes Hollywood beauties like Zoë Saldana, Emily Blunt and Diane Kruger. Some of Wu’s most cherished moments over the past few years include seeing Michelle Williams in a dove gray embroidered chiffon resort gown at the 2010 Venice Film Festival, Emma Stone in a green silk chiffon printed dress at the 2012 Critics’ Choice Movie Awards and Karlie Kloss at the

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“I DIDN’T WANT TO BE A MEDIA DARLING. . . . I WANT TO BE AS UNASSUMING AS POSSIBLE.” Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute Gala in his magenta chiffon and black lace gown. But the style icon holding a special place in Wu’s heart is Kruger, who has been wearing his gowns on the red carpet for years— most recently at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival. “We have a genuine friendship,” he says, “like Givenchy and Hepburn. It’s something quite nice to have today. She’s very much that Jason Wu woman; she knows who she is, and she understands fit and quality.” In stores in January, the designer’s Miss Wu collection—inspired by actress and singer Jane Birkin and featuring plenty of 1960s-style silhouettes in whimsical prints and bold colors— was conceived with 20-somethings in mind. “It felt natural for me to address my generation,” he says. “They’re really into fashion, and they have great taste, but they can’t afford to buy designer clothes.” After that, well, don’t expect another inaugural gown—and that’s not a political prediction. Following some muchdeserved time off, Wu says he’ll spend the next year focusing on strengthening his accessories collection. Designing handbags and shoes, he says, is like starting over, learning a totally new craft. This time around, though, the guy who says he likes to learn by just getting on the bicycle is in no rush. He’s doing things at his own pace.

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JASON WU, FIVE YEARS LATER

2008–2013

CU LT U R E

JULY 2008

His first official magazine credit. Wu is featured in a W cover story with Kate Moss, Daria Werbowy and Lara Stone. Shot by Bruce Weber in Miami, the piece follows “the world’s hottest new designers”— including Wu, Alexander Wang, Gareth Pugh and Christophe Decarnin.

JANUARY 2009

Michelle Obama wears a custom Jason Wu gown to the presidential inaugural ball. The dress is donated to the Smithsonian Institution a year later, and in a speech at the exhibition’s unveiling, the first lady remarks of the gown: “It’s simple, it’s elegant and it comes from the brilliant mind of someone who is living the American dream.”

SEPTEMBER 2009

Wu launches an eyewear collection with Modo that’s currently sold in more than 50 stores, including Bergdorf Goodman and Nordstrom.

JANUARY 2010

The designer moves his headquarters to a 10,000-square-foot showroom on West 35th Street in NYC’s Garment District.

JANUARY 2010

Diane Kruger, a nominee for her role in Inglourious Basterds, hits the SAG Awards red carpet in a Jason Wu gown.

FEBRUARY

2012

Wu’s new signature It bag launches as a part of his prefall collection. Inspired by model Daphne Groeneveld, the bag is named the Daphne.

SEPTEMBER 2010

Inspired by old Hollywood glamour, Wu unveils his first handbag and shoe collection during New York Fashion Week. It also marks the debut of the brand’s new logo—a small owl icon.

FEBRUARY 2012

His capsule collection for Target launches in stores and online. It sells out just hours after its release. Each of the 53 pieces, including apparel and accessories, each retail for less than $59.99.

As a child, Jason Wu gained early design experience when he began sewing and creating designer doll clothing. At 16, he submitted his work to a major U.S. toy manufacturer and was later hired as its creative director.

JANUARY 2013

The Miss Wu collection, his lower-priced contemporary line, will hit Nordstrom stores. The ’60s-inspired pieces (blouses, leather jackets, A-line skirts) will range in price from $195 to $795.

THE OBAMAS: SAUL LOEB/AFP/GETTY IMAGES; STUDIO, SUNGLASSES, BAG, MISS WU LOGO: COURTESY OF JASON WU; DIANE KRUGER: FRAZER HARRISON/GETTY IMAGES

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Blazing TrialmasTers The classic riding jacket gets an upgrade. Belstaff and beyond

PHOTOgraPHeD By Jeffrey WesTBrOOk eDiTeD By Paul freDerick

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hen Belstaff launched in 1924, the British company made waxed cotton jackets for motorcyclists. Almost a century later, Belstaff is still working with that waxed cotton. But now, under the watchful eye of chief creative officer Martin Cooper, it has added more luxurious elements, including crocodile, to the mix. Ever true to its roots, Belstaff is revisiting its signature item,

the Trialmaster jacket. Beloved by icons like Steve McQueen, for whom the brand released a special-edition jacket a few years back, and Che Guevara, the Trialmaster gets an update this autumn courtesy of Cooper. “I wanted to reclaim ownership over something that was ours,” Cooper says. “The Trialmaster has had an incredible history and proven longevity.” Belstaff isn’t the only brand trading on that. The prevalence of the field jacket trend this autumn is visible in Bally’s leather-trimmed shearling version as well as Ralph Lauren’s wool take, which sports a removable hood. Despite the updates, Cooper says the spirit of the piece hasn’t been altered. “What makes it iconic is that it hasn’t changed much in the last six decades,” he says. “It’s truly in a class all to itself.”

(Clockwise from top left) belted parka, $595, shirt, $125, both

JOSEPH ABBOUD COllECtiOn, nordstrom.com; sweater, $248, tOMMY HilFiGER, tommy.com; wool Quad jacket, $1,695, classic crew, $70, sweatshirt, $175, all tODD SnYDER, Barneys New York, 212-826-8900; shearling jacket with plain-leather trim, $7,650, BAllY, bally.com; bonded Napa field jacket, $7,750, BURBERRY, burberry.com; sweatshirt, $175, tODD SnYDER, Barneys New York, 212-826-8900; shirt, $98, POlO RAlPH lAUREn, ralphlauren.com; suede quilted jacket, $1,298, tOMMY HilFiGER, tommy.com; shirt, $88, tOMMY HilFiGER, tommy .com; waxed-cotton Roadmaster jacket, $850, BElStAFF, belstaff.com; sweater, $138, tOMMY HilFiGER, tommy.com; shirt, $125, JOSEPH ABBOUD COllECtiOn, nordstrom.com; wool hooded jacket, $595, POlO RAlPH lAUREn, ralphlauren .com; shirt, $295, tie, $125, both tODD SnYDER, Barneys New York, 212-8268900; suit, $595, JOSEPH ABBOUD COllECtiOn, nordstrom.com.

In September, Belstaff will open a retail location on New York City’s Madison Avenue. Next year, another—a 26,000-square-footbehemoth—will open on London’s Bond Street.


YOU CAN’T BE HALF A GANGSTER

SEPTEMBER I6 9PM OR WATCH IT ON

HBO GO® is only accessible in the US and certain US territories.

© 2012 Home Box Office, Inc. All rights reserved. HBO® and related channels and service marks are the property of Home Box Office, Inc.


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transformers

CU LT U R E

Three major labels relaunch this fall—with three major minimalists at the helm. So how do Christian Dior, Yves Saint Laurent Paris and Jil Sander stack up? TRACEY LOMRANTZ LESTER analyzes

DIOR

J IL S AN de R

Yves saInt lauRent

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jIl sanDeR

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Yves saInt lauRent

R AF SI M ONS

“I am fully aware of the honor and responsibility that are entrusted to me today as director of creation for the world’s most famous French brand.” —Raf Simons “Haute couture is a legitimate subject for Yves Saint Laurent and could resume one day. The priority today is to revamp and redeploy the luxury ready-to-wear.” —Hedi Slimane

jIl sanDeR

DIOR

new creative director on the task ahead BRAND DRAmA

“You have to break rules, if there is a good reason. And now is the right time to be daring. There are few new ideas.” —Jil Sander

BiGGesT CHAlleNGe RaF sIMOns

HeDI slIMane

jIl sanDeR

AeSTHeTIC

= SIMOnS

Getting in touch with his feminine side (Slimane has never formally designed a women’s wear collection)

Staying put

DIOR

Yves saInt lauRent

jIl sanDeR

When Tom Ford left the This marks Sander’s head design post in third attempt to 2004, he remarked, peacefully coexist with “I established a label, the house that bears her and I am frustrated that I name after being pushed wasn’t allowed to out in 2000, only to return complete the and resign again a few transformation.” years later.

alienated former fans DIOR

Yves saInt lauRent

Logo-loving It-bag collectors

jIl sanDeR

uniQLo this guy shoppers

MINIMALIST CREDENTIALS

jIl sanDeR

HeDI slIMane

Mastered the art of monochrome back in 1973

All but invented skinny jeans

RaF sIMOns

Belgian birth certificate, industrial design degree, seven years at Jil Sander

likely muse . . . tIlDa In jIl sanDeR

tIlDa In Yves saInt lauRent

tIlDa In DIOR

GALLIAnO

runway forecast for spring 2013 DIOR

Yves saInt lauRent

Based on Simons’ couture Slimane to deliver the most debut, a reverent nod—and Shazam-able soundtrack of the Paris season a winking twist—to the house’s archives

jIl sanDeR

A standing ovation for Sander’s return, or a lot less pink

As the new creative director of Yves Saint Laurent, Hedi Slimane is already making his mark: The ready-to-wear line originally called Saint Laurent Rive Gauche in 1996 will now be called Saint Laurent. Originally designed by Ukrainian-French artist Adolphe Mouron Cassandre, the classic YSL logo has represented the brand since 1961.

RAF SIMOnS: eRIC RYAn/GeTTY IMAGeS; HedI SLIMAne: STePHen LOvekIn/WIReIMAGe; JIL SAndeR: JUnkO kIMURA/GeTTY IMAGeS; JOHn GALLIAnO: AnTOnIO de MORAeS BARROS FILHO/WIReIMAGe; THIS GUY: YUdO kURITA; UnIqLO: MARIO TAMA/GeTTY IMAGeS; TILdA In JIL SAndeR: venTUReLLI/WIReIMAGe; TILdA In YSL: PASCAL Le SeGReTAIn/GeTTY IMAGeS; TILdA In dIOR: JORGe HeRReRA/GeTTY IMAGeS; dIOR RUnWAY: CHRIS MOORe/GeTTY IMAGeS; JIL SAndeR RUnWAY: CHRIS MOORe/GeTTY IMAGeS

styLe


GIRARD-PERREGAUX 1966 Annual Calendar and Equation of Time Pink gold case, sapphire case back, Girard-Perregaux automatic mechanical movement. Annual calendar, equation of time, date, small second.

GIRARD-PERREGAUX BOUTIQUE 701 Madison Avenue, New York Tel. 646-495-9915 | www.girard-perregaux.com


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LINKED UP

Classic diamond and gold-chain jewelry breaks through as the standout adornment for fall PHOTOGRAPHED by LEON sTEELE

(From left to right) “Olympia” necklace made of round diamonds set in 18-karat white gold, price upon request, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, vancleefarpels.com. Gold-link necklace, $22,500, FRED LEIGHTON, 212-288-1872. Oval-link necklace with pavé diamond link, $12,750, DAVID YURMAN, davidyurman.com. Diamond-link bracelet in 18-karat white gold with pavé white diamonds, price upon request, RALPH LAUREN FINE JEWELRY, ralphlaurenjewelry.com. 18-karat rose gold necklace with rose- and brilliant-cut pavé brown diamond, $72,000, POMELLATO, pomellato. com. 18-karat yellow gold “curb link” bracelet, $21,500, VERDURA, 212-758-3388.

The chain strap on the iconic Chanel 2.55 bag was inspired by a memory from Coco’s childhood in an orphanage, where the nuns wore waist chains to hold their keys.


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CU LT U R E Model on left: Paisley print dress, $159, ANNE KLEIN, anneklein.com. Culte sunglasses, $390, MIU MIU, Ilori, 212­226­8276. Mini Lily bag with tassels, $670, MULBERRY, intermixonline.com. 18­karat yellow gold cuff, $11,000, JENNIFER FISHER, jenniferfisherjewelry.com. Belt stylist’s own. Model on right: Silk blouse, $295, stretch twill wide­leg pant, $99, ANNE KLEIN, anneklein .com. DBS sunglasses, $380, OLIVER PEOPLES, oliverpeoples.com. Leather satchel, $430, A.P.C., 212­966­9685. Brass Single Bar cuff, $500, JENNIFER FISHER, jenniferfisherjewelry.com. Scarf, belt and gloves, stylist’s own.

SLEEk REvivaL

At Anne Klein, everything old is new again. MelissA lieblinggoldberg takes note PHOTOGRaPHED bY kava GORna

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owever much we may love the retro, perfectly coordinated ensembles worn by the ladies of Mad Men, it’s likely none of us can actually envision dressing like Peggy for a day at the office. Or like Betty for an afternoon of doctor appoint­ ments and lunch dates. Back then, design­ ers created clothing with head­to­toe outfits in mind—and most women bought, and wore, them that way. Until, that is, the late 1960s, when American sports­ wear designer Anne Klein first liberated women from matchy­matching our hats and gloves to our shoes and dresses. With her very first collection, Klein proved that every season needn’t be a rebirth; in fact, spring’s peacoat would look equally good with fall’s trouser and that silk blouse you bought three years ago. More than 40 years later, Anne Klein is back in the spotlight and more relevant than ever. For fall 2012, new VP and cre­ ative director Jeff Mahshie set out to follow the classic Anne Klein philoso­ phy of dressing in an effortless, sleek and wholly essential way; everything old is new again. “The idea of building and updating your wardrobe and having it be interchangeable was a concept in­ troduced by Anne Klein,” says Mahshie. “That’s our heritage.” Mahshie came to Anne Klein earlier

this year from Lord & Taylor. With pre­ decessors including Klein’s personal protégée Donna Karan, who famously dropped out of Parsons to work for the company, and, more recently, Richard Tyler and Isabel Toledo, he’s got some very big shoes to fill. Of course, this is a brand that’s proud of its roots, and Mahshie is tasked with preserving the legacy of Klein—a char­ ter member of the Council of Fashion Designers of America and one of five American designers to show at Versailles before she died of breast can­ cer in 1974—while moving the brand forward. For inspiration, he turned to the Anne Klein archives. Fall’s Leo dress is at least partially inspired by the iconic Anne Klein lion logo, which the origi­ nal designer based on her astrological sign, as well as a riff on a shirtdress dis­ covered in the archives by Jones Group chief creative officer Stefani Greenfield,

whom Mahshie cites as a brand muse. (“She’s powerful, smart, strong, a mother— everything,” he says.) As a whole, the collection fuses old and new, an appreciation of the past with a nod to the present. Other key looks include sleek sheaths, ladylike silk blouses and trim pantsuits that Mahshie dubs “the day­to­night tuxedo,” all of it chic and well tailored. “A clean line,” says Mahshie, “is inherently powerful.” And even though this is classic American sports­ wear, don’t expect Anne Klein’s reach to stay within our borders. Mahshie puts the brand’s future reach at a global level. And why not?

Already, celebrities like The Good Wife star Julianna Margulies are turning up on the red carpet wearing original pieces mixed with new items from the collection. Anyone else hear the roar of a certain lion getting louder?

“A cleAn line is inherently powerful.” –Jeff MAhshie

Anne Klein wasn’t the only sartorially inclined Leo. The fashion constellation includes Coco Chanel, Tim Gunn, Iman, Betsey Johnson and Yves Saint Laurent.


IMPERIALE COLLECTION

Ne w York - P a lm B e a c h - B a l H a r b o ur S ho p s Sou t h Coa s t P la z a - W y n n L a s Ve g as - Ol d S an J uan 1 .8 0 0 .CHOPA R D - w w w.c h o p a rd .c o m


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Rose Gold Parisian designer Susie Otero

High-end writing instruments may be Montblanc’s bread and butter, but now the storied brand is aiming to incorporate softer baubles into its main stock. It’s brought on Susie Otero, previously of Cartier, to help invigorate their women’s jewelry with a line that celebrates the elegance and simplicity of Princess Grace of Monaco and the rose, not to mention a sense of style that Grace Kelly, the actress, would surely appreciate.

breathes new life into Montblanc’s jewelry collection with designs inspired by Princess Grace and her favorite flower

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ShoP SchiAP

Though the iconic designer Elsa Schiaparelli is physically gone from the world, her eponymous label is currently making a comeback. Her Paris salon, which shut its doors in 1954, has officially been reopened with former L’Oreal fragrance brand manager Camilla Schiavone helming the business end as CEO. Schiap, as many fans and peers often referred to her, is back in business for the contemporary crowd with a collection of accessories set to launch in February 2013. The brand renovation will also include a few ready-to-wear pieces as well as fragrance and cosmetics, all overseen by the company’s current owner, Diego Della Valle.

Put A lid on it Fall’s buttoned-up looks get topped off

Burberry Prorsum

Giorgio Armani

The late fashion editor Anna Piaggi, an eccentric, claimed that she had not gone out in public without a hat since the ’80s.

COuRTESy OF MOnTbLAnC; SCHIAPARELLI: TIME & LIFE PICTuRES/GETTy IMAGES; HATS: IMAxTREE.COM.

Roberto Cavalli

Christian Dior

Donna Karan

with sharp fedoras and old-school caps for an updated take on classic millinery

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Princesse Grace de Monaco Pétales de Rose necklace, $62,900; 4810 Line Extension Collection ring, $3,260, Montblanc, 212-223-8888.

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FORD. TOM FORD The designer tailors

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scene-stealing suits for James Bond in November’s Skyfall. With handsome lines and a lot of sex appeal, it’s a stylish match made in 007 heaven

BraD BriDgErs

O’Connor suit, $3,660; classic shirt, $590; silk tie, $245, Tom ford, 212-359-0300.

Even without Tom Ford’s help, current James Bond Daniel Craig does a fine job dressing himself; the actor was named the best-dressed man in the U.K. in 2008, although this year the same list dropped him to number 37.


190 YEARS AGO

A MAN BET ON HORSES AND CHANGED WATCHMAKING FOREVER .

In 1821, Nicolas Rieussec changed watchmaking forever with the invention of the first chronograph. Today, the Montblanc TimeWalker Chronograph Automatic is a tribute to 190 years of the chronograph’s technical evolution. 43 mm stainless steel case, skelleted horns and sapphire crystal back, black calfskin strap with white stitching. Crafted in the Montblanc Manufacture in Le Locle, Switzerland.

visit and shop montbl anc . com


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TIME TRAVELERS If you’re a man of the world, you know it’s important to keep track of your time zones. These watches will help you look sophisticated as you get up to jet speed PHOTOGRAPHED by jEffREy wESTbROOk EDITED by SyDnEy wASSERMAn

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World-time watches—the timepieces that display the hour in more than one time zone—are the best way to subtly signify that you’re a man who is going places. Our favorites make the connection between two other important trends: sporty styling and heritage branding. White metal cases and black dials and bezels that lend a touch of ruggedness are easily dressed up for the office with elegant vintage dials and fine leather straps. And did we mention that among the watch cognoscenti, the more complications a watch has, the cooler it looks? —Rhonda Riche

(Clockwise from top left) Stainless steel 43.5 mm Classic GMT World Time watch, $4,200, DAVID YURMAN, davidyurman.com. Stainless steel 42.4 mm Mille Miglia GMT Chrono 2012, $6,610, CHOPARD, 800-246-7273. White gold 39.5 mm World Time Ref. 5130, $47,000, PATEK PHILIPPE, Patek Philippe NYC, 212-218-1240. Stainless steel 46 mm Transocean Chronograph Unitime, $11,200, BREITLING, breitling.com. Three time zone stainless steel 45 mm x 31 mm Master Banker, $24,300, FRANCK MULLER, tourneau.com. Single-gusset crocodile briefcase, $36,000, DIOR HOMME, dior.com. Stainless steel 43 mm Seamaster Aqua Terra GMT, $7,800, OMEGA, omegawatches.com. Antique silver cufflink, $450, BOTTEGA VENETA, bottegaveneta.com.

Franck Muller’s Aeternitas Mega 4 is the most complex timepiece ever made. It can be set to four time zones, has a 999-year calendar and, on the hour, chimes the same notes as the bells of Westminster Abbey. . . . At Baselworld in March, Rolex released the Sky Dweller, the brand’s first watch to have two time zones and an annual calender. It will be available this fall.


Paul Weller and Miles Kane: New York, NY Photographed by Danny Clinch, 2 012

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AGED TO PERFECTION Fashion doyenne Iris Apfel

on a lifetime of splurging at Bergdorf Goodman. ADAM RATHE talks shop

Clockwise from top: Iris Apfel; Bergdorf Goodman’s exterior; a 1969 ad in Vogue; Halston at Bergdorf with actress Anita Colby.

One could say Bergdorf Goodman is literally built on old New York—the store now stands where a Vanderbilt family mansion once did. It moved in 1928, after the property had been developed commercially.

BERGDORF GOODMAN EXTERIOR: COuRTESY OF ThE COLLECTION OF ThE NEW-YORk hISTORICAL SOCIETY; ILLuSTRATION: LARSON/COuRTESY OF CONDÉ NAST.

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t 91 years old, Iris Apfel calls herself “the world’s oldest living teenager.” If that’s the case, then Bergdorf Goodman, the Manhattan department store celebrating its 111th birthday this September, is her clubhouse. “This store has so much personality; it’s not like any other I know of,” Apfel says over lunch at the store’s seventh-floor jewel box of a cafe. “If you have enough money and you can’t find it here, then it just doesn’t exist.” Apfel knows about personality. The native New Yorker is famous for her fashion sense—in 2005, the Metropolitan Museum of Art mounted “Rara Avis: Selections from the Iris Barrel Apfel Collection,” an exhibit devoted to her finery. She is currently developing a perfume as well as being filmed by Grey phOTO BY: EMILY WEISS Gardens auteur Albert Maysles. “Iris is unique in every sense of the word,” says Linda Fargo, Bergdorf’s senior vice president and fashion-forward public face, leaning across the table. “I think Bergdorf is similar. We have a lot of beautiful years under our wig, but we’re also very modern.” Apfel isn’t Bergdorf’s only fan. In celebration of the store’s 111th anniversary, a book titled Scatter My Ashes at Bergdorf Goodman that includes musings from fans like Christian Louboutin and Carol Burnett, and a documentary featuring Apfel, are both being released. Additionally, Gucci, Diptyque, Akris, Oscar de la Renta and others are creating pieces of exclusive merchandise to celebrate the anniversary. The fuss is no surprise to Apfel, who has loved Bergdorf since she was a girl and, despite decades of shopping there, cannot pin down a favorite buy. “Everything I’ve bought has been the thing,” she says, quite seriously. “I came with my mother,” she continues. “If there was something special, this was the place—I thought I was coming to Wonderland.” That charm hasn’t worn off, even if New York is a different place nowadays. “Everything has changed—I think my mother would drop dead again if she walked up Fifth Avenue and saw how people looked,” Apfel says before heading to the second floor to peruse shoes. “The world is full of bereft people dying for fantasy and glamour. That’s not available in the mainstream, it’s only here.” photo by: ormond GiGli


Cocktail Collection

robertocoin.com 800-853-5958


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With clean lines and color blocking, the modernist master has a head-totoe influence on fashion this fall

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PHoToGraPHEd by GrEG VorE EdiTEd by SydnEy waSSErman

(Clockwise from top left)

Onde de Choc boots, $1,595, ROGER VIVIER, Roger Vivier NYC, 212-861-5371. Sterling silver cuff with lapis, $985, JODY CANDRIAN, Capitol Charlotte, 704-366-0388. Suede clutch, $1,980, GIORGIO ARMANI, armani.com.

Giorgio Armani has hotels in Dubai and Milan and now plans to open Paris, New York City and London locations. Not surprising, then, that he’s admitted he’d “have a fresh start as an architect” if he could begin his career over. . . . Alexander Calder’s “Lilly of Force” sculpture (1945) sold for $18.6 million at Christie’s in May 2012—nearly triple the artist’s previous record sale of $6.3 million.


(Clockwise from top left)

“In all art, It Is the artIst’s task to make

forms and colors

Disk necklace in black crocodile and gold, $290, REED KRAKOFF, reedkrakoff.com. Bicolored suede ostrich boots, $2,195, NARcisO RODRiguEz, Barneys New York, 212-8268900. Pivoine and cameo rose suede ankle boots with bow detail, $1,195, cHRisTiAN LOuBOuTiN, christianlouboutin.com. Large blue zip pouch, $650, small blue zip pouch, $495, both VicTORiA BEcKHAM, similar styles available at net-a-porter.com. Lacquered wood Dune bracelet, $260, HERMÈs, usa.hermes.com.

lIvIng and capable of arousIng emotIon.” –pIet mondrIan

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Until October 14, the Morgan Library and Museum in New York City plays host to “Josef Albers in America: Painting on Paper,” an exhibit exploring color relationships within a similar format of concentric squares.


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Behind the high-end, hard-to-get luxury goods of Exemplaire. JONATHAN DURBIN

gets cozy with the brand’s founders

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Jean-Victor Meyers (left) and Louis Leboiteux

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ike many style-conscious men their age, Jean-Victor Meyers and Louis Leboiteux aren’t interested in flashy sartorial declarations of personal wealth, even if the two, both 26, have plenty of cash to spare. instead, the president and ceO, respectively, of upstart French knitwear brand exemplaire specialize in discreet indulgences: understated sweaters in dark, neutral colors made of ultra-luxe materials sourced from the kinds of places where the guides are called sherpas and the closest boutique is half a universe away. cut into slim, louche fits, exemplaire’s debut collection features cashmere and chinchilla worked into pieces like a shawl-collar cardigan ($1,900) and a biker-style blouson jacket with lambskin patches ($3,200). “We target quite a small range of customers,” Meyers says. “Young, demanding people with a high purchasing power.” Meyers could, of course, be describing himself—and, indeed, he admits that exemplaire’s sensibilities reflect his own. He is the grandson of Liliane Bettencourt, heir to the L’Oréal cosmetics fortune and one of the richest women in the world. He was named to the board of that company earlier this year following her departure. Meyers met Leboiteux through

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mutual friends at a dinner party years ago, but the two decided to collaborate only last year. “i was always making alterations on the clothes i bought,” Meyers recalls. “One day Louis suggested that it would be easier for me to create my own line.” Obsessive about details, he points out the collection’s subtle nods to branding—for instance, an inconspicuous “X” logo is sewn into some sweaters. “Our generation’s idea of luxury is much more quality-oriented,” he says, discussing the collection’s finer points. “customers are increasingly sensitive to the manufacturing process, the traditional techniques and the knowhow that is involved. rightfully so, as high prices are not always synonymous with quality.” Besides himself and his business partner, party-page favorites like ryan gosling, Zac efron and Jay-Z are among those he envisions wearing the line. But if the celebrities want the clothes, they’ll have to act quickly. exemplaire is only producing 50 editions of each garment, and the collection is exclusively available at four retailers worldwide: the Barneys New York flagships in NYc and L.A., Montaigne Market in Paris and dover Street Market in London. Hova, you’re on notice.

(From left) Four-ply cable-knit turtleneck sweater, $1,990; three-ply cashmere cardigan with leather details and horn buttons, $1,500; three-ply cashmere halfcardigan rib sweater with shawl collar, $1,990, exemplaire, barneys.com.

the world’s most expensive cashmere suit is designed by Stuart Hughes and richard Jewels. it costs $932,643 with piping made of 480 diamonds.

ALL PHOtOS cOurteSY OF eXeMPLAire.

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NORDSTROM

OR fOR aN auThORizeD DealeR NeaR yOu call

800.872.0172

cha RR iOluSa. c O M | faceBOOK. c O M /chaRRiO lu Sa

Advertising copyright © 2012 A’LOR International LTD. CHARRIOL® is a registered trademark of the Philippe Charriol Group.


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BOOT fOrce Never mind hiking or combat, these

boots are made for working

Leather lace-up boots, $1,740, JOHN LOBB, johnlobb.com.

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Self-winding Royal Oak watch with 18-karat rose gold case on handstitched crocodile strap, $33,800, AUDEMARS PIGUET, 888-214-6858.

After all these years, Audemars Piguet’s Royal Oak is still the king of casual

T

his year marks the 40th anniversary of Audemars Piguet’s Royal Oak, the iconic timepiece born when AP commissioned the late Gérald Genta to create a sports watch that would look as great on the deck of a yacht as it would on the disco floor. Legend has it that Genta came up with the screwed-down, hexagonal-bezel design overnight, while inspired by a vision of a diving helmet Fast-forward four decades, and the Royal Oak is again the status watch for sporty men. It’s a resurgence led by another legend, Miami Heat star LeBron James. The basketball player, as smartly appointed an athlete as they come, has a horological influence that can be seen on the wrists of sportsmen including Tom Brady, Sean Avery and Michael Schumacher. James was introduced to the Royal Oak by his friend Jay-Z and bought his first AP back in 2008. Modestly, James doesn’t take credit for leading the AP charge. “I was at the right place at the right time,” he says. In 2012, AP is also celebrating the 20th anniversary of the Royal Oak Offshore, its beloved oversize timepiece. The watch, which renders other jewelry unnecessary, is James’ preferred wrist accessory. “I like simple things,” he says, “with a great distinctive look.” No matter if your style is in step with a 6-foot-8 basketball star’s, these classic watches are a slam dunk on any guy. —RHONDA RICHE

UNSAFE SOCKS Get a leg up with fall’s brightest new trend Bare ankles were acceptable for summer, but after Labor Day it’s time to cover up. Still, think twice before you slip on those old argyle numbers; to impress critical eyes lingering south of your calves nowadays, it’s necessary to sport something a lot more daring. “Right now, socks are a hot commodity,” says Eric Jennings, vice president and fashion director for menswear at Saks Fifth Avenue. “Colorful, bold socks are selling extremely well.” Those are the same socks that made, ahem, toes curl when designers like Thom Browne and Dries Van Noten showed them for fall. Jennings counts brands like Paul Smith and Marcoliani Milano, which feature eye-catching designs, among his favorites. Before worry sets in that these rainbow-hued

dazzlers will be hidden beneath your slacks, take heart. “Trousers are being worn shorter,” Jennings says. “And it’s an easy way for a man to express himself without stepping too far out on the fashion spectrum.” And without the horror of breaking sartorial statutes—like how socks should match pants—which Jennings says you can abandon with reckless glee. The idea is to throw convention out the window in only the way that paying $30 for a pair of socks can allow. “It’s just a little detail but makes you feel like you’ve put some care into your appearance,” Jennings says. And it’s one that has staying power. “Socks have been trending for a while,” he says. “I can definitely see this continuing for several seasons.”

The dark truth about socks is that, at some point, it’s likely one piece of a pair will go missing—lost in the laundry, tossed behind a bureau, who knows. That’s why on May 9, we celebrate National Lost Sock Memorial Day, an actual holiday honoring those socks no longer with us.

CLOCkwISE FROM TOP LEFT: COuRTESy OF AuDEMARS PIGuET; COuRTESy OF JOHN LOBB; ADAM kATZ SINDING.

OffshOre AccOunTs

Front: Cotton and spandex striped socks, $28, BRESCIANI, Bergdorf Goodman, 888-774-2424. Cowes classic monk double-strap shoes, $618, CHURCH’S, 212-758-5200. Rear: Tiago cotton socks, $28, FALKE, falke.com. Leather lace-up shoes, $1,560, TOM FORD, 212-359-0300.


He saw. She saw.

It’s all on the table. SEASON PREMIERE

SEPT 30 SUNDAYS 9PM Followed by the season premiere of

To order: 1-800-SHOWTIME

ET PT


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LONDON CALLING BACK

After the Olympics, we’re still not tired of London, so we’re soaking up all the stateside Britannia we can, from suits to cars to, of course, fish and chips

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Pet ShoP BoyS’ elySium Dance floor mainstays since the Eighties, this London-based duo is releasing its 11th studio album, Elysium, in September. And considering the charm of the album’s lead single, “Winner,” the Pet Shop Boys haven’t lost a bit of their emotive, electronic touch.

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BurBerry umBrella Rain doesn’t fall only in London, but the British have perfected a stylish way to keep from getting drenched: Burberry umbrellas. Especially fetching is this mustard-andburgundy-striped one—complete with an owl handle crafted of resin—available at the soon-to-open Chicago flagship store. $850, burberry.com.

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the ludlow Three-BuTTOn SuiT in engliSh ThOrnprOOf WOOl Crafted from wool woven at the 175-year-old Abraham Moon mill near Leeds, this suit lives up to its name, thanks to cloth that makes it impenetrable to dastardly English thorns— or whatever brambles you might encounter near the closest J.Crew. Jacket, $450; pants, $228, jcrew.com.

the aSton martin One-77 CyCle Released in an edition of 77, just like the roadster that inspired it, trimmed in handstitched leather and finished in any number of exclusive Aston Martin colors, this bike, designed and built in the U.K., is as chic and technologically advanced—seriously, it has an onboard computer and USB port—as any car. $39,000, factorbikes.com/astonmartin.

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the mildred This Philadelphia restaurant, opening in September, is masterminded by chefs Michael Santoro, who did time at the U.K.’s renowned Fat Duck, and Michael Dorris, a Waterside Inn veteran. Forget plain old fish and chips, though; here the Americanized dish gets upgraded to tempura cod cheeks with beetroot chips and mushroom ketchup. And it probably doesn’t come wrapped in newspaper.

Comic genius Jennifer Saunders (of Absolutely Fabulous) has penned her debut musical, Viva Forever!, about a young woman grappling with the pressure of sudden fame. Oh, and it’s set to the music of the Spice Girls. The production hits London this fall.

SUIT: BRAD BRIDGERS; PET ShOP BOyS: JAnETTE BECKMAn/GETTy IMAGES; InBETWEEnERS: COURTESy OF MTV; UMBRELLA: COURTESy OF BURBERRy; BIKE: JAROWAn POWER; FISh AnD ChIPS: MIKE MCGORAn/GETTy IMAGES; VIVA FOREVER: COURTESy OF JUDy CRAyMER.

the inBetweenerS The hit British TV series, about a set of clueless high school boys—think Skins without the fast living—gets two American adaptations this year: a series reboot, care of MTV, and a feature film currently in development.


©2012 Showtime Networks Inc. All rights reserved. SHOWTIME is a registered trademark of Showtime Networks Inc.

CLAIRE DANES DAMIAN LEWIS AND

M A N D Y P AT I N K I N

IT HITS HOME

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FOLLOWING DEXTER


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SHOP OF WONDERS

Newel, a New York City antiques emporium with a storied past, turns toward the future with a stunning new showroom. Here, four interior designers curate the displays

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PHOtOgRaPHED by SEbaStiaN PiNzON PRODucED by LiSa cOHEN

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ew York City’s Newel may not be a recognizable name to people outside the design industry, but anyone who has watched TV or gone to the movies in the past 70 years has seen some of its 10,000-plus pieces of decorative furnishings—Ghostbusters, The Godfather: Part III, A Beautiful Mind, Boardwalk Empire, Law & Order, Scent of a Woman, Saturday Night Live and 30 Rock are a handful of its credits. Long considered a go-to for prop stylists and decorators, Newel has been invigorated by a merger with Manhattan gallerist Guy Regal, and it’s finally displaying its holdings in a manner befitting its inventory. Today Newel has a collection that spans more than five centuries, but when it was started in 1939 by Russian immigrant Meyer Newman, his main objective was to buy props that he could rent to Broadway shows. Over the decades, it expanded its stock and welcomed TV, movie, magazine and commercial stylists. The gallery also began working with

retail clients—decorators like Billy Baldwin, Mario Buatta and Bunny Williams, and boldface design aficionados such as Katharine Hepburn, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Babe Paley and Barbra Streisand. Newel now houses its vast holdings in a stately six-story, 45,000-square-foot building in Midtown Manhattan. Browsing through the floors is like previewing every estate sale ever hosted by a major auction house— in one visit. Each item is tagged with a basic description and price, ranging from $500 to $500,000. “One reason we’ve remained strong over the years is that our inventory covers virtually every style, every period,” says managing director Jake Baer, the fourth-generation Newman to work there. His father, Lewis, is the current president. After formalizing a partnership with Newel in early 2011, Regal made it his goal to transform the first floor into a proper showroom for buyers. “For so long, the focus was

on the prop-rental side of the business, and the sales side was virtually untapped,” he explains. Designed by Jim Aman and John Meeks of Match Studios, the renovated space soars 13 feet high, with a coffered ceiling and Venetian plastered walls. It’s elegant and impressive, much like the wares on display—recent items included a pair of giant 19th-century gilt roundel mirrors, an abstract canvas by postwar Italian artist Giuseppe Gallo and an 8-foot-tall art deco chandelier. “Newel is like the Crayola box with the 64 colors you had when you were young,” says Regal, like a giddy kid. “Sure, you can color with eight crayons like some other galleries and dealers, but here you don’t have to.” Designers and decorators have responded with equal excitement, and now a rotating roster of them dress the store’s windows. These recent displays prove that, as Regal says, “any designer can source from Newel in their own way.”—carolyn KElly

Screen siren Rita Hayworth, a frequent Newel customer, once scratched her leg on a table in the store. Since her legs were reportedly insured by Lloyd’s of London for $1 million, the owners thought their business was ruined. To their relief, Hayworth just laughed off the scrape.


DESIGNER

MATCH STUDIOS

(JIM AMAN AND JOHN MEEKS) With backgrounds in merchandising and display for Bonwit Teller and Ralph Lauren, this design duo was perfectly at home creating a window for Newel, where they challenged themselves to utilize pieces from every floor of the gallery. Aman and Meeks embraced a disparity of styles but aimed for pairings of furnishings with similar materials. A treeformed Black Forest umbrella stand is joined by an 18th-century Chinese root wood chair, while an art deco 20th-century stone and shagreen box is arranged on an exquisite marble-topped Adams-style console. Match Studios has earned a reputation for its lighthearted, tongue-in-cheek sensibility, which was demonstrated by the blending of a statement piece like Donald Baechler’s “Skull” (borrowed from their own collection) with a wall subtly painted in tonal stripes of white and pale green (Benjamin Moore 2139– 60). And no matter what space they’re designing, the team always includes some glamorous elements. In their window, the wow factor is supplied by a pair of postwar American brass lamps (inset) with natural agate specimens by Willy Daro, exactly the kind of unique object that can be found only at Newel. “They’re the jewelry of the room,” Meeks says.

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DESIGNER

INSeT pHoToS CouRTeSy oF NeWeL gALLeRy.

Hampton, the president and principal designer at the firm established by her legendary father, Mark Hampton, chose to set her scene in a diminutive study or salon. She confesses that without the restriction of a client, she took a self-indulgent approach to decorating her window, starting with fiery orange paint (Benjamin Moore 2010–30) on the walls to offset the formality of the furnishings she chose. A Russian neoclassical secretary dating from the 18th or 19th century was her most-coveted piece (inset). “I’d take it home in a heartbeat,” she says, admiring its masculine lines and rich mahogany veneer. To accompany it, Hampton selected an array of other objects—a glazed Tang dynasty horse, a Victorian tortoiseshell box and a carved agate plate clustered next to a pair of mid-century Italian copper and brass vases on an Austrian neoclassical table—all sharing a warm palette of honey brown and caramel with gold accents. The table and chairs were placed off-center to balance the secretary, and she flanked a large central painting with one medium-size artwork on the left and two smaller canvases on the right.

In the 1950s and ’60s, the sign “Closed Taking Inventory” always hung in the storefront at Newel. Because the owners were so busy with their rental business, they used it to deter retail customers.

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TODD ALEXANDER ROMANO

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THOMAS PHEASANT The Washington, D.C., designer strove to create a setting that felt open and spacious despite the window’s small size. Starting with bare whitestained floors and white walls (Benjamin Moore OC-17), Pheasant limited his color palette to a brilliant cobalt blue and rich black, accented by gold. Designing for a hypothetical modern-minded young collector, he built his room around “Thoughts (Butterflies) Panel II,” a painting by contemporary British artist Barnaby Hosking (inset). “The color saturation and simplicity” first attracted him to the piece, he says, explaining, “It gives the eye a place to rest, and with its large color field, it adds depth to this tiny space. And the wings create small shadows I find just beautiful.” Pheasant produced overt juxtapositions by mixing some of his favorite traditional forms (English Regency-style bookcases and chairs) with uber-modern items, including a postwar Italian glass-and-brass console table and 24-karat gold bowls by British artist Claire Malet. He wants clients to look at every one of their furnishings as a work of art. “I like to choose pieces that are confident,” he says. Whether it’s a bookcase or a small bowl or a chandelier, “each piece has to be able to fulfill the space on its own.”

Today, rentals account for one-third of the store’s business; retail sales make up the rest. Both the White House and gracie Mansion have purchased items from Newel.

INSET PHOTOS COuRTESY OF NEWEL gALLERY.

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Characterized by his signature mixing and matching of colors—the dramatic, customblended, high-gloss blue-black paint (Fine Paints of Europe’s 1798 and 0029) contrasting with the multihued fabric on a Louis XVI–style bergère chair is an ideal example—Romano’s window makes a powerful first impression on passersby. Imagining his client to be a sophisticated world traveler, he centered his dramatic tableau on an elegant late 18th-century Russian rolltop desk (inset) whose high-polished mahogany finish is highlighted by brass handles and inlaid brass stripes. The desk’s clean lines were used to anchor the bottom half of the wall; on top, Romano hung an impressive abstract canvas by New York City contemporary artist Nicole Cohen. “I’m always in favor of creating strong vertical lines—it takes the eye up,” he says. “And, let’s face it, we all love long and lean.” The designer finished his vivid, luxurious space with some of Newel’s most evocative and gorgeous objets d’art: a pair of turquoise Chinese porcelain vases, a biomorphic resin and gold-leaf sculpture and an Italian rockcrystal obelisk embellished with gilt metal and semiprecious stones.


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MAKE IT MONOCHROMATIC Combining pillows of varying textures within

Paya cashmere, $275, ABC Home, abchome.com, 212-473-3000.

the same color palette, like lamb fur or suede, fluffs the luxury feel of any room

Leblon scale silk, $195, ABC Home, abchome.com, 212-473-3000.

Linen with pearl button, $125, ABC Home, abchome.com, 212-473-3000.

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Mongolian lamb fur, $795, Barneys NewYork, barneys.com.

Linen with mirrors, $375, ABC Home, abchome.com, 212-473-3000.

Cowhide with suede backing, $165, Barneys New York, barneys.com.

BRAD BRIDGERS

Oversize “natural pebbles” velvet, $200, ABC Home, abchome.com, 212-473-3000.

Every year on April 7, the Urban Playground Movement calls people in cities all over the world to participate in International Pillow Fight Day. Their philosophy: Why sit at home watching TV when you can bring the fluffy battle to the streets?


OUR BOUTIQUES

OUR BOUTIQUES AT SEPHORA NEW YORK . LAS VEGAS COSTA MESA . MONTREAL


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CLoCKWISE FRoM ToP LEFT: CoURTESy oF TAKUyA MATSUDA; PAoLo FERRARINI/PAoLoFERRARINI.IT; CoURTESy oF PAoLo ULIAN; MIRo ZAGNoLI; CoURTESy oF FoRMAFANTASMA; CoURTESy oF MATTER.

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arble is coming out of the stone age. Thanks to today’s forwardthinking designers, the material used to build the ancient world is getting an ultra-modern overhaul. Paolo Ulian’s Numerica bookcase (upper right) is cleverly composed of Roman numeral–shaped modules. The High Noon mirrors (above), the result of a partnership between Japanese designer Takuya Matsuda and Italian craftsmen Sartori Marmi and Vanzo Ferro Battuto, let users playfully adjust the elemental forms of circle and cone to their liking. The Topkapi table (middle right) from Marsotto Edizioni puts its circle atop a sharp tripod base, firmly anchoring the piece in the 21st century. When it comes to mining the past, Toronto design studio Castor takes a literal approach. The marble base of its desk lamp (middle left) is from an old Bank of Montreal building; the shade is from a defunct lighting factory. And Formafantasma turns more luxurious discards— leather remnants from the production process at Fendi—to create the supple surface of its Roman-style campaign table (bottom right), making a piece that’s truly fit for an emperor. — Carolyn Kelly

(Clockwise from top left) High Noon mirrors of marble and steel, designed by Takuya Matsuda, crafted by Sartori Marmi and Vanzo Ferro Battuto. Numerica bookcase of Carrara marble by Paolo Ulian for Le Fablier. Topkapi table of Carrara marble by Konstantin Grcic for Marsotto Edizioni. Craftica worktable by Formafantasma for Fendi’s Design Performance program. Catherine lamp by Castor.

Looking for marble that won’t chip your teeth? Martha Stewart’s Marble Cake recipe calls for 1 stick of unsalted butter, 1¾ cups of cake flour, 2 tsp. of baking powder, ½ tsp. of salt, 1 cup of sugar, 3 large eggs, 1 tsp. of pure vanilla extract, ⅔ cup of buttermilk and ¼ cup plus 1 tbsp. of Dutch-process cocoa powder.


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CALL YOUR TRAVEL PROFESSIONAL OR 1.800.877.3643 • 809.523.8698 • WWW.CASADECAMPO.COM.DO


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My FIRST bIG ART PURCHASE WHO: FRAnCISCo CoSTA

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Costa, women’s creative director at Calvin Klein Collection

remember the first time I saw Guillermo Kuitca’s collage work—I was immediately curious to learn more. It felt very minimal and textural, with a lot of soul. I was able to meet him through Angela Westwater, his dealer at Sperone Westwater gallery, and got to know him through time spent together at some of her openings and parties. Kuitca and I both come from South America—he from Argentina, I from Brazil—so there was a connection right away. It was a truly exciting moment for me to acquire this piece [“Metropolitan Opera,” 2004] in March of 2007. I saw five pieces at once from this series where Kuitca maps out a seating plan [of NYC’s Metropolitan Opera House] and then he distorts it so that everything becomes

fragmented. Subtle areas of paint lend a tremendous depth. And it’s unique. The piece has a prominent place in the living room of my Manhattan apartment. It floats within a thin black frame and hangs opposite two sofas, sharing wall space with a Bruce Nauman lithograph [“Untitled (Gray),” 1971], a Robert Mapplethorpe photograph and a series of drawings by Jeff Koons. I bought another piece of Kuitca’s, a print of a red and black theater [“Alice Tully Hall,” 2009], three years ago. Both of his works are special to me. His interpretation of those theaters is very telling of who Guillermo is, and I like the fact that his subject matter keeps repeating in different forms. To me, that’s the sign of a very good artist. —As told to Natasha Wolff

Jimmy Choo is collaborating with contemporary artist Rob Pruitt on a 2013 cruise collection that will pay homage to his bold, colorful style and pop culture references. The shoe label has also worked with other impressive names in the art world, like Nan Goldin, Marilyn Minter and Richard Phillips.

PAINTING: COURTeSY Of SPeRONe WeSTWATeR, NeW YORK CITY. PORTRAIT: dANNY ClINCH.

Guillermo Kuitca’s “Metropolitan Opera,” 2004, mixed media on paper


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TABLE ONE AT

LE CIRQUE

i can’t help but vividly recall my first meal at Le Cirque (but then, who doesn’t? The experience is unforgettable). My friend, a prominent, low-key philanthropist, invited me to lunch at its present incarnation at 1 Beacon Court in the Bloomberg Tower in New york City. At the time, i was the arts and entertainment editor at George magazine and was more accustomed to grabbing a sandwich at my desk or at a humble coffee shop on occasion with my boss, John Kennedy Jr. Le Cirque could be a caloric sensation, but my buddy had instructed his nutritionist to oversee his meal so that it was tailored to his dietary regimen. An exceptional request? perhaps. But then, sirio Maccioni, the inimitable impresario of Le Cirque, is an exception to the rule—even within the highest layers of the culinary firmament. When the proud Tuscan opened, in March 1974, Le Cirque’s first location within the Mayfair house at 58 e. 65th street, tout le monde flocked to what would become the epicenter of high-society dining in Manhattan for years. Of course, the food was divine: Along with the unparalleled nose of his young executive chef, the great Daniel Boulud, sirio introduced a lightness of being to the predictable french cuisine afforded at such traditional eateries as La Grenouille, La Côte Basque, La Caravelle and, previously, Le pavillon and the Colony, the latter being where sirio had been, for many years, the all-knowing maître d’ at the bar. (Legend has it that Bianca Jagger, in the midst of a rather boisterous row with husband Mick, further infused the rocker by claiming that sirio was her lover—an erroneous assertion that a chagrined sirio quickly corrected.) Word of mouth, so to speak, spread like a zephyr among café society, attracting regulars to Le Cirque ranging from spanish King Juan Carlos i to princess Grace of Monaco—as well as potentates like henry Kissinger, Nancy and ronald reagan and pope John paul ii. sirio was unintrusive and elegantly reserved with his super-chic clientele, greeting who John fairchild, the legendary editor of Women’s Wear Daily, termed the Ladies Who Lunch with a baisemain and welcoming their powerful husbands with a genteel

handshake (despite the protestations of Malcolm forbes Lynn Wyatt, Casey ribicoff and Betsy Bloomingdale sat for sirio to call him “Malcolm,” sirio would forever de- next to Jacqueline Onassis and sirio’s society seer John Loring. “These women had money, taste and manners,” fer and utter, “Mr. forbes”). After escorting society swans, business titans or the says fairchild. “They knew how to fold a napkin. Their inevitable celebrity to coveted tables one, two (the catch taste wasn’t plooky. sirio’s attitude was ‘i want to please,’ of the day with its corner layout) or three (which sirio and he did it very well. he wasn’t a stupid snob.” A master (and ultradiscreet) juggler (he knew more always kept aside in his breast pocket for an unexpected luminary), the performance would begin. Le Cirque uptown secrets than a hairstylist), sirio squeezed them was sirio’s stage: his talented chefs were the performers, together so artfully that “it was a like a ballet,” says Boulud, who recalls that wayward husbut sirio was the playwright. On any bands would order the finest champagne given weekly afternoon, one might for their mistresses and the cheapest glimpse the premier hollywood agent Burgundy for their wives. “Tables were irving “swifty” Lazar plying his cliflying in the air,” Boulud says. ents with double martinis while broin the asphalt jungle of New york City, kering a deal; sean Connery marvelloyalty is rare. After A Table at Le Cirque ing at the wild scottish grouse; and coauthor pamela fiori parted ways with Woody Allen with Diane Keaton or Town & Country as its editor, sirio rang her Mia farrow, who only nibbled on at home. “‘pamela, nothing has changed,’” vegan crudités. frank sinatra insisted fiori remembers sirio saying. “‘Come to that sirio’s wife personally whip up lunch.’ it was the sweetest thing anybody minute pizzas from her kitchen home Table at Le Cirque: Stories and Recipes has ever said to me.” for him, and frank zappa demurred A From New York’s Most Legendary The once young pup, now 80, may be to sirio’s insistence that he don a tie Restaurant (Rizzoli), by Sirio Maccioni over his white tee (sirio later routinely and Pamela Fiori, is due out in October. hobbled by a bum knee, but he still sits, six shipped zappa’s favorite dish, lobster salad, and the res- days a week, next to the coat check at Le Cirque’s tiger taurant’s signature crème brûlée to him while the musi- ebony–paneled present locale. his three boys oversee his global empire, including the new sirio ristorante, opencian was dying of cancer). Then there were the ladies: prim, pretty and perfectly ing this month in the pierre hotel, where the impresario pulled together with their back-combed hair (thanks to hopes to recapture the cozy neighborhood feel of the first a pricey blowout at Kenneth just before lunching) and Le Cirque as well as court a new generation of ladies. couture suits by fellow Le Cirque patrons Bill Blass and Naysayers would be foolish to underestimate him. “sirio Oscar de la renta and bedecked in David Webb. soigné could always make everything happen,” fairchild says. figures such as Babe paley, C.z. Guest, Nan Kempner, “he is just a gracious gentleman.”

One of Le Cirque’s signature dishes, spaghetti primavera, kicked up quite a fuss when it made its 1977 debut because it lacked a tomato base, relying instead on a medley of vegetables cooked in cream and butter. That was, for a primavera, unheard of. The dish was served only on request and is still off-menu today.

ALL phOTOs: COurTesy Of rizzOLi

So what was it truly like at the high-society hot spot? JEFFREY PODOLKSY dishes


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WEs Gordon and oLIvIa ChantECaILLE CaFFè storICo, nEW York Over lunch with , WHO:

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MISTY WHITE SLIDELL

the fashion designer and the cosmetics executive discuss their love of elegance.

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PhotoGraPhEd bY MIMI rItzEn CraWFord

Founded in 1804—66 years before the Metropolitan Museum of Art—the New-York Historical Society has the distinction of being the oldest museum in the city.


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n some ways, they’re a bit of an odd couple: She’s a cool, almost painfully chic lifelong Manhattan resident and he’s a stylishly shaggy Georgia native a dozen years her junior. But ever since Olivia Chantecaille met Wes Gordon at the Chicago History Museum—at the opening of an exhibit of gowns by British-born, Paris-based 19th-century couturier Charles Frederick Worth—they’ve been fast friends. “I think we were the only two New Yorkers there,” Chantecaille recalls. “Once we realized that we lived a block away from each other, it all just came together.” Of course, the two have much more in common than a neighborhood. As they explained over lunch at Caffè Storico, a grand new restaurant—owned and operated by Stephen Starr, the hitmaker behind Buddakan and Morimoto—on the ground floor of the recently renovated NewYork Historical Society, both have a real appreciation for the so-called finer things, in general, and for fashion, specifically. “I’m always drawn to things that offer a fresh interpretation of elegance and beauty,” Gordon says, eyeing the dining room’s neonyellow leather banquettes, which stand in stark, stylish contrast to

the pieces of white 18th-century china (from the society’s collection, of course) and new dishes that decorate the walls. Indeed, the young designer’s current line does just that, taking inspiration from both a classic novel (Great Expectations) and the futuristic fashion aesthetic embodied by Rooney Mara (the star of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo). It’s easy to see how, in two-and-a-half short years, the 26-year-old has won many famous fans, including Michelle Obama, Jessica Biel, January Jones and Chantecaille herself. “His attention to detail and commitment to quality are impressive,” she says. Not that she can’t relate: In her own position as the creative director of Chantecaille, the all-natural, luxury skin-care and cosmetic company founded by her mother, Sylvie, in 1997, she has to employ a similar level of judgment and focus. “Both Wes and I have a real appreciation for the ways in which fashion and beauty can impact a woman’s confidence,” she says. Certainly, she appreciates the way that his clothes work on her. “I’m so happy he knows my style well enough to be able to dress me for special occasions,” she says. “It’s every girl’s dream to have a neighbor like Wes.”

From theIr lunch table to yours...

Artichokes And BurrAtA

1 ball burrata (around 8 ounces; if burrata is not available, substitute imported buffalo mozzarella); 3 large globe artichokes, washed; 1 lemon; 3½ cup extra-virgin olive oil; 2 tsp chopped parsley Cut artichokes into quarters. Put 4 artichoke pieces in a small pan and cover with 1½ cup olive oil. Place over medium heat until oil starts to bubble. Turn off heat, remove pan from burner and let it sit over the pilot light for 30 minutes or until artichokes are tender. Meanwhile, cut burrata in quarters, set on plates and allow it to reach room temperature. Put the remaining 2 cups olive oil in another small pan and bring it to 350˚ over medium heat. When oil is heated, add 4 uncooked artichoke quarters and deep-fry until golden brown. Set aside. Slice the remaining raw artichoke pieces thinly with a mandoline or sharp knife. Dress with lemon juice, olive oil and parsley. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Arrange the different artichoke preparations around the burrata. Finish with coarse sea salt, fresh pepper and a drizzle of your best extra-virgin olive oil. Serves 4 as an appetizer. Recipe courtesy of chef Jim Burke.

Wes Gordon’s Favorite New York Spots Neue Galerie “This German and Austrian art museum, formerly the William Starr Miller house, is unquestionably the most elegant space in Manhattan.” neuegalerie.org

il Buco

“When in need of a restaurant that’s intimate rather than grand, I go to this Bond Street icon.” ilbuco.com

The cloiSTerS

“The serenity of the Cloisters and its gardens always provides me with a rare New York calmness.” metmuseum. org/visit/ visit-the-cloisters/

The Mark hoTel

“Jacques Grange is my favorite interior designer, and his work for the Mark is flawless. I desperately want the black-and-white floor in my house.” themarkhotel.com

Olivia wears a WES GORDON silk chiffon long-sleeved peplum blouse, $750, by special order, 212-566-5283, and ormolu print silk faille hand-draped skirt, $1,350, Bergdorf Goodman, 212-753-7300. Jewelry, her own.

Besides attending London’s Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, Wes Gordon honed his skills by working as an apprentice for Oscar de la Renta and Tom Ford.


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gEt out oF your room

Any hotel can offer you a room, but these chic spots up the ante with compelling common space. MiCKEY RAPKin hangs out in style

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(Clockwise from left) Rooftop pool and bar at Downtown Mexico City; the Palacio Nazarenas in Cuzco, Peru; the ski bunny–ready breakfast nook and bar just off the lobby at Basecamp Hotel in South Lake Tahoe.

Luxury couch surFIng comEs to new york

flyover city, the chef laughs: “Machu Picchu is amazing, but of course there is more: the calm mysticism of the Sacred Valley, the landscapes. Being thousands of meters above sea level is a nice way to experience the biodiversity of the Andes.” Taking a breath, he adds: “The nightlife is great, too.” Sometimes a city is best viewed from above— preferably with a drink in hand. Which makes the rooftop pool and rooms at the 17-suite Downtown Mexico City hotel a welcome addition to the resurgent Mexico City cultural scene. (This fall alone, the Tamayo Museum of Contemporary Art reopens after a two-year remodeling effort and Madonna comes to the Foro Sol arena.) The hotel is situated in a Colonial-era palace, and the architecture firm Cherem Serrano was wise to retain ornate details like a stone-forge staircase to the gray volcanic rock walls. You don’t want to know what it takes to install a pool on the roof of a 17th century building, but standing there with your feet wet, staring out at the 16th century La Profesa Church, it’s clearly worth the effort. Sit poolside. Toma una tequila. You’ll sleep (on 600-thread-count sheets) when you’re dead.

Trolling the Internet for short-term rentals—say, a one-bedroom flat in London’s Notting Hill—always felt a bit down-market, not to mention unreliable. Meeting a stranger at a pub to pick up keys? It was the stuff of Craigslist wishes and street-meat dreams. But U.K.-based Onefinestay challenges those notions by catering to the kind of crowd that appreciates both good design and clean sheets. Plus, a representative from the firm meets guests on arrival and is oncall 24/7 for questions and emergencies. “Typically these are primary residences,” says CEO Greg Marsh about the high-end homes. “There’s a fully-equipped kitchen, because it’s a kitchen people use.” Now, after two years in London, Onefinestay finally comes to New York City. Currently on offer: a four-bedroom West Village townhouse dating back to 1829 with Bosch appliances and a private backyard for $840 a night, or a two-bedroom Tribeca loft with a mid-century modern aesthetic (and enough toys to entertain an army of children) for $450 a night. Sure, a faceless midtown hotel or sterile corporate housing might work for last-minute business travels. But on vacation with the family, wouldn’t you prefer a cushy pied-àterre for the same price?—M.R.

Forget a cramped kennel when it comes to boarding the dog for your trip out of town. Now there’s a B&B-type service called DogVacay, where your pooch is brought to the home of a qualified host, ranging from professional pet sitters to retired veterinarians.

COURTESY OF DESIGN HOTELS; COURTESY OF PALACIO NAZARENAS; COURTESY OF ONEFINESTAY; EVA KOLENKO.

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ately you can’t shake a stick without hitting a boutique hotel promising Egyptian cotton linens, Kiehl’s products and flat-screen televisions. But there’s more to luxury than a well-appointed suite. That is why the proprietors at a string of new properties are turning their attention to common areas. Christian Strobel, a veteran of the Joie de Vivre minichain of luxury hotels, had good times in mind when he opened Basecamp Hotel in South Lake Tahoe, Calif., this summer. The 50-room property underwent a gut renovation, and a once-grim lobby was reborn as the perfect après ski hangout. (The hotel’s previous version catered to the snowboarding crowd with, yikes, an in-room stripper pole and PlayStation consoles.) Now two oversize chesterfields flank a fireplace— an ideal perch to enjoy the Mirror Pond Ale on tap or an artisanal hot chocolate. An 11-foot reclaimed wooden dining table completes the picture. It doesn’t hurt that Basecamp, which features a rooftop hot tub with views of the mountain, is just a few blocks from Lake Tahoe’s Heavenly Gondola; it’s practically ski-in/ski-out. The location was crucial to creating the vibe Strobel wanted. “I lived in the French Alps for a year,” he explains. “There everybody goes to après ski at the bottom of the slopes. In Tahoe, most people get in their car—but it’s not that fresh-from-the-slopes experience. We’re bringing a bit of Europe to Tahoe.” That same let’s-get-this-party-started ethos comes to Cuzco, Peru, this fall, courtesy of local celebrity chef Virgilio Martinez. His new restaurant Senzo is a finca-to-table spot installed in the Palacio Nazarenas, a 16th century convent reborn as a boutique property complete with oxygenated rooms to ward off altitude sickness. Surely the nuns never had it this good. “Most of the ingredients we use in Senzo are difficult to find in Lima,” explains Martinez. “We manage to collect food from the source—as our ancestors used to do.” In other words, come for the view of Machu Picchu, but stay for the confit of tubers, made with eucalyptus oil. As for Cuzco’s outdated reputation as a


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A TrIp To UnchArTEd WATErs ThE ArcTIc cIrcLE WHAT:

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A sun that never sets, desolate ice cliffs, walruses, whales and polar bears—all accompanied by champagne toasts and massages. Today cruise ships are plying the remote waters of the Arctic in comfort and style. NiNA BURLEigH climbs aboard

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polar breeze nips at my nose and Arctic Ocean spray pelts my boots as I stand in the open mudroom of a luxury icebreaker. Deckhands help me and Lulu, my 9-year-old daughter, into a yellow rubber kayak. As they pass me into the rear of the kayak, they hang a small plastic box around my neck. The purpose of this device: to send a signal to the ship just in case we go under the icy waves. This is no paranoid precaution—countless voyagers have been swallowed by the Arctic waters over the years. Well into the first part of the 20th century, many crews that did stay afloat ended up trapped by the winter ice instead, forced to subsist on seal blubber, the sails and bark of their boats or, in extreme cases, their own shipmates until the May thaw arrived. My own trip was the, er, polar opposite. For seven hedonistic days and nights in June, Lulu and I were passengers on the plush National Geographic Explorer with 146 other lucky souls who’d paid as much as $15,990 per person to travel through one of the world’s most breathtaking climes. The ship’s route took us through Norway’s Svalbard archipelago, a remote island cluster midway between mainland Norway and the North Pole and more than 600 miles north of the Arctic Circle. Recently this forbidding region has gone from no man’s land to hot tourist destination. Cruise ship activity there has doubled in the last six years, according to Det Norske Veritas, a Norwegian risk-management group, as the melting ice has opened up new possibilities for exploration, resource extraction and transport. Operated through an alliance between Lindblad Expeditions and the National Geographic Society, our cruise represents the very high end of Arctic travel. The Explorer is a former Norwegian coastal ferry that Lindblad converted into a tough-hulled floating resort complete with lounge, restaurant, library, gourmet kitchen, gym, spa treatment rooms and spacious berths. Representing the National Geographic half of the alliance are a bevy of onboard naturalists, photographers and expedition leaders. Lulu and I boarded the Explorer on a chilly gray afternoon, after taking a flight from New York to Oslo

and then to the mining town of Longyearbyen (where the law requires citizens to carry rifles outside town limits to guard against polar bears). Although we’d been told that our phones and laptops would work intermittently, service ended within hours of departure. We stowed away our laptops and iPhones, and cameras and binoculars swiftly became our gadgets of choice. We learned to keep them nearby so we could race up to the deck with them whenever a polar bear sighting was announced over the P.A. Our trip followed a delightful rhythm. Every morning I’d enjoy cappuccino in bed, brought to me by my daughter from the bistro. Then we’d go out on adventures. Polar sea kayaking—something we took to after a few strokes, skimming across the water like Eskimos— was only one of them. We clambered into 12-person black rubber Zodiac rafts, sharing the seas with seals, spouting pods of humpback whales and thousands of circling gulls and terns. Guides ferried us to Atlantic walrus “haul-outs,” spots where the immense, blubbery creatures congregated after hoisting themselves onto land with their tusks. We got close enough to smell their fishy stink and hear their snores. We were also brought to rocky shores where we disembarked to watch as reindeer meandered by and puffins plucked moss to build nests. When we weren’t exploring, we’d loll on comfy chairs on the observation deck, watching surreal, giant blue icebergs float by. Naturalists instructed us on the Arctic flora and fauna, and we learned how to spot the polar bears: Look for their cream-colored fur, which stands out against white ice. We held our breath as the bears—some with cubs—gamboled within a few yards of our cruise ship, gazing at us with curiosity before turning tail and disappearing. In the late afternoon, we’d gather in the lounge to sip champagne at cocktail hour and recap the day’s highlights. Then we’d move to the dining room and feast on delicacies like potage of Jerusalem artichoke and grilled fillet of Patagonian toothfish prepared by the Swedish chef, Fredrik Wallgren. Come bedtime, Lulu and I would close the blackout shades in our cabin against the 24-hour Arctic sun, crawl under puffy down comforters

Before boarding the boat, writer Nina Burleigh and her daughter prepped by reading the 1895 book True Tales of the Frozen North by Captain William Wharton. The captain collected and condensed harrowing and heroic stories of exploration dating back to the 14th century, when the first trips to the Arctic were recorded.


jny.com/TheDress

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Previous page: The National Geographic Explorer near Monoco Glacier in the Svalbard archipelago. This page, clockwise from top left: A close view of pack ice; a group prepares to kayak; passengers startle kittiwakes; a polar bear and cub; the writer on her cruise.

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and fall into a contented sleep. What I loved most about the trip was the constant, crazy juxtaposition of the deadly waters around us with our luxurious onboard existence. Every day, after trekking across the permafrost or bouncing across the Arctic waves, we’d return to our sumptuous quarters and feel an extra warmth and giddiness simply to be alive. In his efforts to show us the most amazing wildlife and scenery, Captain Oliver Kreuss steered our vessel into bays and fjords that had yet to be fully charted (to help other travelers, the ship transmitted any new charting data to the United Kingdom Hydrographic Office and from there, to the rest of the maritime world). A crew-cut German with teddybear eyes, Kreuss has been plying the polar regions, North and South, for nearly three

decades. He assured us that his up-to-theminute electronics and gear made our voyage just about as risky as a Caribbean cruise. “We say that in the past, the ships were made of wood and the men were made of steel. Now,” Kreuss pauses sheepishly, “well, it’s the opposite.” He runs a tight ship with one major exception: The captain has an “open bridge policy,” letting passengers wander in and out of the deck to take in the panoramic views and marvel at the control panels with their gauges, GPS charts and sonar and radar screens. As the youngest person onboard, Lulu found a perch in the captain’s chair, while he stood beside her peering through Leica binoculars. All week long, Lulu and the other kids breathlessly looked forward to one event: the

“polar plunge.” When the time finally came, we went to the mudroom and stripped to our swimsuits, immediately erupting in gooseflesh. Then we walked out onto a plank—and jumped into the frigid waves. It was an exhilarating and humiliating experience, each of us gasping, sputtering and tasting the frozen salt water until the guides pulled us out. Although the plunge was only 10 seconds long, the tingling and grins lasted for hours. A single dip was enough for me, but Lulu and her buddies jumped in twice more before they scampered inside to bake off the chill in the sauna. On our last evening Lulu and I vowed to stay up all night to verify that the sun never set. Two and three a.m. came and went—and twilight didn’t arrive. By four we had to give in. In the still-bright golden light, we could see dozens of walruses in the waters around our ship. And as their massive, strangely humanlike heads bobbed among the waves, we drew the shades and surrendered to our dreams.

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Unlike polar bears in the lower latitudes, who hibernate during the winter and gorge in the summer, their Arctic counterparts use their sunless winters as a time to feast. Since more of the sea is covered by ice, it gives them more territory to hunt. They sit on the ice near seals’ breathing holes, wait and then pounce when one comes up for air.

PREVIOUS PAGE: RALPH LEE HOPKINS. THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: RALPH LEE HOPKINS; MICHAEL S. NOLAN; RALPH LEE HOPKINS (2); ERIC GUTH.

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All fractional aircraft offered by NetJets® in the United States are managed and operated by NetJets Aviation, Inc. Executive Jet® Management, Inc. provides management services for customers with aircraft that are not fractionally owned, and provides charter air transportation services using select aircraft from its managed fleet. Marquis Jet® Partners, Inc. sells the Marquis Jet Card®. Marquis Jet Card flights are operated by NetJets Aviation under its 14 CFR Part 135 Air Carrier Certificate. Each of these companies is a wholly owned subsidiary of NetJets Inc. ©2012 NetJets Inc. All rights reserved. NetJets, Executive Jet, Marquis Jet, and Marquis Jet Card are registered service marks.


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LAP OF LUXURY OLIveR Ronson WHERE:

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t was a breezy Southern California day and I’d been in the joint—by which I mean the pet store at the Beverly Center; fine, it could’ve been worse— for three days too long when I saw them: the Ronson sisters. I had been feeling a little down-andout, so to speak. Have you ever been behind bars? It does nothing for your mental health. I turned away from the housewife who’d been checking me out to give the twins the eyes. I’m not typically rude. I just know what I like and I go for it. Otherwise, I am impeccably behaved. I have never, not once, gotten into a fight. I try to keep it classy in honor of my namesake, Oliver Twist—you know, the Dickens character. Charlotte and Samantha loved Dickens as little girls. He was a very important writer. I’m a writer, too. I post to Facebook all day long; I’ve got 227 friends. That’s 225 more than the typical Chihuahua. And

I’m a model. Charlotte is a fashion designer—you’ve heard of her, yes?—and she cast me in one of her campaigns. Overnight, I became a superstar. I was on billboards all around Tokyo, and you know how the Japanese can get about petite dogs. After that, I couldn’t go anywhere without being recognized. Someone even set up an imposter Twitter feed in my name. Fame can be a total bitch. Being an icon also means I have to look my best at all times. It’s not hard. My number one rule: If it’s raining, it’s not for Oliver. Unlike most dogs, who have fur, Chihuahuas have hair. Ralph Lauren is my favorite designer (don’t tell C). My chunky green Ralph sweater gets me lots of compliments, because green is my best color. People say I look “darling” and “adorable,” but I don’t know what they’re talking about. I think Ralph makes me look supermanly. I bet you would agree, yes?

DOGGY STYLE: Scenes from the sweet life of Oliver Ronson

Designer Charlotte Ronson might be a dog lover, but it’s her kitten-print dresses that fly off the racks.

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NETJETS.COM | 866.JET.0506 A Berkshire Hathaway company.

All fractional aircraft offered by NetJets® in the United States are managed and operated by NetJets Aviation, Inc. Executive Jet® Management, Inc. provides management services for customers with aircraft that are not fractionally owned, and provides charter air transportation services using select aircraft from its managed fleet. Marquis Jet® Partners, Inc. sells the Marquis Jet Card®. Marquis Jet Card flights are operated by NetJets Aviation under its 14 CFR Part 135 Air Carrier Certificate. Each of these companies is a wholly owned subsidiary of NetJets Inc. ©2012 NetJets Inc. All rights reserved. NetJets, Executive Jet, Marquis Jet, and Marquis Jet Card are registered service marks.


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sed to be that if you were an East Coast one-percenter with an addiction, you had to go far afield for fivestar treatment: Promises in Malibu, Hazelden in Minnesota, the Eric Clapton–founded Crossroads Centre in Antigua. No more. The East Hampton, N.Y., drug and rehab center the Dunes—a lush villa built on four acres in a town where booze and discreet drug use are as prevalent as money and fame—is a sort of seaside Canyon Ranch for the sobriety-challenged. And it was designed specifically for the kind of type A addict the East Coast breeds so well: someone just as hooked on his BlackBerry as on his drug of choice. Joe McKinsey, owner and CEO of a computer services company and recovering addict active in helping others since his own 1984 drying out, opened the Dunes two years ago with money he raised from family and friends. At 67, he says he’s battled nearly every addiction there is, from drugs and alcohol to overeating and excessive exercising. He conceived the Dunes after moving to the Hamptons from Los Angeles several years ago and encountering the area’s underserved, so to speak, addict population: executives who couldn’t present a PowerPoint without a line of cocaine, Wall Streeters with three-Percocet lunch habits. He’d had enough, he says, of shipping the people he’d sponsored off to destination rehabs: like the prominent Amagansett lawyer he’d persuaded to seek help at a Malibu retreat, only to return an hour later to find

that the man had locked himself in the house, refusing to come out for a ride to the airport. While there are other affluent-friendly detox facilities on the East Coast—like Connecticut’s Silver Hill Hospital and New Jersey’s Alina Lodge—the Dunes is the first place where the rich can get clean and sober in, almost literally, their own backyard. Nestled in a sylvan setting in a residential area, the Dunes provides amenities like sculptured grounds, a tennis court, Jacuzzis and a swimming pool. The rooms are luxurious, some boasting fireplaces and steam baths. Yoga, music, art, massage, equine therapy and other offerings are designed to eliminate stress and encourage expression, and gourmet meals include truffled local eggs and seared tuna over avocado carpaccio. “The cuisine,” says McKinsey, “is a tangible reward for giving up mood-altering substances.” There are no more than 12 patients at a time—“small enough that you can’t hide”—versus up to 80 at similar facilities; the staff-to-client ratio is three to one. “The individual attention you get here in 30 days is equivalent to what you get elsewhere in 90 to 120,” says McKinsey, though he adds that the recommended stay is 11 months. Not all Dunes residents are there that long; a single month can cost up to $75,000, no insurance accepted. McKinsey did his own recovery at what was then St. John’s Hospital in Santa Monica, Calif. (It’s now called St. John’s Health Center and no longer houses a

recovery facility.) Over the years, he spoke about his experience to patients at upscale centers. To develop the Dunes’ protocol, he worked with Harvard Medical School specialist Howard Shaffer, PhD, who provides individual counseling sessions to clients there, Skyped if necessary. The Dunes is distinctive for its emphasis on creating individual treatment plans, says Shaffer. Unlike in residential recovery programs of years past that typically restricted inpatient communication with the outside world—especially to attend to business matters—time is allotted for work during the day at the Dunes, and clients may leave the premises for appointments if accompanied by a sober companion. This, naturally, has proven attractive to highpowered executives and entrepreneurs who often see getting clean as a professional sacrifice. “If you’re going to have to do it when you get out of here, why not experience it while you’re here?” McKinsey says. “That way, you can learn to process.” Residents have reportedly included Fortune 100 CEOs and top advertising brass, but also entertainers, college students and grandmothers. A key element in the Dunes’ philosophy is creating a familial atmosphere. On one visit, a blonde nurse makes her rounds dressed in bright pink jeans while an elegant septuagenarian sits at a country kitchen table eating a muffin. A striking 30-something in Lululemon saunters through the great room on her way out for

Elizabeth Taylor met her last husband, Larry Fortensky, while in rehab at The Betty Ford Center in 1988. The stint was her second and Fortensky’s eighth.

JACK FLASH/GETTY IMAGES.

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Avocado carpaccio, pricey yoga wear and mindfulness meditation. Nope, it’s not a spa getaway. It’s drying out, East Hampton style. DEbRA Scott reports


INTERIoRS: DoNNELLy MARKS/CouRTESy of THE DuNES; PooL: fRANK RoCCANovA/CouRTESy of THE DuNES.

a run. “I believe rehab should feel like home, not an institution,” says McKinsey, whose wife is in charge of special events. “A lot of the best work gets done when all the clinicians go home and it’s just clients,” he says, though he adds that community integration is key, too. Residents are encouraged to venture out into the world together—to the beach, to 12-step meetings, to bowling. “Anyone can be sober in isolation,” he says. Some might prefer it that way. The Dunes has attracted its fair share of controversy, with complaints centering on those very Hamptons gripes—traffic and whether proper zoning rules were followed. After complaints about excessive cars and noise from meetings held outside, the town of East Hampton began looking into whether the Dunes had received proper permits to operate in a residential area. Retired musician Anthony Liberatore, whose house is two away from the center, launched a watchdog group, Citizens for the Preservation of the Northwoods, which sponsors an online petition at exposethedunes .com and regularly takes out anti-Dunes ads in the East Hampton Star. The 30-strong group, which counts as members neighbors such as Loraine Boyle, widow of actor Peter Boyle, argues that McKinsey misled authorities by claiming the center would operate as a single-family home when instead it is run as a clinical facility—and that on occasion, the serenity prayer and more are heard wafting in the breeze.

McKinsey maintains that he went through all appropriate channels before opening the Dunes and that the trouble is just another example of the ongoing stigma attached to addiction. The Dunes’ parent company, Safe Harbor, says the Dunes is a home, not a facility, and that it is working with the town to resolve issues. “We don’t have any more in and out than a large family,” says McKinsey. Considering the town’s many landscapers, florists, chefs and household staff coming and going daily, he has a point. At press time, the Dunes and the town of East Hampton were in settlement talks. “It would be criminal to shut us down,” McKinsey says. “Last I heard, people are allowed to talk outside.”

Legislation was passed late last year in Southampton that requires owners of hedges along property boundaries to trim them once they have become “unsightly.” Those who fail to do so face a fine of up to $1,000, up to 15 days in jail or both.


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CHIN UP

For the Skype and iPhone set, jawlines are a focus and getting implants is the new power surgery. AlySSA GiAcobbe reports

The ASPS reports that most chinplant patients are in their forties and fifties—with a strong showing from otherwise fit 20-somethings. That’s because while diet and exercise might make a chin thinner, they won’t make it stronger. Aligning the jaw with the upper lip—what Antell likes to call a “little cleaning up of the jawline”—can make a person look younger and more attractive. It’s so subtle that most patients report that friends and coworkers can’t quite figure out what’s different. “A lot of people asked if I’d lost weight or started working out” post-chinplant, says Stephens. She even got a raise. “We’re simply more attracted to people with forceful chins,” says Antell. A few years back, he had his staff collect photos of the country’s top CEOs: commanding jaws, all. “People with strong jawlines look more trustworthy and confident,” he says, pointing to former HewlettPackard chairman and CEO Carly Fiorina, whom he

says has a model chin. “And these days, how you look is important. You carry your résumé on your face. Look at Mitt Romney: What a great chin that guy has!” Of course, there are exceptions, says Antell, like Bill Gates, who has a soft chin. But then again, Bill Gates didn’t really need anyone to hire him. The best part, says Antell, is that the procedure is quick, clean and relatively cheap: Local anesthesia, a minor incision under the jaw or inside the mouth to insert a hard rubber implant and you’re home in a few hours—for anywhere from $3,500 to $7,000. Antell says most patients even go back to work in a few days. “It’s just so easy, yet it changes the profile completely,” says Antell. “You can literally take someone who’s a 6 and make them a 9. Do you know how empowering that is?”

Dr. Darrick Antell says that with his patients, the most requested celebrity chins are Mitt Romney’s and Arnold Schwarzenegger’s for men and Angelina Jolie’s and Heidi Klum’s for women.

“LADY WITH AN ERMINE”: DE AGOSTINI/GETTY IMAGES; IPHONE: 2012 FUTURE PUBLISHING.

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s a Manhattan-based IT consultant for Fortune 500 firms, 39-year-old Lizette Stephens was constantly on video conference calls with CTOs from around the world. So were her chins. “I didn’t think I had a double chin—I never noticed anything when I looked in the mirror—but all of a sudden there they were,” she says. Stephens spent hours practicing different angles on video chat and even more de-tagging her chins as photos popped up on Facebook. “I had to look at myself all day long,” she says. “Soon, my double chin was all I was thinking about.” The advent of virtual offices, and doing business by Skype, has brought saggy chins to the forefront—and has led to a boom in one segment of plastic surgery: chin implants, or “chinplants.” According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS), chin augmentation is the fastest growing plastic-surgery category for both men and women and across all age groups, up 76 percent from 2010 to 2011—that’s more than lipo, Botox and breast implants combined. Manhattan plastic surgeon Darrick Antell, M.D., reports that a few years ago he’d perform maybe one chinplant a week. Now he’s up to three or four a day. “Patients are coming in and telling me they don’t like how they look on Facebook,” he says. “Until things like video chat and social media, we weren’t so used to seeing photographs of ourselves all the time or, for that matter, ourselves as others saw us.” And now that we are, we couldn’t be more horrified. As we age, we collect fat and lose muscle; for many, the jawline is the first thing to go. Yet thanks to a culture-wide phone addiction that has us looking down all the time, our chins, says Antell, are getting weaker faster.


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SouLCyCLE InStruCtorS rEvEAL tHE ACtS oF DEvotIon tHEy’vE InSpIrED “i’ve arrived at the studio more than once to find a trail of rose petals leading to and surrounding the instructor bike. i won’t disclose the identity of my secret admirer, but i think i’ve figured out who it is. i give her a little additional love in class in the way of an extra quarter turn to the right when nobody’s looking.” —Danny Kopel

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“i was waiting hours in line at the DmV the day before my driver’s license expired. i got sent outside, because you’re not allowed to be on the phone at the DmV. i couldn’t just walk away—my bags were still inside—and right at that moment a client who happens to own the building the DmV is in walked by and asked me what was wrong. he proceeded to walk me to the front of the line and in about two minutes i had my renewal done.” —Laurie Cole “one of my riders always tries to ride with his shirt off. We told him he had to wear something, even if it’s a sports bra. The next week was halloween and he came to class dressed as me. Wig, pink sports bra and wireless mic. it would’ve been spot-on if only he had shaved!” —Kym Perfetto

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The Spin CrOwD

SoulCycle has developed a cult following among fit celebrities such as Katie Holmes and Anderson Cooper. Here, Lena Dunham on why she’s a pedal pusher

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xercise might be anathematic to Lena Dunham’s character on Girls, but the 26-year-old mastermind behind the hBo series has a very different take on working up a sweat. Dunham keeps plenty busy writing, directing and starring in her show, in addition to other projects, like her role in Judd apatow’s forthcoming film This Is 40. But when she really wants to get moving, she heads to SoulCycle. The swank spinning studio, which opened in 2006 and has branches across manhattan, in the hamptons and in West hollywood, offers preternaturally popular classes that draw in fitness freaks such as katie holmes, Jake gyllenhaal and anderson Cooper. What’s got the fit and famous clamoring to ride bikes that don’t move? SoulCycle’s blend of spinning, weights and core exercises is one part of the equation. The other part is candle-lit classes, high-energy playlists and instructors with diehard followings. The combination inspires fervent devotion: Dunham celebrated her recent birthday by dragging a group of friends to a class, and Lady gaga is said to have SoulCycle bikes on her tour bus. Dunham explains why this particular workout gets her wheels spinning. When did you first hop onto a spinning bike? in December 2011. i knew i needed to do something with this bag of bones for stress reasons, and i’d heard vague murmurs about the cult of SoulCycle. You’ve got a lot on your plate. How often are you able to get to a spinning class? if i have time, i’ll do four a week, one of them a double! When i’m shooting my show it’s more like two, with a constant craving.

What is it you love most about spinning? And what’s your least favorite part of the workout? my favorite parts are the music, motivational speeches that would usually annoy me but don’t, and the way i feel when it’s done. my least favorite thing: i literally sweat from my lips. What do you like to wear to sweat in a classroom full of people? Some days i really turn it out and kind of dress like an exercise mad max. i had a SoulCycle birthday party and my choice of look involved several shopping trips—i settled on some hot pink adidas by Stella mcCartney. But some days i am wearing my mom’s yoga pants and a massive sleep T-shirt and i don’t even feel judged.

What would be worse for you, forgetting your socks or forgetting your bra? Socks! all the way! my breasts are kind of small and immovable—it’s their one true advantage. How often do you fake it and not turn the resistance dial when the teacher commands you to? i’m gonna go with 35 percent of the time. i always turn it, but i sometimes turn it back. We do what we have to do! It’s always easier to work out with a friend. What makes a good SoulCycle buddy? earnest enthusiasm (no snarky irony here!) and no whispering between bikes (I can’t hear you and I don’t want to). i don’t care about your skill level so long as you’re pumped. What songs get you going? “Talk That Talk” by Rihanna and Jay-Z, “Call your girlfriend” by Robyn, “one foot” by fun., “Lose yourself” by eminem, “The girl you Lost to Cocaine” by Sia. On a scale of 1 to 5, how sweaty are you at the end of an average class? i’m usually a 5. i mean, i look like i showered. i feel like i showered. i have forgotten to shower as a result and just gone about my day as if i washed my hair. SoulCycle classes are known for attracting both male and female devotees. How do you deal with the presence of cute guys in class? i’m not usually in that place emotionally, but since i perfected my on-the-bike hair flip, i am feeling bolder in all respects. Have you ever been picked up in a class? not even close. i don’t think i’m the one you’d hone in on in that context, unless you had some kind of fetish for girls who look 17 seconds away from death.

Lena Dunham’s dedication to SoulCycle doesn’t always come through on her Twitter feed. Recently, the actress wrote, “People are always saying it’s healthier to eat slowly but isn’t part of the fun seeing how fast you can jam it in?”

Lena Dunham, geTTy imageS. Bike CouRTeSy of SouLCyCLe.

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The bRighT sTuff The fashion designer reveals her secrets for perfect skin

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Your skin is perfect. Please don’t tell us that it’s just “great genes.” I started juicing at home recently and I prefer that to anything you can buy because it’s completely fresh. I’ll add anything: kale, whole apples, ginger, blueberries, carrots, beets, celery, cucumbers. At the very least, I juice once in the morning. At the most, I do it three times a day. When you drink, as opposed to chew, it’s less work for your body to digest the food, and they say nutrients go into your bloodstream really quickly so you feel the effects right away. Juicing is part of my life now and I’m actually disappointed if I can’t do it every single morning. What other super foods are in your diet? I like the taste of Dr. Junger’s Clean shakes, so when I want more of a meal, I’ll mix avocado and almonds with his Nourish Daily and Move [protein and fiber] powders. I feel like I’m getting more food. I stay full for longer. I have more energy. I don’t have peaks or valleys in the day where I’m like, Oh, my God, I need sugar. I’m also gluten-free in the house. I don’t require gluten-free outside of the house. It’s a really hard way to live in New York City because we’re always out . . . but your skin and hair look better, your eyes look clearer. Nutrition gurus are all the rage. Is there anyone you’re working with? I’ve used Tanya Zuckerbrot, who teaches you how to combine food. You can have your wine and you can have your carbs, but it’s more about what you eat with them, the fiber aspect of it. So if you eat a carb, combine it with a protein and then [Zuckerbrot teaches you] what types of protein to use. I didn’t realize how much fiber I was lacking and didn’t know how to replace certain fibrous foods that fill me up a great deal. So if I’m going to a dinner party or social event where it’s impolite not to eat, I can

still eat. But if I eat some of the foods she’s told me about beforehand, I’m full and won’t fill myself up on fancy junk. Which beauty products are on your “can’t live without” list? I have really sensitive skin and have stuck with Estée Lauder Time Zone moisturizer a long time. I’m half-Indian and get dark circles under my eyes quicker than other people, so I keep a Clinique eye rollerball in the refrigerator for late nights. It has a metal roller on it, which stays cold, and I rub circles around my eyes. I do it while I’m getting my girls breakfast so it’s super easy. In the winter, when I don’t have a tan, I use Bobbi Brown’s foundation stick in Honey to cover dark circles under eyes or dark spots on my face. With so much going on, how do you keep skin from looking stressed? I’ve worked so hard that my face is something I haven’t really paid attention to. Now I’m seeing the benefits of taking off my makeup at night. When [my makeup artist] Cynde Watson comes in the mornings, she notices the difference between the days I remove my makeup and days I don’t. It’s also getting enough sleep and drinking enough water. I keep water canisters at home and in the office with lemon and cucumber slices or mint, and drink it throughout the day. Your environment is so important. When I’m at the spa, I think, This is so relaxing, what can I do about my constant environment to get some of these elements in? It’s small things, like the type of water you drink, the fact that candles are burning, the white towels. You can put so many expensive creams on your face but if your environment brings you stress, I don’t think your skin is ever going to look pretty because how you feel shows up on your face. —STACY BAKER

Rachel Roy’s favorite: Dr. Junger’s Clean Nourish Daily Shake, blended with a handful of blueberries and almonds with almond milk and a scoop of avocado.

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achel Roy likes it at least once a day. Sometimes three. And most definitely in the morning. We’re talking about fresh-pressed juice, which the 38-year-old sportswear designer credits with clearing her skin and giving her more energy than ever before. She could use the support: Roy balances an ever-hectic career—she has two fashion lines, a new shoe collection for fall and a gig dressing Michelle Obama—with raising two young daughters in New York City. Sometimes, when she feels her body needs it, she’ll take three days to do a cleanse. By all accounts, the regimen is working.


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next-level nails

From graffiti to glitter, Beyoncé’s personal manicurist is redefining what it means to be polished— one high-concept nail at a time PHOtOGRaPHeD BY leOn steele

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isa Logan is quickly becoming the authority on tricked-out nail art, thanks in large part to the living, breathing, showstopping advertisement that is Beyoncé Knowles. Logan’s manicures have made appearances onstage, in music videos like the hit “Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)” and on the arm of Jay-Z at countless red-carpet events. The New York City– based stylist even painted the singer’s nails a sapphire hue for one of her first public appearances after daughter Blue Ivy was born. Speaking of new-mom mentalities, Logan says that Beyoncé “loves a bedazzled look but is more cautious of the sharp stones around Blue.” Logan, a 15-year veteran of the nail industry, reveals that lately the pop diva has been partial to glitter, graffiti and animal prints. When she’s not tending to the needs of Beyoncé (whom Logan affectionately refers to as “Bey”), she’s busy working with other celebrities, like Katie Holmes and Pink. Now the sought-after nail artist is bringing her skills to the masses with the opening of her own salon, the Nail Suite by Lisa Logan, in Harlem; so if you like it, you should put some bling on it. — brooke bobb

GET THE LOOK NEW YORK CITY THE NaiL SuiTE By LiSa LOG aN 201 W. 139th St., lisanailsuite@ gmail.com lisalogannyc.com

WEST HOLLYWOOD Mar S THE SaLON 606 Westmount Drive, 310-652-0930 mars-salon.com

MIAMI NaiL Bar

3301 N.E. First Ave., Midtown 4, 305-574-0305 facebook.com/ midtownnailbar

18-karat yellow gold knot ring with diamonds, $4,900, ROBERTO COIN, 800-853-5958. Gold-plated brass phantom cuff, $625, ROBERT LEE MORRIS, 212-431-9405.

Beyoncé posted a photo on her Tumblr of nail art even crazier than her own: A fan got a manicure with mini cutout heads of the songstress and her husband, Jay-Z, on her ring fingers. The other nails were painted blue, with rhinestones spelling out the initials J, Z and B.


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FivE ShOPS whErE your haIrcut coMEs wIth a drInk

BLIND BARBER (New YoRk CitY & Los ANgeLes)

You won’t need a drink to relax at the Blind Barber, a chop shop with locations in New York City’s East Village and Los Angeles, but it helps. Each service comes with a complimentary cocktail from a menu as carefully attended to as the whiskers on your face. Try the Sweeney Todd, a drink combining whiskey, egg whites, lemon juice, honey and grenadine that’s guaranteed to make you forget it’s named after a bloodthirsty barber. Blind Barber, 339 E. 10th St., New York City, 212-228-2123; 10797 Washington Blvd., Los Angeles, 310-841-6679; blindbarber.com.

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TOP SHELF

Men’s grooming is served with a twist this fall—totally intoxicating inspiration from classic spirits PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEFFREY WESTBROOK

316 CLUB BARBER SPA (ChiCAgo)

If it weren’t for the scissors, 316 Club Barber Spa could be mistaken for a billiard hall, considering its pool tables and fireside drinking. But then there are the barbers—and other professionals primed to handle everything down to your shoes—available to members or visitors who want to follow a few rounds (during billiards or at the bar) with manly pampering. Memberships, allowing unlimited treatments and endless lounging around the club, are for full or half-year periods. 316 Club Barber Spa, 175 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, 312- 880-0316; 316barberspa.com.

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(PoRtLANd)

Whether you’re dropping in for a haircut or a spa treatment, a visit to HairM is more than just upkeep. The shop doles out beer and wine as soon as you walk through the door, and if you’re more of a smoker than a drinker, a selection of cigars is also at your disposal. The pampering continues for the grooming: Personal TVs are available during procedures, making it simple to catch the game, have a brew and enjoy a pedicure. HairM, 101 S.W. Main St., Portland, Ore., 503-517-0570; hairmgrooming.com.

PROPER BARBER SHOP (deNveR)

What better way to complement the experience of having your tresses tamed than with an icy can of beer? This shop, which also stocks vintage issues of Playboy, traffics in trims from your head on down, including haircuts, shaves and beard sculpting for grownups as well as cuts for kids, who should presumably bring their own drinks and reading materials. Proper Barbershop, 3923 Tennyson St., Denver, 303-862-7537; properbarbershop.com.

BARBERSHOP CLUB (Los ANgeLes)

This family business, now run by a third generation of barbers, is smack in the middle of L.A.’s Farmers Market. You might need to pick up veggies elsewhere, but you can grab a locally brewed beer (or glass of wine) at the Barbershop Club before you indulge in a trademark straight-razor shave, done with products from London whisker mecca Geo F. Trumper. All treatments kick off with a hot towel—which has been steamed overnight in bay rum—and benefit from the Lovell family’s years of experience with keeping guys dashing. Barbershop Club, 6333 W. Third St. #116, Los Angeles, 323-9319916; barbershopclub.com.

—AdAm RAthe

(Clockwise from top left) Bay Rum Hair & Body Wash No. 1400, $15, C.O. BIGELOW, bigelowchemists.com. Rum Hand (+ Body) Wash, $20, (MALIN+GOETZ), malinandgoetz.com. Sake Infused Shave Crème (Normal Skin), $27.50, KYOKU, kyokuformen.com. Wild Watermint Gin Shave Cream, $24, BLIND BARBER, blindbarber.com. Bay Rum After-Shave Balm No. 1401, $19.50, C.O. BIGELOW, bigelowchemists.com. Rum Tonic, $48, (MALIN+GOETZ), malinandgoetz.com. 90 Proof Hair Pomade, $22, 60 Proof Hair Wax, $22, both BLIND BARBER, blindbarber.com. Gin Tonic Bath Salts, $14, THE MOTLEY + THE SPARE ROOM, themotley.com. | EditEd by Paul FrEdEriCk

London’s Truefitt & Mill, established in 1805, has been certified by the Guinness World records as the oldest barbershop in the world.


www.dimodolo.com

The Mall at Short Hills 1200 Morris Turnpike Suite D30 Short Hills, NJ 07078 973-921-1114


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UNCOMMON SCENTS Mix up “his” and “hers” for fall with

fragrances that satisfy one half or the whole of any power couple PHOTOGRAPHED BY

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CU LT U R E (From left) Pour Femme, $98, DOLCE & GABBANA,

saksfifthavenue.com. Première, $105, GUCCI, saksfifthavenue.com. L’eau de Chloé, $85, CHLOÉ, nordstrom.com. Le Parfum eau de toilette, $105, ELIE SAAB, neimanmarcus com. Noir, $90, TOM FORD, nordstrom.com.

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Red Play, $100, COMME DES GARÇONS, comme-des-garcons.com. Florobotanica eau de parfum, $125, BALENCIAGA, neimanmarcus.com. Perfume, $220, RODIN, oliolusso.com. 08 Seylon, $165, ODIN NEW YORK, barneys.com.

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his season spritzes in with a new crop of perfumes and notes, including Balenciaga’s amber-and-mint Florobotanica, Gucci’s Première with orange blossom and Tom Ford’s Noir for men. The latter, with hints of citrus, bergamot and caraway, promises to be both elegant and sophisticated. That precise mix also predominates in the more established fragrances like L’eau de Chloé and Comme des Garçons’ Play. So whether you’re a woman pairing Dolce & Gabbana’s Pour Femme with a bold Bordeaux-colored ensemble or a guy looking to match Odin’s crisp 08 Seylon to a tailored suit, it’s time to add these blended scents to your style repertoire. And while men’s and women’s fragrances typically sit separately on the vanity, this is the moment to experiment with an aura of the opposite sex. Cool jasmine with spicy neroli, as used in Rodin’s signature scent, works just as well for a woman as it does for a man, and bitters like blackberry and bay blur the line between a heavy cologne and a sweet perfume to create a note that can easily be shared by the “his” and “hers” of any bathroom shelf. —BROOKE BOBB

Blackberry & Bay cologne, $110, JO MALONE LONDON, jomalone.com. Acqua Fiorentina, $260, CREED, neimanmarcus.com. Volutes Eau de Parfum, $140, DIPTYQUE, diptyqueparis.com.

Lady Gaga’s Fame fragrance, out in September, is the first-ever black eau de parfum, meaning it appears black in the bottle but sprays clear. It has a floral scent, not one that smells of bodily fluids, as was previously rumored.


ring from the stella collection

new york

• las vegas • kwiat.com


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BEAUTY BEWARE

A team of cheeky experts weigh in on your every cosmetic concern

Dear Violet: Be completely honest with me: Is the French manicure déclassé? Sincerely, Cecile de la Confused

Dear Violet: I like to wear a strong lip. It suits me, and I’m not afraid. But every time I consider having a cocktail, the rim of the glass looks like a murder scene before I’ve even taken my first sip. And my mouth looks as if someone gave me a Chelsea smile. Do I really have to lick the rim before I drink, or expire from dehydration? Please advise. Awkwardly, Potty Mouth

Dear cecile,

Dear Potty,

The French manicure has seen better days, but don’t be too discouraged—the only thing déclassé is a person who insists on being a conventional beauty. Although it may seem to you that the Frenchie has fallen entirely under the purview of the porn industry, if it’s just the tip you’re after, we can help you. Think of the red-dipped nails J.lo wore for the oscars. now that’s a lady who doesn’t follow a rule she didn’t write herself, and to what fabulous effect! if you cling to the idea of a little graphic structure, for heaven’s sake, err on the side of caution. The line should subtly frame your nail. less, in this case, is more. Always keep the base color as close to your flesh tone as possible and, if you insist on a white tip, make sure it runs into the creamier end of things. Alternatively, you could do a half-moon manicure, filling in the base of your nail with a contrast color. We find a glossy nude nail can offset a vermilion rather nicely. And not just any product will suffice, which is why we defer to chanel Beige no. 565—because if you insist on going nude, only chanel will do.

i commend you for your bravery. As carole lombard once said: “A woman’s first job is to choose the right shade of lipstick.” As such, we tend to stock up on Tom Ford’s beautifully packaged violet Fatale lipstick. Makeup artist robin Black suggests pairing it with MAc Pro longwear lip Pencil in More to love. Another delightful option is nars’ Schiap, a semi-matte hot-pink shade that can be worn thin under gloss or thick paired with a bare eye to really pop. For a traditional red lip, she turns to Armani red 401 and lines it with nars Jungle red. instead of framing the lip, as was once the case—these pencils serve a much better purpose when filling in the whole lip, making for a rich pigment base. it prevents the lipstick from bleeding into fine lines around the edges of the mouth, and it will also keep the color looking solid, even as your lipstick begins to fade. Then just blot, cover with a tiny film of laura Mercier translucent powder and you’re golden. Another final piece of advice: Use a straw and a strategically employed linen napkin.

First of all, it’s not a beauty routine. We think of male hygiene, personal upkeep and general civility as something akin to the pruning that chimpanzees do to one another. in other words: the polite minimum. The way you present yourself should have nothing to do with your own vanity and everything to do with consideration of others. We don’t worry if you have a crow’s nest hatching around your eye, a few rogue gray hairs or even dull skin. A beard can actually be an asset if you weren’t blessed with Montgomery clift’s bone structure, or if every depilatory method gives you a rash. But even if your wife, girlfriend or lover doesn’t object to her delicate face getting roughed up every time she feels overcome with affection for you, you should consider how you might trim the thing. These products will help soften the blow: Kyoku razor repair Balm, Proraso Pre-Shave cream and, finally, Geo F. Trumper Extract of limes Aftershave. We also recommend perusing the best of shaving equipment at Bigelowchemists.com. nineteenth-century fashion icon Beau Brummell had this to say: “civility may truly be said to cost nothing: if it does not meet with a due return, it at least leaves you in the most creditable position.”

Bonne chance, Team violet

L’chaim! Team violet

Truly, Team violet

Dear Violet: As a man, I know I’m supposed to keep my beauty routine as simple as possible, which is why I’ve stopped shaving altogether. But tell me: Is it rude of me to wear a beard in polite society? Fondly, Jack Lumber Dear Jack,

Aside from her illustrious career as an actress, Elizabeth Taylor was often recognized for her dramatically unique eye color, which many people described as “violet gray.”

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Tucked away in a discreet penthouse on Melrose Place is violet Grey—a studio and inspiration lab where beauty insiders come together to exchange ideas and create and test products. Together with editors robin Black and Jessica Joffe, cofounders cassandra Grey and Dany levy have teamed with experts—in everything from makeup to nutrition—to answer your most daring beauty inquiries. Boasting a comprehensive archive of “style files” that include vintage editorials and catalogues of runway and red-carpet looks, violet Grey is about both documenting the art of transformation and defining it. violet Grey’s archive of interviews, inspiration looks and product recommendations can be found at violetGrey.com. Below, the collective minds behind Team violet offer solutions to your latest beauty quandaries. For questions, e-mail violet@dujour.com.


jacobandco.com +1.212.719.5887 48 East 57th Street New York, NY


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A BURGUNDY LIP IS AN INTOXICATING TREND

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ne beauty pairing definitely dominated the runway: a wine-stained lip with a clean eye. From Gucci to Rochas to Yves Saint Laurent, makeup artists favored the darker lip. To carry off the look at home, a little prep is essential, advises Tom Pecheux, creative makeup director for Estée Lauder. Moisturize the night before with a balm to prevent “bleeding.” Prior to applying lipstick, line your lips with pencil—use either a shade that matches your natural color or one that matches the lipstick itself. Never, ever use a pencil that’s darker. Then comes the lipstick. Finish the look with mascara only. It will open up eyes without taking focus off lips.

SKIN SAvErS

NEW AT-HOME GADGETS CAN HELP GENTLY BRIGHTEN TONE AND REDUCE SIGNS OF AGING (from left)

ClarisoniC opal soniC inFUsion sYsTEM

Serum placed on the device is transmitted into the pores via vibrations that also tighten skin. $185, neimanmarcus.com

TEi spa oXYDErM pro

This ozone beauty device is the at-home equivalent of an oxygen facial, removing toxins and activating cells. $285, teispa.com (Above from left) L’Absolu Nu Lipcolor in Rouge Résille, $29.50, LANCÔME, lancome.com. Rouge d’Armani in Limited Edition 408, $30, GIORGIO ARMANI, giorgioarmanibeauty-usa.com. Rouge Allure Luminous Intense Lip Colour in Rouge Noir, $34, CHANEL, chanel.com. Long Last Lipstick in Merlot, $15, CLINIQUE, clinique.com. Pure Color Velvet Lipstick in Limited Edition Black Cassis, $25, ESTÉE LAUDER, esteelauder.com.

liGHTsTiM

The LED therapy tool minimizes pores and increases moisture to make your complexion glow. $249, macys.com

A merlot-hued lipstick looks sensational, but lips messily stained by a vintage merlot don’t. Apply Vaseline or a thick gloss to your lips before you sip that divine glass of wine.

FACES: IMAXTREE.COM (4); LIPSTICKS: COURTESY OF LANCÔME; COURTESY OF GIORGIO ARMANI BEAUTY; COURTESY OF CHANEL; COURTESY OF CLINIQUE; COURTESY OF ESTÉE LAUDER. SKINCARE: COURTESY OF CLARISONIC; COURTESY OF TEI SPA; COURTESY OF LIGHTSTIM.

This fall, speak softly and carry a bold dark-red lipstick

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intermixonline.com


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PARTING WAYS

the best hair walks a fine line between chic and severe this season

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inally the less dexterous among us will get a break—for the latest hair trend, no complicated maneuvers with a flatiron or hair dryer are needed. Prominently featured at the fall 2012 Calvin Klein, Loewe, Michael Kors and Victoria Beckham runway shows was the sleek side part. To achieve the look, start with dry but freshly washed hair, advises Antonio Corral Calero, artistic director for Moroccanoil. Apply a hydrating product to soften and strengthen; using a comb or paddle brush, sweep hair to the side. If desired, fasten into a ponytail and finish with hairspray.

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(From left) Strengthening and Hydrating Hair Oilin-Cream, $25, kiehl’s, kiehls.com Luminous kiehls.com. Hairspray Strong, $21, moroccanoil, moroccanoil.com Fiber moroccanoil.com. Groom Elastic Texture Paste, $29, oribe, oribe.com. Pure Bristle oribe.com Handy Size Brush, $190, mason pearson, neimanmarcus.com. neimanmarcus.com

Christian Dior

There Are No SmAll PArTS 1788

Queen Marie Antoinette

A time line of beAuties who hAve divided And conquered

1941

1967

Veronica Lake

Twiggy

1998

Carolyn Bessette-Kennedy

2012

Michelle Obama

Hair grows an average of a one-half inch per month. Although it may seem to grow more slowly in the fall and winter, weather does not affect hair growth— only genetics, diet and lifestyle do.

DIOR: IMAXTREE.COM. PRODUCTS: COURTESY OF KIEHL’S; COURTESY OF MOROCCANOIL; COURTESY OF ORIBE; COURTESY OF DAZZLINE IMAGES. MARIE ANTOINETTE: IMAGNO/GETTY IMAGES. VERONICA LAKE: EUGENE ROBERT RICHEE/GETTY IMAGES. TWIGGY: MICHAEL OCHS/GETTY IMAGES. CAROLYN BESSETTE-KENNEDY: JIM SMEAL/WIREIMAGE. MICHELLE OBAMA: IDA MAE ASTUTE/ABC VIA GETTY IMAGES.

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ATLANTA BAL HARBOUR BEVERLY HILLS CHICAGO DALLAS FT. LAUDERDALE FT. WORTH HONOLULU HOUSTON PALM BEACH PALO ALTO SAN ANTONIO SAN DIEGO SAN FRANCISCO TYSONS CORNER WHITE PLAINS

Marina B Salon: 589 Fifth Avenue, 16th Floor, New York, NY • 212. 644.1155 www.MarinaB.com


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Tracy anderson WaTer MILL, n.y. The fitness guru who’s helped every WHO:

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celebrity from Gwyneth to J. Lo lose their baby weight takes on a special new mommy client—herself. LINDSAY SILBERMAN reports PHoToGraPHed By MIMI

rITZen craWFord

Anderson in her Water Mill, N.Y., studio with her daughter, Penny

Looking at small, slim, strong celebrity fitness guru Tracy Anderson today—just six weeks after she gave birth to her second child—you’d never guess she was in very different shape after baby number one. But back when she was expecting her first child in 1998, she spent nine months sitting by a pool, eating hot dogs and drinking milkshakes. By the time she’d delivered her son, Sam, she’d packed on 60 pounds—a huge amount of weight for the 5-foot-tall former ballet dancer. “A lot of women use pregnancy as an excuse to let their bodies go, and that’s the worst thing,” she says. “I feel like I’ve lived an entire lifetime since then.” During that aforementioned lifetime, Anderson created her fitness method; opened studios in New York City, the Hamptons, Los Angeles and London; released nine DVDs; and coached dozens of clients including Kate Hudson, Jennifer Lopez, Courteney Cox and Gwyneth Paltrow (later her business partner). When Anderson learned in the fall of 2011 that

she was pregnant with Penelope (“Penny,” for short), she vowed to do it right—at the same time, she also found her newest project. Using herself as a research subject, she came up with special exercise routines. The result is The Pregnancy Project, a new series of nine DVDs, one for every month of pregnancy. Preceding each month’s workout is a compilation of conversations with moms—and Anderson’s former clients— including celebs Molly Sims and Christy

Tracy’s ex-husband—and the father of her son, Sam—is Eric Anderson, a former NBA player. She wed businessman Matt Mogol in September 2011.


One pOst-birth surprise was her breasts. “it was like, ‘hOly bOObs! where did they cOme frOm?’”

Anderson commands a team of 40 trainers who work in her studios or with private clients. Two of them are currently on tour with Jennifer Lopez, while another is on the set of Iron Man 3.

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the fact that even Anderson, a woman who has made a career out of being fit, found it tough to resume working out again. In fact, she describes her first day in the studio as “an incredibly demoralizing moment in my life.” She explains, “For 13 years I’ve been jumping around, dancing at such high levels all over the world and with no sleep for multiple hours a day. I thought, Please, I can bust out an hour of dance aerobics, no problem—wrong!” She faced another unanticipated challenge upon returning to aerobics: her breasts. “It was like, ‘Holy boobs! Where did they come from?’ I had to stop and put on multiple sports bras,” she laughs. “I texted a few of my friends who have big boobs and I was like, ‘I’m so sorry I was so mean to you about dancing and jumping because I can’t do it right now!’” And if women need any more reassurance that rebounding after a baby can be difficult, Anderson recalls of her partner and ex-client Gwyneth Paltrow: “When I first met her, she was stuck. She had to film the first Iron Man and she still had 25 to 30 extra pounds after [giving birth to] Moses and he was already 5 months old. She had tried everything and couldn’t get them off.” While Anderson herself wants to lose an additional 10 pounds, it’s clear that exercising to her is more than a means of reaching a target weight. “I missed working out a lot more than I thought. The first time I sweat, it felt,” she pauses, “like the best feeling. It really was an emotional release. “Movement and being connected to my body are very important to me, which is why I tried to be very connected to the pregnancy,” she adds. “I know that the journey of getting back to your best level of performance physically is very hard, but it’s an incredibly empowering place to be.”

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Turlington, who share their own experiences and advice. “I always knew I wanted to do this project,” she says. “I’ve seen so many women who come to me right after [having children] with disaster bodies that have gone through hell, or they come to me years later and say, ‘Oh, my body is like this because I had three kids.’” Anderson embarked on this pregnancy with some anxiety. “I had a miscarriage before [conceiving] Penny, so I was really nervous. As soon as I thought I was pregnant

again, I was like, ‘I’m not moving!’ I was also so nauseous in the beginning. Once the nausea started lifting, I got a lot of energy in my second trimester.” Besides having to conquer her personal fears, Anderson went through an overall attitude adjustment. Instead of worrying about weight gain or stretch marks, she says, “you have to view pregnancy the most optimistic way you’ll ever see anything in your life. You have to think, I’m so empowered doing exactly what women were meant to do, even if you’re barfing over a toilet or if you have hormonal acne.” The Pregnancy Project shares many of the same overall techniques as the Tracy Anderson Method, her program that aims to strengthen the smaller muscle groups through a combination of low weights and high reps. This approach exhausts the muscles in a way that creates a lean yet feminine shape, what Anderson calls “a dancer’s body.” For expectant moms, she’s put the emphasis on challenging muscular work and not on the dance aerobics–style cardio she’s become known for. “This isn’t just some motivating, fun workout to do. It’s results-oriented. You’ll see results through your pregnancy and you’ll be able to get your body back faster afterward.” Anderson’s svelte shape serves as the best testimonial to her method. During this pregnancy, she put on a healthy 30 pounds. Less than two months after her C-section, she has more energy than ever—she’s already thinking about getting pregnant again next year. For now, she has her hands full tending to Penny and 13-year-old Sam. She confesses, “I don’t really tweet about my personal life, but the other day, I almost tweeted, ‘What was I thinking? Did I think having a teenager and an infant at the same time would be easy?’ What’s funny is they both need the same thing—to be fed and hugged.” She’s also busy whipping her body back into form with daily workouts. New moms should take comfort in


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Trade up your lackluster iPod dock for these sleek, made-toorder stereo speakers from Symbol Audio. Crafted by two furniture design vets, they look as plush as they sound PHOTOGRAPHED by LEON STEELE PHOTOGRAPHED by LEON STEELE

Tabletop Hi-fi, $1,800, SYMbol Audio; custom finishes available in white, gray, black, orange, walnut and oak; symbolaudio.com.

At this year’s Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, audio manufacturer Behringer unveiled the world’s largest iPhone dock, weighing in at 700 pounds. The iNuke Boom retails for $29,999 and pumps out more than 10,000 watts of power.


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Muscle cars have a moment, again

officer—this new breed is as fit for the track as it is for transporting the kids from soccer practice. With a 662-hp V8 engine, the Shelby GT500 is the most race car–esque of the bunch, if you’re looking for road to burn. Still, what’s truly new about this latest bunch of muscle cars isn’t necessarily what’s under the hood. Unlike their gas-gulping ancestors, the GT500, ZL1 and Super Bee all exceed 20 mpg. They’re also pretty sweet for daily commuting, with comfort features like traction control, electronically adjustable shock absorbers and electrically assisted power steering, not to mention inviting interiors with premium sound and navigation systems and add-ons like Recaro seats. At once classic, teeth-rattlin’ Detroit and state-of-the-art luxurious, these are rides for discerning gearheads—and they say as much about our future as they do about our past. —P.B.

2013 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500

2013 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1

2012 Dodge Charger SRT8 Super Bee

earlier this year, pro golfer Bubba Watson, winner of the 2012 Masters Championship, paid $110,000 for the iconic 1969 Dodge Charger featured in The Dukes of Hazzard TV series.

FRoM Top: CoURTeSy oF FoRD MoToR CoMpAny; CoURTeSy oF GeneRAL MoToRS; CoURTeSy oF ChRySLeR GRoUp.

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here are few things as quintessentially American as the beefy lines and earth-rattling growl of ’60s-era muscle cars. Defined by their excesses of power, performance, style and attitude—from Steve McQueen blazing through San Francisco in a Mustang to the Dodge Charger barreling around the banked turns of Daytona— these beasts were the embodiment of a young, upwardly mobile, industrious nation. After clean-air regulations and the fuel shortages of the ’70s halted production, a healthy secondhand and restoration market emerged. But only in the recent postbailout period has the muscle car rumbled back to life. Among the leaders of this new generation are Ford’s Mustang Shelby GT500 (starting at $54,995), Dodge’s Charger SRT8 Super Bee ($42,320) and Chevrolet’s Camaro ZL1 ($55,250). Capable of top speeds just shy of 200 mph—excuse me,


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Actress JOY BRYANT took to the waves, slopes and skate parks to embrace her inner daredevil. She even married a stuntman

Cloudbreak, Fiji

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he first time I went snowboarding, I lied. I told everyone I knew what I was doing, but soon enough it was clear that wasn’t the case. I ended up with a concussion that I swear I can still feel, but there was something about the sport that did it for me. I knew snowboarding was going to be my thing. Growing up in the Bronx, the only sports I’d been exposed to were track and basketball. When I started boarding school in Connecticut, the variety of sports offered surprised me—soccer, squash, even ice hockey. I had a bit of a chip on my shoulder, being the poor black girl from the Bronx at an all-white school, so as a way to challenge myself, I joined up. I’ve always picked the most random things furthest from my comfort zone and jumped right in. For example, I’m not a swimmer. I learned how as a kid, but between the ages of 9 and 22, sheer terror kept me out of the water. On a trip to Mexico, I was dating this hot surfer type and he really wanted to teach me to stand up on a board, and I was like, Okay then! So I got the basics down. Years later I went to Cloudbreak in Fiji, a world-famous surfing spot, and I just had to try and catch a wave. Although I kept thinking I would fall and, because I couldn’t swim, I would die, I refused to let fear stop me. Someone pushed me into a break and I caught it. The feeling of accomplishment was huge, but the next time I attempted to paddle out, everything went wrong. The day’s biggest waves crashed right on top of me. I was really shook up and, thanks to inappropriate surf gear, topless. Snowboarding required more training. After my first season on the slopes, I hadn’t perfected it. I decided to

Lincoln Park Skate Park, Los Angeles

follow the snow to Chile, where I’d practice for three weeks until I got it right. An instructor there advised me to get a skateboard to keep me conditioned in the off-season, so I did. The next summer, while I was filming a movie in Louisiana, I would skate back and forth across the soundstage. That’s where I met Dave. Now he’s my husband, but then he was working on the film’s stunts and offered to coach me—lessons that ended up in a series of “private sessions.” The thing about stunt people is that the risks they take are calculated. Everything is accounted for, down to the angle of the camera. You need to know as much as possible about everything that’s going on and be as knowledgeable as possible about the risks involved. It’s not just jumping off a cliff and hoping for the best. I’ve

learned a lot from watching him figure out a problem. This past season, snowboarding on Powder Mountain, a group of us rode a backcountry trail. I got lost. One minute I was following a guy from our group, the next minute I was alone—and caught in a tree well, a deep funnel that forms around a tree where snow has collected. Trust me, you want to avoid this. The day before, finding ourselves caught in deep powder, Dave had explained how to escape this sort of situation. I could hear his words in my head and sure enough, I figured my way out. Sure, I was still lost and I had no reception on my phone, I was hungry, but I realized that I was the only person I could rely on. So I trusted the path, followed it and was eventually reunited with the group. The thing about snowboarding with Dave is that while my skill

Bryant is gearing up for her action sports YouTube show, “Across the Board.”


Powder Mountain, Utah

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SurF: ScOTT AIchNer; SkATeBOArD: PAm ThOmAS; SNOWBOArD: DAVe POPe.

“I kept thInkIng, If I fall off, I’m goIng to dIe . . . but I refused to let fear stop me.” level may not be as great as his, riding with him has made me more eager to tackle difficult terrain. When it comes to driving, it’s a different story. I’ve always been a nervous driver. For a while, Dave and I lived pretty far outside of L.A., which required getting on the freeway, so I had to get comfortable with it. At first, I would find excuses not to go into town. One day, Dave decided I needed to go with him to work, meaning, at the time, stunt-driving school. And what better way to face my

fears than the method that had sent me into the ocean and careening down a mountain: going at them full force. What you learn to do at stunt school is precisely what you’re never supposed to do on the road. Pulling 180s, spinning, you name it. Students take turns getting in a car with a seasoned driver who demonstrates whatever trick it is he’s teaching before the student does it on her own. It was scary to move a car in ways I’d never imagined, but the confidence that came from this made me

realize I could actually control a vehicle. To this day, even as a registered stunt car driver, I’m a bit of a punk on the highway, and aggressive on side streets. For all the thrills of his job, I’ve always made fun of Dave for being a golf fan. Before I married him, it would have been hell to do anything connected to that sport. So if you ask me what’s the scariest obstacle I’ve overcome since marrying a stunt man, I’d say that I can actually watch a golf tournament on TV. That takes fortitude.

The work has long been delayed on New Jersey’s indoor ski slope, part of the $1.9 billion Xanadu mall and amusement park project, but construction has finally gotten underway again. The new expected opening day will be sometime in 2014.


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RESERVATION

IMPOSSIBLE

Why rabid vintage Rolex collectors will travel the world to indulge in their passion

We asked Lee Brian Schrager, founder and director of the Food Network South Beach and New York City Wine & Food Festivals, for his list of the toughest tables to book. Here is Schrager’s roll call of the recalcitrant—and his reason for why each one is worth the wait. (Plus, we report what happened when a regular person called each restaurant themselves to book “Dinner for four, 8 p.m.”)

ElEvEn Madison Park

MANHATTAN {1 MONTH} 212-889-0905 “Chef Daniel Humm created a sophisticated and yet wonderfully modern tribute to classical cuisine.”

schwa

CHICAGO {NO ANSWER, NO VOICEMAIL} 773-252-1466 “Unfussy. Undecorated. Unmissable.” KENNETT SQUARE, PA. {1 YEAR} 610-444-8255 “Fabulous market by day, fabulous restaurant by night.”

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intage Rolex fans are one determined bunch. A man is known to have flown last May from Argentina—via Africa—to Hong Kong purely to spend a couple of days hanging out with some friends he hadn’t met yet: fellow obsessives from Asia, Europe, Australia, North America and South America. For him, the opportunity to talk about rare Rollies without having to pretend to be interested in anything else was well worth 30 hours spent in transit. The event was the first vintage Rolex Passion Meeting in Asia. Philipp Stahl, the founder of RolexPassionReport .com and owner of the Dutch watchmaker Steiner, organized the meet-up because of keen demand. “Luxury is booming in Asia, and they’re also discovering vintage watches,” says Stahl. “Hong Kong was the logical stop.” The allure of vintage? Timepiece aficionados “are interested in something unique, with character and patina—a watch that a friend definitely does not have.” Thanks to ever-growing online forums devoted to vintage high-end brands such as Rolex (and Tudor), Patek Philippe, Omega and early Radiomirs from Panerai, collecting has truly become a global pursuit. Guests of the Rolex Passion Meeting, held at the modern and minimalist

chEf’s TablE

BROOKLYN, N.Y. {2 MONTHS} 718-243-0050 “Watching chef César Ramirez prepare an 18- to 20course meal is truly a marvel to behold.”

Upper House hotel, were not disappointed: Devotees were able to scrutinize examples of almost every Rolex known to mankind, including rarities such as a gold “green Oman” Daytona (custom-made for the sultan of Oman and “one out of only three examples known to exist”) and a stainless steel Daytona Paul Newman Oyster with a black dial (1 of 10 models), says Stahl. Such global meet-ups are becoming more commonplace. This past summer, Stahl was in Florence and Rome for meet-ups. (Among the attractions in Italy were Stahl’s own ultra-rare Rolex reference number 6538 Submariner with 3-6-9 indicators on the dial.) He is planning another Hong Kong meeting in December, and plans are afoot for events in Pebble Beach, Calif., Holland and Australia. One cannot deny the primal rush —the thrill of the hunt—that a watch fanatic gets when he or she sees and actually holds an undiscovered treasure. No attendee is allowed to come emptyhanded; every collection reflects its

frEnch laundrY

YOUNTvILLE, CALIF. {8 WEEKS} 707-944-2380 “A master class in the art of the details.”

owner’s strain of obsession, which makes for excellent stories over a couple of glasses of wine. Stahl was especially happy to meet Rolex enthusiasts holding pieces of more than 20 years’ standing. “As true collectors, they never sold any of their pieces,” says Stahl, which means that these rarities have not shown up over and over in the traditional watch-circuit venues: the auctions and trade shows. As reports of the Hong Kong gathering started to find their way onto watch forums, the biggest impact was the vintage community discovering the scale and breadth, not to mention the history, of the movement—no way could this be called a hobby, they insist. “Some collections were established well before the Internet could help us understand the secrets and wonders of Rolex,” says Stahl. “I just cherish the fact I know all of these people all over the world.” — Rhonda Riche

Minibar bY JosÉ andrÉs WASHINGTON, D.C. {1 MONTH} 202-393-0812 “Intimate fine dining at its best.”

caTbird sEaT

NASHvILLE {1 MONTH} 615-810-8200 “Every course, a surprise. Literally.”

MoMofuku ko

MANHATTAN {1 MONTH} momofuku.com “Playfully inventive—if you’re lucky enough to snag one of the 12 seats on offer each night.”

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CHICAGO {PREPAID SEATING ONLY} 312-226-0858 “Led by the peerless Grant Achatz, this restaurant dares to think outside the outside of the box.”

willows inn

LUMMI ISLAND, WASH. {2 WEEKS} 360-758-2620 “A singular nature-inspired dining experience led by one of the most talented young chefs working today.”

There are many different ways to spot the difference between a Rolex and a “Fauxlex.” For example if you remove the watchband, the model and case number should be engraved on the side at 6 and 12 o’clock.

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©2012. BRER Affiliates Inc. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Affiliates Inc. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other affiliation with Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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The Iron MAnAgers

For these five CEOs, running businesses simply isn’t enough of a challenge—they’re also driven to run, bike and swim in extremely competitive triathlons around the world. Here, some of their vital stats

laureN HerriNg

CEO, IMPACT Group, a global career management firm CompETIng SInCE: 2005

Best tRIAthlON & RAce tIMe

3:24

10:21

IRONMAN

Paddy sPeNce

2:11:59

FIRst IN Age gROUp

Brasil Telecom Ironman Florianopolis Island, Brazil Swim: 2.4 miles, Bike: 112 miles, Run: 26.2 miles

Ted KeNNedy

CEO, Zevia, CEO, CEO Challenges, offers sport an all-natural zero-calorie soda brand competitions for CEOs and business owners CompETIng SInCE: 1989 CompETIng SInCE: 1986

Chicago Sun-Times Triathlon Chicago Swim: 0.9 miles, Bike: 24.9 miles, Run: 6.2 miles

10:16.48

IRONMAN

Subaru Ironman Canada Penticton, B.C., Canada Swim: 2.4 miles, Bike: 112 miles, Run: 26.2 miles

ViNce Kelly

CEO, Kona HR Consulting Group, a human resources consulting firm CompETIng SInCE: 1996

10:14:07

IRONMAN

Brasil Telecom Ironman Florianopolis Island, Brazil Swim: 2.4 miles, Bike: 112 miles, Run: 26.2 miles

FAvORIte Aspect OF the RAce

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Escape from Alcatraz Triathlon San Francisco Swim: 1.5 miles, Bike: 18 miles, Run: 8 miles

Kim NelsoN

CEO, Royal Containers, a corrugated packaging manufacturer CompETIng SInCE: 1992 Comp

The BlaCk eyed peas

“CheCk The TeChnique”

“’Til i Collapse”

gang sTarr

eminem

“la Villa sTr angiaTo”

rush

“sTronger”

k anye wesT

WhIch Is tOUgheR: RUNNINg A cOMpANy OR A tRIAthlON? There’s a nice routine about training. You can plan what you want to do in terms of preparation and nutrition. You can’t necessarily plan for the human variables involved with running a company, so it is much more complex.

Running a company is by far harder than training or racing! In a corporation, employees depend on you to lead a company in a successful way. There is no dependence in an Ironman—it’s not a team sport. That’s why I chose it!

IF I’M hAvINg AN OFF tRAININg sessION I…

ANy pRe-RAce RItUAls?

Come BaCk The nexT day wiTh a fresh aTTiTude and Body

a glass of pinoT grigio aT dinner wiTh friends

The two endeavors are similar in many ways: Both have peaks and valleys, moments of frustration and others of sheer bliss. Unlike a triathlon, running a company seldom has a finish line, and to the extent there is one, you don’t see it coming.

In a triathlon, all you really need is talent and consistency at training—you need to do some activity every day, with hard work. However, this is only the starting point for running a business—just showing up every day is the easy part.

They are both hard in different ways. Managing a company requires a lot of effort, but the pressures are different and can be handled without the physical exertion and stress that training for a triathlon requires.

ANy INJURIes?

gOAls FOR the cOMINg yeAR?

the FIRst thINg I dO AFteR I FINIsh...

pinChed a nerVe in my BaCk afTer flipping off my Bike down a raVine

To reduCe my slowdown in speed as i age

hug my wife and kids

speed RAceR

MEEt tHE bikE On EvEry irOnMan’s wisH list

Most serious triathletes are gearheads who try to get an edge on their rivals with the latest, greatest and most technologically advanced equipment available. Their latest object of lust: the Cervélo P5, a bike hailed as the world’s fastest triathlon ride. During a three-year R&D process, Cervélo’s engineers broke down the frame into five “aerozones” and analyzed how to best optimize airflow in each area. As a result, the cables—exposed in most models, leading to drag—are hidden in the frame

of the bike itself. Another innovation: custom hydraulic brakes, which are ultra-responsive and powerful on twists and turns. Pro triathlete Frederik Van Lierde, who was consulted by Cervélo engineers when designing the P5, gave it a test run in June at the Ironman Nice in France. Not only did he finish first in the race’s biking portion—13 minutes ahead of his nearest competitor—but he also won the triathlon in record time. ($6,500; cervelo.com for retailers) —Lindsay siLberman

Standard triathlons usually follow international Olympic guidelines, with a 0.93-mile swim, a 24.8-mile bike ride and a 6.2-mile run. The long-distance Ironman consists of a 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bike ride and a 26.2-mile run.

FROM TOP: PORTRAITS COuRTeSy OF THe SuBJeCTS; STOPwATCH, CSA IMAgeS/PRINTSTOCk COLLeCTION; BIke COuRTeSy OF CeRVéLO.

Best tRAININg sONg “Boom Boom pow”


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A WIFE’S TAIL

I THINK MY BOYFRIEND’S SOON-TO-BE-EX-WIFE IS HAVING ME FOLLOWED. HOW CAN I TELL IF I’VE GOT A PRIVATE EYE ON MY TAIL?

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DILEMMA DUJOUR

The high life comes with problems. We’re here to help.

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First of all, show me a pre-divorcée who doesn’t have a PI on the payroll. Of course you’re being followed! The more money he’s spending on you, the less there is for her to siphon off later. But here are some solid clues you’re being tailed: You run into the same “old friend” at Barneys twice in a week. Your regular florist calls to tell you he had an inquiry from a “secret admirer” regarding your peony preference (semidouble or Japanese?), and would you be in town this weekend or at the beach? Your extra-chatty seatmate on the weekend puddle-jumper to Nantucket casually wonders where you’re going, who you’re going with and who paid for your ticket. Unfortunately, unless you’re being harassed or physically harmed (and most PIs worth their P aren’t about to compromise their cover, or more specifically, their fee), there’s not much you can do. Except, of course, remember that these guys are outfitted with the latest superzoom cameras. Meaning: Don’t skip your weekly blowout and do get rid of those Lululemon flare-cuts circa 2009. I don’t care how good you think they make your butt look.

RING TWICE?

CAN I REUSE MY FIRST WIFE’S RING TO PROPOSE TO MY NEW GIRLFRIEND? SHE WON’T EVEN KNOW THE DIFFERENCE.

DUFFEL KERFUFFLE

A FRIEND INVITED ME TO EAST HAMPTON ON HIS PRIVATE JET, BUT MY LUGGAGE GOT DAMAGED EN ROUTE. DO I STILL NEED TO SEND HIM A NOTE OF THANKS?

D’accord! And an invoice, too. Acknowledging a friend’s generosity, either in writing or with French chocolate, is never optional. But if your Goyard was nicked, greased or worse, who’s going to fix it? Not the tooth fairy, and not you. You accepted a ride, not an invitation to buy a new portmanteau. This is what you say: “Dear You, Thanks so very much for thinking to include me last weekend on your Hamptons-bound Cessna. The flight was delightfully smooth, the oysters were so creamy

(Peconics?) and I can’t believe you remembered that 1978 was my absolute very favorite year for La Tâche; you’re so sweet. But unfortunately my favorite luggage was damaged beyond repair. I debated even bringing this up, I really did, but then I thought we might consider it an even swap for that rotten stock tip you gave me last year—you know the one. Anyway, I’ll go ahead and forward the receipt for my new set, which is just lovely, directly to your house manager. Bisous!”

DILEMMA DUJOUR welcomes your social misfit questions. E-mail us at askdilemma@dujour.com. “It is a sad commentary of our times when our young must seek advice and counsel from Dear Abby instead of going to Mom and Dad,” said Abigail Van Buren, a.k.a. Dear Abby. True, but she managed a thriving decades-long career counseling the confused.

CONDÉ NAST ARCHIVE/CORBIS

It’s a risk, but then you’re nothing if not a risk taker, right? Listen, pal. Recycling—I know everybody’s doing it. But know that you’ve got, let’s say, a 95 percent chance of being busted, especially if you’re working with any of the following factors: • Your parents keep your old wedding photo displayed in the Aspen house, because your mom thinks she looks thin in it (she doesn’t). In fact, if former wedding photos exist, period—even if you think you can’t see rock in any of them—your fiancée will eventually ID your ex’s finger in her bling. • You and the ex share a kid. Here’s the direct quote: “My mommy had a ring just like that. Only hers was bigger.” • Female friends—and here we mean friends or “friends”—from your earlier marriage are still in your social circle. Women always remember the diamond. Get two glasses of Cuvée, I don’t care what kind, into that Muffy Enright, and girl will sing. So yeah, sure, go ahead and reuse. Just don’t be surprised if in this divorce, you don’t get it back.


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SMASH ACT

Anjelica Huston acts, she writes and she rehabs sick animals on the side. NATALIA DE ORY talks to the hardworking woman who puts the business back in show business

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PHOTOGRAPHED by THOMAS WHiTESiDE exotic pets. Many, she says, are abandoned or sold to zoos after their owners become overwhelmed. “People think they can control monkeys and big cats,” she says. “They can’t.” Huston wants to encourage more people to adopt animals from shelters and rescue groups. “There’s a surplus of potbellied pigs, which were fashionable in the ’80s and ’90s,” she explains. “They start out small, but suddenly people have a grown pig on their hands— not so good if you’re in an apartment. They also live a long time. My [late] husband gave me one for Thanksgiving. Giorgio the pig had a fine life, but he had lots of room to roam on the ranch.” That central California ranch serves as proof of her commitment to animals, literally. Besides caring for the many animals in permanent residence there, she uses it as a rescue center of sorts, taking in homeless and sick creatures. Along with eight horses and a miniature pony saved from an outdoor carousel, she says, “I have pigs, goats, chickens and a strange woolly sheep named Gus.” As if she weren’t busy enough, Huston is also writing her memoir. Besides covering her relationship with her director father, John Huston, her long romance with Jack Nicholson and her acting career, it will include recollections from her early days in fashion when she worked for legendary Vogue editor Diana Vreeland. “One of the first times I met her, I was asked to go to the magazine’s offices to try on clothes for a shoot. I fainted at her door,” she laughs. “When I came to, she was barking at her editors and assistants. I was really embarrassed, but she took over and was very maternal and sweet.” As she revisits her past, Huston has been enjoying reflecting on her storied existence.“Life just becomes more three-dimensional when you start writing about it.”

Anjelica Huston is featured in the new documentary Diana Vreeland: The Eye Has to Travel, which is directed by the editor’s granddaughter-in-law.

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njelica Huston, 61, has built a career on portraying seemingly indestructible women—like Mafia daughter Maerose in Prizzi’s Honor (which earned her an Oscar), evil Miss Eva Ernst in The Witches and eccentric matriarch Etheline in The Royal Tenenbaums. Now, in the hit NBC series Smash (returning for a second season), Huston plays Eileen Rand, an embattled Broadway producer with zero tolerance for BS and a fondness for throwing martinis at her ex-husband. But even without the gin slinging, Huston stands out in any crowd. Nearly four decades after she abandoned a thriving career as a fashion model in favor of acting, she still possesses a striking physicality with an imposing height (5′10″), trademark bob and expressive eyebrows. Smash is Huston’s first regular TV role. What especially appealed to her about the series, which follows the making of a musical about Marilyn Monroe, was its upbeat subject matter. “The show is not about grim forensics, hospitals or cops,” she says. “It’s about singing, dancing and human involvement. I’m excited to go to work every day.” Huston is equally passionate about her work as an animal rights advocate. When she was a little girl on movie sets, she noticed how often show-business animals were mistreated by being overworked and understimulated. Now she lobbies filmmakers to maintain better conditions for animals— or to not employ them at all. She also works with PETA to write letters to protect chimpanzees used in TV, film and commercials, protests fur farming in Ireland and rallies against the use of carriage horses that carry tourists through Central Park. “It’s some sort of throwback to old New York,” she says of the latter. “But I hate to see animals in pain or discomfort.” Huston also vehemently opposes the trend of keeping


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THE SMART SET Take a hands-on approach to desk work with these tactile, totemic accessories from British design firm Plant & Moss

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PHOTOGRAPHED by lEOn STEElE

Akita Desk Range (lamp, pen holder and tape dispenser) made of concrete, brass, copper and oak, designed by Tatsuya Akita for Plant & Moss, $710, plantandmoss.com.

Tatsuya Akita created the accessories (above) as his final school project at the U.K.’s Northumbria University, where he was discovered by Plant & Moss.


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he Huffington Post Media Group, with its 533-person newsroom, isn’t exactly a momand-pop operation, but that doesn’t prevent its namesake president and editor in chief from playing the part of den mother. Arianna Huffington says she “wants everything to be completely open and transparent” in her downtown Manhattan compound, which explains the large glass window in her office that looks out over her staff. Huffington’s office has a welcoming, lived-in vibe thanks to fun memorabilia such as a Wheaties box with her face on it, a gift given when she visited General Mills. There are also many photographs of her two daughters and, surprisingly for this digital trailblazer, loads of books. The Greek-born doyenne is quick to explain the anachronistic volumes. “Even though we are a digital newsroom, I’ve always believed

in representing the best of the old and the best of the new,” she says. Joining Huffington’s appreciation for literature is a love of art, particularly pieces with sentimental value. One of her favorites is a Picasso print—“Jacqueline With Flowers”—a birthday gift from Tim Armstrong, the AOL chief instrumental in the 2011 acquisition of the Huffington Post. “He bought it for me because he thought I look just like her,” Huffington, who wrote a 1988 biography of the artist, says with a laugh. And her apparent resemblance to Picasso’s second wife, Jacqueline Roque, isn’t the only similarity worth noting: Huffington herself is as warm and charming as her workspace. With snack bowls, scented candles and comfy chairs for one-on-ones with editors, all that seems to be missing from this executive’s office is a welcome mat outside the door. —Brooke BoBB

ARiAnnA huffingTOn

This media maven keeps an eye on her everexpanding empire while finding solace in a workspace that beautifully blends tradition with innovation. PhOTOgRAPhED by MiA bAXTER

In April 2012, the Huffington Post received its first Pulitzer Prize, an award given to David Wood for his 10-part series titled “Beyond the Battlefield,” about wounded veterans and their struggles when returning home. Online-only news organizations have been eligible for Pulitzers since 2009.


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GINA KEATING explains how

the $1 million Netflix Prize influences our lives

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con man has been carefully planning his scam for months. After getting a credit card in a phony name, he makes a series of purchases, followed by payments, and he then watches and waits as his spending limit rises. Finally the day comes for him to “bust out,” an industry term referring to a customer charging a card to the limit with resalable items and vanishing. But when the thief goes to the checkout, his card is declined. How was he found out? The answer has something to do with Netflix. Yes, Netflix. This real-life situation reveals just one of the areas in which technology perfected to win the Netflix Prize—a $1 million contest designed to improve the online movie-rental site’s recommendation system— is extending its influence. We generate reams of data every day, from supermarket trips and Internet browsing to Facebook posts and doctor visits. In ways no one predicted, the prize has accelerated the growth of the industry that tries to analyze and monetize our rapidly multiplying digital traces. Netflix was cofounded in 1997 by mathematician and software engineer Reed Hastings and direct-marketing guru Marc Randolph; one year later, they began mailing DVDs to subscribers. Pretty quickly, the men realized that if the website could be programmed to act similar

to a savvy video-store clerk—directing people to movies they loved, not just ones they liked—subscribers would keep returning. But unlike a Blockbuster employee who had an entire store’s worth of VHS movies to refer to, Netflix’s business rested entirely on DVDs, and the number of titles on the new format was limited. So the company’s virtual clerk had to really know customers’ tastes to match them to the thin catalog of films. Hastings and Netflix’s recommendations chief, Stan Lanning, developed a program called Cinematch. It relied on a “nearest neighbor”–type algorithm, or a mathematical formula, that clustered customers with similar tastes and examined all their ratings to create matrices of “neighbor” films. For example, a subscriber who had rated Apocalypse Now as a five-star film would be steered to movies he hadn’t seen yet but that had scored well with other members in the five-star Apocalypse Now group. Cinematch was a hit. It became good enough at forecasting customers’ likes that eventually most movies rented came from its prompts. But by 2006, it had hit a virtual wall in terms of its accuracy in predicting subscriber preferences, despite tinkering by Hastings and his engineers. Inspired by the British government’s Longitude Prize in the 18th century that perfected the

chronometer and revolutionized navigation, Hastings decided to hold his own 21st-century public challenge. The winning team or person would receive $1 million for being the first to create an algorithm that improved on Cinematch by 10 percent or more; additional $50,000 Progress Prizes would be awarded to the leaders at one-year intervals. The prize was open to anyone from any country allowed to do business with the U.S. Besides the cash, Netflix had a potent bit of computer-geek catnip to dangle: data. Since the contestants would need statistics to write their algorithms, the company was releasing 100 million ratings made on 18,000 movies by 480,189 members. For many programmers and mathematicians, the chance to work with the largest trove of real consumer data ever published was all the inducement they needed to jump in. The Netflix Prize kicked off in the fall of 2006, and by the contest’s end in the summer of 2009, it had attracted more than 51,000 contenders from 186 countries. It fostered a high degree of fierce yet friendly competition. Much of that was due to the fact that it was held almost entirely in the open, with teams tracked on a Netflix leader board, where they’d post their latest solutions. The site also hosted forums in which participants bonded (like about the one subscriber in the data

The top-five most frequently rated films by customers in the Netflix Prize data set were Miss Congeniality, Independence Day, The Patriot, The Day After Tomorrow and Pirates of the Caribbean.


nontraditional data, like comments, postings and looking at whom particular people interact with and how, is the next frontier for predictive algorithms. In August 2009, basking in the glow of the contest’s success, Netflix announced a second prize. This time, it said participants would have an even richer data set— they’d also receive subscriber ages, genders, zip codes, genre ratings and previously chosen movies. But two months later, a class-action lawsuit, Doe v. Netflix, was filed in federal court, and it tossed out a bombshell of a claim: that the first Netflix Prize “perpetrated the largest voluntary privacy breach to date, disclosing sensitive and personal identifying consumer information.” Plaintiff Jane Doe of Colorado was a closeted “lesbian who does not want her sexuality nor interests in gay and lesbian themes broadcast to the world,” and her lawyers alleged that her sexual preferences and identity could have been gleaned from the company data released—a subscriber ID number, movie title, the subscriber’s star rating for a film and the date of the rating. And her lawyers had proof: Two University of Texas researchers wrote an algorithm that compared all of the anonymous Netflix subscribers and their ratings with 50 Imdb.com users, and with that small pool, they said they could identify two individuals. On the heels of the lawsuit, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) sent a letter probing Netflix’s protection of its members’ privacy. By March 2010, Netflix had settled the suit, reached an understanding with the FTC and scuttled a second prize. What continues to concern privacy advocates about the Netflix-style release of our online information is that we view much of it, such as movie ratings and Facebook likes, as innocuous. Instead, we focus our worries on our Social Security, credit card or passport numbers getting out. But Jane Doe’s example shows that seemingly insignificant details can end up revealing secrets. Also troubling is that we may only know when or if such an ID’ing happens after the truth has already come out. “It’s like a trial where you are being processed, charged and evaluated in ways you don’t know about and don’t have the opportunity to respond to,” says Lee Tien of the Electronic Frontier Foundation. The Netflix Prize has galvanized other organizations to hold public science contests, but the officials involved with them have said they’re taking every precaution to prevent the unmasking of individuals. The Heritage Provider Network, a California physicians group, kicked off a two-year, $3 million competition in the spring of 2011, and it hired as a privacy consultant one of the Texas researchers who’d de-anonymized the Netflix data. The winner of the Heritage Health Prize will be the one who creates an algorithm that successfully predicts how many days a patient will spend in a hospital in the next year. Such a formula could have huge implications, both for our health care system and our economy—it could save some of the billions of dollars estimated to be a year spent on unnecessary hospitalizations in our country. Opera Solutions is currently near the top of the leader board. Gina Keating’s book Netflixed: The Epic Battle for America’s Eyeballs (Portfolio Books) will be published on Oct. 11.

In June, Netflix hit a streaming milestone: Worldwide, its subscribers watched a combined 1 billion hours—equivalent to more than 41 million days’ worth—of video.

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set who’d rated more than 17,000 movies) and shared their latest equations, methods and theories. And as the field dwindled, the boards became a place for rivals to meet and form alliances in an attempt to win. The first Progress Prize was won in October 2007 by a team called BellKor, three data-mining experts from AT&T Labs. They put in about 2,000 hours to craft a formula that combined 107 algorithms to improve on Cinematch by 8.43 percent. Over the next two years, however, progress slowed to fractions of a percent, as scientists reanalyzed the data to identify the infinite variables that affected people’s ratings. Netflix officials wondered if the prize could ever be won. Then, in July 2009, BellKor’s Pragmatic Chaos— which consisted of the men of team BellKor, a pair of software developers from Montreal and two Austrian

computer-science researchers—came up with a formula that surpassed the 10 percent mark set by Hastings. Much to their shock, so did the Ensemble, an international group of 35 scientists. Netflix officials said the deciding factor would be time, and after a 34-monthlong contest, the Ensemble lost out on $1 million because the group turned in its solution 20 minutes later than the winning team. Netflix ended up using two of the algorithms produced to refine Cinematch, and they’re still being used today. But surprisingly, the company never adopted the million-dollar formula. That’s because by the time the contest ended, its business model had shifted away from DVD rentals and to streaming video. Now programmers had so much more information than ratings and dates to assess: How much of a video did a customer watch before stopping? When was it stopped? How many videos did a person watch in a sitting? Did viewing preferences change when a subscriber watched on a phone vs. computer vs. Xbox? Still, the advances in algorithms driven by the Netflix Prize are proving to be invaluable in grappling with this influx of data. Strangely enough, the contest’s greatest effect was not on Cinematch but on the rest of the business world, and that impact is still playing out. More people swarmed into the field of data analytics, because as AT&T’s Robert Bell, a member of the winning team, put it, “winning the prize showed you don’t need a lot of heavy training and background.” More important, “the contest emphasized the power of algorithms in making accurate predictions,” said Jacob Spoelstra, head of R&D for Opera Solutions, a New York–based predictive-analytics firm and one of the main sub-teams in the Ensemble. “Often big organizations struggle with making sense of all the data they have.” At AT&T, the winners employed their victorious algorithm to detect customer fraud and to suggest TV shows for subscribers to its U-verse digital cable and Internet service. Opera Solutions used its secondplace finish and the knowledge gained in the process to transform itself into one of the top U.S. businesses churning through Big Data. By the prize’s conclusion, CEO Arnab Gupta estimated he’d already seen a $10 million internal payoff. Since then, Opera Solutions has been hired by a wide variety of private- and public-sector clients. It helped a hospital client crunch years of ER data to discover that patients were more likely to go in on weekends from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. and from February to April. Thanks to the analysis, the hospital redeployed its nurses and cut labor costs by 18 percent. For a retailer, the company devised an algorithm that scoured millions of credit card receipts to sniff out thieves. It learned that cardholders who suddenly change where they shop or what they buy, or who make expensive purchases of resalable items such as electronics, or who shop at times unusual for them might be on the verge of a “bust out.” Joe Sill, a member of the Ensemble, launched a consulting business out of his Netflix Prize fame and is now applying science to make predictions in the prosports arena; he’s working with the NBA’s Washington Wizards. Sill believes that scouring e-mails and social networks Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr for


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What does a $30,000 lunch taste like? You’d be surprised

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s news reports about fundraising fly this presidential election season, just as in years past, the masses wonder what exactly goes into one of those big-ticket meals attended by titans of industry and celebrities alike. “You would think for $30,000 a head, you’d get a proper meal,” dishes one Washington hostess who herself has raised millions of dollars for candidates, “but it’s often passed appetizers and a cheap bottle of wine.” The rationale heard: Any pricey extras—from a meal cooked by a celebrity chef to a musical performance—cut into a campaign’s bottom line. It might not seem fair, but a donation is about more than a square meal; it’s about access. “People pay to get into Sarah Jessica Parker’s apartment or see David Koch’s art collection,” says a prominent lobbyist. “After all, if you want to run with the bulls, you’ve got to pay up.” Still, some fundraiser hosts find ways to dazzle. So what goes into that five-figure meal to benefit your candidate of choice? We break it down by the numbers.

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Protesters arrested in July at a Mitt Romney fundraiser where a VIP ticket cost $25,000

The number of minutes Obama spoke at an Atherton, Calif., fundraiser attended by Lady Gaga—who was reported to tower about two feet over the POTUS thanks to her high heels

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The number on the Billboard charts reached by Kid Rock’s Born Free. The musician performed the album’s title track at a February rally for Romney at the campaign’s expense.

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The restaurant’s cost per person, not including alcohol, tax or tip, for an event at the Four Seasons Restaurant, where Warren Buffett hosted a $10,000-per-head Obama fundraiser in 2011. “If we know a fundraiser is for Republicans,” coowner Julian Niccolini says with a laugh, “we have to charge more.”

Price one New York Republican said she paid for an event featuring Ann Romney at Donald Trump’s Manhattan apartment. “They called it a luncheon,” she says, “but it was really just champagne.”

The number of guests at an Obama benefit George Clooney hosted in May. The Hollywood night raised a rumored $15 million, making it the most successful political fundraiser in U.S. history. The president reportedly stayed for 228 minutes.

Cost per couple at a Romney fundraiser held earlier this year in Southampton, N.Y., by billionaire David Koch

Amount Oprah Winfrey is rumored to have spent lighting her California estate for a 2008 Obama fundraiser

Estimated value of house where Koch threw his fundraiser In March, it was reported that British Prime Minister David Cameron was scolded for hosting dinners at his official residences for guests who’d donated a cumulative 18 million pounds. Penny-pinching Cameron is said to have cooked some of the meals himself.


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WHEN Wall StrEEt MEEtS WaSabi

HigH-end Japanese restaurants Have become tHe backdrops of cHoice for dealmakers. betH landman takes a seat

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n a balmy Friday night, while the noise levels at many sought-after Manhattan restaurants prevented any semblance of conversation, a few tables of suited diners were deep in muted but intense communication at Mihoko’s 21 Grams, which just opened in the Flatiron District. While sipping sake from cups rimmed with gold leaf, the patrons nibbled on spoonfuls of $70 per ounce Santa Barbara uni and nodded in appreciation as an heirloom tomato salad was presented in three bowls: One contained the sliced vegetable in various colors, another held tomato sorbet enveloped in cucumber foam and the third was a red soup drizzled with basil oil. For dealmakers, this environment makes exquisite sense. “Businesspeople have different lives than when heavy French food was in fashion,’’ says David Bouley, who made his name with French-influenced cuisine but is now focused on Japanese fare at his Tribeca restaurant, Brushstroke. “They go to the gym at all hours of the day and night and need energy: They work earlier, stay later. They like clean, straightforward flavors. After a Japanese meal they’re elated, not tired.’’ To cater to this crowd, Bouley added a sushi bar with omakases starting at $150 per person. Bouley’s not the only one to figure this out. Gari, known for such elegant creations as raw tuna topped with tofu sauce, and Masa, with a $350 omakase at its Time Warner Center fish palace, will open neighboring restaurants just around the corner from Brushstroke and the existing Nobu. The settings look to be as artistic and elegant as the food. “The rules were first broken at Matsuhisa, Nobu’s first place in L.A.,” says Richie Notar, who went on to open 22 Nobu restaurants with the famed chef. “Before that, Japanese chefs wouldn’t

take chances and the restaurants had no real vibe. Then Masa came along with his $500 omakase. That was the price; it’s not like you could go in and just have edamame and a glass of chardonnay. These days there’s a real status to high-end sushi: I can’t tell you how many people call to ask me for a table because they have a big deal to close.” Knowing uni from unagi gets points in the business world, and ordering items such as cod sperm or risky blowfish, which can be poisonous if prepared improperly, demonstrates a level of sophistication and nerve. Navigating a sushi list with finesse is edging out navigating a wine list for scoring Wall Street cred. “Savvy customers like to show off their knowledge by talking about the origins of various fish and asking for off-themenu items,’’ says Bouley. Familiarity with the chef who is preparing dinner in front of you is yet another advantage. “At a sushi bar the chef is with you, watching over your entire meal,’’ says Notar. “If you are a regular customer, he greets you and has something special up his sleeve.’’ Staggering tariffs don’t deter; they increase panache. “Masa is going to cost you an arm and a leg, but it makes

Serenity found: Mihoko’s 21 Grams

you look like a hero,” says Notar. According to Tora Matsuoka, an owner of Sen, a favorite little jewel box in the Hamptons that’s unveiling an outpost on West 21st Street in September, the prices are fully justified. “We serve a highly perishable, often exotic product that needs to be of the utmost quality because it’s not cooked or seasoned,” he explains. At Neta, a small spot that opened earlier this year on West 8th Street, a block known for funky little eateries, the $135 omakase includes truffled rice as well as toro topped with caviar. The response: Bring it. Says Notar: “Before, a lot of people thought, God, I don’t eat squid eye! Now the wall of intimidation has been broken down.”

“Courtney, you’re going to have the peanut butter soup with smoked duck and mashed squash. New York Matinee called it ‘a playful but mysterious little dish.’ You’ll love it. And then the red snapper with violets and pine nuts. I think that’ll follow nicely. —Patrick Bateman, American Psycho.


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Ladies Who Launch The 10x10 sociaL acTion campaign Cathie Black and Kayce Freed WHO:

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Jennings on changing the world for girls—with a little help from Meryl Streep. ADAM RATHE reports phoTogRaphed by VicToRia WiLL

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athie Black is taking notes. The topic is 10x10, a social action campaign aimed at raising the bar for the worldwide education of girls, and just across the living room table in her Park Avenue apartment, Black is jotting down what her friend, film producer and 10x10 executive Kayce Freed Jennings, is saying. Between questions, Black lobs her own, scribbling as she goes, and it’s easy to see how the women feed off of each other’s enthusiasm. There’s plenty to be passionate about. What started as a film project about alleviating global poverty has become much more: a global crusade to educate young women involving nine NGOs and comprising not only fundraising ventures but also multimedia projects, including a film (narrated, in part, by Meryl Streep) slated for theatrical release in March 2013, as well as events timed to coincide with the United Nations’ inaugural International Day of the Girl Child on Oct. 11. The draw of the project? “If you can educate girls,” says Black, the former president and chairman of Hearst Magazines, “you can change the world.” Jennings agrees. “It’s a fact,” she says. “You can argue about all sorts of things, but not the impact of educating girls and the impact it has on families, communities, countries and the world.” The women take turns listing education’s benefits: educated girls are less likely to contract HIV, become laborers against their wills, marry early or become young mothers. They’ll even live longer. “I’d like to see everyone aware of the impact that educated girls can have on our world,” says Jennings. “I’d like everyone to realize that investing in their daughters is a really powerful thing, a really good investment and not just the right thing to do, but the smart thing to do.” On Oct. 10, 10x10 will host a Manhattan event for the cause, premiering a trailer for the Tom Yellin– directed movie—which will present the stories of 10 girls, each told by a woman writer from the girl’s country—and featuring speakers on the plight of girls worldwide. The film will also be teased at the Sundance Film Festival. “It’s an auspicious time for us to launch,” says Jennings, “so we’re creating a major event in New York, but—more important—events all over the world to celebrate the girl, the empowerment of the girl and the value of the girl. We want people to be

able to act every time they hear about us.” Indeed, support for 10x10 can come in different ways. Of course, the group is already raising funds for the NGOs in its network (visit 10x10act.org to donate). However, other goals—like reaching 1 million social media impressions to spread the word about the cause — are just as important considering 10x10’s objective isn’t just to heighten awareness but also to change policy. It’s also an opportunity for the socially active, philanthropically inclined women to work on a project with deep personal meaning. “I’ve been involved in women’s issues since I first started working,” says Black. “I spent six years at Ms. during its early days. I also have a daughter who’s turning 21, and I know a lot of women who also have daughters, and we think about women and girls. Giving back to girls and women is what’s close to my heart.”

Black (left) and Jennings

“I’D lIKE EvEryOnE TO rEAlIzE InvESTIng In THEIr DAugHTErS IS A rEAlly pOWErFul THIng.” —CATHIE BlACK

The 10x10 isn’t the only group that’s benefited from Cathie Black’s advice; in 2007, Black released a memoir, Basic Black: The Essential Guide for Getting Ahead at Work (and in Life), which sold more than 130,000 copies.


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Finding the next Mark Zuckerberg

Nothing can guarantee a dot-com’s success, but getting into this exclusive boot camp is a great start. A new book takes us inside PhOtOgRAPhed by henRy hARgReAves

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n American Idol for the dot-com world—that’s one way Silicon Valley’s Y Combinator (YC) semiannual sessions have been described. In some respects, the comparison fits. YC’s young, talented contenders must endure a rigorous screening process and compete under intense pressure in the hopes of a shot at the big time. Run by computer science PhD turned entrepreneur and then angel investor Paul Graham and partners, YC is an ultraexclusive, 13-week accelerator for fledgling entrepreneurs trying to make their individual dot-coms—ranging from a rap-lyrics decoder to a marketplace for university-research lab work— take off. YC provides them with seed money, support and expert guidance. At the program’s end, the startups all receive the opportunity to pitch their ideas to the Valley’s savviest investors. In YC’s seven-year history, more than 400 companies have been born this way, including game changers Reddit, Airbnb and Dropbox. To report The Launch Pad (which Portfolio Books will publish in October), author Randall Stross got rare access to the summer 2011 session. YC was the perfect subject for Stross, a New York Times columnist who’s made a specialty out of innovation-spotting. He was the author of a 1993 Steve Jobs book, and he’s also written books about Google, venture capitalists and American businessmen in China. For The Launch Pad, Stross watched as 63 teams tried to upgrade their ramen reality into a champagne-popping payoff. DuJour asked the author to download some of what he learned. Y Combinator accepts about three percent of applicants. I know that Paul Graham likes people who are great programmers willing to work crazy hours. What else does he look for? He favors applicants whose team members have known one another and worked together for a long time. You don’t want to launch a start-up by yourself—that’s clear. It’s just too hard to do well. You need two or three people with complementary skills, a person to buck up the team when spirits flag. Most importantly, you need someone day and night whom you can bounce ideas off of. That’s key. What other conditions or factors can help lead to start-up success? Failure. It’s one aspect that’s least appreciated by outsiders, but it’s a great teacher. It toughens, and you need toughening to get through the start-up experience. If people can develop a capacity to absorb rejection and carry on, they greatly increase their chances. The best founders are ones who’ve been knocked around a bit. Steve Jobs achieved his greatest successes when he returned to Apple after going through

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12 years of largely failed experiments to make his second company viable. He learned a lot. Graham seems to favor many of the businessto-business realm teams over the consumerfocused start-ups. Why? Business-to-business or business-to-developers is less risky. It’s easier to identify your target customers. With consumers, you have to find a service that people will pay for, and people hate paying for things. Too often you have to train them. You don’t have to train businesses to invest in software. Let’s say a friend approaches me about investing in her venture. Any red flags to look for? Signs it could be a good investment? I’d caution people of average means from investing in only one or two companies. Angel investors who do this on a full-time basis invest in lots and lots of companies. They don’t believe they can pick major winners, so they use a portfolio approach. It’s no different than any other investment strategy—you need the protection of a portfolio. Is there anything employers can learn from Graham about getting the best out of people? Y Combinator doesn’t attempt to micromanage how the founders spend their time; in fact, it encourages them to work at home. I think it would be a wonderful thing if more employers were able to give that kind of autonomy to more of their workforce. Do you think that some day historians will look back and think of the start-up revolution as being as important as the industrial revolution? Comparison to the industrial revolution is not going to work. It would be hard to match that impact. But there doesn’t appear to be any limit to how many start-ups can be accommodated— their growth seems to continue unabated. I think it’s possible to imagine an economy in which the start-up sector might be as big as services or manufacturing. That will be the test of its impact. Does it become something more than just a path you take? Take the university system. Not so long ago you had your select institutions that few people went to and you also had your state universities, but higher education wasn’t something that a significant portion of the population experienced. Then, in the 1960s, higher education expanded, and now something like 40 percent of adults have postsecondary education. Maybe someday 40 percent of adults will have start-up experience. Do you think that would benefit our economy? I do, and the reason is very simple: No business is as agile as a small start-up. —Sharon Kunz

Drew Houston got the idea for cloud file-storage site Dropbox, a 2007 Y Combinator start-up, after he wanted to work on his laptop during a bus ride to Boston but found he’d forgotten his USB memory stick. Today the company is valued at an estimated $4 billion.


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THE PlaY: Moisés Kaufman’s The Heiress brings Jessica

THE SErIES: The Upper East Side continues to be an object of fascination for network TV. The latest instance is ABC’s 666 Park Avenue, a show about a Midwestern couple (above) who takes over the management of a building where the landlord might be the devil.

YOur TalkIng POInT: Anderson reportedly screened the flick for his pal, Scientologist Tom Cruise, who was supposedly not thrilled with the film, rumored to be inspired by his own controversial religion.

YOur TalkIng POInT: Kaufman’s talent for working with screen stars onstage, like Robin Williams in 2011’s Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo. Or the finer points of a prenup.

YOur TalkIng POInT: Evil may call Park Avenue home, but

THE MOVIE: Steven Spielberg films are practically a na-

THE PlaY: As far as Broadway shows go, Chaplin is a sure bet: It combines the guaranteed box office that comes with a recognizable name—perennial favorite Charlie Chaplin’s—and the high-concept idea of watching a live show about a silent-movie star without the mind-numbing quiet.

THE alBuM: Sure, David Byrne was the front man for the Talking Heads, but he’s also a world-renowned visual artist, and he has dabbled in opera, ballet and movie scores as well. Love This Giant, his record with upand-coming rocker St. Vincent, is as interesting and eclectic as art pop’s éminence grise himself.

YOur TalkIng POInT: Chaplin was more than a famous actor; he was also the victim of grave robbers. In March 1978, bandits stole his corpse and held it hostage for 11 weeks before being caught by police.

YOur TalkIng POInT:

Most people will have some knowledge of Byrne; you can one-up them by knowing St. Vincent’s 2011 masterpiece, Strange Mercy.

YOur TalkIng POInT: You can go highbrow, discussing Spielberg’s source material—a tome by presidential scholar Doris Kearns Goodwin—or join the fray wondering what was really going on between Lincoln and his buddy Joshua Speed.

the building used for exterior shots in this show is actually the Upper West Side’s legendary Ansonia, located at 73rd Street and Broadway.

Three friends (Kirsten Dunst, Isla Fisher and Lizzy Caplan) disregard a bride’s instructions for a low-key party and have their own celebration of the impending nuptials—complete with neuroses, black humor and clouds of cocaine—in Bachelorette, writer-director Leslye Headland’s big-screen debut.

THE alBuM:

After an 11-year hiatus—hard to imagine considering Gwen Stefani’s celebrity-weekly ubiquity—No Doubt, the 1990s’ defining ska-rock band, is back with Push and Shove, an album that, judging by its lead single, “Settle Down,” finds the band no less ferocious than when we last saw them.

THE SErIES: Glee mastermind Ryan Murphy’s American

YOur TalkIng POInT: Headland named Dunst’s character,

YOur TalkIng POInT: Stefani and husband Gavin Rossdale have two kids, and among the members of No Doubt there are five others. Anyone thinking of quiting a band to focus on rug rats, take note: It’s possible to do both.

YOur TalkIng POInT: Most of the major cast members from season one of the series—which followed a totally different story—aren’t returning. Could changing characters every season become the new TV norm?

Regan, after Linda Blair’s role in The Exorcist and Caplan’s Gena after John Cassavetes’ wife and muse, actress Gena Rowlands.

Horror Story returns for its second season completely rebooted, with new characters and an entirely different premise. This time around, the setting is a 1960s asylum run by Jessica Lange (playing a nun). Chloë Sevigny, Clea DuVall and Adam Levine costar.

Entertainment’s a bit different at 30,000 feet: The most popular in-flight movies on recent Blue Star Jets private-charter trips have included Forrest Gump, Meet the Parents and the Wall Street sequel.

If YOu’rE TakIng THE BuS . . .

THE MOVIE:

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF THE WEINSTEIN COMPANY; ROBIN MARCHANT/FILMMAGIC; COURTESY OF ABC; 4AD/TODO MUNDO; DAN MACMEDAN/WIREIMAGE, LARRY BUSACCA/GETTY IMAGES; ALEx TROCHUT; YU TSAI; COURTESY OF RADIUS-TWC; GETTY IMAGES.

tional pastime. Now the director is getting really patriotic with Lincoln, a Tony Kushner–penned flick about the final months of the 16th president (played by Daniel Day-Lewis).

Chastain to the stage. The 1947 Henry James–inspired show (which had a Tony-winning 1995 revival) is about, well, an heiress and her suitor, whose intentions might not be so pure.

If YOu’rE flYIng COMMErCIal . . .

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THE MOVIE: Discerning types will want to see The Master, Paul Thomas Anderson’s film about a magnetic 1950s thinker (Philip Seymour Hoffman) and the spiritual organization he helms. Joaquin Phoenix and Amy Adams costar.

If YOu’rE flYIng PrIVaTE . . .

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Cultural CliffsNotes Your cheat sheet to this fall’s music, film, TV and theater—from highbrow to low


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ost New Yorkers who relocate to Los Angeles typically complain about things like living in their cars, the citywide obsession with the latest juice bar and exercise trend, and the fact that nobody reads the paper since Deadline Hollywood reports all the news they could possibly need. I, too, have uttered each of these complaints, but when I moved to the West Coast last year after spending my life in Manhattan, the thing I missed more

than anything was the New York theater scene. Despite a few exceptions— although movie director Jason Reitman’s readings at LACMA are part of its film program, they’re the best live performances I’ve seen here—L.A. is not a theater town unless you want to catch the touring production of last year’s hit Broadway musical. I’ve always been a bit of a theater nerd. Growing up, I would sing along to Rodgers and Hammerstein during

our long car rides to Long Island, much to my family’s dismay. At school, my friends looked at me like I was crazy when I asked them who the Spice Girls were; my version of a top 40 hit was “Soliloquy” from the musical Carousel. By the time I started college at Columbia, I tried to go to a show a week—often alone, since ticket prices are absurdly high and fairly few 20-somethings seem to care about the theater. While I’m critical

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New York native Bee Shaffer grew up singing show tunes on family trips. What happens when a self-described theater nerd moves 3,000 miles from the Great White Way?


a story—I’m a big fan of his, and it’s always exciting to see his work. Of course, while he is talented, Mamet isn’t exactly light and easy, and you may want to lighten the mood. And the perfect antidote to cynicism is . . . The new revival of Annie. Producers held a nationwide talent search to find the perfect orphan, and tween Lilla Crawford certainly looks adorable enough to win over audiences. With classic song-and-dance numbers like “Tomorrow,” “The Hard Knock Life” and “You’re Never Fully Dressed Without a Smile,” this Annie, directed by Tony winner James Lapine, will be a nice break from the jukebox musicals that have taken over Broadway in the past decade.

Shannon was hysterical and physically brilliant, and he’s one of the most commanding actors I’ve seen on the stage. His Mistakes director Dexter Bullard is helming Grace, and Paul Rudd and Ed Asner also star. Off-Broadway, If There Is I Haven’t Found It Yet is the American premiere from talented young British playwright Nick Payne. Featuring Jake Gyllenhaal in a very dark role, the play centers on a family going through a difficult time— the father is immersed in his work, and overweight daughter Anna is being bullied at school—when Anna’s estranged uncle Terry (Gyllenhaal) suddenly shows up. The play was well received when it debuted in London a few years back, and with Gyllenhaal and Brían F. O’Byrne

ONSTAGE THIS FALL:

The Steppenwolf Theatre Company’s production of Edward Albee’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? provides a completely different sort of family fun. The latest version features Amy Morton, best known for her performance in Broadway’s August: Osage County, and Tracy Letts, the Pulitzer Prize– winning writer of that play, as George and Martha, one of the most dysfunctional couples in American theater. The play is an unquestionable masterpiece, and this particular production got rave reviews when it opened in Chicago. But be warned—it’s at least three hours long. My advice: Go early in your week. Craig Wright’s new tragicomedy, Grace, to be headlined by Michael Shannon, is something I was thrilled to read about. In Wright’s 2010 show, Mistakes Were Made, Shannon played a second-rate theater producer who was struggling to keep his professional and personal lives afloat. It was one of the most impressive performances I’ve seen:

leading the cast, I’m sure it’ll be one of the season’s best. Also off-Broadway is The Great God Pan from exciting young American Amy Herzog. Her 4000 Miles and Belleville— the latter to be staged at the New York Theatre Workshop in the spring—are two of the most engaging and heartbreaking plays I’ve read. Her writing is beautiful, quiet and restrained, a welcome change from the over-the-top monologues many playwrights feel they must include during their climax. She hasn’t yet. In lieu of another musical, for a light capper I’d recommend Bad Jews, a comedy from newcomer Joshua Elias Harmon. The story centers on two cousins fighting over their grandfather’s chai necklace when they come together for his funeral. The writing is sharp and funny, and Tracee Chimo—excellent in the plays Bachelorette and Circle Mirror Transformation—is sure to steal the show as Daphna, the obnoxious, entitled but ultimately insecure lead.

One of this fall’s most-watched performances will be Katie Holmes in her first postmarital acting role. She’ll star in the dark comedy Dead Accounts by Theresa Rebeck (creator of TV’s Smash).

If There Is I haven’T found IT YeT LAuRA PELS THEATRE

Opening: September 20

Cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Brían F. O’Byrne, Michelle Gomez, Annie Funke

GraCe CORT THEATRE

Opening: OCtOber 4

Cast: Michael Shannon, Paul Rudd, Ed Asner, Kate Arrington

Who’s afraId of vIrGInIa WooLf? BOOTH THEATRE

Opening: OCtOber 13

Cast: Tracy Letts, Amy Morton, Carrie Coon, Madison Dirks

Bad JeWs BLACK BOx THEATRE Cast: Tracee Chimo, Phillip Ettinger, Molly Ranson, Michael Zegen

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AL PACINO, JAKE GYLLENHAAL, DEBRA WINGER

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about what I like—in general, I think everything is too long, and too many actors put on their “theater voices” at the expense of seeming natural— I’ll still see almost anything. Since my move, I’ve treated myself to biannual trips home—in the fall and spring—for a week of theater. And I do mean a week of theater, when I’ll see seven or eight shows in as many days. This, of course, is a totally different experience than committing to a single play a week. Careful planning is essential. I make sure to include some musicals and intermission-less 90-minute plays in the mix—I won’t torture myself with a full week’s worth of three-hour dramas. (I once told a film critic that I didn’t want to see a movie because it looked depressing, and her response was, “Is great art ever really depressing?” The answer is yes.) So, if you have only one week to spend in New York City this fall and you’re interested in catching a Broadway show—or seven or eight— here are my suggestions: The highly-anticipated revival of David Mamet’s Glengarry Glen Ross, starring Al Pacino and directed by Daniel Sullivan. Of course, Pacino isn’t new to the piece, having played Ricky Roma in the 1992 film version, but this time he’ll take on the struggling and desperate Shelly Levene, while Bobby Cannavale plays Roma. Since the play was revived in a brilliant production only seven years ago—with Liev Schreiber in a Tonywinning performance—some might say it’s too soon. But Glengarry is arguably Mamet’s best work, and with such a strong creative team, why not bring it back? Besides, Pacino live onstage never disappoints. The Anarchist, also by Mamet. This new work, directed by the playwright and making its world premiere on Broadway, is a two-hander starring Patti LuPone and Debra Winger. LuPone, a musical-theater legend making a rare turn in a drama, will play an inmate in a women’s prison seeking parole from the warden (Winger). Although I found Mamet’s most recent new play, Race, uneven—it felt more like a lecture than

Opening: OCtOber 30

annIe PALACE THEATRE

Opening: NOvember 8

Cast: Lilla Crawford, Katie Finneran, Anthony Warlow, Brynn O’Malley

GLenGarrY GLen ross GERALD SCHOENFELD THEATRE

Opening: NOvember 11

Cast: Al Pacino, Bobby Cannavale, David Harbour, Richard Schiff

The anarChIsT LYCEuM THEATRE

Opening: deCember 2

Cast: Patti LuPone, Debra Winger

The GreaT God pan MAINSTAGE THEATRE

Opening: deCember 18 Cast: Judith Ivey


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Two femmes fatales storm the small screen this fall. LINDSAY SILBERMAN goes undercover

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ctor Andrew Rannells is having a blockbuster year. He scored a Tony nod for his role in Broadway’s The Book of Mormon and captivated audiences as Elijah, Hannah’s gay ex-boyfriend, on HBO’s Girls. This fall he stars in the new NBC sitcom The New Normal, where he’ll play one-half of a gay couple expecting a child via a surrogate mother. Four things to know about him:

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He’s famous in the Japanese anime world. As a high school student in Nebraska, Rannells got work as a voice actor for the cartoons Pokémon and Yu-Gi-Oh!, and he still meets fans who recognize him for those characters.

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He was constantly starstruck by the celebrities who went to see The Book of Mormon. The list includes Jim Carrey, Goldie Hawn, Hugh Jackman, Elisabeth Shue, Michelle Pfeiffer, Al Pacino—and a certain sitcom star of the late ’80s and early ’90s. “I met Judith Light! I loved Who’s the Boss? when I was younger. It’s crazy to have these moments when I meet people and I think, I watched you all the time when I was a kid, and now you’re standing in front of me!”

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He still doesn’t “get” Los Angeles. After living in New York City for 13 years, Rannells has temporarily relocated to the West Coast to film The New Normal. “If one more person tells me how close I am to the mountains, it’s so ridiculous. Why would I want to go to the mountains? What would I do when I get there? I’ll always be a New Yorker at heart.”

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itting at a bar in the desolate North African desert, an undercover agent suddenly hears a truck engine rumbling outside. Seconds later, three men burst into the bar. They’re all furious, and they’re all wielding weapons. Adrenaline and instinct kick in as the spy takes them down one by one, dispatching the first by dousing him with a kerosene-like substance and setting him on fire and then shooting the second man. The third attacker puts up more of a fight, until his neck is snapped by the agent’s bare hands. This violent, heart-pounding scene is our intro to the latest take-no-prisoners female operative on prime-time TV: Sam Hunter (Melissa George, above left), the protagonist in the new Cinemax series, Hunted. Sam works for Byzantium, a morally ambiguous private firm specializing in global intelligence and espionage. The show, which premieres Oct. 19, follows Sam as she performs her missions while struggling to flush out the mole on her team who tried to get her killed. As a woman spy on TV, Sam has some stellar company: Carrie Mathison, the CIA officer portrayed by Claire Danes (above right) on Showtime hit Homeland, which returns for a second season on Sept. 30. Not since the glory days of ABC’s Alias with Jennifer Garner as tough, wig-wearing CIA agent Sydney Bristow have women had such license to kick butt. Like Sydney, Carrie and Sam are complex, engaging characters: savvy, independent and physically strong yet emotionally vulnerable and even a bit damaged. “Growing up, I watched loads of TV, and my favorite shows were Mission Impossible and I Spy,” says Frank

Spotnitz, Hunted’s creator and an executive producer. Spotnitz is best known for his role as a writer and an executive producer on The X Files. A few years ago, he wanted to write an espionage drama. “But it was daunting to think about because there’s been so much good work. How do you do something different?” His solution: Make the lead a woman. He says, “It subverts expectations. X Files, for example, worked because we flipped the genders. People assumed the coldhearted scientific mind would be the man, so it was much more interesting for him to be the believer and the woman to be the scientist.” Spotnitz also liked that throwing a female into the male-dominated spy world would instantly render her an underdog. He actually had a chance to work with Howard Gordon, Homeland’s writer and codeveloper, back when Gordon authored a few episodes of The X Files. Spotnitz is frank in his admiration of Homeland. “I think it’s terrific. It’s great and smart and compelling.” With Hunted, Spotnitz aims to deliver a program that combines suspense and action with a “psychological complexity” in the vein of Homeland. And just as Claire Danes’ Carrie struggles with mental illness, Sam has her own trauma to overcome: her mother’s murder. He says, “At the heart of every episode is the theme: Can any of us overcome our past?”

The Book of Mormon has also led actor Josh Gad to success offstage: He stars in the fall NBC sitcom 1600 Penn, and he’s also playing Apple cofounder Steve Wozniak in an upcoming biopic about Steve Jobs (to be portrayed by Ashton kutcher).

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He’s either psychic, determined— or both. His mom recently unearthed his fourth grade “What I Want to Be When I Grow Up” book in the basement of their family’s home in Omaha. In it, he had written that he wanted to go to college in New York City [he attended Marymount Manhattan College for two years] and be an actor on Broadway. Done and done.


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Nicholas Jarecki’s smart, riveting Arbitrage dissects crimes of the upper crust. AdAm RAthe does some detective work

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ArbitrAge’s ROBeRt milleR is the lAtest iN A lONG liNe OF lOw-dOwN hiGh ROlleRs ON Film— meet sOme OF his pRedecessORs

PatrIck BatEMaN

The titular maniac in American Psycho, the sensational 1991 best seller and the 2000 Christian Bale flick, Bateman specializes in mergers and acquisitions at a brokerage house—that is, when he’s not slaughtering coworkers or prostitutes.

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“I knew this world because my parents were in it,” says Jarecki, who attended the elite Upper West Side private school Collegiate and whose family owns the private island of Guana in the British Virgin Islands. Although he’s now based in Los Angeles, Jarecki notes, “I grew up in New York City and saw it every day in front of me. There’s a lot of power; there’s a lot of information. And it has a dark side.” That’s more than apparent as Miller and his gang of high-class henchmen do their best to fudge documents and cover his tracks, while audiences are led on a chauffeur-driven trip through the all-too-familiar world of a master whose universe is crumbling. “I like to be with a character you don’t know quite how you feel about, someone who challenges you,” says Jarecki. “I wasn’t interested in doing a movie about Madoff, so I thought of a guy who’s good but has gone wrong, who has started to think he’s invincible.” Miller believes that if everyone will just do his bidding, he’ll get off scot-free. That’s exactly the dynamic that keeps Arbitrage exciting. He’s a dirty, arrogant liar, sure, but after a lifetime of wheel greasing, is he one who can slip right off the hook? “I tried to think about how I could put Robert Miller in a predicament where we could see him faced with a real crisis,” the director says. “Would he give up power to hang onto his last shred of humanity? It felt

like a modern theme, something that was old but still current.” That gray area is just what makes the film compelling, says Brit Marling, who has a degree in economics and was a Goldman Sachs intern before turning down a full-time job to focus on a career in Hollywood. Considering her thoughts on Miller’s world, it’s probably a good thing she left the financial sector. “How we live right now—we’re obsessed with obtaining minor results along the way instead of focusing on the bigger picture,” the actress says. “The culture has just become unsatisfied; we have insatiable appetites that just want more. More is the engine that drives everything forward.” In part, she found Jarecki’s movie appealing because it doesn’t condemn Miller’s lifestyle so much as probe it. “It’s not glamorizing that world, it’s letting you inside in a way that shows all of the different sides and humanity that’s at the center of it,” she says. “I like that the movie doesn’t land on easy answers.” What it does land on is the sort of smart look at the haut monde—with notes of Six Degrees of Separation and even The Great Gatsby— that’s neither fawning nor sensationalized. It’s a gripping thriller that asks just how much we’re willing to give up to have it all.

GOrDON GEkkO

Michael Douglas’ Gekko, the kinetic villain of 1987’s Wall Street, known for his era-defining declaration that “Greed is good,” remains the textbook example of a Wall Street malefactor—despite the disappointing 2010 sequel.

ShErMaN MccOY

In 1990’s The Bonfire of the Vanities, Tom Hanks portrays McCoy, a bond trader whose life is thrown into turmoil when he and his mistress are involved in a hit-and-run. In the 1990 adaptation of the Tom Wolfe classic, McCoy might not be completely evil, but this Master of the Universe’s fall from grace is stunning just the same.

LOuIS WINthOrPE III

A pampered commodities broker, Dan Aykroyd’s Winthorpe gets his comeuppance after he’s forced to switch rungs on the social ladder with Eddie Murphy’s con man in 1983’s Trading Places.

Nicholas Jarecki isn’t the only member of his family to mine the social stratosphere for content. His filmmaker brother Andrew (brother Eugene is also in the business) set his first feature film, 2010’s inspired-by-true-events thriller All Good Things, in the Manhattan real estate world.

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t’s said that money can’t buy happiness. But when Robert Miller, the filthy-rich hedge funder played by Richard Gere in September’s Arbitrage, is delivered, by way of private plane and Town Car, to his Upper East Side manse just in time for his pictureperfect family to toast his 60th birthday, it’s hard to believe that adage is true. As viewers will soon learn, and as Miller himself must already suspect, his very costly contentment is about to run its course. Arbitrage, the first narrative film from director Nicholas Jarecki (who wrote 2008’s The Informers and directed the 2005 documentary The Outsider), follows Miller through what must be the most trying week of his charmed life. He’s attempting to unload his fund before anyone notices the books are cooked and juggle his socialite wife (Susan Sarandon) and hot-tempered mistress (Laetitia Casta), an up-and-coming French artist whose work is sold mostly to Miller. The money problem is intensified by the digging around of Miller’s daughter and employee (Ivanka Trump ringer Brit Marling) and the mistress problem by a car crash that would make Myrtle Wilson herself wince. When Miller calls in a favor from the son of a former employee—a drug offender whose devotion to Miller is never quite assured—it only serves to spread around the guilt. This is a world that Jarecki, the son of renowned trader, MovieFone founder and Yale professor Henry Jarecki, is intimately familiar with, but he manages to approach it with an outsider’s fascination.

In 2000’s Boiler Room, Giovanni Ribisi plays Davis, a college dropout turned broker for a shady firm dedicated to bilking clients of their savings. Davis is seduced by the big houses and fast cars of his corrupt coworkers but is eventually dragged down alongside the Long Island bankers who confuse Gordon Gekko for a life coach.


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In The Love Doll (Salon 94/Tomio Koyama Gallery, $50), photographer Laurie Simmons (and the mother of Lena Dunham) documents the rich imaginary life of a full-size Japanese silicone doll. In these staged photos, the doll scales walls, takes bubble baths and, along the way, become a regular part of Simmons’ life.

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Take an expertly curated tour through the artist’s early work and influences, and watch as his style evolves from surrealist to abstract— leading to his iconic color fields in Mark Rothko: The Decisive Decade 1940–1950 (Skira Rizzoli, $50).

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For the best dressed table in town

Spanning the ’40s through the ’90s, the sumptuous photos in Slim Aarons: La Dolce Vita (Abrams, $85) showcase the bygone glory of life in Rome, Capri, Lake Como and other Italian beauty spots. It’s the next best thing to time travel.

From 1997 to 2010, photographer Anne Deniau had unparalleled backstage access at Alexander McQueen’s fashion shows. Love Looks Not With the Eyes (Abrams, $75) reminds us of the designer’s staggering brilliance and the beauty that he left behind.

With a touring exhibit and a Louis Vuitton collaboration, 2012 has been a banner year for the octogenarian artist. Page through Yayoi Kusama (Rizzoli, $75) to see her sculptures, paintings and installations, which bust through all boundaries and conventions.

Humpty Dumpty crashes into a Gaultier-clad model. A pilot tries to lift off in a baguette. Pink fireworks explode in a manor house. You’ll delight in the fashion photographer’s visual daydreams in Tim Walker Story Teller (Abrams, $75).

Home decor fans can take shelter this fall with new books from interior designers Barbara Barry, Nate Berkus, Darryl Carter, Thom Filicia, Kathryn M. Ireland and Charlotte Moss.

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In House (Rizzoli, $85), actress and architecture/ design aficionado Diane Keaton presents a range of homes that combine her must-haves: simplicity, function and fun. You’ll find it impossible not to be inspired by these warm and witty remodels.


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War, they say, is hell. But fame isn’t always a cakewalk either. This month, two debut novelists offer fresh, fictional takes on these two perennially fascinating— but very different—topics. FROM LEFT: COURTESy OF RIvERHEAD; GROvE/ATLAnTIC, InC.

Lauren WaTerman

turns the page

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lsa Pitts, née Emerson, is 19 and pregnant with her second child when she’s finally asked the question she’s been waiting to hear ever since arriving in Los Angeles, via bus, more than two years before: “Have you ever thought about acting?” The truth, she promptly admits, is that she’s thought of little else. From the moment in 1929 when a then 9-yearold Elsa first set foot on a stage at the summer-stock theater her parents owned and operated in Door County, Wis., she was hooked, “high”—as Emma Straub

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writes in her fantastic first novel, Laura Lamont’s Life in Pictures—“as light and full of air as an escaped balloon vanishing over the treetops.” Luckily for Elsa, her interlocutor is none other than Irving Green, the second in command at a successful Hollywood studio; in short order, he changes her name to Laura Lamont, dyes her blonde hair black and turns her into a silverscreen star. Straub’s own rise has been hardly less meteoric: The 32-year-old daughter of best-selling horror novelist Peter Straub, she published a well-regarded collection of short stories, Other People We Married, in 2011. And Laura Lamont is sure to increase her fan club: It retains the charm and intimacy of her previous work, but the scope is enlarged, and the plot is downright cinematic—it follows its heroine’s career all the way through to 1980. “The idea came from an obituary I read in the New York Times, for the actress Jennifer Jones,” Straub explains. “This novel isn’t about her, but that’s where I started. . . . I wanted to get way, way outside my own life and experiences.”

But for David Abrams, the author of Fobbit, his own life experiences were exactly the point, becoming rich fodder for his fiction. In fact, Staff Sgt. Chance Gooding, the primary protagonist of this 2005-set Iraq War satire, is close to the bone. “Chance is a midcareer soldier who’s never been to war, and that was me,” the author says. “He works in a military task-force headquarters in Baghdad, writing reams of useless press releases for civilian news agencies that will probably never read them. That was me, too.” Stationed, for 14 hours a day, in a cubicle in one of Saddam Hussein’s many air-conditioned, marble-floored palaces, Gooding at first views his deployment with, as Abrams writes, “equal parts dread and annoyance— fear of being killed at any moment, yes; but also irritation at the fact that he was now on what felt like a yearlong camping trip.” With his lavender-vanilla body wash and dust-covered rifle, he is surprisingly sheltered. But, inevitably, the horrors occurring on a near-daily basis outside the base’s fortified walls begin to creep in. And, unlike his alter ego, Abrams

(who retired from the U.S. Army in 2008) isn’t afraid to go beyond the Green Zone: He’s created a small platoon of characters that allow the reader to infiltrate martial life at every level. (Comparisons to M*A*S*H are all but inevitable.) Many have Dickensiansounding monikers, like the dangerously hapless Captain Shrinkle, unable to make a single decent decision on the terrorist-targeted, civilian-filled city streets that pass, in this war, for a battlefield. Clearly, Abrams’ firsthand knowledge of his topic is not just useful, but essential. The writer’s vivid, jargon-peppered portrait of life on a Forward Operating Base—and of the FOB’s many base-bound inhabitants, known, derogatively, as Fobbits—is so compelling precisely because it feels very real, albeit improbably funny. Like Straub’s book, it’s a rare fictional close-up on a world that’s more often been documented in newspapers and magazine articles. Together, these two debuts prove that while truth might occasionally be stranger, a novel making such deft use of character and environment can be every bit as true.

Another novel to watch for is Erika Robuck’s absorbing Hemingway’s Girl, about a fisherman’s daughter hired as a maid by Ernest Hemingway’s second wife.

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“Avalanche,” 2011

CAROLE BAYER SAGER LOS ANGELES The stellar songwriter is now earning WHO:

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“Gallery,” 2012

attention for her abstract art (and her uncanny celebrity portraits). ALEXANDRA PEERS takes a closer look

hen you get caught between the moon and New York City, the best that you can do is fall in love. Carole Bayer Sager won an Oscar for that sentence and for the ones that preceded and followed it in “Arthur’s Theme,” the song she penned with Burt Bacharach and Peter Allen for the 1981 comedy Arthur. The trophy sits next to various Grammys, Emmys and other awards she’s garnered for many tunes, including the James Bond theme “Nobody Does It Better” and the widely recorded “Don’t Cry Out Loud.” She became a famous songwriter, and you certainly know her songs. But songwriting was her old life. She has a new one: painter. Recently we talked to Bayer Sager about her artwork, a conversation that included her good friend, Steve Martin, calling in from Canada—frankly, one of the better art collectors in the nation—and we delved into her recent excursion into abstraction. Bayer Sager and Martin are the kind of friends who met so long ago that they don’t even remember quite when. “We were at a poker game . . . ” says Martin. “Phil Rubin’s house?” she asks, adding, “We invited you to play poker; we always wanted to play with you.” Even back then, whenever then was, the two shared the same friends, an arty and impressive set: David Geffen, Eric Fischl, Nora Ephron. And they have something else in common, says Martin. “She’s very funny. You couldn’t make it through show business without being funny, without a sense of humor.” And then they also share the portrait. Bayer Sager started painting just short of five years ago, taking lessons daily, experimenting with technique and, often, painting friends. One day her eyes lit upon a photo she snapped of Steve and his wife, Anne Stringfield. A bright day, a happy couple on vacation in Sicily, and she used the space in between them to experiment, skillfully, with an abstraction of trees. It had elements of Fischl, of Alex Katz, but it is her own style. “When we saw it, we were really taken aback,” said Martin. “It’s not only a good portrait, it’s a good painting—the surface of the picture is very interesting... There’s something really different about it.” Bayer Sager had started another, unrelated work, become unhappy with it and scrubbed it, she explains, but some traces and textures remained: “That’s the canvas I used.”

“What’s Left Behind,” 2011

Other friends she’s painted include a smiling Steven Spielberg, puppy in his lap; Michael Chow of the eponymous, celebrity-packed restaurants; Nicole Kidman and Keith Urban; David Geffen. And so she’s finding her way into some major collections. By and large, Bayer Sager’s work hasn’t been reviewed by the scholarly art journals. She helped with programming at one of the first spaces that showed her art, the L.A. Art House, and that can raise questions, and perhaps eyebrows. But the work is good. Martin’s endorsement confirms that. A bunch of Hollywood types have fine art collections, but they’re often almost accidental, as the producer or director or star is talked into whatever pricey acquisition is available that week. Martin’s collection, on the other hand, has been amassed over decades and has a breadth and sophistication—Edward Hopper’s haunting and exquisite “Hotel Window” (at $27 million, it was once in the Malcolm Forbes collection, and it set the record for the artist in 2007) as well as David Hockney’s “The Little Splash”; Francis Bacon’s “Study for Portrait”; works by Picasso, Seurat, even de Kooning’s “Two Women.” In a town where the word masterpiece gets thrown around to

Researchers at the University of Scranton in Pennsylvania released a study this year stating that popcorn, sans butter, oil and salt, is rich in polyphenol antioxidants, which prevent damage to cells and have disease-fighting properties.


“Peanut Butter,” 2012

“Steve & Anne,” 2011

The Crow: New Songs for the Five-String Banjo, written and performed by Steve Martin, won the Grammy in 2010 for best bluegrass album.

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ALL ArTWork: CAroLe BAyer SAGer

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describe talking-animal movies, he owns several true masterpieces. The Bayer Sager life-size portrait hangs in Martin’s home in Santa Barbara, Calif., alongside a work by Mark Grotjahn, a painter represented by powerhouse dealer Larry Gagosian; a Bryan Hunt sculpture; and an April Gornik. Good company. Martin says, “It doesn’t matter that it’s about me; it’s flattering without being flattering.” He adds as an aside: “My wife looks great” in it. Bayer Sager’s newest work, being unveiled this fall, is of hyperrealistic oversize popcorn and peanuts. Powerful and pop-y, it almost crunches. The show opens at the William Turner Gallery in Santa Monica, on Nov. 1st. Her decision to shift styles is social as much as aesthetic: “Some people asked me to paint their portraits, and I didn’t know if I wanted to,” she explains. Also, she paints from photographs and “some don’t lend themselves to creativity.” Michael Govan, director of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, will likely drop by for the opening; she’s on his board of directors, and Govan has been a great mentor, Bayer Sager says. As for Martin, he may see his old friend sooner. They’re all going to get together to catch the Bourne Legacy when he’s back in town. How Hollywood.


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THE WEll-ObsErvEd lifE This fall, Mark Helprin returns with

another big novel set in New York City. PAMELA STOCK reports

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apprenticed as a child to a Shakespearean acting company so that her impoverished family would have one less mouth to feed. “Her English was magnificent although she never got beyond the eighth grade,” he says. His father’s eclectic, impressive résumé includes rounding up children to serve as focus groups for Charlie Chaplin’s films (he himself was only 8 at the time!), traveling through North Africa, Asia and the Middle East to purchase sheep intestines for his family’s meatprocessing business, writing about theater and film for the New York Times and, eventually, running a movie studio. On the side, he helped gather intelligence for the U.S. and British governments. Helprin’s bio is almost as varied. He served in the British Merchant Navy and the Israeli infantry and Air Force, studied at Harvard, Oxford and Princeton, and earned a living as a dishwasher, factory worker, stevedore and speechwriter for Bob Dole. In recent decades, he has limited himself to three occupations: crafting fiction, writing commentary on military and foreign policy for the Wall Street Journal and other publications as a senior fellow of the

Mark Helprin and his wife, Lisa, in 1991

conservative Claremont Institute and making hay on his farm in Charlottesville, Va., in the shadow of Monticello. (Helprin is married with two grown daughters.) He says, “I’ve always been attracted to the Jeffersonian ideal: self-sufficiency, closeness to nature, modesty of aims.” Modesty does not apply to his ambitions as a novelist, Helprin admits. “What I try to do is to look at something and express the truth of it and by so doing, perhaps express the beauty of it.” He feels that too many of today’s writers favor detachment and coolness over the messiness and pain of real life. “This is the ethos of modern literature as far as I can tell,” he says. “You pare the language. You pare the emotions. You look with a cold eye upon them. I don’t do that, because I frankly think it’s cowardly.” For Helprin, whether in fiction or reality, embracing love is the most courageous act of all since we will eventually and inevitably lose it. In his newest book, he continues to show us the glorious rewards of choosing the passionate life.

“WHAT I TRY TO DO IS LOOK AT SOMETHING AND EXPRESS THE TRUTH AND PERHAPS THE BEAUTY.”

Akiva Goldsman, who won an Oscar for writing A Beautiful Mind, is in preproduction on the film version of Winter’s Tale. So far he’s cast Russell Crowe, Colin Farrell and Jessica Brown-Findlay.

BOOk: COURTESY OF HOUGHTON MIFFLIN HARCOURT; HELPRIN: TIME & LIFE PICTURES/GETTY IMAGES

nlike many contemporary authors, Mark Helprin does not tweet, blog or cultivate a Facebook following. He has little interest in creating e-book singles or apps. What he does do is write epic, emotional novels at his own pace—and write them beautifully. In 1983, Helprin’s novel Winter’s Tale, a panoramic tale of love and loss set in New York City in the 19th and 20th centuries, established his reputation as a master of fiction. This fall he comes full circle with In Sunlight and in Shadow, a sweeping saga set in the same city. In six novels and three shortstory collections, Helprin has returned time and again to themes of fate, honor, character, sacrifice, duty and truth. In Sunlight and in Shadow touches on these motifs, but it’s largely devoted to another favorite topic of his: passion. The book follows the incendiary affair between Harry, a virtuous soldier freshly returned from the battle fields of World War II, and Catherine, an actress and heiress already promised to a wealthy, vengeful, older man. Helprin, 65, set the novel in post-war New York, because that’s when and where he grew up. Of his inspiration for his main characters, he says, “I wanted to write about my parents.” Like Harry, Helprin’s father was a World War II veteran and his mother a stage actress (although far from an heiress). But, he adds sheepishly, “I ended up falling in love with Catherine and you can’t fall in love with your mother so it’s only partly about her.” After a chance meeting on the Staten Island Ferry, Harry and Catherine pursue their connection despite increasing threats from her jealous ex-fiancé and his gangland connections. It’s no wonder Helprin’s imagination was fueled by his parents—their backstories alone possess enough drama to fill shelves and shelves of books. His mother grew up in Brooklyn speaking Yiddish. She was


The QuinTessence Of new YOrk

debuting this winter

thequinhotel.com


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A report card for the newest class of blue-chip museum directors. AlexAndra Peers hands out the marks

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ver the past three years, an entire generation of art-museum directors has passed the torch to a new class. With turnover at the top at almost two-dozen institutions, these successors will be deciding who matters most in 21st-century art, who pays for it and how to get art lovers in the door. By and large, the new brood hasn’t had an easy time of it, colleagues and insiders say. Here, with apologies and strong opinions, we grade some of the freshman class.

TOm CAmpbEll

mETROpOliTAn muSEum OF ART

Talk about a hard act to follow: Campbell, an internal pick that ruffled the feathers of the Met’s more senior curators, came after the memorable tenure of the imposing Philippe de Montebello, he who ruled and ran the museum for three decades-plus. Even worse, Campbell’s early days began amid the recession, which forced him into such draconian cost-cutting measures as jettisoning staffers, combining parties (do photo people really mesh with the Korean ceramics folk?) and removing biscuits from the tables in the trustees’ dining room.But Campbell, three years in, gets good marks from colleagues for playing well with others, both inside and outside the institution. And his exhibitions of Renaissance tapestries (showings that essentially argued that cloth can be art) put him right in the wheelhouse of huge Met supporter Anna Wintour, which doesn’t hurt. No political fool, Campbell opens an “Arts and Armor” show this fall saluting one of the museum’s own curators. Admittedly, the blockbuster exhibitions of his tenure—Alexander McQueen, the Steins Collect, the American Wing rehab—were all conceived under his predecessor. But Campbell executed them marvelously.

TimOTHy Rub

pHilAdElpHiA muSEum OF ART

The Philly Museum has great holdings, from masterpieces by Brancusi and Duchamp to Grace Kelly’s wedding dress and the infamous Rocky statue. For decades it was run well by Anne d’Harnoncourt, a cult figure in the art world. Taking over after her death, Rub deliberately took a low profile, museum insiders said, to appear respectful. Now it’s time for Rub to start hustling. He has talked about promising changes, like staying open much later and making available online images of most of the objects from the museum’s vast collection. Not much, however, has happened yet—other than the contemplation of a super-pricey Gehry-designed expansion. The reopening of the nearby Rodin Museum, which his institution administers, was a step in the right direction.

mAxwEll AndERSOn dAllAS muSEum OF ART

Not so many years ago, Anderson ran the Whitney Museum of American Art and was known for interesting, sometimes controversial shows and even better parties. But we hear that he bristled at the wealthy board’s overinvolvement in that institution and that the feeling was mutual. After a stint at Yale, he decamped to Indiana to run the state’s art museum, where you could be forgiven for thinking you’d never hear from him again. Instead, the Indianapolis Museum was chosen by the Department of State in 2009 to represent the U.S. at the Venice Biennale, a hotly sought honor. Did it have anything to do with the fact that the museum devoted an exhibition to the memorabilia of former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright? We’ll never know for sure, but the high profile he earned led to an offer from this deeppocketed Dallas institution, so he was back on the road earlier this year. One possible early misstep: Anderson showed up with a new book in tow and flogged it mercilessly. As far as Dallas is concerned, he could have done something before he started talking about it.

HOpE AlSwAng

nORTOn muSEum OF ART, pAlm bEACH, FlA.

One big trend in the museum world has been for solid but small regional museums to seek a bigger art-world footprint with a pricey expansion for more commercial exhibitions. (Think the Parrish in Southampton or the Museum of Art & Design in New York City.) Which brings us to Hope Alswang, who took over as head of this tony, object-rich institution after a nanosecond-long tenure at the Rhode Island School of Design. “We want to participate in a national discussion in art,” she told the New York Times after getting the job, but is that really the best use of her museum? Maybe not. The Norton used to be a stop for some of the best traveling exhibitions in the country and it had an outsize reputation for small, scholarly shows and great photography exhibitions, like a stellar 2010 Richard Avedon retrospective. But since Alswang got there, she has staged “Now What?”, her curators’ somewhat haphazard selections of contemporary art from local art fairs, and something requiring ample Windex called “Hot Glass Roadshow.” At least she’s added comfy chairs in the galleries, and fundraising is going well.

In March 1990, two men dressed as Boston police officers walked into the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, lied to the security desk and walked out with an estimated $300 million worth of art, including works by Rembrandt, Manet and Vermeer. Today the case is still being investigated by the FBI; the museum is offering a $5 million reward for information on the missing art.


richArD ArMstrong guggenheiM MuseuM

Forgive the Star Trek reference, but if the Guggenheim’s previous director, Tom Krens, was Captain Kirk, barreling about the museum galaxy to preach the religion of art, then Richard Armstrong has been Jean-Luc Picard: quiet, thoughtful, diplomatic and adept at cleaning up messes, several of which he inherited. Krens was infamous for traveling nonstop, getting embroiled in issues of worker mistreatment at the museum’s Abu Dhabi construction site and cozying up to corporate sponsors like BMW and Hugo Boss. As the Wall Street Journal put it: “Some saw him as a prophetic visionary; others as a free-spending megalomaniac.” So imagine the building-wide relief when Armstrong arrived and announced he was going to let other staffers take the spotlight for a change. But the problem is, with the possible exceptions of Asian art expert Alexandra Munroe and Number Two Nancy Spector, nobody and nothing is getting much buzz. Sure, the Guggenheim has a surprisingly robust performance art program (“Tonight, we sink the Titanic!”) and improving finances. But at the recent show of Maurizio Cattelan sculptures, hung by ropes from the ceiling, people were talking more about the installation than the art. Krens’ departure has left a superstar vacuum.

Jeffrey Deitch

Los AngeLes MuseuM of conteMporAry Art

When this New York art impresario left the commercial world to run the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art in 2010, shock was followed by squealing. Chalk it up to school snobbery: The art-museum-y set doesn’t like to think someone can do the job without a PhD. But Deitch had established a global rep for trend spotting important artists and movements (street art, as just one example) years before anybody else. The museum’s board was lastchance betting that this knack for the zeitgeist and celebrity friends (James Franco, Lady Gaga) was just what MoCA needed to solve severe money problems. Given that frantic mandate, anyone at the museum who didn’t update his or her résumé just wasn’t paying attention. Now, following Deitch’s dismissal of the longtime chief curator, things have gone very wrong at MoCA. Four old-guard artist trustees have resigned, and there’s a petition calling for the director to be expelled. But in defense of Deitch—and more people should have spoken up—there was nothing he could have done right. In L.A., the contemporary museum is expected to combine the gravitas of New York City’s MoMA, the experimentation of the Whitney and the hipster cred of the New Museum, an impossible assignment. He made mistakes—like buying Cary Grant’s house (really?). But at least Dietch, with a pop-culture sensibility, market awareness and solid love of art, has nearly tripled attendance. A decade ago, the Los Angeles art scene, fairly or not, was discussed outside of California about as often as Canada’s. Not anymore.

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Dallas Museum of Art

AlswANG

norton Museum of Art, palm Beach

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Cleveland’s only museum isn’t the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and it’s only art isn’t chili poured over spaghetti. This institution, rich in variety, has a good Old Masters and ancient art collection —and huge turnover at the top. New hire David Franklin (2010) is the museum’s third director in about 10 years. He hasn’t had a lot of luck. Shortly after Franklin arrived, one of the board’s most generous trustees walked, essentially complaining very publicly that he was being closed out of decisions for projects he’d help fund. Franklin was also stuck with the bill for an ambitious expansion started by a previous regime. What’s interesting is that while other institutions are pretending to be big-league these days, Cleveland may instead suffer from a lack of institutional self-esteem—the museum publicized one recent show with cocktail happy hours at local eateries. (Its website bragged: “deviled eggs”). And the museum is starting to look sleepy next to a surprisingly robust contemporary art museum in the same town that’s upping its game.

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Hardworking; a likeable, safe steward but bad at math. He’s hiked the museum’s adult entry fee, even though the Met is at record attendance, to a “recommended” $25. Talented, thoughtful, a slow starter. Early indications are hyperactive; artistic ADHD but earns art credit for getting out of Indiana. Hardworking, high-concept but so far on academic probation. Gifted and talented; savvy programming. Doesn’t work well with others. Class scapegoat. Great potential. Needs to participate more in class. The New York City social class, that is.

Can’t seem to get settled into the new school. * I = Incomplete

Following the success of the Marina Abramović Made Me Cry Tumblr, Marco Anelli compiled photos from the artist’s famous 2010 performance at New York’s Musem of Modern Art and compiled them into a book: Portraits in the Presence of Marina Abramović. Visitors were invited to sit across from her for as long as they wanted, which ended in many of them sobbing.


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Christy Turlington Burns at 8, the same age her daughter, Grace, is now


Christy Turlington Burns, with daughter Grace on her arm, and the riding camp students at Stony Hill Stables. Trophy Hunter euroseat front-zip lowrise riding breeches, $170, THE TAILORED SPORTSMAN, Beval, 908-234-2828. Shirt and boots, her own.

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as CHRIsTY TURLINGTON BURNs emBraCes THe mOsT BeaUTIfUL pHase Of HeR CaReeR—HeLpING RedUCe BIRTH-ReLaTed deaTHs ON a GLOBaL sCaLe—THe sUpeRmOdeL sHaRes HeR maTeRNaL INsTINCTs WITH WRITeR LIZa GHORBaNI pHOTOGrapHed BY BRUCe WeBeR sTYLed BY deBOraH WaTsON


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Christy and Grace at Stony Hill Stables. Silk vintage top hat, price upon request; wool and angora coat with velvet-top collar, $2,798, RALPH LAUREN COLLECTION, ralphlauren.com. Jacquard Cool Max wrap-collar riding shirt, $100; Trophy Hunter euroseat front-zip low-rise riding breeches, $170, THE TAILORED SPORTSMAN, Beval, 908-234-2828. Pique stock tie, $40, OVATION, englishridingsupply.com. Monaco field boots, $900, ARIAT INTERNATIONAL, ariat.com.


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at first to use the scene but ultimately hoped it would help reinforce the fact that dangerous births can happen to anyone, anywhere. “I thought some people might perceive it as, ‘Oh, what’s a model doing in this?’” Turlington Burns admits. “But hopefully that falls away. I’m just like any of the other women in terms of giving birth—you’re always vulnerable in that state, and you always need support.” Filming No Woman, No Cry took two years, and the documentary would eventually premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival and air on the Oprah Winfrey Network. But wrapping left Turlington Burns wondering what came next. “I felt like it was a disservice to present people with information and not give them some kind of call to arms,” she explains. “So now they’re like, ‘I can’t believe this is happening. What can I do?’” That’s when she launched the advocacy organization Every Mother Counts (EMC) with the goal of reducing, or eliminating entirely, preventable deaths associated with pregnancy and birth. “I started doing this work after I gave birth to Grace—that’s very, very clearly why I’m doing this,” she says. “But I’m also the mother of a son. It’s important to teach him to be aware of women’s issues and to be kind and respectful.” In two short years, Turlington Burns has already seen the number of maternal deaths worldwide drop by almost half, from 500,000 a year to 287,000 thanks, in part, to her help.

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s one of the original supermodels, Christy Turlington Burns ruled the ’90s with her “Big 5” cohorts—Cindy Crawford, Claudia Schiffer, Linda Evangelista and Naomi Campbell. She starred in ad campaigns for top fashion houses like Chanel and Valentino and was the face of Calvin Klein’s Eternity fragrance. In the video for George Michael’s song “Freedom! ’90,” she pranced sexily in a

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Blackbird munches away on his nectarine and then lets the pit drop to the ground, as though he was privy to their dialogue all along. Turlington Burns grew up riding western style—a freestyle form of riding compared with the more formal English style she and Grace practice now—and was actually discovered at 13 while atop a pony. “I ride here sometimes,” she says. “I started to take it back into my life once I was spending all my time at the barn with Grace.” A perfect combination of her mom and dad, Grace has dark hair, bright blue eyes and a light sprinkling of freckles across her nose. With her birth in 2003, Turlington Burns’ life was forever changed, and not only in the ways a first child might typically transform a mother. After a drug-free birth with a midwife, Turlington Burns’ experience quickly turned scary. Her placenta had grown into her uterus wall, meaning that she couldn’t pass the afterbirth. Removing it resulted in postpartum hemorrhaging— a complication, she says, that easily could have killed her had she not had access to the birthing center at St. Luke’s– Roosevelt Hospital in New York City. “Suddenly I went from totally empowered to, like, on my back,” Turlington Burns remembers. She later discovered that postpartum hemorrhaging, or PPH, is the leading cause of pregnancy-related deaths in the world, including in the United States, where there are a reported 12.7 fatalities per 100,000 live births. Turlington Burns decided to use her own story as a looking glass into the plight of maternal deaths. She funded and directed the 2010 documentary No Woman, No Cry, which follows the journey to birth of four pregnant women in Tanzania, Bangladesh, Guatemala and the U.S. The film opens with footage of her own post-birthing scare, caught on film by her husband. She was hesitant

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hen you think of Christy Turlington Burns—let’s be honest—the first thing that comes to mind is that face. The smoldering, almond-shaped eyes. That delicate upturned nose. Those impossibly full lips, chiseled cheekbones and perfectly arched brows. In the ’90s it all added up to a visage so timeless it’s been likened to the supermodel equivalent of Helen of Troy: the face that launched a thousand magazine covers. But on a rainy afternoon at Stony Hill Stables in Amagansett, N.Y., she is the consummate Hamptons mom, though positively gorgeous despite the weather—and the fact that she’s wearing not a drop of makeup. Turlington Burns says motherhood is the hardest work she’s ever done, but it’s obvious that, as with modeling, she’s a natural. Every summer, she and her husband, filmmaker and actor Ed Burns, migrate from New York City to their house in East Hampton with their kids, Grace and Finn, and Boston terriers Fitzy and Mickey. “It’s nice to be out in the fresh air, and for the kids to be barefoot pretty much the whole summer,” says the 43-year-old, who’s already run six miles today and had a massage. “We’re on a sliver of Georgica Pond, so we canoe and paddleboard and do all those kinds of things.” The family has also leased a shabby little pony, Blackbird, who is presently nuzzling 8-year-old Grace for a nectarine. Turlington Burns warns her daughter not to let him eat the pit, but within seconds the horse snatches the entire piece of fruit from the girl’s hand. “He took it!” Grace exclaims, looking up at her mom. “I couldn’t get it.” “Burns!” Turlington Burns calls to Grace. “What are you doing? That’s probably not good.” “Turlington!” mocks Grace. “What are you doing?” “She’s like 8 going on 14,” Turlington Burns says.


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white sheet while Cindy crooned in a bathtub and Naomi bopped in headphones. In turn, the media portrayed them as an inseparable pack: pretty young things with the world at their fingertips, running around partying and looking fabulous. But that wasn’t really the case. “We shared experiences, but apart from working together we were all so different,” says Turlington Burns. “We came from different family backgrounds, different countries, different everything. But people would call me Cindy or Helena [Christensen] . . . we were all kind of one thing.” What separated Turlington Burns, aside from her look of effortless elegance, was her quiet dignity and humility—not the easiest qualities to come by in a sexy supermodel. She credits her solid character to her stable Catholic upbringing and to her parents, a Pan Am pilot and a flight attendant turned homemaker who raised Turlington Burns and her two sisters with a love of traveling. “The biggest draw of modeling was getting out and seeing the world,” she says. When Turlington Burns was a teen, her El Salvadoran mother, Elizabeth, would accompany her on international jobs. “Nobody was with their moms,” she says. “But I wasn’t in a hurry to be older. I would go to shoot the collections in Paris or Rome, and I would be buying porcelain dolls.” Turlington Burns started modeling at 14 and graduated high school through independent studies at 18 after she moved to New York City. Her career was intense but short. In 1994, at just 25 years old and not even close to peaking, she stopped modeling full-time. “I thought, you know what? I’d rather end it when I want to end it, rather than somebody else doing it for me,” she says. “I never really thought it was going to last that long anyway.” She enrolled in New York University to study comparative religion and Eastern philosophy, graduating

cum laude in 1999. She lost her father to lung cancer in 1997 (she herself had been a smoker but quit when she was 25). His death propelled her into action. She created anti-tobacco PSAs and launched the website smokingisugly .com to educate the public on the dangers of smoking and offer advice on how to quit. She also devoted time to campaigns dedicated to children, education and animal rights, before giving birth to Grace and shifting her focus to maternal health.

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ver a lunch of avocado-and-tomato dosas at Hampton Chutney Co., Turlington Burns talks excitedly about Every Mother Counts, rattling off numbers, bills in Congress, progress to date and the challenges ahead. She relates stories about the many women she’s met. “I want to have a connection with the women I’m helping,” she says. She regularly travels to global health conferences, medical schools and advocacy gatherings to speak on behalf of EMC and is currently training to run the New York City Marathon for the second year in a row to raise money for the organization. Earlier this year, her “No Mother’s Day” campaign, an initiative supported by celebrities such as Blythe Danner, Jennifer Connelly and Debra Messing, issued a call to moms to spend the day in silence—no gifts, phone calls or fanfare—to illustrate just how much a mother is missed when she’s gone. Indeed, she has made good use of her celebrity, enlisting pals like Bono, Coldplay and Patti Smith to lend their voices to two Every Mother Counts CDs, significant proceeds of which go directly to EMC (the second CD will be available for download this fall at everymothercounts .org). The foundation has also partnered with Bono’s ONE campaign, which fights poverty and AIDS worldwide, on

overlapping issues, including infant mortality and the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. “Christy is careful, considered and strategic,” says Bono, who has known Turlington Burns for 25 years. “Every Mother Counts has a big, beating heart, but it’s the brains of the organization that separate it. These are some smart mothers.” One such mother is Erin Thornton. The former global policy director for ONE has been EMC’s executive director since the fall of 2010 and is now the foundation’s face in Washington, D.C. She’s currently working on heading up EMC’s latest campaign: Saving Mothers, Giving Life, a unique partnership between the organization and the U.S. government, Norway, Merck, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and other key players in the global health field. The project will target four hard-toreach districts in Uganda and Zambia to try to reduce maternal deaths by up to 50 percent in one year. “It’s exciting, but difficult,” says Thornton. “The tough part will be going that last mile to really make sure that women throughout the world enjoy these same benefits.” “Our hope,” adds Turlington Burns, “is to bring the facts to light in a way that helps everyone think about just how universal the experiences of pregnancy and childbirth are and how all women deserve access to care that can save their lives.” In addition to her charitable work, the erstwhile supermodel still works her famous face roughly 20 days a year in campaigns for Maybelline, Roberto Coin, Louis Vuitton and a few others. She’s also working on a master’s degree in public health at Columbia University and hopes to make another documentary soon, though she hasn’t yet committed to one of the many ideas she’s considering. And,


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Silk and wool poncho, $13,200, HERMĂˆS, hermes.com. Hair by Thom Priano for Garren Salon, NYC. Makeup by Fulvia Farolfi for CHANEL. Produced by Dawn Boller at Little Bear Inc. Fashion assistants: Julie Simon, Alexa Lanza, Paul Frederick. Prop stylist: Dimitri Levas. Thank you to Latham Thomas, Mama Glow Yoga. The Stony Hill Stables Foundation in Amagansett, N.Y., offers scholarships to local residents interested in horses and equestrian training, from jumping to dressage (stonyhillstables.net).


Now that they’re old enough to start going to those places, they’ll be able to visualize it, too.”

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few weeks from now, the family will be making its first trip to Africa for a safari vacation. Turlington Burns says she cannot wait for her husband and kids to see Tanzania and meet the mothers and children she became close with while filming her documentary. Her kids aren’t thrilled about getting the necessary vaccinations, and Grace doesn’t want to leave her pony for two weeks, but Mom is confident they’ll soon feel different. “I don’t know anyone who hasn’t fallen in love with Africa,” she says. In a life so picturesque, I have to ask if getting older has presented any challenges. After all, hers was the face once dubbed “close to perfect” by Ford Models cofounder Eileen Ford and chosen, in 1993, to be cast in fiberglass to create the 120 mannequins for the Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. How exactly does someone who has for so long been considered the picture of physical perfection deal with the downsides of aging? “It’s been interesting to be in a profession where there’s all this projection around beauty and youth, and people assume that you care—and I feel like I’m not playing the game,” she says with a dismissive shake of her head. “I’ve always liked myself more every year in terms of who I am and the person I’ve become. I can’t imagine denying everything that comes with that.”

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“Triburbia,” and rarely display their love on red carpets or gush about each other publicly. And in an unusual turn of events, Turlington Burns’ older sister, Kelly, married Burns’ brother, Brian. The two families live near each other and vacation together. Kelly Turlington Burns says she’s always been impressed by her sister’s constant juggling of her many interests, especially her dedication to family. “She’s extremely committed to her kids and her husband,” says Kelly. “I think that’s one of the biggest commonalities that she and Eddie have: They focus first on their family, and then everything is kind of built around that. I’m sure it’s a constant struggle to try to balance everything, but she really does it well, and it’s pretty inspiring. It’s one of those middle-child things, I think.” Christy proudly points out that her family defies dated gender roles, not only because Grace is “a really tough cookie” and Finn is “a real mush,” but also because she and Burns run an equal-partnership household while maintaining their respective careers. He takes over when she travels with EMC, and she does the same when he’s away making a movie. She is keen to share her love of travel with her children, as her parents did for her. “I always prepare them when I’m going somewhere,” she says. “They have a huge map, and whenever I go anywhere it’s like, That’s where I am: That’s sub-Saharan Africa, that’s Bangladesh—and so they’re learning about the world through me and my work.

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of course, there’s yoga. A lifelong enthusiast, Turlington Burns has appeared on the cover of Time in the pretzel-like Rooster pose and in 2002 put out a book on the subject, called Living Yoga: Creating a Life Practice. And although she says she can do poses now that she couldn’t when she was 20, even yoga has taken a backseat to her philanthropic causes. She attends only one or two classes a week but still practices every day. “Just not the physical part,” she says. “There’s a thing called seva, which means service. It’s a part of yoga philosophy that I’ve always really liked. I even liken parenting to yoga—it takes patience and clarity.” Of all the natural poses that Turlington Burns strikes— humanitarian, documentarian, student, yogi—it’s obvious that her favorites are mother and wife. When she speaks of Burns, she refers to him as “Eddie” and smiles shyly, as though still in the first flush of love. That took some doing, Burns has said. “She was absolutely not interested in dating me when we first met, so I definitely had to be very persuasive. I think I finally wore her down.” Their relationship started out as standard fare for two gorgeous young stars—the whirlwind romance in 2000, the breakup, the reported rebound (in Burns’ case, model Esther Canadas), the reconciliation, a fairy-tale June wedding in 2003 complete with a John Galliano gown. Nearly a decade after exchanging vows, the couple have proved themselves a kind of celebrity enigma. They live a relatively low-key life in Tribeca, which she fondly calls


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Driving Miss Zaahira

When the author Was hireD to chauffeur MeMbers of sauDi arabia’s royal faMily During their visit to beverly hills, she Was prepareD for a life of five-star hotels, extravagant shopping sprees anD other luxuries enjoyeD by the WorlD’s .001 percent. but she never expecteD to feel privilegeD. an intiMate portrait of one of the WorlD’s Most secretive Monarchies Like many Hollywood multi-hyphenates, actress, script developer and film producer Jayne Amelia Larson found herself on shaky financial ground several years ago. She needed to make money—fast. One night a friend sent a limousine to take her to a party, and Larson chatted with the chauffeur. He explained that he loved his job because while his clients would be off schmoozing and boozing, he’d sit outside in the car and read. Larson secured a job at a limo company, but after a few months, she acknowledged that the gig was not working for her on any front. She was still broke, the hours were exhausting and driving kept her from going on auditions or developing movie projects. But then she heard coworkers talking about a wealthy foreign family coming to town in need of a crew of chauffeurs. Enticed by the rumors of $10,000 gratuities and gifts of gold watches, she interviewed for a spot and was hired. Here, adapted from her upcoming book, is the story of one job she’ll never forget:

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t was the middle of a warm summer evening at Los Angeles International Airport. I stood outside my car and behind me stretched a caravan of armored Benzes, Bentleys, Escalades, Navigators and scores more vehicles, each with its own driver. We were waiting to meet our high profile, highly devout Middle Eastern clients, and we were all on the alert for women in black robes and head coverings. As I watched one sexy group of ladies emerge from Bradley terminal, I wondered, Did a flight from Rio just land? Scantily clad in Versace, Gucci and Prada, with layers of perfect makeup and long, lustrous hair, they looked like a bunch of Brazilian hotties going nightclubbing. I’d just been treated to my first glimpse of royalty— Saudi-style. I’d never met any royals before, so I was keen to know: Were they smarter than the rest of us? Prettier? Happier? I was the lone woman driver in the regiment that

would be transporting Princess Zaahira of Saudi Arabia and her entourage during their Los Angeles stay. [Note: The names of all of the Saudi clients and their identifying details have been changed.] The princess was traveling with several of her prince sons, her one princess daughter and assorted sisters, friends and cousins, and there were dozens of servants to wait on them all—maids, secretaries, nannies, tutors, trainers, cooks and doctors, even a psychiatrist, a masseuse and the royal hairdresser. There were about 40 people accompanying the family of 7. The princess was in her late thirties. She had an open, smiling face with high, wide cheekbones and luminescent, flawless skin. All of her movements were measured and graceful. Maysam, one of her teenage servants, informed me that the princess was worshipped by her husband. I assumed it was because she was so beautiful, but I was told later it was because she’d given him seven sons. As a result, she was his favorite of his many wives.


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GREGORY OLSEN/ISTOCKPHOTO LP.

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What had brought her to Beverly Hills? Shopping, for one. Princess Zaahira went shopping almost every day, sometimes all day. It was endless. If it was true that the family flew in with $20 million in American currency, as rumored, then they ended up spending every penny. I knew they paid their hotel tab in cash—at least 50 rooms for seven weeks, including the presidential suite that cost $10,000 a night. Even the massive royal tea set had its own $500-a-day hotel room, with a balcony overlooking Beverly Hills—servants streamed in and out of this room at all hours preparing tea for the princess and her entourage. On the shopping trips, Zaahira’s head servant was in charge of the cash and paid for everything in hundreddollar bills. None of the royals touched money, ever. If you were assigned to drive someone who was shopping with the princess, you had to follow in your car as they strolled up and down Rodeo Drive. The cars had to be close in case anyone wanted to be driven back to the hotel, which was two blocks away. We’d be seven, eight or nine empty cars in a row crawling up the street, tailing the princess and her hangers-on as they stopped in every store, even if they had cleaned it out the day before. Occasionally, one of the servants would hurry over to the chauffeurs with bags and bags of Jimmy Choo shoes, or armloads of Christian Dior dresses, or Hermès Birkin crocodile bags in every color available. The booty was thrown into the back of a van that made periodic runs back to the hotel. I watched as every week, hundreds of huge crates were filled and shipped back to Saudi Arabia. If the Saudis wanted something, they bought it, then bought more, then bought more, then bought more. It was staggering. Shopping seemed to be more than just a diversion or hobby for them—I saw that, perhaps, it was an act of empowerment. In Saudi Arabia, where the sexes are heavily segregated, many women send their male relatives or servants into shops since most businesses are traditionally

owned and operated by men; strict adherents to Islam believe their religion discourages women to work outside the home. In Los Angeles, where there are so many female-run or -staffed establishments, the Saudi women could shop freely everywhere, and they did. As the only female driver, I was frequently dispatched on personal errands. One day, Princess Zaahira’s secretary, Asra, summoned me and showed me a brassiere that the princess’s cousin Princess Basmah had purchased at Neiman Marcus and liked very much. It was a $500 delicately detailed scrap of satin and lace. Asra said Basmah wanted as many of that bra as I could find, in all of the colors available—pink, blue, black, nude, butterscotch and ivory—and she needed to have them by the following afternoon. It took me a full day of driving to all the luxury stores in a 200-mile radius to secure close to 60 bras. When I proudly showed Princess Basmah the lingerie I’d spent hours procuring, she dismissed me with a wave of her hand without even looking in the bags. Another time, Princess Zaahira’s secretary ordered me to get 27 bottles of Hair Off cream depilatory. No other brand would do, and the 27 bottles were needed right away. On my way out of the hotel, one of the princess’ servants pinched my arm and begged me to hurry. “Yalla, Janni, yalla! The princesses, they need tonight, Janni, tonight, tonight, tonight! Yalla!” I went to more than 20 stores. Most stocked only two or three bottles, so I had to drive all over L.A. County. Twelve hours later, I’d finally gathered the 27 precious bottles of depilatory. Once again, when I returned with my strenuously acquired bounty, the bags were tossed aside, forgotten. I couldn’t help but wonder why the women didn’t just go in for laser hair-removal treatment and be done with it. After all, the other main reason the Saudi women had come to Beverly Hills, the mecca of medical enhancement, was for plastic surgery. If they weren’t shopping, they were in surgery. If they weren’t in surgery, they were shopping or enjoying refreshments at a restaurant

between shopping and a minor procedure. Liposuction, tummy tucks, rhinoplasty, mammaplasty, eyelid lifting/ stretching/cutting, even vaginal rejuvenation were surprisingly routine. An older member in the entourage, a prune of a woman whom everyone called Auntie, had full-on bodywork: face-lift, liposuction and breast augmentation, all in a few weeks’ time. For many of the women, this was standard operating procedure. One afternoon I picked up Princess Zaahira’s friend Amsah after she’d had buttock augmentation. Amsah was a substantially endowed woman in her fifties. Drifting in and out of consciousness, she was escorted into the clinic waiting room in a wheelchair by a nurse who gave me instructions for her care and then scurried away. As we took the private elevator down to the parking garage, Amsah promptly nodded off. “Amsah! Amsah! Wake up. C’mon Amsah, wake up!” I clapped my hands, but she didn’t stir. Shit, shit, shit, I thought. There’s no way I can get her into the car like this. She was at least 180 pounds. I saw several Saudi women exiting the garage elevators, including Sajidah, Amsah’s cousin. “Sajidah? Could you speak to Amsah in Arabic, please? Tell her I can’t get her into the car unless she wakes up,” I pleaded. “Do not interrupt. I am talking to my son in Washington,” she said, holding a cellphone to her ear. She didn’t seem at all put out that her cousin was out cold. Sajidah herself was walking stiffly and with great difficulty because she’d had a bunion removed the previous week; today she was also sporting a thick white chin strap, so it appeared she was getting work done top to bottom. Amsah started to whimper and cry. “Oh, I’m sorry,” I said. “I’m sure it hurts to sit down.” Then she murmured something—it sounded like “ . . . the lovely bottom, yours such the lovely bottom.” I wanted to be gracious but didn’t know how to reply, especially to that kind of compliment from a woman who’d


even the royal tea set had its own $500-a-day room, with a balcony overlooking beverly hills.

looked out the window. “It is so clean,” she said. We were both quiet and watched the waves and the surfers in their black wetsuits silhouetted against the sun. “They look cool, don’t they?” I said. “Yes, they look cool,” she said. “Very cool.” Soraya looked out the window as she wiped her eyes again. “Are you okay?” I asked her. She turned to catch my eyes in the mirror. “I am to be married. My husband is waiting. He is a colleague of my father’s. I am to be his third wife. I was told he is very kind.” “I see,” I said. “So I am happy, I am very happy. I will make my family proud.” Then we sat in silence for a little while more. “Don’t you want to get out of the car?” I finally asked. She seemed surprised. “Oh, no, I will just look. Thank you.” “Are you sure? Don’t you want to walk on the sand or put your toes in the water?” “No, thank you. I will just look. Thank you.” I drove Soraya around all afternoon. We stopped at a Krispy Kreme, where she asked me to run in and buy her several dozen donuts to share with her cousins back at the hotel. In Santa Monica, I doubled-parked near the promenade, and we ate quietly in the car as we watched and listened to crowds of chattering shoppers pass us by. We spent six hours together, and she never got out of the car. Not once. She just looked out the window as if memorizing everything. I never saw Soraya again after that day, even though I repeatedly looked for her. I asked security and the servants, but no one could or would tell me anything. I presume she did return to her family and to the future that awaited her, and I hope that she is happy. Adapted from Driving the Saudis by Jayne Amelia Larson. Copyright © 2012 by Jayne Amelia Larson. To be published by Free Press, a division of Simon & Schuster Inc., on Oct. 13. Printed by permission.

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“I’m sorry, Soraya, but I was told . . . ” I glanced in the rearview mirror and saw her beseeching expression. I unlocked the controls. She beamed. “Thank you!” she said. Then she stuck her head out the window and smelled the air like a big puppy, smiling. I watched her in the mirrors as she slid from one side of the car to the other, looking out at the world passing by. “You are so lucky. Do you like to drive? I would like to learn. I am sure I could learn.” Then she looked down. “It is not possible for me to learn how to drive,” she said. “I must return home to my family soon. It is un avoidable.” She said unavoidable as if it were two separate words. Un Avoidable. “I would like to stay here very much. I would like to study here. I have just come from a summer program at Berkeley. It has been wonderful. I have been so happy there and in San Francisco, because it is a great walking city, and this was new for me. I had a very pleasant time.” “Your English is exceptional,” I said. “I enjoy school very much. It does not seem like work to me. I wish that my father would permit me to stay for this year, but that is not possible. I have asked him many times, but he always says no.” Soraya was quiet for a minute and then said, “I must return home. It is un avoidable.” As she spoke, she powered the window up and down. Up and down. Up and down. “All my family will celebrate. I will make my family very proud. It is un avoidable.” Then I heard her begin to cry softly. I wasn’t sure what to do, and I didn’t want to intrude. I continued driving to the beach, and all the while I could hear her sob; it was the weeping sound of resignation, not indignation. When we could go no farther west, I stopped the car along the Pacific Coast Highway overlooking the ocean. “Here we are at the beach, Soraya.” She wiped away her tears with the back of a hand and

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just had balloons stuck in her butt cheeks. “Shukran [thank you], Amsah. Insha’Allah [if it is God’s will], hopefully your bottom will be as beautiful as mine soon too. Insha’Allah.” “Insha’Allah,” she moaned. I saw my window of opportunity, and I jumped through it: “Insha’Allah, Amsah. Right now, Amsah, Allah wants you to get in the car. I’m going to ask the valets to help us.” I ran over to them. They quickly encircled her and started to lift her, but it all went way wrong immediately— Amsah screamed in pain. I suppose the valets had never dealt with buttock implants. “Cuidado!” I yelled. “No toca el culo! Don’t touch the butt!” Amsah screamed again and passed out. We finally moved her into the SUV after much struggling and crying. Sajidah rode to the hotel with us. As Amsah moaned and groaned in pain, Sajidah prayed to Allah, wailing and keening, begging for him to save her. I doubted it was Allah’s will for Amsah to have butt surgery, and I wished they’d both show a little self-restraint. The royal who made the greatest impression on me was Soraya, Princess Zaahira’s lovely 17-year-old cousin. She looked nothing like the other Saudi girls who emulated the older women with their haute couture and heavy makeup. Soraya was slender with short black hair and dressed simply in a striped T-shirt, pressed jeans and clean white sneakers—reminding me of Audrey Hepburn in Roman Holiday. “Hello, driver,” she said. She spoke with a refined, slightly British accent. “My name is Soraya. It is a pleasure to meet you. I would like to visit the Krispy Kreme, please? And I would like to visit the beach, please. Thank you.” As I drove out of the hotel driveway, she tried to power down the window. It didn’t budge. She frowned and tried again. “Excuse me, please, driver? Will you unlock the window, please?” The family’s security personnel had sternly ordered us to keep all the doors and windows locked at all times.


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cultures collide

a new generation of adventurers has discovered Morocco, where a cruMbling riad can be turned into a charMing second hoMe and history brushes up against exciting Modernity froM Marrakesh to the shores of essaouira written by Maura egan photographed by douglas friedMan


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EntrancE to riad El FEnn, MarrakEsh


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lobby bar at riad El FEnn, MarrakEsh


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riad El FEnn, MarrakEsh


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djEllabar, MarrakEsh


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lE jardin dEs biEhn, FEz


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riad nuMÉro 9, FEz


but it has a deeper meaning attached to its different motifs and colors. “There is a lot of belief in the supernatural here, so each color has a purpose.” Blue, for instance, wards off the evil eye and it also symbolizes water for the Berbers, the Moroccan desert tribes. “It’s the same with patterns and symbols. You can literally read a carpet,” says Montague of the Moroccan tribal rugs, which have become the take-home souvenir for fashion folks like Marc Jacobs and Joseph Altuzarra, whose fall collection was influenced by a trip to North Africa. Moroccan design has reached critical mass—West Elm now sells the Beni Ouarain tribal rug. “There has been a creative explosion here in the last 10 years,” says Montague. Of course, artists, writers and designers have always had an aesthetic love affair with the country. Novelists like William S. Burroughs and Paul Bowles produced some of their most dynamic work in Tangier in the 1950s. Soon after, Yves Saint Laurent became so enraptured with the exotic locale of Marrakesh that he bought palatial houses here with his partner Pierre Bergé. (One is now a museum and public garden.) The Moroccan culture would influence his designs for decades. The 1960s jet-set crowd—including Mick Jagger, Jimi Hendrix and Talitha Getty (whose glorious Moorish costumes would launch a thousand fashion collections)—also touched down there. Today a new generation of creative types has discovered the country, but they experience the places with a more sophisticated lens. As Montague explains, “They’ve taken this old, mystical place and made it fresher, more accessible. It’s a synergy of two worlds.”

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the most exquisitely designed spaces in the world. Most foreign buyers are quite adamant about respecting the traditional design vernacular, renovating the structures in a local manner, in a kind of ethno-chic style. Take Marrakesh’s Riad El Fenn, owned by English business partners Howell James and Vanessa Branson, the sister of Sir Richard Branson, who happens to own the Kasbah Tamadot, a luxury retreat in the nearby Atlas Mountains. The 21-room riad is a lively mix of modern and traditional, the classic and the cutting edge. There are cedarwood ceilings, colorful tadelakt tiles and hand-stitched camel-leather floors throughout, but there are also plenty of contemporary touches—a red velvet-swathed bar, a screening room and a world-class contemporary art collection with works by William Kentridge, Bridget Riley and Pieter Hugo. “People have learned how to combine things here,” says New England native Maryam Montague, who owns the Peacock Pavilions guesthouse in Marrakesh with her architect husband. Last spring Montague, who has served as a design sherpa for recent visitors like Tory Burch and Martha Stewart, published a coffeetable book, Marrakesh by Design. “Spaces no longer need to look like a genie lives here. It doesn’t have to be Epcot,” she says, referring to a time not too long ago when expats erred on the side of theatrical— billowy curtains, excessive use of color and huge fireplaces. “We’ve gotten to a middle-of-the-road moment: It’s more like Sweden meets Liberace.” Montague believes that Moroccan design has resonated with many foreigners because it’s not only beautiful,

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When Stephen di Renza came to Fez in 1999 to purchase a riad—a traditional Moroccan house—he was only the second foreigner ever to do so, he says. “I couldn’t believe people weren’t coming here and buying up these beautiful old buildings for vacation homes.” In the past decade, throughout the country, from Tangier to Essaouira, foreigners have swooped in to buy many crumbling buildings, turning them into second homes and private inns. “The Moroccan king Mohammed VI centralized everything,” says di Renza about the monarch who took over the throne from his father, King Hassan II, in 1999. “He built hospitals and schools and made the country accessible to tourists.” The Philadelphia-born di Renza, a fashion creative director in Paris, converted the riad into a guesthouse in 2006, calling it Riad Numéro 9. The following year, he and his French partner, Bruno Ussel, bought the adjacent building, where the recently opened Restaurant Numéro 7 now lives. They restored the structures to their former glory with the help of local craftsmen: tile workers, woodworkers, metal smiths, leathermakers. “Fez is the country’s crafts capital,” says di Renza, who complemented the guesthouses’ traditional Moorish design with Asian, French and English antiques. Marrakesh is the favored destination, and locals joke (and grumble) that, with so many boutique riads and luxury hotels luring tourists for warm weather getaways, the city has become the Miami for Europeans. But while the locals—expats and natives alike—may complain that Marrakesh is being overdeveloped, stroll through the city’s mazelike souks and you will stumble upon some of


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Palais Faraj suitEs and sPa, FEz


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INSIDER’S GUIDE The ShopS, hoTelS, reSTauranTS and hoT SpoTS making morocco Sizzle righT now

MARRAKESH

This is a city where the muezzin sings out his final call to prayer as DJs turn up the volume, a place where shoppers buy wood tooled by foot in the souk before dropping thousands at Louis Vuitton. Bold, coquettish and utterly unforgettable, Marrakesh has long been a melting pot thanks to traders from other African countries and Europe who’ve been meeting there for centuries to barter goods— not to mention Yves Saint Laurent, who put the North African city on the style map and inspired curious foreigners who flooded in.

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Djemaa el Fna The heart of Marrakesh comes alive at night as snake charmers and henna tattooists jostle for space with the poets, musicians and storytellers whose centuries-old words and notes have earned the square its legendary status. As sunset falls, smoke from food stalls billows into the air while performers’ drumbeats fill it further. Either plunge straight in or watch the spectacle from a nearby cafe roof terrace.

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riaD el Fenn Traditional Morocco is given a twist courtesy of tadelakt plaster walls washed in vivid sea green and a clutch of lanterns transformed into artwork. Two suites here have private pools, and works from co-owner Vanessa Branson’s contemporary art collection—including paintings by Bridget Riley and sculpture by Antony Gormley—are on display. (Derb Moullay Abdullah Ben Hezzian, Bab El Ksour, +212 524 44 12 10; riadelfenn.com; high season from $364)

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atika shoes Soft suede loafers for men, women and children in a kaleidoscope of colors make Atika the number one shoe store in Marrakesh. High-quality leather heels, handbags and jackets are also for sale. Go early because there’s standing room only come midafternoon. (34 Rue de la Liberté, Guéliz, +212 524 43 64 09)

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le salama Everyone from Paloma Picasso to Roberto Cavalli has dined at Le Salama, located just steps from Djemaa El Fna. Styled with a Casablanca flair, the atmospheric dining rooms are spread over three floors, and the cuisine fuses traditional Moroccan cooking techniques with a modern take on flavors. (40 Rue des Banques, Kennaria, +212 524 39 13 00)

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Delano marrakech If a riad isn’t your speed, the Delano Marrakech, opening in September, could be. The 73-suite hotel will boast a 20,000-square-foot spa, three private pools, a roof deck and a subterranean nightclub. And while Morocco is famous for dishes like tagine, dining at the Delano offers more international options, with French and Italian eateries from Michelin–starred chefs Michel Rostang and Giancarlo Morelli. (Angle Avenue Echouada et Rue des Temples +212 524 42 42 42; morganshotelgroup .com, from $315)

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la mamOunia Following a three-year refurbishment overseen by legendary designer Jacques Garcia, the grande dame of Marrakesh hotels offers unparalleled luxury. La Mamounia’s outdoor pool is tiled in Murano glass, while the inside pool forms part of a luxurious 27,000-square-foot spa. (Avenue Bab Jdid, Marrakesh-Maroc, +212 524 38 86 00; mamounia .com; from $670)

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jnane tamsna Brad Pitt and Donna Karan are among the boldface names who’ve enjoyed the house-party vibe at this hotel created by FrenchSenegalese designer Meryanne Loum-Martin. Twentyfour rooms are spread over five properties in the city’s exclusive Palmeraie district. (Douar Abiad, La Palmeraie, +212 524 32 84 84; jnane.com; from $310)

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djellabar Pop art hangs beneath exquisitely plastered Moroccan ceilings in Djellabar— created by Claude Challe, the man behind the Buddha Bar phenomenon. Enjoy cocktails, dinner and dancing alongside Marrakesh’s most fashionable insiders while it’s still under the radar—this restaurant, bar and terrace have yet to hit the guidebooks. (Villa Bougainvillée, 2 Rue Abou Hanifa, Hivernage, +212 524 42 12 42; djellabar.com)

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seafOOd stalls The best of the day’s catch—from spider crab and red mullet to lobster and gambas—is on offer at this string of fresh fish stalls lining the town’s quay. Pick what you want, sit down at a wooden table while your lunch is grilled and watch waves crash against Essaouira’s ancient medina walls as seagulls dance in the blue sky above.

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heure bleue palais If Heure Bleue’s rooftop pool and palm-fringed courtyard are made for sunshine, then its Salon Anglais is the ideal winter retreat. Guests sip cocktails on a leather chesterfield while live music plays in this Out of Africa meets a gentleman’s club– style spot. (2 Rue Ibn Batouta, Bab Marrakech, +212 524 78 34 34; heure-bleue.com; from $370)

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la Gazelle d’Or A 150 miles south of Essaouira and a world away is La Gazelle d’Or. Set in an estate filled with orange groves and bougainvillea, this is where statesmen and socialites alike come to unwind. Tennis, golf practice and swimming are available. Or just walk through the rose garden before relaxing with a massage in the hotel’s aromatherapy spa. (P.O. Box 260, Taroudannt, +212 528 85 20 39; gazelledor.com; half-board for two from $740)

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Sea and sky may have worked their way into every fiber of Essaouira, but the picturesque crumbling white walls and azure woodwork of its houses will never get a makeover. Why? Because this sea town is way too relaxed for all that. Surfers head here for the swells, lovers of gnawa music converge on their spiritual home and others just kick back, relax and shoot the Atlantic breeze.

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT, PREVIOuS PAGE: DOuGLAS FRIEDMAn; COuRTESY OF ATIKA; DOuGLAS FRIEDMAn (2). THIS PAGE: COuRTESY OF AnSOn SMART; DOuGLAS FRIEDMAn (3).

33 rue majOrelle This chic concept store sells a collection of housewares and fashion ranging from simple tea glasses to high-end tailoring handpicked by stylist Monique Bresson and produced by designers and craftsmen who are either local or influenced by Morocco. The shop and its snack and juice bar are interconnected by a salon containing paintings, photography, sculpture and furniture. (33 Rue Yves Saint Laurent, Majorelle, Marrakesh-Maroc, +212 524 31 41 95)

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FEZ

If any city represents the gritty heart of Morocco, it’s Fez. No cars travel the twisting streets of its ancient medina, and a silence thick as velvet falls when braying donkeys and hammering craftsmen finish their day’s work. A spiritual and cultural capital, the city is home to Koranic schools, Sufi singers and some of the finest handicraft in Morocco. And among all the history, there are places where Fez is being reinvented.

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riad FÈS—relais And chÂteau Old-world and modern come together at Riad Fès. Parts of the building, dating back to the 18th century, showcase the best of Fassi craftsmanship while a recently opened renovation houses a sleekly modern swimming pool and adjoining glass-walled bar. Sigourney Weaver and Bono are among those who’ve visited. (5 Derb Ben Slimane, Zerbtana, +212 535 74 10 12; riadfes.com; from $190)

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palais fAraj Suites And Spa Step through the doors of Palais Faraj and into a riot of zellige tiling and intricate plasterwork set off by cedar, marble and sumptuous color. Designed by Arab Andalusian specialist JeanBaptiste Barian, the hotel has a bar overlooking the rooftops of the medina and a spa that recently opened. (16–18 Quartier Ziat, Derb Bensouda, +212 535 63 89 41; palaisfaraj.com; from $260)

previous page: douglas Friedman. This page, clockwise from top left: Alberto coto/getty images; Éric martinez/courtesy of librairie des colonnes; juliette parisot/courtesy of dar nour.

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Le Jardin des Biehn Antiquarian Michel Biehn decamped from Provence with his wife, Catherine, and brought a lifetime’s collection of artifacts he’d acquired. Nine rooms, five of them suites, host everything from Yemenite silk robes to concubines’ chairs from a Beijing palace. (13 Akbat Sbaa, Douh, +212 664 64 76 79; jardindesbiehn.com; from $160)

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the ruined garden After having cut their teeth on the London restaurant scene and painstakingly restoring the garden of a crumbling yet enchanting riad, John Twomey and Robert Johnstone are set to open the Ruined Garden next door to their boutique guesthouse, Riad Idrissy, in September. Locally inspired lunch dishes, afternoon tea and traditional spit-roasted mechwi lamb suppers will be served. (15 Derb Idrissy, Sidi Ahmed Chaoui, Siaj, +212 649 19 14 10)

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Hassan Kabil The son of a master silk weaver is internationally celebrated for reviving age-old techniques at Kabil’s studio Dar al Tiraz. There, he hand-produces the intricately patterned and colored lampas fabrics that Fez was once famous for. The technique, historically used to make belts for noblewomen, now allows Kabil to create prized pieces of art. (By appointment only. +212 655 23 81 35; contact@dar-al-tiraz.com)

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Coin BerbÈre If searching for vintage caftans in Souk des Caftans and old silver in the stalls at Place Seffarine isn’t your thing, head to Coin Berbère. The three Bouzidi-Idrissi brothers have amassed a collection of antiques, including ornate wooden doors and intricately woven carpets. (67 Talaa Kebira, Haddadine, +212 535 63 69 46)

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dar nour It’s all about the sea view in Tangier—and especially at Dar Nour, where guests can enjoy a stunning panorama. Matt Damon is among those who’ve stayed in the riad’s rooms, which are styled with finds from the souk. Down the road, Dar Nour’s sister restaurant, Salon Bleu, also offers views of the distant Spanish headlands. (20 Rue Gourna, Kasbah, +212 662 11 27 24; darnour.com; from $80)

nord-pinus-tanger Perched on the seawalls at the highest point in town, this former pasha’s palace is one of Tangier’s most stylish addresses. A favorite among fashion and art insiders, it has five bedrooms with suites, a restaurant and a roof terrace that offers breathtaking views. (11 Rue du Riad Sultan, Kasbah, +212 661 22 81 40; info@nord-pinus-tanger.com; from $230)

La Fabrique New York City loft style meets traditional French cuisine at the popular La Fabrique. A bar and lounge accompany the restaurant, where French classics with a modern twist are served. (Résidence Salima I–7, Rue d’Angleterre, +212 539 37 40 57)

ViLLa Josephine Set in the exclusive area below Tangier where King Mohammed VI’s palace is situated, Villa Josephine has just 10 suites and a very intimate feel. There are beautifully manicured gardens and a pool with expansive views of the bay. (231 Route de la Vielle, Montagne, Sidi Masmoudi, +212 539 33 45 35, from $315)

Librairie des coLonnes The iconic bookstore is a vibrant component of the city’s legendary literary scene, especially after the fresh refurbishment that bibliophile Pierre Bergé helped with. More than 6,000 titles are stocked, from English, French and Spanish classics to works by both established and up-and-coming Arab writers. (54 Boulevard Pasteur, +212 539 93 69 55)

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PREVIOuS PAGE: DOuGLAS FRIEDMAN. ThIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: ALBERTO COTO/GETTY IMAGES; ÉRIC MARTINEz/COuRTESY OF LIBRAIRIE DES COLONNES; JuLIETTE PARISOT/COuRTESY OF DAR NOuR.

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Tangier’s signature grit-meets-glamour has long made it irresistible. Gangsters, spies, beatniks and the rich and famous flocked to the city after it was made an international zone in 1923, and the party didn’t stop for three decades. Now Tangier is on the upswing again, counting Roger Vivier’s creative director, Bruno Frisoni, and Yves Saint Laurent’s former partner Pierre Bergé among those who have bought homes here.

L’ocean restaurant and beach cLub Tangier insiders head to this bistro on a beach just outside of town, where fresh fish is served on a terrace set against a backdrop of sand and sea. Specialties include lobster salad, red tuna and fresh seafood tagliatelle. There’s also a beach club. (Plage Sidi Kacem, +212 539 33 81 37)

Laure WeLFLing Welfling’s expert eye was honed during her days as an interior designer in Paris, and her shop is now filled with fashion, accessories and housewares. She designs high-end caftans and handbags, while her artist husband creates sculpture and ceramics. (3 Place de la Kasbah, +212 539 94 97 89)

boutique MaJid Owner Abdelmajid Rais El Fenni has been in business for more than 40 years and is always on hand to offer advice over mint tea. You might need it considering the three stories of his Boutique Majid are a treasure trove of antique silk textiles, Berber jewelry, carpets and ceramics. Mick Jagger and Leonardo DiCaprio are among the famous who have visited. (66 Rue les Almouhades, +212 539 93 88 92)

—Megan LLoyd davies

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swede life

“Neon” cashmere coat, $1,995; merino-wool sweater, $175; “Trap” trousers, $165, BOSS, hugoboss.com. Knit cap, stylist’s own.

Joel Kinnaman won over fans and critics in the Killing, the television show based on the celebrated danish series. neXt the swedish actor taKes a bold plunge into americana with the remaKe of robocop. by blaine ZucKerman photographed by paul Jasmin styled by paul stura


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oel Kinnaman was 10 years old the day he soured on fame. He was the goalkeeper on his youth soccer team in Sweden and had just allowed the opposing team to score. “I was so pissed at myself,” he recalls. The whole stadium started chanting a name, but it was not his—not exactly. It was his television alter ego’s. Kinnaman spent the previous year acting on a Swedish soap, and in a country with only two television channels, he’d become something of a star. “I was so embarrassed,” he says. “And I felt, This is wrong.” After that, Kinnaman took a long break from acting. He spent his twenties working jobs in construction, insurance, a bar in the French Alps and a factory in Norway. He’d work double night shifts for months in order to take off and travel for four or five months at a time—alone. As one of six children—and the only boy—Kinnaman says he’d always had trouble being by himself and saw that “as a weakness” (though he admits he’d occasionally give in and “find a girl” to travel with). “For a long time, I had a life aside from acting,” he says. “I lived my life. I had my heart broken and loved again before any of this happened.” (His new love is actress Olivia Munn, by the way.) But traveling the world is a younger man’s sport, and in 2005 Kinnaman returned to Sweden to study acting at the Swedish Academic School of Drama. Following a number of high-profile roles back home, Kinnaman, now 32, has become a fan favorite in the States for his portrayal of badass cop Stephen Holder on AMC’s The Killing, and for small but memorable parts in thrillers The Darkest Hour and Safe House. Next he re-creates an iconic ’80s cyborg in the highly anticipated remake of RoboCop, alongside Gary Oldman and Samuel L. Jackson. To keep himself grounded, so to speak, with the Hollywood of it all, he’s taken up the local pastime: surfing. “When I catch that wave, I feel like, I’m doing it!” he says. “Nothing is more powerful than the ocean.” Not even fame. This Page: Round-neck pullover, $5,400, HERMÈS, 800-441-4488. Crew-neck T-shirt, $35, CALVIN KLEIN, macys.com. Opposite Page: Wool suit, $2,595; cotton shirt, $345; silk tie, $195, BALENCIAGA BY NICOLAS GHESQUIÈRE, 212-206-0872. Shoes, his own.


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FASHiOn ASSiStAnt: SunSHine MADSen.

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Opposite Page: Shawl-collar cardigan, $798; slim-fit straight-leg dress pants, $498, JOHN VARVATOS, johnvarvatos.com. American Shirt cotton shirt, $85, HANRO, hanrousa.com. Calfskin lace-up shoes, $695, BALENCIAGA BY NICOLAS GHESQUIÈRE, 212-206-0872. Plain wool socks, $30, BRESCIANI, Bergdorf Goodman, 888-774-2424. This Page: Wool suit pants, $525; cotton shirt, $345; silk tie, $195, BALENCIAGA BY NICOLAS GHESQUIÈRE, 212-206-0872. Shoes, his own. Groomer: Jamal Hammadi for Hamadi Organics at starworksartists.com. Makeup: Karen McDonald at Aim Artists. Location: the Paramour.


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THIs seasoN’s soIree cIrcuIT INvITes slIck meTallIcs aNd exoTIc skINs wITH cHarIsmaTIc flasH—plus oNe INcluded pHoToGRApHed by adrIaN GauT

Check matte buckle belt, $295, BURBERRY, burberry.com. Crocodile billfold wallet, $2,700, DIOR HOMME, 212-421-6009. Dog tag cuff links, $685, GUCCI, gucci.com.


Trapezoid evening bag, $1,195, REECE HUDSON, The Grocery Store, 415-928-3615. Double-strap stiletto pump, $855, MANOLO BLAHNIK FOR J. MENDEL, 800-J-MENDEL. Pear-shaped diamonds surrounding an emerald-cut orange sapphire set in 18-karat yellow gold ring, $95,000, HAMMERMAN JEWELS NEW YORK, 800-223-6436. Threewinged galactic cuff, $695, ROBERT LEE MORRIS, 212-431-9405.

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Leather belt, $280; silk bow tie, $135, ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA, 888-880-3462. Leather shoe, $650, DRIES VAN NOTEN, Bergdorf Goodman, 212-753-7300. Faceted platinum-plated cuff links, $275, DUNHILL, mrporter.com.


Python metal-frame clutch, price upon request, THE ROW, Barneys New York, 212-826-8900. Pearl and diamond tassel necklace, $150,000, JACOB & CO, 212-7195887. Water-snake belt, $850, NINA RICCI, Ikram, 312-587-1000. Calfskin shoe, $1,095, CHLOÉ, 212-717-8220.

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Tummel glasses, $225, MOSCOT, moscot.com. Drink shoes, $920, HERMÈS, 800-441-4488. 47mm MasterGraff Tourbillon watch, price upon request, GRAFF NEW YORK, 212-3559292. Cigarette case, DIOR HOMME, dior.com. Diamond pavé cuff links, $10,750, DANIEL K, danielk.net.


Leather pump, $1,095, YVES SAINT LAURENT BY STEFANO PILATI, 212-980-2970. Blake clutch, $995, MICHAEL KORS, 866-709-5677. Goldplated sculptural collar necklace, $595, ROBERT LEE MORRIS, 212-431-9405.

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For years, Wendy Vanderbilt lehman painted and sculpted—bold, Vibrant and arresting Work. so hoW has the direct descendant oF “the commodore” made the World aWare oF her talent? she hasn’t, it turns out. but that may be about to change. michael martin reVeals Why. photographed by douglas Friedman

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ranges from drawings to paintings to those sculptures, giant crosses and curves in wood and aluminum that rise to 8 to 12 feet. It is all—to speak in pure art-history terms—very good. Ray Stark and Horst Koch have collected her sculptures. Twelve pieces were purchased by fabled modern-art collec-

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he artist is ill at ease. A visitor has invaded the space that is supposed to break an artistic block, and he is perhaps contributing to it. He asks questions that are difficult. For Wendy Vanderbilt Lehman a lot is at stake. Things have to be carefully considered. First important detail: Yes, Vanderbilt as in that family.

Lehman in the sitting area of her Bridgehampton studio

Her studio is behind her summer home, a wood-shingled place in Bridgehampton, N.Y., the Hamptons suburb that partly serves as an artists’ enclave (home to the studios of the painters Mary Heilemann and Vija Celmins). Some of her aluminum sculptures sit in the front and back yards, organic forms in vibrant colors: red, orange, purple. “I’m a ’60s artist,” says Lehman, settling on a comfortably worn couch in her new studio (an artist’s dream: a small structure with pure-white walls and stations for drawing, watercolors and painting). She wears a sleeveless summer sundress. As for the inspiration for her prolific output, she says, “Where does it all come from? I couldn’t tell you. I really just do what I feel like doing.” Her work

tors Herb and Dorothy Vogel—whom the acclaimed 2008 documentary Herb & Dorothy revealed to be prescient to the point of clairvoyance, having bought Sol LeWitt and Roy Lichtenstein pieces when those artists were just starting out. Lehman’s works sit on the campus of the University of California at Santa Barbara. They are in the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and other museums from Alaska to Hawaii. But Lehman has no gallery and no agent at the moment. “When someone says they’ve heard of my work, I’m startled,” she laughs. “It just doesn’t happen. People see me online, and they want to show colored sculpture in Oneonta [N.Y.] or something, and off they go. I am really bad at

promotion, and it’s an upbringing thing. . . . We were taught not to ask for things. Not to push yourself forward.” Moving over to her desk, she opens a ledger, the record of her work in pencil. There are thousands of entries. She points to the first line, notated “1964.” “Number one: ‘Watercolor on illustration board,’” she reads. “Imagine having the arrogance to imagine that it would someday matter!” Lehman has a slender frame, a brown bob, a wry humor and soft-spoken speech. Being interviewed “has put me in a panic,” she says at one point, her voice seemingly calm. “Can you hear it? I’m out of breath,” she adds, sounding perfectly placid. Lehman is loath to talk about herself in person but gets confessional in her work. One of the drawings on the wall of the studio is a black form with brandished teeth. “I think that one has something to do with something scary in my childhood,” she says. “Some unfinished business.” Then she’s off to a flat file that contains hundreds of watercolors. “Come see this,” she says, opening one of the files. “I think that one is very pretty, which doesn’t bother me. I seem to like crosses for some reason. I’m not religious, but there’s something structural about them—which is probably why they’re symbolic in religion.” A visitor says that it’s been a while since he’s seen an artist’s output that’s so varied. “Oh, I don’t think it’s varied at all,” Lehman says, her voice trailing. “To me, they’re from the same person.” So who is Wendy Vanderbilt Lehman, and where has she been? “I’ve been two distinctly different people,” she says, her eyes scanning the paintings on the wall. “And I have to get them together more.”

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endy Vanderbilt was born in California in 1940. Her father, Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt II, was one of the 20th century’s driving forces of thoroughbred racing. He divorced Wendy’s mother, Manuela Hudson, when their daughter was 2. Wendy’s grandfather Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt I was also a wealthy sportsman. He died in 1915 in the sinking of the Lusitania; his brother, Reginald Claypoole, was the father of Gloria Vanderbilt and the grandfather of Anderson Cooper. Wendy was raised partly in Palm Beach, Fla., and partly in New York City. “I was that tidy little Park Avenue type girl, although I never lived on Park Avenue,” she says. “And then when I went off to boarding school, I discovered a whole new world. I was intellectually stimulated for the


be black, you might be white, you might be lame, you might be a man, you might be a woman, and the inner person has to deal with the outer person for the rest of their life—deal with that person’s abilities, personality and foibles. But which one is the captive audience? The one inside of having the outside, or the outside one of

she made them until four years ago. That is when she briefly “came apart,” and she hasn’t made new work since. To get her creative life started again, she decided to move her studio to Bridgehampton. It has just been built; she is still moving in. And now she is trying to get back to work. She leads the visitor down to the basement of the stu-

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first time; I had teachers take me under their wing. And I found out that I was more worthy than I’d been brought up to believe.” She has no formal art training, other than idolizing Georgia O’Keeffe, whose sister she grew up with. “She was like a granny to me.” One thing Lehman knew early: She wanted to keep her work out of the social sphere. “When I was coming out and all that stuff—the makeup and the little dresses and the Vanderbilt name—I had a lot of attention and fun. So I did that for a while,” she says. “And there were several pictures of me, with a painting or something or another. I began to realize that if I kept getting my face in the newspapers, I would be a socialite artist. So on purpose, I stopped [being photographed]. “I really didn’t want that,” she says, not at all wistfully. “And I think I overdid it.” She attended Sarah Lawrence College, “but aside from academics I was really more interested in learning how to grow up.” When she was in her twenties, she married Orin Lehman, of the Lehman Brothers banking family. The couple had two daughters. Her career progressed in fits and starts. She gives no impression of being ambivalent or regretful about this— “My daughter once said that children are the ultimate sculptures,” she says—just of wanting to be recognized for the right reasons. While raising the children, she went to her studio on 82nd Street near 1st Avenue in Manhattan, first for a few hours while the children were in nursery school, then a few hours more as they grew. The Lehmans divorced in 1995; Orin died in 2008. “People have said to me that to make something of myself in that area, I should add my name back in order to get attention,” she says. “I used to say to Orin, ‘I’m going to use your name when I’m mediocre, and when I hit it big, I’m taking mine back.’” She has never felt comfortable with the idea of self-promotion. “When I would go to an opening at Dia or the Drawing Center, or sitting across from someone at dinner, I would never try to cultivate someone for myself. I feel that’s bad manners.” Lehman shows the visitor a sculpture of a cross, 8 feet tall and cobalt blue, carved of wood. Called “Captive Audience,” it has a door on the side that contains a tiny duplicate of the larger piece. “This is one of my favorites. I’m not a meaning-laden painter. Usually after I’ve done something, I’ve figured out what was on my mind. But this to me has to do with having your intrinsic soul, then someone plunks a Russian doll on top. You might

The work stations of her artist’s studio

having the inside?” It’s a highly conceptual question. But Lehman does not consider herself part of that movement, or any other; she has created her work without even the most casual relationship or dialogue with contemporaries. “I’ve never been someone who’s been with artists,” she says. “My children were at school. When they came home, I came home. I couldn’t go downtown and hang out and be tribal as I would have wanted to.” Lehman started creating the sculptures in 1980—she would mail or fax small drawings to a house builder, who would cut pieces magnified many times, and she would fit them together herself. She sold her first work the next year;

dio, which is a storage space that could pass for a gallery, filled with sculptures. “Here I am lucky to have a nice house, a studio, an apartment, children. The artist in me was taught things in school that saved my life when I was older. I need to learn how to be an active artist all the time. . . . I was a whole other person when I went off into that more intellectual world, where you are admired for what you did—meritocracy.” And then, when the visitor begins to leave, she turns motherly, making the offer of a jacket to cope with the overactive air-conditioning on the train back to Manhattan. “I have plenty,” she says. “In all sizes!” Maybe she too will find one that fits.


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CHARACTER BUILDING This season, designers showed collecTions wiTh a wide range of personaliTy. Model crysTal renn channels Their charM while Taking inspiraTion froM The ulTiMaTe seTTing—The original sTudio and Townhouse of The laTe richard avedon. paTricia BosworTh reMeMBers The phoTographer who capTured characTer like no oTher phoTographed By ThoMas whiTeside sTyled By lesTer garcia


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VALENTINO

Jumpsuit, $2,980, VALENTINO GARAVANI, valentino.com. Patent leather pumps, $645, ROGER VIVIER, Roger Vivier, 212-861-5371.


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OSCAR DE LA RENTA

Silk taffeta pleated gown, $8,490, Saks Fifth Avenue; baroque earrings, $275; neimanmarcus.com, OSCAR DE LA RENTA.


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MARC JACOBS

Metallic paisley dress, $2,100; bouclé lamé skirt, $820; wool scarf, $740; ostrich pilgrim shoes and tinsel socks, prices upon request, MARC JACOBS, marcjacobs.com.


HERMÈS

Double-face cashmere cape coat, $7,350; micro-tweed two-button jacket, $4,500; cotton poplin fencing shirt, $880; lambskin leggings, $5,250, HERMÈS, 800-441-4488.


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LOUIS VUITTON

Silk-blend turtleneck and collared shirt, price upon request; Panama Tec skirt, $1,360; Nelly hat; $1,480; Transsiberian GM bag, $4,750; First Class two-strap pumps, $2,140, LOUIS VUITTON, louisvuitton.com.


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JIL SANDER

Virgin wool dress, $4,250, JIL SANDER, Saks Fifth Avenue.


SALVATORE FERRAGAMO

Knit dress, $5,200; enamel zodiac drop earrings, $790; velvet pendant choker, $930; glass zodiac ring, $290; embroidered egg minaudiere, $3,100, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO, ferragamo.com. Jamaika string bodysuit, $195, WOLFORD, wolford.com.


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VERSACE

Lace blend long-sleeve dress, $3,895, VERSACE, 888-721-7219.


RALPH LAUREN

Velvet wrap coat with shearling collar and belt worn as necktie, $5,000; cotton shirt, $998; acetate and viscose wide-leg pants, $1,698, RALPH LAUREN COLLECTION, ralphlauren.com. Silk top hat, price upon request, RALPH LAUREN COLLECTION, select Ralph Lauren stores.

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CHRISTOPHER KANE

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Flock dress with leather detail, $3,720, CHRISTOPHER KANE, net-a-porter.com. Bolster necklace in crystal, $370, ATELIER SWAROVSKI BY CHRISTOPHER KANE, 212-966-3522.


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MaNiCuriST: HoNey aT eXPoSure Ny. FaSHioN aSSiSTaNT: MarCeLo Gaia.

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PROENZA SCHOULER

Honeycomb dress, $5,975, show trousers, $2,025, PROENZA SCHOULER, 212-585-3200.

Hair: DeNNiS GoTS MaKeuP: CHriSToPHer arDoFF LoCaTioN: CourTeSy oF TowN reSiDeNTiaL 407 eaST 75TH STreeT


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NO PLACE LIKE (HIS) HOME Some people called him a “wonderful terrible mirror.” others said he was exploitative and manipulative. But that’s really beside the point. richard avedon was one of the greatest photographers in the world, both in fashion and portraiture. He died in 2004 at the age of 81, and his work is being shown as much as it ever was in museums and galleries across the globe. This past May his exhibit of epic-size photographic murals at the Gagosian Gallery in New york City was so popular, it had to be extended. Some of the subjects were emblematic cultural figures like andy warhol, and others were groups of government officials who participated in the Vietnam war juxtaposed with victims of the war—survivors of napalm attacks. These studies were the work of avedon’s life and what he wanted to be remembered for. But he may be best known for the endless stream of magical pictures that appeared in Harper’s Bazaar from 1944 to 1965 and then in Vogue, where he was on staff until 1988. in those pages he revolutionized fashion photography by directing his models to dance and leap and twirl and stride about in their boxy coats and swishy silken ball gowns. “you are women enjoying yourselves,” he would say. avedon’s work has been described as “snapshot realism”—fashion in motion where the models, clothes, makeup and hairstyles blur gorgeously and you somehow get a sense of the freedom and energy that is america. He became rich and celebrated, but he disliked being known as simply a fashion photographer. especially because he had always

challenged himself by doing reportage, documenting New york City’s streets and taking celebrity portraits. He worked with a rolleiflex but eventually switched to an old-fashioned 8-by-10-inch Deardorff camera, “because i no longer wanted to hide behind the camera. i wanted nothing to help the photograph except what i could draw out of the sitter.” His initial attempts were soft, worshipful pictures of Henry Fonda as Mister roberts and Mary Martin in South Pacific. But by 1958, avedon had grown bolder. He photographed a hungover Dorothy Parker; a befuddled President eisenhower; a manic Charlie Chaplin; an eccentric, hairy ezra Pound shrieking into the lens. Then there was the ravaged close-up of the Duke and Duchess of windsor. avedon had arrived at their waldorf Towers apartment in New york City and began setting up his cameras as the royal couple carefully arranged themselves. “i’m sorry i was late,” avedon told them, “but the most terrible thing happened. My cab ran over a dog.” (it wasn’t true.) The windsors, both dog lovers, gasped, “ah!” Click went the shutter. an iconic photograph was born. For years avedon had lived with his family on Park avenue and worked out of a studio on east 58th Street. in 1970 he decided to move to a place where he could live by himself and work 24 hours a day if he wanted to. He bought a house on east 75th Street and renovated it. He put in a huge, white-walled studio on the first floor, a darkroom in the basement; he built a terrace garden on

the second floor. avedon then began to work as he had never worked before on his mammoth personal projects, the photographic murals that would reflect the changing times and the people who changed them, in the civil rights movement, the counterculture and the Vietnam war. recently i paid a visit to avedon’s house. The rooms where the photographer worked have been carefully preserved. The darkroom and studio are intact; the shape and structure of the house are still the same—superbly designed, everywhere stark white walls with black stairs. it’s a knowing tribute to avedon’s minimalist style. The impressive six-bedroom, nine-bath residence is complete with a gym in the basement. when this is combined with the remaining areas of the house, it adds up to 8,475 square feet of glorious light-filled space. The highlights for me were the two outdoor terraces. Landscape designer Miranda Brooks transformed them into leafy green sanctuaries with cherry trees and boxwood hedges. Before i left, i walked through this remarkable dwelling again and came to avedon’s studio, so immaculate and white, where he photographed everyone from Hillary Clinton to Philip Seymour Hoffman. i was reminded of how he always wanted his photographs printed on gleaming white semigloss or matte simulacrum to make the subjects stand out with hallucinatory sharpness. “There, all is only order and beauty, luxury, calm and pleasure,” Baudelaire wrote of one fabled place he adored. The same could be said of this new version of the house of avedon, which the photographer’s spirit still inhabits.


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despiTe having Two owners since avedon’s deaTh, his sTudio, showing The daily life of a phoTographer, is very Much inTacT. PHOTOgRAPHEd by duSTIN COHEN


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EYES ON THE PRIZE

Whether he’s catching flak for criticizing the President or saving a constituent from a fire, cory booker, the mayor of neWark, n. J., Just can’t stay out of the sPotlight—but that’s hoW he seems to like it. the telegenic democrat, sWorn into office six years ago, has attracted maJor attention and donations for his city, thanks to friends like oPrah Winfrey and mark zuckerberg. but as booker’s rePutation groWs, observers Wonder Where his real ambition lies. Writer alex bhattacharJi shadoWs a man on the run


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“the challenge for Booker is: does his moment pass at some point?” asks a democratic consultant. like to see him run for governor next year against Republican Chris Christie. They worry about him challenging longserving Senator Frank Lautenberg, a Democrat, in 2014, although not as much as the prospect of his staying put for a third term as mayor. “The challenge for Booker is: Does his moment pass at some point?” asks Democratic consultant Jason Ralston, a senior member of President Barack Obama’s media operation in 2008. “An awful lot of people have waited and waited, and by the time it got to be their turn, they were no longer the guy.” What becomes immediately clear is that Cory Booker moves at his own pace—at once frenetically accelerated and confoundingly, almost stubbornly, deliberate. After a protracted exit from City Hall—Booker’s departure is interrupted in the corridor by the arrival of crime statistics reports and the need to escort a passing octogenarian to the elevator—the mayor finally settles into the back of his black Chevy Tahoe and grabs a Luna bar from a backseat cache. “There’s never a typical day,” he says. “Planes are a blessing. Six hours of undisturbed reading, writing, thinking, e-mailing. I close my eyes on takeoff for about 10 minutes, then . . . I’m going. My staff hates it because when I land, they each have 50 e-mails.” In the course of the six-minute drive to the day’s first event, a tour of a proposed redevelopment site, Booker catches up on city business with Adam Zipkin, his deputy mayor for economic development. He asks Zipkin to connect a pastor who runs a reentry program for former inmates with possible employers, and to reach out to New Jersey’s junior senator, Democrat Robert Menendez, regarding legislation that will fast-track a green card for entrepreneurs who invest in job creation. Then they discuss the redevelopment project. “What’s it waiting on?” Booker asks. “Rezoning. But it’s done,” Zipkin assures him.

Booker with young constituents in a Newark park

Booker nods in approval, grabs his iPhone, opens Twitter, and starts composing. He’s been uncharacteristically idle since his 7:10 a.m. tweet: @CoryBooker “Nothing diminishes anxiety faster than action.” Walter Anderson

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he Cory Booker brand has been built on action in the form of headline-grabbing, Hollywood-style heroics—comforting a 19-year-old shot in the chest as the young man died in his arms; going on a 10-day hunger strike while a city council member to protest the lack of police presence in the projects; sleeping in a trailer to shame the previous administration into cracking down on the drug trade; and, in April, rescuing a woman from a burning building. Booker grew up in Harrington Park, 20 miles north of Newark geographically, and by most other measures. It was (and is) an affluent community, blessed with good schools and little crime. He was a sci-fi geek, an honor-roll student and, as a high school senior, an all-American tight end. From there, Booker amassed diplomas like X-Men comics: a B.A. in public policy and an M.A. in sociology from Stanford; a degree in history from Oxford, where he studied on a Rhodes Scholarship; and, finally, a J.D. from Yale. After graduating from law school, while his classmates were starting partner-track positions at white-shoe firms, Booker moved into Newark’s notoriously dangerous and dilapidated Brick Towers projects. He has been a media darling ever since he upset a 16year incumbent to win a seat on the Newark city council in 1998. Booker’s failed 2002 mayoral bid was the subject of Street Fight, a 2005 Oscar-nominated documentary. When he ran again in 2006, Booker was elected in a landslide. Although he was reelected by a smaller margin in 2010, his favorability rating and name recognition among constituents have climbed throughout his time in office. Yet Booker’s visibility among Newark’s 277,000 residents can seem almost inconsequential compared to his influence in social media. Since he was introduced to Twitter in 2008 by Sarah Ross, the Silicon Valley executive who launched Ashton Kutcher into the tweetosphere, Booker has amassed more than 1.17 million followers— well behind President Obama, but ahead of Romney and nearly 10 times that of Christie.

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he clock is ticking on Cory Booker. At the moment, the mayor of Newark, N.J., is caught between the desk and the door of his office in City Hall, a gold-domed beaux-arts anomaly bracketed by bail-bond offices and a Subway sandwich shop. As he reaches back to grab a sheaf of folders and a Diet Pepsi from his desk, a digital readout across the room counts down the time remaining in his second term: 706 days, 14 hours, 25 minutes, 52 seconds . . . 51 . . . 50 . . . On this late July morning, Booker is facing more pressing deadlines. The first matter of business is what might be best described as penance. “We have to schedule the L.A. trip,” he tells aide-decamp Sharon Macklin. “Have to.” “Okay, but there are conflicts,” she says. “We have to move things around.” “Work with it, Sharon, okay? Let’s get it done. It’s for the Obamas.” The mayor’s raised brows and wide-eyed stare underscore the imperative. Booker is still making amends with the White House after his late May appearance on NBC’s Meet the Press, where he said the president’s campaign ads attacking Mitt Romney’s record at Bain Capital were “nauseating to me...nauseating to the American public.” But while cross-country fundraising trips are one way to earn back the trust of Obama and his campaign staff, they can be a tricky proposition for Booker, who has just been excoriated in the local newspaper for his out-oftown trips (headline: the absentee mayor? cory booker’s endless travel schedule pulls him away from newark). Right now his in-town calendar runneth over. It’s barely 10:30 in the morning, but the mayor is already well behind in a battery of back-to-back appointments. It seems to be a trend for Booker, this trouble sticking to schedules others have set for him. Looming over all that he does is the palpable sense that he has to make a move, that the hourglass is running low on his status as a rising star. “There are plenty of options for him,” says political analyst Dee Dee Myers, who served as White House press secretary under President Bill Clinton. “He could run for the Senate. He could run for governor of New Jersey. If he repairs the damage, he could end up in the second Obama administration.” Many Democrats in New Jersey and Washington would


With President Obama in 2009 at a rally for then–N.J. Governor Jon Corzine

MICHAEL NAGLE/GETTY IMAGES

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“SeriouSly, i’m a wild idealiSt. i think our nation needS more idealiStS and more poetS.”

(“I can metabolize those blessings as fuel for me to fight for America”); his pride in Newark (“You can go through the industries that were started here, including my favorite—M&M’s!”); and his desire to appear genuine in social media (“Be transparent in who you are, from your corny jokes to your midnight cravings for Ben & Jerry’s”). “I’m literally at my worst health right now; you can write that,” he says. “I crossed a barrier that I’d never crossed before—a certain weight—which I won’t even tell you ’cause it’s embarrassing. I was so grossly overweight, which is total hypocrisy because I’m Michelle Obama’s co-vice chair for the campaign against obesity.” Booker, a longtime vegetarian, has made his battle of the bulge very public. He has no qualms about admitting to a little personal vanity. “I had an ex-girlfriend who ruined me in terms of my macho, ex-football-player self— she turned me on to mani-pedis,” he says, unabashedly. “Being a public figure, people talk smack about you, so I found this 24-hour mani-pedi place and go in the middle of the night. It’s this guilty pleasure I have. Look, manis are good, but pedis—there’s something...transformative.” It’s one of the rare indulgences Booker allows himself. At 43, he’s single and lives alone. He abstains from meat and alcohol and considers his greatest vice (ice cream notwithstanding) to be a steady stream of Diet Coke, Coke Zero and Diet Pepsi. Booker struggles to remember the last time he took a true vacation. In December he brought his parents, Carolyn and Cary (also the name of his brother, his only sibling), to Israel but confesses that he spent much of the trip in meetings with political leaders and business and tech moguls. Finally, he admits his last pure pleasure trip was more than three years ago, a 40th-birthday jaunt to the Greek island of Mykonos. Even then he was doing Newark business in a way, reading Philip Roth’s American Pastoral for the first time on the beaches of the Aegean. Roth had good reason to make his hometown of Newark the backdrop on which to paint a human and urban tragedy. The novel is a eulogy for middle-class utopia before the 1967 riots and the radical madness that ensued, before it all—Newark, our families, our heroes, our whole country—went to shit. “Butchered to death by taxes, corruption, and race...What happened to Newark broke his heart,” the novel’s protagonist, Swede Levov,

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“It’s critical for mayors to communicate outside of their city,” says Booker. “Cities aren’t hermetically sealed boxes. Depending on how many times you’re retweeted, 10, 20, 30 million people could have a consumer impression on things I’m saying—that’s very important for a guy who’s trying to show the greatness of his city.” According to Twitter, Cory Booker has more followers than any other U.S. mayor. “It’s a very powerful tool if you’re trying to reignite opportunities for your residents,” he says. Booker uses his Twitter feed for plenty of city business—he publicizes job programs, music festivals and fund raising—and he took to it to mobilize the city during the 2010 blizzard, famously responding to one woman’s tweet by showing up to dig out the home of her grandmother. Beyond his innate PR savvy, much of Booker’s success in mastering social media comes from engaging with the passion and tone of a native user. Take his response to a thread on same-sex marriage: @CoryBooker I’ll fight 4 ur rite 4 religious freedom. When u marry in church b4 God let it b as u want but 4 government let all b equal. “If there are some in the political sphere that feel social media is frivolity, they’re just behind the curve,” says Myers. “I don’t know that we have figured out how it is going to intersect with politics to promote candidates or causes, but if you are not part of the dialogue or don’t think the dialogue’s important, then you’re gonna miss the boat.” In July, Booker returned from Allen & Company’s Sun Valley Conference, an annual meeting of tech and media moguls, where in 2010 his encounter with Mark Zuckerberg led to the Facebook CEO’s $100 million

pledge to Newark public schools. This year, Booker attended as a social-media entrepreneur: He’s one of the cofounders of #Waywire, a video news-sharing site aimed at millennials, whose mission is to promote a dialogue and social values. The New York–based start-up’s investors include Google CEO Eric Schmidt, as well as Booker supporters Oprah Winfrey and Troy Carter, Lady Gaga’s manager and social-media guru. Nathan Richardson, CEO and cofounder of #Waywire, describes Booker’s job as “inspiration architect”—fitting, given his penchant for rousing oratory. Clearly, there has to be some spark if you hope to switch people’s mindsets from I can has cheezburger? to I can change the world. “I could easily be accused of being a Don Quixote,” Booker admits. “Seriously, I’m a wild idealist, and I think our nation needs more idealists and more poets.” #Waywire, which launched Aug. 13, ahead of both parties’ conventions, may be coming at the ideal time for Booker: If, as he suggests, his Meet the Press comments were a poorly phrased expression of his belief that we need to elevate the civic discourse, here he is putting his money—in shares held in trust—where his mouth is. “I had the desire to find a way to disrupt what I consider to be wrong with our national conversation, which is very polarized, very enemy-oriented,” Booker says. “Social media can be the cure for that, especially if you elevate and amplify voices that are shut out of our democratic dialogue. You want people to influence the story, make the story.” If it succeeds, #Waywire has the potential to put Booker at the center of a sizable and politically motivated movement. “There’s a profound change coming, this huge wave of young digital natives who do not consume news and information in the traditional way, who yearn to get their voice heard,” he says. “This is a stream that has the power to break through the arteriosclerosis of our society and create the sort of change we yearn for.” This is quintessential Booker-speak, a blend of soaring rhetoric about political renewal and allusions to clogged arteries. Booker’s speech constantly revolves around weight and food—when he discusses breaking the political bottleneck (“arteriosclerosis”); his sense of obligation (“I eat lavishly from banquet tables that were prepared for me by my ancestors”) and its impact on his desire to serve


With friend Oprah Winfrey in 2006

9/11 Commission. “Very few cities have mayors who can go on The Tonight Show. That’s all helpful to a city like Newark, that’s gotten a lot of black eyes. He’s got not only a national reputation but a good national reputation.” On the other hand, the more time Booker spends in the spotlight, the more he must manage his image at home. After recently spending the day in Philadelphia at an event with Michelle Obama, he made a point of driving around Newark’s Central Ward for hours that night, pressing flesh and taking complaints about bees and requests for speed bumps. “With almost any constituency, if they think you’ve taken your eye off the ball and are getting distracted by the national political glare or Hollywood, they’ll take it out on you,” Kean cautions. “Whether Cory’s crossed that line or not, I don’t know. But if people feel he has, you’re going to see discontent.” It’s a peculiar dilemma for a politician whose personal charisma and mastery of publicity has keyed his rise. While Booker did get jolted by the Meet the Press incident, most political observers agree the episode won’t cause lasting damage to the Booker brand, provided he reins himself in. “One of the things that’s appealing about him is that he doesn’t seem scripted,” says Myers. “He seems like a fresh voice who’s willing to say what he thinks. He’s an instinctual politician, and instinctual politicians make mistakes. Live by the media, die by the media. He is a guy who figured out how to use his platform to be a visible presence, but it’s a bit like wrestling an alligator— lose control of it and it bites you.” Although Booker shows no signs of giving up his trademark extemporaneous speaking style, he insists he has learned from his Meet the Press experience. The backlash was swift and severe—his words used as a rallying cry by the GOP, his loyalty questioned, Obama campaign sources saying, “He’s dead to us.” It shocked and rattled Booker, who didn’t realize he’d put his perfectly pedicured

foot in his mouth until he checked Twitter after leaving the NBC studios. “I saw it blow up,” he recalls. “I got so many great calls from people. My favorite was from [former Pennsylvania governor] Ed Rendell, who said, ‘What you said is right, Cory, but just do me a favor: Never use the word ‘nauseated’ again. Make that your new N-word.’ It was a long week.” @CoryBooker Many meetings today on econ development. Encouraging progress re: jobs w/big announcements in future. Touring another site w/developers now.

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ooker sends this tweet as his SUV pulls up at a massive brick warehouse complex along the banks of the Passaic River. As he exits the car and straightens his blazer, an 18-wheeler passes. If all goes according to plan, Volvos and Range Rovers will replace the tractor-trailers at this 15-acre riverside property, and the warehouses and asphalt lots will become lofts and shops, parks and plazas. For now, however, it is home to the Betesh Group. Before Booker enters family patriarch Sol Betesh’s office, he kisses the mezuzah in the doorway. Betesh, an 81-yearold silver-haired macher, begins describing his companies, which design and manufacture licensed handbags, diaper bags, infant accessories and other products. “More than 200 employees, 60 percent Newark residents,” his son Michael chimes in. They recently released a baby-food processor called Baby Brezza; a new model is already in the works. “It should be perfected by the time I have kids,” Booker says. “You’re having kids?” asks the elder Betesh, rising to give the mayor a hug. Booker lifts both palms. Slow down. “I have to find my ishshah first,” he says, dropping the Hebrew word for wife. In 2010, the Beteshes closed 35,000 square feet of distribution space in New York City and relocated their operations to these warehouses, which they bought in 1991. “We wanted to be here,” Sol says. “In Newark.” “Incredible story. Amazing,” says Booker. Sol and son walk the mayor through their plans. With the administration’s help, they want to move their operation elsewhere in Newark and convert this prime riverside real estate. They show Booker renderings of the residential lofts, storefronts, tree-filled plazas and, of

“Will i run against a sitting governor or a senator of my oWn party? i do not knoW.”

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says, referring to his father’s devotion to Brick City. “It’s the worst city in the world.” That was a widely held view of Newark in 1997, the year the Pulitzer Prize–winning novel was published and Booker became a community organizer in the city’s Central Ward. Ever since, he has made it his mission to not just change Newark but transform it. Within two years after his becoming mayor, murders had declined by 36 percent. Shootings are down more than 20 percent during his tenure. The NHL’s Devils, the NBA’s Nets and Major League Soccer’s Red Bulls have all come to play in the Newark area. There’s $800 million of new construction under way, and Panasonic is relocating its North American headquarters to a $200 million tower being built downtown. In March, U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron even made a trip to Newark to talk to Booker about local economic development. Never mind that the Nets have since decamped for Brooklyn and that budget concerns forced Booker to trim the city workforce by 1,000—this is progress, if not yet transformation. Much of it is born from the mayor’s ability to make his oft-maligned city a cause célèbre. On a short drive through Newark, Booker points out the tangible results: A facility for AIDS patients funded in part by Jon Bon Jovi. A residence for mothers in drug recovery and their children (thanks, Oprah). Sustainable housing for veterans (take a bow, Brad Pitt). Then there is Zuckerberg’s $100 million education endowment. And now Booker is talking to musician Alicia Keys about an arts center. “Most of these folks have really great moral compasses and want to find ways to give back,” he says. “If I get the chance, I just pitch them. It’s a benefit to me to be out there talking, meeting and mixing.” The more than $300 million in private philanthropy Booker has attracted to Newark has come with a cost, however: a reputation for self-promotion. Booker has been known to take paid speaking engagements—receiving up to $40,000 an appearance—while traveling on behalf of the city. His jaunts to the Hamptons, Sun Valley and Aspen have given rise to accusations that he’s gone Hollywood. On one hand, what’s good for Booker can be good for Newark. “He’s taken the city to a new level, mainly due to his own visibility,” says Tom Kean, the former Republican governor of New Jersey and, more recently, cochair of the


JOHN MOORE/GETTY IMAGES

-Please run for higher office, Mr. Booker. Governor? President? -Amen to that! -Amen.. -♥ It! ♥

Booker is in the SUV on his iPhone, checking the most recent comments on his Facebook page, responses to an inspirational post of his that concluded with the lines: Never give up, and you will never be denied No matter what the challenge, there always is – the other side. The mayor is late for the next event on his schedule, the groundbreaking for a 350,000-square-foot distribution center being built on a once-polluted site along the Passaic River. By the time Booker arrives, well into the ceremony, a series of speakers have already spoken beneath the opensided white tent. Behind it lie carefully arranged construction machines, a pile of loose soil and a dozen shiny shovels emblazoned with the date and occasion. About 80 people on folding chairs sit fanning themselves in the withering heat. As Booker is introduced, he senses the crowd’s flagging energy. “Hello. All right. Welcome to you! Wow. An amazing coalition here—a coalition of those with conviction. This coalition of conviction is why we’re here today...” He launches into a short, uptempo, off-the-cuff speech: “We have Panasonic moving its headquarters here to Newark, and, as I often say, I don’t care what the rest of America says, the wine capital of America now is not Silicon Valley or Napa Valley or Sonoma; it’s Newark, New Jersey—because we have Manischewitz’s global headquarters! All of these things are signs of a city that is transforming itself, transforming the nation...” When the mayor finishes to weary applause, he and a handful of state and city officials join the project’s developers beside the freshly turned soil. “Let’s break some ground, people,” Booker shouts. “1-2-3. Everybody pick up your shovels...” After a few moments and a dozen handshakes, Booker, still in his blazer, scrambles into the cockpit of the backhoe. He fiddles with the shifts until the digger’s bucket curls down to scoop up a load of earth as the TV cameras roll. Minutes later, Booker slumps in the back of his SUV. He wipes the sweat from his brow with a brown towel he keeps in the car for such moments. As he tweets an Instagram photo of himself operating the backhoe, I ask him if that was part of the script. Booker shrugs and smiles. “I needed the bigger shovel. I always need a bigger shovel.”

With U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron in Newark in March

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@JaydaNSW I heard Cory Booker resigned? Is that true???? When the tweet arrives, Booker, sitting in his SUV, quickly retweets it, adding: @Cory Booker Um I’m “resigned” that false internet rumors spread quickly. Speculation about his future is rampant and inevitable, but Booker remains cagey, either unwilling or unable to reveal his endgame. “You have to be mission-driven in life. Purpose should always trump position,” he says, echoing sentiments his parents instilled in him. “I just had a conversation with my team about the need to stay focused on why we were elected. There’s a lot of distractions around here as it gets closer to when people are gonna ask me that question—about, you know, the governor’s race.” In late July, Booker told an audience at a local political meeting in New Jersey that he was “strongly considering” either a run for governor or the Senate. If he decides not to challenge the formidable Chris Christie—with whom he has a strong working relationship—next year, his route to

the Senate may be even trickier: Despite the fact he’ll be 90 years old at the time, Lautenberg has given every indication he will run in 2014, and this would force Booker to mount a potentially divisive primary challenge. But there’s also the chance that Booker, who passed on an Obama administration job in 2009, will be offered a position if the president is reelected. But that’s hardly a lock, even without the fallout from Meet the Press. This leaves Booker in the awkward position of hoping against hope that Mitt Romney gets elected and brings Christie with him to Washington, or that Christie opts not to seek another term. “I wish, I wish,” Booker says, perking up. “I would consider running for governor, absolutely.” Then, he quickly catches himself. “But I don’t know if I would do that over staying where I am.” The signals are surely mixed. In early June, Booker formed CoryPAC, a national political action committee. At present he is using the funds to support Sen. Menendez and other Democrats running for reelection this fall, but he knows that the PAC’s existence only adds to the conjecture. “Will I run for a higher office against a sitting governor or a senator of my own party? I do not know, and that’s just, actually, a sincere response,” Booker says. He acknowledges that most mayors have a limited shelf life (10 years, he estimates, or two and a half terms) and that his own opportunities may be nearing their expiration date. “I think the window closes very soon on some of those options, so either I proactively decide,” he says, “or it’ll be a de facto decision.” It’s possible that, intentionally or not, Booker might let the clock run out. “Fortune tends to favor the bold in politics. If you look at the guys who make it, whether it’s Obama or Marco Rubio making it to the Senate, they took chances,” says Ralston. “Booker is a guy who is bold in his governing style and bold in saving people’s lives and things like that, but he hasn’t been particularly bold in terms of taking on the big race.”

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particular importance to Booker and his team, a 40-footwide promenade along the river. “This will change the face of Newark,” Sol says. “I love it. Tenacious,” Booker replies. As he tours the 450,000 square feet of low-rise brick buildings, Booker greets each employee with a handshake, a hands-pressed namaste or a high-five and the line “Hi, I’m Cory.” The mayor’s aides glance anxiously at their watches. Calls are made to revise his calendar. The advance team peels off for the next event. Almost an hour into the tour, Booker is looking at photos of the buildings’ state of disrepair, circa 1991. As Zipkin assures the Beteshes the zoning situation is a nonissue, Sol puts his hand on Booker’s shoulder and says, “We want to get a ferry.” “To Wall Street?” Michael Betesh nods. “It’d only be 26 minutes from here.” “If you build it, they will come,” Zipkin says. “Amen,” Booker says. “We got two years to get this thing built!” Then the mayor spends another 45 minutes greeting warehouse and loading-dock workers, before giving his personal contact information to the Beteshes. This is the campaign before the campaign, but the question is: Which one?


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IL L T S R O Y I T S ON W S, C E T H G O O D T E R V IE N I E E IN K S K H C T A B G O T U SI V P E E E R ' U E ' V E E XCL S NE A K O Y R CH, W NGS, IAL FALL E H T W H E H E B E A A P P E NI N D S P E C T T HI S AT T TURAL H ORTS A ABOU CUL T Y R E P O K NO W PAR NEED T YOU


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CHICAGO The luxe Bottega Veneta Lake Suite at the Park Hyatt

Hotel News Downtown

In-room bar cart service at The James Hotel

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The Public’s Library Bar houses the DJ series.

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The city’s top hotels go beyond the bed with their latest range of offerings. Ian Schrager’s swank Public Hotel (publichotels.com) launched a guest DJ series, with recent spins from Paul Oakenfold and actor Troy Garity (Jane Fonda’s son). Get crafty—and a little tipsy—at The James Hotel (jameshotels.com) with the In-Room Cocktail package: A tray arrives for cocktails, stocked with liquors, measured ingredients and glasses printed with DIY recipes for drinks like the Old Havana and the Moscow Mule. Love the Bottega boutique on the ground floor of the Park Hyatt Chicago (parkchicago.hyatt.com)? Check out the Lake Suite, a collaboration between Bottega Veneta and Park Hyatt. Beautifully minimalist and maximally luxurious with expansive lake views, the room is replete with pieces from the fashion house’s furniture collection: benches, headboard and desk, all boasting the brand’s signature woven leather produced in partnership with Poltrona Frau. Lake Suite rates start at $4,500. —Anna Blessing Style maven April Francis

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AprIl Francis Because sHe’s A jACk Of All trAdes WHY:

“I love stuff that isn’t what I’m seeing all the time,” says April Francis. “If someone is doing X, I want to be doing Y.” As founder of styling biz the Haute Closet, creator of Dose Market and freelance consultant to clients like Nike and Park Hyatt International spas, Francis is actually doing X and Y and Z. And it seems to be working. The 29-year-old is known for her selective eye and ability to edit, a skill she is constantly honing whether she’s culling a customer’s closet, curating local

vendors to participate at Dose (a monthly bazaar of local food and fashion at River East Art Center in Streeterville) or researching the culture in Amman, Jordan, to develop a new Hyatt spa concept. Her personal style is as unpredictable as her career path. “I love weird stuff, the weirder the better,” she says. “But I also love functional.” At a recent party, Francis wore a reversible Kenzo dress. “When I told people, they asked me to go switch it. I did, and everyone loved it.” —A.B.

TOP: COURTESY OF THE PARK HYATT, CHICAGO. COURTESY OF THE PUBLIC HOTEL. CENTER: COURTESY OF THE JAMES HOTEL, CHICAGO. FRANCIS: MICHAEL FORTNER.

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TargeT’s on the Dot DINNER ThE Ikram Store WHERE:

Friends and fashion mavens gathered for a sit-down dinner hosted by Target to celebrate Ikram Goldman, who curated merchandise for the designsavvy mega-brand. Guests wore Thakoon, Marni and Rodarte—and Target—and lauded Goldman’s style. Jewelry designer and friend Carolyn Rosenberg raved: “It’s the perfect high-low combo: Target has great stuff, then you put Ikram’s twist on it, and it’s the coolest thing.” —A.B.

A view from the store’s second floor

Mickey Boardman and Linda Johnson Rice

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Kiley Taslitz, Anthony Cristiano and Laysha Ward

The store’s modern restaurant

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Trish Rooney, Julie Holman and Nicola Jackson

Jackie Anderson and Drew Elliott

Sondra Karman, Bob Faust and Nick Cave


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Tina Koegel, Sue Wyderka, Dana Stone and Wendy Krimmins

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A surprise performance by the Village People wowed attendees at the 35th annual Zoo Ball: The Great Catsby. Following dinner, guests including Joan Cusack and Kathy Brock danced into the night. Late-night snacks from Pinkberry and Connie’s Pizza and the gift of a John Derian memento concluded the evening before partygoers were chauffeured home in BMW courtesy cars. —A.B. Ashley and Jeff Kilburg

An African lioness in her zoo habitat Kol Estricher and Kitsey Ritter

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Jillian Meder, Suzanne A. Meder and Rosemary Jones

Peter Francis and Holly Ceraci

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SPROUT SAN FRANCISCO

A parent’s list of indispensables: Coffee. Grandparents. A stiff drink post bedtime. Adding to that list: Sprout. A trusted new source for environmentally safe gear for the giggle set. Chemical-free furniture, organic sheets and non-toxic toys are a few more ways to soothe worry-fraught moms and dads. 1943 W. Division St., sproutsanfrancisco.com

BRUNELLO CUCINELLI

Cashmere connoisseurs will agree: Not all cashmere is created equal. Brunello Cucinelli can always be counted on for the most luxurious variety. Now the Gold Coast has its own outpost for the Italian line, which includes sweaters, separates, shoes and super-soft pillows and throws. 939 N. Rush St., brunellocucinelli.com

TESA CIGAR CO.

Small-batch cigars—including the Tabacalera series, hand-blended by owner Chris Kelly in Chicago and crafted in Estelí, Nicaragua—line the tobacco-colored walls at West Loop’s Tesa Cigar Co. The masculine lounge harkens back to an era of smoking jackets and old-school gentlemen’s clubs. 1039 W. Lake St., tesacigars.com

DEKA

After New Year’s resolutions, personal trainers and GymPact, Deka is the most compelling reason to get to the gym. The new Magnificent Mile store specializes in sporty style: Y-3, adidas by Stella McCartney, Splits 59 and Newton running shoes—the answer to pre-Pilates, après-spin and everything in between. 900 N. Michigan Ave., shop900.com/shop/deka

MAP: ISTOCKPHOTO.COM. TOP: BOB CARL (8). BOTTOM, LEFT TO RIGHT: COURTESY OF TESA CIGAR COMPANY; COURTESY OF SPROUT SAN FRANCISCO; COURTESY OF DEKA CHICAGO; COURTESY OF BRUNELL0 CUCINELLI

Martin and Debra Beck


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WHAT:

Exciting Retail MoMents in tHE citY AnD tHE SUBURBS WHERE:

SUITSUPPLY

A variety of color at Suitsupply

The wares at CB Boutique

BLOWTIQUE

The Blowtique salon

CB BOUTIQUE

It’s a rare day when the fashion flock strays from the city to the ’burbs, but CB Boutique will lure even the most stalwart city dweller northward. Its Lake Forest space is filled with designer labels for men and women including Theory, Halston and Simon Spurr. (shopcityblue.com)

LUXURY GARAGE SALE

Gently loved Hermès and Louis Vuitton bags mingle with nearmint-condition Manolo Blahniks at Luxury Garage Sale. Owners Brielle Buchberg and Lindsay Segal seek out designer pieces for their consignment business, which just expanded to a bricks-and-mortar shop in Old Town. (luxurygaragesale.com)

INDEPENDENCE BOUTIQUE

Independence boutique

A Balenciaga bag from Luxury Garage Sale

No outsourcing here: “Made in the U.S.A.” is the theme of the classically cool men’s shop Independence. Bespoke footwear made in Chicago by Oak Street Bootmakers and Ebbets Field Flannels from Seattle are on offer at this Gold Coast store. (independence-chicago.com) —A.B.

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City-themed blowouts make up the menu at River North’s Blowtique, a styling-only salon that promises a wash, blow-dry and coif in 35 minutes for $35. Pick the “Chicago” for a classic, smooth blowout, the “NYC” for straight and glossy or the “Dallas” for big, bouncy curls. (blowtique.com)

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: COURTESY OF SUITSUPPLY. COURTESY OF BLOWTIQUE. COURTESY OF INDEPENDENCE. COURTESY OF LUXURY GARAGE SALE. COURTESY OF CB BOUTIQUE.

Perched atop East Oak Street’s Hermès, this outpost of Dutch import, Suitsupply, delivers just what this city needs: made-to-measure suits as well as a relaxed café and a breathtaking wraparound terrace. Look for bimonthly parties with cocktails and snacks from Gibson’s steakhouse, sure to make this ambitious new arrival an old favorite in no time. (suitsupply.com)


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NEW RESTAURANTS FRom West Loop To ThE GoLd Coast

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Clams on the grill at Belly Q

BELLY Q Chef Bill Kim can do no wrong

in the eyes of Chicagoans, who swoon over his pan-Asian Belly Shack and Urbanbelly dumpling house. Asian barbecue hotspot Belly Q is just one more reason to love him. Servers wear long brown leather aprons while presenting dishes like tea-smoked duck on steamed buns and soba noodles with basil and marinated eggplant at Kim’s latest venture in the former One Sixtyblue space. Kim’s partner on this one is Michael Jordan, yet another reason to sing its praises—and since there’s a karaoke room on-site, you’ve actually got a chance to do so. (bellyqchicago.com)

The entrance to g.e.b.

G.E.B.

It was only a matter of time before Graham Elliot landed on Restaurant Row—and he has, with a departure from his out-of-thebox River North Graham Elliot and unique sandwich shop, grahamwich. West Loop’s g.e.b. (Graham Elliot Bistro) is a stripped-down version of the chef’s signature playful cooking, in which the straightforward dishes focus on no more than three ingredients, like linguini with clam and fennel, steak and potatoes with béarnaise, trout with spaetzle and sorrel. Easy, right? Well, if it’s the same Graham Elliot this city has come to know, we’re guessing there’s a lot more than meets the eye. (gebistro.com)

The bar at Jellyfish

JELLYFISH

Fred’s at Barneys. RL at Ralph Lauren. The Café at Ikram. Chicago has its share of power-lunch spots linked to power retail shops. But the big fish in this pond are going to have to make room for the newest on the shopthen-snack scene, Jellyfish, nestled above Ted Baker London and Scoop NYC. Chef Harold Jurado brings background cred (Charlie Trotter’s, Sunda, Chizakaya) with his lobster summer rolls and Wagyu beef skewers, while drinks like The Socialite—muddled gooseberries, white rum, lime and herbal syrup— make it the newest Rush Street hotspot for afterhours swilling. (jellyfishchicago.com) —A.B.

WHAT:

LocAL HAPPENINGS

The course at Medinah Country Club

THE RYDER CUP Medinah Country Club, 30 miles west of Chicago, hosts the 39th Ryder Cup September 25-30. Held on the No. 3 course (ranked No. 20

STEVE MCQUEEN EXHIBIT Catch the first survey exhibition of Steve McQueen’s films and moving-image installations at the Art Institute of Chicago, home to the largest collection of the director’s Steve McQueen’s “Charlotte,” film still, 2004

work in the U.S. On display October 21 through January 6. (artic.edu)

by Golf Digest), the tournament is one of the biggest PGA events of the year—and Justin Timberlake will serve as the first-ever U.S. team ambassador. (rydercup.com)

TKTKTKTKTK CREDITS STYLE? LEFT TO RIGHT,PHOTO TOP: COURTESY OF BELLY Q. COURTESY OF GRAHAM ELLIOT BISTRO. COURTESY OF JELLYFISH. BOTTOM: PHOTO COURTESY OF STEVE MCQUEEN & MARIAN GOODMAN GALLERY, NEW YORK/PARIS. COURTESY OF MEDINAH COUNTRY CLUB.

WHERE:


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DALLAS Jessica Olsson and Zackery McDowell

WHAT:

Kenny Goss and Karla McKinley

The scene at the gallery

He’s George Michael’s ex!

WHERE:

Courtney Kerr, Don Moore and guest

top: Mindy Byrd (5); goss & Michael: dave hogan/getty iMages; BottoM: courtesy of tiMothy oulton (7)

WHO:

TIMOTHY OULTON’s first store openinG POTTER sQUAre

Rhonda Sargent Chambers, Lana Adams and Aja Martin

WHERE:

English furniture designer Timothy Oulton invited guests to celebrate the debut of his first U.S. flagship in true U.K. style. Themed “The British are Coming,” the party drew guests in through Texas-sized Union Jack doors. Tastemakers like Steve Kemble, Amy Vanderoef and Carmaleta Whiteley joined Oulton and 50 of his employees from around the world. —M.T.

Carl Conway and Lisa Garza

Jennifer Cloutier, Amy Vanderoef and Dawn Mellon

Erin Mathews and Russ Davis You might have seen this dapper lawyer around town, but he’s been laying low since he got married.

Carmaleta Whiteley and Jeff Hasselroth Lynae Fearing and Beth Stavinoha

Karen and John Reoch

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The second annual fundraiser for nonprofit WaterThirst was hosted by gallerist Kenny Goss and honorary chair Karla McKinley. Guests enjoyed a silent auction, curated by the Nasher Sculpture Center’s Aja Martin, which featured works from artists including Thom Jackson, Christopher Martin and Geof Kern. —Maxine Trowbridge

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Checking out the silent auction

QUENCHED Art Benefit the Goss-MichAel Foundation


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KIEHL’S STORE OPENING NORThPaRk CENTER

Chang with a Turkana tribe in Kenya which she helped through food distrubition and the donation of child-development kits

WHERE:

Kiehl’s since 1851 and the Dallas museum of art co-hosted a “a family Day” to celebrate the beauty brand’s new northpark center store opening. guests included artist William betts, melissa meeks and max anderson. During the event, Kiehl’s president chris salgardo presented cindy rachofsky, host of tWo x tWo for aiDs and art, with a $25,000 check for the charity. —M.T.

Kristen and Barrett Gibbons and Megan and Kendall Hall

Jennifer and Alexandra Eagle

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WHO:

MINa CHANG ShE’S a lOCal hUMaNITaRIaN

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He’s the director of the Dallas Museum of Art! The ribbon cutting William Betts helped kids make their own artwork.

mina chang is not your typical Dallas diva. the Korean-american pop star, who’s been based in texas for years, has put stage life aside in an effort to shine the spotlight on a worthy cause. formerly an ambassador for nonprofit Linking The World, Chang was recently promoted to president of the international humanitarian-aid organization. this summer, chang traveled to africa to visit children and families in need of emergency assistance in Kenya, nairobi and somalia. “linking the World has a great disaster and emergency response program,” says chang. as she’s the daughter of salvation army commanding officers, it’s no wonder the songbird finds time for charitable endeavors. —M.T. (linkingtheworldusa.org, minachang.com)

Max Anderson, Cindy Rachofsky and Chris Salgardo

Alicia Cox and Melissa Meeks checked out the store’s body products.

Chang checked in on a mother and a baby who were being treated at the Linking the World mobile medical clinic.

Wearing Alexander McQueen in March

top to bottom, left: courtesy of Kiehl’s (7); inset: courtesy of the Dallas museum of art. right: teD min tae; Qc cong; teD min tae

WHY:


LOS A NGE L E S WHAT:

BUZZY BEAUTY So YoU cAn face the daY

MI A MI

N E W YOR K The vast selection of tools and products at Make Up For Ever Rouge Artist Intense #43 Moulin Rouge, $19

WHY:

MAKE UP FoR EVER

With the opening of the Make Up For Ever store in NorthPark Center, now Dallasites can indulge in the same professional artistry as the beauty aficionados of Paris. Considered the ultimate candy shop of makeup stores, Make Up For Ever is the go-to destination for industry artists seeking out the best tools to paint the prettiest of faces. The boutique also offers customized step-by-step makeup lessons that can even be recorded so customers can expertly re-create a perfect look at home. (214-361-2466) —L.G.

A treatment at The RitzCarlton Spa

Renée Rouleau

nATURA BISSÉ AT THE RITZ-cARlTon SPA

If it’s unparalleled luxury you crave, look no further than The Ritz-Carlton Spa, which has recently introduced the European skincare brand Natura Bissé to its spa menu. Pamper yourself with one of the new services like the Multisensorial Lifting or Aroma Awakening facials or a Diamond Manicure and Pedicure. (ritzcarlton. com/dallas) —M.T.

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TOP: COURTESY OF MAKE UP FOR EVER (2). CENTER: COURTESY OF THE RITZ-CARLTON, DALLAS. BOTTOM: COURTESY OF RENÉE ROULEAU (2). KALE & PETTIJOHN: SHANA ANDERSON; PRODUCTS: COURTESY OF KALE NATURALS.

SA N F R A NCISCO

REnÉE RoUlEAU

Dallas’ favorite esthetician and skin expert, Renée Rouleau, has found an efficacious solution to a dull, lackluster complexion with the launch of her new Bio Radiance Night Serum. A high-performance, radiance-boosting serum, this formula will stimulate the epidermis’ natural renewal process by infusing moisture deep within to lessen the visible effects of aging. (Bio Radiance Night Serum, $47.50; reneerouleau.com) —M.T.

KAlE nATURAlS Founders Dana Kale and Tia Pettijohn

Luxury grooming for men just got natural, thanks to Dana Kale and Tia Pettijohn. Inspired by their husbands and sons, this local beauty duo decided to create practical products with anti-aging antioxidants and beneficial botanicals for men. Enriched with bamboo, blue agave, acacia, licorice root and white pine, these ingredients are gentle for all ages. The products ($19-$24) are made in the U.S., and the packaging is made from recycled materials. (kalenaturals.com) —M.T.


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WHAT:

AKRIS STORE OPENING HIGHlaNd PaRk Village

WHAT:

THE OFFICE OF aNgela SCOTT SHE’S STEPPING up

WHERE:

The Miss Mason bootie, $675; theofficeofangela scott.com

WHY:

Shoes and comfort are shockingly contradictory by most ladies’ standards, but at The Office of Angela Scott, bespoke style is informed by the ingenuity of a traditional cobbler. Blending feminine features and masculine lines, Scott’s Italian-crafted footwear is a tribute to her tomboy upbringing. This fall, Scott celebrates the opening of her first “office” in Victory Park and her new collection, which will be sold nationally at Saks. (theofficeofangelascott.com) —M.T.

Albert Kriemler, Akris’ creative director, has been with the brand since 1980

The purple chiffon velvet vertical pleat volume gown from the Fall 2012 collection

Designer Albert Kriemler already counts Angelina Jolie, Cameron Diaz and Princess Charlene of Monaco among his impressive clientele, and now he can add the most stylish ladies of Dallas to that list with the opening of the Akris store in Highland Park Village. The ultramodern brand’s third free-standing boutique—the other two are in New York and Boston—will cater to a local fashionista’s every whim with extended hours, personal shopping, in-house alterations and even a special-order program so shoppers can acquire favorite pieces from past seasons. Also available in the shop will be Valerie Steele’s Akris (Assouline), a cloth-bound hardcover tome celebrating the sleek and minimalist craftsmanship the Swiss-family brand has been producing for 90 years. Of the philosophy behind the signature Akris look, Kriemler says, “I think today’s clothes need to be simple because our lives are so complicated.” (214-530-0004) —Liza Ghorbani

18-karat gold Sethi Couture scroll rings, $1,900—$2,200

WHAT:

NINE-EIGHTEEN THEY HaVE a dISCERNING EYE FOR JEWElRY WHY:

This luxury jewelry boutique and concierge service is easily Dallas’ best-kept secret. Founded by brother and sister duo Darin Kunz and Kim Burgan, Nine-Eighteen stays on point with the current trends as well as exlusive pieces from six jewelry designers (including Amedeo and Sethi Couture), all presented in the comforts of a private showroom. (nine-eighteen.com) —M.T.

TOP TO BOTTOM, LEFT: COURTESY OF AKRIS (2); INSET: COURTESY OF ASSOULINE. LEFT: COURTESY OF THE OFFICE OF ANGELA SCOTT. COURTESY OF NINE-EIGHTEEN.

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Sister and brother Kim Burgan and Darin Kunz


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Four Must-see MuseuM ShowS the world is coMing to dallas WHY:

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SA N F R A NCISCO

A 40th anniversary celebration, The Kimbell at 40: An Evolving Masterpiece (October 7–December 30), will focus on the vision of founders Kay and Velma Kimbell: to establish a first-rate art museum in Fort Worth. Achievements in acquisition and architecture will be highlighted, along with works from the permanent collection including Monet, Matisse and Caravaggio. (kimbellart.org)

The Dallas Museum of Art’s Posters of Paris: Toulouse-Lautrec and His Contemporaries (October 14–January 20) depicts the era of the artistic poster from the 1870s to 1890s in Paris (shown: Manuel Orazi’s “La Maison Moderne,” 1900). The history of the genre reveals early designs and highlights the complexity of creating these stylish works on paper. Featured are rare drawings, watercolors and proofs, from concept to the final artwork. (dm-art.org)

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left to right, top: courtesy of Nasher sculpture gallery. courtesy of kimbell art museum. ceNter: the reNNert collectioN, New york city/courtesy ity/courtesy of the Dallas museum of art. bottom: courtesy of louN lou louNge ge 31. courtesy of stampeDe 66.

Known for reshaping minimalist and post-minimalist sculpture, Eva Rothschild will assemble an intricate network of painted piping in the Nasher Sculpture Center’s entrance bay as part of the Sightings series (October 20–January 20). The work will address the transitional space of the entryway and redefine the visitors’ experience of the architecture. (nashersculpturecenter.org)

Inez van Lamsweerde & Vinoodh Matadin: Pretty Much Everything (September 22-December 30) celebrates the Dutch team’s more than 25 years in the field of fashion photography. This first major U.S. institutional exhibition will feature over 300 works (shown: “Well Basically Basuco is Coke Mixed with Kerosene... The Face,” 1994). (dallascontemporary.org) —M.T.

WHAT:

NEw restAurAnts Chef Stephan Pyles of Stampede 66

stAMPede 66 lounge 31

The Champagne Room at Lounge 31

located right above bistro 31 in highland park Village, alberto lombardi’s new space offers up three bar options: the terrace bar with its retractable roof and specialty drinks; the lounge bar, an ideal spot for watching sporting events; and the champagne room, an area that features more than 20 kinds of bubbly, perfect for intimate get-togethers. (lounge31dallas.com) —L.G.

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local restaurateur and celebrity chef stephan pyles takes a reverent step back to his roots—or should we say his lucchese boots. inspired by the success of his 1990s restaurant star canyon, pyles promises to offer classic texas dishes with a contemporary twist. think a margarita and taco bar, screened porch with a fire pit, a picnic seating area and eight sets of longhorns above the bar at his new uptown Dallas eatery. (chefstephanpylesblog.com) —M.T.


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HOUSTON

WHAT: WHY:

The Line & Lariat Lounge at Hotel Icon

Thanks to her global interior-design firm, Kimberley Miller of Duncan Miller Ullmann has brought “whimsical sophistication with a twist” to high-end properties around the world. She recently lent her unique aesthetic to the $5-million renovation of Houston’s 135-room downtown Hotel Icon. What was your vision with Hotel Icon? To breathe a new, modern style into a historically significant building. We give a subtle nod to Texas and try to emphasize the chic ambience of the vibrant urban center of Houston. What can people expect to find in the refurbished hotel in terms of style? Brilliant orange accents are used in the guestrooms to offset the neutral palette. Calming blue details, from the mirror to the carpet, harmonize with existing millwork. We’ve added humor and a sense of Texas with cow art and fun wall hooks.

Kimberley Miller in her design studio

How do you incorporate Texas charm into an interior without going overboard? The key is to use classic Texan materials in unexpected ways. Use western belts placed end-to-end on a wall as a great border. Apply nailheads in a Texana pattern to a piece of furniture or a wall treatment, make drapes out of leather instead of fabric, or use a western belt buckle as a tieback. All economical and easy to do. (hotelicon.com) —Liza Ghorbani

TOP TO BOTTOM: COURTESY OF HOTEL ICON. COURTESY OF KIMBERLEY MILLER.

HOTEL ICON IT HAS A NEW LOOK


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WHAT:

ShowS to See Downtown WHERE:

WHAT:

tHE BESt Beauty SecretS

Beginning November 2nd, The Contemporary Arts Museum Houston will present works from emerging Chinese artists specializing in sculpture, video projections and installation. This new media exhibit reflects a cultural shift for the rapidly evolving Asian nation. (camh.org)

tHE Do BAR

EDwARD SAnCHEZ VAnItY LoUnGE

Makeup maven Edward Sanchez brings unique beauty services from all around the world to his Houston salon, including lash dipping, couture eyebrow sculpting and makeup classes where clients are advised on how to best use the products in their makeup bags. Sanchez has worked on Joan Rivers, Queen Noor of Jordan and a certain Oscar-winning actor. “One of my proudest moments was when I powdered George Clooney’s brow.” (escvanitylounge.com)

FAÇADE

When New Yorkers Anna Wintour and Vera Wang visit Houston, they come to Corinne Williams at Façade in Uptown Park for specialty services that are in high demand with various local socialites and personalities. Along with eyebrow shaping and makeup application lessons, Williams specializes in creating the perfect party face. “For me, it has always been about fulfilling fantasies,” says the makeup artist. “It can be very emotional.” (facadeuptown.com)

SoLUtIon FoR HAIR

Salon founder Brad Hensler prides himself on providing the best hair color in Houston. With more than 25 years of experience, he’s colored the tresses of top models Coco Rocha and Alessandra Ambrosio, as well as many noteworthy Houston women. “We translate the trends into realistic and wearable color and cuts for our clients, with ease of maintenance being a top priority,” says Hensler, who recommends a glaze between touch-ups to keep color rich and radiant. (solutionforhair.com) —L.G.

WHAT:

A SHoppER’S ParadiSe Claes Oldenburg’s “Strange Eggs V,” 1957

In celebration of its 25th anniversary, The Menil Collection showcases some of the late American artist Claes Oldenburg’s earliest known works, starting September 20. The 18 collages were created during an experimental phase and consist of melded scraps, advertisements and images from old periodicals. (menil.org) —L.G.

HEnRI BEnDEL opEnS At tHE GALLERIA

With the arrival of the Henri Bendel store in the Houston Galleria, fashionistas are transported to one of Manhattan’s most quintessential department stores—complete with an entrance archway modeled after the one in the Fifth Avenue flagship, the iconic brownand-white stripes adorning the space and, of course, the superior selection of fashion, jewelry, beauty products and unforgettable gifts. (henribendel.com) —L.G.

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A one-stop shop for $35 blowouts, braids and other hair and beauty treatments, Do Bar has already become the go-to spot for visiting out-of-towners like Whitney Port. Owner Cara Crafton offers up easy hair solutions for Houston women who battle humidity on a daily basis. “Hair sets the tone for how you feel about yourself in general,” says Crafton, who also owns Craft Salon. “Using the right tools is key to a smooth blowout—a quality blowdryer and the right styling products are crucial.” (thedobar.com)

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CLOCKWISE FROM BOTTOM LEFT: COLLECTION OF CLAES OLDENBURG & COOSJE VAN BRUGGEN/COURTESY OF THE MENIL COLLECTION. COURTESY OF SUN XUN. COURTESY OF THE DO BAR. COURTESY OF EDWARD SANCHEZ. COURTESY OF FAÇADE. COURTESY OF SOLUTION FOR HAIR. COURTESY OF HENRI BENDEL.

Sun Xun’s “21 G” (still), 2010


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WHAT:

BreAKFAST, LunCh AND dInner MIDTOWN WHERE:

Green Apple Mint Dome Cakes at Dolce Delights

The Jar Jar Duck dish at Uchi

In her new dessert shop, Hong Kong native Candace Chang favors bold flavors and some unexpected ingredients to create her delicious goodies. Along with a daily selection of sandwiches and sweet staples like pastries and macarons, Dolce Delights features innovative delicacies like Green Apple Mint and Piña Colada Dome Cakes. Says Chang, “From tofu cheesecake to my Lava Mango Crunch Cake, I want to show everyone the perfect balance between sweetness and healthiness!” (mydolcedelights.com)

Never mind that L.A.’s trendy Katsuya opened in Houston earlier this year—it’s the new sushi restaurant Uchi that’s so popular it requires booking weeks in advance. With Bravo’s Top Chef: Texas winner Paul Qui at the helm of the new outpost (the flagship is in Austin), the eatery has won over locals and was even named one of the Best New Sushi Restaurants in America by Bon Appétit. If you can’t get a dinner reservation, stop by the daily “Sake Social” at 5 P.M. for the small-plates menu and drinks specials. (uchirestaurants.com/houston) —L.G.

Kale and carrot juice at Roots Juice

dOLCe deLIghTS

uChI

WHO:

BRITTANY SAKOWITZ She’S geTTIng hOuSTOn pArTy-reAdy

Brittany Sakowitz

WHY:

Some of the fall offerings at New for the Night

A blue color story

Never one to repeat a fabulous outfit herself, Houston It Girl Brittany Sakowitz launched New for the Night, a rent-a-dress service that allows women to look fantastic without paying the price. “Southern women want to make a statement and get the right kind of attention,” says Sakowitz. The River Oaks showroom, where she has oufitted females ages 13 to 70, is packed with Texas-friendly looks from labels such as Alice by Temperley, Jay Godfrey, Rebecca Taylor and Tibi, with lots of bright colors, bold prints, lightweight fabrics and fun trimmings like feathers and beads. “I grew up with three sisters, and we constantly borrowed each other’s clothes. That experience of putting on something new is confidence-boosting. I love to bring people that feeling!” (newforthenight.com) —L.G.

LEFT TO RIGHT, TOP: COURTESY OF ROOTS JUICE. COURTESY OF DOLCE DELIGHTS. REBECCA FONDREN. BOTTOM: COURTESY OF NEW FOR THE NIGHT (3)

Come beat the Texas heat at Roots Juice, where vegan chef German Mosquera whips up healthy and delicious concoctions right in the heart of Montrose. The new shop changes its samplings on a seasonal basis and culls the freshest local organic ingredients to create flavorful libations filled with nutrients. Kick back in the chic farmhouse with the popular OMGoji smoothie (Goji berry, strawberry, agave, coconut oil, vanilla and almond butter) and take in the rotating collection of works by local artists on display. (rootsjuicehouston.com)

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rOOTS JuICe


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HOTEL NEwS what happens IN vEGAS KEEPS getting better WHY:

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MANDARIN ORIENTAL’S LADY LUCK PACKAGE

The new two-hour Lady Luck package at the Spa and Salon at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel includes personalized chakra and gemstone readings, foot reflexology, a cold jade-stone eye treatment and an acupressure head massage. ($375—$425; mandarinoriental.com/lasvegas)

Sush Machida’s installation at the Cosmopolitan

ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE AT THE COSMOPOLITAN

Each month in its pop-up gallery, the Cosmopolitan showcases a new artist who gets down to business in full view of diners and shoppers. September’s featured artist is Sush Machida, whose work—huge, colorful pieces that pay tribute to Japanese masters—has been characterized as “wickedly Zen” by LA Times critic David Pagel. (cosmopolitanlasvegas.com) 18-karat gold and coral earrings, $5,750

A guest room at the Nobu Hotel

NOBU HOTEL OPENS

Nobu Hotel partners Robert De Niro and Nobu Matsuhisa

When Nobu Matsuhisa opens his first hotel inside Caesars Palace—and his largest restaurant to date alongside it—you’ll be able to eat and sleep Nobu. But even more important: You can order in-room dining. Occupying what was once the 180room Centurion Tower, the new boutique property, designed by David Rockwell, will start taking reservations October 1. (caesarspalace.com)

DOLCE & GABBANA AT CRYSTALS

Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana have performed a double feat: opening an opulent store in Crystals at CityCenter (inspired by roulette and illuminated by giant video monitors and a baroque black chandelier) and simultaneously releasing their first fine jewelry line. The Mamma collection hit stores in August and features pink Elatius coral and 18-karat gold earrings, necklaces and rings. (702-431-6614) —Andrea Bennett

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF MANDARIN ORIENTAL. COURTESY OF THE COSMOPOLITAN LAS VEGAS. COURTESY OF DOLCE & GABBANA. LARRY BUSACCA/GETTY IMAGES FOR CAESARS PALACE. COURTESY OF CAESARS PALACE.

A treatment room at the Mandarin Oriental Spa


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WHAT:

HOT New Bites The sTrip

LAS VEGAS Beef carpaccio roll at Botero Supper Club

The bar at Botero Supper Club at Encore

WHERE:

BOTERO SUPPER CLUB AT ENCORE

With its glowing waterfall and lush koi lagoon, Mizumi’s alfresco seating suggests a Japanese garden. The indoor space, once home to Okada, is drenched in crimson, a shade that’s said to induce appetite. But who needs coaxing with dishes like the Robatayaki platter, a mouthwatering combination of Kurobuta pork, Jidori chicken and Wagyu short ribs? (wynnlasvegas.com) —S.G.

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Tetsu’s dining room at Aria

MIZUMI AT THE WYNN

Mizumi’s private pagoda table at the Wynn The entrance to Lily Bar & Lounge

LILY BAR & LOUNGE AT THE BELLAGIO

TETSU OPENS AT ARIA

Chef Masa Takayama is shaking up barMasa with a new teppanyaki restaurant. At Tetsu—replacing Shaboo as Aria’s restaurant-within-a-restaurant—guests pick from a central table piled high with meat, seafood and vegetables, then move to one of six grills. (Four are blackjack-style tables, in case you forget you’re in Vegas.) Look for jalapeño octopus, Wagyu rib eye, live shrimp and foie gras. And remember to save room for Takayama’s truffle ice cream covered in gold flakes. (arialasvegas.com) —A.B.

The Caramel lounge held court in the middle of Bellagio’s main casino floor for more years than a bar usually survives in Vegas. Its replacement, Lily Bar & Lounge, is a welcome new spot from The Light Group. After 10 P.M., the retractable curtains drop over the open room, shrouding it in mystery. All the better to enjoy over-the-top finger foods like Kobe chili fries and lobster tacos away from the prying eyes of curious gamblers. (bellagio.com) —A.B.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: RUSSELL TKTKTKTKTK PHOTO CREDITS STYLE? MACMASTERS. COURTESY OF BOTERO SUPPER CLUB. BARBARA KRAFT. COURTESY OF BELLAGIO HOTEL. COURTESY OF ARIA HOTEL.

Botero at Encore has introduced offshoot Botero Supper Club, a collaboration with Surrender, Tryst and XS nightclubs. Sit back and listen to celebrity DJs spin and enjoy cocktails and small plates like hamachi tartare with crispy rice cake, rock shrimp po’ boys and turkey mozzarella meatball sliders. (wynnlasvegas.com) —Sam Glaser


CHIC AG O

DA L L A S

LAS VEGAS

HOUS TON

WHAT:

A balletic moment at the exhibition’s entrance

CHANEL NUMÉROS PRIVÉS PARTY The Wynn HOTEL WHERE:

Luck be these ladies! Stars, stylists and socialites were shuttled into Las Vegas via a fleet of chartered planes to celebrate the opening of Chanel’s Numéros Privés installation at the Wynn Hotel. The over-the-top exhibition featured a 10-room tour dedicated to the French fashion house’s iconic history (a giant 2.55 bag, a re-creation of Coco Chanel’s Rue Cambon apartment and Karl Lagerfeld-designed dolls). Alexa Chung DJ’ed at the event’s afterparty, which also included a performance by Irish rocker Imelda May. —Natasha Wolff

Alexa Chung

Balthazar Getty Sophie Auster, Sam Quartin and Anouck Lepère

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ALL IMAGES: DAVID X. PRUTTING/BFANYC. COM & BILLY FARRELL/BFANYC.COM

The plush digs of Chanel’s Fine Jewlery collection

Lily Collins

Rachel Zoe and Rodger Berman

Jessica Alba Scott Sartiano

Guests ogled cages of Chanel Fine Jewelry and accessories.

Gia Coppola


Live the M life at this MGM Resorts International® Destination

SCAN to watch the story unfold

AriaLasVegas.com • 866.359.7757


LAS VEGAS

Jumpsuit provided by Stella McCartney. Jewelry provided by de Grisogono.


LOS ANGELES

MI A MI

N E W YOR K

SA N F R A NCISCO

LOS ANGELES WHAT:

NEW BitEs ANd LiBatiOns IT’S THE NEW fOOdIE dESTINATION WHY:

HANDSOME COFFEE

PrESSED JUICEry

The new outpost in the Fashion District’s Cooper Building allows shoppers to cool off with refreshing juices like aloe vera and Watermelon Mint after shopping. 860 S. Los Angeles St.; pressedjuicery.com

SPICE TABLE

Chef Bryant Ng honed his skills at Pizzeria Mozza before opening this VietnameseSingaporean restaurant. Menu standouts include curry fried chicken wings and beef rendang. 114 S. Central Ave.; thespicetable.com

UMAMICATESSEN

Umami Burger’s Adam Fleischman thinks beyond the beef patty with this deli-style concept that corrals his favorite eats (like mini potato knishes, crispy pig ears and artisanal doughnuts) onto one menu. 852 S. Broadway; umami.com/umamicatessen

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Kelly Wearstler at her flagship West Hollywood boutique

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TOP: COURTESY OF HANDSOME COFFEE. COURTESY OF UMAMICATESSAN. COURTESY OF SPICE TABLE. COURTESY OF PRESSED JUICERY. BOTTOM: COURTESY OF KELLY WEARSTLER (2).

The java shop prepares seasonal beans in a vintage in-house roaster. Latte lovers, take heed: The purist menu consists of coffee and espresso. 582 Mateo St.; handsomecoffee.com

WHO:

KELLY WEARSTLER HER NEW DEsign BOOK WHAT:

“I never thought I’d use breasts as a decorative object,” says interior designer Kelly Wearstler, in reference to a recent decor scheme. “But it works when you have them in marble.” Of course, that’s Wearstler’s style in a nutshell: brazen, glamorous and cheekily over-the-top. The L.A.based designer has made a name for herself with decadent, retro-leaning interiors that can be found at boutique hotels like the Viceroys and Maison 140. From where does Wearstler’s singular creative vision come? That’s the question at the heart of her new coffee-table tome Rhapsody (Rizzoli), which

delves into Wearstler’s inspirations and design process. Taking cues from her colorful blog, My Vibe, My Life, the book tags along with Wearstler to various professional pursuits (shopping auction houses, making sculpture). Along the way, readers get glimpses into the designer’s latest projects and images of never-before-photographed interiors. For her part, Wearstler credits clients, projects and, perhaps most, travel with stirring her creative juices. “I recently traveled to Paris and was so inspired by the street style.” Could Kelly Wearstler berets be imminent? —Evelyn Crowley


CHIC AG O

DA L L A S

HOUS TON

WHAT:

NEW HOLLYWOOD GALLERIES IT’S THE nEW CHELSEA!

L A S V EGA S The new Regen Projects building

THREE ARTISTS TO WATCH

L.A.’s global powerhouse gallery Regen Projects is opening a new space on Santa Monica Boulevard, just east of Highland Avenue, on September 22. Designed by Michael Maltzan—also responsible for the Hammer Museum’s celebrated Billy Wilder Theater— Shaun Caley Regen’s 20,000-square-foot gallery will include an outdoor sculpture area and allow for monumental-scale exhibitions. The addition is a clear signal that Hollywood is being cemented onto the international art world map. (regenprojects.com) —Bettina Korek .com

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MARY WEATHERFORD’s following is

Benefit For The Student Mobilization Committee To End The War in Vietnam, Redling Fine Art, Los Angeles (2011)

Although new to L.A.’s art scene, gallerist Perry Rubenstein is quickly proving himself a creative force to be reckoned with. This summer, the New York transplant opened a sprawling space on Highland. A former film-supply warehouse designed by wHY Architecture, the gallery consists of three rooms, a courtyard and a rooftop with showstopping views. Though Rubenstein remains mum for now about his West Coast roster, his inaugural exhibition, a Helmut Newton retrospective, tells us we can expect big things. (perryrubenstein.com) —E.C.

After getting her start in Chinatown, Erica Redling moved her gallery to Hollywood last year. Redling Fine Art represents L.A.’s next generation at high-profile art fairs like Art Basel Miami and Frieze New York, and the gallery’s artists include such notable emerging figures as Liz Glynn, Jason Kraus and Erlea Maneros Zabala, each of whom combines conceptual strategies with intriguing imagery. Redling, situated in a mini-mall on Santa Monica Boulevard, can be a bit easy to drive past, but it’s already a can’t-miss stop for collectors and curators. (redlingfineart.com) —B.K.

about to get bigger. Lauri Firstenberg, who is curating Weatherford’s upcoming show at LAXART, says her new work is a “radical shift” that incorporates neon signage. (laxart.org)

DANIEL JOSEPH MARTINEZ’s

exhibit at Roberts & Tilton is his first in L.A. in 10 years. There’s been renewed interest in the artist, whose blocklettered signs were included in MoMA’s recent Print/Out. (robertsandtilton.com)

Photographs from Perry Rubinstein’s Helmut Newton: Sex and Landscape show

MATTHIAS MERKEL HESS’ installation of ceramic milk crates and other containers at Acme last year was called “clever, quirky and surprisingly graceful,” and now his work will be seen at numerous art fairs. (merkelhess.net)

LEFT, TOP TO BOTTOM: COURTESY OF REGEN PROJECTS & MICHAEL MALTZAN ARCHITECTURE. BRICA WILCOX/COURTESY OF REDLING FINE ART. JOSHUA WHITE/JWPICTURES.COM; COURTESY PERRY RUBENSTEIN GALLERY, LOS ANGELES; © ESTATE OF HELMUT NEWTON. WEATHERFORD: COURTESY OF ARTIST, BRENNAN & GRIFFIN, NEW YORK & LAXART, LOS ANGELES. MARTINEZ: COURTESY OF ARTIST & ROBERTS & TILTON, CULVER CITY, CA. MERKEL HESS: COURTESY OF ARTIST & SALON 94.

WHY:


w

LOS ANGELES

MI A MI

N E W YOR K

SA N F R A NCISCO

WHO:

CASEy Lane ’CAuSE wE LOvE hiS fOOd

Casey Lane

WHy:

eatery that pairs refined pub grub (pork head potpie, chicken liver mousse with onion rings) with artisanal cocktails by mixologist John Colthorp. a second venture, itri, in West hollywood, has a trattoria-inspired menu revolving around handmade pasta and a wood-fired rotisserie. Lane’s three concepts are markedly different, yet he is quick to note their shared origin. “a handcrafted and heritage-driven pursuit of food is my passion, and that is where we start.” (thetastingkitchen.com) —E.C.

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in 2009, chef Casey Lane opened the tasting Kitchen, an ingredient-driven locavore haven on abbot Kinney. food critics called it “a tour de force” and “performance art.” Lane referred to it as his warm-up act. “i always planned on expansion,” explains the 29-year-old el Paso, texas, native. “new concepts, new food styles and new neighborhoods keep me very motivated.” this summer found Lane laying the groundwork for a gastro mini-empire. in July he opened the Parish, a bi-level downtown

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WHO:

KAThRyN BENTLEY & CLARE VIVIER BffS ANd NExT-dOOR NEiGhBORS

Lane: Longrada Lor. vivier: Courtesy of CLare vivier (3). BentLey: Jeana sohn. store: Joni noe (2).

The designer’s jewelry vitrine takes center stage.

WHAT:

Bentley

stepping into jewelry designer Kathryn Bentley’s new boutique is like falling down a rabbit hole into a playful bohemia. Bentley sells her collection, dream Collective, alongside wares by artists and indie designers like Beatrice valenzuela (moccasins) and niki Livingston (indigo blankets). dream Collective’s new line takes a turn for the mystical with evil eye cuffs and dream catcher pendants. (dreamcollective.com)

Clothing by Clu hangs alongside ZenBunni chocolates and wall collages by Caitlin Wylde.

Vivier

french-born bag designer Clare vivier’s new boutique resembles a Parisian apothecary with its high ceilings and shadow box displays. on offer is a selection of the designer’s favorite finds (Annie Costello Brown jewelry, Chateau Marmont candles, steven alan bloomers). in the coming months, the store will host artist talks, belt-making workshops and, bien sûr, a book club. (seevivier.com) —E.C.

Steven Alan beach blankets and hat and a Clare Vivier duffel

Assorted Clare Vivier bags; artwork by Simone Shubuck


CHIC AG O

DA L L A S

HOUS TON

L A S V EGA S

WHO:

FILMMAKER AND STYLIST JACQUI GETTY ShE’S ConnECTInG fAshIon AND fIlm WHY:

Jacqui Getty’s Web series With Love, Jacqui Getty appears on YouTube’s new fashion channel, Look TV

Designer Lift foundation, $65, GIORGIO ARMANI, giorgioarmanibeauty-usa.com. DermalQuench, $95, KATE SOMERVILLE, katesomerville.com. Red Roses body lotion, $65, JO MALONE, jomalone.com

“From the fall collections, I love Skaist Taylor’s black leather pencil skirt and army-green coat (worn together with heels—so chic); Proenza Schouler’s red looks (I want everything!); and soft cream tops and slacks from The Row.” Fall looks from Proenza Schouler and The Row

Serpenti yellow-gold and diamond watch, $36,500, BULGARI, bulgari.com. Yellowgold and diamond Wishbone ring, $2,750, JENNIFER MEYER, barneys.com

“I’m obsessed with bracelets and my Wishbone necklace and ring from my friend Jen Meyer. I wear a vintage Bulgari wrap-around watch (layered with my bracelets) and vintage diamond studs most days. Rachel Zoe gave me a gold and diamond spike bracelet from Anita Ko that I wear too.”

“This summer in Malibu, I hosted lots of casual dinners for friends and family where I cooked lobster pasta and pork ribs. I served Inglenook’s Blancaneaux white wine and RC Reserve red.” Tonal pink peonies by Eric Buterbaugh

“I just bought a Céline cobalt Luggage tote to carry all my film equipment. For shoes, I only wear Manolo Blahnik heels (in black, beige, red and blue) at night; during the day, it’s K. Jacques sandals or old-school loafers.”

Suede pump, $595, MANOLO BLAHNIK, 212-582-3007

Headphones, $299, BEATS BY DRE STUDIOS, apple.com

“My friend florist Eric Buterbaugh [at the Four Seasons Hotel in Beverly Hills] puts together the most beautiful arrangements. I love seasonal flowers like peonies, dahlias and ranunculus, but I stick to one variety at a time.”

Blancaneaux wine, $51.95, INGLENOOK, sherry-lehmann.com.

”Some of my favorite things: Beats by Dr. Dre are the most amazing headphones ever. I use them to edit videos on my MacBook Pro laptop and to listen to music by Sébastien Tellier, Coconut Records, Frank Ocean and Robert Schwartzman.” —As told to Natasha Wolff

GETTY: DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN. PROENZA SCHOULER & THE ROW: IMAXTREE.COM. LEFT TO RIGHT, TOP: COURTESY OF GIORGIO ARMANI BEAUTY. COURTESY OF KATE SOMERVILLE. COURTESY OF JO MALONE. CENTER: COURTESY OF BULGARI. COURTESY OF JENNIFER MEYER. BOTTOM: COURTESY OF MANOLO BLAHNIK. COURTESY OF ERIC BUTERBAUGH. COURTESY OF INGLENOOK. COURTESY OF BEATS BY DR. DRE.

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“I use Hamadi’s Healing Serum and Shea Leave In products for my hair, which is cut by Chris Turner at Neil George and colored by Tracey Cunningham. I wear Jo Malone’s rose-scented body lotion mixed with Egyptian musk oil daily, Kate Somerville’s DermalQuench Liquid Lift product and Giorgio Armani’s foundation—it’s light and dewy. I get stem-cell and microdermabrasion facials at Carasoin on Robertson.”


LOS ANGELES

MI A MI

N E W YOR K

SA N F R A NCISCO

WHAT:

BEAUtY NEWS BEcAUSE WE WANT YOU TO LOOK YOUR BEST WHY:

LA PRAIRIE’S ADVANcED mArINE BIOLOGY FAcIAL AT THE HOTEL BEL-AIR When La Prairie opened in the Hotel Bel-Air last fall, it raised the bar on spa luxury (no easy feat in this town). Now the venerated Swiss skincare company has done it again with the debut of its Advanced Marine Biology Facial. The 90-minute, anti-oxidant rich, marine botanical-derived service includes exfoliation, a rejuvenating mask and a steam—along with a hot and cold stone massage for face, feet and hands. For the duration of the treatment, guests rest on a Hydramat, a warm water–filled device that helps to alleviate back tension and generates a head-to-toe sensory experience. ($310; hotelbelair.com/la-prairie-spa)

A couple’s treatment room at the Spa by La Prairie Warren-Tricomi’s The Braid Boutique

“The Girl Next Door” style

As followers of red carpet fashion will tell you, braids are having a moment. Fortunately for those who yearn for intricately coiled updos but lack the nimble fingers or a celebrity hairstylist on speed dial, there’s Warren-Tricomi’s new Braid Boutique. Book an appointment at the airy West Hollywood salon and forgo washing your hair (oily strands work as a natural cohesive). Bring in a photo of your desired look or choose from the salon’s extensive menu (including Grecian, fishtails and headbands). Thanks to strategically placed bobby pins, braids last for several days and can even survive a trip to the gym. (Braids start at $25; warrentricomi.com)

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TOP: COURTESY OF LA PRAIRIE. CENTER: COURTESY OF WARREN-TRICOMI (2). BOTTOM: COURTESY OF SONYA DAKAR (2).

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THE BRAID BOUTIQUE At WArrEN-TrIcOmI

SONYA DAKAR’S FADE AWAY FACIAL

A treatment room at the Sonya Dakar Skin Clinic

Sonya Dakar, the Beverly Hills skin guru behind many Alisters’ age-defying complexions, has added a new weapon to her beauty arsenal. Dubbed the Fade Away Facial, the 60-minute treatment features Dakar’s revolutionary lightening product, Fade Away, an all-natural, paraben-free serum comprised of six different lightening agents including a powerful extract derived from daisies. In addition to zapping age spots and freckles, the facial works on a cellular level, blocking enzymes that are responsible for producing hyperpigmentation in the first place. Results can be seen in as little as one treatment. (facial, $250; Fade Away serum, $195; sonyadakarskinclinic.com) —E.C.


CHIC AG O

DA L L A S

HOUS TON

WHAT:

ICE CreaM iT’s TAkiNG over!

L A S V EGA S

The satellite office’s reception area

WHY:

A combination of chocolate sheets (72% dark and 32% white) provide texture to the dish.

A baked meringue stick is infused with the flavor and crunch of espresso beans.

WHAT:

CirCa JEwElRy A new BEVERly Hills OffiCE opens WHY:

In October, Circa—a New York City service for customers who want to resell valuable jewelry and timepieces—debuts a Beverly Hills outpost. “You can come in with anything from a $200 gold chain to a $2 million diamond,” promises cofounder and CEO Chris Del Gatto, “and walk out with a check for it.” (877-876-5493; circajewels.com) —E.C.

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Diamond, sapphire and emerald art deco bracelets

The vanilla bean gelato is made with real Madagascar vanilla and organic cream.

“Fresh berries are sweet and give wonderful dimension,” explains Fernandez.

L.A. is leaving frozen yogurt behind in favor of its full-fat cousin: ice cream. The obsession deepens with the arrival of three sweet treats. At the new Sprinkles Ice Cream (sprinklesicecream.com) in Beverly Hills, slow-churned flavors like Salty Caramel and Cherry Vanilla come in red-velvet cones and sandwiched between Sprinkles cupcake tops. Fonuts (fonuts. com), the unfried doughnut emporium on West Third

Street, uses its namesake pastry in innovative sandwich combos such as Blueberry Earl Grey and Strawberry Buttermilk. And Culina (culinarestaurant.com) at the Four Seasons Hotel in Beverly Hills offers creations like the Knickerbocker Glory, a retro British yummy topped with Jell-O and fresh berries. For those with a serious sweet tooth (or a lightning-fast metabolism), there’s a sundae called the Kitchen Sink (above). —E.C.

AGENT PROVOCATEUR

“Self-Portrait,” negative 1980; print 1990

“Banana & Keys,” 1973

Last winter, LACMA and the Getty Museum made headlines when they jointly acquired 2,000 of Robert Mapplethorpe’s most important photographs. Many of the lensman’s mixed-media objects, portraits, nudes and still lifes will be on view at the Getty’s exhibit, In Focus: Robert Mapplethorpe, October 23–March 24, 2013. (getty.edu/museum) —E.C.

CirCa By THE NUmBERs

80: Carats in a diamond necklace purchased from a European royal that once belonged to Marie Antoinette.

80,000: Dollars paid

50 carat “Circa Cushion” yellow diamond

for a Burma ruby believed by its owners to be but a semi-precious red stone.

60: Carats in a cushion-cut diamond acquired in Switzerland and dubbed the “Circa Cushion.” 800:

The dollar valuation for a necklace of cubic zirconia stones. The owner’s ex-husband had told her they were diamonds so she was understandably dismayed.

Necklace with 85 carats of rubies and 30 carats of diamonds

ICE CREAM: COURTESY OF THE FOUR SEASONS HOTEL, LOS ANGELES. JEWELRY AND INTERIOR: COURTESY OF CIRCA JEWELRY (5). MAPPELTHORPE: COURTESY OF © ROBERT MAPPELTHORPE FOUNDATION (2).

“Locally grown yellow peaches are a perfect addition,” says pastry chef Federico Fernandez.


CHIC AG O

DA L L A S

HOUS TON

L A S V EGA S DJ Diplo spun tunes with a heavy bass.

WHAT:

DAVID LYNCH for Dom PÉrignon MiLk StudioS WHERE:

David Lynch took control of the fete honoring the line of limited-edition Dom Pérignon bottles he designed. And, not surprisingly, the filmmaker’s taste for the absurd extends to party planning: Instructed to wear all black, guests wandered through a dark labyrinth of laser lights, smoke machines and champagnethemed art installations, ultimately entering a concert space where English rock band the Kills regaled them with a blaring set. It was, in a word, Lynchian. —E.C.

Lena and Werner Herzog

Guests were greeted with champagne, natch.

The limited-edition bottles are $169 each and available in October

Martin Lutz

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David Lynch chalked it up

Dates Matthew Mosshart, brother of the Kills’ Allison

Lady Victoria Hervey

Liz Goldwyn and Natasha Lyonne

Lynch with Jessica Szohr

Ian Edelman and Sara Riff Kelly Osbourne

An image from the advertising campaign

The Kills onstage

MOSSHART: DAVID LIVINGSTON/GETTY IMAGES. ALL OTHER IMAGES: PAUL BRUINOOGE/PATRICKMCMULLAN.COM.

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Sky Ferreira


Los anGeLes

MI A MI

N E W YOR K

Dita Von Teese

SA N F R A NCISCO What:

COintReAU’S PooLsiDe SOIREE the BeverLy HiLLs HoteL WhERE:

Mary-Louise Parker

The Aqualillies

What:

BABY2BABY Benefit Jenni Kayne’s Boutique

The launch of Cointreau’s weekly pool soiree at the Beverly Hills Hotel was a splashy affair—in all respects. As the evening’s entertainment, burlesque star Dita Von Teese and synchronized swimmers the Aqualillies took center stage. After the swimmers debuted an Esther Williams– worthy performance, all eyes were on Von Teese as she sashayed to 1940s tunes before a crowd that included Natalie Portman and Mary-Louise Parker. The seven-week series, benefiting Project Angel Food, features special live performances and vintage bar cart service. —Susan Michals

Johnny Knoxville and son Rocko

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Beauty brand Santa Maria Novella, Rachel Zoe and Jenni Kayne hosted the second annual benefit for Baby2Baby, an L.A.-based organization that helps families with young children in need. With their respective broods in tow, guests gathered at Kayne’s sunny West Hollywood shop to browse her latest collection, plant herbs, enjoy custom face painting and refuel with Popshop ice pops and Pressed Juicery drinks. Gift bags bearing Santa Maria Novella rose water (known to help puffy eyes) were a welcome treat for sleep-deprived moms. —E.C.

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COINTREAU: CHARLEY GALLAY/WIREIMAGE (3). BABY2BABY: MICHAEL GARDNER/GETTY IMAGES.

WhERE:

Jenni Kayne and son Tanner at the herb planting station

Getting spray-on stencil art

A sage plant

The Popshop ice pop cart

Shiva Rose and daughter Charlotte


CHIC AG O

DA L L A S

HOUS TON

L A S V EGA S

WHY:

laXarT GARDEN PARTY PARTY GARDEN ThE hOmE Of KARYN LOvEGROvE

Sprinkles Sprinkles cupcakes cupcakes provided provided aa sugar sugar rush. rush.

Amanda Amanda Hunt Hunt and Lauri and Lauri Firstenberg Firstenberg

WHERE:

Floral frocks frocks were were in infull fullbloom bloomatatLAXART’s LAXART’s soiree soiree at theat1920s the 1920s homehome of artof advisor art advisor Karyn Karyn Lovegrove. Lovegrove. The annual The annual event—to event—to benefit benefit LAXART’s LAXART’s artistic and artistic curatorial and curatorial freedom freedom in experimental in experimental exhibitions—brought exhibitions—out broughtdesigners artists, out artists, and designers collectors, andwho collectors, enjoyed who enjoyed cupcakes andcupcakes Veuve Clicquot and Veuve on the Clicquot back on thewhile lawn back taking lawn while in a performance taking in a perforby artist/ mance byBrendan musician artist/musician Fowler.Brendan —S.M. Fowler.

Karyn Karyn Lovegrove Lovegrove

Irene Neuwirth and Amber Busuttil Mullen Eric Block and Claire Birnbaum

Susan Hancock

Firstenberg, Mullen and Lindsay Berger Sacks

Ariana Lambert Smeraldo and Rosette Delug

Maggie Kayne

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Firstenberg, Mullen and Lindsay Berger Sacks

Michael Kors’ NEW STORE ThE Grove WHAT:

WHERE:

Haircalf tote, $598, MICHael Michael MICHael MICHael Kors haircalf tote, KoRs; 323-549-9500 $598;

Native New Yorker Michael Kors fell prey to the charms of L.A. long ago. “I’ve been smitten ever since first visiting my grandparents,” says the designer, who now comes to the city at least four times a year. “The weather! The mix of ease and glamour!” With the opening of this new boutique, Kors will have even more reason to head west. “I just think the Grove is such an iconic shopping experience,” says the designer. The corner shop will house all three accessories lines and MICHAEL Michael Kors ready-towear while catering to SoCal’s casual chic trademark. “‘Can you wear it with jeans?’ is a customers. abig bigL.A. L.A.question,” question,”Kors Korsnotes.— notes.— E.C. E.C.

KORS’ L.A. hAuNTS Hotel: “The “The Beverly Hills Hotel. I immediately head to a cabana. I love the idea of taking a dip in the same pool where Liz Taylor swam.”

RestauRants: “Dan Tana’s. Love the mix of Hollywood and hipsters. And the Apple Pan [for burgers] is divine—so old school and delish.” sHoPPInG: “I always stop in at The Way We Wore for its fab vintage fashion from every era.” WeeKenD DestInatIon:

“I can’t get enough of Big Sur. Nature + Luxury = Heaven.”

Aviators, $125, MICHael KoRs

Kors’ lifestyle boutique at The Grove

Haircalf bootie, $325, MICHael MICHael KoRs

TOP: STEFANIE KEENAN (9): BOTTOM: COURTESY OF MICHAEL KORS (5)

Michael Kors


LOS ANGELES

MI A MI

LOS ANGELES The handbeaded, handtooled, ikat and leather weave collections on display at Cleobella

N E W YOR K

SA N F R A NCISCO

ORANGE COUNTY WHAT:

STORES WE LOvE TO UpDATE yOUR WARDRObE WHY:

The embroidered Layla bag, $300; shopbop.com

CLEObELLA

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From Indonesia to North Africa, Angela O’Brien’s ethnically inspired collection of handcrafted bags and accessories hopscotches across the globe. Cleobella’s husbandNow the Huntington Beach designer has finally given her nomadic label a place to call home in the form of an epony- and-wife team, Angela and Jim O’Brien mous boutique, idyllically perched near the Pacific. “I wanted it to be a store that would be a fun discovery for travelers,” O’Brien says of the Sunset Beach location, right off the PCH. Housed in a converted 1920s cottage, the boutique carries the complete Cleobella line which, fittingly, includes travel accessories. (cleobella.com)

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TOP: COURTESY OF CLEOBELLA (3); BOTTOM: COURTESY OF C. WONDER. COURTESY OF JOIE.

The store’s “American Dream” room

JOIE

C. WONDER

This cheerful lifestyle company takes a something-foreveryone approach to retail. At the new C. Wonder Newport Beach boutique, for instance, shoppers can peruse shelves bearing chunky enamel bracelets, mini cupcake makers and snug cardigans. And with a $40 median price point, it’s that much easier to justify taking home cute nautical-themed coasters or a pair of neonaccented roller skates. (cwonder.com)

A sunny array at Joie

“Southern California by way of Paris” is the vibe at the Joie salon in Fashion Island. The boutique (the label’s first on the West Coast) is modeled after a Parisian apartment, with classic molding, herringbone floors and a white color scheme. But nothing can distract from the shop’s main draw: a covetable collection of breezy separates, stylish footwear and just-launched leather handbags. (joie.com) —Evelyn Crowley


LOS A NGE L E S

Rabbit ragù with fresh pasta at MC Kitchen

MIAMI

N E W YOR K

SA N F R A NCISCO

MIAMI WHAT:

The Best NeW RESTAURANTS You’ve goT To eat WHY:

The roof deck at Juvia

This fall, chef Dena Marino opens MC Kitchen, her first Miami eatery, where she’ll be serving up modern Italian cuisine influenced by the seasons. “We will be creating a lot of our ingredients in-house, from making our own cheeses, pastas and pastries to curing meats, pickling vegetables and canning fruits,” says Marino. “We want to preserve the integrity of each product and plan on sourcing from as many local farms as possible.” (mckitchenmiami.com) —Liza Ghorbani

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JUVIA ESTIATORIO MILOS

The philosophy behind the newly opened Estiatorio Milos is: Don’t mess with perfection. Restaurateur Costas Spiliadis will continue to serve the very best seafood and produce in timeless Greek dishes that maintain their natural flavors. “Every ingredient has a purpose and history,” he says. “The simple and clean food of my ancestors and homeland inspires me to replicate our culinary traditions.” (milos.ca/restaurants/miami) —L.G.

Mediterranean sea bass in sea salt at Estiatorio Milos

TIKL RAW BAR & GRILL

The team behind Miami Beach’s Altamare has taken its talents over the bridge to Brickell’s nightlife district with the new TIKL Raw Bar & Grill. Executive chef Simon Stojanovic has designed a shared-plates menu using locally-sourced ingredients influenced by global cuisines. “There will definitely be an element of surprise at play,” says Stojanovic, “and our guests should expect surprising flavor combinations and textures. There will always be something to discover.” (tiklrestaurant.com) —L.G.

The buzz about Juvia was deafening from the get-go, thanks to its sky-high views and ocean breezes that caress alfresco diners on the restaurant’s chic roof deck. The unique location at the top of the 1111 Lincoln Road building, with its vertical garden and stunning cityscapes, has gotten Miami’s elite in the door, but it’s the cast of top chefs and expertly prepared Japanese-, Peruvian- and French-inspired dishes that keep them coming back. (juviamiami.com) —Hadley Henriette The bar at TIKL Raw Bar & Grill

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF MC KITCHEN. COURTESY OF JUVIA. COURTESY OF TIKL RAW BAR & GRILL. COURTESY OF ESTIATORIO MILOS.

MC KITCHEN


CHIC AG O

DA L L A S

WHAT:

SLS Hotel oPens South BeacH

HOUS TON The grand entrance to the SLS Hotel

WHERE:

Miami (and soon Las Vegas and New York!) finally has an SLS Hotel to call its very own—and it was certainly worth the eight-year wait. Occupying a historic beachfront art deco building on Collins Avenue, the space got a makeover with new interiors by Philippe Starck. Highlights include dreamy white bedrooms, three in-house restaurants (The Bazaar by José Andrés, Katsuya by Starck and Hyde Beach) and two decked-out pools. (slshotels. com/southbeach) —H.H.

L A S V EGA S

Sam Nazarian

This is the second SLS Hotel for SBE owner and CEO Sam Nazarian, whose family purchased the building (formerly the Ritz Plaza Hotel) almost 10 years ago. “The property is designed to allow guests to discover the different spaces and thoughtful details,” he says. “I really love the technology integrated into each guestroom—its own iPad (with a button for room service) and connectivity that allows you to plug your devices into the flat screens.”

While most of the world thinks of Lenny Kravitz as a musician and actor, Miamians have been seeing the fruits of his design group, Kravitz Design Incorporated (KDI), for a while. Kravitz designed the Penthouse Tower Suite and 1 of 10 poolside villas for the SLS, and in the process discovered that Nazarian’s Lenny Kravitz approach allowed his creativity to flourish. “Sam’s openness and his desire to be different made me want to get involved.” “A cocktail of poetry, surrealism, tenderness and unexpected sculptures” is how Philippe Starck sums up his vision for SLS. “Everywhere you look, you have a surprise—like the glowing kayak Philippe Starck above the reception desk. There is also secret poetry written on hidden parts of the walls, sometimes behind the curtains,” says Starck, who was given complete artistic freedom by owner Nazarian and whom he now considers not just a partner but “a brother.”

The hotel lobby One of two pools at the hotel

José Andrés

Winner of the 2011 James Beard award, chef José Andrés’ latest creation is The Bazaar, an eclectic restaurant with Spanish-, Chinese- and Cuban-inflected dishes. “The menu was inspired by so many things that are important to me,” explains Andrés. “It’s about the places and experiences, so we created dishes like the Bao con Lechon, an amazing Chinese bun with pork belly so tender that it falls apart. And I love the Creamy Coconut Rice, which we serve in a beautiful coconut shell. It’s creamy and fresh.”

KRAVITZ: COURTESY OF LENNY KRAVITZ. STARCK: NICOLAS GUERIN. ALL OTHER IMAGES: COURTESY OF SLS HOTELS.

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A Superior City View double bedroom at the hotel


LOS A NGE L E S

MIAMI

N E W YOR K

SA N F R A NCISCO

WHAT:

Lacoste Opens A new stOre LIncOLn Road WHERE:

Short-sleeve classic piqué polo shirts, $89.50 each; 305-674-6810

The Polo Fit Wall and Polo Bar

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COURTESY OF LACOSTE (2).

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Lacoste has brought its timeless sports attire—and legendary crocodile!—to Miami with the debut of its first downtown boutique. Calling upon the French brand’s rich tennis history, the store will feature vintage stadium seats and curtains patterned with tennis nets, as well as an entire Polo Fit Wall and Polo Bar exhibiting the classic Lacoste polo shirts in 65 vibrant colors. For the opening, the store will feature a 3D mixed-media installation by Trong Nguyen that will simulate a fan boat ride down the Florida Everglades, a nod to Lacoste’s work with the Everglades Foundation. During the rest of the year the store plans to feature other art installations and special events in the 600-square-foot exhibition space. “I could not be more proud to see this new addition of style and elegance to the Lincoln Road landscape,” says professional golfer Cristie Kerr, who is both a Lacoste ambassador and Miami native. “Lacoste and Miami are both part of my roots and synonymous with comfort, style and authentic expression. I can’t wait to see the excitement the new boutique adds to [this] already vibrant environment.” And neither can we. —L.G.


CHIC AG O

DA L L A S

HOUS TON

L A S V EGA S

WHAT:

BUSINESSWOMEN MAKING MOVES MIAMI ANd BEyONd WHERE:

Savory pizzas on the new Dylan’s Candy Bar menu

Candy queen Dylan Lauren brings her sweet treats to Lincoln Road with the debut of Dylan’s Candy Bar Miami, which she likens to a gingerbread house of sorts right in the heart of South Beach. Unlike the New York flagship, the Miami store will have an outdoor café, complete with fun cocktails like chocolate daiquiris and vanilla vodka ice cream with Pop Rocks explosions. Those concoctions, along with made-to-share desserts and Latin-inspired finger foods, make it the perfect destination for date nights and bachelorette parties. There will also be a mezzanine available for private parties as well as Lauren’s famed “Color Your World,” where customers can choose from thousands of sweets to customize their own events. “We pride ourselves on how we curate candy,” Lauren says of her franchise. “It’s for people who appreciate art, fashion and the kid in everyone.” (dylanscandybar.com) —L.G. Dylan Lauren

LIZ MARGULIES AND AMY POLIAKOFF

In Bravo’s new reality show Gallery Girls, Miami natives Liz Margulies and Amy Poliakoff, both 25, follow their dreams all the way to New York City, where they compete with five other women as gallery interns in the glamorous and cutthroat industry.

Liz Margulies with her father Marty Margulies and gallerist Eli Klein

Amy Poliakoff has worked at the David Zwirner and Paul Kasmin galleries in NYC.

Were you exposed to great art growing up in Miami? AMy: I have had the privilege of attending Art Basel with my father each year. It is great exposure. LIZ: My dad collected art, so to me, being surrounded by amazing works seemed normal. When I was two years old, my mom would say, “Show me a Lichtenstein, or a Warhol,” and I’d go around the house and point. I have memories climbing up a Miró sculpture and hiding behind a John Chamberlain when playing hide-and-seek. Who is your favorite local artist? AMy: I think Romero Britto has become the face of the Miami Latin art world. I respect his branding and marketing machine as an established commercial powerhouse. LIZ: I like Ruben Ubiera’s work a lot, and Typoe is amazing.

Poliakoff mingles at an opening at Eli Klein Fine Art.

Margulies studied graphic design at NYC’s School of Visual Arts.

What are your top hometown haunts? LIZ: I like going out to Mokai, LIV and Wall. I love Soho House to relax during the day—and, of course, the beach! AMy: I definitely enjoy Fisher Island. It makes Miami more of a vacation for me. —L.G.

TOP: COURTESY OF DYLAN’S CANDY BAR (3). POLIAKOFF & MARGULIES: VIRGINIA SHERWOOD/BRAVO/©NBCUNIVERSAL, INC. OTHER IMAGES: DAVID GIESBRECHT/BRAVO/©NBCUNIVERSAL, INC.

Fun cocktails offer sweet relief.

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DYLAN LAUREN


CHIC AG O

DA L L A S

WHAT:

wynwood It’s tHE up-and-comIng nEIgHborHood

HOUS TON

L A S V EGA S

Kenny Scharf in front of his new mural at Wynwood Walls

WYNWOOD WALLS

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BLOOM

Miami’s open-air park now features 40 museum-quality murals by artists from all over the world, including Kenny Scharf, Shepard Fairey, Faile and Bäst, Retna, The Date Farmers, How and Nosm, Saner & Sego and Liqen. “I can’t think of another urban area so filled with great paintings in the street,” says Scharf, who contributed a new wall this year. “It’s so cool to see the progress every time I visit.” (thewynwoodwalls.com) —L.G.

Chipotle shrimp pinxos at Bloom

Jose Miguel Sarti and Sebastian Stahl’s unique concept at Bloom is to celebrate the market and street foods of Latin America and Asia. They enlisted chef Ricky Sauri, formerly of Nobu, to create a diverse menu that includes braised oxtail and shiitake enchiladas, Korean barbecue short rib arepas and pork belly ramen, served alongside innovative cocktails like Tequila Beets, which fuses beet juice and tequila. (bloomwynwood.com) —L.G.

FRANGIPANI

Tina Frey resin cake stands, $340 and $260

ALESSANDRA GOLD

Alessandra Gold’s new concept store on the edge of Wynwood is a perfect stop for indie duds. The airy space boasts not only trendy men’s and women’s fashion, but also a photography studio for rent in the back. While still emerging stateside, the Brazilian-born designer already has an international following. Miami’s It Girls have taken an immediate shine to Gold’s signature slouchy “Kimono” boots. (alessandragold.com) —H.H. Sneakers and boat shoes on display at Alessandra Gold

This new lifestyle boutique prides itself on one-of-a-kind finds exclusive to Miami. Stop in and pick up something in the way of chic decor (throws, vases, sculptures) or fashion accessories. “Frangipani’s juicy product selection will entice clients to linger,” says owner Jennifer Frehling, “including many items that are handmade, artistic, sustainable and intelligently designed.” (frangipanimiami.com) —L.G.

MAP: ISTOCKPHOTO.COM. MURAL: MARTHA COOPER/COURTESY OF KENNY SCHARF & WYNWOOD WALLS. CENTER: COURTESY OF BLOOM WYNWOOD. BOTTOM, LEFT TO RIGHT: TOMMY CHUNG. COURTESY OF FRANGIPANI

WHY:


CHIC AG O

DA L L A S

Hot new Beach cLuBs north of miami BeacH

HOUS TON

L A S V EGA S

WHAT:

FreSco

WHERE:

Poolside dining is de rigueur in Miami, but the St. Regis Bal Harbour brings it to a new level with Fresco. Discerning diners, likely to be guests at the new luxurious hotel, will be thrilled by Fresco’s light but filling dishes. Only the best-quality ingredients are used: the Puerto Vallarta fish tacos are made with large chunks of grilled mahi-mahi, and the ceviche with fresh corvina and the turkey burgers are strictly organic. Miamiinspired options include a churrasco steak sandwich and a layered Key lime pie. Just remember to bring your suit—you’ll definitely want to stay and rent a daybed or one of the over-the-top cabanas that give even the best hotel rooms a run for their money. (stregisbalharbour.com) —H.H.

The view from Bella Beach Club.

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Bella Beach cLuB

Miami may be famous for its sand and waves, but before the opening of Bella Beach Club in the Trump International Beach Resort in Sunny Isles, there were no restaurants directly on the Redling Caption tk beach. Now diners can revel in Saint-Tropez-style dining steps from the ocean with their toes in the sand. Extras include bocce ball, oceanfront lounge chairs and daybeds that offer total privacy with the pull of a string. It’s perfect for relaxing with a glass of rosé after a lunch of grilled fish or Wagyu mini burgers. Luxe items like Osetra caviar and South African lobster are fit for the Russian billionaires who frequent the hot spot, which is owned by local nightlife notables Alan Roth and Tommy Pooch. (bellabeachclub.com) —H.H.

SportS WHAT:

WHAT: The BankAtlantic Center’s entrance

Now there’s no need to ever worry about not getting primo seats for a Florida Panthers game or the next Jay-Z concert! At the exclusive new Club RED, membership buys a seat for all BankAtlantic Center events and allows access to the 12,000-square-foot luxury lounge with a bar and gourmet food, not to mention meet and greets with players and VIP parking. (clubred360.com) —L.G.

New Spa treatment

The lounge area at Agua at the Delano

Come inside the Agua Spa at the Delano hotel and experience ancient beauty rituals combined with modern skincare technology, all in a stunning oceanfront setting. The new KeSARI menu of exotic treatments—featuring massages, facials and scrubs— was inspired by Indian bridal rituals. Utilizing natural ingredients, like saffron and coriander, the expert hands at Agua aim to give spa-goers a calming, energizing or balancing journey. (delano-hotel.com) —H.H.

TOP: COURTESY OF ST. REGIS, BAL HARBOUR. CENTER: COURTESY OF BELLA BEACH CLUB. BOTTOM: COURTESY OF BANKATLANTIC CENTER. COURTESY OF KESARI BEAUTY.

Poolside lounging at Fresco


MiaMi

LOS A NGE L E S Adrienne bon Haes and Marvin Ross Friedman

N E W YOR K

SA N F R A NCISCO Ximena and Tony Cho, Mike Fitch and Anne Owen

WHAT:

chloé fashion show soho beach house WHERE:

Miami’s Fashion Week Swim marked the U.S. debut of the Chloé Spring 2013 collection at Soho Beach House, which turned its pool area into a catwalk for the occasion. The who’s who of fashionable Miami were treated to a show of safari-meets-folk garb embellished with lace and military details. Afterward, guests sipped Peroni and Moët & Chandon in the balmy garden and grooved to DJ Johnny the Boy. —H.H.

Chapman and Kristin Ducote, Olga Bahdanava and Jorge Arevalo

Laura Buccellati, Dana Shear and Susanne Birbragher

Lolo Surdarsky and Ricardo Dunin

Jose Manrique (right) and guests

Julie Henderson

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WHAT:

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salon allure Party w south beach

TOP: WORLD RED EYE (7). BOTTOM: AARON DAVIDSON/GETTY IMAGES FOR W SOUTH BEACH HOTEL & RESIDENCES (5)

WHERE: Shayne Benowitz, Monica Sorensen and Elizabeth Wheaton

Jen Kerckhoff and Hannah Cole

Fabian Hernandez and Ana Lorena Sanchez

Kicking off its Swim Week trade show in style, Salon Allure hosted a poolside bash at W South Beach Hotel & Residences. The soiree drew more than 800 guests, who dove into cocktails like the Grey Goose L’Orange South Beach Punch. The fashion flock watched the runway show, which showcased some 56 swim- and resortwear brands including La Perla and Mara Hoffman. —L.G.

Adriana Lara, Bobbie van der Vlugt, Tracy Wilson Mourning, Norma Jean Abraham and Takeyah Young

Guests at Salon Allure


CHIC AG O

DA L L A S WHAT:

artefactO hOme oPeNiNg PARty aVentUra

Champagne chandelier aerialists poured bubbly into guests’ glasses.

Romero Britto and Lais Bacchi

HOUS TON

L A S V EGA S

Herman and Alexia Echevarria

Helio Castroneves and Paulo Bacchi

WHERE:

Briggs Solomon

Artefacto Home hosted the grand opening of its luxuryfurnishings showroom on Biscayne Boulevard in Aventura. Guests worked the room to the music of DJ Irie as they took in Paulo Bacchi’s vision for the Brazilian design brand at the 42,000-square-foot two-level showroom and viewed new collections, including the debut of celebrity designer Briggs Solomon’s first-ever furniture line designed exclusively for Artefacto. —L.G.

WHAT:

caliche Rum LAuNCH PARty tHe BAtH CLuB

Rande Gerber and Roberto Serrallés celebrated the launch of Caliche, their new light Puerto Rican rum, at The Bath Club’s courtyard in North Miami Beach. DJ Mr. Best spun tunes as notables— such as Cindy Crawford (Gerber’s wife), Jillian Altit, Oribe and Michelle Pooch—sported complimentary fedoras while sipping Caliche mojitos and toking hand-rolled cigars. —H.H.

Alexander Mijares Rande Gerber and Cindy Crawford

Adriana Pinto-Torres and Sildy Cervera

Belkys Nerey

Ingrid Hoffmann

Alex Delgado, John Andrew Rodriguez and Regina Arriola

WHAT:

ALexANdeR mijares art OPening South of fiftH WHERE:

Christoph Simon

Glenn and Dorit Rotner and Roberto Serrallés

Art enthusiasts descended on a spectacular oceanfront property in South Beach’s South of Fifth neighborhood to view 22 new works by breakout artist Alexander Mijares. Many of the paintings on display sold at impressive prices, and Mijares pledged to donate 10 percent of the proceeds to Make-A-Wish Southern Florida. —L.G.

ALL IMAGES: WORLD RED EYE

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WHERE:


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LOS A NGE L E S

MI A MI

NEW YORK

SA N F R A NCISCO

NEW YORK A view of the High Line’s staircase entrance on 14th Street and Tenth Avenue

OPENER? 000 285

LAUREE FELDMAN/GETTY IMAGES

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DA L L A S

NEW YORK WHAT:

THe Hottest happenings UpTown and down

HOUS TON

L A S V EGA S

MANHATTAN

WHERE:

CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN

ESSIE

Inside the Samuel Shriqui salon, nail polish brand Essie has opened a flagship, with roomy couches and outdoor garden treatment spaces. But the centerpiece here is definitely the recessed white wall that impressively displays the company’s entire line of polishes, over 250 shades in all. 35 E. 65 St., 212-472-6805

SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

One of the city’s most popular shopping destinations, Saks’ 10022-Shoe floor is getting a makeover to expand its designer collections (most notably Louis Vuitton) and introduce labels like Alejandro Ingelmo and Carven. 611 Fifth Ave., 212-753-4000

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The 1,500-square-foot men’s-only boutique is the perfect showcase for the brand’s sought-after accessories. In the back of the shop is the Tattoo Parlour, where you can customize your kicks with bespoke Lesage embroidery. 808 Washington St., christianlouboutin.com

THOMAS HOUSEAGO ON THE HIGH LINE

Check out L.A.-based sculptor Thomas Houseago’s 15-footlong headless bronze statue, “Lying Figure,” among the overgrowth between the old tracks, the third project in the High Line Commissions series. Little West 12 St., thehighline.org

“I wear a Tank watch because it’s the watch to wear,” Andy Warhol said in 1973.

225 RECTOR PLACE

Jonathan Adler has imprinted his vision on select residences at the Battery Park City luxury condo building. One- and twobedroom model units showcase the designer’s whimsy with touches like metallic bamboo wallpaper, graphic carpets and decorative pillows. 225 Rector Pl., rectorplace225.com

Tank Anglaise large model steel and 18-karat rose gold watch, $10,250; cartier.com

WHAT:

cartier’s new Tank anglaise we love waTches WHY:

Truman Capote wearing his beloved Tank

If it wasn’t already a classic, one might say that the Tank Anglaise’s time has come. The original Tank, worn by New Yorkers like Andy Warhol and Truman Capote and stars such as Eizabeth Taylor and Catherine Deneuve, is getting an update. Gold models (with or without diamonds) debuted in June, and a gold-and-steel version will be released in November. First designed in 1917 by Louis Cartier and said to be inspired by the Renault military tanks, the timepiece can only become more popular, thanks to these timely changes. —Natasha Wolff

MAP: ISTOCKPHOTO.COM. LEFT TO RIGHT, TOP: COURTESY OF CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN. COURTESY OF SAKS FIFTH AVENUE. COURTESY OF ESSIE. CENTER: COURTESY OF HAUSER & WIRTH. SCOTT FRANCES. WARHOL: © ARNOLD NEWMAN/GETTY IMAGES; THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS, INC./2011 PROLITTERIS, ZURICH. WATCH: COURTESY OF CARTIER. CAPOTE: WITH PERMISSION OF TRUMAN CAPOTE LITERARY TRUST © RUE DES ARCHIVES/FARABOLAFOTO/ITAL.

CHIC AG O


LOS A NGE L E S WHO:

The SuSSmaN BROthERS WE love thEiR cOOKiNg!

MI A MI

NEW YORK

SA N F R A NCISCO

Eli and Max Sussman man the grill in their Williamsburg backyard.

WHAT:

NeW FitNESS OBSEESSiONS tO MIX it uP

WHY:

WHY:

REVOLVE FITNESS The Virginia-based Big Apple with the Fall opening of its Union Square fitness center, which will offer three different kinds of high-intensity classes, including a calorie-shredding interval ride. (revolvefitness.com)

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TOP TO BOTTOM, LEFT: ALEX FARNUM. ANTHONY FALCO. TAYLOR CHADWICK. RIGHT: COURTESY OF REVOLVE FITNESS. COURTESY OF THE FITNESS CELL. COURTESY OF BARRY’S BOOTCAMP.

spin company is scheduled to take on the

THE FITNESS CELL COLLECTIVE The new UES space will focus on intimate group classes based on personal training techniques and influenced by Pilates, The entrance to Roberta’s

meditation, gymnastics and martial arts.

Too many cooks in the kitchen? Not a problem for Max and Eli Sussman, a pair of food-obsessed brothers working for two of Brooklyn’s most-beloved restaurants who recently joined forces to write a cookbook. “I love Mile End,” Max says of the Boerum Hill deli (mileendbrooklyn.com), where his brother is a line cook. Likewise, Eli admits to going to Max’s restaurant, Roberta’s in Bushwick (robertaspizza.com), “an embarrassing amount.” For This Is a Cookbook: Recipes for Real Life (Olive Press), Eli and Max crafted over 60 easy-to-prep recipes for all occasions while working out of their Williamsburg home. Opposing schedules made collaborating a challenge, but the book is the product of a total partnership—the kind where disagreements inevitably surfaced. Says Eli: “Heated debates about calling something an aioli or the bake time of a graham cracker crust—those are pretty standard for us.” —Chadner Navarro

(fitnesscellcollective.com)

BARRY’S BOOTCAMP OPENS IN TRIBECA The two-floor York Street satellite of this fitness mecca will offer the kind of intensive interval workouts you’d expect at Barry’s plus a fuel bar and Malin + Goetz bath products in the locker rooms. (barrysbootcamp.com)

Mile End in Boerum Hill


CHIC AG O

9/13

9/18

DA L L A S

Marilyn Minter covers the Mondrian Hotel lobby with her “Kicksilver” wall paper, an installation produced by Maharam and Morgans Hotels’ Adam Shopkorn. (mondriansoho.com)

WHat:

The Best new exhibiTions upTown and down

Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years explores Andy Warhol’s influence. One-quarter of the 150 selected works, including “Flowers,” 1964, are by the artist and the rest are by some 60 contemporary artists. (metmuseum.org)

WHere:

11/03

Guillermo Kuitca’s Diarios (shown: a 2005 example) will inaugurate the reopening of SoHo’s not-forprofit institution The Drawing Center, after an expansion project. (drawingcenter.org)

11/02

In his first U.S. show in eight years, Turkish artist Kutlug Ataman will present four video installations from his latest series, Mesopotamian Dramaturgies. Shown: “Journey to the Moon,” 2009 video still. (speronewestwater.com)

10/05

Picasso Black and White is the first major U.S. show to focus on the black-and-white works throughout Pablo Picasso’s career. Shown: “Reclining Woman Reading (Femme couchée lisant),” 1960 (guggenheim.org)

10/30

Vincent Van Gogh’s masterpiece “Portrait of a Peasant (Patience Escalier),” 1888, which marked his break from Impressionism, comes to the Frick Collection and will be accompanied by lectures and gallery talks. (frick.org)

10/25

Leo Villareal’s 30-foottall site-specific light sculpture, “Buckyball” (2012), is inspired by the work of Buckminster Fuller and will be installed in Madison Square Park. (madisonsquarepark.org/art)

CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP LEFT: COURTESY OF MORGANS HOTEL GROUP. COURTESY OF SPERONE WESTWATER, NEW YORK. © 2012 THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS, INC./ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK. © JEFF KOONS. TOM JENKINS; © 2012 ESTATE OF PABLO PICASSO/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK. COURTESY OF LEO VILLAREAL. NORTON SIMON ART FOUNDATION. COURTESY OF SPERONE WESTWATER, NEW YORK.

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Works by artists like Bruce Nauman, Sigmar Polke and Jeff Koons (shown: “Michael Jackson and Bubbles,” 1988) are on display alongside Warhol’s.


LOS A NGE L E S

NEW YORK

MI A MI

Jessica Stam and Elettra Wiedemann

SA N F R A NCISCO

WHAT:

CoaCh’s SummER Party on thE HIGH LINE WHERE:

For the second year in a row, Coach hosted an evening to raise funds for one of NYC’s most beloved public spaces, the High Line. The accessories brand’s carnival-themed bash offered a lavish prize booth featuring goodies like key fobs and bags. Stars mingled and danced to DJ Kiss’ tunes, while Friends of the High Line cofounder Robert Hammond volunteered for the dunk tank. —C.N. Maggie Gyllenhaal

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Bobbie and Lew Frankfort

Josephine Skriver and Patricia van der Vliet Amanda Burden David Neville, Gucci Westman, and their children

Mamie Gummer and Ben Walker

Kate Mara and Dianna Agron

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ALL IMAGES PATRICK MCMULLAN

Vanessa Bayer, Bobby Moynihan and Abby Elliott


CHIC AG O

DA L L A S

HOUS TON

L A S V EGA S

WHAT:

Beauty News Look your Best

Three years after its first NYC retreat shuttered, Cornelia Spa has found a new home at the Surrey Hotel with amenities including champagne tastings and warm, gingerinfused welcome towels, the spa celebrates its return with a totally revamped service menu boasting luxurious signature treatments like the Lumina Gemstone Radiance facial: a pampering therapy using micronized rubies, sapphires, citrine, gold, emeralds and pearls to reverse signs of aging. ($245; corneliaspaatthesurrey.com)

WHY:

TRACIe MARTYN’s ruBy ray treatments

West Coast barbershop Rudy’s has made its way east with a shop next to the ACE Hotel. Offering the same affordable services as its pioneering locales ($17 for the signature buzz cut while regular cuts start at $40), the NYC outpost also has a 400-square-foot retail space that offers a range of products from Krochet Kids and Apolis Global Citizen. Local bookstore Karma curates Rudy’s Oprah-esque monthly list of recommended books. (rudysbarbershop.com)

After months in the sun, your skin

might be in desperate need of some TLC. Make an appointment to see skincare expert Tracie Martyn at her Fifth Avenue salon for a revitalizing LED light therapy–based Ruby Ray treatment —you’ll be bathed in totally safe red light from head-to-toe—which ramps up cellular energy production. Martyn says the treatment, originally discovered by NASA to help heal astronauts’ wounds, “will improve the skin’s tautness and

The Ruby Ray light bed

effectively address signs of aging while offering slimming, stretch mark-diminishing capabilities.” (A 15-minute The styling area of Rudy’s Barbershop

FeKKAI’s Blowout Bar

Through September, head to Frédéric Fekkai’s Midtown salon for its temporary Blowout Bar, where $50 gets you gorgeous locks in record time. Styles include the “Hollywood Glam” for wavy tresses, the “St. Barth’s Sexy” for a textured beachy style or the salon’s signature sleek blowout, “The New Yorker.” The best part? The salon opens at 7:30 a.m. so you can tackle that 9 a.m. with your CEO in style. (fekkai.com) —C.N. from left:

Blowout stations; the waiting room at Fekkai’s Fifth Avenue salon

session costs $150; traciemartyn.com)

TOP TO BOTTOM: COURTESY OF CORNELIA SPA. COURTESY OF TRACIE MARTYN (2). COURTESY OF RUDY’S BARBERSHOP (2). COURTESY OF FREDERIC FEAKKAI (2).

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A treatment room at the Surrey Hotel’s Cornelia Spa

Tracie Martyn’s purple treatment room


LOS A NGE L E S Brooke Neidich, Fred Wilson and Kara Walker

NEW YORK

MI A MI

SA N F R A NCISCO

WHAT:

YaYOi Kusama Opening The WhiTney MusEuM WHERE:

The Louis Vuitton dinner for Yayoi Kusama’s retrospective at the Whitney Museum showcased the power of the polka dot. Although the reclusive 83-yearold Japanese artist wasn’t in attendance, her presence was felt by wide use of her signature print on menus, beach balls, and even the wallpaper. Some like it dot! —N.W.

Zac Posen and André Saraiva

Courtney Plummer and David Maupin

Yves Carcelle and Martha Stewart Margherita Missoni and Eugenio Amos

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Dots Infinity Cuff, $1,165; louisvuitton.com

PM Dots Infinity Bangle, $360; louisvuitton.com

On wall: “Leftover Snow in the Dream” 1982; on floor: “The Clouds,” 1984

BANGLE & CUFF: COURTESY OF LOUIS VUITTON. ALL OTHER IMAGES: BILLY FARRELL/BFANYC.COM

The Kusama-printed place setting

Models Amber and Nisha with Waris Ahluwalia

Diane Kruger

Dianna Agron and Sofia Coppola The deconstructed cherry cheesecake dessert “Accumulation on Cabinet No. 1,” 1963

Malcom Morley


N EW YORK’ S MOST B OLDLY LAVISH HOT E L A ND R ESI DENCES 77 T H ST R E E T at MA DISON

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LOS A NGE L E S

MI A MI

NEW YORK

SA N F R A NCISCO WHAT:

Ovadia & SOnS MENsWEaR ThEY’RE dappER dudEs WHY:

Brothers Ariel and Shimon Ovadia are having quite the year. Their Brooklyn-based label, Ovadia & Sons, picked up an accolade as GQ’s Best New Menswear Designer, which led to a capsule line in collaboration with Gap. Simultaneously, the boys’ Blue Label is launching exclusively at Barneys New York and will feature a selection of the same versatile, street-and-office-­appropriate­pieces­that­have­ been­influential­on­the­pair’s­road­to­acclaim.­ Think­perfect-fitting­patterned­dress­shirts,­tartan­ pants,­sporty­shoes­and­boots­and­flannel­vests­ that the designers layer under a sports coat or over a hoodie. (ovadiaandsons.com) —C.N.

Suede laceup, $595; chcmshop.com

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TOP: JUSTIN CHUNG. BOTTOM, LEFT TO RIGHT: COURTESY OF FIVESTORY. COURTESY OF FD GALLERY. COURTESY OF IPPOLITA.

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Ariel and Shimon Ovadia take center stage.

WHAT:

StOreS TO MaKE NOTE OF Three-stone ring, $4,995 and hoops, $3,695

The townhouse’s entrance

FIVEsTORY

Newly opened Fivestory—the elegant boutique housed inside one of the UES’s landmark townhouses—will expand its menswear offerings and add a children’s category that will no doubt rival its already famed womenswear stock (Cushnie et Ochs dresses sit alongside Edie Parker clutches).­For­men,­find­Orlebar­Brown­sharing­ shelf space with lesser-known names like Cashca and­Adam­Kimmel.­For­kids,­you’ll­find­lines­like­ Chloé and Bathing Ape Kids. (fivestoryny.com)

The store’s luxe jewelry vitrines

Fd GallERY

When it comes to jewelry collecting, the rarer the piece, the better. For some of the most prized baubles around, make your way to Fiona Druckenmiller’s FD Gallery, which curates a blue-chip stock of 20th century jewels on the UES. Whether it’s Van Cleef & Arpels art deco pieces or modern­designs­by­JAR­and­Taffin,­you’ll­find­something to splurge on at this amazingly-curated shop. Don’t miss the massive collection of vintage Cartier pieces in its very own display case. (fd-inspired.com)

IppOlITa

September sees the opening of jewelry designer­Ippolita­Rostagno’s­first-ever­standalone­ store, which will house the label’s entire range (from $175–$37,500) and exclusives pieces from the Oceano collection, shown above. The Madison Avenue space will feature standout design elements like a chandelier Rostagno commissioned herself. “It’s­a­9-foot­custom­design,­comprised­of­flowers individually hand-cast in porcelain,” she says. “Truly stunning.” (646-664-4240) –C.N.


CHIC AG O

DA L L A S

HOUS TON

L A S V EGA S

WHAT:

Paris Opera Ballet Summer Soiree LincoLn Center

Hal Witt, Anne Bass and Helene Alexopoulos

WHERE:

After a 15-year absence, the Paris Opera Ballet returned to New York. The Lincoln Center Festival treated dance aficionados like Mikhail Baryshnikov, Henry Kissinger and Anne Bass to an Opening Night program of 20th-century French ballet and an evening of dinner, drinks and music at the David H. Koch Theater. —Ariel Greene David and Julia Koch

Lisa Rinehart and Mikhail Baryshnikov Alanagh Cook and Tristan Brennan

Dayssi Olarte de Kanavos and Olivia Flatto

The scene at the Standard

WHO:

294 .com

WHAT:

Jessica White and Tika Sumpter

Manon Vermeulen and Kim Feenstra

Nick Loeb

Fireworks over the Hudson River

Anna Brown and Adriana Ameri

Kelly Rowland was on top of the world as she unveiled her TW Steel special-edition watches. One arm donned her signature oversize timepiece, while the other gestured for TW Steel CEO Jordy Cobelens to join her for a champagne toast. Guests were treated to a fireworks display over the skyline at the end of the night. —Lindsay Kaplan Jordy Cobelens and Kelly Rowland

Chad Carr, Zoe Wilson and Tyler Stewart

Rowland’s rosegold-plated chronograph watch with croc-embossed strap, $1,295; twsteel.com

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TW sTEEL WaTch PartY the Top of the Standard

ALL IMAGES: PATRICK MCMULLAN/PATRICKMCMULLAN.COM

Katherine Farley and Jerry Speyer


LOS A NGE L E S

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NEW YORK

WHO:

richard peÑa HE’s bEEN iN cHaRgE Of tHE new york Film fEstival fOR 25 YEaRs

SA N F R A NCISCO Richard Peña at the Walter Reade Theater at Lincoln Center

WHY:

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pHOtOgrapHed bY kirk edwards

GROOMING: NATASHA LEIBEL AT ARTISTS BY TIMOTHY PRIANO.

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After a quarter century spent curating some of the most closely-watched festivals in the world, Richard Peña, the trail-blazing head of the Film Society of Lincoln Center, is stepping down from the job. But don’t worry, it’s a happy ending. Peña, who oversees the annual New York Film Festival as part of his Film Society responsibilities, exhibited a precocious enthusiasm for boundarydefying cinema. When he was a child, he dragged his aunt to a festival showing of an Erich von Stroheim flick; later, at Harvard, he studied under eminent director and renowned experimentalist Vlada Petric. After spending eight years in programming at the Art Institute of Chicago, in 1987 Peña landed in the topspot at the Film Society, where he has bolstered the careers of Quentin Tarantino,

Michael Moore and Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami and premiering such films as Hoop Dreams and My Own Private Idaho. “Richard’s taste is amazing, and his knowledge of cinema is awesome,” says filmmaker Harmony Korine (Kids, Gummo). “I think the festival always tends to reflect that.” Film Society programs launched under Peña include the rookie revue New Directors/New Films, which introduced works from auteurs from Egypt, Turkey and Thailand, and The New York African Film Festival. Both have become fixtures on cinephiles’ calendars. “The thing about New York,” Peña explains, “is that you can find an audience for almost anything.” Enough moviegoers that in 2011 the Film Society opened the 17,500-square-foot Elinor Bunin Munroe

Film Center as a complement to the 21-year-old Walter Reade Theater across the street. The new space gave Peña and colleagues common areas plus two additional screens that have allowed the society to expand into first-run films and more esoteric offerings like a career retrospective of French director Claude Sautet. With the expansion firmly in place, Peña admits he’s “looking forward to slowing down a bit.” Although he’ll leave Lincoln Center at the conclusion of this fall’s festival —which launches its 50th season on Sept. 28—the show’s not over for him entirely. He’ll continue to teach film at Columbia University and perhaps even watch a movie or two for fun. “I think,” he says, “it’s time to sit back and enjoy the work of others.”—Adam Rathe


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LOS A NGE L E S

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NEW YORK

MI A MI

SA N F R A NCISCO

HAMPTONS WHAT:

TOPPING ROSE HOuSE BRIdGEhamPTON

A cottage guest room at the Topping Rose House

WHAT:

ThE PERfEcT lIsTING WaTERmIll

A view from the infinity pool

Nail stations at Salon Bar

WHERE:

WHAT:

salON BaR EasT hamPTON WHERE:

The high life is still alive and well on the East End. Take this 20,000-squarefoot Mecox Bay mansion listed by Douglas Elliman: The eight-bedroom, 11-bath Rose Hill Road house sits on a sprawling four-acre property and features a koi pond, wine cellar, tennis court, theater and restaurant-style bakery. (elliman.com) —C.N.

The house’s cast-bronze double staircase

Services like the 24-Karat Gold Eye Treatment (starting at $35), 24-Karat Gold Collagen Facial ($205), made with real gold flakes, and Wine and Chocolate Body Wraps ($175) are just some of the out-of-this-world treatments you can expect at cosmetologist Christina Savescu’s new Swarovski crystal-adorned spa in East Hampton. (salonbar.com) —C.N.

Salon Bar’s makeupapplication area

.com

The opening of Topping Rose House proves that the Hamptons is as much a year-round destination as it is a summer hotspot. Originally built as the home of Judge Abraham Topping Rose in 1842, the Greek revival-style mansion is now co-owned by Bill Campbell and Simon Critchell, who, along with celeb chef Tom Colicchio, are working to bring the property back to prominence with a sleek, cozy design. The 22-room inn (now slated to open in early 2013) features suites, cottages and studios done up in clean palettes and homey decor (fireplaces, hardwood floors with graphic area rugs, soft-patterned upholstery) for a stately feel. Other amenities include a spa, a pool adjacent to a pear orchard and a restaurant boasting a locavore menu. “We’re focusing on cultivating our farm,” Colicchio says. “Our goal is for it to feel like a country escape, and this is the perfect setting.” (toppingrosehouse.com) —Chadner Navarro

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TOP: COURTESY OF TOPPING ROSE HOUSE. BOTTOM, LEFT TO RIGHT: COURTESY OF DOUGLAS ELLIMAN (2). COURTESY OF SALON BAR (2).

WHERE:


CHIC AG O

DA L L A S

HOUS TON

L A S V EGA S

WHAT:

NEW DESIGN StarS SaG Harbor WHERE:

Max Eicke

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The 22-year-old Sag Harbor resident Maximillian Eicke was considering a career in architecture—that is, until he created his very first piece of furniture, a Bauhaus-inspired coffee table for his senior project at The Ross School in East Hampton. “My passion changed overnight,” he explains. “Nothing could beat the feeling of seeing a full-scale version of a design I had dreamt up.” Eicke—whose father is an art collector and mother an ex-Vogue editor—then went on to intern at renowned design firms like Hermès collaborator Polenz GMBH before launching his own company soon after turned 20. Eicke has just debuted his third collection of simple-yet-striking tables, chairs and shelves in materials like teak, marble and stainless steel. “It’s the perfect mix of my minimalist passion for using hard edges and basic geometrical shapes,” says the designer. (maxidny.net) —C.N.

The Dr. N chair, $3,400

The Babaloo bookcase, $6,800

The Sunday console table, $10,800

The Hans chaise, $8,800

Leather-wrapped coolers, thermoses and flasks

Osvaldo Borsani leather chair, bleached-oak bench, merino wool ottoman and Ico Parisi tub chair

In some ways, a modeling agent is the perfect person from whom to buy antique furniture—her eagle eye is trained to spot treasures in the unlikeliest of places. And that’s exactly what you get at Sag Harbor’s recently unveiled boutique Monc XIII, whose owner, Natascha Esch, was the president of Wilhelmina Models before she struck out as an interior designer. “My time at Wilhelmina gave me exposure to global influences of different styles,” she explains. “But it has also trained me to recognize beautiful things.” And while Esch’s scouting background is evident in the individual pieces in the shop, the way she positions these items in the space is what brings her design process into focus. She says, “After designing for 12 years, I wanted to curate my own vision and the store was the perfect platform.” (monc13.com) —C.N.

Natasha Esch on Monc XIII’s signature circular staircase

EICKE: TANYA MALOTT. FURNITURE: LUCA DE CONEY. MONC: ERIC STRIFFLER FOR MONC

English chesterfield sofa, Jacques Adnet arm chairs and Willy Rizzo table


LOS A NGE L E S

NEW YORK

MI A MI WHAT:

HARRY WINSTON OcEaN sPORt lauNch PaRtY ON shEltER islaNd

de Narp and Russell Simmons

SA N F R A NCISCO

Stuart Parr and Allison Sarofim

WHERE:

Hilary Rhoda and Frédéric de Narp

Seventy-five guests, including Hilary Rhoda, Harry Winston president and CEO Frédéric de Narp and André Saraiva, were flown by seaplane from Manhattan to Shelter Island’s Sunset Beach Hotel to fete the launch of the jeweler’s new timepiece line, the Ocean Sport Collection. The event featured a live creation of artwork by graffiti artist Saraiva, dinner served in the hotel’s vineyard and a rousing performance from The Virgins. —C.N.

Harry Winston Ocean Sport Chronograph, $27,200; harrywinston.com

André Saraiva dances with Annabelle Dexter-Jones

Parrish MidsuMMER PaRtY sOuthaMPtON WHAT:

Vojtova and Jamison Ernest Stacy Engman

Honorees Chuck Close and Barbara Goldsmith

WATCH: COURTESY OF HARRY WINSTON. ALL OTHER IMAGES: PATRICK MCMULLAN/PATRICKMCMULLAN.COM

WHERE:

Hundreds celebrated as the Parrish Art Museum honored seven of the East End’s most creative forces, including artist Chuck Close and choreographer Paul Taylor. Guests like Donald Sultan, Beth DeWoody and Eric Fischl were treated to cocktails and dinner, plus after-hours dancing with Tom Finn at the DJ booth. The event raised $650,000 for the museum, which is set to open its new Herzog and de Meuron building (and triple its space) in Water Mill on November 10. —C.N.

Terrie Sultan and Paul Taylor

Beth and Carlton DeWoody

Close, Sultan, Patricia Birch, Goldsmith, Taylor, Taylor Barton-Smith, Tony Ingrao and Randy Kemper

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The Virgins onstage

Louise Donegan, Kenza Fourati and Linda Vojtova

April Gornik and Eric Fischl


LOS A NGE L E S

MI A MI WHAT:

Summer of Polo BRidgEhamptON pOlO cluB

Nacho Figueras and Marco Mattiacci

NEW YORK

SA N F R A NCISCO

WHERE:

Rainy weather got the polo season off to a slow start, but that didn’t rein in the likes of Kelly Klein and Peter Brant. Society’s thoroughbreds were all on hand for the Bridgehampton Polo Club’s 16th annual opening day, hosted by Marco Mattiacci, CEO of Ferrari of North America. (A tent showcased the FF, Ferrari’s first four-seater with four-wheel drive.) The action continued all summer long, as Nacho Figueras and company galloped in front of spectators like Veronica Webb and Nigel Barker. —C.N.

Drena De Niro and Gabby Karan De Felice

Veronica Webb and Chris Del Gatto

Nick Manifold, Kelly Klein and Tony Melillo Peter and Jamee Gregory

Nigel Barker

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WHAT:

thE Big BaNg BENEFIT WatERmill cENtER

Jay McInerney

WHERE:

TOP: PATRICKMCMULLAN.COM (6). BOTTOM: BFANYC.COM (7)

Some 1,200 people gathered on a rainy night to raise funds for the Watermill Center and toast its founder, Robert Wilson. With an art-heavy list and a tribute exhibition of the late Mike Kelley’s work, it’s no surprise The Big Bang was lauded as the Hamptons event of the season. Artist David Jones, who flew in from Alaska, says, “It’s not only the best event in the country, it’s the best in the world.” —Debra Scott

Sarah Hoover and Misha Nonoo

Simon de Pury

Dianne Vavra

Cindy Sherman and Klaus Biesenbach

Richard Meier

Brendan Fallis and Hannah Bronfman


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LOS A NGE L E S

MI A MI

NEW YORK WHAT:

Recent, RENOvatEd aNd RivEtiNG NEW JERSEY & CONNECtiCUt WHERE:

NEW YORK

SA N F R A NCISCO

TRI-STATE JHOUSE GREENWICH HOTEL

Connecticut’s new boutique property, The JHouse Greenwich, features sleek design and a buzzy dining scene, courtesy of the seasonal menu at chef François KwakuDongo’s eleven14 Kitchen. Further enticements can be found at the Chocolate Lab boutique in the form of house-made gelato and chocolates. The hotel also features eco-friendly touches like bamboo and reclaimed-wood flooring, filtered drinking water bottled on-site and in-room iPads, which eliminate the need for printed matter. (jhousegreenwich.com) —Ariel Greene

SMITH & CHANG IN JERSEY CITY

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Jersey City’s popular Hamilton Park store Smith & Chang General Goods, known for a mix of merchandise that spans vintage eyeglass frames and mounted animal heads to Billykirk leather carryalls and antique furniture, has debuted a line of bath and body goods inspired by the upstate New York farm of owners Sawyer Smith and Alex Chang. Called the Patria Collection, the all-natural soaps, lip balms, lotions and even laundry detergent boast outdoorsy scents like sandalwood and fresh-cut grass. (smithchang.com) — Chadner Navarro

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TOP TO BOTTOM: COURTESY OF JHOUSE GREENWICH. COURTESY OF KOLO KLUB. COURTESY OF SMITH & CHANG. COURTESY OF FLYWHEEL SPORTS.

Eleven14 Kitchen restaurant at the JHouse Greenwich hotel

The bar at Kolo Klub

KOLO KLUB IN HOBOKEN

Flywheel Sports’ spin studio in Stamford An array of kitchen tools at Smith & Chang

When mixologists Michael Neff and Kenneth McCoy crafted a drink menu for Kolo Klub, Hoboken’s new cocktail bar, the challenge was to create adventurous cocktails that wouldn’t alienate the city’s beer-loving nighttime revelers. “We needed to make something accessible without being condescending,” Neff explains. The results include Eastern European-inspired libations with unusual flavor profiles like the Prague ‘36, which features Zubrowka vodka, Aperol, Combier orange liqueur, lemon juice and apple slices. (koloklub.com) —C.N.

FLYWHEEL SPORTS IN STAMFORD

High-energy, effective and personalized, Flywheel Sports is rolling into a spot at the new Chelsea Piers in Stamford, its first Connecticut location. Established in 2010 by fitness instructor Ruth Zuckerman, Flywheel offers an innovative fitness experience—its exercise studio has stadium-style seating, custom-made indoor cycling bikes and the exclusive TorqBoard, a technology that lets you follow your progress during class on a flatscreen monitor or off-premises via a private webpage so you can track yourself over time. (flywheelsports.com) —A.G.


CHIC AG O

DA L L A S

WHO:

DANIELLE MEROLLO PERSONAL SHOPPER HER FAVORITE fALL LOOKS

HOUS TON

L A S V EGA S

Lanvin

WHAT:

HUGO

“This leather and tweed dress is perfect now or in the dead of winter. The length of the sleeve is great, and it’s a truly versatile item which can be a crewneck or a turtleneck (with an added neck piece). The leather detailing makes it especially fresh.”

“A number of designers combined fabrics in chic ways this season. At Lanvin, Alber Elbaz hit it out of the park with his amazing juxtaposition of double-faced cashmere, fur and leather. The pieces can all be worn separately, of course. But why not put them together–with a pair of cool low boots, as he does here–for a strong, modern statement?”

“By unexpectedly layering a cozy cable-knit sweater over a sheer silk skirt, Michael Kors creates a look that’s fun and flirty. Yes, you can pair the sweater with skinny jeans or suede leggings, but consider channeling Kors and mixing it up—you might surprise yourself.”

Michael Kors

Danielle Merollo, Americana Manhasset’s secret weapon, is not just a personal shopper in the fashion realm. If she’s not scooping up Tom Ford and Prada for her clients (ages 7 through 80), she may be purchasing cars (Bentleys, even an antique Ferrari) and NYC apartments for them. “When a woman trusts another woman, there is trust all around,” she reasons. Merollo has been at the Long Island luxury-shopping destination for the past decade, and for her loyal following, it’s her round-the-clock service and extra attention that keeps her on speed dial. “I’ve planned four weddings,” Merollo says, “and for one of the brides, I also did her Communion dress!” Now that’s a repeat customer. —Natasha Wolff

WHAT:

NEW RESTAURANTS

WHAT:

JAGUAR’S “ALIVE” DRIVING EVENTS Jaguar’s 2012 XJ sedan

LA MARINA

Head to the upper reaches of NYC for waterfront wining and dining with unbeatable views at La Marina, a new complex along 75,000 feet of Hudson River waterfront. Modular construction splits the maritime-inspired interiors into a lounge, three riverfront bars, a beach area and a restaurant. Chef Pierre Landet, who’s worked at Michelin-rated restaurants throughout France, has created a menu that emphasizes seafood. (lamarinanyc.com) —Ariel Greene

MODERNE BARN

Armonk’s Moderne Barn is joining the locavore trend with a rooftop garden—where the harvest includes beets, radishes, spinach, eggplant and more—tended by executive chef Ethan Kostbar. “My personal belief is that great chefs need to have creative vision as well,” he says. “For me, it starts with a rooftop garden.” Pesto pizza, for example, is made using raised-bed basil, and Moderne’s lamb dish comes with a straight-from-the-sky mint milkshake. (modernebarn.com) —Lindley Pless

This October and November, Jaguar is bringing its Alive Driving Experience to Rye and Queens, NY. At these events, the venerable brand will reintroduce itself and its most popular models to gearheads. After a short briefing on just what types of tricks the vehicles can do, attendees can test-drive the brand’s newest releases alongside racing pros. (jaguarusa.com) —L.P.

LEFT TO RIGHT, TOP: IMAXTREE.COM (3). COURTESY OF AMERICANA MANHASSET (2). BOTTOM: COURTESY OF LA MARINA. COURTESY OF MODERNE BARN. COURTESY OF JAGUAR.

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Americana Manhasset in Long Island


LOS A NGE L E S

neW yorK

MI A MI

SA N F R A NCISCO

WHAT:

VeuVe clIcqUot Polo classIc lIBerty state ParK

Dree Hemingway

WHERE:

For the first time in five years, the Veuve Clicquot Polo Classic—a benefit for Work to Ride, an equestrian nonprofit for disadvantaged youth—made its way to Jersey City, where guests gathered beneath a canopy of yellow parasols for the match at Liberty State Park. Rachel Zoe threw out the ceremonial first ball while others enjoyed champagne and the traditional divot stomp. —A.G.

Jennifer Morrison, Zoë Saldana and Minka Kelly

Alek Wek and Padma Lakshmi Clive Owen and Leslie Bibb

Players on the field

000 307

Benedict Cumberbatch

Coco Rocha

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The JU-52 aircraft

WHAT:

rimowa’s Party for the jU-52 aIrcraft WhIte PlaIns aIrPort

TOP: GETTY FOR VEUVE CLICQUOT (7). BOTTOM: COURTESY OF THEO WAGNER/GETTY IMAGES (7).

WHERE:

The crowd at the Westchester County airport took a flight back in time during Rimowa’s celebration of the original Junker JU-52 aircraft’s East Coast arrival. Alessandra Ambrósio, Joe Manganiello, Chris Benz and Rimowa CEO Dieter Morszeck looped around NYC on the 1930s plane (aka the “flying suitcase”) and ended the evening with dinner (a beet trio and short ribs) and live music inside the Panorama Hangar. Also showcased was the German brand’s luggage—its corrugated duraluminum exterior matching the grooves of the classic plane. —N.W.

Women dressed as flight attendants

Alessandra Ambrósio disembarking with help from Dieter Morszeck Ambrósio with the Rimowa execs

The setting at the Panorama Hangar

Les ex evendis debita quide Joe Manganiello

A view of NYC from the plane


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LOS A NGE L E S

MI A MI

Dede Wilsey and Alexis Traina

san FranCisCo

N E W YOR K

SAN FRANCISCO Alexis Traina and Claiborne Swanson Frank

WHAT:

“Real to Real” PhotoGraPhy Exhibit thE DE younG musEum WHERE:

An actor was hired to impersonate the famous subject of Diane Arbus’ “Mrs. H” photograph.

Back row: Alec Soth, Ryan McGinley, Daniel Lefcourt; front: Cox, “Mrs. Henry,” Traina and Moore

MULBERRY storE oPEninG Party Union Square

Connie Nielsen and Jennifer Siebel Newsom

WHERE:

To celebrate its new three-story store, Mulberry hosted a party with five gorgeous and influential co-hosts: Jennifer Siebel Newsom, Connie Nielsen, Sabrina Buell, Rachael Mann and Mackenzie Burdick. In keeping with their English roots, the store’s retro-chic second-floor space showcased an exhibition of Anglo photography from the past few decades (including portraits of Kate Moss and Julie Andrews in drag!) chosen from British Vogue archives. —N.F.

Oysters from London’s J. Sheekey

DJ Zen Freeman spun Britpop.

Rachael Mann

Maggie Rizer

A vitrine with small leather goods on the mezzanine

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The Grant Avenue storefront

WHAT: TOP: ALL IMAGES CLAUDINE GOSSETT/COURTESY OF DREW ALTIZER PHOTOGRAPHY. BOTTOM: COURTESY OF MULBERRY.

Trevor Traina presented favorite images from his extensive photography collection to friends and family at reception in Golden Gate Park. His mother, Dede Wilsey, presided over Wilsey Court before going into the exhibit to view the Arbuses, Avedons and new work from artists Roe Ethridge and Ryan McGinley. The Swansons poured their own wines and opted for Napa’s Gott’s Roadside burgers and fries for casual party fare. With impromptu photo sessions and two models dressed as the infamous Arbus twins, guests felt as though they were seeing art come to life. —Nicki Richesin

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Trevor Traina and Kevin Moore

Julian Cox, Leslie Berriman and Nion McEvoy


CHIC AG O

DA L L A S

HOUS TON

L A S V EGA S The open kitchen and seating areas at Comal

WHAT:

THREE HOT RESTAuRANTS WE’RE HuNgRY WHY:

A TEMPORARY OFFERING

Don’t get too attached to the menu at the oft-changing FoodLab. The restaurant hosts rotating Bay Area chefs, part of the pop-up food/fashion/retail concept on the ground floor of the Mid-Market Renoir Hotel. Next door, Rio Grande slings cocktails and the notfor-profit Luggage Store Gallery showcases local artists and designers. (atemporaryoffering.com) —Anna Blessing

CRAFTSMAN AND WOLVES

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At pastry chef William Werner’s contemporary patisserie in the Mission, you’ll devour sweet treats and savory muffins (like “The Rebel Within”) in a wolfish gulp. Consider a box lunch (petit sandwich, house pickle, fruit and petits gâteaux) and head to Dolores Park for a picnic. (craftsman-wolves.com) —N.F.

COMAL

A selection of sweets at Craftsman and Wolves

Phish’s long-time band manager, John Paluska, has teamed up with ex–Delfina chef Matt Gandin to fire up the downtown Berkeley spot with nontraditional, feisty Mexican dishes. The Bon Vivants have even created an all-Mexican cocktail menu. (comalberkeley.com) —N.F.

WHAT:

STORES WE LOVE

CAVALIER

The towering loftlike space in the Tenderloin district showcases interior designer Jay Jeffers’ unique mix of vintage and contemporary pieces. We’re coveting his debut collection of smart tailored furniture (Kingsley and Coulter sofas and hand-embroidered ottomans), feathered skulls by Laurence Le Constant and Alex & Lee jewelry, all designed exclusively for the shop. (cavaliergoods.com)

HEATH CERAMICS

The Sausalito-based design brand converted a linen and laundry facility into a breathtaking new shop and factory featuring a gallery space, a chef’s kitchen with local foodie items and a Blue Bottle Coffee cafe. The glass factory walls give patrons the chance to see artisans at work, while the tile showroom features rotating design installations and a tile bar for planning out projects. (heathceramics.com)

LE LABO

You’ll feel as though you stepped into a high school chemistry class upon entering the new Pacific Heights apothecary, outfitted with beakers and an array of elixirs used to create fragrances. The perfume maker uses materials imported from France to concoct 12 unisex fragrances (like Bergamot 22 or Rose 31), which are produced on-site as a scent or candle. (lelabofragrances.com)

MARCH

Like a scene from a Nancy Meyers movie, March’s lightfilled interiors feature collections that will make your fantasy kitchen dreams come true. It’s not complicated when you have all manner of shining copper cookware, cutlery and bespoke butcher block tables to choose from. Stock your pantry with preserves, olive oil, vinegars and spices from its artisanal March Pantry label. (marchsf.com)

ROBERTA FREYMANN

Beloved by New Yorkers, Roberta Freymann brings her colorful designs to the Fillmore. Inside you’ll discover linen and silk tunics and dresses, in addition to a selection of accessories, like beaded clutches and pom-pom-edged scarves— all spoils from Freymann’s far-flung travels. Rumor has it she’s also slated to open a Roberta Roller Rabbit lifestyle shop in Marin County. (robertafreymann.com) —N.F.

LEFT TO RIGHT, TOP: COURTESY OF A TEMPORARY OFFERING. COURTESY OF CRAFTSMAN & WOLVES. COURTESY OF COMAL. BOTTOM: COURTESY OF CAVALIER. COURTESY OF HEATH CERAMICS. COURTESY OF LABO. COURTESY OF MARCH. COURTESY OF ROBERTA FREYMANN.

A Temporary Offering’s Rio Grande pop-up


los a nge l e s

Mi a Mi

SAN FRANCISCO

n e w yor k

WHAT:

RESTORATION HARDWARE BECAUSE IT’LL MAKE YOU HOUSE-PROUD WHY:

noT everyone has The space To hang a sTarbursT chandelier,” says Fulk. “By putting it on the floor, you don’t have to worry about ceiling height or electrifying it. To me, this piece is fun. It has a sense of humor.” Sputnik floor lamp, $595; restorationhardware.com

The Madsen sofa is pared down—The bones of whaT good design is,”

FULK: TYLER GOURLEY. FRIEDMAN: ALEX FARNUM. FURNITURE: COURTESY OF RESTORATION HARDWARE (4)

i’ve always been a fan of classic, uTiliTarian chairs,”

Fulk says, “and this color adds so much exuberance. These Hagen chairs would be wonderful around a big classic table or a small, round glass table.” $99

i love The clubby look of disTressed leaTher,”

Fulk says of the Maxime sofa: “It feels very familiar, full of character, like it’s got a story to tell. And then, in contrast to that, you have the sexy tuck-and-roll upholstery at the frame.” $3,195

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says San Francisco-based designer Ken Fulk. The dapper social butterfly has decorated homes for Silicon Valley heavyweights Mark Pincus and Jeremy Stoppelman and designed events like the Jean Paul Gaultier exhibition gala at the De Young Museum in March. The look gets extra points for versatility, too. “You can float a sofa like this between lots of interiors,” Fulk says. “And frankly, it’s terribly comfortable.” $2,995

It used to be that you needed a house in the country, or at least a floor-through loft, to purchase one of the massive leather sectionals from Restoration Hardware. The same was true of their heroically proportioned chandeliers and headboards. Well, not any more. The venerable home design company has released a collection of furniture designed for intimate rooms. Big Style/Small Spaces offers up tailored versions of Restoration classics (handsome plank tables, chesterfield sofas), as well as some fresh ideas (lean, mid-century-inspired seating, statementmaking floor lamps) that help you make the most of your space, be it a city apartment or a cottage by the sea. “We call it a collection of epic proportions,” says Gary Friedman, chairman and CEO of Restoration Hardware. Directing attention to the cover of the collection’s sourcebook, which features a climber scaling Abraham Lincoln’s nose at Mount Rushmore, Friedman adds, “And good design is all about proportions.” —Damaris Colhoun


FAMOUS LAST WORDS

Domestic Diva martha stewart BeLieves iN coNstaNt seLf-improvemeNt. we asK a haNDwritiNG eXpert: Does her script seND the same messaGe?

While Stewart’s handwriting shows some degree of repression, she sublimates her energy with her “t bar”—it’s the only time she lets herself go. This stroke shows that she’s generous, choosing to have a healthy interest in others rather than withholding herself.

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Stewart’s handwriting is that of a perfectionist— see how conscientiously her every letter is formed. Constantly aware and mindful of how things look, she writes as if she’s taking care of the reader.

She uses classic copybook script, reproducing what she was taught in grade school. This shows an allegiance to traditional values.

Stewart’s capitals are elaborate and proportionately larger than the rest of her letters. Whenever a person puts special adornment and emphasis on capitals, we can tell that first impressions are very important to her.

“A

ll my life I have tried to remain current and up-tothe-minute with all aspects of technology, social discourse, science and food,” says business mogul Martha Stewart. “The quote [above] embodies in six words what I try to live each and every day.” Whether she’s writing books, creating her own product lines or hosting a TV show, change has always defined Stewart’s career. This autumn, she is shifting

Notice the large signature. Stewart has a strong feeling for space—a small signature would have created imbalance. She’s always thinking about what is aesthetically pleasing.

gears again with a new PBS show, Martha Stewart’s Cooking School. On this weekly series, which premieres in early October, she’ll take viewers step-by-step through classic culinary techniques. The teacher role seems to come naturally to Stewart— and her penmanship bears this out. Toronto-based graphology expert Annette Poizner, a clinical social worker and the author of Clinical Graphology: An Interpretive Manual

for Mental Health Practitioners, analyzes Stewart’s handwriting and points out that people who possess the domestic guru’s “copybook”-style script always want to pass on their knowledge about the proper way to do things. Stewart’s penchant for perfectionism and her meticulous attention to detail explain a lot about her tremendous and enduring success—and also why she can consistently cook the perfect pot roast. —LINDSAY SILBERMAN


New York Boston Dallas 877 700 1922 Explore the Akris Boutique at www.akris.ch


1-800-441-4488 Hermes.com

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Christy Turlington photographed by Bruce Weber. Fashion designer Jason Wu remembers the dress that made him famous, Lena Dunham's favorite w...

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Christy Turlington photographed by Bruce Weber. Fashion designer Jason Wu remembers the dress that made him famous, Lena Dunham's favorite w...

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