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FALL 2017

PRESENTING

UMA


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FALL 2017

CONTENTS THOUGHTS DUJOUR

Letters from our Editor-in-Chief and CEO

STYLE 35

STYLE NEWS

26

MASTHEAD

28

CONTRIBUTORS

Rodarte brings us fashion on film, Roberto Coin goes wild and eco-fur takes the runway

30

DUJOUR.COM

40

BEAUTY

Your 24/7 source for the latest in style, culture and luxury

Dramatic eyes and a strong foundation, while deep dark scents send you into fall

32

44

BEHIND THE SCENES

See exclusive photos of our fashion photographers, stylists and models on set

92 Make a Power Play for Women’s Fashion

WATCHES

Historic timepieces as a status symbol

45

JEWELRY

Celestial-inspired jewels take shape

LIFE 46

A WALK AMONG GIANTS

Spot rhinos in the wild, but relax in your luxury villa back at camp in South Africa

50

THE MOVING IMAGE

A visit to legendary photographer Walter Iooss' Montauk home

52

FANTASY ISLAND

Private Hawaiian communities are a place where the rich relax

56

HI TECH

Get loud with Master Dynamic and keep quiet with Rolls-Royce

58

CANDID CULTURE

Dennis Rodman visits North Korea and comes back with some new opinions

59

THE REINVENTION OF COGNAC

The spirit is finding itself in the mixologist spotlight

From left, on Elena: Turtleneck, $695; skirt, $545, MAX MARA, 212879-6100. On Madelane: Sweater, $1,950; pant, $990, FENDI, fendi.com. Earrings in 18-karat pink gold with Mother of Pearl and diamond, $2,800, BULGARI, bulgari.com.

ON THE COVER Dress, $3,775, DOLCE & GABBANA, 877-7034872. Cento convertible diamond lace choker in 18-karat white gold, price upon request, ROBERTO COIN, Saks Fifth Avenue. Photographed by David Bellemere, Styled by Isabel Dupré.

JONAS BRESNAN

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D E S I G N P O R T R A I T.

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FALL 2017

CONTENTS

FEATURES 70

UMA THURMAN

Our cover star is about to hit Broadway BY ADRIENNE GAFFNEY PHOTOGRAPHED BY DAVID BELLEMERE STYLED BY ISABEL DUPRÉ

80

THE OBSESSION ENDURES

Calvin Klein releases his first book with his most iconic images

86

MEET ME IN MYKONOS

This Greek isle is a fall favorite BY ELENI N. GAGE PHOTOGRAPHED BY FRÉDÉRIC LAGRANGE

104 Structural menswear silhouettes

92

POWER PLAY

Wilhelmina models bring strength to fashion PHOTOGRAPHED BY JONAS BRESNAN STYLED BY AERI YUN

CULTURE 60

AN AMERICAN IN PARIS

100 DARK HORSES An unbelievable story of power and drugs set in the world of horse racing AN EXCERPT FROM MELISSA DEL BOSQUE’S BLOODLINES

An eccentric media scion is the Paris Biennale’s first American president

104 NEW HEIGHTS

62

Men’s fashion lives atop Zaha Hadid’s only residential property in New York

BOLD IS BACK

Kyle Bunting and his gorgeous hide rugs

PHOTOGRAPHED BY AMAR DAVED STYLED BY ERIC MCNEAL

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STRENGTH ON FILM

Filmmaker Maggie Betts and her female-focused feature

66

FUNNY BUSINESS

Carolines on Broadway is a laughing matter

67

BRANDON FLOWERS

The band behind "Mr. Brightside" introduces a new personage

Turtleneck, $845, STELLA MCCARTNEY, stellamccartney .com. Coat, $4,195, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI, brunellocucinelli .com. Watch, price upon request, HUBLOT, 646-582-9813.

AMAR DAVED

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BY JOSHUA GLASS


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Cellini Jewelers New York, New York

Tourneau Bryant Park New York, New York

Timeless Luxury Watches Frisco, Texas

Tourneau Time Machine New York, New York

Westime Sunset West Hollywood, California

Vagu Miami, Florida

Swiss Fine Timing Chicago, Illinois


FALL 2017

CONTENTS CITIES

62

111 South Coast Plaza turns 50, and Assouline celebrates it

112

ASPEN/DENVER

An artisanal market adds on a hotel; art bigwig Amy Phelan’s local favorites

114

CHICAGO

The Museum of Contemporary Art’s new in-house restaurant; a hotel inspired by Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity

115

Kyle Bunting and his vibrant hide rugs

DALLAS/FORT WORTH

A Tony award–winning playhouse goes Southern Gothic; Valentino and Cartier hit the mall

116

HAMPTONS

A seasonal boutique turns full-time; Cafe Clover travels east

HOUSTON

Cities: featuring Hotel Indigo in Los Angeles

Two sets of sisters launch fashion startups; a New York designer’s H-Town homecoming

119

LAS VEGAS

Sweet spots from Momofuku’s dessert doyenne; Diana Ross rocks the Wynn

120 LOS ANGELES The Obamas’ interior designer’s best bets; an all-rosé café shacks up at the Roosevelt

122 MIAMI

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An art museum debuts a new look; Christian Louboutin makes a lasting impression

Swanky safaris in South Africa

124 NEW YORK CITY Black Tap’s Lower East Side takeoever; Magnum Real Estate Group’s Orchard St. project begins

128 ORANGE COUNTY Where to find eco-friendly indulgences

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130 SAN FRANCISCO A young couturier defies convention; a photographic visionary gets a new retrospective 131

The reinvention of cognac

TRI-STATE

A modernist art installation unlike any other; David Chang’s apprentice decamps upstate

132

PARTIES

133

BINNSHOT

ARTIFACT 136 IN THE HEART Yves Saint Laurent’s runway accessory

45

Trending: Celestial jewelry

COGNAC: JEFFREY WESTBROOK

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111


25 ye ars a go we revolutionized a n industr y. We’re about to do it again.

EQ U I N OX H OT E LS SPRING 2019 H U D S O N YA R D S NYC

N E W YO R K

LOS ANGELES

S E AT T L E

HOUSTON

E Q U I N OX .C O M / H OT E L S

CHICAGO


Thoughts DuJour

T

he stage is set for a powerful and provocative fall. Be it in the worlds of fashion, art, film or travel, society is getting braver and more ambitious—in every thing from business ventures to style choices. We’ve emerged from last year’s tumultuous political season empowered, and that power is emanating on all fronts. The fall fashion we shot in Power Play hones in on the power of women to be both sexy and strong. Our cover star, Uma Thurman, exudes that same confidence, and her commanding presence will be a welcome addition to Broadway when she makes her debut in November. My first issue with DuJour brought me to many exciting places this summer. I always attend the Venice Biennale—and this year it inspired us to write about Christopher Forbes, whose upcoming takeover of the Paris Biennale is magnifiqué. In Miami, I had the pleasure to preview new exhibitions coming to The Bass, and, of course, I spent time on the East End, a highlight of which was visiting Walter Ioose’s collection of rare and notable prints. Back in New York, our team got exclusive access to Zaha Hadid’s only residential building where we shot our men’s fashion story New Heights. I would love to knock on the door of our duplex location in a few months, once the residents have moved in, to see what design elements they’ve brought to that majestic blank slate—such a unique and atypical place to call home. As summer winds turn cooler, I encourage all our readers to not shake the sand from your shoes just yet. Cheat the seasons if you can and allow yourself one last escape. Your body and mind will thank you for it. Until the holidays… ■

Renee Lucas Horan

RUG: KYLE BUNTING. ALL OTHER IMAGES: VICTORIA STEVENS

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ED LETTER


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CEO LETTER Lily James

Fendi’s Gaetano Sciuto

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Berggitte Maeser, 5W Public Relations’s Ronn Torossian, Rhonda Torossian, Jonathan Cheban, Steve Guttenberg

JFINE’s Jordan Fine

O

ne could argue that fall marks a new beginning of sorts. We’ve still got time to enjoy the summer weather, and plenty more time to enjoy the East End, but I guess you never truly shake the feeling of a fresh start come autumn. Whether it’s thanks to old habit and a new school year for the kids, or the bittersweet end to vacation with exciting promises at work ahead: fall 2017 is a promising season for us here at DuJour. But before you turn the pages of this hard-earned book, let’s reminisce over some of the exciting times we shared this past season. To properly kick off the summer, we welcomed the warm weather with open arms at our annual Memorial Day Weekend party at Gurney’s Montauk, in honor of Ray Kelly and Whispering Angel’s 10th anniversary. Guests like David and Sybil Yurman and Ray and Veronica Kelly were treated to an elevated evening of good friends, music and overdue rosé thanks to our wonderful sponsor, Whispering Angel. This marked just one of many unforgettable

Sean Connery and Douglas Elliman’s Howard Lorber

Dennis Rodman

Kate Tucker and Rüdiger Albers of Wempe

Surf Lodge’s Jayma Cardoso

weekends in the Hamptons, which never disappoint as the perfect escape from a bustling life in NYC. My Binn angels Penny and CeCe got the chance to go a little more north for their own escape—as no surprise they had the best time at Camp Robindel in New Hampshire. And my little man Oscar and I had many, many fun times together—just us boys—out East. It’s also key to mention the beautiful British belle Lily James, who was a hit as our Summer 2017 cover. As the star of the summer’s most anticipated film Baby Driver, opposite good friend to DuJour Ansel Elgort, James absolutely rocked her performance, our cover and best of all, the red carpet at the cover party. The newly opened Beauty & Essex L.A. played host to the unforgettable night, and our show-stealing sponsor Belvedere Vodka made sure to deliver on what ended up being one for the books for our team and supporters like Chris Bosh and Adrienne Williams-Bosh. The issue marked 25 years of my career in media, and it meant the world to me that the issue—along with exclusive video projects with Lenny Kravitz and Kevin Costner—has properly paid homage to what can only be described as my wildest dreams coming true. We also can’t omit the most important factor in all of this: the DuJour family. Our company continues to grow and we’re happy to have welcomed Lisa Guerra, Courtney Collyer, Luis Luquis, Catherine Gargan and our new Editor Renee Lucas Horan to the team. Paired with the fantastic new addition of Zenith Watches to our partners, DuJour’s strongest attribute—our people—continue to make me proud and as always, excited to enter this new season of what’s to come. ■

Jason Binn

Twitter/ Instagram: @jasonbinn


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CEO LETTER HANDPICKED Russell Simmons Alice Aquilino Michael Pomeranc Natasha Shumny Juventus’s Sami Khedira, Stephan Lichtsteiner, and Mario Mandeuhc

LVMH’s Anish Melwani

Adam Miller Bill Mcbeath John A. Golieb Katie Underhill Dave Warren Nicole Vecchiareilli CeCe Coffin Barbara Jones Charles Ressler James Cohen Karlee J. Crowley Dr. Matthew White

Marty Burger, Rob Vecsler and Larry Silverstein of Silverstein Properties

Douglas Elliman’s Dana DeVito

Harvey Spevak and Gary Friedman

Darren Prince Katie Kinsella Jay T. Shulman Patrick Ottomani Howard Lorber Jane Hertzmark Hudis Diane M. Ramirez Jeff T. Blau Jayma Cardoso Stewart Bain

Moet Hennessey’s Jim Clerkin

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Crissy Rea-Bain

Susan Ruiz Patton Jennifer Barre Gaetano Sciuto

Jason Binn

Harvey Spevak Katie Solomon Virginia Cademartori Jonathan Greller Nicki Berlyn Katz Rodney Williams Rob Roche Steve Sadove Jason Morrison Sean Walsh Stevan Hill Johnathan Levine Kevin Wess Susan Kangas Steve Aoki and the DuJour Team

Matthew Clarke Donald Pliner Dylan Howard

Chris Bosh

Francesca Pittaluga Frank Cooper Jim Clerkin Michael Clinton Sean Christie Pernod Ricard

Related’s Jeff Blau

Donald Pliner

Peter Webster Philip Valles

Dr. Matthew White

Medocino’s Stevan Hill, Christine Meagher

David O. Brown Elena Nabioli Ronn Torossian


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EDITOR IN CHIEF

CEO/PUBLISHER

Renee Lucas Horan

Jason Binn

ART DIRECTOR

PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR

SENIOR SALES LEADS

Alexander Wolf

Catherine Gargan

Araceli Franco Berggitte Maeser

CONTRIBUTING ARTICLES EDITOR

Adrienne Gaffney ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Samuel Anderson EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS

Rachel Barber Atalie Gimmel

SALES LEADS

Betsy Jones Christine Meagher EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

Ryan Byrne INTEGRATED SALES PLANNER

Alexandra Schwab

CONTRIBUTING COPY CHIEF

Svetlana Kitto

Maura Aleardi

INTEGRATED MARKETING DIRECTOR OF INTERGRATED MARKETING

Courtney Collyer MARKETING DESIGNER

Chelsea Hernandez

24

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

William Pelkey

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CONTRIBUTING FASHION RESEARCH ASSISTANT

DUJOUR.COM

DIRECTOR OF MEANINGFUL PARTNERSHIPS

Gaïa Jacquet-Matisse

PRODUCTION

WEB PRODUCER

IT MANAGER

Kasey Caminiti

Luis Luquis

PRINT CONSULTANT

PAPER SOURCING

Calev Print Media

The Aaron Group

CITIES REGIONAL EDITORS

Amiee White Beazley (Aspen/Denver), Carly Boers (Chicago), Holly Crawford (Houston), Holly Haber (Dallas/Fort Worth), Laura Itzkowitz (Hamptons, Tri-State), Jeremy Kinser (Los Angeles, Orange County), Rebecca Kleinman (Miami, Palm Beach), David Nash (San Francisco), Andy Wang (Las Vegas)

FINANCE FINANCE MANAGER

CONTROLLER

John Domingo

Dahlia Nussbaum

CONTRIBUTORS

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

BOARD ADVISOR

Alex John Beck, Patricia Bosworth, Cedric Buchet, Grant Cornett, Arthur Elgort, Kyoko Hamada, Henry Hargreaves, Michael Oh, Victoria Stevens, Bruce Weber, Lynn Yaeger

Stephanie Cabral-Choudri

Jonathan Greller

INTERNS

Angelika Dennis Emma Storm

GENERAL COUNSEL

John A. Golieb

DuJour (ISSN 2328-8868) is published four times a year by DuJour Media Group, LLC., 530 7th Avenue, Floor M1, NYC 10018, 646-679-1687. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. The publishers and editors are not responsible for unsolicited material and it will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication subject to DuJour magazine’s right to edit. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, photographs and drawings. Copyright © 2017 DuJour Media Group, LLC. For a subscription to DuJour magazine, go to dujour.com/free, call 800-783-4903 or email custsvc_dujour@fulcoinc.com


TOURBILLON G-SENSOR RM 36-01 SEBASTIEN LOEB

RICHARD MILLE BOUTIQUES ASPEN • BAL HARBOUR • BEVERLY HILLS • BUENOS AIRES • LAS VEGAS • MIAMI • ST. BARTH • TORONTO


CONTRIBUTORS

ISABEL DUPRÉ

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Dupré (Uma on Stage, pg. 70) is one of the most prominent fashion stylists in the industry. Her remarkable career began at ELLE, where she worked for 13 years with creative director and photographer Gilles Bensimon as style director to produce iconic covers and editorials. Her innate French style is due in part to her Parisian upbringing. She works closely with world-renowned photographers such as Ruven Afanador, Peter Lindbergh, Patrick Demarchelier, Annie Leibovitz and many more.

AMAR DAVED

Daved (New Heights, page 104) is a fashion photographer from London now living in New York. He began a career in modeling at age 17 and a few years later he decided his passion was behind the lens. He began assisting several fashion photographers in London and started shooting his own projects. He has shot for clients such as Nike, Vogue Italia and Glamour.

JOSHUA GLASS Glass is a New York–based arts and culture journalist interested in fashion and how it reflects our greater society. In his interview with Calvin Klein (The Obsession Endures, page 80) he speaks with the fashion legend about his new book out this fall, and also chatted with shoe designer Erica Pelosini about her women’s collection, Miss Leeman (In Her Shoes, pg. 41). Glass is a graduate of New York University’s film program and has held staff positions at various cultural publications such as Document Journal, Essential Homme and BlackBook magazine.


RARE AND BEAUTIFUL

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CONTRIBUTORS ERIC MCNEAL

McNeal (New Heights, page 104) is a self-proclaimed “architect” who believes fashion is about building a point of view. He has worked with Rita Ora, Solange, Erykah Badu, Jaime King, Julia Roberts, Zayn Malik, Ciara, Charli XCX and Alicia Keys. The focus of both Eric’s editorial and celebrity work is to pay attention to detail and build a solid foundation for a fresh approach to styling.

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JEFFREY WESTBROOK New York–based photographer Westbrook, who contributed to this issue’s style photography, honed his versatile approach during many years as a custom black and white printer for Annie Leibovitz, Steven Klein and other industry legends. Inspired by the works of Irving Penn and Richard Pierce, his work fuses both classic sophistication and modernism. When not in his studio, Jeffrey can be found in the woods on his dirt bike.

ELENI N. GAGE The daughter of a Greek father and a Minnesotan mother, Gage was the perfect person to explore off-season Mykonos (Take Me To Mykonos, page 86). She is the author of the novels The Ladies of Managua (partly inspired by her Nicaraguan grandmother-in-law), Other Waters, for which she researched in India, and the travel memoir North of Ithaka, about the year she spent palling around with assorted retirees in a Greek mountain village. Having worked on staff at Allure, InStyle, People and Martha Stewart Weddings, Eleni is now a freelance writer for publications ranging from Travel + Leisure to The New York Times and a contributing editor to Martha Stewart Living.

JONAS BRESNAN

Photographer Bresnan (Power Play, pg. 92) began his career at age 16 in Perth, Australia. Originally from the bushland, he quickly moved to London to pursue photography. Unable to remain in one place for very long, when Jonas is not working for publications and advertising clients, he can be found in one of the major fashion capitals or relaxing on a beach.


E AC H D R O P O F H E N N E S S Y X .O I S A N O DY S S E Y

PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY. Imported Cognac Hennessy ®, 40% Alc./Vol. (80˚). ©2017 Imported by Moët Hennessy USA, Inc., New York, NY. HENNESSY is a registered trademark.


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YOUR DAILY DOSE OF STYLE, CULTURE, LIFE ... AND MORE

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Making a Racket

Tennis great Maria Sharapova, DuJour.com’s August digital cover star, refl ects on wins and losses in her memoir Unstoppable: My Life So Far, out September 12. Top, CHRISTIAN DIOR. Coat, EMILIO PUCCI. PHOTOGRAPHED BY ERIC RAY DAVIDSON STYLED BY PETRA FLANNERY

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CALIBER RM 037

RICHARD MILLE BOUTIQUES ASPEN • BAL HARBOUR • BEVERLY HILLS • BUENOS AIRES • LAS VEGAS • MIAMI • ST. BARTH • TORONTO


BEHIND THE SCENES Bringing timeless women’s fashion to the 90°F New York streets in Power Play

Lofty Ambition

Ê FOR MORE BEHIND THE SCENES, VISIT @DUJOURMEDIA ON INSTAGRAM

Zaha Hadid’s first residential property in New York was the perfect location to explore men’s fashion in New Heights, page 104. The building marks a transformative moment for the High Line in the city’s West Chelsea neighborhood. One of (if not the) most anticipated real estate opportunities to finally open its doors this fall, 520 W 28th boasts 11 stories of just 39 exclusive units, which range in size from two-to-five-bedrooms, and in price from $4,950,000 to $50 million. It was exciting for the entire crew to have been granted such access to the building, as well as shoot in a truly jaw-dropping duplex unit—complete with a wraparound terrace that we made liberal use of throughout the story. Our model Miles helped define the easy-going vibe on the day of shooting— he even taught a few members of the photo crew how to skateboard.

Beyond the Beauty We wanted it to convey a timeless look, even if we were shooting exceptionally of-the-moment fashion. Our decision to use models all from the Wilhelmina agency, who already knew and were friendly with one another, made for an effortless chemistry on set. To achieve the look, hair stylist Yoichi Tomizawa used Moroccanoil (Moroccanoil.com) Mending Infusion, which is intended to restore elasticity and provide moisture. Given the day’s temperatures were well into the 90s, everyone was a complete trouper and we couldn’t have asked for a better crop of talent to push through.

COVER STAR CLOSE-UP Uma Thurman was the ideal choice for a seductive and sultry concept, which David Bellemere achieved perfectly. Bellemere is known for evocative, dramatic photo shoots with powerful women and he delivered on all fronts. In short order he and Uma developed a great rapport—while the Gramercy Park Hotel gave them a lived-in and textured backdrop. Stylist Isabel Dupré showcased the glamorous gem tones of fall accompanied by rich jewelry from David Yurman, Van Cleef & Arpels, Roberto Coin, JFINE and Bulgari among other houses.

Stylist Isabel Dupré selecting the finest fall fashion for cover star Uma Thurman


STYLE Serpenti Forever Bag, $2,800, BULGARI X NICHOLAS KIRKWOOD, bulgari.com

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Luxury Forever

A classic style and new vision unite PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEFFREY WESTBROOK

Italian accessory house Bulgari is partnering with luxury shoe designer Nicholas Kirkwood for a backpack, clutch and crossbody collaboration reinterpreting the classic Bulgari Serpenti Forever bag. Says Kirkwood of the partnership, “Even though we’re very different companies, we have quite a few similarities—the unexpected use of color, the quite graphic nature, the bold patterns.” Bella Hadid will star in the campaign, shot by Terry Richardson. The exclusive collection hits stores on Sept. 1. —RACHEL BARBER


STYLE

N E WS

Sister Act

The Rodarte design team make a trippy return to the screen

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Theresa (Kirsten Dunst) wears a custom black gown designed by Kate and Laura Mulleavy— one of three versions of the dress created for Woodshock.

Like fellow designer-turned-director Tom Ford’s A Single Man, the Mulleavy’s first feature, for which they also wrote the screenplay, is a quiet, visually rich character study. Shot on location seven miles north of the Mulleavys’ hometown of Berkeley, the film’s pastoral setting ref lects the sisters’ lifelong fascination with the natural landscape. “Our father studied mushrooms—he was a mycologist—and certainly the fact that he was interested in nature on a very microscopic level had a lot of inf luence on us,” says Kate (at the most recent Rodarte showing in Paris, models paraded down the runway wearing f lower crowns). But unlike A Single Man, which could have been a two-hour Tom Ford commercial, the costumes in Woodshock are a stylistic departure from Rodarte’s highly embellished glam (Theresa is often wearing a simple slip that, if you look closely, changes subtly as well). “Weirdly enough there just wasn’t an overlap [between our collections and the film],” says Kate. “If anything, it felt more separate than I would have ever expected. I really ended up compartmentalizing them.” “They may have affected one another,” adds Laura, “but we would have to have a psychoanalyst come figure that out.” In fact, the polymathic sisters’ interest in film runs as deep as their fashion sense—a creative adaptivity they owe to their academic backgrounds. “Our interests prior to fashion were based in visual and narrative storytelling,” says Kate. “We both went to UC Berkeley and I was an Art History major and Laura was an English major, and we were taking film history classes, too. You don’t walk away from those things just because you’re in clothing design.”  And yet, Laura adds, fashion and costume design proved to be psychological opposites: “For us, it was about letting go of clothes as concrete signif iers. The clothing wasn’t about what [Theresa] was exactly wearing at this time; it was an emotional ref lection.”  ■

KATE & LAURA MULLEAVY : AUTUMN DE WILDE. KIRSTEN DUNST (2): COURTESY OF A24

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n 2010’s Black Swan, the ballerina costumes, created by Rodarte’s Kate and Laura Mulleavy, were more than just couture eye candy. They were dramatic visual signifiers of Natalie Portman’s ratcheting paranoia, which peaks when she emerges onstage as the Black Swan in a jet-black tutu, white face and blood-red eyes. In Woodshock, the sisters’ trippy, understated directorial debut that follows Theresa (Kirsten Dunst), a medical marijuana dispenser in California’s Humboldt County, as she reels from her mother’s passing, there are no such showstopping theatrics. While the costumes, like those of Black Swan, do ref lect the character’s psychological journey, they do so through minute details—true to the delicate, naturalistic form of a Rodarte gown. “For one black dress Theresa wears, we had made three versions to represent three [stages] of decay,” says Kate. “If you watched it one time, you might not notice the dress is black in one scene and in the next it’s red and black, and in the next scene it’s shredded.”

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BY SAMUEL ANDERSON


PROFILE

ALL IMAGES: COURTESY OF ROBERTO COIN

A selection of pieces from Roberto Coin’s Sauvage Privé collection. The designer has taken a more avant-garde approach this season

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BY ATALIE GIMMEL

oberto Coin began his professional life in hospitality, but upon discovering the art of fine jewelry at the age of 34, he decided to mix his passions for service and fashion into one. “It was like a breath of fresh air,” Coin recalls. “Something totally new, totally different.” His knack for the creative process did indeed transform the self-proclaimed “wild” young man into a highly regarded designer, but to pay homage to the wildness which remains—in all of us, that is—the designer created the concept of his newest collection, Sauvage Privé. Born from the French word for wild, the Sauvage Privé line is one of the most avant-garde collections in the Roberto Coin universe, and portrays his vision of embodying the characteristics of the women of the future—women who want to be and wear things that are not merely expensive but unique and born from creativity. “The art of being different is in your genes because you cannot learn creativity in university. Either you’ve got it, or you haven’t got it. And it comes by being yourself,” Coin says. As the designer points out, a creative mind has the ability to identify what is beautiful. Even more, a creative mind has the ability to be privy to beauty’s evolution. As Coin observed, “The fashion of beauty is not based on price, it is based on beauty.” He continues, “You can buy something inexpensive that is more beautiful than a piece that is expensive. This is fascinating, no? It doesn’t mean that because it’s costly, it’s beautiful.” To appease the evolving taste of his clientele, and to give each client the opportunity to be unique, Coin’s collection has harnessed a new level of simplicity to best express elegance. “It is avant-garde for Roberto Coin,” the designer admits. “The design is more decisive, we’ve taken away the superf luous and it’s very distinctive. [But it defines] the elegance of the future. If I put [them] on a 17-year-old girl, her mother and her grandmother—I think all three of them could wear the same piece.” ■

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Roberto Coin’s latest collection is an avant-garde twist on the new definition o bea t

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Wild Splendor

STYLE


STYLE

N E WS

Fur on Deadline

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BY ADRIENNE GAFFNEY

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aves went through the fashion world in June when the Yoox Net-a-Por ter Group made the announcement that its stable of high-end fashion retail sites (which also include Mr. Porter and The Outnet) would no longer be carrying fur. The announcement was noteworthy because of its impact—the publicly traded company has over 2.9 million customers with net revenues of over $2.2 billion in 2016—but the sentiment is an unsurprising, and increasingly popular, one. What may have been a limiting business move a generation ago is now nearly an industry standard and, as alternative materials are increasingly making animal fabrics nearly irrelevant, there’s little to miss. Net-a-Porter wasn’t the first one to make the move. Armani declared themselves fur free in 2016 and Tommy Hilfiger dropped it in 2007. Calvin Klein made the announcement way back in 1994. But no one has been more vocal or successful in making the argument for sustainability than Stella McCartney, whose business became the first vegetarian luxury brand when she founded it in 2001. Leathers (in addition to furs, skins STELLA and feathers) have always been verboten and until recently MCCARTNEY the designer has also eschewed any leather substitutes. A/W 2017 Recent advancements in the field of alternative materials helped McCartney to create “skin-free skin,” which she unveiled in her Fall 2017 collection. What to any eye would be indistinguishable from leather or suede were actually the brand’s alter suede and alter eco nappa fabrics, which use polyester, polyurethane and vegetable oil coating. (Fur-free fur has been a longtime staple.) McCartney’s movement is growing. Piñatex, a sustainable textile created from pineapple leaves, was created by Carmen Hijosa, whose startup Ananas Anam has helped turn the fruit’s waste into a fiber that functions as a leather alternative, which brands like Puma and Camper have used for protoypes. “The fiber is sourced from the waste leaves from existing pineapple fruit farming so the raw material does not require additional land, water, fertilizer or pesticide to produce, meaning it has a much lower environmental footprint than leather, as animal agriculture

Pineapple fibers drying; Piñatex creator Carmen Hijosa examining fibers

Everlasting Blooms

Rose atelier Venus ET Fleur’s owers last all ear long At the intersection of romance and style, the bespoke rose atelier Venus ET Fleur, customizes lush, vibrant and beautiful rose arrangements for any occasion. Cut at their peak state, the Ecuadorean roses in the Eternity DE Venus line, miraculously maintain freshness for over a year without the help of sunlight, water or any other elements. Once the roses are plucked, they are bathed in a proprietary treatment and then beautifully packaged in an opulent Parisian-inspired boite. Prices range from $39 to $1499 for a grandiose arrangement, which includes about 130 roses. venusetfleur.com

A fauxleather bag from Stella McCartney’s Spring 2016 collection

is a resource-heavy industry,” Hijosa explains. “Unlike a lot of leather, particularly low-cost and low-quality leather, which uses heavy metals and toxic chemicals in the process of tanning, Piñatex does not use any harmful chemicals in production.” Designers and star t-ups like MycoWorks and the tech firm Grado Zero Espace have also been experimenting with mushroom leathers, textiles made from various elements of fungi, which produce an uncanny approximation of suede. There’s more on the horizon. Stella McCartney recently teamed with Bolt Threads, a San Francisco biotechnology firm focusing on innovative materials and this fall, the MoMA exhibit Items: Is Fashion Modern? will feature a McCartney dress made from Bolt’s spider silk, a man-made fiber created from a harvested protein. Animal materials, you’re on notice. ■

PINEAPPLE FIBERS (2): B. BANCO. STELLA MCCARTNEY: GETTY IMAGES

As the industry moves away from using real fur and leather, designers are finding wa s to ma e abrics that loo li e the real thing


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Miss Leeman will be Erica Pelosini’s first collection of her own, which she will design alongside her husband, Louis Leeman

hree years ago, when the stylist Erica Pelosini married footwear designer Louis Leeman in Capri, Italy, she had one stern r e q ue s t: t a s s e l s . He r w e dd i ng d r e s s , designed by Peter Dundas, then the creative director of Pucci, was adorned by delicate fringe cords across the lattice criss-cross neckline, while her white, lace-up pumps, made by Aquazzura’s Edgardo Osorio, furthered the fantasy, with tiny tassels carefully placed above the ankle. “I’m just obsessed with them!” Pelosini shouts over the phone today. She’s calling from a windy island nearly half-a-day away from the coast of mainland Greece. In a few hours she’d be in Mykonos for friend and fellow shoe designer Bryan Atwood’s birthday, but for now, beside the shimmering Mediterranean waters, she is adding the f inished touches to her very own collection, Miss Leeman, designed alongside her husband. Her favorite pair? A simple pair of tasseled out sandals, of course.

er a li etime o ri ate collecting and designing or men rica elosini deb ts her er first line o ootwear

PORTRAIT: MIKE ROSENTHAL

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Erica Pelosini and her husband, Louis Leeman

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BY JOSHUA GLASS

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In Her Shoes

Though the two have been working together for the past few years on Louis Leeman the brand, a line of super-luxe men’s shoes handcrafted the Italian way, the new collection marks their first, completely realized line for women after special projects with Roberto Cavalli and Mary Katrantzou in the past. The transition, however, was not so challenging for Pelosini, a self-professed shoeaddict, who owns no less than 2,000 shoes at one time and whose closest circle—largely shoe and fashion designers—have named many pieces in her honor. “My whole life I’ve always collected shoes,” she says. “I look at them as their own form of art.” It was in fact a collaboration with Katrantzou—a bowembellished slipper that appeared on the Greek designer’s Fall 2017 runway—that previewed Miss Leeman’s premiere the following day this past February in London. Revealed at Mark’s Club, a noted members-only club from the ’70s in a cozy Mayfair townhouse, the idea was to welcome life to the line as if it were a private home. Pearl-applied loafers and shiny velvet boots— which recalled ancient embroideries from the Byzantine period— were seen as bites of brunch while posh high tea was served. The designer f loated through the space perfectly outfitted, sharing thoughts of the creations, each a personal monument in some way or another. A simple black suede sandal silhouette, for instance, was enlivened by a fringe top-strap. “The right detail really makes the shape stand out,” Pelosini smiles. This first collection, which debuts in stores this fall, pulls details from the ancient cities of Costantinopole, Tyre and Antiochia, and was inspired—like much of the husband-and-wife’s life—by travel. “Louis is from Holland, I’m from Italy. Our studio is in Florence, but our home is in America. We are always on the road,” says Pelosini, who is from Greece. “There is no better inspiration than traveling. I love going to different countries and walking around, discovering—there is culture everywhere. Of course, I’m always wearing the right shoes when I do so.” ■


STYLE

Sisleÿ L’Integral Anti-Age Eye and Lip Contour Cream, $210, SISLEY, sisleyparis.com

B E AUT Y

Superhero Liner, $24, IT COSMETICS, itcosmetics.com

Eye-Conic Multi-Finish Eyeshadow Palette in Frivoluxe, $49, MARC JACOBS, sephora.com

Metalizer Eye & Lip in Platine Fusion #528, $25, DIOR, dior.com

Stop and Stare

This fall, the eyes have it. And as with autumn’s best fashion, layering is key to the season’s mesmeri in loo isley s ca eine an e ti e rich eye cream e s an rms hile a el sha o li e the ne etali er rom ior rimes lids. From there, it’s all about mixing color and te t re arc aco s alettes o er si sha es an nishes meant to e len e into hat the designer calls “the dressed eye.” flic o a elt ti liner mean hile a s e nition an is est to e ith an ltra lac len thenin mascara Troublemaker Mascara, $24, URBAN DECAY, sephora.com

Fine Lines

Just like the “no makeup makeup” trend of seasons past, fall’s decidedly more polished look requires well-maintained skin, and Korean beauty juggernaut Innisfree is finally bringing its natural, ingredient-driven skincare to the U.S. Sourced from the complex ecosystem of Jeju Island, the anti-aging orchid collection is infused with the hearty f lower extract known for its skin strengthening properties, while the brand’s bestselling green tea hyd rating ser um plumps and nourishes even the most parched complexions. Youth-Enriched Rich Cream with Orchid, $31, INNISFREE, innisfree.com EDITED BY MEG STORM

There is perhaps no greater beauty challenge than finding the right foundation shade, but bareMinerals is hoping to change that with its bespoke Made-2-Fit formula. Created in partnership with MatchCo, the innovative technology that turns a smartphone into a virtual makeup artist, users download an app and take pictures of their complexion that are analyzed to create a 100 percent custom shade (seriously, no two are the same). The personalized bottle then arrives at customers’ doorsteps in less than a week. Made-2-Fit Fresh Faced Liquid Foundation, $49, BAREMINERALS, bareminerals.com

PORTRAIT: BEN HASSETT/TRUNK ARCHIVE. ALL OTHER IMAGES: JEFFREY WESTBROOK

PERFECT MATCH


Darkest Hour

As the seasons change and the air turns crisp, intricate ouds and velvety musks provide a sophisticated dose of warmth and dimension PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEFFREY WESTBROOK

Clockwise from top: Oud Wood Intense, $304, TOM FORD, tomford .com. Révolution, $190, MAISON TRUDON, barneys .com. Hwyl, $125, AESOP, aesop.com. Velvet Haze, $230, BYREDO, byredo .com. Pachulí Kozha, $230, NISHANE, twistedlily.com.


STYLE

PROFILE

Jordan Fine at the Argyle mine in Western Australia

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Rare and Refined Diamond expert and founder of JFINE, Inc., Jordan Fine, talks some of the rarest diamonds in the world BY RACHEL BARBER

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he Argyle mine, located in remote Western Australia, has produced more than 800 million carats of rough diamonds in its over 30-year history. Out of that 800 million, only 1 percent of those diamonds have been pink. The extreme rarity of the Argyle mine’s pink diamonds have sparked a cult following among diamond collectors, and Jordan Fine is one of the select few who can get his hands on them. As founder of JFINE, Inc., a boutique diamond company specializing in the rarest colored diamonds in the world, Fine works directly with the Argyle mine to bring these exotic diamonds to clients. The discovery of this region as a diamond hotspot occurred in 1980, when a gemologist hiking through the area noticed a tiny glint atop a massive anthill. Fine recounts the coincidental tale, “[The gemologist] realized these ants were bringing diamonds up from almost the center of the earth. Since then, [Argyle] has been the largest producing diamond mine in the world.” In the years following its founding, Argyle has prided itself on ethically sourcing their diamonds. The land is home to the Gija and Mirriwung people, who have occupied the area for about 40,000 years. Fine recalls his own visit to the mine, saying, “It’s a massive area with just a handful of towns.” Argyle operates under the permission of the traditional landowners and has a deep and respectful relationship with them and the surrounding communities. “They have good relationships with them,” says Fine. “They’re very involved.” Fine recalls them performing a blessing over the group before they entered the darkness of the expansive mine. “Just to see the sheer size of it made me appreciate the diamonds a lot more and what they go through to get them out of the ground,” says Fine. Of all the colored diamonds he works with, Fine seems to have a soft spot for pink. “When you start to look at some of the jewelry, pink diamonds are so rare and so valuable, you really have to put them in a unique piece that highlights the color, so that’s really something we’ve focused heavily on,” says Fine. While gemologists know what causes other hues of diamonds, like blue or yellow, the recipe for pink remains a mystery. With the Argyle mine predicted to close in 2021, no doubt significantly impacting prices, now might just be the time to buy one of the peculiar—and beautiful—pieces for yourself. ■

The jeweler and founder of JFINE works with the rarest colored diamonds in the world


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STYLE

Dip Dye for the Divine

What’s old is new again at Hermès Despite the company’s rich history of tradition, Hermès’ revital ized approach to its iconic silk scarves is “out with the old and in with the new.” The traveling pop-up concept store Hermèsmatic aims to breathe life back into old scarves with their installations of mini-laundrettes, featuring washing machines and wallpaper in their signature orange hue, throughout select cities in the United States and abroad. The interactive animation strays far from the stuffy and gives customers the opportunity to brighten and refresh their worn Hermès scarves using a complimentary dip-dye washing technique, while also providing the opportunity to purchase one-of-a-kind scarves from their dip-dye collection in store or online. The dip-dyeing is available in upbeat colors like fuchsia pink, denim blue and jungle green. The colorful voyage began for the French fashion house in New York City and will travel to various cities across the United States before finishing in Los Angeles in November 2017. —ANGELIKA DENNIS

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Taste the Rainbow

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Etro’s new “Rainbow” collection has taken the colorful meteorological phenomenon and adapted it for this season’s go-to accessory. Each bag in the new line features Etro’s iconic gold metallic closure, a subtle homage to the brand’s logo, while keeping with the Himalayaninspired tone.

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For the Autumn/Winter 2017 season, Etro looked to the sky for inspiration

THE NEW BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB

Serena Rees takes her designs from bed-to-street by turning to the next generation for her brand’s premier collection Two decades after she founded Agent Provocateur, Serena Rees has launched Les Girls Les Boys: a line of democratic intimates and layers inspired by the same young people she hopes to empower with her premier Fall/Winter 17 collection. “Brands are pushing an unrealistic sexualized image that’s unreachable by most and makes a lot of people unhappy,” Rees says. “It’s far more sexy to be cool with who you are and to be down with

Styles range from $25 to $143 and will be available on lesgirlslesboys.com starting Sept. 1.

your friends. To me, that’s the new sexy.” Upon examining how her own children and their diverse, stylish friend group of millennials tend to live today, as they float through her house and around the world, Rees’s foray into everyday fashion for the young is a statement in making the practical more fluid, accepting and free. Without devoting time to labels, Rees has designed a breathable collection to be worn by anyone and everyone. —ATALIE GIMMEL


STYLE

WATCH E S

Buying Time

Historic timepieces are the new celebrity status symbol

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im Kardashian West broke the watch -world Internet in June when she bid $379,500 to win a Cartier Tank previously owned by Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. The revelation was a bombshell within horology circles—sellers and collectors of historically significant timepieces usually keep their trades on the down-low. But it’s a whole other game for watch-loving stars, who are anything but shy when it comes to showing off their latest acquisitions. Kardashian’s not the only one f locking to historic timepieces. Demand for vintage timepieces so outstrips supply that watchmakers are re-issuing classic collectibles. Omega even used X-ray tomography to recreate 1957 versions of the Seamaster 300, the Railmaster and the Speedmaster. But there’s a special appeal for celebrities who want to avoid showing up in a “Who Wore It Best” showdown on the red carpet. Having an iconic watch that was owned by an icon is ultra-exclusive. And stars love a good story and Hollywood pedigree. Anyone with enough connections and good timing can get their hands on a Paul Newman Rolex Daytona— a version of the Rolex Cosmograph Daytona Reference 6239 with an exotic dial that the actor wore in the 1960s. While this style of chronograph is already rare, Paul Newman’s own personal Daytona is a singularity. And it’s coming up for auction at Phillips’s first New York watch auction this October. The rarity and provenance alone makes it the most anticipated watch auction of 2017. But fueling it all might be a subconcious idea that possessing a watch associated with a famous person might buy you a bit of ref lected glory. One of the highlights of New York’s July Antique Jewelry and Watch Show was the Duchess of Windsor Wallis Simpson’s 1940s-era, platinum and pavé diamond Van Cleef and Arpels Cadenas watch. Just imagine—someone asks who you’re wearing and you’re able to answer: “The Duchess of Windsor, my dear.”

On Watch

These new timepieces are lighting up our wrists this Fall From left: Vanguard Yachting, $19,800, FRANCK MULLER, franckmuller.com. 67-02 High Jump, $120,500, RICHARD MILLE, richardmille.com. Big Bang Ferrari, $42,200, HUBLOT, hublot.com.

WANDER LUST

Louis Vuitton’s Tambour Horizon is a smart watch for the jet set There has been much handwringing about the transience of technology and whether or not spending upwards of $3K on a luxury smartwatch, which advancements could quickly make obsolete, was a good investment in the future. But sometimes luxury is the ability to say: “Who cares? Let’s live in the moment!” Louis Vuitton’s first fully-connected watch, the Tambour Horizon, recognizes that. It’s based on the Tambour, their unmistakable, drum-shaped foray into the watch world, released in 2002. Designed in France with Swiss case components, the Horizon also has Silicon Valley roots: Louis Vuitton worked with Google and Qualcomm Technologies, Inc., to develop the tech. It works wherever there is a signal and has all of the intel of a smartphone, but with a user experience specifically engineered for frequent fliers, tracking flight times, terminal and gate information, and delays. The face can be customized to feature a multitude of designs. You can further personalize your timepiece by choosing a Graphite, Monogram or Black bezel finish and selecting one or more of the 60 easily switchable strap options. (Prices range from $2,450 to $2,900.) Contemporary and connected, the Tambour Horizon brings timeless design to the tech world.

ALL IMAGES: COURTESY OF CHRISTIE’S

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BY RHONDA RICHE


J E WE LRY

STYLE

Fabergé Simple I Love You bangle with white diamonds in 18-karat rose gold, $3,250, FABERGÉ, faberge.com

Fall for the Stars

Solari planets Saturn necklace with diamonds in 18-karat gold, $9,800, DAVID YURMAN, davidyurman.com

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The Chanel Joaillerie Fil de Comète earrings worn by LilyRose Depp at the La Danseuse premiere in Paris

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History earrings, $129, SWAROVSKI, swarovski.com

Silver XL single star earring, $265, JENNIFER FISHER, jenniferfisherjewelry.com

LILY ROSE DEPP: MARC PIASECKI/GETTY IMAGES

Ziggy Ear in 18-karat yellow gold and diamonds, $10,200, EFVA ATTLING, efvaattling.com

Bangle bracelet in 18-karat white and yellow gold set with diamonds, price upon request, BUCCELLATI, buccellati.com

EDITED BY ATALIE GIMMEL

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In between summer and winter, an astronomer’s crème de la crème might very well be the compromise of autumn’s sky. Striking a balance, constellations of the preceding and following seasons shine bright and transform the sky into a sea of stars. Here, we explore the best in this season’s celestial accessories and starshaped jewels—because if you wear one, you are one.


At Thanda Safari in South Africa, rhinos are considered one of the “Big Five” animals to see. Left: an aerial view of the luxury Thanda villas

ALL IMAGES: COURTESY OF THANDA SAFARI

LIFE


A Walk Among Giants Tracking African rhinos on foot gets safari-goers up close, and quite personal, with one of the world’s most beautiful, and compromised, animals—and arms them with more than a few stories to take home

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GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

BY ALYSSA GIACOBBE

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n the northeast corner of South Africa, a few miles from the Swaziland border, I drape my “binos” around my neck, tuck my pants inside my socks, as you do—to prevent anything “foreign” from crawling up inside, of course—and prepare to embark into the bush, a city girl in search of white rhinoceroses. It’s nearing dusk, and we’re at Thanda Safari, a 35,000-acre private game reser ve in the KwaZulu-Natal province that boasts a complete set of Africa’s “Big Five”—elephant, lion, leopard, Cape buffalo, and rhino—plus nine tricked-out suites, a private villa that sleeps 10, one of South Africa’s best wine cellars and, now, the “exclusive” activity at hand: the chance to go walking with 5,000-pound rhinos. It’s a prospect as terrifying as it is thrilling. Rhinos, we are told, will charge if they feel threatened, and they can run up to 34 mph. (Usain Bolt, meanwhile, maxes out at just under 28.) Thanda was created by Swedish tech entrepreneur Dan Olofsson as a model of sustainable luxury travel, as dedicated to its conservation and research initiatives as it is to crafting an impeccable guest experience. A commitment to the socioeconomic and developmental needs of the tribal communities that surround it includes hiring guides and trackers born and raised nearby, and guests are also welcome to visit local Zulu tribal villages and schools. A threehour drive from the coastal city of Durban (though with a heli-pad on site), the camp’s tented and impeccably designed suite accommodations can be as rugged, or not, as you want: the tents are an electricity-free experience, while the suites have circular outdoor daybeds and private plunge pools (also: walls). The private villa, which comes with a full staff, including a private chef, was added with Olofsson’s own growing family of children and grandchildren in mind—the ideal option for multigenerational, multi-interest groups. Here, there’s something for every sort of safari-goer: Twice daily game drives are included in the rate but, in addition to the rhino tracking, there’s plenty else to do, including photo workshops with the resident wildlife photographer, river safaris, private bush dinners and a full-service spa. Our three guides—Barry, Daniel, and their leader, Morné, a charismatic, South African–born former exotic reptile dealer who can identify a rare bird on a tree from a few hundred yards away—work as part of Thanda’s conservation team, which exists to monitor the health and safety of the animals throughout the reserve. This includes rescuing and rehabbing the critically injured and keeping up to date on their numbers, breeding success rates and overall well-being. Morné walks with a limp following an encounter last year with a wounded rhino he was helping rescue. Was it so scary? Someone asks. “No,” he says. “It was hilarious. He really got me!” I’d been on safari before. But until I traveled to Thanda, I had never seen a rhino without a full day (or more) spent looking for them and never without the aid of binoculars. A safari on the Maasai Mara in Kenya had turned up a rare sighting of two black rhinos, and a day searching at Etosha National Park in Namibia resulted in one white and one black—black being the smaller and generally more aggressive of the two—both fairly far off in the distance. This isn’t all that unusual: throughout Africa, rhinos are among the hardest to spot of the Big Five and getting harder each year, due to a poaching epidemic that many say could wipe out the species entirely within a decade. That’s why most responsible reserves have begun monitoring their rhino populations on a daily basis. In South Africa alone, poachers kill more than 1,000 rhinos a year, driven by a demand for rhino horns for use in traditional Chinese medicine—as a cure for hangovers, impotence, and cancer—and as tokens of good luck. A single horn can command up to $300,000. Conservation project Rhinos Without Borders estimates that a rhino is killed every eight hours.


TR AVE L

THE INTENTION IS TO HAVE THE RHINO-MONITORING WORK DRIVE THE GUEST EXPERIENCE, AND NOT HAVE THE GUEST EXPERIENCE BE THE REASON FOR THE RHINO MONITORING.”

Eventually, reserves realized there might be a real benefit to inviting guests to take part in the monitoring activity, a bolster for both the tourist experience and for conservation efforts. “The opportunity to be so close to such a prehistoric creature is magical—and the chance to be an active participant in saving one of the world’s greatest species is unprecedented,” says Mark Lakin, co-founder of eco-minded luxury travel planner Epic Road. The rush is undeniable, especially since most big game safaris have, until now, kept guests confined to the Land Rover, and most fees associated with outings go right back into programs meant to help save the animals. “Tracking on foot exposes one to the habits and behaviors of animals and often provides thrilling encounters that leave one with a deep sense of respect,” says Warren Beets, Thanda’s Reserve Wildlife Manager. “This kind of experience and sense of appreciation cannot be enjoyed from the comfort of a vehicle.” While many of Thanda’s rhinos are tagged—and therefore locatable by GPS, for almost-guaranteed sightings—part of the fun is learning to rely on old-school tracking methods like spotting footprints, reading rhino dung (“It’s like wildlife email,” says Morné), and learning to notice where parts of the bush have been broken or trampled on. We’ve been driving for about 30 minutes when Morné finds some fresh rhino tracks leading into a mess of greenery undoubtedly filled with critters of all types and sizes. This, apparently, is our sweet spot. We unload from the Land Rover and form a single-file line behind him (and his rifle). Daniel is on lookout near the front of the group and Barry keeps an eye, and ear, out in the back. The guests chatter mindlessly as we whack through the brush until Morné stops short and Daniel turns with a sharp “Shhh!” “It’s very important that you walk as quietly and purposefully as possible,” says Morné. “Try not to step on anything that will crackle,” which of course is everything. “And listen to me at all times.” Most importantly, he instructs, keep your cool and don’t cry out, even if and when you see the rhino. Startling a rhino is a bad idea; discretion is key. (All of which is why most programs

want kids to be at least 13, though often as old as 16, to take part in rhino walks. Listening ears, all times.) Morné stops and points: There’s a rhino—three of them, actually—just on the other side of some bushes. We can hear them breathe (they can hear us, too, he says). It’s exciting, for sure, but also extremely nerve-wracking; I can’t help but look around to plot which tree, exactly, I will scramble up should something come charging. The guides fuel the adrenaline with exaggerated movements and wide eyes, and while they’re definitely having fun, it’s not entirely a show. Morné tells us we’re about as close as we should be but that our time is limited, and invites us one by one to stand beside him for the best view of the rhinos—who are, no joke, maybe 10 feet away—before saying, “OK. Now we get out of here, fast. Quietly! But fast.” Like at most reserves that offer rhino tracking—including Wilderness Safari’s Desert Rhino Camp in Namibia’s Damaraland region (where Prince Harry famously spent a summer working with black rhino conservation), Saruni Rhino in Kenya, the Ziwa Rhino Sanctuary in Uganda, and Edo’s Camp in the

Thanda’s camps can be as rustic or as luxurious as you choose. Tents are electricity free—or choose a villa with full staff and luxury accomodations

ALL IMAGES: COURTESY OF THANDA SAFARI

LIFE


BUSH WALKERS: CHRISTIAN SPERKA

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BUSH WALKERS: CHRISTIAN SPERKA

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Kalahari area of Botswana—Thanda’s rhino-monitoring program was already in play before management decided to bring guests along. Recording data on animals, and especially those most endangered, helps responsible parks and reserves monitor threats (human and animal), including effects of habitat management and intra-species fighting over territories or mates. But as rhino tracking on foot becomes more of a draw—and like anything special in travel and life—reserves will have to limit availability, if not demand. In Namibia, Grootberg Lodge in Damaraland has called for a managed approach to tourist participation after rhinos showed signs of distress. At Thanda, Beets says that the number of rhino-tracking experiences sold to guests “isn’t high enough to impact the animals dramatically” but that the reserve is taking steps to ensure such impact stays low. Our own trek was cut short because Morné felt the animals had become too aware of human presence, and he could sense they were starting to get agitated. In choosing a reserve, say the guys at Epic Road, it’s important to find out the credentials of its wildlife teams: Why do they run the program and is their work making an impact? “The intention is to have the rhino-monitoring work drive the guest experience, and not have the guest experience be the reason for the rhino-monitoring,” says Beets. “The whole point is to be as sensitive as possible. The best type of sighting is one in which the animal did not even know you were there!” ■


LIFE

PHOTOG R APHY

The Moving Image Inside legendary photographer Walter Iooss’ Montauk home are some of the world’s most iconic prints BY RENEE LUCAS HORAN PHOTOGRAPHS BY VICTORIA STEVENS

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e knows it’s time to categorize his collection, but legendary photographer Walter Iooss doesn’t seem too interested in doing all the paperwork and research the task would entail. He’s too concentrated on the art—the moving image and the beauty of the photograph. “I’m trying to get this more organized down here. We need a more refined list. There are over a thousand signed and dated prints over there,” he says, pointing to a section of the lower level of his house he jokingly calls his “man cave.” But it’s no cave. It’s a museum showcasing both Iooss’ own work and the work that he admires. Descend down the staircase of his Montauk home and you are greeted by a signed print of Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima by Joe Rosenthal and below that, one of Irving Penn’s nudes. On the opposite wall are several photos taken by Peter Beard—and also a photo of Beard at Studio 54. Other photographers with space on his wall include the great jazz photographer Herman Leonard, Mar y Ellen Mark, O. Winston Link, James Nachtwey, Shelby Lee Adams and Pete Turner. The list goes on to read like a who’s who in the history of photography. When Iooss and his wife Eva built this home in 1982, he was already an established music and sports photographer. They raised their two sons out east way before Montauk became a summer playground for the wealthy, but now he calls Bruce Weber, Julian Schnabel and Dick Cavett neighbors.

From sports to swimsuit and music to history, Walter Iooss is both a photographer and a collector of some of the world’s most famous imagery. Bottom left: A football game, the first photo Iooss ever took and developed.


Right: Outside Iooss’ Montauk home was the all-new Cadillac CT6 PLUG-IN. The luxury auto company had its first electric sedan on display. Below: Framed prints, negatives and collages take up the lower level of Iooss’ home

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As Iooss walks us through his collection, he modestly gazes over some of the most recognizable shots in sports history—the ones he took. Michael Jordan’s “Blue Dunk,” “The Catch” (when Joe Montana threw the touchdown pass to Dwight Clark in the 1982 Championship Game) and the famed portrait of Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier, taken in 2003. Of the thousands of assignments he’s had for Sports Illustrated, he’s shot more than 300 covers and 20 swimsuit covers. Amid the uncategorized prints and negatives, Walter shows us the first photo he ever took, at a football game in 1959, as well as his first assignment, from SI in 1961. Since then Muhammad Ali, Michael Jordan, Tiger Woods, Steffi Graf, Kelly Slater, Patrick Ewing, Derek Jeter, Kevin Garnett and Ken Griffey Jr., have all been photographed by Iooss—and the list continues to grow. Iooss lights up while talking about the recent Players Tribune party he shot at the Beverly Hills Hotel, and it becomes clear why there’s no time for him to organize his collection—he’s simply too excited by sports and photography to turn down a good invitation. “What a party that was,” he says. “It was an exhausting job, shooting for four straight hours. It was so much fun being there, we took portraits of every player we could get our hands on.” No doubt the young athletes at this party were honored to have their portrait taken by Iooss. ■


LIFE

RE AL E STATE

Fantasy Island Hawaii’s private club boom separates the rich from ... the really rich BY ALYSSA GIACOBBE

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our years ago, Edwin Lucas and his family were looking to leave Whistler, the tony British Columbia ski town where they’d spent the previous ten years. Lucas had retired in his early forties after a lucrative two decades working in finance in Asia. Regular vacationers in the islands, the family liked the resort life and the outdoors. But, well, so do lots of people. Oahu was a disaster; on Maui, he says, “We were always sitting in traffic.” That’s when he found the Big Island, and fell in love. There was no one there. Around that time, Kohanaiki, a private residence club that offered homeowners access to five-star resort-quality amenities, was just opening its doors to buyers. “A friend said, ‘Just go for the free game of golf,’” Lucas recalls. The course was spectacular, designed by starchitect Rees Jones to include sweeping, almost distracting, views of the ocean and dramatic pond pits of black volcanic rock. Beyond that, he says, “there was a lot of ‘it’s gonna be this and it’s gonna be that,’” he says. Few built buildings, barely any club infrastructure, and only the promise of the

on-call concierge and pricey clubhouse (and everything else) to come. Even so: he became the club’s investor #13. Because there was one thing the developers promised there wouldn’t be. And that was tourists. The Big Island of Hawaii is one of the state’s biggest and most geographically diverse, with 13 climate zones that travel the spectrum from active volcanos to snow-capped mountains. But it’s long been one of its least traveled, with most visitors and second homeowners opting for the five-star hotels and big named developments on Maui and Oahu instead, where the weather is reliable, the beaches are beautiful, and the shopping great. The Big Island’s rocky lava Kona coast didn’t fit with tourists’ idea of white sand beaches, there was no shopping to speak of and it was too big to walk anywhere. Those 13 climate zones resulted in unpredictable weather. It languished as a destination. It took the development of Hualalai Resort, along a stretch of then-deserted Kona coast, for anyone to take notice. Silicon Valley types had been coming here to commune with nature, and not crowds, and the area famously became a favorite hideaway for Steve Jobs. Eventually, Dell computers’ Michael Dell bought


Top: Scuba Diving at Kohanaiki. Bottom: The beachside sunset bar at Kohanaiki. Opposite page: Beachfront aerial shot at the Kohanaiki Club

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founder Bob Parsons—come in. Members-only means you know exactly who you’ll be getting, where they live, and how often you might expect to run into them. Random renters aren’t a problem, either—whereas many owners at Hualalai had been attracted by the ability to lease their places to help pay the mortgage, the sorts of people who shell out for memberships at Kukio and Kohanaiki—where buy-in starts at $150,000, and annual dues $25,000, and that’s before you even build your house—are well off enough that they don’t even care. “The idea behind Kohanaiki was to create both exclusivity and community,” says Kohanaiki general manager George Punoose. “Like an ancient Hawaiian village where you actually know who your neighbors are. In a resort atmosphere, you don’t know anyone at the pool or on the golf course. Visitors come and don’t return for four or five years—they have no stake in the place.” What makes the private community option so appealing, he says, is the fact that the resort-residence model is so broken. “When resorts try to mix private ownership along with a hotel, one side always ends up getting jaded about the other based on who and what developers are focusing on,” he says. “At first, the focus is usually on selling homes, and taking care of potential homeowners. Once homes are sold, the focus moves to the hotel side and taking care of guests.” Someone always loses. Punoose says that Kohanaiki has welcomed “quite a few” Hualalai expats who are done with the Four Seasons and come looking for something more exclusive; a place where the homeowner always comes out on top. “The homeowners are the ones who spend millions on a home,” says Punoose. “The daily guest only spends $1,000 a night.” At the Four Seasons, anyone can come and have sunset cocktails. That’ll never happen at Kohanaiki; the Kukio property, meanwhile, doesn’t even have an entrance sign. “The communities we’re talking about are very elite, and like nothing we’ve ever seen,” says Frank Schenk, a real estate agent who’s worked on the Big Island since the ’90s. “We now have some of the most expensive real estate in the world.” The current median home price along the Kona coast is now just under $3 million. Developers have also started to focus on another Hawaiian island that’s remained relatively under-trafficked: Kauai, often referred to as the most local of the major Hawaiian Islands. NFL star Drew Brees is building a home at Kukui’ula, the site of a for-

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Hualalai—he liked it that much—teamed up with the Four Seasons to manage it and turned it into one of the premier properties in the hotel group’s portfolio, a place so well done guests wanted to keep coming back. Soon, they could, with the hotel’s debut of its residences, which were an instant hit. Buyers—most of them second and third homeowners—saw it as the best of both worlds. They had the ease of owning in a managed community and the built-in pampering of a five-star resort with the smart investment of owning a piece. Similar models, including at Mauna Lani up the coast, followed. But turns out that while buyers wanted to be treated like fivestar hotel guests at home, they didn’t want to mingle with actual hotel guests. Hualalai eventually grew to some 240 guest rooms, and the private residences were available for rent as well. Which meant you never knew who you were going to get. That’s where the new breed of members’ only clubs like Kohanaiki and its neighbor Kukio—home to Wells Fargo CEO Paul Hazan and GoDaddy


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mer sugar plantation, while the in-development, $800 million Hokuala at Timbers Kauai promises 450 residences by 2018. “You’re paying more,” says Timbers Managing Director Gary Moore. “But it’s not because we’re jacking up prices. We’re building an infrastructure team. We’re curating experiences. Everything—from the moment you step foot on the island to the moment you leave—will be taken care of for you.” Which, he says, is what today’s second/third homeowner cares about most. As work gets more wired and all-consuming, time has become the most valuable commodity of all. And while younger homeowners in particular want the investment and exclusivity, but not the responsibility, of owning a second or third place, most buyers at places like Timbers and Kohanaiki aren’t first-time second homeowners. They’ve done it before; they know what a hassle it can be. Which is why other islands have started to catch on, with ultra-exclusive developments in progress on Maui at Montage Kapalua Bay and on Oahu, which will debut a $300 million waterfront complex Wai Kai in 2019. Homeowners at Kohanaiki, who include tennis pro Lindsay Davenport, golf champ Ben Crenshaw, actor Don Cheadle and plenty of hedge funders and tech entrepreneurs, will take pains to point out that shirking the resort crowd is not, necessarily, an act of snobbery. It’s less that they want to be exclusive and more that they want the freedom to be familiar. “We didn’t want to be part of a stuffy club,” says Lucas. “I didn’t want to move into a neighborhood where I didn’t know people’s names. That’s why I chose to join Kohanaiki. We’ve got the best of the best: Chefs who have worked at all the right places, former surf and golf pros. But there are no name badges, and there aren’t tons of rules. You’ll see people on the golf course playing barefoot.” (Chances are even good, he

Hole 14 at Hokuala’s Ocean Course. Above: The reception area at the Hokuala at Timbers Kauai Residences

says, it’ll be a scratch golfer.) Certainly, these aren’t your parents’ planned communities: At Kohanaiki, there’s sushi on demand, a community organic farm and brewery on site, and a $65 million clubhouse, with bowling, CrossFit, and personal scotch and cigar lockers. And it doesn’t end on-site: Punoose organizes annual member golf trips to exotic courses—Cabot Links in Nova Scotia, Bandon Dunes in Oregon—as well as couples’ trips to Australia and Dubai. “Our members live for that kind of stuff,” he says. The key to making that sort of thing work, of course, is to curate the right mix of people. And, well, socioeconomics is a powerful unifier. The developers of these clubs have essentially created the country’s most exclusive neighborhoods. “Most people who come here are world-class something-or-other,” he says. “But they leave their egos at home.” He loves impressing friends with views of the Pacific Ocean on one side and Ben Crenshaw teeing up on the other. But just as much, he loves that he can pop into the clubhouse on any given night and always find someone he’s excited to drink with. “Anyone can build a resort,” he says. “What’s more valuable is the ability to create a community.” ■

LANDSCAPE: PAUL DYER

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WE’RE CURATING EXPERIENCES. EVERYTHING— FROM THE MOMENT YOU STEP FOOT ON THE ISLAND TO THE MOMENT YOU LEAVE—WILL BE TAKEN CARE OF FOR YOU.


DON’T BE DRIVEN BY SUCCESS

BE DRIVEN TO SUCCESS

PROUDLY CHAUFFEURING VISIONARIES, LEADERS, INNOVATORS, AND DISRUPTORS FOR OVER 30 YEARS empirecls.com

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(800) 451-5466


LIFE

TECH

GET LOUD

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Gold Standard

Master & Dynamic continues to bridge the gap between tech enthusiasts and design-conscious trendsetters with their high-end headphones and audio accessories. Known for designer collaborations with powerhouses like Proenza Schouler and Bloomingdale’s, the company now debuts an audible pop of color. “While we’ve always been proud of our leather colorway selections, the re-release of the lambskin ear pads allows our customers to take their customization of their headphones one step further,” says the brand’s CEO Jonathan Levine. Last year’s first release flew off the shelves, but the accessory will be back again in mid-September.

What could be more luxurious than swiping a solid gold credit card? When Christopher Scanlon founded Aurae Lifestyle Membership program in 2015, he offered the ability to do just that. Since then, the company has inked partnerships with equally luxe collaborators—including fine jeweler Misahara and FFF Racing Team, an elite sports car club—to produce even more unique (think: exquisitely engraved and diamond-adorned) iterations of its signature product. Like most other programs of its kind, Aurae offers all of its members access to a private concierge service. It’s here where the company’s real luxuries are found, in the form of access to a calendar of global events, many of which even the most savvy of jet-setters aren’t guaranteed entry. Those lucky enough to be invited to join the Aurae Lifestyle Membership program receive a bespoke 14-karat credit card engraved with their name, signature and a design. “We want to present this as a gift from a ceremonial standpoint,” says co-founder Terrence Thomas. “We like to identify someone who’s achieved a lot and present it to them in a meaningful way … and this is all about the art and the emotion—not the points and rewards.” Elite Lifestyle members can even opt to upgrade to an 18-karat gold customizable card. The cost of membership starts at $25,000 with annual dues of $5,000 per year.

Quiet Cars

With their pin-drop-quiet cabins and meticulously designed interiors, Rolls-Royces have always been hybrids of motorcars and museums. But that line has never been blurrier than in the New Phantom, the latest model in the carmaker’s luxury f leet. The hallmark feature is The Gallery, an all-new customizable dashboard (and the company’s first change to the dashboard configuration in 100 years) that can display any work of art in its panoramic glass frame—a modern innovation inspired by 18thcentury nobility. “Miniatures were highly fashionable items of art that allowed their owners to carry images of their loved one with them wherever they travelled,” says Director of Design Giles Taylor. “I really loved the idea of taking your art with you so now our clients will be able to do the same.” Drivers can work with the Rolls-Royce team to create a custom vista, or choose from a range of default backgrounds—digitally rendered silk, wood, metal and leather surfaces. And with a virtually silent twin-turbo V12 engine, the New Phantom is a must-have addition to any car collector’s garden of earthly delights.


veryone loves the Greenbrier experience. A select few can live it.

Since 1778, The Greenbrier Resort has been a place of rest and relaxation. Now, with the addition of new homesites being offered, it can be your residence as well. To experience a lifestyle unique to those who call The Sporting Club home, schedule a private tour today.

Life As Few Know It

View new homesites by contacting 888.784.8220 or GreenbrierSportingClub.com.

Obtain the Property Report required by Federal law and read it before signing anything. No Federal Agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. This is not intended to be an offer to sell nor a solicitation of offers to buy real estate in The Greenbrier Sporting Club by residents of Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, and Oregon or in any other jurisdiction where prohibited by law. This project is registered with the New Jersey Real Estate Commission, N.J. Reg. No. 11-59-0002. This project is registered pursuant to New York State Department of Law’s simplified procedure for Homeowners Associations with a De Minimus Cooperative Interest and contained in a CPS-7 application available from the sponsor. File No. HO-00-0082. This project is registered with the Pennsylvania State Real Estate Commission, Registration No. OL-000654. Use of recreational facilities and amenities requires separate club membership.


LIFE

INTE RVIE W

Candid Culture with Dennis Rodman

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orth Korea is always a controversial subject—and so is Dennis Rodman. When the former basketball player and reality star went to visit the country on a trip sponsored by marijuana currency company potcoin.com, onlookers were left scratching their heads. DuJour sat down with Rodman immediately following his return from the country led by Kim Jong-un. We asked questions to clear some confusion, and Rodman gave us a bit of insight on what he saw in the country so shielded from our side of the world. 

How do the people of North Korea perceive you? You think you’re a famous athlete over here, well, you feel really small when you go over there. People don’t even know you. You think that you’re cool in America, that you can go anywhere and people recognize you, want your autograph and pictures. You go over there, and they just walk right past you. What was your first impression of the people of North Korea? They work very hard and they take pride in the simple things in life. Whatever their job is, they do it to the best of their ability. I’m not sure anyone there knows how to be lazy, they have a lot of focus.

The citizens there are very kind … but it’s like you’d think these people have a spell on them because all they talk about is him [Kim Jong-un.] I mean it’s insane. I am so intrigued about how they live their lives through this guy ... and he is only, like, 33, 34 years old. He is changing North Korea so much it is really becoming a 24thcentury country now — it’s more like they took down the Flintstone Age and put in the Jetsons. Out with the old, in with the new. Where do you stay when you’re there? I stay in a nice hotel … it’s been there for 200 years. I stay in the Jimmy Carter suite—it’s all marble. Has traveling around the world inf luenced your fashion? I always get ideas from what I see around the world. I just try to keep it real and throw together what I think works. What’s shopping like there? Are there recognizable brands there or do they have their own goods?  Shopping there is all their ow n brands. Ever y thing there definitely has that homemade feel. Whether it’s clothing or anything, it’s all pretty much made there.  Are you still interested in fashion and luxury or are you more interested in world culture and events?  You know me ... I like to mix fashion and luxury into world events and culture. If I can do that, then I’m onto something. ■ Dennis Rodman speaking with DuJour publisher Jason Binn about his time in North Korea

ALL IMAGES: MONICA SCHIPPER/ GETTY IMAGES

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Following his return from North Korea, Dennis Rodman gave a candid interivew to DuJour at the Roxy Hotel


SPIRITS

The Reinvention of Cognac The spirit is experiencing a grand resurgence and cocktail connoisseurs are taking notice BY WILLIAM PELKEY

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released to prepare your nose and palate for what’s to come: a complex spirit, with numerous notes—dried fruits, nuts, cacao, coffee, pepper, honey, vanilla and leather— that combine into something sublime in each sip.

Cocktail Recipe: The Sinatra Sidecar • • • • • • • • •

Superfine brown sugar Lemon wedge 2 oz D’Ussé VSOP Cognac .75 oz of Grand Marnier  2 oz freshly squeezed blood orange juice .25 07 freshly squeezed lemon juice .50 oz of simple syrup 2–3 drops of homemade orange bitters 1 bar spoon of smoked buckwheat honey

Spread your superfine brown sugar on a small plate. Rub lemon wedge around rim of chilled coupe glass. Dip top of the glass in sugar to lightly coat outside rim. Set aside. In cocktail shaker, combine D’Ussé Cognac, Grand Marnier, blood orange juice, lemon juice, simple syrup, one barspoon of smoked buckwheat honey and 2–3 dashes of bitters. Add ice and shake vigorously until well chilled, about 30 seconds. Strain into prepared coupe glass and serve.

RÉMY XO ($150) The blending of up to 400 varieties of eau-de-vie gives this cognac a complex, exciting array of aromatics that linger and open up with each successive sip. With an abundance of fruit, the smoothness and balance come forward in this very enjoyable cognac, from your first sip to your last.

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D’USSÉ XO: JEFFREY WESTBROOK. ALL OTHER IMAGES: WILLIAM PELKEY

1888 FRAPIN ($5000) This beautifully packaged cognac—presented in a gift box with a decanter and a reproduction of an 1888 pocket watch— is one which sniffing is unavoidable. When you open the watch, a special perfume is

D’USSÉ XO ($230) Made for more than 200 years at France’s renowned Chateau de Cognac by passionate cellar master Michel Casavecchia who set out to create his own legacy, D’Ussé XO—the brand’s ultra-premium expression—delivers complex, layered flavors and a smooth, balanced finish. Each batch is aged a minimum of 10 years and bottled in modern bottles designed with the “Cross of Lorraine,” a symbol used by the French resistance during World War II. 

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LOUIS XIII ($3500) One of the most recognizable of the luxury brands, this cognac’s Baccarat crystal decanter is an iconic symbol of style, taste and wealth. Elegant and smooth, with a long oaky wood flavor, it delivers layered tasting notes—figs, dates, prunes, dried apricot and vanilla— that come alive midway. Although it satisfies discerning fans of cognac, this flavor is accessible and sure to turn any neophyte into a convert in a few sips. 

HENNESSY XO ($150) The brand may be mass, but this rare high-end cognac, which Maurice Hennessy started making in 1870 for a group of friends, is anything but. It regularly tops imbibers wish lists, thanks to its smooth signature blend of fl avors— cocoa, pepper, candied fruits and myriad spices that culminate in an almost velvety fi nish.  

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n the classic Saturday Night Live skit “The Continental,” Christopher Walken portrays a suave bachelor who sits beside the fireplace in a smoking jacket, sipping cognac. The French brandy was a natural choice for SNL w riters to complete the caricature. But the stodgy stereotypes have given way to a modern reappreciation. As with bourbon, tequila and other spirits that have seen a renaissance thanks to cocktail connoisseurs and mixologists, cognac is now undergoing a welcome reinvention. Snifters are optional. Sipping is too. Adding ice? Totally acceptable, and mixers too—cognac is enlivening a variety of craft cocktails, including the rediscovered Vieux Carré and Sidecar, and is being used in lieu of gin in the French 75. Some things about the brandy named after Cognac, France, haven’t changed. All cognacs start with a base of eau-de-vie, or “water of life,” a clear brandy made from grapes, which is then twice distilled in copper pot stills and aged in French oak barrels. Except for use in cocktails, you may somtimes bypass VS (Very Special) and VSOP (Very Special Old Pale) varieties and stick to those with the XO or Extra Old designation, which have been barrel-aged a minimum of eight years. Just as with collectable spirits, cognac is also available in some great affordable drinking vintages. In addition, there are some very rare and highly sought-after labels, ones that have been aged and packaged with a very educated and discerning imbiber in mind. And with price points at well over the $1,200 mark, you can only imagine how wonderful these are in color, aroma and taste. ■

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“Lady Hamilton as Sybille of Cumes” by Elisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun. Right: The “Anthropomorphic Landscape” by Pablo Picasso.

Christopher Forbes becomes the first merican resident o a iennale in aris and brings with him an all new artistic inter retation BY SAMUEL ANDERSON

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n 1975, freshly minted Princeton grad Christopher Forbes organized an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. He was 24, and already selling ads for his father Malcolm, publisher of Forbes magazine. “I wrote a catalog instead of a regular paper for my senior thesis and the Metropolitan Museum asked if they could have it first,“ says Forbes. “I brought a lot of my clients to the opening. My father said, ‘Maybe he’s onto something.’” Now, as the first American president of La Biennale, Paris’s premier arts and antiques fair, Forbes is up to his precocious 24-year-old ways. Come September, when the sprawling show takes over Paris’s glass-domed Grand Palais, Forbes will again use his golden Rolodex as an outlet for his obsession with art history. “I spend a lot of time with people of means who are also interested in art,” he says. “So I hope to bring a few of them with checkbooks in hand to the halls of the Grand Palais.” This year is one of many firsts for La Biennale. Besides crowning Forbes president, the fair also changed its name (formerly “Biennale des Antiquaires”) and went from biennial to annual—

LADY HAMILTON: LUIS LOURENÇO. ANTHROPOMORPHIC LANDSCAPE BY PABLO PICASSO: HÉLÈNE BAILLY GALLERY. OBJET-FORCE: STUDIO FERRAZZINI BOUCHET. CHRISTOPHER FORBES: GETTY IMAGES

An American in Paris

“Objet-force” from the Democratic Republic of Congo, Kongo (19th century). Power objects were produced and used by wizards (nganga) to ward off evil spirits


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WOMAN IN TUB BY JEFF KOONS: STUDIO FERRAZZINI BOUCHET. ROSE-GOLD TIMEPIECE: DAMIEN BOQUET ART

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an effort, says managing director François Belfort, to compete with more frequent international expos. “In the ’50s, every two years was enough,” says Belfort. “But now, with some fairs happening twice a year, if you’re not changing with the rhythm, then you’re forgotten.” While some yearly fairs, like Art Basel Miami, have become as much about the after-parties as the art, don’t expect a Biennale bacchanal. “We are one of the oldest fairs, so we have an identity unto ourselves,” says Belfort. “Our identity is quite different from Art Basel.” Not that La Biennale has been without drama. Last year, a reduction in exhibition space caused an exodus of major jewelers like Cartier, Van Cleef & Arpels, and Boucheron. With his academic demeanor and moneyed relations, Forbes could be just the quarterback to navigate the fair’s momentous changes. His family has been on the frontlines of the 1% ever since B.C. Forbes, Christopher’s grandfather, founded Forbes business magazine in 1917. In 1982, B.C.’s son Malcolm originated the “Forbes 400 Richest Americans” list, and in 2000, under the tutelage of eldest grandson Steve, Forbes introduced the Global CEO Conference, a watering hole for the über-rich and an early model for today’s various and sundry leadership summits. And yet, Forbes’s idiosyncratic tastes make him somewhat of a black sheep, even within his own family. For decades he has nurtured an intense fascination with Napoleon III (his brother Steve, by comparison, collects alpha-dog Winston Churchill memorabilia). Just last year, at the behest of his wife and children, he auctioned off over 2,000 objects related to Bonaparte’s lesser-known nephew. Naturally, as grand marshal of La Biennale, Forbes’s Francophilia will be at full tilt. That weekend, he plans to bring a group of guests to Balleroy, his French chateau in Normandy. “The house is the earliest surviving work of the architect François Mansart,” Forbes says. “The Mansart roof was a tax incentive in 17 th-century France because it added an extra f loor that was technically part of the ceiling (French homes were taxed by the

number of f loors below the roof line). Architectural genius, like everything else, was inspired by a tax cut.” And while Steve may have inherited Malcolm’s seat at Forbes, as La Biennale president, Christopher will, to some degree, be the one retracing his father’s footsteps. “For years all he did was bring clients [to the chateau],” says Forbes. “When he took them on his boat, he would say, ‘CEOs think they can walk on water and they never want to prove it.’ Which is to say, they’re yours while they’re on board. And it was the same in Normandy; when they’re your guests, you get to work on them the whole weekend long.” Christopher’s unusual taste in hobbies also seems to be passed down from Malcolm, who once held the largest collection of Fabergé eggs outside the Kremlin. “The Kremlin had 10 and my father had nine and a half,” Forbes says. Malcolm also loved hot air balloons, which coincidentally, was the theme of La Biennale when Karl Lagerfeld served as interior designer in 2012. “[Christopher] is fascinated by hot air balloons because his father used to organize them at Balleroy,” says Belford. “So that’s an object that’s a link between [the fair] and the Forbes family.” But as La Biennale president, Christopher achieved something his father never did: combining his artistic and professional pursuits. “He wouldn’t have done [something like this],” says Forbes. “He was so busy doing so many other things for the business.” As Malcolm might say, if he were alive today: Maybe he’s onto something. ■

“Woman in Tub” by Jeff Koons (top), 18-carat rose-gold timepiece (top center), and “Composition” by Auguste Herbin


CULTURE

DESIG N

Bold Is Back

Kyle Bunting reveals an unexpected take on the classic hide rug

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yle Bunting did not plan on being a designer—let alone having an eponymous line of contemporary hide rugs, wall pieces and artwork. When Bunting tells the fortuitous tale of his path to design, he begins with his childhood in Dallas, Texas. Bunting’s father, a businessman working in manufacturing facilities for textile companies, liked to dabble in the creation of hide rugs and art pieces as Kyle grew up. He’d take his creations to the Fort Worth stock show, Kyle in tow, to sell to ranchers. Kyle remembers the enthusiasm that locals had for the unique creations, but at the time, never imagined following in his father’s footsteps. Bunting wouldn’t catch the design bug until years after graduating the University of Texas at Austin and moving to San Francisco. Bunting remembers, “I ended up literally waking up one night and just sort of thinking about the carpets [my father] had made and started drawing and envisioning how they could be completely changed. Maybe more contemporary, we could be using color.” These thoughts drove Bunting to jump on the next f light home to Texas, where he asked his dad for a tutorial in his craft. “He transferred the knowledge to me and gave me the business and said, ‘Here, whatever it was, you can have it.’ All the intellectual property and all of the tools, everything, which was really special.” Bunting took his very first creation to Union Street Fair in San Francisco. Since then, his pieces have appeared in luxury hotels, glossy magazines and stunning private homes across the country.

Now, Bunting will debut something completely new: a bright, surprising take on the hide rug. “We’re seeing a lot more vibrancy,” he says, “Bold is back.” And it’s back, specifically, on the floor. Bunting says the bright new shades came from interior designers’ requests for colorful styles they could add to an otherwise neutral, muted room. “I think they’re treating it as art for the floor, and I couldn’t be happier,” he remarks. This vivid collection, called Prisma, marks the second collaboration Bunting has completed with renowned New York City– based interior designer Amy Lau. A frequent client of Bunting, Lau often called in custom pieces for her clients. He remembers, “I was so enamored with some of the custom work that we were doing for her that five years ago, I asked her if she wanted to create a collection together.” A huge proponent of collaboration, Bunting f requently points out that his brand’s success wouldn’t be possible without the designers he works with and his team. “The truth, for me, is not until you’re re a l ly c ol laborat i ng with other people and feel that energ y of doing something positive together, do you really find that higher level of creative work.” ■ Designer Kyle Bunting’s contemporary and vibrant rugs

KYLE BUNTING: HAYDEN SPEARS

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BY RACHEL BARBER


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CULTURE

FILM

Strength on Film With her first eat re aggie etts has ca t red a world o orgotten women and established hersel as film s most e citing new name BY ADRIENNE GAFFNEY PHOTOGRAPHED BY VICTORIA STEVENS

E Director and screenwriter Maggie Betts debuts her feature film, Novitiate

merging directors have a tendency to stick to topics that hit close to home but with her debut feature, October’s Novitiate, director/screenwriter Maggie Betts had no hesitation about going way out of her realm. Unlike the quirky romances and accounts of 20sangst that make for so many indie-film forays, Betts’s drama is a quietly devastating period piece recounting the agonies of young women going through the punishing process of joining the nunhood in the early ’60s. Vivid and compelling, Novitiate has marked Betts as one of the most interesting new voices in film but her process of becoming a filmmaker began years before the camera started rolling. Tall and beautiful, Betts has had a charmed life. She grew up in New York City, the daughter of Roland, an investor and the chairman of Chelsea Piers, and Lois Betts. At Princeton in the late ’90s,

she studied English and nurtured her love of research. After college she lived with close friend Barbara Bush, whose father has been Roland’s best friend since they attended Yale together, in the West Village. She was known primarily in the worlds of philanthropy, through a longtime relationship with UNICEF, and fashion (Prabal Gurung is another close friend). But for years she had a desire to pursue filmmaking that went unheeded. “I was always writing scripts,” she says. “It was just a confidence thing. If you don’t really, in your heart, believe that it’s going to get made you can psych yourself out and you start losing the discipline to continue writing.” After volunteering with UNICEF in Africa, Betts began work on a documentary about maternal transmission of HIV in Zambia. It was a perfect fit in the sense that the magnitude of the subject would prevent her from ever abandoning the topic. “I knew that the issue would propel me through when I felt shaky or


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I KNEW THAT THE ISSUE WOULD PROPEL ME THROUGH WHEN I FELT SHAKY OR WOBBLY.

the self-abusive environment portrayed in Novitiate. “There was so much that was similar. We suddenly ended up in this really deep conversation about the similarities between the striving for perfection that nuns have and that of ballerinas,” Betts says. If Novitiate doesn’t come from Betts’s experience, it was certainly shaped by her background and her extremely close relationship with her parents, both of whom are avowed anti-cinephiles. “I’m a really big Terrence Malick fan and I remember being like just so obsessed with Tree of Life. I saw it six times and it was so profound and everything to me,” she recalls. “I told my parents to go see it, not thinking really and they were like are you kidding me? They’re like, you sent us to see that piece of crap?” Their perspective has been tremendously valuable to Betts, who has found that what’s celebrated within avant-garde film circles often fails to connect with audiences. “I actually create for them as an audience more than for myself. Way more,” she says. “The most interesting feedback I’ve gotten repeatedly about Novitiate is that it’s too commercial. But that’s because I wanted to make it all the things I wanted to say but accessible to as many DUJOU R .C OM

wobbly. That the importance of the issue would force me to man up and just get through this movie and make this movie and pull myself together,” she says. “I might have actually chosen a serious-issue documentary as a way to teach myself to get through the hard times in a movie.” The Carrier premiered at Tribeca Film Festival and was released in 2011. Betts followed it up in 2014 with Engram, a 25-minute short film that was her foray into screenwriting. Each project was a building block to what would eventually be Novitiate. “It takes a while when you’re a woman. It’s such a mostly male-dominated field that it took me a while to think that I could do it,” she says. “I started with a documentary and then made a short film and worked my way up to a feature, which was taking more time but I wanted to feel like I could be in control of the situation when I made a feature. That I wasn’t going to be out to sea.” While working on The Carrier, Betts, who didn’t grow up Catholic or even religious, stumbled upon a biography of Mother Teresa. The book was a love story, she realized, and the subject of Teresa’s passionate ardor was God. “It dawned on me that that’s who she was talking about and I was like, ‘Oh, my Lord!’ I did not know that women could have this kind of relationship with God. I’m a pretty passionate person but it was like my first boyfriend times ten thousand,” Betts recalls. A fanatical researcher, she was soon perusing Amazon for memoirs from former nuns, the bulk of which were written by women who’d f led the church during the post–Vatican II period from 1965 to 1975. She realized almost immediately that the subject was filled with the drama and conflict necessary to sustain a full-length film. Set at a convent, Novitiate explores the period of apprenticeship that young nuns must go through in order to become full members of the order. The cast is led by The Leftovers actress Margaret Qualley, who plays a young woman beginning to question her once-passionate love of God, and Melissa Leo, as a Mother Superior who leads a culture of deprivation and abuse. Betts felt an immediate connection with Qualley, whose mother is Andie MacDowell, when she first auditioned her via Skype. An atheist, Qualley had no personal relationship with religion but as a former ballet dancer she was very familiar with a practice that promotes an obsessive need for perfection, which lined up with

Melissa Leo’s Mother Superior berates her young adherents in Novitiate

people as possible. I listen to them and they’re ruthless.” Her attachment to her family and to her New York roots has Betts determined to remain in the city, even as it looks like Novitiate could have the impact to dramatically change her life. The film took Betts to Sundance, landed her an agent with CAA and has garnered Oscar speculation. She is currently at work cowriting a political drama for Focus Features that she will direct. Politics is not a coincidental theme, but rather a result of the presidential election forcing her to examine the impact of what she focuses on. (She’s also been pursuing a potential project related to abortion.) “Since Trump has been elected, every idea you have has to pass through this sort of test of being like even the most abstract way, is this furthering a conversation about where we are right now? It feel sort of indulgent, weirdly, if it’s not,” she says. “The things I’m working on now, they’re born of that need to talk about important things. ■


CULTURE

STAG E

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Funny Business

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Caroline Hirsch and her comedy empire compete with streaming specials today BY RACHEL WALLACE Chris Rock onstage at Carolines on Broadway Caroline and Jerry Seinfeld

Seth Meyers, Caroline and Amy Poehler

Louis CK onstage at Carolines on Broadway

JASON KEMPIN/ GETTY IMAGES. ALL OTHER IMAGES: COURTESY OF THE SUBJECT

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here’s something very intimate about stand-up comedy. One lone soul takes the stage, armed at most with a bottle of water or a beer and at the very least, a microphone and a litany of observations that they hope will fill the room with raucous laughter. The fanfare around this quirky art form has increased in recent years, with streaming powerhouse Netf lix releasing stand-up specials at a pace of one per week in 2017. But comedy—and the business behind it—is anything but new. It was back in 1982 that Caroline Hirsch, along with friends Bob Stickney and Carl Christian, left her job at nowdefunct retailer Gimbel’s and opened a Chelsea cabaret club, which quickly changed shape Adam Sandler, Colin Quinn and Caroline at Carolines into something much funnier. in Chelsea “Singers and some comedy, but not a lot,” Hirsch tells me of the first iteration of what would eventually become Carolines on Broadway in Times Square. “We dabbled; the first comedian we hired was Jay Leno and then we just decided to go full-f ledged comedy,” she says. Since the beginning, t he club ha s move d t w ic e (first to the South Street Seapor t in 1987, then later to Times Square) and has become synonymous w ith the sort of big-name star power infiltrating the business more prominently now. “As a kid, I used to watch Johnny Carson and comedians would come on and say they were performing at Mr. Kelly’s in Chicago,” she tells me. “I always remembered that so I said, ‘we’re going to find our comedian to go on David Letterman and Johnny Carson and have them say that when they’re in New York, they’re at Carolines.’” With this, and later a show on A&E called Carolines Comedy Hour, Hirsch became widely known for spotting and launching serious talent like Louis CK, Jay Leno, Chris Rock, Jerry Seinfeld, Kathy Griffin, Colin Quinn, Amy Poehler, Seth Meyers, Ellen Degeneres, Adam Sandler and Wanda Sykes, among others. “I don’t go around telling jokes,” she says so bluntly that I laugh out loud. “I have a sarcastic attitude, but I don’t tell jokes. I know what’s funny, I know what sells.” At its core comedy is an art form best enjoyed live, and come November, Hirsch will produce the New York Comedy Festival, a weeklong extravaganza of real-time laughs she began in 2004, for the 14th time. This year, headliners like Bill Maher, the Impractical Jokers, Iliza Shlesinger, Nick Offerman and more will take stages around NYC, including Madison Square Garden, Carnegie Hall and, of course, Carolines. “I’ve always had a feeling that comedy had this very outlaw kind of thing,” says Hirsch. “It was never really accepted and I always knew it was going to be. I knew way before anybody embraced it. Right now, you can’t get away from it—it’s the hottest arts medium today.” ■


M USIC

CULTURE

Brandon Flowers is The Man The Killers front man Brandon Flowers opens up abo t the band s fi h studio album, Wonderful Wonderful. BY KASEY CAMINITI

THE KILLERS: ROB LOUD/GETTY IMAGES

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him meant revisiting his past persona. “I had to go back and explore my view of masculinity from when I was 22 years old and The Killers were just taking off. It was actually pretty easy to call upon that person, which was a little scary,” he admits. That person, as Flowers has said in interviews, is more arrogant and insecure than the one he is now. He gained his bad-boy reputation when The Killers first found fame and he was especially candid about the level of his talent and the band’s quick rise to success. That changed when, in 2005, Flowers married and started a family—a subject he says he examines for the first time on Wonderful Wonderful. “I’ve always been pretty protective of my family. It’s not that I’m not anymore but I needed to give myself permission to go there,” he says. Flowers vaguely explains that his wife, Tara Mundkowsky, suffers from complex PTSD stemming from damage done in her youth. He tells me that her symptoms only recently exposed themselves, which can be common for female survivors in their thirties. “We’re just starting to understand it now,” Flowers says of the struggle. “Going into that unknown territory helped me understand and have more empathy for her.” While working so closely with his wife was emotionally taxing, Flowers says it was also a very powerful and enlightening experience. “I’d never had to run lyrics past her before or sit down and play her songs,” he says. “It helped me become more compassionate and it’s where the question of what it is to be a man came from. That’s really where [the song] ‘The Man’ came from,” he adds. So does opening up about his wife’s delicate situation mean the rocker’s more reckless, black eyeliner–wearing persona is gone for good? “I feel ‘The Man’ is like a grand entrance,” he says. “The red carpet gets rolled out for this guy and with him, arm in arm, comes the rest.” ■

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Album cover for Wonderful Wonderful from The Killers

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early 14 years after the release of their immediately anthemic first single “Mr. Brightside,” The Killers are introducing the world to another mysterious character in the form of a song title: the lead single off their forthcoming fifth album, Wonderful Wonderful, is called “The Man.” When I speak to the band’s quirky leader, Brandon Flowers, I ask if he is, in fact, the man that the song refers to. “It depends on what day of the week you talk to me,” Flowers says with a sheepish giggle. Soon after arriving on the scene in 2003, The Killers, comprised of Brandon Flowers on vocals, Ronnie Vannucci, Jr., on drums, Mark Stoermer on bass and Dave Keuning on guitar, defined a generation with songs like “Somebody Told Me” and “All These Things That I’ve Done.” The endurance of these iconic pop-rock songs, each of which garnered the band two Grammy nominations, are a testament to the band’s rock and roll legacy, but on their newest release—their first in five years—they dare to explore more raw, emotional, uncharted territory. “When you come back together after having a break, ever ybody has had new exper iences; absorbed new things and rejected things,” says Flowers, whose family plans to move from their longtime home of Las Vegas to Utah. “You’re the same four people physically but … you’re different. It can be like starting over.” Flowers reveals that starting over for


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FALL 2017

JONAS BRESNAN

Uma Thurman’s focus moves to the stage as she prepares for her Broadway debut. Women’s fashion is strong and powerful and Calvin Klein reflects on his many years in the business. Plus, men’s fashion soars to new heights atop Zaha Hadid’s only residential New York building.

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UM

On Stage


Gown, $7,290, J. MENDEL, jmendel .com. Palmyre earrings with diamonds in 18-karat white gold, price upon request; Bouton d’or bracelet with chrysoprase, onyx and diamonds in 18-karat yellow gold, $49,000, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, vancleefarpels.com. Chatelaine pave bezel ring with black onyx and diamonds, $800; PavÊflex three row bracelet with diamonds in 18-karat gold, $16,500, DAVID YURMAN davidyurman.com.


NOTICE

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YOU

THE VOICE BEFORE ANYTHING. PRECEDING HER AS SHE makes her way down the hall, the alluringly husky tone is striking, and causes you to sit up a bit straighter, while also being comfortingly familiar. When the woman herself arrives and sits down next to you, managing an impossibly impeccable all-white outfit on a sweltering day, it’s clear that her voice is part of a presence that’s remarkable in every way: enviable height, a distinct self-assuredness and a regal bearing rounding out the package. Today Uma Thurman has something to be very happy about. In November she will be making her first appearance on Broadway and she beams at the very mention of it. This is a milestone, and a considerable challenge that she’s very ready for. “I couldn’t possibly be more excited. I’m just sort of getting my head around the prep,” she says, seated on a velvet sofa on the Gramercy Park Hotel’s terrace. While official rehearsals don’t begin for two months, she’s about to begin full-time preparations and seems as energized about it as one can possibly be. The project is titled The Parisian Woman, but actually revolves around an ambitious Washingtonian, Chloe, and the lengths she goes to help her husband (played by Josh Lucas) secure a powerful position in the modern-day political landscape. Based on La Parisienne, a 19th-century French comedy by Henry Becque, it was written by House of Cards creator Beau Willimon, whose celebrated 2008 play Farragut North was based on his experience as a staffer on Howard Dean’s 2004 presidential campaign. “He’s an inspiration, actually,” Thurman says. “His writing is so sharp and so witty and funny and dry and fast and also deep and provocative.” Willimon, who also worked for Hillary Clinton and Bill Bradley, helped start the advocacy group Action Group Network in response to the 2016 election and, in Februar y, tweeted a 25-point Declaration of Resistance to the President; so it’s likely

the specter of Trump will loom large. Those overtones are something that Thurman’s hoping to move towards, not away from. “I think you have people withdrawing from the world and others who know that this is the time to pull in,” she explains. “The play goes inside the lives of people who are in this moment. Who are real human beings with relationships and agreements and marriages and feelings and conf licts. It’s a bit funny. How can it not be in this moment of time?” It’s surprising that Thurman’s thirty-year career hasn’t yet included a stop on Broadway. She’s clear to note that that’s not for any lack of interest on her part. In fact, it’s been a much focused-on career goal that she’s carefully plotted, waiting for just the right time. The moment came when she received an introduction to the Tony-winning theatrical director Pam MacKinnon, who was already at work on The Parisian Woman and was eager to have Thurman read it. “My dream was that I would find a piece of modern contemporary writing, that that would be what would come to me, and this is exactly it. From experience I knew and was always thinking that I wouldn’t go and do a play without a superb per for ma nce d irec t or,” she rec a lls. She loved it immediately and began appearing in table reads for investors with the hopes of being able to bring it to Broadway. The time is right for a new challenge. In prior years, finding the time to even see a Broadway show was difficult. Her oldest child, daughter Maya Thurman-Hawke, a model and student at Julliard, is 19 years old, son Levon Roan Thurman-Hawke is 15 and Luna, Thurman’s daughter with former fiancé Arpad Busson, just turned five. “I’m finding myself a little freed up,” she says. “Twenty years of having a child somewhere in the super neediest ages has its blessings and its challenges to your time; but I think I’ll be able to get out more in the future.”

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“SOMETIMES YOU GET EVERYTHING: THE PART IS PERFECT, YOU LOVE THE OTHER ACTORS, YOU LOVE THE DIRECTOR, THE SCRIPT IS BRILLIANT. SOMETIMES IT’S NOT NECCESSARILY SO OBVIOUS.”

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“THE PLAY GOES INSIDE THE LIVES OF PEOPLE WHO ARE IN THIS MOMENT AND ALSO ARE REAL HUMAN BEINGS WITH RELATIONSHIPS AND AGREEMENTS AND MARRIAGES AND FEELINGS AND CONFLICTS. IT’S A BIT FUNNY. HOW CAN IT NOT BE IN THIS MOMENT OF TIME?”

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brutal. It’s about brutality; sad, twisted humor that’s also tragic and horrifying.” That thought leads her to admit to her conf licted emotions regarding violence in entertainment. “I myself don’t really like violence but I have made some films that have violence and violence is in the world and it’s part of a lot of great artists’ work,” she admits. “I don’t like it in the world and I don’t really enjoy it in art. I don’t find it enjoyable. I’m not the kind of person who wants to go see people get shot up for fun but it has its place in the arts.” It’s an opinion that might seem incompatible with a body of work that’s been heavy on violent imagery, but also a refreshingly candid insight into some of the compromises inherent in a Hollywood career. A step in a different direction is October’s War With Grandpa, a family movie that reunites Thurman with Robert De Niro (the titular Grandpa), her co-star in 1993’s Mad Dog and Glory. It’s not typical Uma fare. “I’ve never made a movie quite as sweet as that,” she says. But her comedic ability, though cited less often than her dramatic work, is something she’s always valued. “I like comedy. I have an attraction to comedy. It’s wonderful to break it up. It can also very difficult because it’s very harrowing. It’s either going to be really bad or funny.” What’s even more harrowing to Thurman in this moment is readying herself for center stage. She’s well aware of the physical and emotional toll that eight shows a week has on a person and isn’t taking it lightly. “It’s so much work. I’m scared. I feel like I’m at the base of a very steep incline,” she says. “It’s going to be challenging beyond words. I’m going to do just about whatever I can.” There’s no doubt that she will and that the results will be sublime. ■

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Palmyre earrings with diamonds in 18-karat white gold, price upon request, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, vancleefarpels .com. Bralette, $225, ARAKS, araks.com. Shirt, $1,775, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI, 212-334-1010.

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Thurman, now 47, has been actively working since she was a teen, appearing on the cover of British Vogue at age 15 and leaving the Massachusetts boarding school Northfield Mount Hermon for New York’s Professional Children’s School. By 19 her CV included four films, among them The Adventures of Baron Munchausen and Dangerous Liaisons. Early on she began working with iconic directors: Stephen Frears, Ted Demme and Quentin Tarantino, a longtime collaborator who cast her in Pulp Fiction and Kill Bill. To this day, the ability to work with a director she loves is one of the top things that draws her to a project, even ones she might not otherwise have considered. “I think as a teenager starting out in the time where auteur filmmakers were the king of the cinema, I was very impacted by that,” she says. “Sometimes you get everything: the part is perfect, there’s a lot for you to do, you love the other actors, you love the director, the script is brilliant. Sometimes it’s not necessarily so obvious but you love that director’s work and so you put yourself in their hands.” One example is Lars von Trier’s upcoming The House That Jack Built, a graphic look at the life of a serial killer (Matt Dillon), in which Thurman plays a murder victim. The script has been called shockingly violent, even by the standards of boundarypushing von Trier. (The director has said it was so off-putting that even actors eager to work with him passed on it.) The disturbing subject matter was difficult to tackle and Thurman admits it’s not likely she’d have taken the role were it not for the involvement of von Trier, who directed her in the film Nymphomaniac. “It’s a very difficult script. It’s really out of love for him and support for him as an artist that I would be like oh, God, okay, we’ll try it. He liked to tease that I was obviously illiterate because I would have to be crazy to be in the movie. Fair enough,” she says. “It’s savage. It’s


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78 FA L L 2017 Gown, $4,990, TOM FORD, tomford.com. Socrate earrings with diamonds in 18-karat white gold, $65,500; Bouton d’or ring with diamonds in 18-karat white and rose gold, $20,500, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, vancleefarpels.com. Hair: Marco Santini using Kerastase Paris L’Incroyable Crème. Makeup: Asami Matsuda using Dior Addict @ Artlist NY. Location: Gramercy Park Hotel.


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THE

OBSESSION ENDURES

CALVIN KLEIN REVISITS FOUR DECADES OF PERSONALITY AND PROVOCATION FOR HIS FIRSTEVER BOOK, PREVIEWED HERE IN THESE EXCLUSIVE PHOTOGRAPHS. BY JOSHUA GLASS

KATE MOSS, 1993 PHOTOGRAPHED BY MARIO SORRENTI


OPPOSITE

ANA DRUMMOND, JENS-PETER ARVID JOHNSTON, ROD ROWLAND, LISA MARIE SMITH & JOSIE BORAIN, 1986 PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRUCE WEBER BELOW

MAGINE THAT YOUR MOST MEANINGFUL POSSESSIONS WERE TO BE

collected and set aside for storage in a sole space. What would you send off into history? Would there be photos of loved ones? Perhaps an antique painting, mysterious in value as much as it is in origin? For Calvin Klein the man, such a place does exist, and it’s replete with photography, clothes and stories. Lots and lots of stories. Established in 1968, the same year as his eponymous fashion label—then still a small coat shop based out of Manhattan’s York Hotel—Klein’s archives span two rooms today. The first of which is a historical library of sorts—printed books, raw images and visual accoutrements—while the other holds garments from nearly every fashion collection created by the designer. Attached to them are Polaroids, taken backstage, from each item’s runway debut, along with the date of the show and team members from the season. “I saw my whole life in front of me,” Klein says, reimagining the space. It is there where he has spent the last few years, quietly yet thoroughly reliving each and every memory for Calvin Klein the tome—the first monograph from the seminal designer, available this October through Rizzoli. At over 400 pages the book is behemoth, and loses the chronology of the standing archives to weave together decades, ideas and emotions in striking editorial. A barebottomed Kate Moss, whom President Bill Clinton condemned so many years ago for her work with Mario Sorrenti for the brand, is seen pages away from a shadowed Nathalie Gabrielle and Rick Arango f lying through the air in mid-embrace, lensed by Bruce Weber half a decade earlier. The blending effect is one of timelessness, something that the designer says was necessary to make the portfolio, which spans three to four decades, still relevant today. “I had to go through 40,000 images all over again,” says Klein, who edited the photography himself the first time. “Thirty years ago I would have Si Newhouse [Jr.] on the phone screaming at me, telling me I’d be thrown off the newsstands in Florida because they were too risqué. I’d tell him, ‘You have to have courage. You have to have courage!’ I realized that they didn’t look dated. Today, they still hold up, which is a key thing. I wouldn’t have made the book otherwise. The only difference is back then we didn’t have the power of the Internet. Still, I managed to create an impact around the world.” Divided into three chapters, the volume considers K lein’s most compelling moments, from the creation of his fashion house to his retirement from it in the early aughts. There are the obligatory names, such as Brooke Shields, whose 1981 “Nothing comes between me and my Calvins” campaign defined not only her career but the spirit of the time, and the many collaborators—iconic photographers such as Irving Penn, Richard Avedon and Patrick Demarchelier. There are also instances of ref lection as we’re offered a rare glimpse at the softer side of the agitator, what noted art director Fabien Baron, who collaborated with Klein for many years and on the book, offers as “the other Calvin Klein.” There’s an homage to Kelly Klein, his wife and creative partner for decades, whose fingerprint can be seen on nearly every campaign and collection under the brand, including Eternity, the scent about the two falling in love; as well as the Baron Nicolas de Gunzburg, a pioneering Vogue editor that closely mentored the designer throughout his early career. “He had an eye and taste unlike any other,” Klein remembers. “Every season I’d preview the collection to Niki, and after we’d go to Bill’s on 40th street, a writer’s hangout. He’d sit down, take a deep breath, and tell me, ‘Now tell me, Calvin, what’s wrong?’ Niki was brutally honest, but he taught me to follow my gut—to always remain true to myself.” A designer lauded for modernity and incitement, Klein says he is ultimately not someone that likes to look backward and, because of that, the process of writing the book was even more challenging. “I live in the present,” he expounds, “and plan ahead.” Still, with introspection comes sentimental hindsight. “More than half of my life sits with the archives and in this book now,” says Klein. “I don’t get emotional very often, but it is very emotional. That is the only way to describe it.” ■

CALVIN KLEIN, 1984 PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRUCE WEBER


OPPOSITE

SASHA MITCHELL, 1985 PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRUCE WEBER BELOW

MARIE LINDFORS, 1983 PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRUCE WEBER

“THIRTY YEARS AGO I WOULD HAVE SI NEWHOUSE [JR.] ON THE PHONE SCREAMING AT ME, TELLING ME I’D BE THROWN OFF THE NEWSSTANDS IN FLORIDA BECAUSE THEY WERE TOO RISQUÉ. I’D TELL HIM, ‘YOU HAVE TO HAVE COURAGE. YOU HAVE TO HAVE COURAGE!’


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View of Mykonos from a room at the Belvedere Hotel. Opposite: View near Agios Sostis

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MEET ME IN M Y K O N O S You’ll see endless pictures of your friends loving the summer life in Mykonos, but to experience it in all its glamour, wait until the Autumn BY

ELENI N. GAGE! PHOTOGRAPHED BY FRÉDÉRIC LAGRANGE AS A GREEK-AMERICAN TRAVEL WRITER WHO LIVED IN Athens as a child and returns to the country every year, I’m constantly asked for advice about visiting Greece. But what always seems to intrigue Americans most is Mykonos, the site of all those postcards of whitewashed churches with blue domes, and paparazzi shots of celebrities sunbathing on a yacht or frolicking in the apothecary-blue sea. My advice is always: “You should absolutely go. And you should do it in the fall.” It’s hardly a secret that Mykonos, like many other welltrafficked locales, truly shines in September and October, when the crowds have gone back to work and school but the weather is

still warm. The beaches are more peaceful, the streets more serene and everything from the best hotel on the island to the hottest table in town is more affordable and accessible. But traveling to Mykonos in the fall is the kind of thing everyone knows they should do, and few manage to achieve, because the kids are in school, or work gets busy, or, well, everyone goes in the summer, don’t they? Not if they can go in autumn. Spending September on Mykonos feels like getting to extend your summer vacation after everyone else has gone back to class and, with some of the background noise removed, offers the


chance to actually engage with the vibrant local scene. The weather is in the 80s, and the open-air cinema, Cine Manto, shows Hollywood hits al fresco through the end of the month, so you can indulge in the beloved Greek summer pastime of eating souvlaki, drinking local wine, and watching movies under the stars. (The theater then runs a program of documentaries for the first week in October, before closing for the winter.) I know what you’re thinking—what about the beaches, and the beach clubs? Will I be able to swim in the sea, lie on the shore and dance on the sand, like everyone who’s been popping up in my Instagram feed all summer? Absolutely. And it will be fabulous. In September, the water temperature is in the mid-70s, and while the coasts are less crowded (which means you won’t have to reserve a deck chair a day ahead on see-and-be-seen Psarou beach), Scorpios beach club on Paraga beach grooves on all month, hosting DJs and what they describe as “communal happenings” including yoga, meditation and “sunset rituals” (read: dance parties). My favorite beach is the idyllic, desert island–like Agios Sostis, which has no lounge chairs or umbrellas, much less DJs or beach clubs; nothing but a monastery at the top of the hill, and Kiki’s, a taverna halfway up that has no stove, only a refrigerated case for the salads and an open-air grill for the fish and meats. Kiki’s serves lunch into October, weather permitting—and you might be the only customers there, as opposed to having to stand

in line behind the bikini-clad vacationers who have their yachts tied up below in summer. Even though there won’t be a wait, before lunch you should, without fail, scamper down the hill to jump in the blue-green ocean; October is still warm enough to swim most days, as temperatures dip into the 70s and sea temps into the high 60s. Diving lessons may be harder to come by, but water sports aside, virtually all of your Myconian must-sees can be enjoyed in autumn. Take, for example, the sacred island of Delos, a satellite isle off the coast of Mykonos that is said to be where Apollo and Artemis were born, and which is now a massive archaeological site encompassing Doric temples, a Hellenistic agora, Roman mosaics and what many consider to be the world’s oldest known synagogue. It’s open year-round, except for Mondays, so you can spend the morning sailing across the Aegean, then climb Mount Kynthos for the best view over the ruins of several civilizations and across the sea to Mykonos. In Little Venice, the seaside neighborhood that is one of the best places on earth to watch the sunset, cocktail spot Veranda Bar is open through October. Sit on the balcony and watch the sun dip into the ocean and stain the windmills across the bay pink (these views are the stuff of legend), or, if you come later in the season, when Veranda is closed, go to the neighboring spot Rhapsody, and sit on their balcony, watching the waves crash against the wall below as a large boat passes, or, if you’re already

Th e b e a ch e s a re m o re p e a cef ul , th e s tre et s m o re se re n e a n d eve r y th in g f ro m th e b e s t h ote l o n th e isl a n d to th e h ot te s t t a b l e in town is m o re a cce s sib l e .

Hotels, restaurants and clubs are at high season during the summer. Our expert says wait until fall for travel to Mykonos to experience it like a local. Left: a Greek salad specific to the island. Right: View at Parenthesis Villa


The Mykonos windmills (Kato Mili) are a quintessential feature of island’s landscape. Left: one of the many idyllic places to relax at the pool at the Belvedere Hotel

several days into your Mykonos mood, leaning forward to try and catch some of the spray. From there, it’s an easy walk to dinner, whether you want to go gluten-free on the seafront at Nice n Easy (open through early November), dance on tables at Sea Satin Market or follow the locals to what might just be the island’s best meatballs at To Maereio (open year-round). Part of the reason that the walk is just so pleasant is that the crush of tourists, both those staying on the island and those disgorged into town from cruise ships stopping in the harbor, decreases dramatically come September. You’ll no longer have to dodge the same people you might have bumped into at the Whole Foods at home as you wander the twisting alleys of Mykonos Town (also called Chora). Instead, you may stumble across one of the pelicans that are the mascots of the island. Without the crowds, Mykonos Town is a delight at any time of day; be it at dusk, when the candles inside one of the town’s many little chapels are all aglow, or in the early morning, when the fishermen and vegetable sellers hawk their wares in the open-air markets next to the picturesque waterfront chapel of St. Nikolaos. You don’t need to understand Greek to enjoy watching them trade insults and anecdotes with each other, rubbing their luxuriant moustaches when they get in a particularly good dig, while old ladies from town and chefs from yachts docked nearby manhandle the produce. There’s so much to see in Mykonos Town beyond the crashing waves and the roaming pelicans, from the high-end boutiques of Matogianni Street (check out the made-in-Greece label Ergon) to bakeries selling amygdalota, the local almond cookies, to museums carved out of old mansions (the Archaeological Museum is open daily except Mondays all year). In order to make the most of it, stay in or within walking distance of Chora—my favorite place to do so is the Belvedere, a luxury boutique hotel open yearround in the quiet neighborhood near the art school. (And if you prefer sea views to whitewashed roofs, Villas of Distinction offers

expansive private villas for rent through November and, in some cases, into December.) Once the tourists taper off, it’s easier to dive into the life of the island: the days get slightly shorter, and you don’t feel compelled to spend all of each one at the beach. On September 23, there’s the Mykonos Run, 5- or 10K road races which are an incredible way to get to know the surroundings. The wine harvest goes all month long—you can join in the grape-stomping at Vioma Vineyard. And October 28th brings the national holiday of Oxi Day, when there’s a parade and dancing on the waterfront to commemorate the date in 1940 when the Greek prime minister, Metaxas, was asked by Mussolini to surrender to the invading Italians during World War II, and answered, “Oxi,” or “No!” When I think of Mykonos, I always remember when my daughter was three, and we stopped at a shop in Chora for a bottle of water. When the shopkeepers held a shell up to her ear, she was amazed to discover that she could hear the ocean as clearly as when we’d made sand castles on Agios Sostis beach earlier that day. Coming to Mykonos in fall is like holding a shell up to your ear—it suddenly becomes easy to cut through the background noise and tap into the essence of the island. Just be warned that when you do, you may start looking for any excuse to visit year-round. Spring is amazing, too, what with the wildflowers and all the pageantry of Orthodox Easter (which falls on April 8th in 2018). But who can wait that long? Surely there’s something unmissable going on next week ... ■


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Power Play

Women’s fashion this fall is powerful, sexy, bold and confident. These Wilhelmina models stand strong to show style for the assertive and assured PHOTOGRAPHED BY

JONAS BRESNAN! STYLED BY AERI YUN


From left, on Elena: Dress, $2,295, BRANDON MAXWELL, Neiman Marcus. On Yada: Blazer, $2,450, VERSACE, 888-7217219. Shirt, $990, THE ROW, 212-755-2017. Opposite; From left, on Lauren: Dress, $2,290, NINA RICCI, ninaricci.com. Belt, $250, NINA RICCI, 212-288-2621. Shoe, $1,350, FENDI, fendi.com. Ring in 12-karat gold vermeil, $200, EDDIE BORGO, eddieborgo. com. Bracelet in 18-karat gold, $3,900, DAVID YURMAN, davidyurman.com. On Roosmarijn: Turtleneck, $695; pant, $745, MAX MARA, 212-879-6100. Shoe, $1,025, VERSACE, 888-7217219. Ring in 18-karat pink gold with black ceramic and diamond, $5,000, BULGARI, bulgari.com. On Elena: Turtleneck, $695; skirt, $545, MAX MARA, 212-879-6100. Shoe, $1,490, MONSE, shopbop.com. On Madelane: Sweater, $1,950; pant, $990, FENDI, fendi .com. Shoe, $2,395, ROGER VIVIER, rogervivier.com. Earrings in 18-karat pink gold with Mother of Pearl and diamond, $2,800, BULGARI, bulgari.com. On Yada: Top, $410, SELFPORTRAIT, self-portrait studio.com. Pant, $455, THEORY, theory.com. Shoe, $520, MAX MARA, 212-8796100. Earrings in 18-karat gold with diamonds, $3,500, DAVID YURMAN, davidyurman.com.


Dress, $3,950; bracelet, $625, PROENZA SCHOULER, proenzaschouler .com. Opposite; From Left, On Elena: Dress, $1,080, SONIA RYKIEL, 212-3963060. On Madelane: Bodysuit, $990, NINA RICCI, Barney’s. Skirt, $850, NINA RICCI, Bergdorf Goodman. On Lauren: Dress, $2,945, BARBARA BUI, barbarabui .com. Shoe, $1,750, SERGIO ROSSI, sergiorossi.com.


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Above, from left, on Elena: Jacket, vest, pant, belt, price upon request, LOUIS VUITTON, 866-884-8866. On Madelane: Blazer, $695, TIBI, tibi.com. Pant, $1,590, ISABEL MARANT, isabelmarant.com. Necklace in 12-karat gold and sterling silver vermeil with jet enamel, $385, EDDIE BORGO, eddieborgo.com. Above, right: Skirt, $1,900, DION LEE, dionlee.com. Shoe, $1,150, GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI, giuseppezanotti.com. Right: Blazer, $2,395; vest, $845; pant, $845; top, $975, DOLCE & GABBANA, 877-703-4872. Opposite: Top, $3,400, CÉLINE, 212-535-3703. Earring in 18-karat pink gold, $4,250, BULGARI, bulgari.com.


From left, on Lauren: Hoodie, $975, VERSACE, 888-721-7219. Skirt, $1,900, DION LEE, dionlee.com. Shoe, $1,150, GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI, giuseppezanotti.com. On Yada: Blazer, $1,485, BARBARA BUI, barbarabui. com. Pant, $675, VERSACE, 888-721-7219. Shoe, $1,395, ROGER VIVIER, rogervivier.com. Opposite: Turtleneck, $695; skirt, $545, MAX MARA, 212879-6100. Bracelet in 18-karat pink gold with black ceramic, $5,850, BULGARI, bulgari.com. Hair: Yoichi Tomizawa using Moroccan oil at Art Department. Makeup: Christopher Ardoff using Armani for Art Department. Models: Elena Bartells, Lauren Taylor, Madelane De Jesus, Roosmarijn De Kok and Yada Villaret at Wilhelmina.


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In 2009, nascent drug lord Miguel Treviño, a force in Mexico’s Zetas cartel, set his sights on horse racing as a way to convey his wealth and status— and launder money into the United States. In her new book Bloodlines: The True Story of a Drug Cartel, the FBI and the Battle for a Horse-Racing Dynasty investigative journalist MELISSA DEL BOSQUE covers an unbelievable story of drugs, power and eventual downfall set within the world of race tracks. The book is out this month from Ecco, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

HORSES


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known who was the true owner of the horse. “We’re going to win,” said Omar. “If I win what?” Villarreal said. The radio connection on his Nextel was beginning to break up. “… We’re going to win. You will see.” Miguel’s rise to power had been an unlikely one. He had no political connections, and he came from a poor neighborhood on the margins of Nuevo Laredo. But he was a man of his time, very much shaped by Mexico’s past. And as the Gulf Cartel and the Zetas were on the brink of war in late 2009, he was posed to attain even greater power. In many ways, politics had paved the way for Miguel’s ascension. Over several decades, the semi-authoritarian Partido Revolucionario Institucional, or PRI, had ruled Mexico, and its leaders had amassed their wealth through plato o plomo, bribery or threats, co-opting anyone who challenged their power monopoly and allowing cronyism and corruption to flourish. As the illicit drug economy grew in Mexico, eventually generating as much as $25 billion or more annually, the PRI’s leaders divided the country among the handful of organizations, including the Gulf and Sinaloa cartels. Generals, law enforcement, and politicians took a cut from the cartels that worked the divided territories, and in return they let them run their trafficking business without interruption. As part of the arrangement, cartel leaders pledged to keep the violence among themselves and not to call undue attention to their growing illicit empires. With 90 percent of the cocaine and 70 percent of the methamphetamines and heroin consumed in the United States—the biggest drug market in the world—either produced or passing through Mexico, it was a pragmatic plan of accommodation that also made the political elite extremely wealthy. But by 2000, the old arrangements, already frayed, started to unravel after the PRI lost its bid for the presidency for the first time in more than seventy years. The new president, Vicente Fox, a former Coca-Cola executive, and his opposing political party, the Partido Acción Nacional, or PAN, promised to make the country less corrupt and more democratic. “Mexico doesn’t deserve what has happened to us. A democratic change is urgent,” he proclaimed. It was a message that Mexicans had been waiting to hear since the revolution, but it was already too late. The cartels had become too powerful, and the rule of law too weak. As the old arrangements with the PRI fell away under President Fox, the cartels saw an opening. They began to further exert control over their terr itor ies. Heav ily armed and well f inanced, they wouldn’t take orders from the politicians anymore. Now it would work the other way around. It was a terrible irony that just as Mexico was being heralded around the world for its bud-

FBI agents survey a Lexington, Oklahoma, horse ranch where Jose Treviño purchased hundreds of horses on behalf of his brother Miguel. Opposite page: Omar Treviño Morales, who ran the Zetas with brother Miguel, after his 2015 arrest in Mexico.

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THIS PAGE: HORSE: AP PHOTO/SUE OGROCKI. OMAR TREVINO: XINHUA/PEDRO MERA. OPPOSITE PAGE: AP PHOTO/BRETT DEERING.

I

T WAS LATE OCTOBER 2009, AND STILL FOUR months away from the Zetas’ declaration of war against the Gulf Cartel. But Miguel was someone who always planned ahead. For the last two years he’d been investing in quarter horse racing, which not only indulged his passion but was also a sign of his growing status within the Zetas. In Mexico, quarter horse racing had long been an obsession steeped in North Mexico’s proud ranching heritage, which was also deeply ingrained in its former territories of California and the American Southwest. Every cartel had its favorite jockeys, trainers and horse agents. Owning the best bloodlines signaled that Miguel’s wealth and power were ascending in the drug world. And very soon, he knew that his place within that world would be tested. His mind had begun forming around a plan after he’d received the good news from Texas two weeks earlier. A sorrel colt he owned, called Tempting Dash, had qualified for one of the most prestigious quarter horse races in America. In the past, he hadn’t thought much of the horse. The colt came from a top bloodline, but he’d been so skinny and small they’d called him Huesos, “Bones,” on the racetracks in Mexico. But the horse had surprised them all with its speed. In two days, Tempting Dash would run in the Dash for Cash Futurity in Texas, one of the most lucrative races of the season, with a $445,000 purse. The race was held every October at the Lone Star Park racetrack in Grand Prairie, not far from where the brothers had spent their teenage years in status-conscious Dallas with its luxury cars and gated mansions. Miguel had always liked Dallas, which had shown him a more enticing side of life than the poor, working-class barrios of Nuevo Laredo. For the last two years, Ramiro Villarreal, a horse agent from Monterrey, had been buying and racing horses for Miguel in the States. And it was Villarreal who had delivered the good news about Tempting Dash. With so much money on the line, Miguel wasn’t going to leave the outcome of the race sorely up to fate and the horse’s natural ability. He instructed his younger brother to radio Villarreal on his Nextel to make sure everything was going to plan in Texas. Omar had come up with Miguel through the ranks of the cartel. His rounded cheeks and boyish face made him appear less menacing than his brother, who had fierce dark eyes and sharp cheekbones, but Omar, who always strived to be his elder brother’s equal was just as ruthless and prone to violence. Villarreal picked up his Nextel to answer Omar’s call. He was driving to a horse auction at Heritage Place in Oklahoma City, then on to Lone Star Park for the race on Saturday. “What are you doing, Gordo? … ,” Omar asked the rotund horse agent. “Talk to me … what’s the forcast? … When is Chevo leaving?” “After 9:40 but … but he has to get there at the same time for the vet to check them out there…,” Villarreal said. “… Did the batteries take?” It was an old trick. To win the race, Tempting Dash would be shocked with volts of electricity from a hand-held device. The maneuver used by jockeys, called “buzzing,” had been outlawed on U.S. tracks. But during a training session they had used it on Tempting Dash to see the colt’s reaction and whether the shock resulted in that extra surge of speed needed to win. “It’s done,” Villarreal said, meaning the experiment had worked. “And where are you know?” “I’m on the road between San Antonio and Austin.” “You will win, Gordo, you’re going to win,” said Omar. He instructed Villarreal to pose with Tempting Dash in the winner’s circle and when the photo was snapped to make a sign with his hand that the brother would recognize, so that it would be


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As the Zetas ascended in power, their reign of terror gripped the nation.

ding democracy, the country’s first paramilitary drug organization—the Zetas—was formed. The cartel’s military founders had been trained by the American military to combat the growing threat of narcotrafficking. But the drug lords paid better than the government. Osiel Cárdenas, leader of the Gulf Cartel, based in Matamoros in the border state of Tamaulipas, recruited the military deserters to be his bodyguards and to protect the Nuevo Laredo plaza, or smuggling territory, the most coveted in his vast drug empire, which ranged from the Texas-Mexico border down to the Gulf coast of Mexico. Cárdenas called their partnership “the Company.” His enemies were legion. Paranoid and ruthless, he’d earned his nickname, El Mata Amigos, “the Friend Killer,” after enlisting one of the Zetas’ founding soldiers, Arturo Guzmán Decena, to shoot a business partner in the back of the head. In 2003, Cárdenas was arrested and sent to a high-security prison near Mexico City, where he continued to run the Company from behind bars. He sent his Zetas to tamp down any revolt in his territories in the eastern half of Mexico. With the arrest of Cárdenas, the wily drug lord Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán sensed weakness and an opportunity, and sent in his army of sicarios, or hit men, to take over the coveted plaza of Nuevo Laredo. Guzmán’s Sinaloa Cartel, from the fertile northern triangle in the west of the country where most of the country’s opium was grown, was the largest, most powerful drug organization in Mexico. And El Chapo and his associates wanted all of Mexico for themselves. Miguel and Omar aligned themselves with the Zetas, the Company’s enforces, to wage war against El Chapo and the Sinaloa Cartel. Their hometown of Nuevo Laredo had always been a coveted plaza in the drug trade. Trucks and trains continuously shuttled back and forth across the five international bridges. Nearly half of the trade between the two countries— at least $180 billion in imports and expor ts—passed through Nuevo Laredo every year. Among the thousands of semis paked w ith telev isions, car par ts and combustion engines there was other valuable cargo, including kilos of cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine cleverly concea led in fa lse compa r tment s or waved through by U.S. customs agents on the cartel’s payroll. The brother’s job was to exterminate the Sinaloa Cartel’s gunmen and workers in Nuevo Laredo, which the Company called contras. Miguel immediately excelled at his new vocation. He wasn’t military-trained like the other Zetas, but he

was an experienced hunter. And he saw no difference between killing contras and the deer he hunted in the empty ranchlands beyond the city. If he didn’t kill someone every day, he felt he hadn’t done his duty. If he was unable to apply the tiro de gracia to a contra himself, then his brother Omar, who always shadowed him everywhere, would finish the job for him. Miguel’s reputation for ferocity and violence grew. By 2006, the Zetas had repelled the Sinaloa incursion and preserved the Company’s territory, and Miguel’s rank within the Zetas was on the rise. Heriberto Lazcano, a former Special Forces soldier, was now in charge of the Zetas. Lazcano was a pragmatic leader, ambitious and ruthless. He’d earned his nickname, El Verdugo, “the Executioner,” for his baroque torture methods, which included feeding his victims to lions and tigers he kept on one of his many ranches. In 2007, Mexico finally extradited Osiel Cárdenas to a high-security prison in the United States. The Friend Killer’s grip on the Company was slipping, and Laczano sensed an opening. He began to think of independence and expansion. As a former military man, he had his own ideas about how the Zetas should be run. While the Gulf Cartel was content with smuggling drugs, the Zetas could instead demand a cut from every black market transaction in their territories, whether it was oil stolen from the national monopoly Pemex, pirated CDs, or prostitution. They could also levy a tax on legitimate businesses and commerce in exchange for protention. In Miguel Treviño, Lazcano recognized a useful and equally cold-blooded ally. He sent his new second in command to conquer more territory. The Zetas, using their military training, gathered intelligence on rivals and government forces using a system of spies and informants, and they set up private communications networks. But their most effective tactic was spreading terror to subjugate their enemies and the communities they conquered. Corpses of members of rival drug gangs were left swinging from bridges, and garbage bags full of mutilated body parts were strewn along the highways. Bodies were stacked in piles outside police stations or at major intersections, their torsos carved with the letter Z. This was Miguel’s specialty and his calling card. By 2008, Lazcano had also tasked Miguel with national recruitment to expand their ranks. In a first for Mexico’s drug trade, the Zetas set up military-style training camps, staffed by Colombian paramilitaries and Kaibiles, special force commandos from Guatemala renowned for their jungle warfare skills, to train recruits in the use of shoulder-fired missiles, 50-caliber machine guns, and other military-grade weaponry smuggled in from the United States or Central America. The Zetas were training ordinary men to become mercenary soldiers. Miguel looked for


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despite their struggles. Working with Villarreal, he’d learned how easy it was to purchase racehorses in the United States, where transactions were often in cash and sealed with nothing more than a handshake. He would use the horses to funnel more of his money through the U.S. banks, where it would be safe from his enemies. He would recruit others to set up front companies in the United States to mask his involvement. They could bid on valuable horses, like Villarreal had been doing, and Miguel could put any name on the ownership document he wanted. But who could he trust to run the operation? In the drug business, betrayal and double dealing were inevitable. He only had to look at the trail of bodies he’d left behind him on his quick rise to the top. He already suspected that Ramiro Villarreal had been padding his expenses. After two years, Villarreal knew too much about his business. Something would have to be done about the horse agent. The closest he came to something akin to trust was with his family. Lately he’d been thinking about his second-oldest brother José, who was 43 and still chasing the American dream in a suburb of Dallas. José was a U.S. citizen and had a clean record. He’d never wanted anything to do with the drugs or Miguel or Omar’s business. On a good year he cleared $50,000 working as a brickmason. With four children to support, he barely made enough to keep the lights on at home. His brother could use the money. And Miguel could convince him with the fact that he’d never had to touch a kilo of cocaine. It would all look perfectly legitimate. José would be his new front man. This way, he’d keep the money in the family. And the Treviño name would be associated with the finest champions, the best bloodlines the United States had to offer. The plan was nearly perfect. He’d deal with Villarreal when the time was right. ■

Miguel and Omar took advantage of their brother José Treviño Morales, here after winning a 2010 race. Opposite page: Tempting Dash, the Treviño’s treasure quarter horse, ridden by jockey Julian Cantu at the 2009 Texas Classic Futurity where he took home a $1.1 million prize.

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recruits like himself, poor with no education or future. He wanted to know if these men, most of them barely out of their teens, were cold-blooded enough to be Zetas. They were given a machete or a sledgehammer and told to kill a person tied up in front of them. The human targets were culled from kidnapped contras or the waves of immigrants passing through their territories on their way to the United States. Those who felt no remorse after the slaughter were enlisted to be Miguel’s personal bodyguards or soldiers for the front line. They accepted that their lives would be brief and violent. It was a pact made with the devil for money and to feel, for once, what it was like to have power. Miguel and the Zetas were making so much money that it had started to become a burden. As he made his plans on the deserted outskirts of Nuevo Laredo for the upcoming race in Texas, each brother carried duffel bags full of cash to bribe their way out of ambushes and military roadblocks. Most of their money was in U.S. dollars, but it wasn’t good for anything but bribes until they could launder it through the banking system. A team of accountants and lawyers worked daily to devise new ways to make the dirty money clean. The Zetas were a multibillion-dollar, transnational business just like General Motors or Exxon Mobil and there was no more lucrative and coveted territory for moving merchandise than their hometown. In one month, shipping between one thousand and three thousand kilos of Colombian cocaine to the United States, Miguel could make as much as $30 million. This was from just one city in an expanding territory under his control along the eastern half of Mexico. With their new wealth, the brothers invested in cash-intensive businesses like casinos and bars, and bought up real estate, sports cars, and coal mines. But Miguel remained fixated on horses, a passion he shared with his brothers and their father, who had managed ranches for wealthy landowners in northern Mexico. If Tempting Dash won the futurity, with its $445,000 purse, Miguel would own a valuable commodity. Increasingly it made sense to grow his racing empire in the United States and get his money out of Mexico. The coming battle for territory and power between the Zetas and the Gulf Cartel had the potential to be more vicious, more deadly than anything seen before. Up until then, the only wealth his family had ever known was in their numbers. They were a large and sprawling family of seven brothers and six sisters, with Miguel right in the middle, followed by Omar. Growing up on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border, they’d always lived on the margins because of poverty, especially after their father left when they were young. If they were familiar with anything, it was hardship. The eldest, Juan Francisco, was locked up for twenty years in a U.S. prison for marijuana smuggling. In Nuevo Laredo, a gunman from the Sinaloa Cartel had shot the youngest brother down in the street in front of his mother’s home. These days she spent so much of her time in Texas where it was safer, along with his remaining brother and sisters, away from the endless spiral of murder and vengeance in Mexico. But the drug business had made Miguel wealthy beyond what any of them could have imagined. With his millions he could build a racing dynasty in the United States that would be his legacy and for his mother, Maria, who had always cared for them

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THIS PAGE: NEWSPAPER: AP PHOTO/ALEJANDRO COSSIO. TEMPTING DASH: REED PALMER. OPPOSITE PAGE: JOSE TREVINO MORALES: AP PHOTO/THE EL PASO TIMES/ RUDY GUTIERREZ

WITH THEIR NEW WEALTH, THE BROTHERS INVESTED IN CASH-INTENSIVE BUSINESSES LIKE CASINOS AND BARS, AND BOUGHT UP REAL ESTATE, SPORTS CARS AND COAL MINES. BUT MIGUEL REMAINED FIXATED ON HORSES.


Jacket, $695, Pant, $850, Turtleneck, $295, CALVIN KLEIN 205W39NYC, calvinklein.com.


HIGH ATOP ZAHA HADID’S ONLY RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY IN NEW YORK,

PHOTOGRAPHED BY

ERIC MCNEAL STYLED BY

MEN’S FASHION IS INSPIRED BY STRUCTURED TAILORING AND STRONG ARCHITECTURAL LINES

AMAR DAVED!


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Turtleneck, $1,090, ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA COUTURE, zegna.com. Coat, $5,400, Pant, $790, BOTTEGA VENETA, bottegaveneta.com. Shipwreck coin band ring, $395, DAVID YURMAN, davidyurman.com. Opposite: Coat, $2,300, BOTTEGA VENETA, bottegaveneta.com. Shirt, $830, HERMÉS, hermes.com.


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Sweater, price upon request, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO, 866337-7242. Pant, $495, CANALI, 212-752-3131. East West 2-Hand watch in stainless steel, $3,750, TIFFANY & CO., tiffany.com. Opposite: Jacket, $2,980, Sweater, $920, Pants, $980, PRADA, 877-997-7232.


Groomer: John Ruidant using Evo Hair at See Management. Model: Miles Montierth at Fusion Models. Location: 520 W. 28th St.


T I M E TO P L AY

WORLD CL ASS GAMING ICONIC ENTERTAINMENT ENDLESS SURPRISES SEMINOLEHARDROCKHOLLY WOOD.COM


ASPEN/ DENVER  CHICAGO  DALL AS/ FORT WORTH  HAMPTONS  HOUSTON  L A S VEG A S  LOS ANGELE S  MIAMI  NE W YORK CIT Y  OR ANGE COUNT Y  SAN FR ANCISCO  TRI-STATE

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ADRIAN GAUT

SHOPPING AT THE COAST

As malls across the country struggle to stay afloat, Orange County’s South Coast Plaza is a monument to the golden age of brick and mortar. Opened in 1967, back when much of Southern California was still farmland, the behemoth shopping center remains one of the largest luxury retail destinations in the country. In October, to honor the mall’s 50th anniversary, Assouline’s  South Coast Plaza at 50 will give mallrats their retail fix in the form of a coffee-table book.


ASPEN/DENVER

Longtime NYC power gallery Marianne Boesky expanded to Aspen this summer with Boesky West, where Frank Stella and Larry Bell headlined the inaugural show. marianneboeskygallery.com

CITIES

Hotel Arrivals The latest addition to the Denver skyline, the Mark Zeff–designed Hotel Indigo, takes inspiration from the gold rush that first put the Mile-High City on the map. In addition to custom murals based on photographs of the turn-of-the-century gold mines, Zeff designed Hearth & Dram, a modern saloon and eatery that features more than 300 whiskeys from around the world. But perhaps Denver’s most anticipated opening for 2017 is The Source Hotel. Inspired by The Source, an artisan market hall housed in an 1880s foundry next door, the 100room hotel will feature three restaurants, experiential, craft-focused vendors and a small-batch brewery. Unlike the original, this offshoot boasts a rooftop terrace with sweeping views of downtown and the Rocky Mountains. ihg.com; thesourcehotel.com

Aspen’s most luxurious spa, Reméde at St. Regis, is also its most 420friendly. The spa is now offering a hemp oil–infused massage using CBD, a compound found in cannabis. Sourced organically in Colorado, CBD has all of the relaxation

properties of cannabis without the psychoactive effects. But just like the real thing, the CBD treatment is taking off across the region, with St. Regis expecting to implement it at all West Coast locations. stregisaspen.com

Glitter Gulch

Everything from a car dealership to Dior has occupied Aspen’s iconic Brand Building, located in the city’s “Glitter Gulch” on Galena Street. Now, thanks to David Johnston Architects, the building is entering a new era as luxury apartments. “I’ve always been fascinated with mid-century modern design and the Bauhaus movement,” says architect Collin Frank, who helped develop new construction methods in order to bring a clean, minimalist design—think large kitchens, open living rooms and floating fireplaces—to the vintage space while retaining the 130-year-old brick exterior intact. A 715-square-foot, one bedroom, 1.5 bath unit in this historic stalwart will run you $3.95 million. djarchitects.com; Listing agent: Andrew Ernemann, Sotheby’s

Amy Phelan

While she makes her primary home on Park Avenue, Amy Phelan doesn’t come to Aspen just to hit the slopes. As Event Chair of the Aspen Art Museum’s largest annual fundraiser, ArtCrush, she is the most influential arts patron in town. Here’s where you’ll find her when she’s not moving and shaking. POWER LUNCH

Casa Tua is a chic and cozy Italian restaurant with fun al fresco dining, a delicious menu, and live music in the evenings. casatualifestyle.com

Ê FOR MORE ON ASPEN, VISIT DUJOUR.COM/CITIES

FIELD TRIP

Woody Creek Tavern is one of my happy places. You can bike ride the Rio Grande Trail to Woody Creek for the best fresh lime margaritas you’ve ever tasted, not to mention the nachos. You can sit inside or outside and watch the hummingbirds and cyclists come and go. woodycreektavern.com DON’T MISS

The Aspen Art Museum is not only an architectural masterpiece designed by the world-renowned Shigeru Ban, but also always has inspiring exhibitions, a rooftop café overlooking Aspen Mountain, a cool gift shop, as well as fun events like the artist lecture series, rooftop movie night, live jazz music and much more. aspenartmuseum.org HIDDEN GEM

The Caribou Club is an Aspen institution. The cuisine is always fresh, creative and delicious, and if that weren’t enough, a live DJ and dance floor dancing starts after 10 p.m. So much fun! caribouclub.com

AMY PHELAN: ROE ETHRIDGE. HOTEL INDIGO: CUSTOM CREATIONS. BRAND BUILDING: BRENT MOSS

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HAUTE HEMP

KEY TO THE CITY


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CHICAGO

Chicago Architecture Biennial, the largest architecture event in North America, returns on September 16 with citywide exhibitions by over 100 architects and artists. chicagoarchitecturebiennial.org

CITIES

Of the recently unveiled $16 million renovation at the Museum of Contemporary Art, which transformed 12,000 square feet of museum space, the most mouth-watering addition is Marisol, a brand new restaurant led by chef Jason Hammel of Lula Cafe. Marisol, named for the late French-Venezuelan pop artist Marisol Escobar who gifted the MCA its first-ever piece of artwork in 1968, is a work of art in itself. Los Angeles firm Johnston Marklee appointed the space—which accommodates 125 diners and also features a bar— with dramatically arched, vaulted ceilings. Turner Prize–awarded artist Chris Ofili created the space’s distinctive decor, animating the high-ceilinged space with a custom mural. Hammel created a hyper-seasonal menu with bold, contemporary flavors meant to meld with their surroundings. Leveraging his longstanding relationship with regional farmers, Hammel emphasized shareable meat and seafood dishes, handmade pastas and innovative vegetable-forward dishes. marisolchicago.com

Marisol Escobar, the inspiration behind the new restaurant

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CONTEMPORARY CUISINE

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Tech meets chic room design at Hotel EMC2

KEY TO THE CITY

Susan Flaga

Susan Flaga, co-owner of Logan Square salon Sparrow, recently launched Sparrow for Everyone, a line of eco-friendly, Tavi Gevinson–approved essential oils. In addition to a healthy dose of aromatherapy, here’s where the oils expert goes to unwind. POWER LUNCH

Though my husband’s restaurant Parson’s Chicken and Fish is famous for fried hush puppies and Negroni slushies, you can easily pull off a healthy lunch. The giant patio has the best, relaxed vibe. parsonschicken andfish.com

CUP OF JOE

Ipsento is tiny, no frills, and has amazing coffee. They do their own roasting, and make signature lattes that will flip your lid. Plus, I always hear some indie rock band that I loved in my twenties while I’m there. ipsento.com

RETAIL THERAPY

Asrai Garden is stunning. While technically a flower shop, this slightly gothic, not-toofeminine space has so much more: fine jewelry, apothecary, purses—you name it. asraigarden.com

DON’T MISS

It took entertaining out-of-towners to get me to be touristy in my own town, and the Chicago Architecture Foundation River Cruise was my first stop. Take the twilight cruise—you will not be disappointed. architecture.org

MARISOL: JACK MITCHELL/GETTY IMAGES

ROOM REQUEST

Both right- and leftbrained people will find plenty to love about Streeterville’s new 21-story Hotel EMC2. Inspired by Einstein’s theory of relativity, the hotel boasts urban vistas and geek-friendly amenities such as a gramophone that is compatible with mobile devices and Amazon Alexa. Best of all, robotic “staffers” bring you Jetsonsstyle room service. hotelemc2.com


The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth goes ghoulish with Misty Keasler’s eerie photographs of haunted houses and their monstersin-residence, on display Sept. 23 to Nov. 26. themodern.org

CITIES

DALLAS/FORT WORTH Dallas Theater Center’s Kevin Moriarty

TAKING RESERVATIONS

PORTRAIT: KAREN ALMOND. PERFORMING ARTS CENTER: IWAN BAAN

Valentino comes to Highland Park Village this Fall

Highland Park Village

Joining the likes of Hermès, Chanel and Dior, homegrown Dallas favorite The Tot will bring the gold standard in baby and toddler gear like a Doona Infant Car Seat Stroller ($499) and a Luxe Lion Coat from Little Goodall ($170) to Highland Park, the city’s premier open-air shopping center. And for less baby-friendly selections, the luxury mecca will welcome two new outposts, Valentino and Cartier, this fall. Befitting its arid surroundings, the latter will introduce succulent-inspired jewelry from the new Cactus de Cartier collection. thetot.com

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Inside Cartier’s new Highland Park boutique

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On Aug. 30, Dallas Theater Center, winners of the 2017 Tony for Best Regional Theater, will kick off the theatrical season with Boo Killebrew’s Miller, Mississippi—a drama that lives up to the company’s newfound national spotlight. Following one Mississippi family from the Civil Rights movement through the early ’90s, the play’s themes of race and class remain just as relevant today. “The play is about radically changing understandings of race and individual power,” says artistic director Kevin Moriarty. “It lifts up those national themes.” The play also continues DTC’s commitment to diversity through nontraditional casting—an effort at odds with the city’s reputation as a conservative bastion. “Equity, diversity and inclusion aren’t necessarily what the country associates with the old Dallas,” Moriarty notes. “So we’re really, really proud to represent our city in a new way.”

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DALLAS THEATER CENTER

With one hit Dallas eatery under their belts, the husband and wife team behind Gemma are branching out to Highland Park. Sachet, chef Stephen Rogers and wife Allison Yoder’s latest passion project, will offer a bird’s eye view of Mediterranean cuisine, taking inspiration from Spain all the way to Lebanon. “It will be fun and a little more health conscious [than Gemma],” says Yoder. Meanwhile, esteemed restaurateur Al Biernat is expanding his namesake surf-and-turf temple with a second location this fall. Taking over the space that was the twenty-year home of Del Frisco’s Double Eagle Steak House in north Dallas, Al Biernat’s will open up the dining room with sweeping windows and an expanded bar. Upstairs will provide a more intimate experience via the speakeasy bar and adjoining cigar lounge. albiernats.com


HAMPTONS

CITIES TAKING RESERVATIONS

Father-son duo Eric and Adam Miller’s new restaurant Flagship ( flagshipmontauk.com) serves local seafood and riffs on classic cocktails. Eric, the chef in the family, brings over thirty years of experience in the dockto-dish and farm-to-table movements, while his son Adam—previously of the Happiest Hour and Slowly Shirley in Manhattan— designed bottled cocktails and a make-your-own sour program.

FLOWER POWER

Unique finds at Big Flower out east

ROOM REQUEST

Montauk’s got a new boutique hotel on the block. Hero Beach Club (herobeachclub.com) has 32 rooms outfitted in polished boho style with woven jute rugs, canvas curtains and ethereal photographs showing the surrounding scenery. No need to fight for a spot on the sand—the semi-private beach has plenty of loungers and umbrellas.

East Hampton’s The Maidstone has received a refresh in the public spaces and a new restaurant by the chef behind Manhattan’s Cafe Clover. Owners Jenny and Jonathan Baker teamed up with Partners & Alchemy, run by Faena Hotels and André Balazs Properties alum Ian Nicholson, to bring some downtown vibes to the East End.

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Nick & Toni’s Manhattan location may have shuttered, but the team behind it is opening a new restaurant called Coche Comedor in Amagansett come October. The new eatery in the old Honest Diner space will serve Mexican dishes emphasizing local fish and produce.

MAIDSTONE: FRAN PARENTE. FOOD: MELISSA HOM

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After the successful launch of their seasonal store last year, husband-andwife team Greg and Stacy Ammon have reopened Big Flower (big flower.com), and this time, the beachy boutique will espouse the East End lifestyle all year round. In addition to stocking tunics and beach dresses for women and Italian linen shirts for men, the Ammons introduced a coral and turquoise jewelry line handcrafted by Stacy herself.


Ready for a spontaneous Hamptons getaway? Standard hotels’ last-minute booking app One Night (onenight.com) recently launched in the Hamptons. Starting at noon, you can now snag same-day reservations for coveted hotels like Gurney’s Montauk, the Maidstone and Surf Lodge.

HOT PURSUITS

KEY TO THE CITY

Adam Miller

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POWER LUNCH

Candy Kitchen. Old school. Chicken over Greek (no onions). Estia’s and Pierre’s are certainly in my rotation. COCKTAIL HOUR

Beacon in the summer. Since my client is the owner there is always a warm seat for me. RETAIL THERAPY

I enjoy doing a round of retail therapy in East Hampton. On the weekends I take my two daughters and we can always find something to buy. Sometimes, it’s a book at Bookhampton, sometimes a pair of workout shorts at Lulu. James Perse and Varvatos are a must. FEILD TRIP

Longhouse Reserve, which is very close to my house. I can go there to meditate. DATE NIGHT

East Hampton Grill. The food is so consistent even in the winter. My birthday is in February and the fire makes it cozy and warm. HIDDEN GEM

The beaches anywhere along Napeague. It’s where I proposed to my fiancée.

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CUP OF JOE

Jack’s in Amagansett for the real rocket fuel. However, since my office is so close to Starbucks in Bridgehampton, every day at around 3pm I treat everyone to an afternoon cup to keep them on their toes.

While the notoriously difficult Bridgehampton Race Circuit, which closed in 1998, didn’t draw a particularly artsy crowd, The Bridge, a golf course located on the racetrack’s site, pays tribute to the former tenants by combining creativity and cars. The golf course’s eponymous car show–meets–art gallery, which debuted last year, will return on September 16 with a fleet of vehicles circa 1957 to 1974—the period of time that marked the racetrack’s glory years—and art from six leading galleries including Marlborough Contemporary, David Zwirner and CANADA gallery. The show is presented by watchmaker Richard Mille, whose first watch was inspired by F1 racing. “My watches are an expression of my love for all things technical, and automobiles in particular,” says Mille. “The Bridge promises to showcase cars one might never see.”

As the head of Adam Miller Group, P.C., the go-to real estate law firm based out of Bridgehampton, Adam Miller knows the East End. When he first made the move from Manhattan 10 years ago, Miller aimed to combine his large firm experience with localized knowledge, providing a niche, top-tier experience for the area’s high-net-worth clients. Since then, the firm has acted as counsel on over $2 billion in real estate transactions. Says Miller, “The really important thing for me is big firm experience but local expertise.” Miller has partnered with Brian Desesa, who brings a specialization in land use and 10 years of experience on the Southampton town zoning board, of which he is now Vice Chair. Having lived and worked on transactions in both Manhattan and the Hamptons, which does Miller prefer? “The Hamptons,” he says, “I find it to be much more personal. [Clients] are often more engaged in this process because they’re not passing this on to some associate who is handling that business. I enjoy it here because it’s just easier to transact business that way, to meet people. Whereas in the city, most of the day is spent in a high rise.” After a decade of living and working on the luxe Long Island enclave, Miller has discovered some top-notch places for everything from a business lunch to a mid-week meditation. We tapped the attorney for his list of the very best local spots.


HOUSTON

Expect things to heat up at the Texas Hot Sauce Festival, Sept. 23–24, a two-day celebration of the spicy nectars of the gods. Tickets $10. texashotsaucefestival.com

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SIBLING BONDS

Two new Houston apparel brands are serving up comfort-friendly fashion with a side of sibling rivalry; Chris Gramer, the brainchild of three sisters who left corporate jobs, will launch this fall with a line of structural, draped designs made with super-soft crepe fabric. “Everyone should consider asymmetry,” says forward-thinking designer Christine Lee, who brought on her sisters Merrie Lee, who handles logistics and Grace Lee, who oversees sales. While their skill sets vary, the sisters share a sisterly bond when it comes to fashion. “Sometimes we show up to work in the same clothes top to bottom, and then it becomes a day of ‘who wore it best?’” says Lee. Houston caftan makers Mirth will release a collection of tops for the first time this fall. Launched in 2016 by sisters Katie and Erin McClure, Mirth specializes in ethically sourced super-breathable cotton, “Made with handwoven fabric, [the tops] are meant to transition from summer into fall,” says Katie. The McClure sisters donate five percent of profits to education in Bagru, India. chrisgramer.com; mirthcaftans.com

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3-D printed jewelry from designer Jessie Dugan

STATEMENT PIECES

Houston-based accessories designer Jessie Dugan has always been ahead of the curve. While working in New York City for companies like rag & bone, Henri Bendel and Tory Burch, she became a behind-the-scenes fashion influencer. “Taylor Swift wore a backpack I designed at Henri Bendel, and it’s now one of their bestsellers,” she says. Since returning to Texas, the Houstonite hasn’t lost any of her edge. Last month, she released a 3-D-printed jewelry line. “I introduced them in a ‘buy now, wear now’ runway show,” the designer says of the collection, which focuses on statement chokers and earrings. “I truly think the fashion scene in Houston is in the middle of a renaissance,” says Dugan. “I’m seeing really cool things happen here, and I’m so glad to be a part of it.” jessiedugan.com

RESERVATION REQUEST

Two wine-centric hotspots are popping the cork in the Montrose neighborhood. Goodnight Charlie’s is a bona fide honky-tonk with city slicker appeal. Think wine on tap, a jukebox and live music in a cedarwood barn—the brainchild of David Keck, one of the city’s three Master Sommeliers. Keck and partner Peter McCarthy didn’t stop at a wine list—they also traveled to Kentucky to handpick bourbons. About a mile

away, restaurateur Shawn Virene’s first solo endeavor offers a St. Tropez picnic in the heart of Houston. The concept, a’Bouzy (a play on Bouzy, a village in France’s Champagne region) boasts what Virene calls the “most researched Champagne list in the city.” The Champagnes —250 kinds ranging from north of $2,000 to $12—are perfectly paired with food items like deconstructed bouillabaisse, served with chard and drizzled basil lemon toast. goodnightcharlies.com; abouzy.com

Caviar at a’Bouzy


DSquared2, edgy Canadian clothiers who unveiled their first Las Vegas store earlier this year, will supply the costumes for Ricky Martin’s new Vegas residency, which opens September 12. dsquared2.com

CITIES

SUPREME REIGN

Diana Ross is coming out to Wynn Las Vegas. The legendary singer will showcase chart-topping hits like “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” and “Touch Me in the Morning” during a limited run of nine intimate performances from October 11–28. “She creates an electric connection with her audiences, and the intimacy of the Encore Theater is the perfect setting for her to deliver an up, close and personal experience to her fans,” Maurice Wooden, President of Wynn Las Vegas, says of Ross, who once performed through a thunderstorm to thousands in Central Park. This time, the venue will most likely be rainproof. wynnlasvegas.com

LAS VEGAS

Diana Ross to perform at The Wynn in October

KEY TO THE CITY

Christina Tosi

Christina Tosi brought the sweet life to Las Vegas last year when she opened the first West Coast outpost of Milk Bar at The Cosmopolitan. POWER LUNCH

DIANA ROSS: RAFAEL MACIA/ REDFERNS. CHRISTINA TOSI: MELANIE DUNEA

DON’T MISS

LIFE IS BEAUTIFUL

With headliners like Chance the Rapper, Lorde and Haim, the Life is Beautiful music festival will offer plenty of ear candy when it returns on September 22. But like anything in Vegas, this three-day bacchanal is all about sensory overload. “We aim to create a festival experience unlike any other [that] leaves a lasting impression," says Chief Experience Officer Ryan Doherty. In addition to musical acts, the lineup includes comedy, a vibrant art show including work by Shepard Fairey and a keynote speech by Bill Nye. For refreshments, check out downtown Las Vegas neighborhood hotspots Therapy or Bocho. lifeisbeautiful.com

The Neon Museum. It’s the best place to explore. I love checking out all the fonts and signs from Vegas past and present, and it reminds me of the pink neon signs hanging over the entrance of every Milk Bar location. neonmuseum.org HIDDEN GEM

I love being a cheesy tourist, so Vegas Indoor Skydiving and also the roller coaster at New York New York are personal favorites. vegasindoorskydiving.com COCKTAIL HOUR

If I’m trying to be funny, Frankie’s Tiki Room can be pretty epic. For a shot, a beer and a game of Pac-Man, ReBAR. frankiestikiroom .com; rebarlv.com

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In Vegas, I’m up at 5 and in an Uber by 5:15 on my way to Red Rock Canyon. Being a New Yorker, I can’t resist starting my mornings outdoors in one of the most gorgeous parks just minutes away from work—and I’ve got to get ahead of the loads of cookies, cakes and pies I’ll inevitably consume in the kitchen. redrockcanyonlv.com

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I’m not awesome at stopping for lunch, but if I’m with the team, we hit up In-N-Out or get a slice at Secret Pizza in the Cosmopolitan. For more of a “grownup” lunch, I’ve fallen hard for Milos—quick, super tasty and easy. If I’m being super indulgent, I go for Lotus of Siam. milos.ca; lotusofsiamlv.com


LOS ANGELES

CITIES

KEY TO THE CITY

PEARLY POP UP Forget breadsticks; The Rosy Oyster, a pop-up oyster bar inside the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, offers diners a complimentary appetizer of glazed bacon. The main event, as the name suggests, is oysters served with rosé—a combination dreamed up by modelturned-sommelier Lelañea Fulton, the “hipster-meets-luxury” expert behind the wine list at New York City’s Dirty French. Overlooking the iconic David Hockney–designed hotel pool of the Roosevelt’s infamous nightclub Tropicana Bar, the Rosy Oyster recalls the space’s nightlife roots with a rotating playlist of Drake, Childish Gambino and more. Thanks to a modern menu of mini lobster toast and California halibut crudo that’s drawn diners like China Chow, Kristen Stewart and Fergie, the Roosevelt pool scene is having its Hollywood comeback. thehollywoodroosevelt.com ROOM REQUEST

Downtown Los Angeles— once fueled by the nightlife of the silent film era and underground speakeasies, now by new hotels and shopping centers—has finally come full circle with the opening of Hotel Indigo. High above the hyperactivity of the neighboring L.A. Live complex is the hotel’s presidential suite, an 18th-floor crown jewel patterned after the dressing room of Anna May Wong, silent

Michael S. Smith is one of the most decorated names in interior design, so it’s no surprise that when the Obamas were in the White House, they tapped him to redesign their private quarters. Now that the Obamas have transitioned to civilian life, we are sure the former first family will call on the Architectural Digest honored designer yet again when it’s time to revamp a new home. When he isn’t color swatching and choosing furniture with the former first lady, here is where you’ll find the Santa Monica-based designer. michaelsmithinc.com CUP OF JOE

Bouchon Bakery in Beverly Hills has the best coffee. thomaskeller.com/ bouchonbakerybeverlyhills FIELD TRIP

I love taking friends to the restaurant at The Getty Museum. There is such a beautiful sunset view. getty.edu/museum/ DATE NIGHT

film actress and Hollywood’s first AsianAmerican star. “Her success story embodies an opportunity-driven culture that continues to attract ambitious travelers,” says designer Alex Kuby of Hirsch Bedner Associates. “Providing guest experiences along her own perspective, each space in the hotel reveals more about Anna May and the city.” ihg.com

I go to The Polo Lounge at the Beverly Hills Hotel. I love the McCarthy Salad and Tortilla Soup. dorchestercollection.com POWER LUNCH

Michael’s in Santa Monica. michaelssantamonica.com RETAIL THERAPY

JF Chen for unique accessories and antiques. jfchen.com COCKTAIL HOUR

Tower Bar at the Sunset Hotel. I love their Paloma cocktail. sunsettowerhotel.com

MICHAEL S. SMITH: WESTON WELLS

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Michael S. Smith


Looking for the most photogenic space imaginable for your cocktail party or wedding? Whether you want swaying palm trees or living succulent walls, you’re unlikely to find a more selfie-friendly backdrop than the lushly manicured Beverly Hilton Gardens. beverlyhilton.com/the-gardens MORE TO C

Five new residences at Mr. C Beverly Hills are the latest additions to the Cipriani dynasty’s high-gloss portfolio. Mr. C (short for Cipriani), opened in 2011, is the New York-based restaurateurs’ flagship West Coast property, and their first foray into the hotel space. The four-story, standalone homes, designed by famed architect Ray Knappe, are built adjacent to the hotel, each with their own private entrances. Residents will be a stone’s throw from hotel amenities like a concierge, a spa and pool, a gym, and housekeeping, plus access

to a complimentary chauffeured “house car” and hotel deals (owners also have the option to rent back to the hotel). But they’ll feel right at home thanks to the sleek, light-filled interiors, designed for optimum privacy and convenience; the residences, which range from $5 to $8 million, boast private elevators, glass-enclosed staircases, gourmet kitchens, outdoor hot tubs and multiple terraces overlooking Hollywood and Century City.

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CENTURY STYLE

Dreaming Big Like something out of a Meatpacking District fever dream, TAO Group’s aptly named Dream Hollywood combines several Manhattan-based properties into one, multitiered nightlife destination. In addition to West Coast reincarnations of TAO Asian Bistro, Avenue, and Beauty & Essex, the hotel introduces a new name to the hospitality company’s portfolio. The crowning piece of the development, which opened in July, is a rooftop lounge designed for all-day revelry called The Highlight Room. The 11,000-squarefoot, multipurpose hangout features a cabana-lined pool, a restaurant serving signature items like Hamachi crudo and brick oven chicken with salsa verde, and 360-degree views of Los Angeles. At night, the space will transform into a DJ-centric party space, which, just in case the dreamy California weather lets up, can be covered up by a fully retractable roof.

Following the suit of Santa Monica Place, which underwent a massive redesign in 2010, Westfield Century City has invested millions into an extreme makeover officially debuting this fall. While the mall has boasted an open plan since it opened in 1964, the $1 billion renovation will reimagine the indooroutdoor space with techenabled parking spots and bike valet service, an extra 422,000 square feet of retail space, and 200 new tenants including Aritzia, Suitsupply, and Zadig & Voltaire. The complex also takes the concept of an outdoor shopping center to the next level with a central outdoor terrace designed to be the “living

room” of the property that has communal tables, native trees, and shaded cabanas. To achieve its al fresco ambiance, the mall recruited SoCal interior designer Kelly Wearstler who outfitted the openair spaces in solid teak furniture, reflecting pools and Moroccan tile, as well as art, ceramic and sculptural accents. Joining the quintessentially Californian environs will be a few East Coast imports including Shake Shack and the first West Coast outpost of Eataly.


MIAMI

CITIES Rafael Domenech, “Untitled structure 43,” on display at The Bass

“Vocabulary of solitude,” Ugo Rondinone. Installation view, coming to The Bass

Welcome to The Bass

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With a snappy new name, the Bass, née the Bass Museum of Art, will unveil its $12 million expansion on October 8. Led by Arata Isozaki protégé David Gauld, the additions include a “creativity center” and multimedia lab, a café and four new galleries. “A museum-going experience is not the static, contemplative one it once was,” says Chief Curator Silvia Karman Cubiña. “Visitors will now have a more dynamic space that calls for social interaction and leisure.” The unveiling will include new solo exhibitions by Pascale Marthine Tayou, Mika Rottenberg, and Ugo Rondinone, each playfully reflecting themes of internationalism and inclusion: Cameroonian-born Tayou created an LED wall installation that spells “Welcome” in 70 languages; Rottenberg’s Cosmic Generator, an immersive sculpture and video installation, examines the global economy; and, taking up the entire second floor, Swiss-born Rondinone’s exhibit features 45 life-size clowns.

RETAIL ROUNDUP

Jo Malone opens in South Beach

The British and Brazilians are coming. Jo Malone London opened a South Beach boutique in time for the rollout of two new colognes, English Oak & Hazelnut and English Oak & Redcurrant. São Paolo–based resortwear designer Adriana Degreas relocated her year-old store to Coral Gables and upgraded to flagship status. jomalone.com; adrianadegreas.com.br

Christian Louboutin’s Miami footprint just grew a few sizes. Replacing the starter is a 4,000-squarefoot flagship in its place, adding a beauty counter and a second story for men’s. The kicky décor came far and wide, like a ’70s-era colonnade imported from Paris and furniture from Louboutin’s personal collection. 155 NE 40th Street; christianlouboutin.com

Parisian décor comes to Miami at the new Christian Louboutin store

UGO RONDINONE: COURTESY OF THE ARTIST. PASCALE MARTHINE TAYOU: LORENZO FIASCHI. RAFAEL DOMENENCH: COURTESY OF FREDRIC SNITZER GALLERY AND THE BASS, MIAMI BEACH

The Bass celebrates its expansion with several solo exhibitions and a new ‘creativity center’


The Brightline express train service will open this fall, linking the downtowns of Miami, Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach in one 60-minute, Wi-Fi-enabled ride. allaboardflorida.com

Ascension to the District

The Jouin Manku agency created Van Cleef’s newest home in Miami’s Design District A new Van Cleef & Arpels boutique opened its doors in the Miami Design District. Inspired by the city’s blue skies and sculptural shadows, Patrick Jouin and Sanjit Manku of the Jouin Manku agency designed the space on the premise of light and water. Neutral tones of blue and gray play off lacquered panels and matte surfaces, and small leaves of brass and stone act as a discrete

reference to nature, while more devoted details like the concentric ripples on the ceiling directly play into the designers’ aquatic inspiration. The contemporary two-floor boutique, a well-rounded addition to the culture- and art-centric neighborhood, is just a few steps from R. Buckminster Fuller’s emblematic structure, “Fly’s Eye Dome,” and the perfect home for Van Cleef & Arpels’s newest creations.

DIZENGOFF: NICK SOLARES

both are part of restaurateurs Michael Solomonov and Steven Cook’s everexpanding empire, and are shacking up side-by-side. Despite their more glamorous surroundings, Cook felt a familiar sense of brotherly love in Miami’s Wynwood neighborhood. “Its energy reminded us of South Philly when anything was possible,” he says. dizengoff hummus.com; federaldonuts.com

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TAKING RESERVATIONS

The South Beach spinoff of New York sushi den Sushi Azabu has something the original doesn’t: a robata room for Wagyu beef and Sakura Farms pork sizzled on a binchotan charcoal grill. Ask for nikumaki style, or thinly sliced and wrapped in veggies. Kakigoori (fluff y shaved ice soaked in house-made syrups) offers the perfect palate cleanser. sushi-azabu.com Two popular Philly-based mainstays, one a donut shop and the other a hummus and pita hut, are turning up the heat in Miami. While Federal Donuts and Dizengoff ’s hummusiya take different approaches to fast casual,

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ROOM REQUEST

The Julia, a historic, 29-room property, revisits South Beach’s boutique hotel heyday in the Nineties. Named after “Mother of Miami” Julia Tuttle, an American businesswoman who owned the land on which the city was built, the adults-only oasis recalls her bygone era. “I channeled [Julia] having a party in her parlor or garden,” says designer Stephen Busto, who achieved a garden party aesthetic with soft pastels, mobiles of origami butterflies and antique oil paintings of Florida landscapes. 336 Collins Avenue; thejuliahotel.com


NEW YORK CITY

CITIES

Creating a Neighborhood

er ears o disc ssions and ro ections dson ards begins to ta e sha e BY ADRIENNE GAFFNEY

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ive years after ground was broken on the project, life is beginning to sprout at Hudson Yards, the ambitious 20 million-square-foot West Chelsea retail, residential and office development that will transform midtown Manhattan and become the largest private real estate development in American history. The earliest office tenants have moved in, the first residents are settling into rental apartments, and an ambitious new food program has Manhattanites poised to pounce on reservations. For New York, it’s development with the magnitude to shift the center of the city, and for Jeff Blau, CEO of Related Companies, the real estate firm behind the deal, it’s the high point in a twenty-five year career. “This is the largest real estate development ever done in New York’s history. Taken by itself, it’s the fifth largest downtown in America,” he says of the project, which runs from West 30th Street to West 34th, and between 10th Avenue and 12th. “No one’s ever really had the opportunity to do something as impactful as Hudson Yards and that’s going to be our legacy.” The countdown to the first quarter of 2019, when an ambitious food and retail complex will open, has begun as the pieces of the long-awaited neighborhood begin to fall into place. In the late spring, the 52-story tower 10 Hudson Yards opened.  Coach’s global headquarters, Boston Consulting Group, VaynerMedia, Dan Doctoroff ’s tech firm Sidewalk Labs and L’Oréal have all moved in. “It’s not just finance or just media, it’s a mix of everything—which is really great because it kind of creates the community that we’re trying to build here,” Blau explains. Companies like KKR, TimeWarner, the law firm Cooley LLP, Third Point and Steve Cohen’s asset management firm have all leased office space in yet to be completed towers. In 2019 will see the unveiling of The Shops at Hudson Yards, anchored by New York’s first Neiman Marcus. A few months earlier, restaurants (twenty-five at last count) will begin to fill the space, a process that will make the area the city’s undisputed culinary destination. The list reads like a foodobsessive’s dream: A steakhouse from Thomas Keller, a new outpost of the Midtown favorite Estiatorio Milos, a new concept from David Chang and a 35,000-square-foot food hall from José Andrés, opening next fall, that Blau calls “a Spanish version of Eataly.” 

THIS IS THE LARGEST REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT EVER DONE IN NEW YORK’S HISTORY.

Blau t ook a n a c t ive role i n selecting chefs to par tner w ith. Some, like Thomas Keller, whose restaurants Per Se and Bouchon Bakery are located within Related’s Time Warner Center, were old friends. Others required a bit more scouting. “We just started travelling the world and going to great restaurants and then you eat someplace great and you try to figure out who the owner is and who the chef is. That’s really what happened with Juan Santa Cruz,” says Blau, who introduced himself to the chef after eating at his London hotspot Casa Cruz. Santa Cruz will make his United States debut with a restaurant at 35 Hudson Yards. Related’s vision is to create a community that you, truly, never need to leave. “It’s a little cliché to say ‘live, work, play,’ but that really is the lifestyle of the future; how people want to live their lives. Here at Hudson Yards, you can have your office, you can live here, you can go to the restaurants and


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Jeff Blau, CEO of Related Companies on-site at Hudson Yards. Top right: The future Shops and Restaurants at Hudson Yards. Opposite top: A vision of the Hudson Yards Public Square and Gardens, featuring Thomas Heatherwick’s sculpture Vessel, which will open in early 2019. Bottom: A duplex penthouse at Hudson Yards

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are not commodity buildings all by the same architect. Each one is different.” Current buyers have signed on without the benefit of seeing the finished product and Blau acknowledges the risk inherent in that, but believes it will pay off. “Right now, it’s a major construction site and you need to have a little vision to see what it’s going to turn into,” he says. “New Yorkers still don’t appreciate what an incredible transformation is happening on the West Side because it’s not done, it’s all behind fences. Once it’s open and people can walk through and see it, I think there’s going to be a huge escalation and the people that bought in these early stages are going to have tremendous appreciation.” What might end up having the biggest impact are Hudson Yards’ public spaces. In April, work began on Vessel, a 15-story steelwork sculpture from British designer Thomas Heatherwick, that will be the focal point of the expansive plaza. (Those curious can peek in at its progress from atop the High Line.) Vessel is made up of 154 flights of stairs, allowing visitors to capture unique views of the waterfront. Related knew that they needed a special kind of visual draw if they wanted Hudson Yards to become a true New York City destination. “We wanted to do something so that everyone that comes to New York has to come here and see it. So we thought about great squares and great plazas around the world and in New York—Rockefeller Center and the skating rink and the Christmas tree. Ultimately, we decided we needed to create our own version: a 365-days-a-year Christmas tree,” he says. There’s no one more eager for Hudson Yards to throw open its doors than Blau.  “The opportunity to do something as impactful to the community as this is really the experience of a lifetime,” he says. “To have the ability to change the city—in a positive way, we think—and make these incredible spaces, where you come by 10 years later and realize you were part of creating the expansion of New York City.” ■

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bars, and go shopping and work out—all in one day. That’s really what’s happening here,” he says. For him, the concept extends past the Hudson Yards border into the greater West Chelsea neighborhood. “People that come to look at 15 Yards [the project’s first residential tower]: their kids can walk to Avenues School on the High Line and walk over to Chelsea Piers for after-school activities,” he says. (A public elementary/middle school will also be opening at Hudson Yards and a Success Academy charter school launches this month at nearby 555 10th Avenue.) Becoming a part of the Chelsea neighborhood, Blau believes, is crucial to the success of Hudson Yards. “It’s really meant to be part of the city fabric not a separate area, like how Battery Park City feels isolated. This is really meant to feel like it’s part of New York City with each building standing alone,” he explains. Sales of residences at 15 Hudson Yards, which range from $5 million to $32 million, began in September and, according to Related, they’ve sold faster than any other new condominiums in Manhattan. Buyers have come from other West Side Manhattan neighborhoods, like the Upper West Side and Tribeca, as well as the Upper East Side and communities in New Jersey, Long Island, Connecticut and Westchester County. Some are looking to relocate, while others are seeking a second home in the city. Driving interest, Blau believes, is the focus Related put on design. “Each one of the buildings has a great architect and the ones that are coming on the West Side are just going to be incredible,” he explains. “All have big-name architects and great interior designers that are really doing something special with each building. These


NEW YORK CITY

If this year’s edition is as Instagrammable as last year’s, you won’t want to miss Refinery29’s pop-up art and fashion funhouse 29Rooms which runs from September 8–11 in Bushwick.

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THE GOLDEN TICKET

No viral food sensation lasts forever, but Black Tap—makers of the mountainous, garnish-packed “Crazy Shakes” that blew up on Instagram back in 2015—is only gaining momentum. After opening up a Lower East Side location in June, the fun-friendly diner enlisted a fleet of food trucks this summer to spread sugar highs from South Street Seaport to Broadway (the Imagination Shake, topped with purple and gold rock candies, is a collaboration with Charlie & The Chocolate Factory The Musical). The Willy Wonka of Black Tap, Chef/Owner Joe Isidori, may have won the social media lottery, but the Michelin star–winner was always focused on the food. “After 15 years in fine dining, it wasn’t fun anymore,” says Isidori. “So I said, ‘I’m going to flip burgers for the rest of my life. I wanted to create that quintessential New York City luncheonette burger but take it to the next level with the acumen of a Michelin star chef.’” Already, the chain has transcended the food fad. In January, Isidori’s luncheonette-inspired burger went global with an outpost in Dubai. Next up, the restaurant will tackle In-N-Out territory with a new Las Vegas location in December. “I can’t tell you where it’s going to be, but we’re going to be in a very prominent hotel,” says Isidori. And on the menu, Black Tap will tackle another viral sensation—the meatless “Impossible Burger.” “We’re talking about putting the Impossible Burger on our menu to give a healthier option with a meatier flavor,” says Isidori. “And one day, we really hope we can offer a vegan milkshake on a regular basis.”

AUTUMN EQUINOX

OLD WORLD, NEW BUILD Magnum Real Estate Group has begun construction at 196 Orchard, the future site of 94 top-of-the-line condominiums. “The building is the new landmark building for the Lower East Side, one of the most historic and culturally rich neighborhoods in New York,” says developer and Magnum’s President Ben Shaoul. The building, at the intersection of Orchard and Houston, straddles the ever-upscaling LES, Soho and East Village neighbor-

hoods—right next door to tenement-era stalwart Katz’s Delicatessen. But you won’t have to go far to work off that pastrami on rye; the first two floors of the building will be taken up by an Equinox club and spa. The condos, which range from studios to 4-bedrooms, come with 12-foot ceilings, kitchens decked in marble and Miele appliances, and access to nearly 3,000 square feet of landscaped rooftop space.

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While every Equinox is different, the Upper West Side chapter, which completed a head-to-toe renovation in June, is unique in name as well as kind. Equinox Sports Club (formerly Reebok Sports Club, which the gym giant acquired as part of a $110 million deal in 2014) lives up to its sporty moniker now more than ever, thanks to new boxing and cycling studios, which join basketball, track and rock-climbing gymnasia. “This club has always been special and we’ve just added to the magic,” says Harvey Spevak, Equinox Executive Chairman and Managing Partner. “There’s an incredible calendar of events every month from author nights to urban-farming food tastings. Then, of course, there’s the unparalleled fitness and performance spaces. Our basketball leagues are seriously competitive, we have classes you won’t find at any other Equinox and there’s the stunning Roof Deck for everything from outdoor yoga to track running.” But it isn’t all about blood, sweat and tears: the renovated complex also pays homage to the Upper West Side’s foodie heritage with a new café and restaurant concept. “That’s why we call it a community,” Spevak says. “This really can be—and is—a central part of our member’s lives. We take that very seriously.”


D R I N K S

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30 Rockefeller Plaza, 65th Floor | Sunday–Friday Evenings | 212.632.5000 | barsixtyfive.com


ORANGE COUNTY

CITIES

Hammer & Nails Grooming, which offers haircuts, shaves, and hand and foot care in a man cave–like atmosphere (think bison leather chairs, private TVs and frosty beverages) plans to bring 10 locations to the greater Orange County area over the next five years. hammerandnailsgrooming.com

Assouline’s South Coast Plaza at 50

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KEY TO THE CITY

Evan Marks

MATERIAL WORLD

Before Rodeo Drive, there was South Coast Plaza, SoCal’s original luxury shopping destination. Built in 1967, the mall now houses more than 250 boutiques from Chanel to Hermès, drawing 20 million visitors who spend nearly $2 billion per year. This October, Assouline will release South Coast Plaza at 50 ($175) in honor of the upscale marketplace’s milestone anniversary. In addition to over 100 lustrous photos, the book details the property’s history, tracing its origins as a lima bean farm and rise as a cosmopolitan retail mecca.

COCKTAIL HOUR

Side Door in Corona Del Mar is a throwback to an older time, yet the food and drinks are very much in the future, connecting local agriculture to a rich, thriving community. sidedoorcm.com DATE NIGHT

Chef David Pratt does a great job of keeping it simple at Brick in San Clemente. My wife and I love walking down the street for pizza and one of his garden salads sourced from South Coast farms. brickpizzeria.com POWER LUNCH

Tucked in a shopping center in Irvine is my favorite Japanese restaurant, Fukada. I love that Mr. Fukada sources veggies like fiddleheads from ferns and other unique forest vegetables to put on top of his noodles. fukadarestaurant.com RETAIL THERAPY

While my family grows much of our own food, the San Clemente Farmers Market has good avocados nearly year round.

TAKING RESERVATIONS A dish from Fatty Tuna in Irvine

The country’s most renowned Japanese restaurant has franchises from Malibu to Dubai, so it was just a matter of time before Nobu shacked up in the OC’s most luxurious enclave. Opened earlier this year, Nobu Newport Beach offers classics like black cod miso and rosemary panko-crusted lamb chops. But for top-shelf sushi in a less tony zip code, consider

Irvine’s Fatty Tuna, specializing in Omakase dining—pre-fixe meals consisting of dishes specially selected by the chefs Wonny Lee and Hugh Pham. Don’t be fooled by the eatery’s up-and-coming environs: “We source the best seafood and produce while executing it in its purest form,” says Chef Lee. “Our guests will dine on a sushi experience of the highest quality.” noburestaurants.com

SOUTH COAST PLAZA: C.J. SEGERSTROM & SONS

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Evan Marks, founder of The Ecology Center, Southern California’s only organic farm and ecological education center, develops solutions that enable communities to live more sustainably. Here, he offers some of his favorite eco-friendly indulgences in the area.


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SAN FRANCISCO

CITIES

The theme of this year’s San Francisco Fall Art & Antiques Show (October 26–29) may be “Flower Power” in honor of the 50th anniversary of the city’s historic Summer of Love, concert, but the annual fair’s offerings, which range from a 17th-century gilt mirror to antique jewelry, are anything but hippieish. sffas.org

TOKYO REBEL

SOUND AS A BARREL

In 2005, Wall Street trader Jamie Kutch made the move from crunching numbers to stomping grapes by founding Kutch Wines in Sonoma, California. The investment paid off, and last year, Kutch’s award-winning vineyard earned national acclaim with its debut Chardonnay. While some sommeliers are quick to dismiss the ubiquitous, ever-popular grape, New York Times wine critic Eric Asimov called Kutch’s “textured, harmonious, long on minerality—one of the best California Chardonnay’s I have had in a very long time” and Wine Spectator called it “one of the most compelling new Chardonnays made outside of Burgundy.” With Kutch’s follow-up Chardonnay, the $42-per-bottle Sonoma Coast, hitting shelves this fall, it seems this former trader’s stock is up. kutch.com

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THIS AMERICAN LIFE “Walker Evans,” an exhibition launching this fall at SFMOMA, chronicles the seminal photographer’s 50-year fascination with American culture. “Evans was intrigued by vernacular,” explained Clément Chéroux, senior curator of photography at SFMOMA. “By elevating vernacular to the rank of art, he created a unique body of work celebrating the beauty of everyday life.” In addition to over 300 vintage prints dating from the ’20s through the ’70s, the exhibit includes nearly 100 documents and objects from the artist’s personal archive. The exhibition will encompass all galleries in the museum’s Pritzker Center for Photography—the largest space dedicated to the exhibition of photography at any art museum in the country. sfmoma.org

TAKING RESERVATIONS

Acacia House, a restaurant at the new Las Alcobas hotel, is Napa’s most hospitable new restaurant; for cyclists passing through, the kitchen offers “musettes” or lunch bags with shoulder straps. The all-day menu showcases Top Chef Masters winner Chris Cosentino’s signature brand of bold and balanced flavors, with seasonal highlights like Ibérico de Bellota with a caramelized onion popover, the Napa Valley lamb tartare and the asparagus a la plancha with almond-serrano streusel. Housed in a historic Georgian-style building, the restaurant is the centerpiece to the three-

acre Las Alcobas complex, which also includes a 3,500-square-foot spa and offering an apothecary blending bar and traditional Asian treatments dating back 2,000 years, as well as 68 guest rooms—six of

which share a building with the restaurant. While the close proximity may make for speedy room service, the porch seating with unbeatable valley views is worth dining out. lasalcobas.com

YUKA: MAXIMILLIAN TORTORIELLO. ACACIA HOUSE: JASON DEWEY

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Yuka Uehara, the creative force behind the startup atelier Tokyo Gamine, has always had a rebellious streak. “I am instinctually drawn to chaos and madness,” says the 32-year-old designer, who moved from Tokyo to the United States to study immunology before pursuing fashion. Her first collection, which launched in 2015, drew comparisons to fellow iconoclasts Rei Kawakubo and Yohji Yamamoto. “There is a particular aesthetic that all Japanese designers carry,” says Uehara. Like Kawakubo, the visionary behind Comme des Garçons, Uehara takes inspiration from the French. For her fall collection, Uehara wanted to emulate 12th-century French aristocracy, combining materials like gold brocades and raw silk. And while French aristocrats may inspire them, Uehara’s designs can be found on California royalty: she counts Second Lady Jennifer Siebel Newsom as a client. “I enjoy working with people who are bold and not afraid of trying something different,” says Uehara. “I can relate to that a lot.” tokyogamine.net


There’s nothing like fall in the Catskills, and Roscoe Beer Company’s third annual Oktoberfest on September 30 is just the place to enjoy it, with traditional German fare, seasonal brews, and pumpkin painting for the kids.

CITIES

TRI-STATE

Dine al fresco at The Amsterdam in Hudson Valley

Going Dutch

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OUTDOOR ART

The Glass House, a National Trust Historic Site located in New Canaan, Connecticut, is a stunner by itself, but the property also regularly features art that compliments Philip Johnson’s modernist architecture. Last year, they invited Yayoi Kusama to adorn the house with her red dots and metallic spheres, and this year, Robert Indiana’s rust-colored steel structures entitled “ONE through ZERO” descend on the south lawn, echoing the Glass House’s angular frame. theglasshouse.org

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Hudson, New York’s development as a tourist destination continues with The Wick, part of Marriott’s luxury boutique portfolio. Located two hours outside Manhattan, the buzzy region offers plenty to do, from dining to vintage shopping to yoga. “Hudson has become a home away from home for those in the know, and is gaining momentum as a sought-after destination with its indie spirit and vibrant social scene,” said Julius Robinson, Vice President and Global Brand Lead, Marriott Tribute Portfolio. The hotel, taking its name from the former tenants, a candle and soap factory, boasts a rooftop with views of the Hudson Valley. thewickhotel.com)

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: JENNIFER MAY (2).TOM POWEL/ © 2017 MORGAN ART FOUNDATION / ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK

ROOM REQUEST

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Savor the last warm days of the season by dining al fresco at The Amsterdam, a charming new restaurant set in a 19th-century Rhinebeck Dutch townhouse. “Autumn is my favorite time of year to be in the Hudson Valley,” says executive chef Sara Lukasiewicz, a one-time David Chang apprentice. lovetheamsterdam.com

Robert Indiana’s “ONE through ZERO” structures

The Veuve Cliquot Secret Garden at Ocean House

Check out two summerthemed Rhode Island pop-ups that will stay up through the fall. First, there’s Watch Hill Inn, a seasonal property open through the end of October that just opened a custom Lilly Pulitzer

suite decked out in preppy nautical décor. Then there’s the Veuve Cliquot Secret Garden at Ocean House, an outdoor lounge serving champagne cocktails right through Thanksgiving. watchhillinn.com; oceanhouseri.com


PARTIES

DuJour Memorial Day Party WHO: Ray

Kelly, Frank Cooper, Harvey Spevak WHAT: DuJour’s annual summer kick-off party in the Hamptons WHERE: Gurney’s Montauk Resort PRESENTED BY: Whispering Angel

MORGAN VALLE

GERI & BRADFORD GOVEN

JAVIER ROMERO

JASON BINN RAY KELLY FRANK COOPER

MARLA WEAVER

HARVEY SPEVAK

PIERO ZANGARINI TERRI BAZLEY

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OLENA STETSENKO

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DuJour Summer Issue Launch Party WHAT:

WHO: Lily James, Phillip Bloch, Chris Bosh DuJour issue party celebrating cover star Lily James WHERE: Beauty & Essex PRESENTED BY: Belvedere Vodka

KATHRYN LE

PHILLIP BLOCH

WHITNEY HOY

VINCENT DE PAUL

ELLIOT MINTZ

LILY JAMES

TRICIA ROSENTRETER JASON STRAUSS

ALL IMAGES: GETTY IMAGES

CHRIS BOSH

JASON BINN JESSICA WONG


BINNSHOT Stephanie Harton, Adam Miller Group’s Adam Miller, Gerald Maxwell

Richard Barrett, CeCe Coffin and Erica Scott of David Yurman

Virginia Cademartori of Pal Zileri

Anne Binstock

Hearst’s Michael Clinton and Cosmopolitan’s Bill McBeath

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Gabrielle Reece, Laird Hamilton and Gary Cohen

Chris “Vo” Volo, Dennis Rodman, Darren Prince

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Araceli Franco, James Morissey, Jim Clerkin, Betsy Jones

Kramer Levin’s Tom Constance

Anastasia Webster, Araceli Franco, Betsy Jones, Stevan Hill, Rob Roche, Lilia Soria, Lorenzo Soria

Metavision Media’s Gary Mantione, Michael Ehlinger, Stephan Basile

Lynn Cohen and Ryan Seacrest

BlackRock’s Frank Cooper


BINNSHOT The Polo Bar’s Nelly Moudime and The Grill’s James Julius

Peter Malachi and Chelsea Kozak of Hermés

Gucci Team

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Estee Lauder’s Jane Hudis

Maria Valim and Carol Pennelli of David Yurman, Betsy Jones

Cartier’s Carter Berman

Susan Kangas of California Closets

Daily Mail’s Sean Walsh, Susan Magrino, Xin Fu

Halstead’s Diane Ramirez

Equinox’s Harvey Spevak

Beth McFadden and Eleanor Ashford of Armani

Joanna Coles and ABC Carpet’s Charles Ressler

GUTTER CREDIT HERE TK

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Saks Incorporated’s Steve Sadove


Mark Calev, Rodney Williams, Alisha Colins, Nina Cooper, Frank Cooper

Stevan Hill, Lorenzo Soria, Chris Bosh, Adrienne Bosh, Lilia Soria Katie Kinsella and Tatiana Imamura of Roberto Coin Whispering Angel’s Paul Chevalier, Xin Fu and Martha Stewart

Related’s, Jeff Mancini DUJOU R .C OM

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Stevan Hill, Rob Roche, Lorenzo Soria

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300 Entertainment’s Kevin Liles, DJ Clark Kent Master & Dynamic’s Jonathan Levine

Douglas Elliman’s Howard Lorber Carolina Herrera’s Reid Soles

Adrienne and Chris Bosh

Gurney’s Brandon Tarpey


ARTIFACT

The Heart of the House

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T Yves Saint Laurent’s heart-shaped pendant was worn by his favorite model in each show

BY SAMUEL ANDERSON

hese days , top models are hatched through a super f icial science involv ing beauty, pedigree, Instagram followers, Tyra Banks, or some combination thereof. But for Yves Saint Laurent, deciding the model that would close each of his shows was so personal and subjective that he used a heart-shaped pendant, a kind of artist’s signature, to adorn his selection. This three-by-five-inch trinket, created a year after the house’s founding in 1961, will be a centerpiece of the inaugural exhibit at the Museé Saint Laurent Paris, opening on Oct. 3 in the designer’s former Paris salon. The sentimental symbol may seem at odds with the fashion house’s latter-day hyper-edgy image, but from the start of his 40year reign, Saint Laurent valued sincerity over appearances: “Without an elegance of the heart, there is no elegance,” he is often quoted as saying. Nor did he cling to material wealth: “I’d like to imagine that [costume] jewels are more spiritual than real rubies or diamonds,” he said in his first interview with the press in 1954. Indeed, throughout Saint Laurent’s extended selection process, the bauble—inlaid not with precious gems but Swarovski crystals—became a mythical talisman. “He always had maybe seven or eight models that worked during the creation of the collection. There was a competition between all the models, of course,” says Head of Collections Aurelie Samuel. “He was a gentleman, but he always chose the heart for his favorite one.’” Those who wore it on multiple occasions, like Somalia-born Amalia Vairelli, instantly acquired “muse” status. Encased separately from the rest of the jewelry collection, the pendant will—quite literally—be the museum’s beating heart: “The light on the display will open and close, mimicking the movement of the heart,” says Samuel. And there’s no better home for the late designer’s heart given the museum’s president—Pierre Bergé, Saint Laurent’s lifelong partner. ■

ALL IMAGES: GUY MARINEAU (C) MUSÉE YVES SAINT LAURENT PARIS.

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Yves Saint Laurent and the token o his a ection


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Fall 2017  

Uma Thurman prepares for her Broadway debut; Dennis Rodman gets candid about the culture of North Korea; Calvin Klein gives us an exclusive...

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