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DUJOUR.COM

SEVEN DOLL ARS

SUMMER 2013

Rethinking Summer Fashion DEFENDING DONALD

TRUMP &

IN THE CLOSET WITH

MICHAEL DOUGLAS

+

The National Enquirer:

60 Years of Scandal

E N N A I L JU RE

NEW REASONS TO LOVE

MOO

FROM YACHTS TO COTS: MEET THE NEW LUXURY!


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I N T RO D U C I N G

OBJECTS OF CURIOSITY


mark dvorak & gary spain COLLECTORS/CURATORS SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA The timekeepers, reflecting on the nature of time as they're surrounded by the world's most prized historical, industrial and shop clocks.


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contents

Portugal up close

PAGE 110

LIFE

THE COVER-UP Why are we swathed in more fabric than ever before, even as the temperature soars?

36

BEAUTIFUL RUINS Michael Trapp has turned a passion for the dilapidated into a thriving business

52

#NEEDTOKNOW Ferragamo Vara’s 35th; Louis Vuitton travel books; trendy new stones and more

40

DECORATING NEWS

54

MY FIRST PIECE OF ART: DANIEL BOULUD

56

THE DEEP DIVE Take the plunge with these top-of-the-line diver’s watches

42

READY, SET, FORAGE A semi-secret society of top chefs gathers to cook the world’s most inventive meals

58

GRAND SLAM Lacoste’s croc gets an update for its 80th

42

BOARD GAMES Women over 30 are now plunging into the surf

60

IN THE CLOSET WITH MICHAEL DOUGLAS The actor’s costumes have made him an enduring style inspiration

44

BODY 64

LINES IN THE SAND This season’s most striking shoes, handbags and jewelry draw inspiration from Palm Springs desert minimalism

46

SUN & GAMES Retro shades, bold lip hues and nail lacquer inspired by Tom Wesselmann’s punchy Pop art BEAUTY NEWS

66

BEACH BOYS Ease into summer with these locally sourced items fit for both the street and the sand

68

THE GREAT RECESSION Appalled by going bald? The future that no man, neither friend nor celebrity, can escape

70

SOLAR POWER How to protect and, if necessary, restore skin

72

ADRIAN GAUT

STYLE


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Marguerite print dress, $5,950, BOTTEGA VENETA, 212-371-5511. BB shoes, $595, MANOLO BLAHNIK, 212-582-3007. Round diamond bracelet; round diamond line bracelet, both price upon request, GRAFF, graffdiamonds.com. Love bracelet, $5,850, CARTIER, cartier.com.

Ballet wonders

PA G E 1 5 0

PA G E 1 0 4 PLAY EXTREME DREAM It’s hard to imagine where the new Range Rover can’t go

74

GRAPE ESCAPES Experts are journeying farther south for bottles worth trying

76

AUSTERITY COMPLEX Peace-seekers clamor for harsh conditions in pursuit of personal transformation

78

WILL BARK FOR TRUST FUND When their owners die, some pets get very big payouts

82

PRIVATE JETIQUETTE 101 The dos and don’ts of flying even better than business class

84

WORK HOW LEGO WAS SAVED The truth behind the iconic toy’s resurrection

86

88

MR. CONGENIALITY Is Donald Trump the most misunderstood man in the world?

90

THE NEW DON DRAPERS Move over, Mad Men. In 2013, brand experts are the real kings

94

CULTURE PORTRAIT OF A COLLECTOR What motivates Rosette Delug, self-taught connoisseur of contemporary art

97

SUMMER’S BIGGEST EVENTS True Blood’s Stephen Moyer; has-beens to highbrow; Hollywood fixers hit Showtime

100

FEATURES JULIANNE MOORE The actress takes her career and her personal life into her own hands. By Lauren Waterman; photographed by Will Davidson

104

IN PLANE VIEW Photographer Adrian Gaut examines the daring, dynamic architecture of Portugal. By Adam Rathe

110

DUST TILL DAWN Socialites and celebrities are flocking to the Burning Man festival. Mickey Rapkin asks, can you put a price on enlightenment?

116

#NOFILTER On the Cayman Islands, racing shutter speeds reveal flashy neons and bold textures. Photographed by Hans Feurer

120

FRUIT OF THE GLOOM Nutritionists and healers are the new talk therapists. Amanda Fortini confesses. Photographed by Grant Cornett

134

A SIMPLE SUMMER Fashion photographer Thomas Whiteside captures the extremes of minimalism, at once graphic and serene

138

THE HISTORY OF THE NATIONAL ENQUIRER The truth behind America’s favorite tabloid proves just as juicy as the stories in its pages. By John Connolly

144

IN FLIGHT Power couple Natalia Osipova and Ivan Vasiliev are taking the dance world by storm. By George Wayne; photographed by Arthur Elgort

150

On the cover: Pieced jersey dress, $2,300, MARC JACOBS, 212-343-1490. On eyes: Telescopic Shocking Extensions Mascara, $10, L’ORÉAL PARIS, lorealparisusa. com. Photographed by Will Davidson; styled by Lori Goldstein

FROM LEFT: WILL DAVIDSON, ARTHUR ELGORT

Moore gets honest

GIMME SHELTER A new wave of authors are drawn to the seclusion of the Hamptons

(On her) Dress, price upon request, CHANEL, 800-550-0005. Scarf, $320, FORGET ME NOT, barneys.com. (On him) Biker pants, $928, RICK OWENS, 212-627-7222. T-shirt, $148, JOHN VARVATOS, johnvarvatos.com.


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contents CITIES Furry cover-ups

PAGE 36

CHICAGO Urbane outposts in Harbor Country; a family of restaurateurs; top taverns in River North

160

DALLAS McQueen comes to town; Dallas Contemporary’s house party; a Top Chef’s seafood spot

162

HOUSTON 164 Ballet Ball does Beyoncé; Texas-size outdoor spaces; style-savvy sisters LAS VEGAS Hakkasan’s debut; Sergio Rossi’s concept store; Mandalay Bay’s pool party

167

LOS ANGELES 172 Max Mara’s fete; A-list neighbors; DuJour toasts Kim Kardashian and Bruce Weber; a LACMA standout; movies under the stars

Ready, set, forage

PA G E 5 8

ORANGE COUNTY 179 Fendi classics return; Lanvin hits South Coast Plaza; Peter Fonda revs up; resort wear MIAMI 181 An essential wellness retreat; John Varvatos arrives; Porsche’s high-rise hustle NEW YORK 185 Local designers dive into swimwear; the High Line Hotel; Hermès celebrates a night to remember

HAMPTONS 190 Montauk musts; Greenport grows up; new workout classes; Binn around the Hamptons SAN FRANCISCO An interior designer takes the Bay Area by storm; SoulCycle’s new outpost

Retro inspiration

PA G E 6 4

193

BACK PAGE FAMOUS LAST WORDS 200 Horror master Stephen King pens the most revealing sentences of his career—for our handwriting analyst

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TRI-STATE 189 Atlantic City’s Borgata turns 10; Greenwich’s French invasion; Jersey City’s frozen treats


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webby awards Letter from the cEO

Jason BInn

I

t’s easy to see why su m mer get s people so excited: The kids are out Photo by Bruce Weber of school, vacation homes are ready to be opened for the season, and winter coats can be swapped for linen suits— or sometimes even less. And it’s an especially exciting season for me because this is York Giants’ Victor Cruz and Blondie frontwoman Deborah Harry, who’s touring Europe this our very first summer issue of DuJour. From our cover story on the beautiful Juli- summer and is as beautiful and punk rock as ever. Additionally, our industry has recognized the anne Moore—who will appear in a couple of this summer’s must-see movies—to our exten- magazine for excellence. DuJour’s website won sive coverage of seasonal hot spots all over the a prestigious Webby for best homepage and we country, including the Hamptons, a place that’s were an honoree for best navigation/structure, very near to my own heart, this issue embraces while min (Media Industry Newsletter) awarded what’s sure to be exciting, enjoyable and excep- DuJour with an honorable mention for being one of the best new sites launched this year. tional about the coming months. Not that the recent quarter hasn’t been great And the accolades aren’t just exclusive to our for me and for DuJour. I hosted a much-buzzed- online presence. Everywhere I go, whether it’s Milan for Fashabout, fabulous luncheon in honor of our spring issue cover star, Kim Kardashian, for which a ion Week, London or Paris, I meet people who pregnant Kim made her way to the Darby, the in- are excited and enthusiastic about DuJour and credibly popular and perennially crowded Man- the remarkable space it’s created globally. Or, hattan boîte run by Scott Sartiano and Richie as I like to say, “glocally.” Of course, we’re also thrilled to have the supAkiva. More than 75 guests gathered to enjoy an extraordinary meal by Iron Chef Alexandra port of readers who pick up the magazine, log on Guarnaschelli, as well as Kim’s peerless charm. to DuJour.com and interact with us on Twitter, The issue was a runaway success, of course, Facebook and Instagram, where we’re proud to but introducing Kim to DuJour’s friends and boast more than 400,000 followers. There’s plenty to love in this issue, and we family was an incredible experience, too. We’ve also had the honor of publishing digital issues can’t think of anyone whom we’d rather spend with diverse, singular cover stars like the New the summer with than you.

Just shy of celebrating our first anniversary, DuJour has won the highly regarded Webby—the Oscars of the Internet—for Best Home/Welcome Page for our website. This is quite an honor, considering the very worthy field of approximately 11,000 applicants. Kudos to our amazing team of print and digital professionals who have put together a

site that the industry has singled out as best in class. Don’t miss our exclusive web content and the innovative site navigation that sets DuJour.com apart from the competition.


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thierry prissert

albert reaching kriemler “always “teekay tkt tkt tk” for the stars”

omer acar

arthur sulzberger jr., jeff zucker, bryant gumbel

“media savvy”

“let’s go to raffles in paris”

pierre & madison keyser

john howard

“athletes at their finest”

“suave & debonnaire”

handpicked “extended family” BEHIND THE VELVET ROPE

BINN ShotS

Follow on Twitter @JasonBinn

jim gold & linda fargo

“solid citiZens”

james mullaney & giovanna furlanetto

# furla handbags

etta meyer & stephanie jones

“best in class in givenchy (l) and lanvin”

piers morgan & jonathan wald

“live wires”

julie macklowe & rob wiesenthal

“vbeautÉ fans”

jeff roseman & shirley ramos at bianca, miami

“newmark’s commercial real estate kingpin”

k arl rove, richard ash m.d. & jonathan cheban

Amanda Withelier Amy Gross André Balazs Andrew Rosen Andrew Sasson Angela Arabo Ann Caruso Ari Horowitz Bruce Weber Catherine Malandrino Cecile Andrau Celeste Fierro Chris Paciello Chuck Townsend Cori Galpern Damian Mould Dan Galpern Dave Grutman David Barton David Martin Desiree Gruber Desirée Rogers Erik Maza Federica Boido Federica Marchionni Garine Zerounian Gary Melius Greg D’Alba Guy Chetwynd Hanna Struever Harry Slatkin Harvey Spevak Hilary Rhoda Isaac Gindi Jack Chehebar James Cohen James Shay Jason Weisenfeld Jeff Bercovici Jeff Dagowitz Jeff Hirsh Jesse Angelo Jill Smoller Jim Kerwin

“three wise men at cipriani”

donald trump jr. at the darby iesha reed, jonnice slaughter & paula dirks

“the write stuff”

“he’s no apprentice”

andrea sanders & deidre costa major

“destination americana manhasset”

guglielmo melegari at cipriani

“pomellato, anyone ? ”

senator kirsten gillibrand & liontree’s aryeh bourkoff

lawrence lewis

“a gem of a guy”

peter lichtenthal cornelia guest & bobbi brown

“always up for a shoot”

david yurman, andrew rosen, jenny dyer & sybil yurman

“as good as it gets”

evan yurman at milos

“top of his game”

albert kriemler at sushi samba

“style & substance”

“a cut above the rest”

kelly rutherford, suzy biszantz

“la perla ambassadors”

brett yormark

woody harrelson & richard plepler

“headliners”

“the prince of the brooklyn nets”


TW Steele’s Monique Hienkens, Joe Romulus & Jordy CobelenS at yelllowtail in las vegas

Jarrod Weber, Petra Nemcova, Mark Weber

“Two men with an eye for beauty”

BINN Shots

Allison & Howard Lutnick

“big smiles, big hearts”

Follow on Twitter @JasonBinn

“extended family” Continued... jason Klarman, Karolina Kurkova, Nigel Barker, Coco Rocha

Andrea Tremolada

“It’s all about the face”

John Demsey

“Needs no introduction”

HANNA STRUEVER

Rajat Singh, Fabio Gnocchi, Massimo Caronna, Elif Gezgec & Giorgiana Magnolfi

“location location location”

jeff tweedy at stk

“aka sean john”

#adventurous

“wardrobe is everything”

Jason Strauss at marquee

Jane Hertzmark Hudis

“My Modern Muse”

Nicole Oge at cipriani

“it’s her ‘town’”

Nick Wooster, Simon Doonan, Tommy & dee Hilfiger & jeffrey banks

“style warriors”

MEHDI & Roya eftek ari

“one proud father at the four seasons los angeles”

“the boss” Ward Simmons & Fergie have everything to smile about

Mark Birnbaum

“catch me if you can”

melissa Beste

“last name says it all”

paolo Viera Torello

top editor deborah needleman with husband, slate’s jacob weisberg, & arianna huffington

Jolie Hunt JP Geoghegan Judith Stone Julia Erdman Keach Hagey Kevin Dyson Kim Walker Larry Goodrich Lauran Walk Lee Schrager Lisa Cohen Lisa Marchese Lottie Oakley Mara Buxbaum Marcy Engelman Mary Gerzema Mary Warren Matt Witheiler Melissa Pordy Michael Apa Michael Hirtenstein Michael Karsh Michael Warren Michael Weaver Mike Heller Nick Beim Nick Hissom Pascaline Servan-Schreiber Paul Lerner Peggy Drexler Peter Malachi Randy Brandoff Rebecca Minkoff Richard Ash Richard Beckman Dr. Richard Firshein Richard Kirshenbaum Robin Bronk Rod Manley Roger Ehrenberg Samir Husni Sante D’Orazio Scott Sartiano Selita Ebanks Shauna Brooke Stefania Girombelli Steve Cohn Susan Duffy Tim Crout Tom Florio Tom Sansone Veronique Gabai-Pinsky

Celeste Fierrro, David Spade

“let’s meet at stk steakhouse”

John Oates, Larry Sands

“take it from the top”

Marcy & Michael Warren

“my first investors— still smiling”

the great Brunello Cucinelli with saks kingpins steve sadove and ron frasch

Toni & Paul Lubestky

“full house”


A MOMENT WITH THE EDITORS

THOUGHTS DUJOUR something you never thought you would, getting your hands a little dirty. Embracing the unexpected.

PAGE 97

Gathering all your fancy friends, say, for a week at Burning Man. (Read about that, too, in Mickey Rapkin’s excellent report on the private-jet crowd’s Making a magazine is unpre-

dictable work. No matter how well you plan, there’s always drama—some deadline missed,

N V : We’ve got the famously unpredictable George Wayne on Russia’s premier ballet dancers, who

turn out better than you hoped. Others might

requested Queen as the music for our photo shoot

disappoint. The goal for each issue is to have the

with Arthur Elgort. And marriage advice from

pleasant surprises outnumber all the other kinds.

Stephen King. And let’s not forget how we traveled all the way to the Cayman Islands to shoot lush and

Of course, we like surprises. Surprise

tropical summer fashion—and some of the most

is what makes our job—and, we think, the maga-

inspiring shots photographer Hans Feurer returned

zine—interesting. From the very beginning, we’ve

with were taken in a dusty parking lot.

known that the single thing we do not want DuJour

KP:

to be is predictable.

obvious is the one about accidental art-world darling

NV: Since we launched, we’ve aimed to be a bit

Top: The collection in Rosette Delug’s library. Above: On Grand Cayman, model Jacquelyn Jablonski wears a dress and carries bags by LOUIS VUITTON. Also on Jablonski: Swimsuit by A.T.G WOMEN, necklaces by MISSONI, MICHAEL KORS and ALEXIS BITTAR, bracelet by PIERRE HARDY, and shoes by POLLINI. Below: Burning Man gets comfortable with a little air-conditioning.

the counterintuitive.

some film lost, some last-minute triumph. Stories

KEITH POLLOCK:

PA G E 1 2 0

takeover of the desert festival.) We found glamour in

For me, the most compelling story about the un-

Rosette Delug, who clawed her way into the exclusive world of big-time collectors. And I’m fascinated by

contrary. This month, though, things really went

designer Michael Trapp, whose love of the imperfect

in an entirely unexpected direction. We surprised

involves creating the most beautifully dilapidated

even ourselves!

interiors and gardens you’ve seen. We also see a

KP:

Take our cover model. You think you know

surprisingly softer side of Donald Trump. Writer Vicky

Julianne Moore. She’s gorgeous, smart and elegant.

Ward came to us with the idea of making an argu-

But in our story, Moore is something else, too. She

ment for Trump, who is probably as unpopular right

completely upends the notion of the sound-bite Hol-

now as he’s ever been, as a good guy. We weren’t

lywood actress, coming off to writer Lauren Water-

sure. But she makes a convincing case.

man as a bit gruff and very direct. We’re so used to

N V : Another definitely pleasant surprise: This spring,

celebrities presenting themselves a certain way, but

DuJour.com was the winner of a Webby award for

this story strips the glossy sheen from both Moore

Best Home/Welcome Page. The award, along with

and the standard celebrity interview. She has her

all the amazing feedback we’ve gotten over the past

own idea for where the conversation

year—from many unexpected people, in fact—is

will go, and she takes it there.

serious validation. Because no matter how much you

NV:

All signs began pointing to an

I’ve-been-doing-this-too-long part of you that wor-

summer ever. We’ve got women

ries there’s not room in a crowded industry for a new

surfing, men going bald on purpose,

magazine. We’re so grateful you disagree.

retreats that sell guests on bare conditions. Lynn Yaeger makes a persuasive case for dressing so seasonless that even fur is fair game for summer.

KP:

Why not, right? And that’s the

theme that emerged: Why not? Céline fur sandals? Why not! There’s something to be said for the luxury

PA G E 1 1 6

believe in a project, there’s always some hard, cynical

issue that celebrated the most badass

of bending the rules, challenging the notion of what’s standard, doing

COUNTERCLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN; HANS FEUER; JODI GUBER BRUFSKY; THOMAS WHITESIDE

N

ICOLE VECCHIARELLI:


Co-Editor in Chief Keith Pollock

Co-Editor in Chief Nicole Vecchiarelli

Chief Revenue Officer Alan Katz

Sales

Art Director Stephanie Jones

Executive Director Gayle Perry Sobel

Executive Editor Nancy Bilyeau

Executive Director Ron Stern

Editor at Large Alyssa Giacobbe

Executive Director Phil Witt

Features

Executive Director Susy Scott (Italy)

Deputy Editors Daryl Chen (Features), Natasha Wolff (Cities) Articles Editor Adam Rathe

Executive Director Sylvie Durlach S&R Media (France)

Staff Writer Lindsay Silberman

Project Manager Isabelle McTwigan

Research Editor Ivy Pascual

Senior Executive Assistant Mallory Samet Executive Assistants Shani Edalati, Caitlin Hosek

Associate Editor Natalia de Ory

Sales Assistant Jennifer Lentol

Art + Photo

Marketing Director Julia Light

Photo Editor Etta Meyer

Designer Jason M. Szkutek

Designer Gina Nastasi

Chief Advisor Monty Shadow

Fashion + Beauty Senior Market Editor Sydney Wasserman

Executive Vice President Cynthia Lewis

Assistant Fashion/Market Editor Paul Frederick

Production

Editorial Assistant Brooke Bobb

Vice President, Production Shawn Lowe Prepress Manager John Francesconi

DUJOUR Cities

Prepress Assistant Michael Oh

Regional Editors Anna Blessing (Chicago, Las Vegas, San Francisco),

Coordinator Robert Cohen

Holly Crawford (Houston), Rebecca Kleinman (Miami), Chadner Navarro (New York, Tri-State), Maxine Trowbridge (Dallas)

Print and Paper Management CALEV Print Media

Correspondents Andrea Bennett (Las Vegas), Genie Fitzgerald (Los Angeles, Orange County),

Finance

Carlos Lopez (Los Angeles), David Nash (San Francisco), Lindley Pless (Tri-State), Nicki Richesin (San Francisco)

Financial Controller Allie Schiffmiller

DUJOUR.com

Contributors Paul Biedrzycki (Automotive), Patricia Bosworth,

Chief Digital Officer Robin Keller

Lisa Cohen (Home), Dori Cooperman, Douglas Friedman, Cassandra Grey, Beth Landman,

Web Editor Sarah Leon

Jeffrey Podolsky, Mickey Rapkin, Rhonda Riche, Lee Brian Schrager, Michael Solomon, Tyler Thoreson,

Social Media Editor Krista Soriano

Lauren Waterman, Bruce Weber, Thomas Whiteside

Senior Web Developers David De Los Santos, Bill Van Pelt

Contributing Editors Melanie Carnsew (Art), Kate Crane (Copy),

Web Producer Julianne Mosoff

Kara Cutruzzula (Features), Antoine Dozois (Copy), Nick Earhart (Copy), Dacus Thompson (Research)

Founder/CEO Jason Binn

Interns

Chief Financial Officer Caryn Whitman

Delia Bennett, Esmae Duran, Meaghan Hartland, Hayley Shear, Efi Turkson,

Co-Chairman James Cohen

F. Annabel Walsh, Kyle Wukasch

Director of Editorial Operations Haley Binn

Web Design Code and Theory

Co-Chairman Kevin Ryan General Counsel John A. Golieb

BPA Worldwide membership applied for October 2012 DuJour (ISSN 2328-8868) is published four times a year by DuJour Media Group, LLC., 2 Park Avenue, NYC 10016. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. The publishers and editors are not responsible for unsolicited material and it will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication subject to DuJour magazine’s right to edit. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, photographs and drawings. Copyright Š 2013 DuJour Media Group, LLC. For a subscription to DuJour magazine, go to: subscribe.dujour.com


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contributors

Getting to know some of the talent behind this issue—lunch order and all

Lori Goldstein

stylist, “julianne moore,” p. 104 Soup DuJour: Lentil When it comes to fashion, Julianne Moore just gets it, according to stylist Lori Goldstein. The two have been friends for many years. “We have the same aesthetic. When we see a great coat or piece of jewelry, she gets excited about it like I do. It’s really special to be around that energy instead of an actor who is just blasé,” says Goldstein, who has styled ad campaigns for Donatella Versace and Vera Wang. “It was really fun to pull the shoot together. It was like playing dress-up with a girlfriend on a Sunday afternoon.”

Hans Feurer

photographer, “#nofilter,” p. 120 Soup DuJour: Chinese Chicken The day before DuJour’s summer fashion shoot in the Caribbean, photographer Hans Feurer spent hours scouting locations around Grand Cayman. When he arrived at Rum Point on the island’s North Side, he knew he had found the right place. “There was a dreamlike quality to the location. It was a magical corner with a huge sand bank,” he says. “The island was enchanting.” Feurer, who is based in Zurich, has been shooting fashion editorials all over the world since the late 1960s. His work has appeared in Vogue, Elle and Marie Claire.

writer, “dust till dawn,” p. 116 Soup DuJour: Tomato Bisque Writer Mickey Rapkin is hoping to attend the next Burning Man. After reporting his story about the influx of wealthy Burners, Rapkin says, “I imagined it was a free-for-all sexand-drugs party. There’s definitely some of that, but it’s really kind of a spiritual experience. I’m desperate to go. I’m not above taking an RV shower.” Rapkin, whose work has appeared in GQ, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly, also had another realization: “There’s no right or wrong way to do Burning Man. It’s just important to go.”

Arthur Elgort

photographer, “in flight,” p. 150 Soup DuJour: Tomato Working with ballet dancers is a challenge for Arthur Elgort— they tend to hold back on shoots because they fear injuring themselves. But Natalia Osipova and Ivan Vasiliev didn’t pose that problem for the famed fashion photographer. “They were free and uninhibited and unpredictable. I liked that about them,” he says. “Ivan would be making crazy faces and turning upside down, while Natalia was very serious. They were opposites, but it worked for them.” Elgort’s illustrious career shooting both fashion and dance spans more than four decades, with his work appearing in Vogue, GQ and Rolling Stone.

*du jour [doo zhoor] adjective [from French: of the day] Example: What is your soup du jour?

from top: jason frank rothenberg; max vadukul; taghi naderzad; audrey amelie rudolf

Mickey Rapkin


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Adrian Gaut

photographer, “in plane view,” p. 110 Soup DuJour: Vietnamese Pho “It was a bit renegade-style,” says photographer Adrian Gaut of his shoot in Portugal. “I would show up at a building, take some pictures and hope nobody asked questions. I love working that way. It’s so loose and fast, and there’s no one trying to shape the picture.” When Gaut first began his career, he was innately drawn to architecture. But his distinct style—which focuses more on the details, rather than the bigger picture—was slow to take off editorially. He marvels at how things have changed since then. “It’s amazing to be doing what I love,” Gaut says. His work has appeared in New York, Architectural Digest and Elle.

Vicky Ward

writer, “mr. congeniality,” p. 90 Soup DuJour: French Onion “It’s easy to stereotype him as a bombastic show-off,” Vicky Ward says of her profile subject, Donald Trump, whom she met in 2001. “But he has insecurities that give him a complexity and a charm.” Ward turned to his daughter Ivanka for insight into the real estate titan. “She told me that people think he does all the talking, but part of his cleverness is he’s always assessing the situation shrewdly. He doesn’t miss a thing.” Ward has written for Vanity Fair, The Huffington Post and The Independent. Her book about New York City’s General Motors building will be published in the fall.

george wayne

David Vandewal

stylist, “#nofilter,” p. 120 Soup DuJour: Gazpacho Stylist David Vandewal found his inspiration for DuJour’s Cayman Islands shoot right on set. “Hans Feurer happens to be one of my personal fashion heroes,” he says. “I’ve stared at his images since the ’70s, and I wanted to create this homage to him and the way he portrays women as strong and dynamic.” As for the beach-ready fashion, Vandewal was drawn to the neongreen neoprene bathing suit by A.T.G, which he describes as a “summery scuba-diving look.” Vandewal has styled editorials for W, Interview and Italian Vogue.

*du jour [doo zhoor] adjective [from French: of the day] Example: What is your soup du jour?

from top: #selfie; chloe crespi; patrick cashin; dan jackson

writer, “in flight,” p. 150 Soup DuJour: Creamy Clam Chowder For his story on Russian ballet superstars Ivan Vasiliev and Natalia Osipova, George Wayne sat in on a rehearsal at ABT studios in Manhattan. “Being in their presence, and watching them under the tutelage of Alexei Ratmansky—one of the world’s most acclaimed ballet masters—was without question a monumental highlight of my year,” he says of the experience. Wayne, a contributing editor at Vanity Fair, found the dancing duo endearing—particularly Ivan. He muses, “How can you not love a ballet god who still takes time out for the occasional Marlboro Light cigarette?”


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behind the scenes

Have Island, Will Travel

DuJour decamped to the pristine beaches of Grand Cayman

Clockwise from top: An aerial view of Grand Cayman; makeup artist Vicky Steckel works with model Jacquelyn Jablonski; Hans Feurer frames a shot; one of the many sunny buildings on Grand Cayman; the crew celebrating postshoot, with, from left, DuJour co-editor in chief Keith Pollock, DuJour photo editor Etta Meyer, hair stylist Ward Stegerhoek, Feurer, Jablonski, stylist David Vandewal, Steckel, fashion assistant Daniel Edley and photo assistant Karin Gfeller

clockwise from top: getty images; keith pollock (2); getty images; courtesy of hans feurer

T

he secluded Caribbean paradise of Grand Cayman was a natural fit for DuJour’s most colorful summer fashion story, given that the island’s rainbow-hued, colonialstyle architecture is so vibrant it can be seen from the plane. Located only a quick four-hour flight from New York City, Grand Cayman—the largest of the three Cayman Islands—contains many spectacular areas that our 10-person crew spent time discovering and exploring. Like the Queen Elizabeth II Botanic Park, a 65-acre sanctuary of rare wildlife, vibrant flowers and hidden trails. And the island’s North Side, where the beach at Rum Point is simultaneously tranquil (hammocks, lounge chairs, tropical libations) and bustling with activity (surfing, Jet Skiing, snorkeling). But before all the fun could be had, our group first rose before dawn to assemble on the coral sands of the Seven Mile Beach in front of the Ritz-Carlton, where fashion photographer Hans Feurer went to work. With the sun rising behind her, model Jacquelyn Jablonski paraded across the beach in Proenza Schouler, Etro and Dries Van Noten. A setup by the hotel’s majestic pool drew stares from intrigued + more @ vacationers, with the main attraction being duJour.com our model in Chanel, gliding through the water with the elegance of a synchronized swimmer. After the final shot, Jablonski toweled off, her hair black as an oil slick. An excited little girl ran up to her. “Are you a model?” she wanted to know. After four sunny days, six different locations, eight lunches and dinners of conch fritters and just-caught grouper and one memorable photo shoot, our crew gathered at Cayman Cabana, a tiki-style waterfront restaurant known for its seafood. Live reggae music provided an upbeat soundtrack, and the group ended the trip in proper tropical style: by toasting each other with piña coladas as the sun set on the Caribbean. —LINDSAY SILBERMAN


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TREND WATCH

The cover-up I

f you go to runway shows all the time, after a while nothing fazes you—not reenactments of Highlands rapes (McQueen, fall 1995); benches collapsing (Balenciaga, spring 2012); models in coffins (Thom Browne, fall 2012); or even a sheep reluctantly taking to the catwalk (Miguel Adrover, fall 2001). So is it any wonder that when Prada proposes serious mink coats for

summer 2013, no one in the audience even blinks a cream-shadowed eye? The Prada coat (a highly desirable and beautiful item, by the way, especially if you subvert Miuccia Prada’s intentions and save it for next December) is but a single example of the tendency this season for designers to cover

One Christmas Eve, Yoko Ono called a Bergdorf Goodman associate to come to her home with fur coats. How many did she and John Lennon buy? 70.

Time & life pictures/getty images

Why are we swathed in more fabric than ever before, even as the temperature soars? Lynn Yaeger spins a theory.


COLOR DREAMS Collection

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WORK

C U LT U R E

Above: As told in the Bible, Sarah greets the Egyptians in layered and embellished style. Left: Conservative Victorian women amble about in very full skirts and bow-tied bonnets.

In 2010, the Olsen twins pedaled their way through a SoulCycle class wearing cashmere sweaters with cashmere sweatpants—presumably by The Row.

TOP TO BOTTOM: SUPERSTOCK; POPPERFOTO/GETTY IMAGES; IMAXTREE (3)

were often met with ridicule. In the early 1850s, feminist Amelia Bloomer suggests covering your limbs—so prissy are the times that you can’t even say the word legs—with the puff y bif u rcated sk ir t that bears her name. (Unfor tunately, hardly anyone but Amelia chooses to wear it.) The late 19th century se e s va r iou s ot he r attempts —the Aesthetic Movement, of which Oscar Wilde is a proponent, loosens corsets, even as it envelopes you in tea gowns neck to ankle. It isn’t until around 1920, when young couples can be naughty in the backs e a t s of a u t o m o b i l e s and listen to suggestive tunes on the radio, that things really get going. I n t he September 9, 1925, issue of The New Republic (I have a copy right here, don’t you?), there is an essay titled “Flapper Jane” wherein the author, Br uce Bliven, descr ibes h is f ictional 19-year-old heroine’s outfit: Her dress, as you can’t possibly help knowing if you have even one good eye, and get around at all outside the Old People’s Home, is also brief. It is cut low where it might be high, and vice versa. The skirt comes just an inch below her knees, overlapping by a faint fraction her rolled and twisted stockings... And if Jane and her sisters can d r i n k batht ub gi n and d ance the Black Bottom in a rouged-knee-revealing backless, almost frontless bea ded sh if t, even a s a bli z za rd r ages, why shou ld n’t he r jau nt y g r e a t- g r a n d d a u g ht e r s p e n d t h e su m me r of 2013 t r aipsi ng dow n Jobs Lane in a tie-dyed Miu Miu fox stole tossed insouciantly over an ankle-length denim duster? Her feet may be clammy and soggy in fur-lined Céline sandals, but rest assured, her fashionable spirits will be soaring.

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Valentino

you up as temperatures climb. Junya Watanabe sees you buried in heatseeking nylon; The Row wants to swaddle you in cashmere. At Valentino, Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pier Paolo Piccioli think you should spend a war m evening clad in a demure round-necked, long-sleeved eyelet frock. (Could they have been counting on the other presidential candidate winning the election, ushering in an era of high-collared, alcoholfree Washington cocktail parties?) It may be st ra nge i n a n era of global warming, but fashion is often a little peculiar—isn’t that what m a ke s it , wel l, at le a st m a rg i nally fun? Actually, this business of weather-discordant dressing is nothing new: It stretches back to ancient times, at least if my recollection of The Golden Book of Bible Stories can be considered a reliable source. Here are Rachel and Sarah swathed in sheets of pristine ivor y fabric. (Eve, of course, is an entirely different story.) No matter how hot it gets in the Negev, no one is trotting through the Red Sea in a monokini. This propensity to enrobe oneself in lugubrious garments is the order of the day through the Middle Ages and the Enlightenment, but jump ahead a little—railroads are beginning to rumble, photography is a mere click away, f lush toilets will gurgle soon enough—and the pendulum has swung, at least brief ly, in the other direction. Chic young ladies are spending the Napoleonic era f litting around in sheer shortsleeved, low-necked Empire frocks and f limsy slippers, regardless of the bone-chilling climes and the foot-high drifts of snow. (And remember, winters were colder back then.) Alas, this sexy raiment is soon replaced by a mournful Victorian aesthetic that relies upon ridiculous hoop underpinnings, miles of ball fringe and layer upon layer of brocade and velvet, regardless of the suffocating heat just outside the (unair-conditioned) cottage door. Attempts to rectify this situation

BODY

Prada

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Miu Miu

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San Diego West Coast Eye Care 4413 La Jolla Village Dr. 858.320.0075

Los Angeles The Eye Gallery 8624 Sunset Blvd. 310.652.2121

Las Vegas Bellissimo 3600 Las Vegas Blvd. S. 702.207.2135

Las Vegas Mesmereyes 3600 Las Vegas Blvd. S. 702.731.0300

Destin The Eye Gallery 4143 Legendary Dr. 850.650.4370

Miami The Eye Gallery 1661 SW 37th Avenue 305.774.0891

Atlanta The Eye Gallery 3330 Piedmont Rd. NE 404.231.3772


STYLE

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C U LT U R E JEWELRY

KID ROCKS

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ewelers’ windows are looking a little more crowded lately. A slew of new stones are jostling to become the trendy rocks du jour, and a freshman class has emerged thanks to several shifts in the gem world. Long-open mines are becoming extinct, reducing the supply of conventional stones and encouraging more adventurous gemology. At the same time, gold prices have risen—an ounce can cost $1,500, up from $350 a few years ago— meaning that plain jewelry no longer is as eye-catching as its price. Adding a few splashy stones, though, burnishes visual impact and value. Of course, sometimes the “undiscovered” rocks are simply a marketing trick. We corralled a gem-world brain trust for an insider’s rundown of the new rock stars.

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3

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#NEEDTOKNOW 1

FERRAGAMO L’ICONA Few shoes are as timeless as the Ferragamo Vara, and to celebrate the pump’s 35th anniversary, the brand tapped photographer Claiborne Swanson Frank to capture modern-day style stars, including Miroslava Duma, Lauren Santo Domingo and Camilla Belle, wearing their favorite pairs. This also marks the first time the Vara can be customized in a variety of bold colors and printed fabrics.

2

MAWI X BRUNO MAGLI Embellishment takes center stage with Mawi jewelry and Bruno Magli’s new collection of pumps and accessories. In rich hues and bedecked with costume gems, the shoes aren’t the only offering from this brilliant partnership—the line also includes bags, earrings, bracelets and necklaces.

3

LOUIS VUITTON TRAVEL BOOKS Louis Vuitton’s brand-new travel books are perfect for your carry-on or your coffee table. The luxury house commissioned contemporary artists Jean-Philippe Delhomme, Daniel Arsham, Natsko Seki and Chéri Samba to interpret their journeys through London, Paris, New York and Easter Island. The project will continue next year with new destinations and artists.

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4

CRIPPEN Susie Crippen brings cool to eco-fashion with the debut of her easy-to-wear eponymous collection. The co-founder of J Brand introduces tunics, caftans and a suit made from sustainable fabrics. They’re sure to be hits whether worn with Birkenstocks or a sleek pair of stilettos.

5

IMPRESSIONS DIOR Dior fans should immediately head to Granville, France, for a medium-crossing new exhibition at the Musée Christian Dior. Paintings by impressionist masters Monet, Renoir and Degas are paired with designs by Monsieur Dior and a few of his successors, like Raf Simons and Yves Saint Laurent. Open through September 22, the show explores how nature, light and movement inf luenced the work of these creative geniuses.

6

ANGELA CUMMINGS FOR ASSAEL Celebrated jewelry designer Angela Cummings returns after a bit of a break to create a new collection with Assael. The pieces contain Assael’s famous Tahitian black pearls and South Sea white pearls, which are set against gold and diamond seahorse and coral motifs. —BROOKE BOBB

MOZAMBIQUE RUBIES Less than a decade ago, a new deposit was unearthed in northern Mozambique. The massive hoard produces stunning rubies that match and even best Burma’s iconic but sleepy reds. “It’s a clean, very lively crystal,” says Taffin’s James Taffin de Givenchy. “Hang a pair of Burma red studs from your ear and they will look black, but these will show the red and be alive.”

SPINEL Spinel is found amid deposits of rubies and sapphires and was historically confused with them. The so-called Black Prince’s ruby, part of the British Crown Jewels, is actually an egg-size spinel. These ultra-hard stones, most prized in red and blue, fell from favor but are surging again—some of the finest reds are from Tanzania, the top-tier blues from Vietnam.

TSAVORITE Named not after the Russian king but in honor of Kenya’s Tsavo National Park, this yellowish green stone was first discovered in the late 1960s, at much the same time as Tanzanite. It’s a terrific understudy for emeralds, according to Paul Howie of Oscar Heyman—both for its lower cost and for its durability, proving harder and more chip resistant.

RUBELLITE Marina B’s Paul Lubetsky says the new Chinese market, where red is a lucky, cherished color, has reignited interest in the stone, but prices have yet to skyrocket. (They’re still a fraction of the cost of comparable rubies.) “Nothing else compares to it, as it’s so bright,” he raves. —MARK ELLWOOD

Louis Vuitton has commissioned Frank Gehry to design the Foundation for Creation, a $127 million private art museum, opening in Paris next year.

STYLE NEWS: CIRCLE IMAGE: CLAIBORNE SWANSON FRANK; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY OF THE DESIGNER. GEM: GETTY IMAGES.

STYLE NEWS


S o m e B e lieve All Vo d k as Ar e C reated Eq u al.

Freeze-Filtered. Bold Flavor. Highest Rated White Spirit In the World. *Beverage Tasting Institute 97 Rating, 2006, 2007, 2009 and 2010.

ww w .el i t by st oli. c om S AVO R e lit™ R E S PO N SIB LY. elit™ by STOLICHNAYA® Vodka. 40% Alc./Vol. Distilled from grain. William Grant & Sons, Inc. New York, NY. © 2013 Spirits International, B.V.


LIFE

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MILESTONES

TIMEPIECES

THE DEEP DIVE

Take the plunge with these top-of-the-line diver’s watches

+

C U LT U R E

A

GRAND SLAM

s one legend goes, French tennis champion René Lacoste was eyeing an alligator suitcase when the press—confusing its reptiles—dubbed him “Le Crocodile.” The nickname stuck and proved memorable as a logo: Lacoste emblazoned the right-facing crocodile on his polo shirts in 1933.

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Now celebrating its 80th anniversary, the brand nods to its origins and looks to the future with two notable new lines. Lacoste loyalists can expect a number of covetable pieces in the Edition collection, including re-creations of the popular ‘80s aviators and a 1963 herringbone canvas tennis shoe, plus polos inspired by rare sketches pulled from the archives. The Unexpected collection stays true to its name, giving Lacoste’s well-known pieces, like the piqué polo, an ultra-playful spin. + more @ To update the iconic logo, creative DuJour.com director Felipe Oliveira Baptista tapped British designer Peter Saville, who’s collaborated with Yohji Yamamoto, Jil Sander and Givenchy. “It’s an interesting project because it’s about framing time,” Saville says. “I saw that these simple circles— the ‘8’ and the ‘0’—could provide the frame for Lacoste past and present.” The resulting motif is prominently placed on several pieces—but no higher than the crocodile.—KRISTA SORIANO René Lacoste at the Davis Cup, 1927

Clockwise from top left: Limited Edition Oracle Team USA Aquaracer, $5,500, TAG HEUER, shop.tagheuer.com. Fifty Fathoms Flyback Chronograph, $18,400, BLANCPAIN, 212-396-1735. Deep Sea Chronograph, $11,300, JAEGER-LECOULTRE, jaeger-lecoultre.com. Royal Oak Offshore Diver, $18,900, AUDEMARS PIGUET, audemarspiguet.com. King Power Oceanographic 4000, $21,800, HUBLOT, hublot.com. Superocean 42, $3,195, BREITLING, breitling.com.

Diver’s watches first became popular after Jacques Cousteau strapped on a Blancpain Fifty Fathoms in the 1956 film Le monde du silence.

DIVE: BRAD BRIDGERS; GRAND SLAM: COURTESY OF LACOSTE

STYLE


AN ELEGANT PERFORMANCE

THE ALL-NEW QUATTROPORTE. A CELEBRATION OF ELEGANCE, TECHNOLOGY AND POWER. The Quattroporte was born in 1963, when Maserati put a racing engine in a Grand Touring automobile. Today, the sixth-generation Quattroporte is simply the world’s finest luxury sports sedan, with a choice of two new engines: a 523 hp V8 capable of 191 mph or a 404 hp V6 with intelligent Q4 all-wheel drive. Both engines are matched to an 8-speed automatic transmission for maximum acceleration and fuel efficiency. Quattroporte blends unmistakable Italian design and one of the most spacious interiors in its category with engineering precision for a combination of performance, luxury and driving pleasure that only Maserati can offer. maserati.us / 877-my-Maserati

Maserati Quattroporte S Q4 with intelligent all-wheel drive starts at $102,500.*

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retrospective

in the closet with michael douglas

Even before his sartorially striking role in HBO’s Liberace biopic, the actor’s costumes have made him a style inspiration. Here’s what we’ve learned.

1987

1972–76

The China Syndrome

The Streets of San Francisco

1984

1993

1992

Adam at 6 A.M. Flaunting beefy forearms is a surefire way for a college professor to reinvent himself as a Midwestern lineman.

1979 When you need to summon courage in the face of a possible nuclear meltdown, nothing helps like a beard.

Black Rain Want to look like a badass? A leather-jacket-and-sunglasses combo is the way to go.

1970

44

Shaking off the shackles of authority can be as simple as long-ish hair and blue jeans. As long as the authority is really, really old.

Wall Street Despite felonious shortcomings, Gordon Gekko got one thing right: He dressed for success. At least before prison.

Falling Down

Basic Instinct

If the whole nerd look works for you, run with it—but maybe without the pocket protector.

Against Sharon Stone’s famous white dress, Douglas held his own in sharp suits and deep-V sweaters. When he wasn’t naked.

2007

2013

King of California

Behind the Candelabra

Scraggly facial hair and artfully disheveled bedhead worked for Douglas, inspiring baristas everywhere.

Playing Liberace means wearing sequins, and Douglas proves that confidence is the best accessory.

The lesson here is to avoid the aviatorsand-peaked-cap look, which was de rigueur for guys in 1970s S.F., cop or not.

1987

Romancing The Stone

Fatal Attraction

There are very few times in your life when you can dress like you’re going on a treasure hunt. So when you’re actually doing just that, spring for a safari suit.

A great suit can drive a woman crazy, so be careful about what you wear—that whole scenario can backfire.

Dressed For Excess

Liberace wasn’t always Liberace. The pianist’s early stage outfits were relatively demure. It was only after he gained notoriety that his clothes, often collaborations with costume designer Michael Travis, became flamboyant. During his career, the performer would wear outfits like a 150-pound fur cape and a jumpsuit that lit up with 600 lightbulbs.

Lucky for his Candelabra co-star, Douglas doesn’t just dress well. Matt Damon, who plays his love interest, has said, “Michael was a wonderful kisser.”

in order of the chart: getty images (3); everett collection; getty images; everett collection; getty images; everett collection (4); claudette barins/hbo

1969

Hail, Hero!

1989


"WHEN YOU FLY A RACING PLANE PROPELLED BY A 3200 HP ENGINE, YOU NEED THE SUPERIOR PERFORMANCE OF THE WORLD’S BEST CHRONOGRAPH."

Upon arriving as a youngster in the U.S. with just a few dollars in his pocket, Thom Richard had just one dream: to fly aircraft. A seasoned pilot who has clocked up more than 9,000 flight hours, he now lives his passion to the full – in particular by taking part in the famous Reno competitions at the controls of Precious Metal, the most legendary of all race planes. His next challenge is to set the world speed record and to win Reno. On his wrist is the Chronomat, an ultra-sturdy and ultra-reliable instrument powered by a high-performance "engine", a 100% Breitling movement. For Thom Richard, it is quite simply the world’s best chronograph. 5-YEAR BREITLING WARRANTY $13,120


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Accessories

lines in the sand

This season’s most striking shoes, handbags and jewelry draw inspiration from Palm Springs desert minimalism PHOTOGRAPHED by Christine Blackburne

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edited by sydney wasserman

Lumina pumps, $750, JIMMY CHOO, 212-593-0800. Evening Newton clutch, price upon request, EMILIO PUCCI, emiliopucci.com.


Cocktail Collection

robertocoin.com 800-853-5958


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Left: Bag, $3,100, CÉLINE, Mitchells, 203-227-5165. Above, from left: Academy bag, $990, REED KRAKOFF, reedkrakoff.com. Bag, $2,100, GIORGIO ARMANI, 212-988-9191. Classic shoulder bag, $3,500, THE ROW, Bergdorf Goodman, 888-774-2424.

This spring, Suzanne Somers put her Palm Springs estate on the market for $14.5 million. The five-building compound is accessible only via funicular.


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Clockwise from top left: Striped minaudière, $1,745, BALENCIAGA, 212-206-0872. Chaîne d’ancre Initiale bracelet, $4,125, HERMÈS, hermes.com. Pumps, $750, NICHOLAS KIRKWOOD, 646-559-5239. Clutch, $2,300, LANVIN, lanvin.com. Patchwork cuff, $1,810, GIVENCHY BY RICCARDO TISCI, Barneys New York, 212-826-8900. BB pumps, $595, MANOLO BLAHNIK, 212-582-3007. Clutch, $6,650, VICTORIA BECKHAM, victoriabeckham.com. Babylone bangle, $2,990, SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE, 212-980-2970. Paint throughout: Farrow & Ball’s Arsenic, Blue Ground and Great White.


ANGELA CUMMINGS

ASSAEL

the most magnificent pearls in the world assael.com

212 819 0060


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Spotlight

beautiful ruins

Michael Trapp has turned a passion for the decrepit and dilapidated into a thriving interior- and gardendesign business. Daryl Chen finds the method behind his magic. Produced by Lisa Cohen

antiques shows. Laughing, he recalls, “I’d go to a fancy show with my old, dirty stuff and the dealers would whisper, ‘Did you see what that kid from Ohio brought?’ ” In 1990, he opened up his shop in an 1820s Greek Revival house on the banks of the Housatonic River. Customers were drawn to his wares yet perplexed. They loved his pieces, but they had no idea what to do with them. Trapp would show them his rooms—at the time, he lived upstairs—with their pastiche of animal skeletons, chandeliers, ethnic textiles and antique bibs and bobs, as well as his enchanting terraced garden. They’d take one look and beg him to do the same for their houses, which is how he fell into design.

Billions of dollars of treasures are up for grabs in the waters off Indonesia—as many as 10,000 unexcavated shipwrecks are believed to be there.

rob cardillo

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nter one of the Connecticut barns where designer Michael Trapp stores the loot from his travels and it’s like walking into a life-size cabinet of curiosities. In a few steps, you’ll see a row of faintly gleaming, threefoot-high 19th-century Tuscan olive-oil jars; a pile of craggy, coral-crusted 15th-century dishes recovered from a shipwreck near Java and Sumatra; and crumbling Gothic plaster balusters deaccessioned by the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Then there’s a brown, sculptural, ancient…wait, what is that? “It’s a termite mound from New Guinea,” Trapp says matter-of-factly. In Trapp’s world, beautiful oddities like that abound. What’s more, he’s managed to turn the things once consigned to junk heaps into in-demand statement pieces. He’s done it both by selling these objects in his West Cornwall shop, a place frequented by tastemakers like Bunny Williams and Oscar de la Renta, and by deploying them to stunning effect in the houses and gardens of his clients. He’s credited with being one of the first to bring the detritus of civilization and nature—architectural fragments like pillars and archways, tree trunks, farm equipment, headless garden statuary and rusted furniture, shells, empty picture frames—indoors. Asked what he searches for when he shops, he says cheerfully, “I’m looking for rack and ruin.” Trapp’s career has evolved like one of his finds, organically and over time. The son of an Air Force professor and a microbiologist, he was born in Maine but spent some formative years in France and Spain. In Europe, his mom would take Michael with her to antiques auctions and markets so he could translate. “That was my first exposure to the antique world,” he says. The family then moved to Ohio, where Trapp went to junior high and high school. He studied landscape architecture at Ohio State but hated it and dropped out. (“That was the best thing I ever did; otherwise, I’d be probably be designing parking lots.”) To make money, he wove tapestries. He also bought cast-offs that caught his eye and sold them at f lea markets, moving up to high-end


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Today Trapp is currently working on 20 projects, split between interiors and gardens, and that means he must keep finding stuff to fill those spaces. To replenish his stock, he’s been closing his store and spending December to March in Asia—this winter, he was in Myanmar, China and Indonesia—and he goes to Europe + more @ every few months to shop. He ships back container loads duJour.com of objects that fill two barns and a few fenced areas next to his home. He also relies on a global network of dealers and contractors to send him photos of potential purchases. Even though Trapp has a vast, ever-changing inventory—”a frightening volume of stuff moves in and out”—he can instantly ID any piece and tell you about its origin in enthusiastic detail. Despite his love of history, Trapp doesn’t have the snobbish insistence on provenance that many antiquarians do. “I could care less,” he says. “ ‘Is it authentic or not?’ shouldn’t matter; ‘Do you like it or don’t you?’ is a much more important question.” He has no problem with imitations, provided they’re of high quality. If he can’t find ones good enough, “I have pieces made.” In his barn there are knockoff 19th-century Raffles chairs manufactured in Bali; in the yard, he shows me two mock Doric stone columns—a white granite one carved in China and a Mississippi limestone version from Indiana. Outside, he pauses by a massive chest-high crate filled with what looks like rubble. He explains that they’re cobblestones from a street being repaved in Providence, Rhode Island. However, that’s only their latest incarnation. Once, they covered roads in Europe, where they were trod upon by humans and horses for decades, perhaps centuries. Then, in the 19th century, these granite blocks were used as ballast to weigh down the empty ships sailing to this country to pick up tobacco and other goods. Finally, in America, they were turned into cobblestones again. And what are Trapp’s plans with them? He might use them to build a driveway. Or maybe a patio, a garden path, a grotto, a hearth…the list goes on. “There’s something everywhere you can look,” Trapp says. “You just have to use your imagination.”

Opposite page: The garden outside Trapp’s store. This page, clockwise from top left: A lap pool in the garden is surrounded by sculpted topiary and ancient pots; a corner of one of his barns teems with a typical Trapp mélange—a midcentury British daybed, old Parisian dressmakers’ forms, sharks’ jaws and other curiosities; seating, ranging from Indonesian Dutch Colonial to French provincial, fills a barn loft.

Trapp sees beauty in decay: When dead birch trees were delivered for a client’s garden, Trapp displayed the trunks in his own living room instead.


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Wondrous objects fill Restoration Hardware’s new collaboration

iant clocks, handmade journals, antlers cast in iron—Restoration Hardware’s new collection has somethi ng for ever yone ti red of cook iecutter home furnishings. “We are children at heart and remain innately curious,” says Gary Friedman, Restoration Hardware’s chairman emeritus, in explaining the company’s new collaboration with 13 collectors, reproductionists, artists and curators. “We love to discover people, places and objects that have a story to tell.” Case in point: Nick Veasey, a British artist whose inventive X-ray photography blurs the lines between art and science. California-based ceramicist Sara Paloma, who sells her neutral-colored pieces on Etsy, created bowls, bottles and vessels for the collection. And Dutch historian and designer Theo Eichholtz,

reproduces mechanical home furnishings by hand, transforming brass telescopes and vintage propellers into art. “Everything and everyone in this new collection is an object of curiosity,” Friedman explains. “Each of the people, all of the objects have both a past and a present.” One of the items that transforms the old into new is a 1920s-era lightbulb tester turned bar cart, from Belgian antique collectors Mark Sage and Rudi Nijssen. “It is such a beautiful and interesting sculpt ure,” Fr iedman says. Pou r ing an early-evening cocktail will bring to mind the iron piece’s past life sitting in a European factor y; it also acts as an excellent conversation starter. The answer to “what is that?” has never been so interesting.—SARAH LEON

Clockwise from top left: Light Bulb Tester bar cart, $1,995, MARK SAGE AND RUDI NIJSSEN FOR RESTORATION HARDWARE, restorationhardware.com. Artemis bust, $89; Hygieia bust, $53, KAREL HEINEN FOR RESTORATION HARDWARE. Stoneware Nesting bowls, from $35, SARA PALOMA FOR RESTORATION HARDWARE.

PILLOW TALK

Brunello Cucinelli debuts a luxe new home line. “I wanted to bring that high level of artistry and skill from our collections into customers’ homes [with] everyday items that would serve a beautiful purpose,” says Cucinelli, whose own residence is a sprawling 17thcentury Umbrian countryside manor in Solomeo in central Italy. Naturally, the medieval town served as inspiration for the neutraltoned home furnishing line called Lifestyle, which consists of pillows, soft throws and cable-knit-detailed candles.—KRISTA SORIANO Cable-knit cashmere pillows, from $745; Cashmere throws, from $1,040; Shirt (on model), $485, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI, brunellocucinelli.com.

The producers of Downton Abbey have revealed that there will be a show-inspired collection of décor, furniture and wallpaper launching this year.

PILLOW TALK: SHAWN LOWE. RESTORE & REUSE: COURTESY OF RESTORATION HARDWARE.

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Esteban Vicente, Untitled

Daniel Boulud

As the celebrated French chef toasts the 20th anniversary of his NYC restaurant, he shares the story of the first painting he ever owned

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Daniel: My French Cuisine, which combines a cookbook with personal essays by the chef, will be published in October.

Painting: scott rudd; portrait: getty images

My First piece of art

hen I opened my first restaurant, Daniel, on East 76th Street, I worried about what I was going to put on the walls. The David Findlay Galleries were next door and I decided to start a relationship with the owner, so I borrowed three paintings by the Spanish artist Esteban Vicente. Later I got a chance to meet the painter. I would go to his studio in Hell’s Kitchen, bringing a terrine or a little lunch. I spent a lot of time with him there, talking while he painted, looking at the work. I was discovering his art in the most vibrant, later part of his career, when he used many rich colors. I moved Daniel to East 65th Street four years later, and I found the artwork was not connecting anymore with the spirit of the restaurant. But I told the gallery when returning Esteban’s works that I wanted to buy this particular one because of its red tones. It reminded me of a period in my life: my first restaurant and time spent with Esteban. For me it’s about falling in love with the work and then the artist. He didn’t get the recognition he deserved. When I reopened Daniel, I moved into an apartment in the same building. Now this piece hangs in the dining area across from my kitchen, so I get to enjoy it a lot.—As told to natasha wolff


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Below: Chefs eat canal-side in Denmark. Right: Davide Scabin’s steak tartare in a cinnamon stick; turnip and yellowtail by David Chang

Right: Cook It Raw, edited by Alessandro Porcelli and featuring essays by top food writers, available from Phaidon ($50). Below: Iñaki Aizpitarte and Claus Henriksen explore Denmark; Quique Dacosta’s “rose” was a carved endive colored with beet juice.

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READY, SET, FORAGE

Every year a semi-secret society of top chefs gathers to cook the world’s most inventive meals

René Redzepi says in its pages. “Nobody is pretentious. People are quite open—they don’t feel they’ve f inished lear ning. None of these guys see themselves as artists.” Cook It Raw captures + more @ the avant-garde nature of the enterprise, DuJour.com combining regional maps, ingredient lists (everything from liquid nitrogen to bags of squid ink) and even a recipe for baked beets that urges: “Kill a reindeer. Save the blood.” The meals are also meant to inspire creativity back at the participants’ Michelin-starred kitchens. Besides future meet-ups, Cook It Raw’s next goal is to identify and encourage other like-minded chefs. Those with a taste for adventure are encouraged to apply. —KARA CUTRUZZULA

Chang’s yellowtail dish had an interactive twist: Guests used the bowl’s serrated edges to grate the turnip before pouring in a sauce.

CANAL-SIDE, TARTARE, CHEFS: PER-ANDERS JORGENSEN; TURNIP: ERIK OLSSON; ROSE: ERIK REFNER; ALL IMAGES COURTESY OF PHAIDON PRESS

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our years ago, 11 chefs were set loose in the wilds of Denmark. Their goal wasn’t to perfect an entrée for their menus or dazzle a food critic. They had to prepare a dish entirely new to them for a multi-course dinner, with two caveats—they couldn’t use any energy and had to rely only on what they could forage and find. Apparently collaboration (and beer) begets inspiration. Although stripped of kitchen gear, the men served what many called the most memorable meal of their lives. This gathering was the birth of Cook It Raw, an annual event founded by culinary consultant Alessandro Porcelli. Since then the world’s culinary experts, from Momofuku’s David Chang to Magnus Nilsson of Fäviken, have gone on excursions armed with self-imposed new directives: to embrace creativity in barren Collio, Italy; to live off the frigid land of Lapland, Finland; to fuse modern gastronomy and traditional cuisine in Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan; and to explore culture in the melting pot of Suwalki, Poland. Now the illuminating book Cook It Raw—part art project, part travelogue, part cookbook—lifts the lid on the semi-secret gatherings. “I think there is a spiritual thing that brings us together,” Noma’s


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CHILE OUT

BOARD GAMES

Women over 30 are now plunging into the surf. Kayleen Schaefer takes a dip.

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THE WORKOUT

ost busy women grab personal time whenever and however they can, a pedicure here or 30 minutes at the gym there. But recently, some have started to leave their earthly concerns—like, say, their kids and jobs—behind by doing something more adventurous: grabbing their boards, heading to the beach and paddling toward the horizon. In search of a release and a sense of liberation from their ordinar y routines, more women over 30 are taking up surfing. And the fact that the gear is incredibly cool doesn’t hurt. “I have a racerback wetsuit, and I see these young girls on their boards and I look hotter than them,” says Lauran Walk, 42, who lives in Tr ibeca with her husband, Charlie, a music executive, and their four children, ages 6 to 13. She took her first l e s s o n f i ve ye a r s a g o. “The minute that I got up on a board, I fell in love,” she says. “It made me feel young and free and like nothing else mattered.” Leilani Bishop, 36, an Amagansett, New York, model and creator of a fragrance line, and mother to a 10-year-old son, agrees. She loves how surfing makes her feel an ocean away from her daily responsibilities. “It’s like stepping out of reality and into a lifestyle that doesn’t have deadlines and conference calls,” she says. More than many other sports, surfing demands your complete attention, “and that’s satisf ying to a lot of people,” says Tony Caramanico, an instructor based in Montauk. “They can forget about all the bullshit. All they’re thinking about is coming to the surface or the feeling of actually riding a wave.”

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And while it’s true that surfing is not an easy activity to take up when you’re older, that difficulty is yet another lure. Caramanico says the sport’s rough-and-tumble nature—you wipe out more than you stand; you get pummeled and tossed around by the waves—is why so many of his female clients are drawn to it. “It’s a new challenge that’s not as sterile as going to the gym or playing tennis or golf,” he explains. “A lot of women who excel in different fields want to pursue surfing and work through it, even though the ocean will kick their ass.” But the satisfactions of s u r f i ng a r e mor e than mental. The sport tones the entire body, but pa dd l i ng e s p e cially works the core, forear ms, back and chest. Andrea Shapiro, a 45-year-old artist and DJ based in Los Angeles, says that after she started surfi ng, she dropped the gym. “I haven’t been in eight years,” she declares, “and I feel better than ever.” Walk is plan ning to go on a surf retreat this year, to celebrate a g roup of he r g i rlf r ie n d s t u r n i n g 4 0. T h is su m mer, she wants to ride the waves as often as possible. “My kids can’t find me when I’m on that board,” she says, laughing. “There’s no phone.” Gary Simmons limited-edition surf board, for Tommy Hilfiger in collaboration with Art Production Fund, $2,000, TOMMY HILFIGER, available at Tommy Hilfiger New York and L.A. flagship stores.

Trek to the tip of South America—Chilean Patagonia, to be precise—and you’ll find inspiring vistas and two chic hotels vying for your attention. THE REIGNING CHAMPION: Since 1993, Explora’s Hotel Salto Chico—in the heart of Chile’s almost 600,000-acre Torres del Paine National Park—has been the area’s go-to upscale hotel experience, based on a model of “luxury of the essential”: comfortable rooms, locally sourced food and wine and an overarching eco-minded philosophy. The 49-room lodge fosters camaraderie, and guides lead cocktail-hour discussions on such topics as glaciers and pumas after chatting with guests about the following day’s excursions, each more visually stunning than the next. explora.com THE CHALLENGER: Opened in late 2011 in a former coldstorage and sheep-processing plant after 10 years of renovation led by Chilean designer Enrique Concha, the Singular Patagonia is modern and minimalist, with concrete ceilings and panoramic glass windows offering fi ve-star views of icy fjords. Although the soaring two-level dining room and bar, led by a Paris-trained chef and bartenders practiced in the perfect Pisco Sour, is the star here, the well-planned excursions afford unforgettable experiences like horseback riding with gauchos and mountainside condor-watching treks. thesingular.com

Guests at the two hotels can get up close to wildlife on their hikes.

VERDICT: Food lovers will appreciate the Singular’s expansive menu—Magellan lamb, guanaco—and wine list, and its gentler excursions go easy on hangovers. Still, location is everything, and it’s tough to beat Explora’s hyper-personalized upscale-camp feel in the center of Patagonia’s most postcard-ready landscape. Cozy rooms with unreal views, strenuous excursions rewarded with Baileys-spiked coffee atop massive rock formations and friendly, knowledgeable staff make up for the fact that the meals and the wine, though immaculately prepared and selected, could stand more variety. You’ll be too exhilarated from the day’s 12-mile hike, followed by a soak in one of four lakefront Jacuzzis, to care.—ALYSSA GIACOBBE

At Camilla Franks’ recent Sydney fashion show, a roaming llama threatened to steal the spotlight from Georgia May Jagger.

SURFBOARD: COURTESY OF TOMMY HILFIGER. PATAGONIA: ROBERT PARSONS/SEVEN ELM.

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OR WATCH IT ON HBO GO is only accessible in the US and certain US territories. ©2013 Home Box Office, Inc. All rights reserved. HBO ®

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and related channels and service marks are the property of Home Box Offce, Inc.


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Must haves

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Sunglasses, $300, GIVENCHY BY RICCARDO TISCI, Neiman Marcus, 310550-5900. L’Absolu Rouge lipstick in Rose Mythique, $30, LANCÔME, lancome-usa.com. La Laque Couture in No. 36 Vert d’Orient, $25, YVES SAINT LAURENT, yslbeautyus.com.

SUN & Games

Play with retro shades, bold lip hues and gleaming nail lacquer for a look inspired by Tom Wesselmann’s punchy Pop art

Sunglasses, $290, PRADA, sunglasshut .com. Vernis nail lacquer in Blazing Pink, $24, DIOR, dior.com. Rouge d’Armani Sheer No. 101 lipstick, $30, GIORGIO ARMANI, giorgioarmanibeauty.com.

PHOTOGRAPHED by Christine BlackBurne

Sunglasses, $365, MARC JACOBS, solsticesunglasses.com. Le Rouge lip shade in Croisière Coral, $36, GIVENCHY, sephora.com. Nail lacquer in Vapor, $30, TOM FORD, neimanmarcus.com.

Sunglasses, $730, LINDA FARROW LUXE, lindafarrow.com. Rouge Coco lip color in Amant, $34, CHANEL, chanel .com. Le Vernis in Rouge d’Enfer, $23, GUERLAIN, saks.com.

Want to a wear a piece of Pop art? This season, Uniqlo has partnered with The Andy Warhol Foundation for Visual Arts on a line of T-shirts and tunics.


Š 2013. Douglas Elliman Real Estate.

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C U LT U R E THE MANSCAPE

TAKE IT OFF There’s a certain actor in a certain summer blockbuster sporting some extreme designer stubble—an exacting trim that was apparently in during the ‘20s. But while many stars have contributed to the

Star Bronzer Palette in Bronze Essence, $42, LANCÔME, lancome.com

popularity of hipster mustaches and manicured scruff, facial hair is on the way out. Guys, it’s time to break out the straight razor because this is the summer of the clean grooming collective The Motley will

IN SEASON

FAUX SOLEIL

launch its year-in-the-making Port Products Shave Formula cream, Action Solutions for Men’s new beard buster will land on shelves nation-

Save face this summer with new bronzers that brush lightly over your SPF and strike a natural, healthy glow Luminizing Face Enhancer in Sand Beige, $95, CLÉ DE PEAU BEAUTÉ, neimanmarcus.com

wide and skin-care favorite Urth will drop its soothing Post-Shave Elixir. Bye-bye, beards!

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Splendours Summer Bronzing Compact, $35, CLARINS, macys.com

Pure Color Illuminating Powder Gelée in Heat Wave, $40, ESTÉE LAUDER, esteelauder.com

ON THE COUNTER

TEAM PLAYERS

By fabulous people, for fabulous people: New creative collaborations hit the beauty market

NARS + PIERRE HARDY

Pierre Hardy adds a graphic touch to the NARS line, creating a group of nail-polish and blush duos inspired by his spring collection. Chicly packaged in mini shoeboxes and dust bags, the polishes pop with bright hues and the powders feature Hardy’s cubist design.

Sharplines Nail Polish, $29, PIERRE HARDY FOR NARS, narscosmetics.com

MAC + RIHANNA

Rihanna‘s muchdiscussed multicollection partnership with MAC kicked off with a sultry matte red lip shade for summer called RiRi Woo. Not only was the lipstick the first of five items in the color line to be released, it also sold out within just three hours.

RiRi Woo Lipstick, $15, MAC, maccosmetics.com RIRI x MAC

ALBER ELBAZ + LANCÔME

The Lanvin designer lends his talents to the classic Lancôme Show line, creating whimiscal packaging for a new falseeyelash set, as well as for their best-selling mascaras and palettes. As Elbaz’s first foray into makeup, these aren’t likely to sit on shelves for long. Color Design Doll Palette in Rose Coquette, $51, LANCÔME SHOW BY ALBER ELBAZ, lancome.com

“Eyes are the new fashion accessory,” says Alber Elbaz. “People are obsessed with eye makeup, it’s the one thing that can transform you the most.”

FAWCETT: EVERETT COLLECTION. ILLUSTRATION: CSA IMAGES/PRINTSTOCK COLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES. TEAM PLAYERS: COURTESY OF NARS; GETTY IMAGES (2).

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Clockwise from top left: Thick Shampoo, $25, PORTLAND GENERAL STORE, portlandgeneralstore.com. Ouch Stuff, $16, MAYRON’S GOODS, brooklyngeneral.com. Cold Water handmade soap, $5, FORGETMENOT SOAP SHOP, forgetmenotsoapshop.com. Goe oil, $40, JAO BRAND, stevenalan.com. Truman razor, $10, HARRY’S, harrys.com. Pro Diver watch, $695, INVICTA, invictawatch.com. Classic Pomade, $20, IMPERIAL BARBER PRODUCTS USA, imperialbarberproducts.com.

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Ease into summer with these locally sourced items fit for both the street and the sand PHOTOGRAPHED by Grant cornett

prop stylist: janine iverson

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FIRST PERSON

THE GREAT RECESSION

Appalled by going bald? Mark Ellwood reveals the future that no man, neither friend nor celebrity, can escape. PHOTOGRAPHED BY HENRY HARGREAVES

INNOVATIONS

HAIR LOSS TREATMENT

ARTAS Using a robotic arm, this machine transplants hairs piecemeal—rather than in strips—from the lower scalp, minimizing pain or scarring.

PRP, OR THE VAMPIRE TRANSPLANT A platelet-rich plasma, made from the patient’s own blood, is slathered on transplanted follicles to accelerate growth.

Thanks to the success of Propecia and its related rub-in treatment, Rogaine, there is a lot men can do. Thus remaining bald is practically taboo. (One Hollywood publicist even checks the weather forecast before sending her naturally chrome-domed client to red carpets; high temps mean his sprayed-on hair will melt, so she restricts him to a single photo op, then whisks him into the AC.) But not eve r y g uy c owe r s i n fe a r or c ombs over the shiny pate: Some 35,000 people belong to BHMA, or the Bald-Headed Men of America, an organization dedicated to bald pride. Others

SMP, OR SCALP MICROPIGMENTATION The non-surgical procedure involves staining the skin with tiny dots of color to mimic the look of a freshly shaven head.

embrace hair loss in a different way: with a safety razor. The HeadBlade is specially designed to achieve that gleaming look, with an easy grip and wheels to steady a newbie’s hand. Recently relaunched, it’s available in a luxury limited-edition metal model, the S4 Shark. “As long as you have one hair on your head, like Charlie Brown, you’re still balding,” says inventor Todd Greene. “Shave your head, and you’re not balding anymore.” Well said. But Vin Diesel notwithstanding, for now most ever yone I k now is just sticking with their Propecia.

Remember Hair Club for Men? It still exists! The company with those inescapable ‘80s commercials was sold last year to a Japanese wig maker.

PROP STYLIST: NICOLE HEFFRON

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’d known the men sitting around the table for years, yet one evening I learned that each one of them had been keeping a secret from me, held back over the course of long friendships. The fi rst confession was coughed up like a social hair ball: With an awkward laugh, my buddy said his anti-baldness pills, Propecia, had gone off patent. The rest of the room murmured a sigh of relief—as much due to the fact that they could now buy generic as that the topic was on the table. All except me, that is: I realized that I was the only man in the room with an all-natural mane. As such, I’ve never known fi rsthand the anxiety over going bald that the majority of the male population quietly harbors. (Some 35 million men in the U.S. alone are affected by male pattern baldness.) At the heart of many men’s deep-rooted fears of losing their hair is a lifetime of messaging that a full head of hair means virility, strength, masculinity… in short, being a man. Is it any wonder some of us are so freaked out about going bald we’re willing to not just suffer in silence, but undergo all manner of treatment and maintenance—even at the risk of our emotional health? Not long after that revelator y night, a lawyer friend admitted to me that he had recently undergone a hair nightmare. After stashing his Dopp kit in his checked luggage for a weekend away, the bag went AWOL. He spent a wretched, restive night waiting until he could call in a fresh Propecia prescription, and he could think of nothing but the warning on the label that stopping Propecia puts every safeguarded follicle at risk of self-destructing. It gets worse. A doctor friend mentioned, in one unique case, a bipolar patient so traumatized by the hair-loss side effect from his mood stabilizer Lamictal that he stopped taking his meds altogether and relapsed. The message was clear: For modern day Samsons, it’s more manly to be mentally ill than thinning.


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Italian beauty Bianca Balti (center) embodies Dolce & Gabbana’s Sicilianthemed spring/summer ’13 collection. For the first time, Balti is lending her Mediterranean spirit to the house’s beauty line as the new face of its Light Blue fragrance, alongside David Gandy. Collection and fragrance available at 877-70-DGUSA

SUMMER BEAUTY

How to protect and, if necessary, restore skin

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h ield i ng you r sk i n f rom t he su n s h o u ld n’t b e c o m pl i c a t e d . P u t o n su nscreen, g r ab a hat, veer towa rd shade—you’re good, right? If only. Making sense of the annual summer barrage of sun-centric info—news on medical studies, SPF breakthroughs, ray-neutralizing clothes—can leave you feeling like you’re reading a NASA document, not heading out the door. Allow us to deliver the lowdown: Most dermatologists say SPF 30 is a good enough baseline for daily protection.

“There’s probably no need to use more than an SPF 50,” says Dr. David Colbert, a New York City der matologist and founder of Colbert MD skin care. Buy only the sunscreen that says it offers “broad-spectrum protection,” which means it protects you from both UVA and UVB rays—anything else isn’t worth the slather. Even better are lotions that contain zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, mexoryl and Helioplex. And don’t stop there. In addition to sunscreen, dermatologists suggest using an antioxidant with vitamin C, idebenone or resveratrol, like Prevage Face Anti-Aging Daily Serum.

Dr. Neil Sadick, a New York City cosmetic surgeon, also recommends taking a prescription pill called Heliocare, which can up antioxidant protection and decrease pu f f y, pi n k , post-bea ch- d ay sk i n. But what if you’ve got it all down, and somehow you’ve burned? It happens. Just know that aloe vera is most likely inadequate for repairing damage from 50 shades of ray. Within 24 hours, seek out der matologic LED-based light treatments like Gentle Waves to get rid of redness or inf lammation. Sessions range between 10 and 30 minutes.—KAYLEEN SCHAEFER

Last year, the bottle for Light Blue by Dolce & Gabbana appeared in the first-ever exhibit on perfume design at NYC’s Museum of Arts and Design.

TULLIO PUGLIA/GETTY IMAGES

SOLAR POWER


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TEST DRIVE

EXTREME DREAM

The writer takes the driver’s seat.

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rading the cackle of Manhattan for the deep-space silence of the southern Utah desert is a jarring, but welcome, wake-up call. Although I’d wager there’s a Walmart within 10 miles, it feels like I’m on the edge of civilization. Tucked amid this otherworldly landscape is the Amangiri resort, a slab compound that I imagine is what a settlement on Mars, albeit one with fine dining, a yoga studio and a favorable guest-to-staff ratio, might resemble. Frontier living with a whiteglove touch—it’s an entirely proper base from which to test drive Land Rover’s 2013 Range Rover ($83,545), a reboot of the brand’s f lagship allterrain vehicle. As SUVs became the car r yall of choice for denizens of upscale communities, the Range Rover drifted from its off-road roots, moving toward becoming a luxury station wagon that was increasingly removed from its utilitarian heritage. With this fourth generation, though, Land Rover has reoriented itself, promising a vehicle that can perform in extreme conditions yet offer the pinnacle of luxury. Trying to be all things to all people is the easiest way to lose yourself, however: Multipurpose design—a car that can wade

through nearly three feet of water but also act as the appropriate coach in which to arrive at a charity gala—is a tall order to fill, and I’m skeptical. At f i r st i n spect ion , t h is R a nge Rover can largely be defined by what it’s lost, most notably 700 pounds, thanks to an all-aluminum unibody and a nip-tucked bodyline that recalls the f unctional silhouette of Range Rovers past. The exterior is matched with an elegant, basic interior that has 50 percent fewer switches and buttons than the previous model. The remaining dash controls are mostly “secret until lit,” with an intuitive touch screen that makes it easy to quickly pair a smar tphone, input a route i n t he nav igat ion system or change environment settings for both driver and passenger. As I cr uise down long st retches of two-lane desert blacktop, passing roadside stands and tourist traps, I notice how the Range Rover handles much like a luxur y sedan. It f loats smoothly on its upg raded air suspension, and, with the help of new adaptive dynamics systems that sense road conditions and vehicle angle, the usual top-heavy feeling of driving an SUV through tight curves is

minimized. Yet while the naturally aspirated V8 has an excess of low-end torque compared to luxur y sedans at a similar price point, it’s slightly anemic when looking for that pop of acceleration—necessary for a quick lane change or evasive maneuver in the cit y—leadi ng me to thi n k the supercharged-V8 option would be a well-advised upgrade. And at this point, what’s an extra $12K? Approaching the turn-off to a series of mountain trails, I switch the ve h icle i n t o a n of f- r o a d s e t u p. Over red sand t rails blan keted by freshly fallen snow, the ride is just as comfor table as it was on the pavement. Later, as I trade the whitewashed landscape for gravel and steep rock climbs toward the Grand Staircase Escalante-National Monument, the Range Rover vaults over sandstone crags with ease. In these extreme driving conditions that would likely stop other SUVs in their tracks, I find myself rolling down the window and opening the expanded pan-

oramic sunroof, risking getting the handcrafted leather interior wet, just to feel a connection to the elements. While a majority of the Range Rovers sold in the New York City vicinity (Land Rover’s largest metropolitan market worldwide) will never see offroad use, the potential is undoubtedly alluring. As our environment continues to change, the 2013 Range Rover—whose weight loss, incidentally, has contributed to marked improvements in fuel mileage and CO2 emis-

WHEN LOCUSTS AND PLAGUES COME, I’LL GRAB THE FAMILY AND A RANGE ROVER AND HEAD FOR HIGHER GROUND. sions—is an ideal vehicle to navigate the canyons of the American Southwest or of dow ntow n Ma n hat t a n. W hen the “s” hits the “f ” and the hordes of locusts, plagues, walking dead and f loods come, I’m grabbing the family, the bug-out bag and the ne a r e s t (a nd p r oba bly s omeb o d y else’s) supercharged Range Rover and heading for higher ground.

No Curiosity Rover needed to get there: Scientists are using Utah’s desert terrain to simulate the conditions of Mars.

DRIVING PHOTOS COURTESY OF RANGE ROVER; ATMOSPHERE: DAVE PINTER

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It’s hard to imagine where the new Range Rover can’t go. Paul Biedrzycki fastens his seat belt.


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The Stellenbosch region in the Western Cape has helped raise the profile of South African viniculture.

Grape escapes

dating back to 1682, Steenberg offers travelers ny w i ne con noisseu r wor t h he r g r apes a luxurious experience with a historical twist. has already trekked to Napa, Tuscany and Southern Hemisphere wine getaways extend probably even La Rioja to raise a glass. But Experts are journeying farther beyond the unique ter roir of South Africa. now, with U.S. wine consumption at an allLike Stellenbosch, the Mendoza Province in time-high—we’re officially the largest wine south for bottles worth trying. Argentina is known for its distinct fruit and market in the world, surpassing both France Lindsay Silberman taste tests. stunning mountainous backdrops. “Both reand Italy—adventurous enotourists are tradgions have incredible white wine with some ing in Sonoma for South Africa and Alsace for Argentina. That’s because below the equator, select vineyards are less-than-mainstream grapes,” says Smith. “The local Torrontés grape produces beautifully vibrant and aromatic whites that are a wonderful producing some of the planet’s most interesting wines. Take South Africa’s Cape Winelands. The region’s subtropical climate, aperitif.” One ideal place to sip a crisp Torrontés is at Cavas Wine Lodge high-altitude vineyards and fertile soil allow it to create phenomenal reds in the foothills of the Andes Mountains. The hotel is nestled between and whites, including what one expert says is the finest Chenin Blanc two of the most notable wineries in the region—Ruca Malén and Viña outside France’s Loire Valley. “It usually sees little to no oak aging, and Cobos—and contains 17 Spanish colonial-style villas. With more than 800 wineries, the province is South America’s largest it’s prized for its rich texture and mouth-puckering freshness,” says Brian Smith, a sommelier and winemaker based in New York City. Among the winemaking area, yet before Cavas Wine Lodge opened in 2005, it didn’t best destinations for those wanting to sample the wines—and enjoy the have a single high-end boutique hotel. A young couple from Buenos Aires scenery—is Delaire Graff Estate in Stellenbosch. After jeweler Laurence seized the opportunity. “We have 320 days of sun a year,” + more @ Graff acquired the property in 2003, he added two restaurants, a world- says Cecilia Díaz Chuit, who owns the lodge with husband duJour.com class spa, a winery and a state-of-the-art cellar. Its 10 Cape Dutch–style Martín Rigal. “The nature inspired us. You walk beneath lodges come with private butlers and sweeping views of the Simonsberg the vines to go to your room.” Chuit says the local standout—a buttery Mountain Range. Delaire Graff joins the ranks of other well-established chardonnay—leaves wine lovers with a lingering memory of the charmestates in the Winelands, like the Steenberg Hotel and Vineyards in Con- ing setting. Fittingly enough, the label reads “Bramare”—which means stantia Valley. With elegant 17th-century manor houses and a wine farm “to yearn for” in Italian.

Barack Obama celebrated his 2008 election victory by toasting with Graham Beck Brut, a sparkling wine from South Africa’s Western Cape.

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zeitgeist

austerity Complex

Affluent peace-seekers are clamoring for harsh conditions—the harsher the better—in pursuit of the one thing money can’t buy: personal transformation. Stephen Heyman smells the patchouli.

“Surely if God had meant us to do yoga, he would have put our heads behind our knees.”—Rod Stewart

travel ink/getty images

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he nonprofit Omega Institute, two hours north of Manhattan in Rhinebeck, New York, bills itself as a “university of life,” offering instruction in everything from yoga and meditation to tantric sex and f lying trapeze. Twenty-three thousand people come to the bucolic 200-acre campus each year and enter an irony-free zone; people talk a lot about their “life process,” and the staff welcome you without seeming like officious automatons. There are hammocks aplenty, a hilltop sanctuary and forest air so fresh it qualifies as aromatherapy. The blowing of a conch shell announces the start of meals in the communal dining hall, which serves vegan-friendly and gluten-free options, several types of milk and locally sourced miso. Visitors include schoolteachers and aging flower children, millionaires and celebrities like Mia Farrow. None of them seem to mind busing their own tables; many sleep in tents or rustic dormitory-style rooms with communal bathrooms. What they’re seeking is something more elusive than pleasure or even peace, and that is personal transformation. “It’s not about who you know or what you’re wearing. It’s about escaping that regimented, masky, label-driven consumerist culture,” says Patty Goodwin, a retired Manhattan executive and Omega board member who started coming to the campus in the early 1980s, when just a few hundred people showed up each season. In those days, Goodwin was a covert yogi. By all appearances, she was the archetypal corporate warrior, wearing the uniform of the day—dark business suit with shoulder pads, knee-length skirt and tie—and working “insane hours” as the co-founder of a strategic communications firm. No one knew her crunchy little secret. “Would I ever tell the CFO of a Fortune 500 company that I spent my vacation meditating in the woods? Absolutely


+ King cognac booze

not!” she says. “In the ’80s it was considered fairly bizarre to go off for a yoga retreat. Now the culture has completely shifted.” I ndeed, the personal-g row th i ndust r y is booming. Yoga alone generates more than $10 billion per year in the U.S., almost double the total from 2008. But for a certain class of affluent soul-seeker, yogic retreats and gym classes aren’t extreme enough. For this group, austerity is the new luxury—and the harsher the better. “It follows very much Maslow’s hierarchy of needs,” says Melissa Biggs Bradley, the founder of Indagare, a boutique travel agency that caters to very wealthy clients. “The more money and security you have, the more you think about enlightenment, enrichment, deeper satisfaction.” True asceticism involves some trade-offs. You would never confuse the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, with a tonier alternative. At its sprawling red-brick building that looks a bit like a senior center, a certificate course on “Positive Psychology” has attracted largely female, professional participants who pay $5,000 (plus room and board) over 11 months to learn what it means to be happy. Annice Smith, a former yoga teacher who lives in Providence, Rhode Island, received her teacher training at Kripalu in the late 1990s, before the center started serving coffee and meat in the cafeteria, “when it was a lot of earthy people in unitards,” she says. These days Smith ret ur ns regularly to K ripalu for retreats. “I guess it’s not ‘luxurious,’ but for me, Kripalu is def initely a luxur y,” says Smith, who has also visited the Esalen Institute, a yoga retreat in Big Sur, California, known for experiential workshops and clothing-optional hot tubs. “It’s a luxury to eat in silence. It’s a luxury not to have to clean up after my kids for a few days.”

Jacquelyn Mayfield, a leadership consultant in Manhattan, first went to Omega four years ago after visiting a yoga retreat in India. Despite the voguishness of mind-body retreats, she says her commitment is genuine. “When I’m at Omega I’m surrounded by women who are choosing to be there for what it does for t hei r bei ng, not because t hey’re followi ng [yoga instructor] Rodney Yee and his wife, not because Donna Karan or Jennifer Aniston said it,” she says. Many of the richest clients view these ascetic retreats as a way to escape not just the anxiety of modern life but also their money. Emily Bouchard, a partner at the Wealth Legacy Group, coaches inheritors and people whose net worth often exceeds $25 million on how best “to cope with the emotional impact of wealth.” “I know what you’re thinking—I’d love to have that problem,” she says. “But for a lot of these ultra-high-net-worth people and new inheritors there can be guilt and shame and a lot of ambivalence about money.” Bouchard went with one of her clients, an heiress who was suffering from a chronic illness, to Rancho La Puerta, a mind-body retreat in Tecate, Mexico. “It isn’t posh,” Bouchard says. “It’s just a place where you can let down your hair and be you. Our culture so strongly identifies somebody by their net worth. To feel a bit like everybody else, to do the same exercises or to wash dishes together in the communal kitchen can really help some people gain a better perspective.” “It’s funny, ‘exclusive’ used to be an honorific,” says Goodwin, the Omega board member who once concealed her New Age bona fides. “People used to say proudly, ‘I’m going to an exclusive spa.’ But now it’s about going to a place that’s inclusive.”

The setting was a black-tie dinner on a small island in Udaipur, India, where connoisseurs had gathered to sample the second Rare Cask in Rémy Martin’s 289-year history. Debuting this month, the high-end version of Rémy’s Louis XIII line comes in a black crystal decanter crafted by 20 artisans and trimmed in rose gold. The spirit spent almost 100 years aging in barrels (as opposed to some cognac’s four) and has, at 42.6 percent, a higher alcohol content. It’s also much harder to get: Only 738 bottles will be released worldwide. It’s safe to say stumbling onto something worthy of being labeled Rare Cask was as unplanned as that spill. In this case, the credit goes to Rémy Martin’s revered cellar master, Pierrette Trichet, for spotting it + more @ early: “In 2009, when I was tasting duJour.com casks for Louis XIII, I identified a few casks where the aromatic complexity was different,” she says. “Over three years, I tasted the blends again and again, and I realized one was very special.” As Rémy Martin chairman Dominique Hériard-Dubreuil, whose family has run the house since 1925, explains, “Louis XIII is a blend of very old eaux-de-vie that started with family reserves, so the principle was to make sure that the very best were selected if they had potential.” Collectors are on the hunt for the resulting cognac, containing notes of autumn fruits, tobacco leaf, wood bark and myrrh. But, of course, once they find Rare Cask, it’s their own responsibility not to lose a single drop. —ADAM RATHE

High-profile cognac fans include Jay-Z, Ludacris and Busta Rhymes, who called it out in his song “Pass the Courvoisier.”

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courtesy of rémy martin

“would I ever tell the cfo of a fortune 500 company that i spent my vacation meditating in the woods? absolutely not!”

A collective gasp hushed the party chatter; silverware stopped clinking; ribald jokes went unfinished. A waiter had dropped a glass of cognac. On a guest. While a spill could ruin anyone’s night, this dram was from Rémy Martin’s Louis XIII Rare Cask. At $22,000 a bottle, this was an extremely pricey mishap.


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Lap of luxury

will bark for trust fund a

A Countess’ Best PAL In the hierarchy of canine heirs and heiresses, German shepherd Gunther Liebenstein III is considered the king, having inherited a reported $80 million upon the passing of German Countess Carlotta Liebenstein in 1991. Thanks to savvy investments (by human advisers), his only son, Gunther IV, inherited a $372 million estate when Gunther III died a few years later. no kibble for them Buckshot, Katie and Obu-Jet—a beagle and two Lab mixes owned by Maryland resident Ken Kemper—are eating their inheritance, literally. Caretaker Roy Grady once noted that the dogs, who scored 800,000 bones after Kemper died in 2006, dine on spaghetti and meatballs with garlic bread every Friday night. tony transport Forget the short leash. Conchita, the Chihuahua of Miami heiress Gail Posner, and her “sisters” (a Maltese and a Yorkie) are chauffeured around town in Conchita’s very own gold Cadillac Escalade. When Posner passed away in 2010, Conchita and her four-legged siblings inherited her Miami mansion and $3 million cash—$2 million more than Posner’s (human) son, Bret Carr. golden eggs Publishing tycoon Miles Blackwell was utterly devoted to his hen, Gigoo, who scored £10 million after Blackwell’s demise. The money left for Gigoo was tucked away in the Tubney Charitable Trust, a philanthropic organization dedicated to, among other causes, farm-animal welfare. (The Trust closed its doors in 2012.) well -dressed trio Before his suicide in 2010, fashion icon Alexander McQueen made sure his three bull terriers, Minter, Juice and Callum, would continue to have pampered paws with an $82,000 gift and a plea in his suicide note to family and friends to “look after” the pups.   beats the doghouse Although there weren’t any pups aboard the Starship Voyager, the wife of Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry was certainly an animal lover. When Majel Roddenberry succumbed to leukemia in 2008, she left their dogs a $4 million residential trust, plus $1 million and residential rights for their caretaker.—MEGAN JOHNSON

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no jerks allowed

I always get special perks at restaurants—except when I have a waitress I’ve never met. How can I let the new girl know who I am without seeming demanding?

My ex-wife and I co-own a business, but her new husband is a total embarrassment. How do I ask her to stop bringing him along to networking outings?

The first step is to recognize that you are demanding. And cheap, too, since I’m guessing by “special perks” you mean a free glass of blanc de blancs or, what, a bonus course of Peekytoe crab cakes? But if you insist, try this: “Last time I was here, Eli sent me something ah-mazing from the kitchen. I adore being his guinea pig—and I’d love it again. Unless it was guinea pig. Might you tiptoe back to the kitchen and ask?” Or, “When you have a moment, please do let Mario know I’m here. I wanted to show him this adorbs photo of us in New York Social Diary.” And, of course, the best way to ensure the best treatment is to pony up on the tip: 50 percent is the new 20, you know.

I had similarly masochistic friends. They ran a winery, which I’m guessing is how they managed to stand being around each other even after their marriage went the way of Lehman Brothers. But if you can’t rely on getting everyone else drunk enough to disregard the buffoon in the room, let the Ex-Mrs. know—politely, of course—that invitations come with a plus-one, not a plus-one-jerk. Is she aware, for example, that Muffy McButters is going around saying that Husband #2 got handsy during last month’s Howard Lorber Cipriani lunch? You’re sure it’s an exaggeration, but you know how Muffy is and, well, now everyone knows. Best the fellow lay low for a while. C’est bon?

Maplemint Enterprises president Alison Minton set up a hefty trust for her two parrots, begging the question: How many crackers can Polly get for $50,000?

Slim Aarons/Getty images

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s monetary settlements called “pet trusts” grow in popularity, animal companions of the wealthy can continue living large even after their owners are long gone. “People develop a really strong bond with the animals they share their lives with,” says Worcester, Massachusetts, attorney Tracy Craig, who sets up 8 to 10 pet trusts a year and has a $75,000 trust for her two golden retrievers. “They’re viewing their pet animals as family members.” Here, a round up of furry friends who scored sizable nest eggs.


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P’s & q’s

Private Jetiquette 101 The private-jet set knows exactly how to navigate the pitfalls of intimate in-flight space. But as such travel becomes more mainstream, newbie passengers face constant quandaries at 40,000 feet. To untangle the mysteries, DuJour assembled a team of experts: Jodi R.R. Smith, president of etiquette consultancy Mannersmith; Carolyn Paddock, a veteran private-jet staffer and founder of the blog In-Flight Insider; and etiquette consultant Grace Connell. Behold their plane protocol.

AVOID OVERPACKING Light aircraft have stringent, safety-related weight restrictions, so travelers toting heavy bags will rarely be repeat guests. Send golf clubs or ski equipment by FedEx or UPS. “And, remember, it’s not the pilot’s job to carry your bag onto the plane,” Smith says.

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in the scene

Ibiza by night

They don’t call Ibiza the world’s party capital for nothing. A picturesque destination for the jet set—and for people intimately familiar with those three little letters, “V-I-P”—the Spanish island is beautiful by day, but truly comes alive after dark. This summer, go from beach to bar at Bomba Ibiza, the new club from international hotelier and restaurateur Giuseppe Cipriani, who lives part-time on the island. (He opened the Downtown Ibiza restaurant last year.) “I have always loved the nightlife,” says Cipriani. “Daytime stress seems to fade away.” bombaibiza.com

FASHION (ALWAYS) SOARS “Dress better than you think you should have to,” Connell says. Save the flip-flops for the beach, and don’t chafe if you’re asked to remove your shoes to spare the often light interiors. Paddock recalls working a private jet where a chairman noted one of his executives had forgotten to shave: “He was so annoyed, he made him sit in the back of the airplane.” CHOOSE SEATS WISELY The first few rows are reserved for the host—“like the front pews at a church wedding,” says Connell. To dodge seating snafus, try to board last or, Paddock suggests, head to the rear and ask the flight attendant for guidance.

DINING DRAMA Follow your host’s lead: Paddock recalls one flight where the boss was on a strict Paleo diet, so the galley was catered cavemanstyle. Also, don’t be too specific: Ask for a coffee, rather than a macchiato, to avoid the sticky moment of “Sorry, we don’t have that.” FORGET THE MEMORIES “Do not try to sneak specialty items on an inbound flight. Customs sometimes brings dogs onboard, and if contrabrand is found, you are in big trouble,” Paddock says. Once a staffer forgot to jettison a fruit basket; the fine was thousands of dollars. Leave room service in your room. MONEY MATTERS It’s gauche to tip the staff or offer to contribute to the costs. “Are you going to take your Amex out and try to pitch in $10K for fuel?” laughs Connell. Instead, make a reciprocal gesture after landing. SILENCE IS GOLDEN What happens on the jet stays on the jet. “One of the great things about private flying is that anything can happen,” notes Paddock, “and you don’t want to be the blabbermouth.”—MARK ELLWOOD

bbq

top RACK

Backyard barbecues are getting classed up thanks to Belcampo Meat Co.’s Best Rack Box—a decadent 28-pound delivery of organically fed Wagyu beef, raised on the boutique butchery’s 10,000-acre farm north of San Francisco. Select a custom mix of cuts (like rib-eye caps, porterhouse steaks and tenderloins) and Belcampo will ship the order overnight. At $2,000, the box is a guaranteed carnivore crowd-pleaser. To order, go to belcampomeatco.com or call 415-448-5810.

The Denmark-based luxury-golf-car brand Garia has released its limited-edition Mansory Currus, which has a price tag of £50,000—or around $76,235.

ibiza, top to bottom: courtesy of cipriani; getty images; courtesy of cipriani. Jetiquette: hapa/getty images. Top rack: greg ceo/getty images.

DON’T BE TARDY FOR THE TARMAC “There is no such thing as being fashionably late for a private jet,” Smith warns. “It’s exactly the same as a commercial flight. Be early.”


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REBUILDING LEGO

In the new book Brick by Brick, David Robertson, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, explains why LEGO, one of the world’s most iconic toy brands, crumbled and what it had to do to be saved. In your book, you talk about something many people don’t know— that in 2003, LEGO was on the verge of bankruptcy. LEGO was worried about competition from video games and other companies so it started coming out with one new toy after another. While it had a few hits—LEGO Star Wars and Harry Potter, Bionicle—the successes hid all the products that sold poorly. [94% of LEGO sets were unprofitable.] When no Star Wars or Potter films came out in 2003, those sales plunged and LEGO went from doing OK to being in big trouble. So how did the company save itself? They returned to the core system of play.

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FLY WHEELS

hat if we told you that inside this retro-looking bicycle, fitted with handmade wooden fenders, is a battery...and a motor? Yep, it’s electric, and you can start the Faraday Porteur’s motor by simply pedaling. Charging the bike is as easy as riding it—just plug it into a standard outlet and you’ll have full battery in two hours. Faraday Bicycles CEO Adam Vollmer says the bike was specifically designed with commuters in mind. “You don’t want to show up to work wrapped in spandex or covered in sweat,” he says. “But be-

What do you mean? A breakthrough occurred when executives realized that parents weren’t just buying a box of bricks; they were buying a system where all the pieces fit together. Parents know the more sets they buy, the more their kids can play—there’s a genius in it. LEGO had gotten away from that by creating products that didn’t fit with the other LEGO sets. What else changed? Previously, the managers were deciding which toys went to market based on what they thought would be successful, but too often they were wrong. They have a great saying at LEGO: There are two honest groups of people in the world—kids and drunks. Now the company presents toy concepts to children first. Do they get excited? Do they tell stories about them? The more kids start inventing stories, the more the company knows it has a hit. The patent on LEGO bricks ran out years ago, and several companies sell cheaper versions. How has LEGO managed to stay on top? LEGO learned from Star Wars, which had a rich story that took place in an exotic, detailed world with vivid characters and lots of opportunities for clothing and other tie-ins. LEGO’s gotten good at developing a set of innovations that together make a great play experience. With Ninjago, for example, it’s not only an interesting line of toys; there’s a story, a TV show and Web games. Kids can play with other kids using the figures, and there are tournaments at LEGO stores. The company has created a whole ecosystem. When you do that, it’s hard for a knockoff product to compete.

cause there’s a motor, instead of going 10 miles per hour, you can go 25 miles per hour. It’s exhilarating. It’s like being a witch on a broomstick.” —LINDSAY SILBERMAN Faraday Porteur electric-propelled utility bicycle, $3,800, FARADAY BICYCLES, faradaybikes.com. Available for pre-order with delivery in the fall.

What can people learn from LEGO? That innovation is not just about creativity. Yes, you need some people who are wildly creative and have great ideas. But you also need people who focus the ideas and make sure they’re profitable, as well as people who find companies to make complementary products. And still you need other people who work with outside partners and then ones who work with the smartest customers and get their best ideas. There are so many sets of skills necessary for successful innovation.—INTERVIEWED BY SHARON KUNZ

Faraday used a Kickstarter campaign to fund production of this bike, its first-ever design, raising more than $175,000 in 25 days.

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nd if you move here, you can live across the street from the guy who wrote The Silence of the Lambs!”

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A beat. “You do want the fabulous writer’s life in the Hamptons, don’t you?” You know you’re making the right decision to move from the city to the Hamptons when your realtor, on your first journey out to find the perfect bungalow near the beach, spends as much time giving you a historical tour of the crash pads of every writer, dead and alive, who called the Hamptons home as she does finding you your dream cottage. And knows instinctively that living across the street from Thomas Harris, who did in fact create Hannibal Lecter right here in Sag Harbor, isn’t spooky at all. Keep going, I tell her. “OK, so this is where John Steinbeck lived.… E.L. Doctorow still lives right here. It’s a pretty modest house, considering, but it is E.L. Doctorow.” Joseph Heller. Peter Matthiessen, who worked for three years as a commercial fisherman before becoming the Peter Matthiessen, still lives over there, she says. George Plimpton’s old house, Betty Friedan’s. “You wanna see where Jay McInerney lives?” Be still, our hearts. We had started in Sag Harbor, of course, which is mecca for famous and fabulous Hamptons writers, going back many, many decades. But the entire East End (of Long Island), the nonpretentious, writer-preferred term for the Hamptons, is rife with the spirits, past and present, of literary luminaries: from Truman Capote, who retired to his rustic Sagaponack retreat, with its screened-in porch and single twin bed on four sumptuous acres, to complete In Cold Blood when he wasn’t at the local haunt Bobby Van’s with his buds Matthiessen and Heller, imbibing his favorite drink, an “orange thingee” (four parts vodka, one part orange juice), which often led to Matthiessen having to deliver him back to Sagaponack, to the Pulitzer Prize–winning biographer Robert Caro (his most recent effort: the stellar four-volume work on Lyndon Johnson), who, according to the very local Dan’s Papers, is known to take a thermos and a sandwich out into the toolshed in the woods by his East Hampton home, where he writes in longhand, then types it up later on an old Smith Corona. Writer-wise, it doesn’t get much better than this.

At the American Hotel, author hangout: Steven Gaines, Lisa DePaulo, Michael Shnayerson, Robert Sam Anson

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gimme shelter

Steinbeck, Capote and Vonnegut all called the Hamptons home. Lisa DePaulo chronicles the new wave of authors drawn to the seclusion of the East End. photographed by Mimi Ritzen Crawford

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he first thing I did when I decided to move from the city to the East End was ring up my two favorite writers-in-residence, authors Michael Shnayerson (currently at work on a bio of Andrew Cuomo for Grand Central Press) and Robert Sam Anson, whom I sometimes refer to as the most fascinating man alive, both for his reportorial skills and his Zelig-like past. (How many people do you know who were not only at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles the night Robert Kennedy was assassinated, but also survived being taken prisoner in Cambodia while reporting for Time?) Anson lives in the woods and on the bay, which is possible to do in Sag Harbor, in a home made more awesome by his wife, the interior designer Amanda Kyser, but he spends most of his time in the backyard in a silver Airstream trailer, a.k.a. his office. You just can’t do this sort of thing in Manhattan. And in a very Hamptons-esque aside, it was Anson who introduced me to Shnayerson—on a blind date, which didn’t take, but enough about that. Bob Sam and Michael would become my Hamptons posse, soon joined by the inimitable Steven Gaines, who single-handedly peeled the layers off the Hamptons and all its marvelous melodrama with his classic, Philistines at the Hedgerow. Which to this day, 15 years after publication, is still prominently

Some players on Artists-Writers softball teams: Jackson Pollock, John Irving, Irwin Shaw, Willem de Kooning, Mike Lupica and Ken Auletta.


“Friends with a house on the east end gave me keys and said, ‘Go write the book.’ ”

All photos: getty images

—Steven Gaines

Peter Matthiessen, novelist and naturalist, at home in Sagaponack

finished the book “in a little dream cottage tucked behind Estia’s,” a favorite restaurant “with a view of Little Long Pond, where I’d hear the loons at night. And I would stumble over to Estia’s for the best coffee out there.” As lonely as writing can be, being here was soothing, says Haag: “I knew this was the place where I could have support, peace, seclusion and anonymity if I wanted it.” The support writers find out here is an enormous part of the appeal. So integral to the fabric of the Hamptons are the literary heroes who live among the ranks that you’ll find things such as The Grapes of Roth, a wine label by the dean of the local winemakers, Roman Roth—in honor of Steinbeck, of course, whose classic The Winter of Our Discontent is believed to have been inspired by the Schiavoni supermarket family in Sag Harbor. There is an annual Artists-Writers Softball Game in East Hampton that is such an institution that summer-crowd celebs like Alec Baldwin and Bill Clinton are known to stop by—and even join the game. There is a yearly writers’ gala that is one of the hottest tickets at the beach. And at the Bridgehampton library, “Fridays at 5,” a lecture series in the garden with mostly local authors, is actually competitive, both for the authors themselves and the ticket-seekers. And of course there are the haunts, perhaps none more famous than the American Hotel in Sag, where book editor Alice Mayhew has her own table and McInerney can be found with fourth wife Anne Hearst. It’s where all the writers hang out, even if they’re just visiting, such as the time Fred Exley came to see his editor, Robert Loomis, and ended up being driven home nightly (he stayed a while) by the bartender who could quote passages of A Fan’s Notes. But it’s the indie bookstores, particularly BookHampton, that really nourish the community—prominently showcasing (and talking up) local

writers, few of whom are strangers to the stores. What happens when, say, a James Salter walks in? “First of all,” says Kim Lombardini, a manager at BookHampton in East Hampton, “you’ve got your authors that you recognize by face, and then you’ve got your authors where someone has to elbow you and say, ‘That’s James Salter.’ ” But do all of them check how prominently their book is displayed? “Oh, yeah, all of them do that!” says Lombardini. One way or another. “I heard from Kurt Vonnegut’s widow, Jill, that he used to send her in to find out where his books were placed in the store while he sat out in the car smoking cigarettes. Mrs. Doctorow has been in. I talked to her and assured her that we had everything in from Mr. Doctorow.” Among the local favorites on the shelves: Colson Whitehead (a regular at the store), Andy Cohen, Adam Ross, Kati Marton, Ali Wentworth, Alexandra Styron, Heller, Capote, Nora Ephron. The current best-selling local authors? “It’s between Nelson DeMille and Alan Furst right now—and Ina [Garten]’s cookbooks.” ended up not moving next door to The Silence of the Lambs but into the most adorable cottage in Bridgehampton that’s a stone’s throw from Bobby Van’s, where my not-so-shabby neighbors include James Salter. I knew one of my favorite editors had once lived in my cottage but recently learned the entire parcel of land it sits on was once owned by the novelist Barbara Howar, during her tumultuous three-year marriage to Willie Morris. Which is the other great thing, of course—there’s a story behind every privet.

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George Plimpton was once arrested by police and handcuffed on his East Hampton lawn for shooting off fireworks without a permit.

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displayed and sought after at BookHampton, the independent bookstore to the cognoscenti. Gaines, who has written 12 books while ensconced in various homes in the Hamptons, remembers his epiphany in 1971. At the time, he was quite the party boy in Manhattan (as evidenced by his juicy roman à clef The Club, about the debauchery at Studio 54), but was trying to write his first book. “Friends with a house on the East End gave me the keys to their house and said, ‘You’re too much of a party boy, you’ll be out all night, you’ll never get serious about writing. Go write the book.’ ” At the time, “there were tumbleweeds all over. And nothing open. You could starve! The train only went to Westhampton [30 miles away], the supermarket closed at 6.” But could you write? “You had no choice.” It is little mystery why the literati, and wannabe literati, head east from Manhattan. For starters, what are the options? New Jersey? The godforsaken New York suburbs? Seriously?! The Hamptons offer that elusive combination of ethereal beauty and intellectual stimulation. If you choose it. And if you don’t, you can hide in your bungalow or your castle and no one will give a rat’s ass. It’s peace, at its finest. It’s also inspiring. The actress Christina Haag, who wrote the gorgeous best-selling memoir Come to the Edge, about her relationship with John Kennedy Jr., decamped to the East End to write it. “Whenever I get to the dunes and smell the privet and the salt air, I’m anesthetized,” she says. “It was as if it were calling me to write there.” She wrote in Montauk in the dead of winter, then in Sag, then

Clockwise from left: Truman Capote lived and wrote in Sagaponack for 23 years; Betty Friedan speaks at a party in support of women’s rights in East Hampton, 1970; Joseph Heller in East Hampton, 1990; George Plimpton at the famous Artists-Writers Softball Game in East Hampton, 1989


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Mr. Congeniality

Is Donald Trump actually the most misunderstood man in the world? Vicky Ward makes her case.

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Work woes translate easily: Spin-offs of The Apprentice have aired in Africa, Belgium, Estonia, the U.K. and more.

Contour by getty images

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t’s a funny thing to be loved for firing people...” several conversations that we’ve shared since 2010. mulls Donald Trump in his workplace aerie in In person he’s tall, he’s formal—and he’s quieter Trump Tower on Fifth Avenue and 56th Street. than he comes across on-screen. Even his muchHe’s talking about the success of his reality series pilloried hairstyle and its color look subdued. The phone buzzes in his office almost immediThe Apprentice, now in its 13th season on NBC. “You know I think I’m a very nice person. I help ately; the caller is a banker from Florida. “Vincent, people. I love to help people…yet to me it’s very Vince…Vince…” The Donald is bouncing around. interesting and very sad that the show is number one, “What are you doing? You’re the greatest.… Where and [its catchphrase] is ‘You’re fired’ and viewers are you in Florida nowadays, Vince? You know I just bought the Ritz-Carlton, Jupiter…and do you get to love me for it.” For a f leeting moment the Donald purses his lips, my course in Mar-a-Lago? No? Oh. That’s terrible. I puts his hands together as if in prayer and ref lects. bought Doral [in Miami] too…bought ’em all...I got There’s a glimpse of someone else here. Someone I like a monopoly.... Could you call me next week? If call “Second Donald,” the man in the shadows—and I can help the bank I will…” He puts the phone down and star ts telling me I’ve been able to see this Donald firsthand. It’s the end of January, and the real estate titan about Vince. “He’s the head of a big bank in Florida. Wants to and political pundit and I are having the latest of


Trump loved the building when he owned it in a joint venture with the insurance firm Conseco from 1998 until around 2000, but he tells me that he doesn’t love talking about it. He wasn’t able to hang on to it after his partners went bankrupt. “This was the only deal I’ve made where I made a lot of money but I was disappointed in the deal. I really wanted the building,” he has told me bluntly. “I fixed [the building]; I made it great. I came up with the idea of the dome in front… and Steve Jobs got the credit for that, and that’s OK. Let him have the credit, he was incredible.” Again, the two Donalds—one capable of giving credit, one eager to take it away. The truth lies somewhere in the middle. Steve Jobs’ vision was incredible. Apple turned the building into the most visited retailer in the world. But was Trump behind this? Not really. He did call the guy who ran the Cheesecake Factory and see if the chain would put in a restaurant shaped as a glass triangle. It never happened. But Harry Macklowe, the developer who bought the building in 2003, had a similar inspiration. Macklowe drew several shapes on a napkin at the Four Seasons Grill Room, got on a private jet and f lew to see Jobs, and the idea of the cube turned into reality. But Donald doesn’t worry about details like this. They are unimportant when it comes to the bigger nar rative of his life—and whether it captivates or repels you, the story of Trump is compelling. Donald John Trump Sr. grew up rich but unsophisticated. His father, Fred, the successful New York City developer who began the family legacy in real estate, gave him an address book with powerful connections, but the family had yet to cross the river from Brooklyn. It was the young, brash Donald who made the move, driving around in his father’s Cadillac stretch limousine and famously appearing to be on the phone with all the governors, mayors and city planners of New York. No one knew whether he actually was or not. But he had chutzpah. He did a deal he couldn’t really afford (his father would have to help him) with the Pritzker family, which made him a co-owner of the Grand Hyatt New York Hotel. That set him up to buy the Trump Tower. With its ornate façade and a cascading waterfall, it also announced Trump’s style to the world. Trump had decided he would not do anything without a (literal) splash ever since, as a young man, he’d seen the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge open and watched the architect, Othmar Ammann, be ignored at the ceremony. He would never make the mistake of being quiet about what he did. What was the point? Outwardly it looked like uncalibrated, careless f lash. He dated models, marrying a Czech blonde, Ivana, in 1977, with whom he had three children, Donald Jr., Ivanka and Eric. He had a public brawl with New York City mayor Ed Koch over the West Side Yards. He bought three casinos in Atlantic City and developed a rivalry with Vegas developer Steve Wynn. He bought an airline, a boat, the Miss Universe pageant (which he still owns). He bought a football team, the New Jersey Generals, and wrote a book, Trump: The Art of the Deal. Trump seemed unstoppable. A Jay Gatsby with bling, the gaudy symbol of the American dream. And like many men who peak, he overreached. He had bought the Plaza hotel when he didn’t know much about hotel management. Deep down, it would also emerge in a confession to a peer, he had no real passion for the casino business either. These things mattered when the market

There’s been drama on the green over Trump’s development of two golf courses in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, which locals staunchly oppose.

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know if he can do business with me...dying to do business with me, so he respects me…that’s why when you have a problem I can call them for you.” Most people would hear this and write it off as typical Trump bombast. In the last few months, the Financial Times has mocked his verbiage as “trumptastic.” Another piece in The Atlantic described him as nothing more than a branding/marketing whiz, derided by the big banks as the “Paris Hilton of the business world.” I have no idea who Vince is. I also cannot know if he really needs Trump’s help rather than vice versa, but here’s what I do know: There’s an altruistic streak beneath the bombastic veneer. Trump really does like helping people, and, contrary to allegations, he isn’t viewed as a milquetoast or Paris Hilton by Wall Street bankers. Far from it. I know this as a result of research on my forthcoming book on the history of the most expensive piece of commercial real estate in America: the General Motors building, which Trump once owned. Some of the bankers at major Wall Street banks who have financed his deals over the years—and continue to do so—have talked to me for the book. Many of them say that he is a canny, wily negotiator not to be underestimated. Further he called my bank on my behalf during a house sale in the middle of my divorce three years ago and he was effective. No one at the bank—perhaps the biggest bank in the U.S.—ever asked: “Donald who?” His generosity was both enormous and (until now) under the radar—not a phrase usually associated with Donald Trump. At a frenzied press conference held at Tr ump Tower in early May, Trump announced he would be giving away money ($5,000 each to 10 people) as part of a promotion for his new partnership with crowdfunding website FundAnything.com. As for my own experience, Trump helped me for no very good reason other than he liked me, he’d liked my first book about the fall of Lehman Brothers and he saw me struggling. (His daughter, Ivanka, and others—friends, real estate peers, even another journalist—say he has done similar things for several people who work for him, including putting their kids through college.) After he called my bankers, they stopped hurting me. His brokers helped me find an apartment, and he invited my children and me to stay at Mar-a-Lago, his 20-acre private resort in Palm Beach, Florida. And he did all this without getting anything in return. This could be why I’m somewhat protective of him. I may be one of the few (OK, very few) journalists who feel sincerely empathetic for him when he says that he is misunderstood by the media and he can’t quite work out why. I have begun to see two men in him: Donald One, the impenetrable familiar caricature. And Donald Two who is, well, vulnerable. “I have a much better relationship with the public than with the media,” he says. “Some of the media is great, professional, and some of it’s just dishonest,” he says, in particular singling out Vanity Fair editor Graydon Carter, who served as my mentor for many years. (The two men have never liked each other.) Carter wrote about him in GQ magazine back in May 1984 for a themed issue on “Success.” “It was the worst article, but the cover [photograph] was great, so I put it up, you know?” he says, looking at it on the wall. Right there you have the two Donalds, openly discussing the best and the worst in the same sentence. I see this contradiction in him quite often. Take for example his relationship to the topic of my book—the General Motors Building.


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turned in the early ’90s. At the same time, Trump was undergoing an expensive divorce to Ivana so he could marry his then-girlfriend Marla Maples. He had to sell it all. Or nearly all. He held on to the Trump Tower, but the planes, boats and other buildings (save the casinos) went. But he never filed for personal bankruptcy, which mattered greatly to him. One person said that if he’d been the Donald during this period he’d have thrown himself off a building. But Trump was chipper. “Survive through ’95” was his mantra. After ’95, his style was a bit different. He continued to build but was careful not to over-leverage himself again. And by the time Mark Burnett, producer of The Apprentice, decided to sign Trump as the host in 2003, his brand was recovering. Donald was ready for prime time. Which brings us to the Trump of the last decade. There really are two Donalds, agrees Pam Liebman, president and chief executive of the Corcoran Group and an old friend of Trump’s. There’s the public Donald with all the bravado—and then there’s the relaxed Donald whom you’ll see throwing a ball with a kid around the pool at Mar-a-Lago. “It might surprise people to know that he likes children. He’s produced three hard-working, unspoiled children, which, given their circumstances, is no mean achievement. That says a huge amount about him.” “He was and is a very hands-on father,” says daughter Ivanka, who oversees acquisitions in the family business. “Perhaps more educational than most. But our relationship with him is real.” Liebman says she often sees Donald driving Barron, his sevenyear-old son, around on the golf course. “It’s very sweet to watch. Of course he tells us, ‘Barron is the tallest, the best…look, he has the best golf swing,’ ” she laughs. “He can’t help it.” Bar ron is the progeny of Tr ump’s third mar riage, to Melania Knauss, 43, a Slovenian model he married in 2005 after a seven-year courtship. (He also has a daughter Tiffany with his second wife, Marla Maples.) In his office, Donald hands me an article about Melania’s new jewelry line. “She looks beautiful,” I say. He jumps in: “She’s a beautiful person with a great, big heart who’s also a tremendous mother—she loves Barron so much. She is beautiful, but ultimately that is much less important than other ingredients. You know the beauty is good for the first ten minutes, right?” It was Melania who put an end to his presidential ambitions in 2011 by telling him that of course he would win if he ran. The bigger question was, did he need to? “I thought Romney would win,” says Trump. “I really did. But he didn’t resonate. Even a lot of very strong Republicans did not get up and vote… I think the party is now very confused. They don’t know who they are anymore. And they’re falling into every single trap that you can fall into.” The possibility of a Trump bid dominated headlines for weeks, as did his critiques of Obama. His repeated calls for the president to release his birth certificate, even saying he’d give $5 million to charity if Obama also released his passport application and college records, struck many people as extreme. Does he think it was a mistake to have focused so hard on the From top: Donald Trump with his realbirther issue? Donald One is adamant: “Not at all. It was a real estate-mogul father, Fred, at the Trump question. It still is a real question. Most of the country really Plaza hotel, in 1988; Trump and third wife Melania Knauss attend the launch cares about this, and I don’t think we’ve got the truth. In fact, of daughter Ivanka’s book with their son, Vicky, you should look into it…you would win a Pulitzer….” It’s Barron, in 2009; Trump with contestants this doggedness that draws people close and also creates enfor Miss USA, which he also owns.

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emies. During our conversation, he harps again on his nemesis at Vanity Fair. “I don’t even look at that magazine. He sends it to me every month,” he says, conjuring up an imaginary note. “ ‘From the desk of Graydon Carter.’ I don’t even read it. I just throw it away.” Does he really care about negative press? “I wouldn’t call him sensitive,” says Ivanka. “But he doesn’t like being used and he doesn’t like being hit. So if somebody goes after him especially for no reason, he will hit them back harder. It’s who he is.” Donald often asks those around him about social media. He finds Twitter a fascinating anthropological study. “The world is divided into two people: those who want the American dream + more @ and those who’ve failed.” The failures duJour.com are the ones who don’t like him or understand him, he believes. Before making his reality debut, he says Regis Philbin told him, “Trumpster, just be yourself on TV”—and that worked. It remains to be seen whether the public or media will ever accept both sides of Trump. But as our meeting ends, the Donald deep inside, Donald Two, wants to appear on the surface. “Just write a fair piece,” he says as he hugs me goodbye. Momentarily he looks wistful. But then the room fills, and Trump is off looking at f loor plans and buildings. Bankers are calling, and Donald is telling them all he can help…no need to repay the favor...

Trump’s gotten into a number of Twitter tiffs, including back-and-forths with Mark Cuban, Jon Huntsman and Michelle Malkin.

getty images (3)

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“you know the beauty is good for the first ten minutes, right?”


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From left: Imri Larsen wears a suit and shirt by BRIONI, tie by ISAIA, pocket square by BRUNELLO CUCINELLI, watch by FRANCK MULLER, tie bar by DAVID YURMAN, belt by BOSS and shoes by TOD’S. Amit Sabharwal wears a suit and shirt by ISAIA, tie and pocket square by BOSS, tie bar by THE TIE BAR and shoes by ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA. Jung Kwon wears a suit and pocket square by J.CREW, shirt and tie by ISAIA, tie bar by THE TIE BAR, belt by BOSS, shoes by TOD’S and bag by ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA. Andy Meehan wears a suit by J.CREW, shirt and pocket square by BOSS, tie by BRIONI, belt by TOD’S, shoes by CHURCH’S and bag by ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA. For full fashion details, visit dujour.com.

corporate

The new don drapers Move over Mad Men. In 2013, brand experts are the real kings.

PHOTOGRAPHED by DREW INNIS STYLED by Paul frederick

Brand-strategy consultant Andy Meehan (far left) and designers Imri Larsen (above left) and Jung Kwon (above right) are among the 140-plus employees in Lippincott’s youthful workforce.

Curious about celeb coffee orders? Go to the Starbucks Gossip website to learn about Rob Lowe’s macchiatos and Kate Middleton’s decaf skinny lattes.


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a simpler, cleaner logo. Samsung’s new Galaxy smartphone? They named it. Wise says the branding industry attracts driven, left-brain/right-brain people: architects, industrial designers, writers, business consultants and people with psychology backgrounds. Energetic twentysomethings fresh from college and graduate programs make up nearly 40 percent of Lippincott. “We’re somewhat restless and demanding of ourselves,” says Wise. “We run hard, we work hard. Most of us got into branding because we like the notion of taking strategic thinking and applying it to a tangible outcome,” such as helping Walmart redesign its stores and logo around its slogan. Currently the company is working with clients in Asia, where projects include the launch of Estée Lauder’s brick-and-mortar stores. As Wise says, “We love the notion of helping a client with a big transformation.” What’s bigger than changing the world, one consumer at a time?—KRISTA SORIANO

Lippincott CEO Rick Wise wears a suit and pocket square by BRUNELLO CUCINELLI, shirt by ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA, tie by ISAIA, watch by FRANCK MULLER, tie clip by TIFFANY & CO. and shoes by TOD’S.

Mad Men’s Jon Hamm is more than happy to don modern suits. “I lived through the ‘70s,” he has said. “I’d rather not get into those clothes again.”

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Groomer: Benjamin Thigpen for Recipe for Men

Lippincott is a global giant: Previous clients include corporate behemoths Walmart and McDonald’s. “We want our brand strategists to get enthusiastic about the design and seeing the logo on the TV screen when it’s all done,” says CEO Rick Wise (seen below). “One of the neatest things about [working with] the iconic brands that everyone knows is just how visible the impact is.”

ou might think of a brand strategist like a bigger picture Don Draper—more ideas, fewer catchy slogans, far less hair gel. Wider range. In a 28-story, I.M. Pei–designed building on the corner of Park and 59th, brand-strategy-and-design firm Lippincott has dozens of them, all hard at work plotting how you’ll soon be thinking about the sort of big-brand names you typically take for granted. Since 1943, the firm has been helping Betty Crocker, Coca-Cola, Delta Air Lines, Samsung and dozens more of the world’s most powerful companies define, and redefine, themselves in the eyes, and hearts, of consumers. “Often what we’re doing is what we call ‘revitalizing a brand,’ ” says CEO Rick Wise. “We’re helping them refresh it, restage it.” This means digging deeper than the traditional modes of advertising: methods like updating Starbucks’ look for its 40th anniversary. Or positioning eBay as more user-friendly experience by introducing


c-print, Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York

Erwin Wurm, One-Minute Sculpture, 1997

StandardHotels.com


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show & Tell

Portrait of a Collector

George Epaminondas discovers the surprising truths of what motivates Rosette Delug, self-taught connoisseur of contemporary art

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wo cent uries ago, French writer Marie-Henri Beyle noted his disorientation when viewing Florence’s Re naissa nce ma st e r pie ce s for t he first time. “I was seized with a fierce palpitation of the heart.... I walked in constant fear of falling,” he observed under the pseudonym Stendhal. The condition would later be named Stendhal syndrome, an acute disorder induced by exposure to an abundance of sublime artworks. Fortunately Stendhal never made it to the Los Angeles home of Rosette Delug, with her growing display of modern and contemporary blue-chip art. The works, which emblazon every inch of her light-filled Trousdale Estates residence, inspire a f lurry of responses, from surprise to fascination, elation to discombobulation. “Don’t

PHOTOGRAPHED by douglas friedman you feel good when you wal k i n?” Delug asks, pleased with her handiwork. Stendhal syndrome be damned. Delug’s collection, assembled in the last 12 years, numbers more than 500 paintings, drawings, sculptures, photographs and installations. Visitors initially observe an acrylic chamber, located by the entrance like a postmodern portal to another dimension, by Ger ma n conce pt u al a r t ist Olaf Nicolai. Once inside the midcentury home, guests are confronted with well-k nown works by John Cur rin, Matthew Barney, John Baldessari and Chris Ofili. The latter’s monumental The Saga Continues... The Journey from Hell, complete with a ball of elephant dung, has pride of place in the living room. So too does a surreal Jim Lambie sculpture of folded doors. Ev-

ery single wall, from the powder room to the kitchen and the media room, has been covered with work. Even the bottom of her pool is, with the provocative Lawrence Weiner text piece Stretched as Tightly as Is Possible (Satin) & (Petroleum Jelly). It’s a wildly eclectic mélange, and the only lin k bet ween the works is their owner. “I just know what I like,” says Delug. The Tu rk ish-bor n collector, who moved to Califor nia in 1972, is cradling her angelic grandd aug hter Soph ia Rose on a recent afternoon. With her f laxen hair, olive skin and girlish demeanor, Delug se e m s c on side r ably you nge r t h a n 63. She’s wearing a f igure-hugging black ensemble, a tangle of talismanic necklaces and sky-high Chanel boots. Over the span of several hours, Delug

is gar r ulous, insightf ul, f un ny and f lamboyant. Taking a sip of ginger tea, Delug shares her thoughts on the difference between male and female collectors. “Men are like conquerors. They have to have the biggest, the most expensive piece,” she says. “We’re more emotional creatures. I’m not saying I’m a decorative person, because I would never buy a piece because it matched my r ug. But we appreciate beauty.” Delug bought the 8,000-square-foot home in 2007 and im mediately set about tweaking it to accommodate her expansive collection. The f loors were sanded, accent lighting was installed, and the dining room was transformed into a gallery-library. Single after 25 years of marriage and with her children all grown up, Delug determined

In 1999, NYC mayor Rudy Giuliani decried Ofili’s The Holy Virgin Mary as “sick” and threatened to cut funding to the Brooklyn Museum, where it was shown.


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Previous page, left to right: James Lee Byars’ Untitled (circa 1960); Rachel Harrison’s sculpture Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (2011); Larry Johnson’s photographs Untitled (Land Without Bread) (2000, on wall); Chris Ofili’s The Saga Continues...The Journey from Hell (1997)

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At left: A wall in the kitchen showcases six works from John Baldessari’s “Person with Guitar” series (2005).

Top: Marilyn Minter’s video Green Pink Caviar (2009) plays in the media room. In living room, left to right: Jim Lambie’s Exceeder (2007); Raoul De Keyser’s Surplace nr. 4 (2002); Tomory Dodge’s Levitate (2006)

that th is house would be a pr ivate sanctuary. The master suite reveals a closet for her shoe and bag collection, while the office has custom shelving for her rare books. There’s a screening room in the basement. “Rosette’s home is, like her, remarkably open,” says artist Alex Israel. “Often you see an art collection, and it’s of the moment, or of the market. Rosette’s collection is truly unique—it’s a portrait of her.” Gazing at a wall festooned with paintings, Delug says, “I live with this ar t. I eat on it. My dining t able is by the ar tist Fran z West. I take great pleasure from this whole thing. Yes, there’s a social aspect, but that just goes along with it.”

In addition to being a recognized collector, Delug is an accomplished hostess, and her parties are attended by the art-world glitterati. Earlier this year she hosted a dinner for the Berlin-based Enrico David, to celebrate his show at the Hammer Museum. “What sets Rosette apart is that she is sincerely interested in the artists and wants to get to know them personally as friends,” says Ann Philbin, the director of the Hammer. “As a result, her parties are always vibrant affairs which end up around the Lawrence Weiner pool and often in it.” In the past Delug has hosted raucous events complete with stilt walkers, Cuban bands and Playboy bunnies styled like characters from Japanese manga—

this last flourish for a soiree venerating Japanese artist Takashi Murakami. Occasionally she becomes concerned about potential damage to her collection. “I have cameras everywhere, and sometimes after a party I will watch. Pretty scary. But I don’t want to live any other way.” The stor y of how Delug emigrated to Los A ngeles sheds lig ht on her penchant for rebell ion. Delug h ai ls f rom an aff luent Jewish family based in the Turkish city of Izmir. When her

In entryway: Mark Grotjahn’s Untitled (Black and Cream), 2005, above table; Robert Mangold’s Column/Figure (Gray/Brown), 2004, at left; works by Raymond Pettibon, at right


parents arranged her betrothal to an older man, as was customary among

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her peer group, she f led Turkey. First she went to Paris, then to London, and eventually she settled in Los Angeles. A few months later she was accepted to the theater-arts program at UCLA. “The Vietnam War was still going, the professors had Afros, and everyone was smoking pot, dropping acid and having sex. It was quite a change for me.” T h ree yea r s later, af ter g radu ation, Delug d r if ted back to Tu rkey only to have her parents orchestrate another union. She escaped to L.A. again and this time stayed put. Soon after, she encountered Sam Delug, an Australian-born attorney who would make a for t une in the inter national long-distance telephone business. The pair mar ried in 1977 and had th ree child ren together. Delug ad mits to being shell-shocked by their split in 2001. That spring she found herself at the Armory Show in New York. “I was roaming around this gigantic art fair in a stupor,” she says. She bought a drawing by Neo Rauch, a small painting by Luc Tuymans and four drawings by Marlene Dumas. “A nd this is how it started,” she says. Though much of her early collection is in storage, t he Tuy ma n s — a pocket-si ze, khaki-hued canvas—is still displayed in the great room where we sit. In the begin ning she was unschooled in the machinations of the rarefied art scene, but she learned fast. “When I started collecting, none of the American galleries would sell to me, so I had to buy from the Ger man or the Dutch ones, or I had to buy really expensive pieces and donate them to museums for the promise that I might get a small piece later.” She is guided in her purchases largely by instinct, and she has never employed a consultant. Delug exudes an insatiable curiosity for artists, their interior lives and their methods. At one point, she plucks a small dark canvas from the overwhelming wall of works behind her bed. It’s a painting of a ghostly figure by L.A. artist Monica Majoli. “Ap-

Sigmar Polke’s Untitled (2001–6) shines bright in Delug’s hallway.

parently she works for four years on a little canvas like this,” Delug says in disbelief. “She’s like a Dutch master.” Delug herself avidly champions e me rg i ng a r t ist s , i nclud i ng Sc ot t Campbell, Tomory Dodge and Mimi Lauter. She is equally affectionate toward older artists whom she feels have been overlooked or marginalized by critics and curators alike. “This is Jack Whitten,” she says in her library, gesturing to a large abstract piece as-

sembled from small tiles of pigment. “He’s in his seventies and underappreciated, yet his work is fascinating.” Pausing before another recent acquisition, a fetish-inspired leather-wrapped bust by Nancy Grossman, Delug says, “If you met her, you would never think that a woman in her seventies would come up with these very S&M pieces.” She likes to juxtapose the output of older artists with that of budding talents to spark a generational dialogue.

The pairings speak volumes. In June, Delug will head for the Venice Biennale, followed by Art Basel in Switzerland. She’s attended every Art Basel for the last 12 years, except the one she skipped for her son’s wedding two years ago. After that, she returns to her aerie above Los Angeles and what she has created. Sometimes, in the still of the night, Delug will spin around her house admiring her astounding collection. “I feel very blessed,” she says.

At 2011’s Venice Biennale, Maurizio Cattelan installed 2,000 taxidermied pigeons above the event’s main building. Hitchcock would have loved it.


STYLE

LIFE

BODY

P L AY

CULTURE

WORK

NOTICED

SPOTLIGHT

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S

BAD BLOOD

tephen Moyer has plenty to sink his teeth into. The Britishborn True Blood star will be reprising his role as Bill Compton, the once-gentle vampire now out for bloody world domination, on June 16, when HBO’s gory Sunday-night soap opera returns for its sixth season—and this time, he’ll also be behind the camera. Here, Moyer gets candid about playing a bad guy, directing and what happens when he brings work home with him. After five seasons of playing a nice vampire, are you excited to embrace the dark side of Bill? He’s always tried to do things from

the right place, so even when he’s been a shit, he’s been a shit because he was doing it for what he considered the right reasons. The characters played by you and your wife [Anna Paquin] have a tumultuous relationship. Does that ever come home with you? It’s very difficult to avoid. Sometimes you come home and the last thing you want to talk about is work, but you’ll get into conversations like, “I can’t believe Sookie’s going to do that to him, it’s ridiculous!” True Blood has always been seen as an allegory for what happens

In addition to playing Bill, you’re directing the premiere episode of season six. That’s a lot of responsibility. It’s terrifying, but I relish it. And the cast has been fantastic about me doing it. It’s like being given the keys to the kingdom. What’s left for the characters on True Blood to battle this season? I hesitate to say this, but I think we’ve got a really great season. Obviously I have the benefit of being behind the curtain now that I’m directing, so I know a lot of stuff prior to the other actors and I’ve seen some footage. I’m excited and I think there’s a real sense of early True Blood about some of the episodes. It’s hard to stay shocking, but I think we’ve managed to do that. —ADAM RATHE

Four once-sizzling stars stage unexpected second acts

ANDREW DICE CLAY

ANDREW DICE CLAY THEN: After the comic hit it big in the 1980s with his foul-mouthed act, a series of career missteps and public blunders waylaid him.

NOW: Following an arc on HBO’s Entourage, Clay landed a juicy role in Woody Allen’s Blue Jasmine, out in July.

CHAD MICHAEL MURRAY

CHAD MICHAEL MURRAY THEN: Murray shot to fame on teen soap One Tree Hill, but after a feud with the network and a messy divorce from a costar, his star dimmed considerably.

NOW: Murray seems to be inching back toward on-screen stardom; this summer he has a role in the Sundance favorite Fruitvale Station.

SUMMER ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE

NO DIVING

FROM SHALLOW TO DEEP MAN OF STEEL Henry Cavill slips on the world’s most famous tights for Zack Snyder’s Superman reboot. 6/14

WORLD WAR Z It’s Brad Pitt versus a hungry army of zombies. That should be a piece of cake for the dad of six. 6/21

THE HEAT You know Lethal Weapon? Imagine that—but with Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy. 6/28

BAD MONKEY Carl Hiaasen doing what he does best: Skewering Florida fat cats and delivering big laughs. 6/11

THE JUGGLERS David Hockney, who’s recently taken up iPad painting, debuts his first video project. 5/23

THE SILVER STAR The Glass Castle author’s latest stars a plucky heroine named Bean— a guaranteed book club favorite. 6/11

BAD BLOOD: GETTY IMAGES. HAS-BEEN, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: EVERETT COLLECTION; JESSICA MIGLIO ©2013 GRAVIER PRODUCTIONS, COURTESY OF SONY PICTURES CLASSICS; GETTY IMAGES (5); EVERETT COLLECTION.

to outsiders. Do you think that’s still true? Our show works best when it’s holding up a mirror. It’s very difficult to keep doing it and always be prescient and at the forefront of what’s going on. At the end of season two, we had Bill taking Sookie off to Vermont because that was the only place vampires could marry humans.

HAS-BEEN TO HIGHBROW


GETTING FIXED

Handling scandals goes Hollywood with Showtime’s Ray Donovan

FRED SAVAGE

FRED SAVAGE THEN: Savage and his puppy-dog eyes were intrinsic to the success of The Wonder Years, though the actor failed to find roles with similar resonance.

NOW: He’s directed episodes of Modern Family and is behind the camera next with Ladies Night, a comedy starring Charlize Theron.

THEN: The follicularly remarkable Stamos starred on Full House, dated Paula Abdul and married Rebecca Romijn. None of those things lasted.

ONCE I WAS AN EAGLE Folk rocker Laura Marling proves there’s life after Adele, to whom she’s endlessly compared. 5/28

NOW: Stamos is upping his cool by drumming for Grammy-winning rockers The Black Keys. Luckily, another sitcom isn’t entirely out of the question.

THE BLING RING A true-life story of teens who robbed Hollywood homes. But not director Sofia Coppola’s. 6/14

BREAKING BAD The New Mexico tourism board’s least favorite show returns for its fifth (and last) season. 8/11

NIGHT FILM Keep the lights on when you read Marisha Pessl’s spooky, impossible-toput-down thriller. 8/20

web of infidelity and Oscar winners and the cutthroat admissions process for Los Angeles’ most prestigious private school. Donovan’s own issues, namely a problematic family life and an ex-con father, played by Jon Voight, complicate matters. Biderman, who’s done serious research on Hollywood’s seedy underbelly, says Schreiber seemed a natural fit for the role. “He just has a certain kind of old-fashioned masculine quality that Ray needed to have,” she says. “He brought to the part a soulfulness and intelligence—apart from the brutality.” Brutality is what fans might want to see, considering the popularity of TV series about pros who clean up the messes of the rich and famous. “I’ve been keeping fi les for years on the gestalt of the town, on crime and lawyers and private investigators and cops,” Biderman says. “Human behavior is what it is and at the end of the day, that’s what people respond to. Not glamour.” —MICHAEL SLENSKE

THE SPECTACULAR NOW The movie to see if you didn’t get your fill of off-kilter love in Silver Linings Playbook. 8/2

BLUE JASMINE Woody Allen directs Cate Blanchett as a disgraced socialite recovering from a breakdown. 7/26

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JOHN STAMOS

JOHN STAMOS

R

oyalty of the Hollywood variety has always needed cover for any litany of indiscretions. In Tinseltown’s Golden Age, studio-appointed puppet masters like Eddie Mannix and Howard Strickling were responsible for tending to movie stars’ troubles, whether that meant covering up affairs—for, among others, Tarzan star Johnny Weissmuller—or managing a suspicious death, like that of Jean Harlow’s husband Paul Bern. In June, a modern version of this cloak-anddagger operation lands on Showtime via Ray Donovan, a new drama starring Liev Schreiber as the titular problem-solver. “The fixer is this iconic character who’s been around since Hollywood’s been around,” Ann Biderman, the show’s creator, says. “It’s a very entitled town and people here get away with a lot of stuff—but they can also get into trouble.” The bespoke-suited, Mercedes-driving, Bostonborn Donovan makes those troubles disappear. Early on, he deals with action stars and a complex

DIVING

GETTING FIXED: SUZANNE TENNER/SHOWTIME. DIVE IN!: WORLD WAR Z: JAAP BUITENDIJK; THE HEAT: GEMMA LA MANA/20TH CENTURY FOX; BREAKING BAD: FRANK OCKENFELS/AMC; SPECTACULAR NOW: COURTESY A24; THE JUGGLERS, THE BLING RING, BLUE JASMINE: ALL GETTY IMAGES.

BACKSTORY


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Juli anne Mo ore

Never one to choose the easy path, Julianne Moore takes her career and personal life into her own hands—and finds extraordinary success. Lauren Waterman asks, Is this Hollywood’s most honest actress? PHOTOGRAPHED by Will Davidson Styled by lori goldstein

W

e’re only about halfway through lunch when Julianne Moore says something, quite casually, that upends the story I’d been planning to write about her. We were discussing her cu r rent f ilm, W hat Maisie Knew, in which she plays a self-obsessed musician, and we’d already spent some time talking about her Bible-banging role in the upcoming Carrie remake. But when I observe that both movies hinge, plot-wise, upon her characters’ spectacular failings as parents—“They’re both such terrible mothers,” I say, “but in such different ways”—she agrees and then shuts me down in a single breath. “I know,” she says cheerfully, “and I hate that comparison.” Taken aback, I ask why. “Oh, just because it’s so reductive. These are two very different movies.” Needless to say, she’s right. And this is only one of several moments in our conversation, conducted over salads and zucchini fries at a cafe near her home in Manhattan’s West Village, in which Moore resists the easy and the neat in favor of the true. It’s an impulse that’s served the actress well over the course of her nearly threedecade career: Ever since getting her start in the mid-1980s as a pair of identical half sisters on the long-running soap opera As the World Turns, she’s won praise, and awards, for her funda-

mentally honest, sympathetic portrayals of women as varied as a drug-addicted porn star (in 1997’s Boogie Nights) and Sarah Palin (in 2012’s Game Change). Scott McGehee, who co-directed Moore alongside creative partner David Siegel in What Maisie Knew—a contemporary adaptation of Henry James’ novel about a neglected young girl dealing with her parents’ bad divorce—says that he never doubted Moore’s ability to inhabit Susanna, a dissolute rock star. “This is one of the things that she does so well,” he explains. “She finds the human part of an unlikable character.” (She also lear ned how to sing and play guitar for the role, although she points out that her approach was pretty far from Method: “I needed to learn how to play three chords, and I worked really hard at learning those three chords, but I couldn’t play them for you now.”) “She believes very much in being present in the moment of performance,” Siegel explains, “but she doesn’t carry it with her when she leaves.” Indeed, McGehee says that, between takes, Moore would swiftly drop character to be “a comforting colleague” to her young co-star, the talented newcomer Onata Aprile. “It was fun to watch her with her own kids, too,” he adds, referring to Caleb, 15, and Liv, 11. “The principal loca-


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“Men aren’t asked about age or about their children. Not that these things aren’t important, but I do feel like it becomes reductive.”

tion was literally around the corner from her house, so they popped by every now and then, and she has a really lovely, warm relationship with them.” Motherhood, Moore says, “was something that I always wanted to do. I didn’t know if I’d get married—I just didn’t innately feel like that was something I could be goal-oriented about—but I knew that I wanted to have children.” And ultimately, of course, she did decide to marry her kids’ father, the writer-director Bart Freundlich, but not until 2003, when the couple had already been together for seven years. “It starts to become societally challenging,” she says. “When you say partner, people ask, ‘Do you mean your business partner?’ So we’d be reduced to saying boyfriend and girlfriend, and then there are always issues with hospitals and health insurance, and it just starts to seem silly. We are a family. We are emotionally responsible for one another, so we wanted to be legally responsible for one another, too. I think the institution is what you make it.” In person, Moore comes across as both war m and no-nonsense—her responses to several of my questions betray a very low-key frustration with the kinds of questions she’s always asked, but she’s genial nevertheless. “Do we have to talk about parenthood?” she wonders, after I push her to elaborate. “I don’t mind, but I do think it’s an extremely profound experience, something that’s difficult to encapsulate in a single interview.” Later, she worries that queries about parenting and getting older might be inherently sexist, regardless of intent. “Men aren’t asked about age,” she points out. “Men aren’t asked about their children. Not that these things aren’t important, but I do feel like it becomes reductive,” she says, returning to the same (not particularly common) word that she used earlier in our conversation, “when a woman’s life becomes, ‘Talk to me about your kids and how you feel about plastic surgery.’ ” For the record, she is willing to answer. “I just think that it’s boring! I don’t say that to you—I say that to everyone. Our fear of aging is really a fear

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there, and it’s not anybody’s job to find it for me but mine. You’re always responsible for trying to figure out what to do with your own career.” Certainly she’s found plenty to do lately: Starting with The English Teacher, a quirky comedy that debuted on VOD in April and is currently in theaters, she’ll appear in no less than six f ilms this year. Coming this October is Don Jon, Joseph GordonLevitt’s buzzed-about directorial debut, about a man who attempts to quit watching what used be called “adult films” at the behest of his girlfriend, played by Scarlett Johansson. (Moore plays a fellow student in the community-college class that the title character enrolls in, again under duress.) “When I first saw the script,” she says, “I knew it had something to do with porn, and I just thought, Ugh. But then I started to read it, and it was so funny and so lovely and so surprising. I said, ‘This isn’t about porn!’ I think it’s a great rumination on the nature of intimacy.” If her co-stars’ performances seem to have been heavily inf luenced by MTV’s Jersey Shore, whereas hers is far more naturalistic, that’s exactly the point. “A lot of people [in this movie] are behaving in a way that, culturally, they feel they should be behaving,” she explains. “What I liked about my character is that she’s at a place in her life where she can’t be

anything less than 100 percent authentic.” Also in October, she’ll venture to the dark side, playing a powerful witch in the family-oriented adventure film Seventh Son and the deranged mother of a telekinetic teenager (played by Chloë Grace Moretz) in Carrie. Like her director on that movie, Kimberly Peirce, Moore took her inspiration directly from Stephen King’s 1974 novel. “It’s really about social isolation and what that does to a person,” she says, speaking of both the book and the new adaptation, “and the kind of unhappiness and even rage that it can incite. What I hadn’t remembered is that Margaret is really someone who marginalized herself. The only world she knows is the world that she has with her daughter, and she’s doing everything she can to keep that world intact.” Finally, she’ll star opposite Liam Neeson in an airplane-set thriller called Non-Stop. (The film is a reunion of sorts for the two, who worked together in 2009’s Chloe, which, Neeson allows, “was a very, very different sort of film. But I love acting with her. She’s so easy to work with— she’s just always so real, and we giggle a lot. The crew loves her. She’s just a lovely burst of feminine energy on the set.”) Given all of the above, and the fact that her performance in Game Change recently netted her an

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of dying; aging is a physical manifestation of decay, and I think that is what’s so upsetting to most people.” Of course, Moore herself looks as beautiful as ever at 52 and, quite possibly, even more distinctive. As Tom Ford, who frequently dresses the star for big events and also directed her in 2009’s A Single Man says, “When I looked at her through the [camera] lens it was startling: She is actually luminous.” (In a follow-up interview, Moore manages to make her contract with L’Oréal, for which she promotes, among other products, an anti-aging cream, seem perfectly in line with her principles. “They’re great because they have a range of women representing their brand,” she notes, “from very young women all the way up to Jane Fonda, who’s 75. It’s not about being beautiful for your age. It’s about being beautiful at your age.”) She likewise has little patience for the idea that it’s difficult for an actress to locate good parts once she hits the far side of 40; examine her own CV and it’s easy to see why. Although Moore worked steadily in her late twenties, moving from lead parts in miniseries and TV movies to third- or fourth-billed roles in high-quality popcorn f licks like The Hand That Rocks the Cradle or The Fugitive, it wasn’t until her early thirties that she appeared in Short Cuts, Vanya on 42nd Street and Safe, a cinematic hat trick of rich, subtle performances that established her as a dramatic force to be reckoned with. And it’s only in the past 14 years—since she turned 39—that she’s cemented her reputation as a major star, thanks to her indelible acting in critically acclaimed films like Magnolia, Far From Heaven, The Hours and The Kids Are All Right. “Good parts, really interesting parts, are difficult for anyone to find at any age,” she says, “because this business is not set up in such a way that it’s about finding great parts for actors and actresses.” Major studios, she continues, “are looking for a great product that they can sell globally. So I can’t sit here and rail against the industry, because I do think that there’s interesting stuff out


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Emmy, a Golden Globe and a Screen Actors Guild award, it could reasonably be argued that Moore is in her prime. But I get the sense she wouldn’t necessarily appreciate hearing that. “We try to impose a narrative on everything where it doesn’t exist, because we like narrative,” she says, after I ask a general question about the arc of her career. “We love story—I particularly love story—and so we think, That was the beginning, and this is the middle, and then there’s going to be the conclusion. We even talk about it! Like, in magazines, they’ll say, ‘This next chapter of her life…’ Chapter? Like something ended, and you’re beginning something new, when really there’s just a continuum. The fact of the matter is, you can’t impose a narrative until someone’s dead, because you don’t know what’s going to happen. “There’s not an arc,” she goes on, “just a line that moves forward, without being able to see past the horizon. That’s my philosophy these days: I don’t try to go ahead of that, because there’s no sense in it. Ahead of that, you don’t know what’s going to happen. It’s not true. It’s not real. It’s imagined.” This way of thinking, she says, extends to more than just acting, although that career, she admits, is especially unpredictable. “There’s not much certainty,” she insists, even for someone as accomplished as she is. “You can have a great experience on something and then just be unhirable the next year. It could be over! People ask me, ‘Why would you worry about not working again?’ And I always say, ‘Because it’s not unprecedented.’ ” But it doesn’t seem that she worries about unemployment so much as acknowledge that it’s a possibility, one that—in spite of her earlier assertion that it’s up to her to find her own parts—she knows she can’t necessarily control. “It’s funny,” she muses. “When you think about the steps you take to get somewhere, we’re not always clear. When I was 17, I decided, out of the blue, that I wanted to be an actor, and I was like, ‘OK. I’m going to go to acting school, and then I’m going to move to New York, and then I’m going to get an agent, and then I’m going to get a callback.’ Everything was always, ‘I’m going to do this, and then I’m going to do this,’ but not with a whole lot of sense of…” She pauses, then breaks into a smile. “If I saw myself sitting here at 52, talking about my career and how I’ve been doing it for the last 30 years, I would be like, ‘Are you kidding me? It happened?’ ”


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a look at the daring, dynamic architecture of Portugal PHOTOGRAPHED by Adrian Gaut Written by Adam rathe

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In Plane View


P

ostcards from Portugal inevitably feat u re Lisbon’s old-world cob blestoned streets or the boat-dotted shores of Porto. But while these images are the ones most people associate with Europe’s westernmost country, its stunning moder n architecture is threatening to steal the scene. “From Frank Gehry to Rafael Moneo, the world’s important architects have paid tribute by being inspired by its f reedom in for m and space,”

Pedro Gadanho, the Portuguese-born curator of contemporary architecture at New York City’s Museum of Modern Art, says. “This impact is broader than you think.” Any discussion of modern Portuguese architecture, which was jumpstarted after the 1974–75 revolution that ended almost 50 years of authoritarian rule, has to begin with Álvaro Siza, the 1992 winner of the Pritzker Prize, the most prestigious award in

the f ield. His buildings are characterized by clean angles and cur ves, the use of inexpensive materials like concrete and local products like tile, and a harmony with the complex natural and manmade landscapes around them. His work imparts a sense of the essential and of the eternal. Siza’s impact can be seen on all the structures pictured here. His significance has grown through his countless projects across Portugal—he’s drafted ever ything from swimming pools and public housi ng de velopments to banks and university buildings—and from his role as a professor to generations of st udents at the University of Porto School of Architecture.

“Obviously, there’s a filtering and an inf luence of moder nism. All of these buildings show different inf luences, f rom Le Corbusier to Alvar Aalto, but they are blended with the local vernacular,” Gadanho explains. Perhaps Siza’s best-known protégé is Eduardo Souto de Moura (who was awarded the Pritzker Prize in 2011). Like Siza, Souto de Moura presents a refracted and streamlined interpretation of his cou nt r y’s histor y and u n ique geog raphy th roug h h is de signs. For Cascais’ Casa das Histórias Paula Rego museum, Souto de Moura used red concrete to mimic the terracotta prevalent in the traditional local buildings, while the two pyramid-like stacks echo the towers of the nearby Sintra National Palace, a U NESCO World Heritage site. Fascinated by the interplay between the artificial and the natural, Souto de Moura also selected

111 Opposite page: The Cinema House in Porto, by Eduardo Souto de Moura. This page, from left: Casa das Histórias Paula Rego in Cascais, by Souto de Moura; the Church of Santa Maria in Marco de Canavezes, by Álvaro Siza


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Opposite page: Vodafone Headquarters in Porto, by Barbosa & Guimar達es. Above: Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown in Lisbon by Charles Correa Associates


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Above: The Portuguese National Pavilion in Lisbon, by Siza

the red to stand in bold juxtaposition with the greenery of the museum’s setting in a forest in a southern coastal town. Despite the dynamism and variety of these str uctures, many of which were completed only in the last few years, Portuguese construction has now ground to a halt due to the count r y’s intense economic t roubles. (I n Febr uar y, its u nemploy ment rate hit 17.5 percent.) “There is no architect ure here at this moment,” Siza says. Souto de Moura concurs. “I have nothing to do in Portugal. Everything is at a standstill. All public works are suspended: the government, municipalities, hotels. Building in the private sector is also suspended. It’s not just here, but in Spain and Italy, too.” Still, this stasis could have beneficial effects. For one, you’ll probably star t seeing more Por t ug uese architect u re spread beyond its borders and 10.6 mil-

lion inhabitants and enrich the outside world. Sout o de Mou r a says, “ W hat some architects like myself are doing is looking outside of Europe.” (He’s considering potential commissions in Latin America and Africa.) And in the same way that a politicalregime change ended up catalyzing the work photographed for this story, the euro-zone catastrophe could foment a new wave of ingenuity in architecture. MoMA’s Gadanho thinks the moment could be ripe for such a shift. “I do think this style has become somewhat fashionable. It’s become a formal language and a trap in itself,” he says. “Now that we have this crisis stopping people and leaving them without work, I think we might go back to a more conceptual moment to try and understand our roots and be innovative once again.” With additional reporting by Natalia de Ory

Clockwise, from above: Another view of the Vodafone building; Living Foz apartments in Porto, by dEMM Arquitectura; Casa da Música in Porto, by Rem Koolhaas


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International Center for the Arts Jose de Guimar達es in Guimar達es, by Pitagoras Arquitectos


dust till DAWN

Socialites and celebrities are flocking to Burning Man, the annual self-expression festival. But Mickey Rapkin asks, can you put a price on enlightenment?

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PHOTOGRAPHED by barbara traub

A

few summers ago, two hot TV starlets whose names you’d recognize traveled to Burning Man, the annual arts-and-hedonism festival in Black Rock Desert, Nevada. It was an odd juxtaposition, these two parading around the weeklong absurdist free-for-all—a place where cars shaped like octopuses roam and citizens offer lectures in topics from physics to S&M in exchange for shelter. Or rather, it would have been an odd juxtaposition, if anyone knew those two actresses were there. “They put on Kabuki masks and walked around naked,” says a friend. While Burning Man has long been popular with tech types—Larry Page and Sergey Brin of Google, Elon Musk of Tesla Motors, MTV creator Bob Pittman—it’s lately become a fixture on the socialite calendar, with Stavros Niarchos and his sister Eugenie braving the sand storms, not to mention Alexandra von Furstenberg, Margherita Missoni, Bettina Santo Domingo, Lady Victoria Hervey, Francesca Versace, PC Valmorbida (the Aussie behind L.A.’s hip Prism Gallery) and David de Rothschild, to name a few. It girl Tali Lennox (daughter of Annie Lennox) twice accompanied her father, film producer Uri Fr uchtmann, to the event. Meanwhile, one New York City f inance type (and fixture on the nightlife scene) is rumored to have spent close to seven figures on a custom RV, prompting one socialite to sniff: “Who the fuck would spend a million dollars on a camper!” Welcome to the new Burning Man. It was founded in 1986 as a summer-solstice ceremony with 20 people and has grown exponentially since; the 2012

“They walked around naked.”


festival drew some 50,000 visitors. The vibe, however, remains the same, operating on the tenets of Radical Inclusion and Radical Self-reliance. As the principles state, “Burning Man encourages the individual to discover, exercise and rely on his or her inner resources.” But the inf lux of well-heeled travelers has created a market for what die-hard Burners condescendingly refer to as “pay-to-play” or “turnkey” camps. Meaning, for a price, one can now f ly from Reno to Burning Man’s landing strip on a six-passenger Cessna Turbo 207 and then be escorted to a tricked-out RV—turning Burning Man into one kick-ass party with visuals you won’t see anywhere else. Naked afternoon bike ride, anyone? Jodi Guber Br ufsky, founder of Beyond Yoga (and daughter of Hollywood film producer Peter Guber) went to Burning Man in 2011 with her hus-

band and some friends. When she showed up in Black Rock City, the group’s RVs had been arranged with an air-conditioned dome at the center serving as their private commissary, complete with a chef specializing in raw vegan food. Says Guber Brufsky, “There were margarita machines going all day long, snacks and a costume area,” adding, “There was nothing they couldn’t provide.” Which is saying something, since they were in the middle of the desert. The price tag for the trip: upwards of $20,000 per person. For a sample of the vitriol that some hard-core Burners feel toward this moneyed crowd, simply google “turnkey” and “Burning Man.” Or, better yet, ask f ilmmaker Chris Weitz (About a Boy, A Better Life), who met his wife at Burning Man and married her there in 2008. “Plug and Play camps,

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in which people live for a fee and have their needs catered to, are a big problem,” he says. “Taking the monetary exchange off-site doesn’t change the fact that you’re paying strangers to do what you and your friends should figure out. Look, you have to realize that the Black Rock Desert is a place that turns a glass of ice water into a luxury and a PopTart into a gourmet meal. But that’s no longer the case if you have your own freezer.” Burning Man isn’t for the faint of heart, that’s true. There are frequent dust storms, and—at nearly 4,000 feet above sea level—even cream with the highest SPF is no match for the midday sun. So why brave it? Says Guber Br ufsky, “What’s incredible at Burning Man is the ability to be anonymous. It gives people the permission to be uninhibited in a safe environment.” Like the starlets walking around naked. Or the supermodel and her boyfriend who were seen running around dressed in Native American tribal costumes two years ago. It’s a voyeur’s paradise, and $20,000 is simply a front-row ticket to the show. Morgan Wa ndell, a television producer in L.A. who runs in jetset circles and has been to Burning Man 10 times, cer t ai nly doesn’t rough it. (He once hired then-unknown actor Armie Hammer to drive his RV from Los Angeles to Reno.) Talk about extremes: He knows a guy who had maid service for his RV. “I said to him, ‘Don’t tell anyone ever again that you had maid service at Burning Man. That’s the most un–Burning Man thing you could ever say or do.’” Wandell believes it’s vital that everyone contribute to Burning Man; he and his friends run a bar out of their camp, inviting strangers to drink for free (there is no money exchanged at Burning Man). As he intones: “You have to come out here and be your authentic self. Because guess what—you’re not interesting because you’re rich and you go to the Hamptons in the summer. No one cares about that here.” The end-of-summer festival also offers a pretty spectacular backdrop to play dress-up. Says designer Emilie Ghilaga, “I’ve always thought Burning Man was the true fashion week.” Since it’s so hot during the day, clothing is often optional. At night the girls are heavy on a Mad Max, apocalyptic leather-and-fur feel. Yvonne Force Villareal

radical inclusion?


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chronicled her Burning Man sartorial choices for Vogue; she brought a vintage Gucci baby-blue fur and a Dior lace-and-gold gown. Burning Man— which is known for serious recreational drug use— brings new meaning to high and low. “If you know fashion,” says one tony festivalgoer, “you know that look isn’t cheap.” Despite the online grumblings, for the most part, it’s been a peaceful coexistence between socialites and Burners. (Although Lady Victoria Hervey has noticed a change, saying: “I went for the first time six or seven years ago, when it was less commercialized.”) There was also a memorable snafu in 2011, when champagne company Krug hosted a dinner on the Playa and invited writers for Notes on a Party and Town & Country. One plugged-in partygoer recalls the sponsored event: “It was fucking really fun, but there was definitely backlash.” Perhaps that’s why interior designer Rachel Horn

“don’t admit maid service.”

declined to com ment for this story. In August 2011, she and her husband were featured in the New York Times, discussing the Airstream trailer they retrofitted for the festival with Corian countertops. Horn’s business partner (and husband) e-mailed DuJour, saying: “We would rather not commercialize Burning Man any further.” But as another well-to-do Burner says, all this talk about commercialization is silly: Everything has a price tag. “A lot of the stuff that people think is super cool, some of the rich people are funding. Opulent Temple”—an electronic-dance-music notfor-profit—“comes in, and they’re essentially donating the DJs and the equipment and the bus.” Weitz, who was co-executive producer on a documentary about Burning Man called Spark, is part of Ashram Galactica—a group of 60 to 165 people who build a free hotel and bar. Of the backlash against

the socialite crowd, Weitz says, “Radical Inclusion is a big deal at Burning Man, so theoretically nobody has anything against anyone from the get-go.” He simply advises newcomers to give themselves over to the festival. “It’s up to you whether or not you’ll gain anything by it, but it would be good for starters to abandon the idea that you ‘do’ Burning Man.” He adds a sharp critique: “Nothing cushions you from participation like money.” Wandell puts a fine point on the festival’s appeal: “There’s none of this nonsense like in the outside world where people say, ‘We’re here and then we’ll go there for a drink and that’s going to be better.’ No. You’re at the coolest, best party on the planet, and everything you’re seeing and everything you’re doing is amazing. Wherever you are, that’s where you’re supposed to be.” Burn, baby, burn.


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Nofilter Nofilter On the cayman islands, racing shutter speeds reveal summer’s flashy neons and bold textures— and an electrifying bo derek 2.0 PHOTOGRAPHED by Hans feurer styled by david vandewal


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Dree long dress, $1,445, DRIES VAN NOTEN, Blake, 312-202-0047. Sunset bandeau, $100, and Malibu bottom, $100, MIKOH SWIMWEAR, barneys.com. Sunglasses, $60, POLAROID SPORT, dillards.com. Ferrule necklace, $175, HOLST + LEE, Saks Fifth Ave, 877-551-7257. Who Are You necklace, $1,118, ERICKSON BEAMON, Beyond Seven, 646-619-6857. (Right arm) Inverse cuff, $6,800, LYNN BAN, barneys.com. Throwing Star cuff, $2,800, LYNN BAN, maxfieldla. com. (Left Arm) Throwing Star cuff, $2,800, LYNN BAN, maxfieldla.com. Cage bangles, $2,500, LYNN BAN, barneys.com.


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Dress, $5,530; Glass bracelet, $480, MISSONI, 212-517-9339. Surf Hipster, $48, J.CREW, jcrew.com. Fringed earrings, $881, ETRO, 212-317-9096. Necklace, $3,570, GUCCI, gucci.com. (Right arm) Comb bangle, $85; Beetle bangle, $85; Wishbone bangle, $85; Liquid bangle, $85; Firestone bangle, $750; Seaweed Wrap bangle, $85, DINOSAUR DESIGNS, dinosaurdesigns.com. Evening bag, $9,900, CHANEL, chanel.com. Sandals, $850, ROBERTO CAVALLI, robertocavalli.com.


Dress, $2,990, GUCCI, gucci.com. Double Strap top, $120, A.T.G WOMEN, atgishere.com. Moveable Triangle earrings, $300, LYNN BAN, barneys.com. Drop necklace, $521; Beaded collar, $540, ETRO, 212-317-9096. Twisted Necklace, $670; Chain-Link Necklace, $750, DRIES VAN NOTEN, IF, 212-334-4964. (On face) Sheer Color Cheek Tint in Summer Pink, $26, BOBBI BROWN, macys.com. (On hair) Diamond Oil Shatterproof Shine, $40, REDKEN, ulta.com.

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124 At Seven Mile Beach outside the RitzCarlton, surfers catch waves and parasails hover. Dress, $8,925, PROENZA SCHOULER, 212-585-3200. Sunglasses, $60, POLAROID SPORT, dillards.com. Fringed earrings, $497, ETRO, 212-317-9096. Cuff, $705, DRIES VAN NOTEN, Blake, 312-202-0047. Evening bags, $9,900 each, CHANEL, 800-550-0005.


Cape, $3,550, SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE, 212-980-2970. Embroidered T-shirt, $635, RICHARD CHAI LOVE, Pas de Deux, 212-475-0075. Crochet swimsuit, price upon request, HERVÉ LÉGER BY MAX AZRIA, herveleger.com. Triangle choker, $995, ALEXIS BITTAR, alexisbittar. com. Bracelets, $715 each, ROBERTO CAVALLI, robertocavalli.com. Oval ring in 18-karat yellow gold, $3,700, ROBERTO COIN, robertocoin. com. Bag, $350, 3.1 PHILLIP LIM, 212-334-1160. Fringe boots, $5,225, VERSACE, 888-721-7219.

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126 Plunge into the pool at the Ritz-Carlton Grand Cayman, a 144-acre resort with a spa and five restaurants, including Blue by Eric Ripert. Bandeau top, $110, A.T.G WOMEN, atgishere.com. Hat, $1,590; Necklace, $4,375, CHANEL, chanel.com. (On eyes) High Impact Waterproof Mascara, $16, CLINIQUE, macys. com. Liquid Eyeliner, $18, ELIZABETH ARDEN, elizabetharden.com. (On lips) Lacquer Rouge lipstick in Disco, $25, SHISEIDO, shiseido.com.


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128 Dress, $1,825; Short Fringe necklace, $2,650; Long Fringe necklace (worn as belt), $2,825; Fringe Hoop earrings, $625, VERSACE, 888-7217219. Double Strap top, $120, A.T.G WOMEN, atgishere.com. Sunglasses, $60, POLAROID SPORT, dillards.com. Oracle cuff, $865, LANVIN, 312765-7075. Bracelet, $145; Bracelet, $150, HOLST + LEE, Saks Fifth Ave, 877-551-7257. Oval ring in 18-karat yellow gold, $3,700; Ring in 18-karat rose gold, $4,300; Martellato Square ring in 18-karat yellow gold, $3,500, ROBERTO COIN, robertocoin.com. Pipeline Beach bag, $165, MIKOH SWIMWEAR, mikohswimwear.com.


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Fringe dress, price upon request, RODARTE, Ikram, 312-587-1000. Sunglasses, $60, POLAROID SPORT, dillards.com. Moveable Triangle earrings, $300, LYNN BAN, barneys. com. Who Are You necklace, $1,228, ERICKSON BEAMON, Beyond Seven, 646-619-6857. Crystal necklace, $695; Crystal bracelets, $450 each; Crystal pins (worn on necklace), $350 each, MIU MIU, miumiu.com. Eye ring, $2,800; Triangular ring, $4,500, LYNN BAN, maxfieldla. com. Intrecciato Nappa fringe bags, $3,550 and $3,750, BOTTEGA VENETA, bottegaveneta.com. Graphic heel, price upon request, RODARTE.


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Dress, $5,800, DIOR, 800-929-3467. Moveable Triangle earrings, $300, LYNN BAN, barneys.com. (On face) Bronze Goddess Luminous Liquid Bronzer, $29, ESTÉE LAUDER, esteelauder.com. (On lips) Color Fever Gloss in Intense Fuchsia, $27, LANCÔME, lancome-usa.com.


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Take a stroll through Grand Cayman’s Botanic Park, a haven for endangered blue iguanas and rare orchids. Swimsuit, $95, DIESEL, diesel. com. Olemac skirt, $430, DIESEL BLACK GOLD, 212-966-5593. Claw earrings, $400, LYNN BAN, barneys.com. Breastplate, price upon request, ALEXIS BITTAR, alexisbittar.com. (Right arm) Shagreen cuff, $1,800, LYNN BAN, maxfieldla. com. (Left arm) Throwing Star cuff, $2,800, LYNN BAN, maxfieldla.com. Cage bangle, $2,400; Armor ring, $290, LYNN BAN, barneys. com. T-Strap sandals, $695; Oasis Beach bag, ALEXANDER WANG, alexanderwang.com.


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The North Side of Grand Cayman at Rum Point Club Restaurant is a serene spot for cocktails and local cuisine. Opera coat, $2,995; The Blaze bag, $2,995, BURBERRY PRORSUM, burberry.com. Highneck bandeau, $130; Brazilian bottom, $60, A.T.G WOMEN, atgishere.com. Sunglasses, $60, POLAROID SPORT, dillards.com. Claw earrings, $400; Spike bangle, $1,300; Gear bangle, $1,200, LYNN BAN, barneys.com. Sandals, $695, GUCCI, gucci.com.


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Maxi dress, $2,970, ROBERTO CAVALLI, robertocavalli.com. Swimsuit, $194, MIKOH SWIMWEAR, ishine365.com. Fringed earrings, $497; Beaded collar, $540, ETRO, 212-317-9096. Twisted necklace, $670; Chain-Link Necklace, $750, DRIES VAN NOTEN, IF, 212-334-4964. Karma necklace, price upon request, ORLY GENGER BY JACLYN MAYER, jaclynmayer.com. Spike bangle, $1,300; Gear bangle, $1,200; Inverse cuff, $6,800, LYNN BAN, barneys.com. Hair: Ward for Living Proof. Makeup: Vicky Steckel at Bryan Bantry. Model: Jacqueline Jablonski. Production assistant: Grayson McLean. Fashion assistant: Daniel Edley. Casting: Oliver Ress at Art Forum. Special thanks to: Ruth Myles and the Department of Tourism; Nancy Harrison and the Ritz-Carlton Grand Cayman.


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FRUIT GLOOM of THE

Nutritionists and healers are the new talk therapists. Amanda Fortini confesses. PHOTOGRAPHED by Grant cornett

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too late, and that I loathe any day that I have to wake up early. I tell him nearly every last thing I consume, from verboten sweets to approved-of supplements. After a bad breakup several years ago, I confessed to him that I was indulging in the odd cigarette, and that I’d occasionally smoked an herb less legal than tobacco. Surely by now, you’re thinking, She’s talking about her shrink. But you would be wrong. I’m talking about my homeopath. I’m not the only one with an alternative health practitioner who has become her de facto therapist. If you’ve gone to a dinner party lately or shared a meal with a friend, the topic of food has likely dominated the conversation—not only the food being ordered, served or eaten, but also the food not being eaten. It seems like nearly everyone is dabbling in an elimination diet of some kind—gluten-free,

sugar-free, wheat-free, dairy-free, a detox or a cleanse—for reasons of health or weight loss. Because these regimens tend to be administered by professionals who require regular visits, clients frequently develop a therapy-like relationship with their practitioner, telling him or her far more than how many calories they’ve consumed. “I don’t see a shrink but I feel like she’s become like my shrink,” says a 30-something publishing professional, whom we’ll call “Fiona,” about her relationship with her nutritionist, New York City–based Keri Glassman. (Names and identifying characteristics have been changed at the subjects’ request.) “She knows so much about me: She knows how I sleep, if I take a bath before bed, she knows so much.” Clients often come to view their healer or nutritionist as a guru of sorts and talk about him or her (and the

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t least twice a month, and more if my life is skidding into crisis, I sit on a couch in a sunny, incense-scented office (or call in for a phone session from home) and tell my doctor all. I tell him when I’m feeling anxious or depressed, when my boyfriend and I have argued, when I’ve lost it with my mother. I tell him when I’m feeling stuck in a piece of writing, that I’m trying to create better boundaries for myself, that I want to make more money. I tell him when I’ve been staying up


desk while your boss hollers in the background. Likewise, a late-night carouser who comes home with the munchies is going to eat differently than a more regimented, early-to-bed soul. “I ask myself, Am I looking at a person that is in this position because they’re an obsessive-compulsive eater or are they eating because of stress?” says David Allen, a Woodland Hills, California, nutritionist whose services are so in demand he recently created a concierge package that includes texting, e-mailing and round-the-clock availability, even on the weekends. “What’s going on in their lives? Are they going through divorce? Did they get a job that’s so stressful they don’t eat for nine hours? Do they sit there and eat the last two hours before going to bed? Are they emotional eaters? What’s driving their habits?”

“The reality is that the reasons people make poor food choices have very little to do with hunger.” —dietitian Tanya Zuckerbrot

To address such questions, most healers and nutritionists require that their clients fill out a comprehensive initial questionnaire that asks not only about their diet but also their lifestyle— which, of course, leads back to diet. Allen says he gives new prospects “a huge packet” composed of “every question known to man, from sex drive to everything you can think of. I know everything about them: If their poo is green, you know I know it.” Says Latham Thomas, a wellness and birth coach who offers clients nutritional support and yoga instruction: “I’ll ask about stress, about their job, what it is they’re excited about, what’s new and good in their life, what they have anxiety about, what they’re stewing about now. It starts casual, but it gives me an entry point and it leads to something deeper.” Fiona, the publishing executive, recalls a similar initial experience

with Glassman: “We started going through all the usual things—parents, health history, my eating habits, my sleeping habits—but ended up talking about who you’re dating, and are you up all night? Do you do drugs? Do you smoke cigarettes? How much are you drinking? You have to tell her everything.” And why not? What is there left to hide from someone who knows the vicissitudes of your libido and the frequency with which you visit the bathroom? It may also be that coming clean about one’s problems is a way of justifying unhealthy habits. “It’s like, ‘I didn’t really start exercising yet, and here’s why.’ You’re explaining why you haven’t taken care of yourself,” says an art director in her late thirties (let’s call her “Agnes”) who saw a nutritionist to shed her post-baby weight. Suffice it to say, when it comes to food—when it comes to most things—our behavior stems from our deep emotional selves. We eat to celebrate our professional victories, to calm our anxiety at social functions, to assuage the pain of a breakup. “The reality is that the reasons people are making poor food choices have very little to do with hunger,” says Tanya Zuckerbrot, a New York City dietitian whose high-fiber “F-Factor” diet is followed by a passel of high-powered types. “They’re usually reacting to an emotion. They’re bored, they’re sad, they’re lonely, they’re frustrated. I uncover during sessions what leads to those emotions. That’s where people really share the personal side of their lives.” She sounds uncannily like a traditional psychotherapist. As does Glassman: “If you don’t know what’s going on in someone’s life, it’s very difficult for you to understand, say, why they are eating late at night. If they’re stressed that their teenage son is out doing drugs…I can’t tell that person, ‘Well, you just have to put the food away.’ Instead, we have to deal with the underlying problem.” And so, relationships, parenting, important rites of passage and significant life struggles all get discussed. “You’d be surprised how many boxes of tissues I go through,” Zuckerbrot tells me. Yet I have a hunch that people are opening up to naturopaths and nutritionists for a simple, very human reason. Given how busy our lives are, it’s not uncommon to go days without a single person inquiring, with genuine curiosity, how we are. So when someone, even if it’s someone we’re paying, focuses on us, rapt and ready to listen, we unfurl and maybe come a little bit undone. Agnes, the ar t director, remembers breaking down in tears during the first couple of visits to her nutritionist: “I got in and

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ostensibly life-altering diet being touted) in the reverential, mildly obsessed way inhabitants of a bygone era nattered on about their analysts and analysis. “It’s now very chic to have to see your acupuncturist or herbalist or naturopath,” says Dr. Joy Jacobs, a clinical psychologist and assistant clinical professor at the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine who specializes in eating disorders, weight management and healthy lifestyles. It’s as though we’ve taken our anxieties about all the things we can’t control (money, illness, other people—to name a few) and channeled them into an area we can control: what we put in our mouths. Indeed, for reasons cultural, social and practical, the healer has become the new shrink, and dieting the new therapy. “That’s just nor mal, that you become par t therapist to your patients. That’s just part of what happens,” says Dr. Frank Lipman, a doctor of integrative medicine whose New York City practice, Eleven Eleven Wellness Center, counts Gwyneth Paltrow, Kyra Sedgwick and Maggie Gyllenhaal among its clients. “You can’t separate emotional, psychological health from physical health—it’s all part of the same thing. You’re not happy in your relationship or you’re having a problem at work, it often presents physically.” In other words, according to this holistic point of view, because the mind and body are so entwined, trying to get to the root of physical problems—whether a serious health matter or those last few clingy pounds—can mean a necessary confrontation with emotional ones. “People come, they usually think, to deal with weight issues,” says Miami Beach psychotherapist and doctor of holistic nutrition Dr. Etti Orya, who simply goes by Dr. Etti (though people also call her “The Juice Goddess”). But once her clients start fasting, she explains, they frequently find themselves flooded with feelings: “Everything comes up. [One’s] relationship with food, relationship with one’s self, relationships with your family, your loved ones, your children, everything.” Anyone who has ever found themselves inexplicably bawling midway through a juice fast knows exactly what she’s talking about. But if the mind-body connection seems too woo-woo to you, it’s likely still obvious why talking about one’s diet would lead to confessing about one’s life. For starters, how and what we eat is clearly determined, to a great extent, by the way we live. If you work from home and have time to prepare a meal for yourself, you’re likely going to make healthier choices than if you’re forced to wolf down your lunch at your


because, in her words, “I felt like I wasn’t getting anywhere. I wanted to be much more goaloriented, to have someone hold me accountable for what I wanted to achieve in my life.” She c u r r e nt ly s e e s a health coach; together, they map out her goals in six-month intervals. “We talk about everything from food to the i n c o m e I w a nt t o b e generating to relationships in my life and how they’re going,” she says. D r. E t t i , a fo r m e r m a r r iage a nd fa m i ly therapist who no longer provides talk therapy because she “didn’t find it effective,” believes that ministering to the physical self opens up a quick route to the soul. (If the problem is purely physical, a nutritionist is probably the way to go.) “The Freudian point of view of looking t h roug h t he pa st a nd finding the issue takes s o m u c h t i m e ,” s h e says. “It’s like, ‘W hy did my mother say this?’ Who cares why?! Snap out of it, and really deal with the issues today and how you can change them.” She pinpoints the appeal of following a foodand-wellness-centric regimen: You leave with a plan, and before long you see and feel results. After all, changes to our bodies, like weight loss, a re fa r more t a ng ible t h a n ch a nge s i n ou r minds—and the former can have a profound effect on the latter. I’ve been in traditional talk therapy, off and on, for 15 years. Have I fixed or improved upon any of the problems and obsessions to which I always return? Marginally. Yet when I do a juice fast or stick to a healthy diet, it’s not long before I feel like an entirely new me.

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I’ve been in traditional talk therapy, off and on, for 15 years. Have I Improved upon any of my problems and obsessions? Marginally. weight-loss consultant (“after I lost the weight I still kept seeing her for a like a year”) “soured,” because, as he puts it, “I was gaining all the weight back, and she felt like I wasn’t dealing with things in my life that were making me unhappy but I didn’t want to deal with them in her way.” For the self-directed, results-oriented person who doesn’t want to talk desultorily, the naturopathic approach may in fact be preferable. Kerri Axelrod, a for mer political communications director who is currently a holistic health coach in Boston, stopped seeing her psychotherapist

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he was like, ‘Hi! What can I do for you? What’s going on?’ And for some reason, it was like the first time since I’d had the baby that I actually took t i me — besides a manicure or something stupid—for me. So I just kind of let ever ything c ome out. I t old h i m about my life, what my last year was about…I remember coming back to the office and saying to a colleag ue, ‘Holy shit, I don’t know what happened. I just cried in that guy’s office.’ ” Since those of us who t r e a t o u r a lt e r n a t ive health practitioners as shrinks have someone to talk to on an almost weekly basis, it can often seem to us like the space in ou r lives for a therapist has been filled. What’s more, we have someone to spill t o w it h ou t e ve r h aving to admit a need for a trained professional who would force us to wade into the muck of ou r d a rker emot ion s. But is therapy therapy under any guise? Many clients I interviewed remarked that when their heale r bega n play i ng the therapist—when he or she assumed the role the client had put him or her in by gushing—they felt annoyed. It was like revealing too much to a friend and then feeling like you want to avoid her. “He started bothering me when he started to have opinions on my family and stuff,” says Agnes. “I was like, ‘Why are you judging my husband?’ I just kind of wanted him to listen. I didn’t want him to give opinions.” “Mark,” a 33-year-old New York City publicist for several art galleries, says his “very personal” two-and-a-half-year relationship with a


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Summer embraces the extremes of minimalism, at once graphic and serene PHOTOGRAPHED by Thomas whiteside styled by Catherine Newell-Hanson


139 Opposite page: Tunic, $1,460, AKRIS, Bergdorf Goodman, 888-774-2424. This page: Coat, $4,990, LANVIN, 646-439-0380. Sweater, $1,595, BURBERRY PRORSUM, burberry.com. Petersfield skirt, $995, BELSTAFF, belstaff.com. (On body) Tonic Body Treatment Oil, $56, CLARINS, macys.com. Something Blue Eau du Parfum Spray, $85 for 1.7 oz., OSCAR DE LA RENTA, saks.com.


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Cracked-leather double-zip jacket, $2,950, PROENZA SCHOULER, 212-585-3200. Bathing suit, $96, DKNY, dkny.com. (On nails) Pure Color nail lacquer in Nuditテゥ, $20, ESTテ右 LAUDER, esteelauder.com. (On hair) Heat Styling Protection, $28, MOROCCAN OIL, moroccanoil.com.


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Above: Vinyl double-breasted coat, $3,850; Calf vest, price upon request; Vinyl turtleneck, $1,250; Belt, $743, CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION, 212-292-9000. Skirt, $870, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO, 866-3377242. Left: Jacket, $4,300; Pants, $2,200, DIOR, 800-929-3467. Faux Nappa loafers, $895, STELLA MCCARTNEY, stellamccartney.com.


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Above: Shirt, $1,550; Skirt, $8,100, CÉLINE, Neiman Marcus, 310-550-5900. Faux Nappa loafers, $895, STELLA MCCARTNEY, stellamccartney.com. Opposite: Tejus printed calf-hair coat, $7,990, REED KRAKOFF, reedkrakoff.com. Turtleneck sweater, price upon request, BALLY, 212-751-9082. Thoroughbred Signet ring, $295, DAVID YURMAN, davidyurman.com. (On eyes) Le Crayon Poudre in Mahogany, $26, LANCÔME, lancome-usa.com. Art direction: Joao Moraes. Hair: Fernando Torrent using Leonor Greyl at L’Atelier NYC. Makeup: Kristin Gallegos using Chanel at CLM. Model: Maria Borges. Manicure: Maki Sakamoto for Rococo at Kate Ryan Inc.


photo credits teekay

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Gene Pope with the cover of Elvis Presley in his casket that shocked America—and sold a record-setting 6.5 million copies.

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In 1971,

the sleepy Flor ida

opposite: wireimage/getty images. this page: ©The Palm beach press/zumapress.com.

t ow n of L a n ta n a , p opu l at ion 7, 0 0 0 , wa s b e st known for its state hospital and a short stretch of beach fronting the Atlantic Ocean. But on July 19 of that year, L a nt a na woke up—a nd st ayed awa ke. On t hat day, a mysterious office building that had been swiftly erected filled up with 57 people. Days earlier, these people had all worked long hours in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. Now they would perform the same tasks in South Florida. Their job: putting out a weekly newspaper called the National Enquirer. A midnight move to Florida is one of the oddities associated with the phenomenon that is the story of the National Enquirer. Purchased just over 60 years ago from the Hearst Corporation by a man named Generoso Pope Jr., the tabloid is now being recognized for transforming not only American newspapers and magazines but also celebrity culture, TV and even politics. As acclaimed documentarian Ric Burns films a miniseries on Pope, scheduled to air in 2014, it’s clear that the time has come to examine the publication’s influence and impact. And while many people may think they know the story—and its most infamous moments—there are secrets embedded in the newspaper’s time line just coming

to the surface now. In exclusive interviews with former editors and reporters as well as law enforcement and media observers, DuJour tells the story of the Enquirer, both the wild triumphs and the darker mysteries. The abrupt relocation to Florida is, it turns out, key to understanding the newspaper’s roots. Pope moved his family and his newspaper staff to Florida because he was in fear for his life. And not without reason.

A Shadowy Beginning

Pope was 25 years old when, in 1952, he bought what was then called the New York Enquirer, but he’d already had some newspaper experience as publisher of the family-owned Il Progresso Italo-Americano. His father, Generoso Pope Sr., shoveled gravel and hauled water to make ends meet after immigrating to America from Italy. His ambition and determination took him from laborer to owner of one of the largest sand and gravel companies in the world in little more than a decade. He bought Il Progresso in 1928, followed by other media acquisitions, and also became active in New York City politics. His third child, Gene, attended the Horace Mann School and earned an engineering degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology before his father installed him as Il Progresso’s publisher. But after Pope Sr. died in 1950, his son was ousted because of a fight with his siblings. His next move, sources say, was to join the CIA and undergo training in psychological warfare at the height of the Korean War. When Pope made his move to return to publishing, the New York Enquirer barely sold 17,000 copies a week and published horse-racing statistics for the city’s gamblers. The renamed National Enquirer would one day be worth hun-


“For Gene, it was always the story that mattered. He didn’t care what it cost. If it was a good story, he wanted it.” —Editor-in-chief Iain Calder

dreds of millions of dollars, but Pope liked to tell people that he was so broke back when he bought it, he had to use his lucky silver dollar for cab fare to get him to the paper’s closing on time. So where did the money come from to buy the newspaper? For decades, rumors have swirled about the purchase price—placing it between $10,000 and $75,000— and Pope’s source of funds. According to exclusive interviews for DuJour with former employees, the money came from two men: a $10,000 loan from Pope’s godfather, Frank Costello, the boss of the Luciano crime family and head of a national gambling empire, and an equal amount from the lawyer Roy Cohn, a friend of Pope’s who had helped convict Julius and Ethel Rosenberg and was soon to gain notoriety as counsel for Senator Joseph McCarthy. Costello was deeply involved with the paper, sources agree. One former National Enquirer reporter says, “We would often get visits from guys in dark suits sporting pinkie rings who would have private meetings with the boss. We all suspected that Pope had some kind of deal with them regarding the paper.” There were even whispers that, early on, Costello covered the Enquirer’s payroll. Joe Coffey, now a retired lieutenant of detectives for the New York Police Department, was assigned to tail Costello in New York City in the 1960s. “Costello was the prime minister of the underworld,” says Coffey. “He had great political inf luence, too, but had a nice way about him. He was hard to dislike.” The link between Costello and the Enquirer was exposed one night in early May 1957, when the mob boss hosted a large group dinner at L’Aiglon restaurant on Manhattan’s east side. Among the guests were Gene Pope and John Miller, one of his reporters, along with Miller’s wife, Cindy. (Costello was godfather to the Millers’ son, the future broadcaster John Miller.) At 11 p. m ., Costello went home to his apartment on Central Park West. Just as the crime boss entered his building, a gunman named Vincent “Chin” Gigante shouted, “This is for you, Frank!” and shot him in the head. Costello survived, but his reign as mafia king was on the wane. In her book Dish, about the world of gossip, Jeannette Walls wrote that in the late 1960s, Costello discreetly warned Pope to stay away from him because otherwise he could get hurt. Shortly thereafter, Pope’s staff informed him that delivery trucks were distributing fewer copies of the paper than had been loaded.

Pope enlisted an ex-con to investigate and ride in one of the Enquirer’s suspect trucks. The next day, the truck returned. Pope’s man was dead in the back, and there was a note attached to the knife in his chest. It read, “Don’t f—k with us.” The message was received. The Enquirer moved to Lantana.

Enquiring Minds Want to Know

At first, Pope had no idea how to make his newspaper a success. In an early mission statement, he declared, “In an age darkened by the menace of totalitarian tyranny and war, the New York Enquirer will fight for the rights of man, the rights of the individual, and will champion human decency, dignity, freedom and peace.” That formula failed to ignite sales. Then Pope had an epiphany one night in 1957 during a traffic jam. As his car reached the cause of the delay—a violent crash—he realized that the drivers all slowed down to get a good look at the carnage. This kicked off the paper’s gore stage, which lasted almost a decade. Headlines screamed about one tragedy after another: “I’m Sorry I Killed My Mother, but I’m Glad I Killed My Father.” Circulation soared, and Pope took the newspaper national, changing its name to the National Enquirer. Gruesome stories and photos were the order of the day. But two subjects were strictly off-limits: the CIA and the Mafia. Pope changed the National Enquirer’s mission yet again in the mid-1960s. While the tabloid turned a nice profit, he had his eye on supermarket distribution. Pope told his editors that gore was out and the Enquirer must become the sort of newspaper that women could buy at a grocery-store checkout counter. The headlines still screamed for attention, but in a new—and even more effective—way. Bill Sloan, who worked for the Enquirer from 1968 to 1970, says, “Pope had an uncanny ability to know not only what would sell but also what kind of stories the average person wanted to read about.” One of Pope’s pet stories was about people who’d become “fallen angels.” His favorite angel was Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. Sloan says, “Pope had standing orders that there was to be a cover story or cover line on Jackie in every issue.” Another pet story of Pope’s was the “gee whiz” tale, or, as Sloan puts it, the “Hey, Martha, you gotta read this!” story, covering topics like miraculous

left to right: ©The Palm beach press/zumapress.com; GETTY IMAGES

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Newsroom: Gene Pope, called “G.P.” behind his back and “Mr. Pope” to his face

Frank Costello, center, appears before the Senate Crime Committee in 1951. A friend of the Pope family, Costello controlled a vast gambling empire across America.


top to bottom: ©The Palm beach press/zumapress.com; getty images

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cancer cures and UFO sightings. The public loved it and clamored for more. “What most critics and others did not understand was that the paper was much more than celebrity gossip. In truth, celebrity stuff was rarely more than 40 percent of any issue,” says Iain Calder, a Scotsman who was hired by the National Enquirer in 1964 and eventually became editor in chief. “We wrote about stories that regular people could relate to. They were human-interest stories with some odd or freakish twist that would make them interesting. We didn’t make stuff up, but we The flag flew at half-mast in front of the newspaper offices on Oct. 3, 1988, in observance of Pope’s death. did sensationalize it.” Circulation grew and grew. In the 1980s, the National Enquirer sold an average of 4.5 million copies a week. According to S. Elizabeth Bird, a professor of anthropology who specializes in media culture at the University of South Florida, every copy of the Enquirer is estimated to have been read by an average of five people during that time, meaning that almost 25 million people read the paper every week—more than 10 percent of the U.S. population. One tactic that Pope put in place very early on was paying cash for stories. Calder says, “For Gene, it was always the story that mattered. He didn’t care what it cost. If it was a good story, he wanted it. The paper sold on emotion.” Reporters often paid cab drivers, doormen, hospital workers and waiters for information—anybody who knew something juicy. (Major news organizations have always been ethically constrained from doing the same.) For years, Enquirer reporters were allowed to pay up to $2,500 to a source without any approval needed from the home office, say several ex-employees. But Pope was willing to go way higher. In 1977, after Elvis Presley died, he chartered a jet to rush a task force to Memphis. According to Tony Brenna, who worked for the Enquirer for 18 years, “We took over a hotel and had special telephone lines installed so that we could not be bugged by other papers. I was assigned to get information on the Elvis physician who had prescribed him all the drugs. Others on our team were charged with getting a photo of the dead Elvis. We bought every miniature camera that was for sale in Memphis. One reporter found a distant cousin who, for a guarantee of more than $5,000, agreed to go to Graceland and try to get a photo.” The issue featuring that photo of Elvis lying in a white suit in his copper coffin became the biggest seller in the history of the National Enquirer, moving 6.5 million copies. While human-interest and medical stories remained popular, gradually the big, shocking stories on celebrities and politicians became the ones that riveted Arnold Schwarzenegger was one of the celebrities harassed by the Enquirer. readers, such as when married senator Gary Hart was caught with a girlfriend on a boat while running for president in 1988. Bill Sloan admits that, coming from traditional media, he was taken aback by the hardball policies of the Enquirer. When Senator Ted Kennedy was sus- be it a DWI or other arrest on a minor charge, an intimate photo or video, an pected of having extramarital affairs in the 1970s, Pope dispatched a squad of affair (particularly worrisome if it involved the spouse of another star), a gay his most tenacious reporters to get the story. Sloan remembers four or five “very or lesbian encounter or an out-of-wedlock child. In exchange for information nasty” stories on Kennedy in those years. It is widely rumored that an emissary on someone else or agreeing to an exclusive interview, stars were able to keep from Kennedy approached Pope with an offer to become a confidential source their secrets out of the spotlight. Confidential sources confirmed to DuJour that celebrities were essentially blackmailed to work with the Enquirer or else risk for the Enquirer if the paper would leave the senator alone. Pope agreed. Over the years, scores of celebrities and politicians were rumored to be mak- their improprieties appearing on the front page. It is alleged that Sylvester Staling deals with the National Enquirer to conceal all manner of indiscretions, lone was told to cooperate or have a nasty exposé published. As agreed, such a


getty images

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“THE ENQUIRER PUSHED THE BOUNDARIES OF GOOD TASTE, GAVE THE PEOPLE WHAT THEY WANTED.”

Far left: Iain Calder, former editor-in-chief of the Enquirer, was Pope’s go-to man for more than 20 years. Clockwise from top: The annual “Predictions” issue of the paper was its most successful, year in and year out; the Enquirer posted a $100,000 reward to catch the murderer of Bill Cosby’s son, Ennis; Pope loved running stories on America’s “fallen angels,” and his absolute favorite was Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: SHAWN LOWE; GETTY IMAGES (2)

WORKING ON A TIGHTROPE

Pope lavished money not only on sources but on staff. National Enquirer reporters were paid more than any others in the country. In the mid-1980s, a starting salary was $50,000. Raises of $20,000 a year were handed out to top performers. There were also bonuses for landing a hot story: $360 for the top half of the page, $180 for the bottom and $1,500 for a full front-page story. The downside to the fat paychecks was that employees had little job security. Pope held “Friday Massacres,” when he’d fire as much as half the staff on a Friday afternoon. Iain Calder, who lasted more than 20 years there, says, “God help the reporter or editor who didn’t deliver,” and that the Enquirer’s pool of terminated employees “could have filled Carnegie Hall, maybe Yankee Stadium.” According to the book The Godfather of Tabloid: Generoso Pope Jr. and the National Enquirer, Pope “once fired a man for stepping into an elevator ahead of him, only to be told, ‘I don’t work for you—I was just delivering lunch.’ ” Whether it’s because of or in spite of such a newsroom operation, the National Enquirer has earned the grudging respect of much of its competition for feats such as finding and printing photos of O.J. Simpson in Bruno Magli shoes after he denied owning such a pair, helping solve the murder of Bill Cosby’s son Ennis by offering a cash reward of $100,000, breaking the story of Rush Limbaugh’s painkiller addiction and, most recently, revealing that John Edwards had fathered an illegitimate child. “At certain times, the National Enquirer has beat the mainstream media at its own game,” says media critic Howard Kurtz. The Enquirer also spawned a cluster of imitators, ultimately reshaping media in the United States. Not long after the paper’s successful gore period, clones like the National Tattler sprang up. Then, when the Enquirer made its profitable shift toward celebrity journalism, other publications followed. Rupert Murdoch’s Star led the charge into the fray in the 1970s, as did the New York

Times Company, with the original Us magazine, and Time Inc., publishing People. Ch r istopher Ten nant, the co founder of Radar Online, who is cu r re ntly w r it i ng a sc re e nplay about the tabloid world, considers the National Enquirer the single most i n f luent ial publicat ion of the 20th cent ur y. He says, “The Enquirer nuclearized the tabloid for mula, pushed the boundar ies of good taste and gave the people what they wanted—the unvarnished but highly sensationalized truth. For better and certainly for worse, things we consider mainstream today would not exist without it, from gossip blogs to reality TV.” Through it all, Gene Pope, the man behind the juggernaut, never left Florida. He worked six days a week minimum. On weekends, the publisher, well over six feet tall and often described as “odd,” appeared in his newsroom in a T-shirt and shorts or even a bathing suit. The National Enquirer was the second-largest employer in Lantana, after the hospital down the road. Pope sponsored an annual dinner-dance benefit in nearby Palm Beach for another hospital, roping in Bob Hope to host and celebrities ranging from Dolly Parton and Raquel Welch to Joan Collins and Don Johnson to attend. “Mr. Pope was very generous,” says Jack Carpenter, the founder of the Lantana Historical Society. “Every year he would erect a huge Christmas tree on the grounds of the National Enquirer.” Pope went to enormous trouble to scout what he, in typical Enquirer overstatement, called the “world’s largest tree,” and thousands of people came to see it at holiday time. In 1988, at the age of 61, Pope suffered a heart attack and died on the way to the hospital. He specified in his will that the National Enquirer be sold after his death—and it was, to McFadden Publishing Inc. (It is now owned by American Media Inc.) The paper Pope bought for, at most, $75,000 was sold for $412 million.

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story was not written, but a National Enquirer reporter gave the incriminating details to Hollywood private investigator Anthony Pellicano for one of his clients to use as leverage against Stallone. (Pellicano is currently serving 15 years in federal prison for numerous RICO violations, including illegally wiretapping his clients.) Other prominent figures who reportedly cooperated under duress were Arnold Schwarzenegger, Burt Reynolds and Bill Cosby.


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In ямВight BALLET POWER COUPLE NATALIA OSIPOVA AND IVAN VASILIEV ARE TAKING THE DANCE WORLD BY STORM. CULTURAL CHRONICLER GEORGE WAYNE SWOONS OVER OUR RUSSIAN INVASION. PHOTOGRAPHED BY ARTHUR ELGORT STYLED BY KATE SEBBAH


(On her) Bodysuit, price upon request, LOUIS VUITTON, louisvuitton.com. Coup de Fouet scarf, $410, HERMĂˆS, hermes. com. (On him) Biker pants, $928, RICK OWENS, 212-627-7222.

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Beauty of style and harmony and grace and good rhythm depend on sim-

(On her) Dress, price upon request, CHANEL, 800-550-0005. Cora bodysuit, $83, YUMIKO, 212-969-9400. Scarf, $320, FORGET ME NOT, barneys.com. (On him) T-shirt, $148, JOHN VARVATOS, johnvarvatos.com. Biker pants, $928, RICK OWENS, 212-627-7222.


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Dance is the hidden language of the soul.

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ot si nce t he encha nt i ng d ays of Rudolf Nureyev and Margot Fonteyn some 50 years ago has the international dance world been so intrigued as with the American Ballet Theat re’s new reigning pr incipals, Russian-born couple Ivan Vasiliev and Natalia Osipova. I am in thrall to them! And I am far from alone. Let me set the stage: Opening night of the ABT spring season, 2012. The staid black-tie gathering could not contain its amazement, and there was oohing and aahing as if it were some Ringling Brothers big-tent spectacle. Vasiliev and Osipova truly owned the opera house that night. Even the fact that Vasiliev tumbled to his knees in the wings after one spectacularly stupendous leap only added to the lore of “Thor Ivan,” as I call him. Now that the 2013 season is upon us, dance mavens are gathering again to witness the magic. These darlings of the ballet were both nurtured and groomed at the Bolshoi Theatre, but without a doubt Lincoln Center is now their true home. Ivan Vasiliev has been acclaimed as the best male dancer in the world since 2010. Natalia Osipova, or “Natasha,” as her fans refer to her, has been acknowledged as the world’s best female dancer since 2007. The exquisite pair are expected to perform everything this season from Don Quixote to Le Corsaire. To watch them rehearse at the ABT studios on lower Broadway in Manhattan is to witness greatness being fine-tuned to perfection. I was so thankful to sit in as artist-in-residence Alexei Ratmansky recently put his muses through rehearsal of a new ballet set to the music of Shostakovich. American ballet enthusiasts owe such a debt of gratitude to the ABT and, in particular, ballet master Ratmansky, who wooed them to our shores. Onstage, Vasiliev, 24, is all chutzpah and bravura. He stands no more than 5'6", with the most alluring mop of unruly, curly hair and legs carved from the finest oak. His leaps and jetés are phenomenal. His taurine strength, simply put, has no equal. And to watch his par tner, the swan Osipova, 27, is to be in complete awe of her textbook-perfect technique and f lawless execution. Her grasp of ballet’s essential vocabulary, even in practice—the emotion, the agony and the ecstasy—is simply a joy to behold. That the two are lovers, on the stage and off, adds more to the drama and intrigue. I had the incredible experience of talking to the duo and learning about their lives as dancers and as a couple. They told


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Dancing is the most moving, the most beautiful, of the arts. it is not translation or abstraction from life; it is life itself.

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me how much they love living in America—“It is truly a new world for me; my conf idence has grown,” Osipova says— and especially in New York City. They go to the movies and discover seafood restaurants where Vasiliev, who grew up in Vladivostok, near North Korea, can enjoy fish and shellfish, especially oysters. What a study in contrasts they are! Vasiliev has a future, should he choose, on Comedy Central. His loose, unfettered sensibility is immediately apparent and endearing. “Thor Ivan” is always ready with a broad smile for conversation. His beloved, Osipova, is all focus and dedication, ser ious and composed—the traits we, of course, demand of our prima ballerinas. T h e c o u pl e r e ve a l e d t o me how they feel about each ot he r: “ I f i r st met Iva n at an international ballet competition in 2005. We didn’t dance together du r i ng that competition because he was i n a you nge r g r ou p,” s ays Osipova. “I love dancing with Ivan, being onstage with him, because his sincerity shines through so much. I just unde r st a nd h i m —whe n I a m

with him dancing I feel like we are truly delivering to the audience a message from our heart. I feel like my power onstage is doubled when I am with him. But the thing I love most about Ivan is his curly hair!’’ And now from the lips of Vasiliev: “For me, what I love most about Natasha is she is unique. There is no other person like Natasha who has ever been in my life. She is special.” There is such chemistry between them, even with all their fascinating differences, one of which being how they prepare for a performance. Osipova says, “I am always rehearsing. When I am performing, I often get to the theater six hours before I have to go onstage. It is just focus for me.” As for Vasiliev: “I love the whole process of putting on the makeup and the costume and taking on that role. I am a whole different person onstage. Before I go on, I look in that mirror and see that transformation—and I am just ready to go.” There is no denying it: The annals of millennial-era ballet have not seen a more mesmerizing duo than Ivan Vasiliev and Natalia Osipova.

Previous page: Dancer’s own tights. This page: Dress, $13,000, DIOR, 800-929-3467. Albion ring, $1,475, DAVID YURMAN, davidyurman.com. Opposite page: (On her) Keras cardigan, $495, ’S MAX MARA, 212-879-6100. Nadine swimsuit, $840, HERVÉ LÉGER BY MAX AZRIA, herveleger.com. Scarf, $320, FORGET ME NOT, barneys.com. (On him) Tank top, $27, EMPORIO ARMANI, macys.com. Dancer’s own sweatpants, POLO RALPH LAUREN, ralphlauren.com. Hair & Grooming: Deycke Heidorn using Shu Uemura Art of Hair at See Management. Makeup: Kristin Gallegos using Chanel at CLM.


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C A R E E R C H A U F F E U R S • O N L I N E R E S E R VA T I O N S • O U T S TA N D I N G S A F E T Y R E C O R D • I M M A C U L A T E V E H I C L E S • U N PA R A L L EL ED C US TO M ER S ER V I C E • P H O N E C A L L S A N S W ER ED W I T H I N 3 R I N GS • AWA R D - W I N N I N G S ER V I C E


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From coast to coast, we’ve got the goods on the hottest cultural happenings, exclusive interviews, party reports and special sneak peeks. Take, for instance, Bridgehampton’s new House, the farm-toTopping Rose House, table restaurant helmed by chef Tom Colicchio—one of our favorite new places to celebrate the season.

OUR HAMPTONS COVERAGE BEGINS ON PAGE 190!

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Clockwise from left: The Rabbit Run Inn; the housewares at Trilogy Antiques & Design; leather slippers from Morocco and Dosa scarves and throws at AP Shop; mixing drinks at Journeyman Distillery; housemade fennel sausage at Local

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lake town escape

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ess than two hours by car from Chicago is Har- (109 Generations Drive, Three Oaks, journeymanbor Country, a nostalgic cluster of communities distillery.com) and its beautiful tasting room, where where beautiful homes line the shores. This string you can pair whiskey with pickled farm eggs or a of charming towns—New Buffalo, Union Pier, hearty bison sloppy joe. While in Three Oaks, a Lakeside, Three Oaks and Sawyer—in southwestern stop at Trilogy Antiques & Design (19 South Elm Michigan attracts city dwellers who come for a brief Street, Three Oaks, trilogyantiques.com) is a must. visit and inevitably end up staying longer. On a week- This showroom houses a huge collection of treasures end jaunt, you can drive from town to town, visiting from dealers, curators and designers. Back along the cool shops, tasting local beer, spirits and food, Red Arrow Highway, another don’t-miss spot is and taking walks along Lake Michigan’s AP Shop (14931 Lakeside Road, Lakeside, shore. Owned by interior designer Linda apshop.blogspot.com), a store owned by Politicos Rahm Emanuel and Jo Clough and husband Rodney Clough, former Barneys visual director Ariane David Axelrod Rabbit Run Inn (6227 Elm Drive, SawPrewitt and packed with a constantly both spend time in Harbor Country. yer, rabbitruninn.com) is a picturesque changing display of finds: linen bags and place with meticulously designed, comhandmade leather shoes from Mexico, cotfortable rooms and stellar service (expect ton apparel and home goods from India, and fresh fruit and pastries at your doorstep every morn- pieces from independent American designers like ing). Less than a mile from the inn is Stacia Garriott Jasmin Shokrian. Stock up for your drive back to Cass’ Sojourn (12908 Red Arrow Highway, Sawyer, the city at Local (424 East Buffalo Street, New Bufsojournastore.com), a gorgeous interiors shop that falo, localnewbuffalo.com), an artisanal food shop walks the style line of beach house and city, vintage and butcher with fresh-baked bread, local cheeses and modern. Stick around in Sawyer for a bite and and house-made charcuterie. Your final stop? At a pint at Greenbush Brewing Co. (5885 Sawyer Nani’s Café and Beach Shop (16117 Red Arrow Road, Sawyer, greenbushbrewing.com), a popular Highway, Union Pier, naniscafe.com ), you can cap craft brewery and pub. But if you’re more in the spirit off your summertime idyll with a Chicago-style hot for spirits, you’ll enjoy Journeyman Distillery dog and root beer float.

clockwise from left: Cassandra Ginter; Richard Hellyer; Ariane Prewitt; Daniel Milsk; Jen Shelley

URBANE OUTPOSTS IN HARBOR COUNTRY


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river north roundup top taverns and culinary takeovers

Gnocchi with truffle cream, sage and pancetta at Siena Tavern

Siena tavern

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Bub City’s whiskey bar; Jerrod, Molly and R.J. Melman (below, left)

51 West Kinzie Street sienatavern.com Fabio Viviani—who charmed viewers when he competed on season 5 of Top Chef—just wants to make diners happy. And what could be more crowd-pleasing than the cuisine of central Italy? Viviani and his partners returned to his hometown of Florence to research their concept, and the result is this Italian-American restaurant with a menu full of delights: artisanal pizza (baked in a wood-burning oven), spaghetti carbonara, Tuscan kale Caesar and hamachi crudo. The space itself is welcoming, too, with its industrial and rustic chic décor, cozy booths and a bar that wraps around a curving wall of windows. “It’s not just a place to get fed, but a place to feel happy,” Viviani says.

top to bottom, left: Anjali Pinto (2); right: Anthony Tahlier; Galdones Photography

Club and RPM Italian, we wanted to create a hangout for ourselves. We hooked up with this great mixologist, Paul McGee [of the Whistler], for the cocktails and worked with chef Doug Psaltis on the food.

THE MELMANS ARE COMING

What was the inspiration for your new tiki lounge, Three Dots and a Dash? J: It came out of Paul McGee’s passion for tiki drinks. That culture has faded away, and we wanted to pay tribute to what tiki was and also move it into the 21st century. RJ: Tiki’s gotten a bad name, and most of the drinks are made from mixes. We’re reviving what was great about them: fresh juices, great rums and syrups.

Jerrod, Molly and R.J. Melman are more than the heirs to Lettuce Entertain You Enterprises, a group of wildly successful restaurants started by their father, Rich Melman. They’re entrepreneurs in their own right who’ve opened one winning spot after another, from Hub 51 to Paris Club to RPM Italian. They talked to DuJour about their most recent ventures, Bub City and Three Dots and a Dash, as well as RPM Steak, which is slated to start up this fall.

Your restaurants are all hits. What’s the secret? RJ: We always start with being inspired by great food, and then we develop a concept around it, looking for holes in the market. J: All of our restaurants in Chicago are within walking distance of each other. Since it’s the neighborhood where we live and go out, we know what’s missing. So we saw there were no places with live country music that served great BBQ, which is what we’re doing at Bub City.

Tell us what led you to open Bub City.

What’s the best advice your father gave you? M: Our dad told us to find our passion and then work our hardest at it. There was never any pressure to work in the restaurant business because he wanted us to do what we love. I tried other things, like teaching kindergarten, but never loved them. When I started in restaurants, I realized I loved going to work.

RJ: It was originally a large BBQ place our father owned

from 1989 to 1998. Over time, we got so many requests to reopen it. About a year ago, we wanted to start working on a BBQ restaurant, and we created our own Bub City. J: When we think about our childhoods and our father’s places, Bub City always stood out. After we opened Paris

Tofu with caviar and ginger at Sumi Robata Bar

Sumi Robata Bar

702 North Wells Street sumirobatabar.com This is one restaurant that wants to go up in flames—everything at Sumi Robata Bar (Japonais chef Gene Kato’s new boite) is tied to charcoal. “Robata is barbecue with a bolder profile than most Japanese cooking, which is more subtle,” Kato explains. The upstairs has a long sushi bar, two robata grills, and sashimi and dessert stations. Downstairs, the dark gray and black Charcoal Bar is lined with 100 planks of burnt wood. Standout dishes include the poached egg in dashi broth, tofu with caviar and ginger, and robata-grilled beef tongue. “People are surprised to find it so tender,” Kato says.

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ZaZa Voom

2332 Leonard Street hotelzaza.com Hotel ZaZa celebrated its 10th anniversary in the city this year, and now it has something else to toast: the Bungalows, located nearby at Fairmount Street and Thomas Avenue. These charming, luxurious guest suites— complete with full kitchens— are perfect for long-term stays or wedding parties. “Think seaside meets New Orleans, with gas lanterns, a landscaped courtyard and private porches,” Benji Homsey, the hotel’s coowner, says.

The Rendez-Vous Suite at Hotel ZaZa

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boutiques, bungalows and bling

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Keep Calm and Shop McQueen

Suite 44A Highland Park Village alexandermcqueen.com This spring an Alexander McQueen A car from the Lowrider Clubs

boutique, its fifth in the U.S., will open in Highland Park Village. The space has marble floors and walls of lacquered linen and gesso, along with details like shells, sea horse tails and skulls.

Amanda Gerards

PHENOMENON party at the Dallas Contemporary

A spring look from Alexander McQueen, price upon request

Dzine and Capera Ryan

Bling it on, Phenomenon. The annual event, which raises funds for exhibitions and educational programs at the Dallas Contemporary, was a house party of brilliant proportions (it was curated this year by Chicago-based artist Dzine). Its glitzy mixed-media installations were the perfect backdrop for pumped-up, tricked-out vehicles from the Lowrider Clubs of Dallas, Bad Boyz Kustom and Majestix Car Club. More than 400 guests—led by committee chairs Laura Noble, Kristie Ramirez and Jon-Bernard Schwartz, and honorary chair Capera Ryan—enjoyed tunes from DJ Derrick Carter and were wowed by the fancy footwork of break-dancing crew NUEKR3W/VGC.

phenomenon: Jenifer McNeil Baker; all other images courtesy

Laura Noble and Dogan Perese


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TEMPTING TASTES CULINARY DELIGHTS OF DELICIOUS PROPORTIONS

Hamachi at Sēr Steak + Spriits

Spoon Bar & Kitchen’s owner, John Tesar

SPOON BAR & KITCHEN

SĒR STEAK + SPIRITS

Hilton Anatole 2201 North Stemmons Freeway sersteak.com Twenty-seven floors above the Dallas skyline, this gem in the Hilton Anatole hotel boasts the best view of any steakhouse in the city. Even better: The food lives up to the setting. “The spinalis is my favorite dish on the menu. It takes the best part of a rib eye, and it’s tender, flavorful and unique,” chef Anthony Van Camp says. The duck breast entrée, accompanied by broiled apricots, is another standout. Just don’t forget to order some of the scrumptious sides, such as sweet potato hash with mascarpone and thyme, or the hen-of-the-woods mushrooms grilled with garlic.

Why, out of the big universe of kitchen tools, did you single out the spoon? Because a spoon is the only cooking utensil you can’t live without. What dish on the menu do you crave most often? I love the smoked-eel headcheese. It’s a unique creation we came up with. Any tips for aspiring chefs? Don’t go to cooking school. Just work.

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MESO MAYA

1611 McKinney Avenue mesomaya.com Dallas loves El Fenix, the Tex-Mex institution in the landmark Luna Tortilla factory on McKinney (across from the Perot Museum of Nature and Science), which has been satisfying locals for years. Now the historic establishment has added an authentic Mexican restaurant, Meso Maya, and street-side take-out concept Taqueria La Ventana, to the mix. Our Meso Mayo recommendations: avocado margaritas, Ceviche Mixto served with a glass of Chilean sauvignon blanc, and the hidalgo-style Kobe beef barbacoa.

Budin Azteca at Meso Maya

SWEET NEWS

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CUPCAKE SANDWICH!

This summer, cupcake mainstay Sprinkles is opening an ice cream shop near its bakery, in the Plaza at Preston Center. sprinklesicecream.com

Let’s talk Top Chef. Who’s better— Tom Colicchio or Emeril Lagasse? I love both Tom and Emeril, but I have to say I’m more partial to Tom because I’ve known him for a long time. Also, being from New York, I can relate more to his style of cooking. Tom is a chef’s chef. What drew you to Dallas? You were well established in New York. I came here to replace Dean Fearing at the Mansion. Then I married a rancher’s daughter and fell in love with the city and its potential to develop great new restaurants.

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8220 Westchester Drive spoonbarandkitchen.com With his competitive performance on Bravo’s Top Chef still the talk of the town, John Tesar opened his latest restaurant, Spoon Bar & Kitchen, in November. Specializing in seafood, Spoon has an ambience of serene sophistication. Thanks to the open kitchen, guests get a table-side view of Tesar and his team at work concocting their eclectic dishes. Oyster stew, diver scallops, meaty monkfish and arctic char are just a few of the tantalizing choices on offer here.


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Tonya Riner

THEY’RE NOT JUST PRETTY FACES

SUNDAY RILEY

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The creator of the product line that bears her name says she’s been obsessed with anti-aging skin care since she was 12. That’s when Sunday Riley’s grandmother first taught her about the skin-healing benefits of botanicals. Her ancestors were among the original settlers in Texas, and they learned to live off the land with the help of Native Americans; this heritage is a cornerstone of Riley’s beauty business. In treatments like her Good Genes with NV-5 Ageless Complex, which flies off the shelves at Barneys and Sephora, she combines her passed-down family knowledge of natural skin care remedies with lab-tested biotechnology. Riley recently added makeup to her collection, including easy-glide eyeliners. sundayriley.com Sunday Riley Modern Lip Color in Ruby Bite, $32

When Houstonians Ana Fields and Jessica Rosales—a biochemist and a pharmaceutical sales rep, respectively—first met, they bonded over a love of skin care. Last year, they decided to turn their passion into a product line, and the result is Purisa, an organic collection formulated to work on even the most sensitive skin. “My two sons had eczema,” Rosales says. “But after we eliminated chemicals in their environment, their skin healed.” The duo’s dermatologist-tested collection of 12 products is free of fragrances, sulfates, parabens, mineral oils and phthalates. What it does contain are plant-derived extracts like gotu kola (to stimulate collagen), dandelion (to attack free radicals) and horsetail (to regenerate skin cells). “Our small batches and handcrafted approach allow us to maintain a high level of quality and purity,” Fields says. purisaskin.com Purisa Resurface Jojoba Citrus Dermabrasion, $60

BEAUTY FOR REAL

Thanks to heavenly lip glosses, nail polishes and mascara whose packaging features LED lighting and built-in mirrors, Beauty for Real products have been making their way into the city’s chicest clutches. Created by local makeup artist Tonya Riner (and her pal Leslie Munsell, a Miami-based pro), the line is made for flawless applications on the go—and it’s packed with therapeutic ingredients like avocado oil, collagen, and extracts of green tea, grapeseed and aloe. “It’s not enough to make pretty colors. We’re creating formulas that deliver antiaging and skin-perfecting benefits in high-functioning packaging,” Riner says. Her must-have is Get Glowing!, a cheek tint and luminizer duo containing the patented ingredient Luminera. “I went without it one day and had a few friends ask if I was feeling okay,” she laughs. “Never again.” beautyforreal.com Beauty for Real Get Glowing! Cheek Tint and Luminizer, $29

RINER: JULIE SOEFER; ROSALES AND FIELDS: MORRIS MALAKOFF; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

Jessica Rosales and Ana Fields

PURISA


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space city chic

Dancing with the stars and discovering the new cool

HOUSTON BALLET ball

AN EYE FOR DESIGN TALENT

A glamorous black-tie crowd of 500 (including designer Carolina Herrera) turned out to see the iconic Lynn Wyatt take a turn on the dance floor with Houston Ballet Artistic Director Stanton Welch at the annual Houston Ballet Ball. Welch choreographed the original four-minute performance, which was set to Beyoncé’s “Halo” and included more than a dozen principal dancers. The Events Company transformed the Wortham Theater Center ballroom into a colorful, light-filled spring wonderland made for dancing, while Tony’s delighted with a multicourse meal following a cocktail reception. Chaired by Martin and Kelli Cohen Fein, the Rite of Spring–themed gala raised $760,000 for the ballet through table sponsorships and silent and live auctions of fine wines, luxurious getaways and other rareties.

The style-savvy sisters—Jane Hong Fernandez, 28, and Anne Hong Gottschall, 31—behind the successful new fashion site Dos Coquetas are Houston natives and Princeton grads. They’ve maintained their Texan sensibilities, while taking their site national and spotlighting emerging North and South American designers. (doscoquetas.com)

What are you loving in fashion? JHF: I adored everything Stella McCartney showed for fall. AHG: Alber Elbaz can do no wrong at Lanvin. I love his elegant designs. Favorite recent acquisition? JHF: A gray military Burberry Pror-

sum coat with pleating in the back. Stanton Welch dipping Lynn Wyatt during the performance

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AHG: A Chanel handbag. I rarely

even take it out of the box—I’m too obsessed with it!

texas-size outdoor eateries cottonwood

proof bar + patio

brooklyn athletic club

This Garden Oaks gastropub serves up a menu of gourmet comfort food, like salmon deviled eggs, pork-belly corn dogs and BBQ Gulf oysters, on a 5,000-square-foot terrace where you can work off the calories afterward with a game of bocce. Located in a former mechanic’s shop, Cottonwood boasts a great indoors, too—the bar offers craft cocktails and 40 beers on tap.

It pays to be neighbors of the James Beard Award–nominated Reef. Thanks to a Reef-top location, Midtown roof lounge Proof features light bites from the seafood restaurant. Challenge friends to a round of darts, pool or video games, and make the prize a Texas Tease (a signature drink that blends Texas liquors Waterloo Gin, Treaty Oak Rum, Starlite Vodka and Z Tequila).

This restaurant has many dimensions—a dining room, a chef’s counter bar, an outdoor deck with fire pits, and a sprawling, sportsfilled (horseshoes, badminton and croquet) backyard. At Brooklyn Athletic Club, executive chef and native Texan Jeff Axline displays a deft touch with local ingredients in dishes like pan-roasted Texas striped bass with kale.

3422 North Shepherd Drive cottonwoodhouston.com

2600 Travis Street proofbarhouston.com

601 Richmond Avenue thebrooklynathleticclub.com

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How do the two of you work together as a team? JHF: We have different perspectives, which makes us a strong team. I focus on the site’s design, and Anne is a wonderful, eloquent writer. AHG: Jane has a great eye for photography, while I enjoy bringing people to life in my writing. Since we both have finance backgrounds, we’re both involved in the business side.


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SEEN ON THE STRIP THE LATEST AND GREATEST ON THE BOULEVARD

ROBERT GRAHAM, FASHION SHOW MALL

3200 Las Vegas Boulevard South robertgraham.us What better city than Vegas to roll out the saturated hues of a real American eclectic? Robert Graham, which is known for its colorful and witty garments, has opened a store—the brand’s sixth in the U.S.—that

captures its exuberant spirit in the Fashion Show mall across from Wynn Las Vegas. Playfully kitted out with a silk patchwork sofa and tables constructed from repurposed antique car hoods with iron welded joints, the boutique offers the entire men’s and women’s collections.

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HAKKASAN, MGM GRAND

3799 Las Vegas Boulevard South hakkasanlv.com The modern Chinese chain, known for its busy, buzzy hot spots in London, Mumbai, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Miami and New York City, finally set up shop in Las Vegas in April. Why was its projected New Year’s Eve opening delayed for nearly four months? Perhaps because this venue, spread out over five levels in the former Studio 54 space, had 80,000 square feet to design and fill. This newest Hakkasan is all about the deejays. Calvin Harris, DJ Tiesto and Steve Aoki have signed on for residencies at the nightclub, which can fit more than 3,000 people.

IN ACCESSORIES NEWS...

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SERGIO ROSSI, THE FORUM SHOPS

3500 Las Vegas Boulevard South sergiorossi.com As a city renowned for its show girls and over-the-top spectacles, Las Vegas is a fitting spot for Sergio Rossi to open its first Front Stage and Back Stage concept store at Caesars Palace. In the front, you’ll find the Italian brand’s colorful statement heels on sculptural brass and glass displays set against an arresting black and white herringbone floor. But of course, backstage is where the real drama happens. A blue velvet sofa on a plush blue carpet beckons shoppers to slip on their new weapons of seduction for a Tawaraya sandal, $1,295, more intimate show. SERGIO ROSSI, 702-734-0991

NICHOLAS KIRKWOOD, THE WYNN

3131 Las Vegas Boulevard South nicholaskirkwood.com British footwear designer Nicholas Kirkwood is unveiling a 1,400-square-foot shoe salon (his second in the U.S.) at the Wynn in June. “We are thrilled to join the stores at the Encore Esplanade,” Kirkwood tells DuJour. Bootie, $995, NICHOLAS KIRKWOOD, 702-770-3543


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daylight breaking

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bit cheesy.” As Sasson explains, “It’s a more upscale version of the emorial Day in Las Vegas marks the official start of “day typical Las Vegas pool party, offering world-class live entertainment club” season—booze-fueled party scenes at man-made and fine cuisine you can’t find anywhere else.” One of the biggest beaches that can last into nightclub hours. The most andifferences between Daylight and other pool clubs is its prime locaticipated opening this year is the Light Group’s Daylight tion. With its own parking and valet service, Daylight is the first to Beach Club at Mandalay Bay. With room for 5,000 revel3950 Las Vegas sit directly on the Strip, creating a direct path to the pool and allowers, the club encompasses 50,000 square feet of outdoor Boulevard South ing people to bypass the hotel and casino. Guests can accompany space—the pool alone spans 4,400 square feet—with an enormous daylightvegas.com their tuna sashimi with tropical cocktails like the Clooney (made stage framed by six LED screens. The lounge area consists of 70 daybeds, 23 cabanas and two bungalows with private pools (all of which must with the actor’s Casamigos Blanco tequila, grapefruit juice, agave nectar and be reserved far in advance). Andrew Sasson, the Light Group’s founder, says lime). But the music will be a draw all its own, featuring some of the same leading he developed Daylight in response to the widening gap between Vegas’ more DJs—Skrillex, Swedish House Mafia’s Sebastian Ingrosso and Axwell, Alesso sophisticated nightclub scene and its daytime beach clubs, which have become “a and Nicky Romero—who spin at Mandalay Bay club Light.

Daylight Beach Club at Mandalay Bay

daylight by the numbers

SIGNATURE COCKTAIL

square footage of the stage adorned with vines and metal mesh

square footage of the pool

THE CLOONEY square footage of total outdoor space

daybeds for revelers

resident djs have been booked so far.

LED screens line the stage.

cabanas and 2 bungalows (with private pools) can be reserved for large groups.

1½ oz Casamigos Blanco 3 oz Ruby Red grapefruit juice Splash of freshly squeezed lime ½ oz pure agave nectar Garnish with Ruby Red grapefruit slice and Luxardo cherry.

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The New Mandalay Bay pool party


Live the M life at this MGM Resorts International® Destination

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HOT HOOD: SUMMERLIN this once-stuffy suburb has morphed into a foodie mecca

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ummerlin, long the province of ladies who shop at Whole Foods in full bling, is becoming, dare we say...hip. Less than 20 miles west of the Strip, this master planned community exemplifies affluent suburban sprawl, the kind of place you see in the opening credits of Showtime’s Weeds. Now the area is home to culinary gems, Vintner Grill and Marché Bacchus. Here’s where else to go: Clockwise from top right: Black Angus skirt steak at Dos Caminos; the lounge at Poppy Den; turkey meatballs at Honey Salt

Dos Caminos

10820 West Charleston Boulevard doscaminos.com “No-holds-barred garish” seemed to be the design concept at Mexican standby Agave, whose fuchsia exterior anchored the Pavilion Center shopping area until its shuttering last year. B.R. Guest’s Dos Caminos has moved in, replacing that frantically festive atmosphere with a spot where you’ll want to hang out and have a prickly pear margarita (or three). There’s reclaimed barn wood on the walls, pendant lights suspended from the 28-foot ceilings, and candlelight and fire pits warming the patio. Expect all the Dos Caminos favorites: an expansive tequila selection, superfresh tacos, guacamole made to order (hint: add lump crab), and specialties like smoky grilled brisket enchiladas and sizzling shrimp cazuelas.

Honey Salt

1031 South Rampart Boulevard honeysalt.com Blink and you might miss this corner restaurant, the newest from culinary

mastermind and consultant Elizabeth Blau (she’s worked with One & Only Palmilla Resort, Montage Resorts and Wynn Las Vegas) and her husband, partner and chef Kim Canteenwalla, whose experience includes positions far (Toronto, Singapore and Dubai) and near (Society Café at Encore at Wynn Las Vegas). The space is charming. Light-green banquettes and perfectly weathered, mismatched chairs fill the room. Lining the walls are large-scale, wish-youwere-there photos of farmers’ markets in Cape Cod and Ojai. When it comes to the food, you’ll fall in love at first bite of

the homey, fresh dishes presented with little twists, like a “backyard favorite” burger with Beehive cheddar, tomato jam and butter pickles (be sure to order it “Kim’s style,” with the addition of a farm-fresh egg). Other stellar appetizers include a scallop ceviche with avocado, and charred octopus with romesco sauce, patatas bravas and shaved celery. The entrées are fantastic—and don’t forget to accompany them with a side of creamed spinach made with Greek yogurt. Blau and Canteenwalla say this is how they like to entertain at home, and at Honey Salt, you’ll be glad to be their guest.

440 South Rampart Boulevard tivolivillagelv.com This 700,000-square-foot shopping and dining complex offers up ersatz European (hand-cut stones and strollable space) in that way in which Vegas truly excels. Although its first phase opened in 2011, the place didn’t attract serious foodie buzz— until now. Angelo Sosa of Top Chef fame opened Poppy Den, an avant-garde Asian gastropub, and we’ll bet its outdoor patio becomes Summerlin’s new hot spot. Bradley Ogden, missed since he left Caesars Palace, is bringing back his award-winning farm-to-table fare to the forthcoming Ogden’s Hops & Harvest. But the food isn’t Tivoli’s only attraction. The elegant Ritual Salon and Spa features Liz Maier, the colorist who’s worth leaving the Strip for. At Jeff White Custom Jewelry, Danny White can find just about any diamond for you and help design the perfect ring. You’ll browse happily for hours among the repurposed antiques at Artifact LV, and the whole family will enjoy TheMarketLV, a mash-up of wine bar, swimwear store and cupcake shop.

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V E G A S. Clothing and Accessories provided by Donna Karan

Jewelry provided by Bulgari


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THE SKINNY ON MINNIE PHOTOGR APH BY ELIZ ABETH URBAN

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hen faced with nothing to wear, most of us go shopping. But fashion designer Minnie Mortimer just heads to the drawing board. “When you can make anything you want, it’s hard not to make the things that you’re craving for your own wardrobe,” says Mortimer, who launched her womenswear label in 2007. For spring, she wanted to create clothing that could keep pace with her busy bicoastal lifestyle, so she designed a collection of durable, day-to-night silk dresses. “A big motivating question was, Is this something I can wear straight from the plane to an event?” says the New York–born Brentwood resident. Her travel companions most often include her husband, Oscarwinning screenwriter Stephen Gaghan, and their four-year-old daughter, Tuesday. Also this season, Mortimer has partnered with California knitwear company Three Dots to devise a capsule line of Lycra and viscose-blend dresses. Revved up with Mortimer’s favorite bold colors and stripes, the 10-piece collection contains flattering silhouettes like a maxi, a shift and a knee-skimming number with side cutouts. “It sounds more risqué than it is,” she says. “The trick is it doesn’t show midriff—it shows rib cage.” minniemortimer.com

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WHAT’S CURRENTLY ON OUR STYLE RADAR

HIDDEN GEMS

CIRCA’S WES CARROLL TALKS HOLLYWOOD GEMS AND BEING THE GO-TO JEWELRY GUY When Wes Carroll joined Circa as the director of its recently opened Beverly Hills office, he became one of the West Coast’s preeminent jewelry experts. The diamond and gem guru relocated from New York City, where he had held posts at Cartier, Graff and

Bulgari over his 25-year career. Circa, which specializes in buying jewelry and watches, sees more than its fair share of fabulous bijoux. We checked in with Carroll to talk about some recent buys and share some tales of the trade. What’s the most outrageous piece of jewelry you’ve seen so far at Circa? There was a diamond tiara that came from a European royal family. The younger generation of the family brought it in. Being that times have changed, they didn’t have many opportunities to wear it and they wanted to turn this into some money.

What stones are your customers currently buying and selling at Circa? We see more diamonds than anything else. In the past month, I’ve been seeing more colored diamonds come through. In terms of jewelry trends, how is L.A. different from NYC? Many people in Los Angeles would rather wear one or two pieces than a bunch of tchotchkes, so women might have a beautiful diamond watch and an amazing ring. I tend to see larger single-stone diamonds—like engagement rings—on people on the West Coast than I did on the East Coast. But there are also the cus-

Cartier gold, diamond and ceramic Trinity ring; Buccellati gold and diamond bangle

tomers who like to wear a lot of casual jewelry. They’ll throw on diamonds-bythe-yard chains, or they’ll wear larger diamond studs. circajewels.com

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SHE’S GOT IT IN THE BAG

PAST WINNERS

2007

Emily Blunt

ACTRESS HAILEE STEINFELD HELPS SUPPORT WOMEN IN FILM

wood II. “I love a pop of color,” the actress says. “I also have a black one that goes with everything—you can dress it up or down.” Because of the Italian brand’s 11-year relationship with Women in Film, 20 percent of the proceeds from sales of the clutch will benefit that organization. Previous recipients of the award, which was launched in 2006, have included Elizabeth Banks and Zoe Saldana. Steinfeld herself has been lucky to work with some accomplished women: “Catherine Keener played my mom in a film I just shot, Can a Song Save Your Life?, and she’s so talented. I really look up to her. And I loved working with Kristen Wiig [on Hateship, Friendship]; she’s amazing.”

2008

Ginnifer Goodwin

2011

Katie Holmes

Hollywood II clutch, MAX MARA, MARA $975, 866629-6272

L.A. REAL ESTATE: TOP SPOTS FOR SUMMER HOMES

WHEN JUNE GLOOM ROLLS INTO TOWN, ANGELENOS MAKE A DASH FOR ONE OF THESE ENCLAVES

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H

ailee Steinfeld is no stranger to acclaim (for True Grit, she was nominated for an Academy Award). Now, thanks to her talent, as well as her style and her contributions to the community, the 16-year-old has been named the recipient of the 2013 Women in Film Max Mara Face of the Future Award. “It’s exciting to be a part of something that gives opportunities to women in the arts,” she says. Steinfeld, who can be seen this summer in Romeo and Juliet and Three Days to Kill, will be honored at the Women in Film Crystal + Lucy Awards on June 12 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. To commemorate the occasion, Max Mara has created a suede and snakeskin clutch, the Holly-

MALIBU COLONY

MONTECITO

OJAI

SELLING POINTS:

SELLING POINTS:

SELLING POINTS:

Homes here boast some of the area’s best beach views. Since privacy is a priority for Colonyites, don’t expect access unless you hold the keys to an oceanfront castle.

Sandwiched between pristine coastline and rolling mountains and boasting a mild climate, Montecito attracts some of America’s wealthiest.

An hour and a half north of L.A., Ojai is an hautehippie oasis complete with solar-powered ranch houses, health-food cafes and a spiritual guru.

CURRENT LISTING:

CURRENT LISTING:

CURRENT LISTING:

23736 Malibu Colony Road. A rambling estate that includes a seven-bedroom Cape Cod–style main house and a guest house. $23 million; redfin.com

1880 East Valley Road. A six-bedroom Mediterraneanstyle manse. Perks include a putting green, a lap pool and a spa. $18 million; sothebyshomes.com

915 Del Norte Road. Owned by Reese Witherspoon, the property has a nine-bedroom Wallace Neff–designed home and stables. $7.25 million; theagencyre.com

TO DO:

TO DO:

TO DO:

Nibble on dolmathes and moussaka at Taverna Tony’s; lob tennis balls on a private court, surf.

Quench your thirst at the new Pressed Juicery; browse the knickknacks at Upstairs at Pierre Lafond.

Relax at the Ojai Valley Inn & Spa; enjoy the “pink moment” (the reflection of the setting sun on the bluffs).

STATUS SYMBOL:

STATUS SYMBOL:

STATUS SYMBOL:

A private room at Giorgio Baldi. An invite to Steve Tisch and Alec Gore’s respective 4th of July bashes.

A private vineyard. House calls by aesthetician Melanie Simon.

A backyard sanctuary for endangered species. A small-batch almond-milk business.

FAMOUS NEIGHBORS:

FAMOUS NEIGHBORS:

FAMOUS NEIGHBORS:

Sting, Jacqui Getty, Brian Grazer

Oprah Winfrey, Drew Barrymore, Steven Spielberg

Anthony Hopkins, Jerry Bruckheimer, John Krasinski


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party time

kim kardashian and friends toast DuJour and bruce weber The Four Seasons Beverly Hills’ Culina restaurant was the setting for a double springtime celebration: The intimate lunch feted Kim Kardashian’s March cover and photographer Bruce Weber’s birthday. Guests like Carole Bayer Sager, Waldo Fernandez, and designers Scott Sternberg and Rachel Roy dined on a special menu that included melon and cucumber soup and spaghetti alla chitarra with Wagyu meatballs. Of course, dessert was birthday cake—a decadent carrot creation from the Ivy. “It was great to celebrate Bruce’s birthday with such a fun mix of attendees,” said Four Seasons general manager Mehdi Eftekari. Florist Eric Buterbaugh brightened the space with seasonal flowers. “I wanted to showcase pink fuchsia and purple anemones, which are only available for a short period of the year,” he explained.

Kim Kardashian and Bruce Weber

Bruce’s birthday cake Jason Binn and Cornelia Guest

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Scott Sternberg

caption tk

weber and dujour: Getty Images; all other images courtesy

Kris Jenner and Mehdi Eftekari

Rachel Roy and Khloe Kardashian

his business is blooming

He’s Gwyneth’s go-to florist when she’s in L.A., he did the arrangements for Salma’s wedding, and Demi has him on speed dial— clearly, Eric Buterbaugh has amassed quite a following since he opened a boutique in the Four Seasons Hotel 10 years ago. Here, he shares his floral fixations:

Kim shows off her cover.

Summer pick: I love dahlias. They come in so many amazing colors, and they work really well with other blooms in a bouquet. Round, ball-shaped arrangements can look dated, so let a few pieces stick out—or use single stems in bud vases. Most underrated flower: Carnations

Most overused combo: Hydrangea and roses Favorite floral scent: Lily-of-the-valley smells divine. Strangest arrangement he’s created: A huge, three-dimensional red rose heart that measured four feet across. It was flown to Hawaii on its own private jet!


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high art

NE W Y OR K

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WIND UP or UNWIND

two OF THE SEASON’S standout exhibits

James Turrell: Sooner than later, roden crater, Kayne Griffin Corcoran James Turrell’s End Around (2006) at Kayne Griffin Corcoran, on view through July 20

Ranked among the top indoor-cycle experiences, the intense sweat-a-thon adds a healthy dose of competition to your cardio with “tech pack” and “torque board” technologies that enable you to compare your metrics with your classmates’. flywheelsports.com

When is a sunset not just a sunset? When it’s observed from a James Turrell “skyspace.” The structures’ roof apertures frame the sky to create a dynamic canvas of cloud formations and celestial hues. “We wanted a place to appreciate the unique experience afforded by the California light,” says Bill Griffin, whose Kayne Griffin Corcoran gallery has a multimedia exhibit on the project. The show coincides with the opening of the gallery’s new 10,000-square-foot location in a former auto shop on La Brea. kaynegriffincorcoran.com

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turrell: © James Turrell/Robert Wedemeyer; prina: courtesy of the artist; veev: JGI/Jamie Grill/Blend Images/getty images; all other images courtesy

flywheel sports opens in west hollywood and larchmont

exhale spa

Angelenos who’ve been driving to Santa Monica to go to its Exhale Spa no longer need to make that trek, thanks to its new location in the Loews Hollywood Hotel. There you can enjoy luxurious services like a Glow Body Scrub, Acupuncture Massage or Tata Harper facials. exhalespa.com

VeeV VitaFrute

Stephen Prina: As He Remembered It, LACMA

One day in the 1980s, Stephen Prina was strolling down La Brea Avenue and stumbled upon a bright pink furniture unit by architect R.M. Schindler that had been abandoned on the street. The image stayed with him and now serves as the inspiration behind his new LACMA show. The artist copied 28 Schindler furniture pieces, coated them in Pantone Honeysuckle (the 2011 color of the year) and arranged them in a grid. “The challenge for me was to seize this atrocity and conjure an aesthetic out of it, not in spite of it,” he says. lacma.org

An installation view from Stephen Prina’s exhibit, which explores themes of context and memory, at LACMA through August 4

L.A.-based VeeV Spirits has unveiled a line of ready-made cocktails that blend the original VeeV açai-based recipe with summery drinks like lemonade and margarita. Clocking in at just 125 calories per serving and certified organic, these refreshing beverages are perfect for health-conscious tipplers. veevlife.com


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The new store

BRANDS SET UP SHOP IN BEVERLY HILLS

Jennifer Lopez Katy Perry

Cash Warren, Jessica Alba and Tommy and Dee Hilfiger

To mark the opening of his new Robertson Boulevard flagship store, Tommy Hilfiger recruited a pack of his Hollywood pals—including Jennifer Lopez, Katy Perry and Jessica Alba—to join him for a glamorous evening. “He’s a really dear friend,” said Alicia Keys of Hilfiger at the in-store cocktail party. “He’s been around for so long and just continues to evolve.” Later that night, guests made their way to dinner at Soho House where Keys and Axl Rose held an impromptu performance for a boisterous bunch of A-listers that included Kanye West and Kim Kardashian.

Neil Patrick Harris and David Burtka

Rosario Dawson

Hilary Swank

PEN PALS

Emmy Rossum and Navid Negahban

Rachel Griffiths

Jane Seymour

Julianne Hough

ia for UNICEF in Swank visited Ethiop . lanc CEO Lutz Bethge October with Montb

Celebrating the launch of its charity-minded collection Signature for Good, Montblanc hosted an elegant brunch at the Hotel Bel-Air with Emmy Rossum, Rosario Dawson and Hilary Swank. Through Signature for Good, the German luxury label is donating part of its proceeds for every piece of the collection sold; it plans to raise at least $1.5 million for global UNICEF education initiatives by March 2014. Swank, who traveled with Montblanc to Ethiopia last fall to observe its collaboration with the children’s nonprofit, praised the company’s dedication. “They have been working closely with UNICEF for nearly a decade,” she said. “These kinds of steady efforts are the only way that you can really make an impact and end the cycle of poverty.”

HILFIGER: GETTY IMAGES FOR TOMMY HILFIGER; MONTBLANC: JB LACRIOX AND PASCAL SEGRETAN; ETHIOPIA: COURTESY OF MONTBLANC (2)

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TOMMY BOY


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THE NATURAL

Mariel Hemingway Launches a Healthy-Living Initiative Photograph by Andrew Mcleod

Crispy beef at Mr. Chow; the exterior of Nobu

asian haute spots

“I

movies: Everett collection (3); all other images courtesy

guru, with a holistic diet-and-wellness initiative called Running With Nature (runningwithnature.com) aimed at inspiring others “to find your own unique ways of living an amazing life.” The program, founded with her partner, former stunt man Bobby Williams, is based on the couple’s philosophy of good food, less stuff and plenty of laughter. Their new companion book, Running With Nature, shares the couple’s approach and also contains recipes that emphasize fresh, organic and local ingredients. “I was the girl that ate every way,” says Hemingway. “I was macrobiotic, I was vegan. I was on the search to be healthy. Now I’ve come full circle with a diet that’s just simple and clean.”

firm Studio PCH, the minimalist 6,000-square-foot space comfortably seats 220 and boasts a lovely, sun-dappled patio. Already a popular spot for dinner—Britney Spears and Robert Downey Jr. are regulars—the restaurant recently launched a lunch and brunch menu. Highlights include truffle steak and eggs, Malibu “Takumi” burgers and pastrami salmon crispy rice—a sushi bar by way of the deli counter indulgence. (22706 Pacific Coast Highway; noburestaurants.com)

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movies under the stars

Grab a picnic basket and blanket, and head to the Malibu Country Mart for the shopping center’s first annual film series. One Sunday a month, the mart will screen family-friendly fare— Endless Summer Revisited, Madagascar and The Goonies—on the main lawn. The movies will start at 8:15 (or roughly 15 minutes after sunset). malibucountrymart.com

6/9

Endless Summer Revisited (2000)

7/14

8/11

madagascar (2005)

the goonies (1985)

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hough she could have sailed through life on her famous last name, Mariel Hemingway, 51, has forged her own path—or paths—as an actress, cookbook author and, most recently, documentary subject. Running From Crazy, an Oprah Winfrey–produced movie centered on Hemingway, examines her clan’s bitter struggle with suicide and mental illness and premiered in January at the Sundance Film Festival. “The film is a personal story of one woman’s triumph over adversity,” says Hemingway. “I hope viewers will be inspired by my journey and that other families dealing with mental illness will realize that they’re not alone.” Now the Malibu resident is taking on the role of lifestyle

t’s by the ocean... it’s Los Angeles at its best,” says restaurateur Michael Chow about why he decided to bring an outpost of his famed Mr. Chow franchise to the Malibu Country Mart (in the former Nobu space). Like its sister locations in Beverly Hills, London, Miami and New York City, the restaurant, which opened this spring and was designed by Chow himself, exudes high-gloss glamour with its white-on-white décor, a glass-topped bar and an open kitchen where diners can watch chefs preparing classic Mr. Chow dishes, including green prawns, chicken satay and Ma Mignon (3835 Cross Creek Road; mrchow.com). Nobu, meanwhile, has relocated a few miles down the road to a tony beachfront development owned by Oracle honcho Larry Ellison. Designed by local architecture


BOMBAIBIZA.COM

BOMBAIBIZA

@BOMBAIBIZA


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O≤NGE COUNTY

SHOP AROUND

THE LATEST IN SOCAL STORES AND SUMMERTIME STYLES

LANVIN OPENS IN SOUTH COAST PLAZA

FENDI CLASSICS COME BACK

The Selleria handbag line, introduced in 1925, has returned and is now available in Costa Mesa. The pieces, all made by hand, are named after the Fendi sisters and their mother. “It’s an homage to the women who loved handbags and their craftsmanship,” says creative director Silvia Venturini Fendi. fendi.com

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3333 Bristol Street, Costa Mesa lanvin.com The French house has been in expansion mode with boutiques popping up in Kuwait, New York City and Beirut. Its newest addition: a jewel box of a store in South Coast Plaza that contains a show-stopping wall of handbags and an extensive array of the things that California shoppers need most: swimwear, beach baubles and sunglasses.

Selleria Carla 650 bag, $2,350, FENDI, 714-751-1111

SWIMWEAR: CHRISTINE BLACKBURNE; NICHOLSON & FONDA: SILVER SCREEN COLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

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BIKINI BEACH

PETER FONDA REVS UP

More than four decades after making movie history in Easy Rider (above, with co-star Jack Nicholson), Peter Fonda is heeding the call of the open road again. Teaming up with Troy Lee Designs, he has created a collection of motorcycle accessories inspired by the stars and stripes worn by his Rider character. “I thought that putting the American flag on my jacket would be cool and provocative,” Fonda says. Helmet, $425, gloves, $75, PETER FONDA COLLECTION BY TROY LEE DESIGNS, peterfonda.com

Top, $60, bottom, $60, VITAMIN A, southbeachswimsuits.com

This season, one swimwear designer, L*Space Swim founder (and Corona del Mar resident) Monica Wise, is deviating from the less-is-more SoCal norm with Maio, a collection of chic maillots, and the Collection, a debut line of resort wear (lspace.com). In Laguna Beach, Amahlia Stevens has been winning raves for her brand Vitamin A and its ultra-flattering bikinis. “The bottom is scooped at the hip to emphasize the curves,” she says. (vitaminaswim.com)

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One-piece, $176, MAIO SWIM, maioswim.com


THE PURITY AND TEXTURE OF NATURE. THE AMENITIES OF THE WORLD’S FIRST 1 HOTEL. A PLACE YOU HAVEN’T BEEN BEFORE. WELCOME TO 1 HOTEL & RESIDENCES SOUTH BEACH EXCEPTIONAL BEACHFRONT 1, 2, 3 AND 4 BEDROOM RESIDENCES AND PENTHOUSES 2399 COLLINS AVENUE TELEPHONE 786.431.0254 EXCLUSIVE SALES AND MARKETING BY FORTUNE DEVELOPMENT SALES 1HOTELS.COM/SOUTHBEACH

Oral representations cannot be relied upon as correctly stating the representations of the developer. For correct representations, reference should be made to a purchase contract and the other documents required by section 718.503, Florida Statutes, to be furnished by a developer to a buyer or lessee. This is not intended to be an offer to sell condominium units in any state where prohibited by local law and your eligibility for purchase will depend upon your state of residency. Equal Opportunity Housing.


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seaside stars Three newcomers charm the city, from South Beach to Bal Harbour

1685 Collins Avenue clubessentia.com This newly rebranded rooftop wellness center is now delivering 21st-century science, courtesy of medical director and co-founder Dr. Ivan Rusilko. An osteopath and expert in sports nutrition, fitness, aesthetic medicine and weight management, he is determined to establish a new approach to proactive health. “Many people’s bodies are prematurely aging due to poor diet and smoking,” Dr. Rusilko says, so he’s created procedures that go far beyond the traditional waxing, pedicures, facials and massages (although those are all available). The center’s staff first performs diagnostic tests on clients

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woman: Joshua Hodge Photography/getty images; nest casa: Moris Moreno Photography; all other images courtesy

Club essentia wellness retreat, Delano

and then recommends specific treatments and programs. The center’s procedures include everything from hair regeneration and hyperbaric oxygen therapy to dermal fillers like Botox and hormone revitalization. The doctor’s secret weapon? Injections of platelet-rich plasma. “It’s the ultimate form of recycling the blood and sparks the natural healing process,” he says. “For example, it can stimulate new collagen growth in the face.”

four intriguing treatments

1

Stem Cell Body Wrap ($200)

A two-step apple-stem-cell exfoliation is followed by a peptide-infused massage.

2

mesotherapy ($650)

This injectable form of liposuction liquefies and removes fat cells.

3

Trios Skin Rejuvenation ($1,000*)

The phototherapy system is used for hair removal and the treatment of acne. *six sessions

4

dr. ivan’s hangover cocktail ($150)

An IV-dispensed nutrient-rich cocktail replenishes the body after a night out.

John Varvatos has arrived

1020 Lincoln Road; johnvarvatos.com Lincoln Road just got a jolt from Miami’s first John Varvatos store, and the shop’s smoky mirrored ceiling and more than 30 black crystal chandeliers fit in nicely to South Beach club land. Limited-edition signed prints of musicians can be purchased alongside clothing and accessories from the designer’s different collections, handcrafted rocker jewelry, and watches created in collaboration with Ernst Benz. “I’ve found the perfect spot on Lincoln Road,” says Varvatos. “Miami is a wonderful community with a great fashion spirit.”

Nest Casa

9700 Collins Avenue; nestcasa.com Model turned design maven Sara Colombo opens a second location dedicated to home accessories and gifts at Bal Harbour Shops. In her first store, she revealed she had a great eye for furniture and lighting. Now she shifts her curatorial focus to finding exclusive items like napa leather boxes and surreal crystal sculptures.


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The Jetsons have arrived

18555 Collins Ave., Sunny Isles Beach porsche-design.com/towermiami In South Florida’s never-ending luxury high-rise hustle, the 60-story Porsche Design Tower Miami currently under construction offers something unique: Its auto-lift system will bring residents’ vehicles up to personal garages adjacent to their units. Not only does the amenity put an end to endless elevator trips with groceries, but it also ensures an incredibly high level of privacy. And since nearly every apartment has its own balcony with a pool and a kitchen, living in the Tower is more like living in a single-family home. “By maximizing outdoor space and offering the convenience of one’s own garage, we’ve created the ultimate sky residence,” says Gil Dezer, president of Dezer Development. The perks continue with a car concierge to handle routine maintenance, an on-site movie theater, game room, and oceanfront ballroom. Slated for completion in early 2016, the Porsche Design Tower consists of 132 units that range from 4,200 to 17,000 square feet and cost from $4.5 million to $25 million.

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Porsche’s high-rise elevates the automobile

Culinary Crush

Tongue & Cheek

from late-night bites to gastropub grub

Biscayne Tavern

146 Biscayne Boulevard biscaynetavern.com Jeffrey Chodorow believes in Brickell. Not only is his China Grill reopening there in late 2013, but he’s also installed

Crispy smoked head cheese at Swine

S AN F RAN C I S C O

Biscayne Tavern in b2 miami downtown, a new hotel. Enjoy a fried oyster po’boy, fancy grilled cheese, pot roast or a seafood Cobb salad in a homey setting filled with slate, oak and mirrors.

Charles St.

2000 Collins Avenue charlesstmiami.com For an area loaded with nightclubs, South Beach has surprisingly come up short on decent dining in the wee hours. That’s changed with Charles St., a bistro that serves daily until 5 a.m. Try the sliders or the crab cakes and spicy remoulade;

Long Bone Short Rib Pot Roast en Cocotte with fresh horseradish and warm truffle popovers at Biscayne Tavern

short ribs and aged cheddar; and chorizo, shrimp and eggs are all available, too. During the day, it offers baskets so you can picnic on the beach.

Swine Southern Table & Bar

2415 Ponce De Leon Boulevard runpigrun.com 50 Eggs, the firm behind

Yardbird and Khong River House, has burst into Coral Gables with Swine Southern Table & Bar (billed as “Yardbird’s tougher older brother”). Our picks: the 1855 Black Angus Burnt Ends, either with fried cornbread and molasses or on barbecued beans glazed with Paradise Farms honey.

431 Washington Avenue tandcmiami.com In South Beach’s South of Fifth neighborhood, Tongue & Cheek lives up to its name with a beefcheek burger. The menu is filled with American classics and dishes influenced by chef Jamie DeRosa’s travels. A snack bar serves nibbles like boquerones and ham and pimento cheese on rye crackers. NEW MOVES Icebox Café (1855 Purdy Avenue) and Tex Mex cantina El Rancho Grande’s new Tequitzlan (1884 Bay Road) are moving to Sunset Harbour.

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swine: David Cabrera; Biscayne Tavern: Gary James; all other images courtesy

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MIAMI


WE GO WHERE YOU GO

Liberty Helicopters continues to fly clients to their desired destinations. Whether it’s a weekend in the Hamptons or an important board meeting, we have the ability to get you there. Our large fleet of ships, combined with decades of flying experience, makes us stand out against the rest. Corporate | Executive | Commuter | Casino Charters | Airport Transfers Courier Services | Sporting Events | Recreational Destinations

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FASHION NEWS

LOCAL DESIGNERS DIVE INTO SWIMWEAR

pair with...

pair with...

pair with... Bikini, $230, ESTUARIES, estuariesny.com

Bikini, $255, JOY CIOCI, joycioci.com

pair with... Top, $130, bottom, $98, FAHERTY BRAND, fahertybrand.com

Sunglasses, $425, SAMA EYEWEAR, at the Eye Gallery, theeyegallery.com

Sunglasses, $245, GUCCI, gucci.com

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Bikini, $210, LAUREN MOFFATT, madewell.com

MOFFATT: CHRISTINE BLACKBURNE; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

Sunglasses, $275, LUMETE, lumete.com

Sunglasses, $450, LANVIN, at H.L. Purdy, hlpurdy.com

ESTUARIES

JOY CIOCI

LAUREN MOFFATT

FAHERTY BRAND

WHAT: For design inspiration, sisters Zhu Ru and Layla Chen combined their Hawaii upbringing with their present-day NYC lifestyle. The result? Pieces that can be worn in or out of the water. “The key is versatility,” says Chen. estuariesny.com

WHAT: The suits from this womenswear brand—Brooklyn Decker is a fan—were influenced by Florida and the whimsy of 1920s synchronized swimming. “Our collection is a reflection of the vivid life beneath the sea,” Cioci says. joycioci.com

WHAT: Moffatt’s swim line features her popular prints. “It has the same aesthetic as the rest of my designs: classic shapes with fun details,” she says. “My suits are feminine with a tomboy streak, so they’re not overtly sexy.” laurenmoffatt.net

WHAT: The fabric used in twins Mike and Alex Faherty’s suits are truly unique—made primarily from recycled water bottles. Being green was a priority, says Mike. “We developed an amazing material that was as eco-friendly as possible.” fahertybrand.com

WHERE TO WEAR: The bikinis, maillots and cover-ups come in bold brights and feature easy yet sexy silhouettes with touches like ruching and color blocking— just right for a plunge at the Soho House pool. sohohouseny.com

WHERE TO WEAR: The suits’ neoprene fabrics with scalloped edges are cuttingedge, while Cioci’s marine-life prints add just the right amount of beachiness. Show them off at the pool at the Equinox Printing House gym. equinox.com

WHERE TO WEAR: The collection is perfect for lounging while you snack on lobster and carnitas tacos at one of The Beach’s cabanas at Dream Downtown. Take your pick from heart-print halterneck one-pieces or highwaisted bikinis. marblelane.com/beach

WHERE TO WEAR: The lightweight, quickdrying suits in subtle but striking patterns are great for doing morning laps at Le Parker Meridien’s rooftop pool, followed by a smoothie at Norma’s or a shake at the Burger Joint. parkermeridien.com


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RETAIL ROUNDUP

STYLE BASICS FROM BIG NAMES

HOTEL HITS

DKNY CONCEPT SHOP From top: A guest room at the Refinery Hotel; the lounge at La Prairie at the Ritz-Carlton Spa; Melanie Simon’s CircCell Geothermal Clay Cleanser, $35, and ABO +|Blood Serum, $118, 646-358-3600

THE HIGH LINE HOTEL

180 Tenth Avenue thehighlinehotel.com New York City’s boutique-hotel boom continues with this new establishment housed in a 118-year-old brick Gothic structure (once a seminary). Designed by Roman & Williams—the firm responsible for the hipness that is the Ace Hotel—the 60-room High Line Hotel ups the cool factor with the first East Coast Intelligentsia coffee bar, staff uniforms by designer Patrick Robinson and a deskless, paperless iPad checkin. Guests also get to enjoy something priceless during their stay: fantastic views of the High Line.

LA PRAIRIE AT THE RITZ CARLTON

50 Central Park South laprairie.com Get your body summer-ready with the latest pampering treatment at La Prairie at the Ritz-Carlton Spa. The transformative 90-minute Diamond Perfection ($295) is a head-to-toe ritual that uses the Cellular Mineral Body Exfoliator (a micro-crystal medley of diamonds, freshwa-

ter pearls and quartz crystal) to smooth the skin. The relaxing rubdown ends with an application of the opulent Skin Caviar Luxe Body Cream, letting you show the world your softest side.

MELANIE SIMON AT CORNELIA SPA

20 East 76th Street corneliaspaatthesurrey.com The Surrey Hotel’s Cornelia Spa has just launched its Experts in Residence program, which will bring in the country’s beauty and wellness masterminds to administer services. Celebrity aesthetician Melanie Simon (Oprah Winfrey is just one of her fans) is introducing New Yorkers to her two-hour, devotion-inspiring Chemistry Facial ($595), which combines Dermarolling

(imagine a lint roller covered with microscopic needles that help penetrate and clean the skin), a concentrate of organic plant-based liquid stem cells, and her electrical Nano Perfector machine. Simon says the procedure will leave your skin plump while also improving overall tone and color.

REFINERY HOTEL

63 West 38th Street refineryhotelnewyork.com This Fashion District home away from home—once the headquarters for many hat manufacturers—channels an industrial-chic vibe that pays homage to its past while offering the comforts of the modern world. Its 197 loft-like rooms have concrete ceilings and weathered hardwood floors, and the building’s amenities include a sprawling indoor/outdoor rooftop lounge and Southern-food restaurant Parker & Quinn—destined to be one of this summer’s hotspots.

DENIM & SUPPLY

99 University Place ralphlauren.com Ralph Lauren’s American-heritage offshoot Denim & Supply Ralph Lauren has landed in Manhattan with this 2,500-square-foot brickand-mortar shop. Distressed jean jackets, prairie dresses and faded chambray accessories harmoniously complement the interior’s throwback style.

ALL IMAGES COURTESY

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FROM THE HIGH LINE TO THE EAST SIDE

168 Fifth Avenue dkny.com The quintessential Big Apple clothing and lifestyle brand DKNY has unveiled a Flatiron store that stocks all the essentials for women—think day-to-evening pants, slouchy jeans and sleek sneakers in city-friendly shades of black, white, gray—just in time for summer fun.


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A CELEBRATION OF DANCE AND TIME

A fantastic time was had by all at the launch of Hermès’ newest watch, the Dressage Chronograph, at the Baryshnikov Arts Center in Chelsea. Hermès CEO Robert Chavez and Luc Perramond, CEO of the brand’s watch group, introduced a specially commissioned ballet choreographed by David Drouard that explored the mechanics of time. Drouard and dancer Sandra Savin performed the piece (dressed in Hermès, of course) to the works of Philip Glass and other composers. Guests then went to the Skylight Studios loft for dinner and the unveiling of the timepiece. Kelly Rutherford, Dr. Lisa Airan and Neville Wakefield ogled an installation of watches and dined on sunchoke soup, lamb chops, and a poached pear and chocolate cloche for dessert. “I felt like I’d stepped into a beautiful and mysterious world of timepieces that was part museum exhibit and part land of Oz,” Olivia Chantecaille said.

Robert Chavez, Olympia Scarry and Neville Wakefield

The Hermès Dressage Chronograph watch

Lauren Remington Platt and Jamie Johnson

Sandra Savin and David Drouard performing

Shala Monroque takes a peek.

Olivia Chantecaille and Kelly Rutherford

The elaborate centerpieces at dinner

BEAUTY BITES

Zani Gugelmann watches on.

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raids, fishtails and twists are the season’s hottest do’s, and making them will be a breeze thanks to Kenneth Salon’s brand-new trio of hair products: Smoothing Balm, Texturizing Paste and Sexture ($12 to $18, kennethsalon.com. “Sexture uses nature’s elements to create a loose, tousled look,” says Kevin Lee, the salon’s creative director and mane man to Tory Burch and Mary-Louise Parker.

Kenneth Salon

✹ Sweden’s cult-fave fragrance label Byredo has released its

newest scent (and latest Barneys New York exclusive). The clean, floral Inflorescence is packed with complementary notes of rose petals, pink freesia and jasmine—a sweet and heady blend that’s subtly feminine and luxurious.

Inflorescence eau de parfum, $220, BYREDO, barneys.com

✹ Skincare maestro Dr. Dennis Gross has moved his 22-year dermatology practice to a gleaming, state-of-the-art office on the Upper East Side (900

The pear and chocolate cloche dessert

Fifth Avenue, dgskincare.com). The new space features a mini-boutique that showcases the physician’s rapidly expanding product line—be sure to try his Ferulic + Retinol Triple Correction Eye Serum—and Dr. Gross, an expert on skin cancer, also plans to host seminars with health and fitness experts for his patients.

FOR MORE ON NYC, VISIT

DUJOUR.COM/CITIES

HERMÈS: BILLY FARRELL AGENCY; WATCH: COURTESY OF HERMÈS; KENNETH SALON: BOB STEIG; OTHER IMAGE COURTESY

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A NIGHT TO REMEMBER FROM HERMÈS


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TRI-STATE

AN A.C. ORIGINAL

GREENWICH’S FRENCH INVASION

THE BORGATA CELEBRATES 10 YEARS

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reenwich Avenue, the major Connecticut retail thoroughfare and home of born-inthe-USA brands like Ralph Lauren and Tory Burch, has fallen for France with a spate of recent openings. ✹ The Hermès store (289 Greenwich Avenue; hermes.com ) emphasizes the house’s iconic pieces and offers housewares, too. In an eye-catching window display, artist Parmen Pereira explores Hermès’ rich equestrian history.

✹ Just in time for the beach, a satellite

HERMÈS: IMAXTREE; PUCK: JOE SCARNICI/WIREIMAGE; BUTLER AND ANISTON: JAMES DEVANEY/WIREIMAGE; JAY-Z: PRINCE WILLIAMS/GETTY IMAGES; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

THE BORGATA

One Borgata Way theborgata.com The Borgata—Atlantic City’s hotel, casino and spa—is celebrating its 10th anniversary with renovations and openings aimed at making it an even more appealing place to stay. The overhaul started last year with a comprehensive $50-million room redesign that softened the color scheme and added details like quirky, mismatched

furniture to 1,566 guest rooms. But the improvements go beyond the visual. The city’s most impressive culinary roster—which includes Wolfgang Puck and Bobby Flay—gets better with gastropub newcomer 28 West Bar & Bites from Wesley Holton (the former executive chef at Daniel Boulud Brasserie in Vegas). “This anniversary marks another milestone in our history and makes us take a step back to see all we’ve accomplished,” says Joe Lupo, Borgata’s senior vice president of operations.

2006

2009

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2013

Famed American glass sculptor Dale Chihuly designed 14 hand-blown glass chandeliers which hang

Renowned glass sculptor Dale Chihuly designs 14 mesmerizing hand-blown chandeliers for the property (above, the lobby).

Austrian celebrity chef Wolfgang Puck opens his American Grille as part of the Borgata's North Expansion.

✹ Sandro’s stark, sleek boutique (200 Greenwich Avenue; sandro-paris .com ) brings its foolproof pieces—for men, trenches and baseball-inspired varsity jackets; for women, effortless deskto-dinner dresses, blazers and strappy Vest, jacket, sandals—to fill gaps in local wardrobes. shirt and shorts, ✹ Parisian womenswear label Maje

HERMÈS, 203-622-3007

(200 Greenwich Avenue; us.maje.com ) contributes its more youthful aesthetic with pretty silhouettes, modern leather and bohemian prints.

BORGATA THROUGH THE YEARS 2003

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A newly renovated room

of the St. Tropez men’s swimwear brand Vilebrequin (200 Greenwich Avenue; vilebrequin.com ) opens, offering expertly constructed swim trunks in various lengths. The eye-catching colors and patterns include vivid primary hues and playful florals.

Amid rumors of romance, Jennifer Aniston and Gerard Butler move in while filming The Bounty Hunter.

Jay-Z performs at the resort’s event center in March as part of his Blueprint 3 tour for his 11th album.

Borgata is the first U.S. casino to debut an in-room gaming system of slots and video poker games, available in all rooms.

FREEZER FRESH Jersey City resident and exGramercy Tavern pastry cook Emma Taylor has launched ice cream and cake venture Milk Sugar Love. Ice creams include ricotta with caramelized pistachios, and smoked almond and sangria sorbet; vanilla and Nutella and chocolate blackout are among the cakes. Find Taylor’s frozen treats three days a week at JC farmer’s markets; she hopes for a storefront by fall. (milksugarlove.com)

FOR TRI-STATE TREASURES, GO TO

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eastern promises

wine wonderland

the region’s best, from the north fork to montauk

greenport grows up

montauk musts

From top: Yasha Wallin and Emily Anderson; surf boards at Jimmy’s Ding Repair

two experts talk lobster rolls and antique sales

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est friends and New Yorkers Yasha Wallin, a magazine writer and editor, and Emily Anderson, an art director, spend almost every summer weekend in Montauk exploring the area. All their amazing intel ends up in the duo’s two-year-old black-and-white broadsheet The Usual (theusualmontauk .com), where they cover cool Montauk residents (artists, surfers, skaters and more) and happenings. Here, their five favorite things about New York’s easternmost hot spot.

Moby Dick’s “If strong

cocktails and a spectacular view of the harbor are your thing, we’ll see you at this chill, year-old seaside watering hole. We can’t get here often enough.” mobydicksmontauk.com

Melet Mercantile’s annual sale

Turf “Housed in an

Airstream trailer in the parking lot at Ditch Plains, what started as Zach Lynd’s marketing-thesis project is now home to one of Montauk’s most sought-after lobster rolls. What’s better than buttery lobster, the sun on your back, and the ocean?” andturf.com

The People’s Boot Camp

“Held on the lawn at Ruschmeyer’s, these classes, taught by Hamptons native Adam Rosante, offer the prettiest setting ever for a much-needed ass kicking.” thepeoplesbootcamp.com

“Eclectic collector Bob Melet’s four-year-old shop is a great spot for people watching—both Bruce Weber and Waris Ahluwalia are customers—and during one weekend every summer, he invites the public over for discounts, where you can score everything from old copies of Playboy to samurai swords.” 631-668-9080

Jimmy’s Ding Repair

“We’re at Jimmy’s watching our surf boards get bandaged back to life more than we’re actually in the water. He also has a reputation for taking his sweet time. Not to be missed is his annual BBQ and board sale.”

825 North Road The winery Greenport produces kontokostawines.com around 3,000 library and a tasting room for With the opening of cases a year. the vineyard’s syrahs, cabernet Kontokosta Winery, francs, rieslings and more. Michael a 9,000-square-foot Kontokosta is particularly pleased waterfront property from brothers with the 2007 cabernet franc. “A Michael and Constantine Kontokosta, oenophiles now have another perfect growing season that year provided us with amazing fruit,” reason to linger in the North Fork. he explains. “We had a leisurely Modeled on a New England barn, the eco-friendly space—perched on harvest to make wine, and like the cabernet franc, our other 2007 a picturesque bluff overlooking the Long Island Sound—boasts a wine varieties are aging beautifully.”

getting fit

sweat it out at these new classes Physique Cardio

SLT

264 Butter Lane, Bridgehampton physique57.com

50 Station Road, Watermill sltnyc.com

Jennifer Maanavi and Tanya Becker

Founder

Amanda Freeman

A heart-pounding, more cardio-focused version of its popular sculpting class

workout

“Pilates on crack,” performed on a megaformer

A luxe outdoor patio area for clients to lounge, pre- and post-class

bonus

Light treats and juices from favorite NYC health spot Hu Kitchen

Zooey Deschanel, Emmy Rossum and Kelly Ripa

celeb fans

Sofia Vergara, Katie Couric and Kyra Sedgwick

wallin and anderson: Glenn Glasser (2); kontokosta: Toni Robertson Photography; all other images courtesy

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Kontokosta Winery


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Canvas and leather tote, $498, COACH, 631-324-0394

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SHOP TALK

WITH COACH AND MISSONI

TOP DESTINATIONS TO KNOW ABOUT Olivia towel sets, from $118, MISSONI HOME, 631-353-3700

LIVING LARGE

COACH’S COLLABORATION WITH SAINT JAMES

50 Newtown Lane, East Hampton coach.com Coach gets a nautical boost, thanks to a collaboration with seafaring, Normandy-based clothing label Saint James (which counts Johnny Depp and Gwyneth Paltrow among its fans). The capsule collection is a Breton stripe bonanza: Horizontal lines show up on towels, beachy totes trimmed with Coach’s leather and hardware, and easy-breezy bateau-neck Ts—the French brand’s famous silhouette—are updated with nautical drawstring hems made with rope.

MISSONI HOME DEBUTS

50 Jobs Lane, Southampton missonihome.com Missoni Home is opening a standalone store— its first in the world—in the Hamptons. The 500-square-foot showcase plans to carry the brand’s line of printed furnishings, from pillows to poufs, while a lovely outdoor area will be dedicated to by-the-pool pieces like chaise longues and deck chairs. The shop will also stock a debut collection of scented candles, poured into glasses adorned with zigzag prints and inspired by Rosita Missoni’s favorite regions in Italy.

FROM THE FOODIE FILES NICK AND TONI’S BRAND-NEW DÉCOR

ALL IMAGES COURTESY

PARRISH ART MUSEUM

279 Montauk Highway, Water Mill parrishart.org This longtime Hamptons institution—it opened in 1898— made a high-profile move to a Herzog and de Meuron building on a Water Mill estate late last year. This summer you won’t want to miss an exhibit showcasing the lesser-known drawings of sculptor Alice Aycock (through July 13) or the striking “Angels, Demons, and Savages: Pollock, Ossorio, Dubuffet,” which explores the artistic dialogue among the three masters and opens on July 21, eight days after the Parrish hosts the season’s biggest fete, the Midsummer Party.

136 North Main Street, East Hampton nickandtonis.com To celebrate its 25th year in business, the proprietors of East Hampton mainstay Nick & Toni’s (frequented by Steven Spielberg, Alec Baldwin and Sarah Jessica Parker) have given the interiors a face-lift and modernized the dining area and bar.

PEPALAJEFA’S GOURMET ON THE GO

7 Main Street, Sag Harbor pepalajefa.com Livia Hegner’s takeout upstart Pepalajefa, which had a soft opening last year, is back for the entire summer season. Stock up on superfresh gazpacho, just-rich-enough seafood lasagna, and indulgent gelatos and sorbet.

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If NYC congestion has you jonesing for privacy and space, check out this six-acre Westhampton residence. The 8,000-square-foot postmodern home—with 320 feet of waterfront—has a grand entrance foyer, double-height ceilings, seven bedrooms, seven and a half baths, a butler’s pantry and a formal dining room (perfect for entertaining all the people who will want to stay with you). “There’s even room for expanding—you could build a tennis court, family compound or anything your heart desires,” says Lynn November of Douglas Elliman. 18 Apaueuck Point Lane Road, $11 million; elliman.com


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binn around the hamptons

dujour ’s jason binn shares some favorite moments from his summer

Alan Leiberman, Cathie Black and Howard Lorber

Alison and Andy Brod

Nan Bush

Romy, Ronda, Piper and Harvey Spevak

Kevin Ryan

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Michael Wainstein and Jeffrey Chodorow

Bobby Flay, Rosanna Scotto and Lisa and Jimmy Cohen

Chris Robbins, Anne Caruso and Stephanie Hirsh

Erica and Michael Karsch

Leyla and Marco Mattiacci and Peter Brant

George Kolasa and Justin Tarquinio

Joanne and Bernard Kruger

Delphine and Reed Krakoff

Stephanie, Ron and Nicole Kramer

Katie Lee

MEHDI EFTek ari & Roya eftek ari

“one proud father Andrea Tremolada Seth Greenberg and #adventurous Noah Tepperberg

Dottie Herman

Candy and Mark Udell, Frédéric de Narp and Gwen Halsted-Horne

Anna Throne-Holst, Henri Barguirdjian and Marianne Lafiteau

Lew and Bobbie Frankfort

Graziano de Boni

Melissa Pordy and Richard Lefkowitz

for more hamptons, visit

Allison Lutnick, Lauran and Charlie Walk

Matt Blank and Matt Lauer

Trent Fraser

Eric Ripert

dujour.com/cities


READING ABOUT HISTORY

READING ABOUT HISTORY

WATCHING IT AT HOME

NOTHING BEATS BEING HERE TAKING A NAP

WITNESSING HISTORY

WITNESSING HISTORY

TICKETS ON SALE

9 AM ET MONDAY, JUNE 10 USOPEN.ORG AUGUST 26 – SEPTEMBER 9 Past participants shown. ©2013 USTA. Photo © Getty Images.


Introducing the

WORLD’S FINEST PENTHOUSE

p a l a z z o d ’ o r o | $ 55 m i l l i o n Furnished by Fendi Casa OT H E R R E S I D E N C E S AVA I L A B L E F R O M $ 8 TO $ 2 5 M I L L I O N SUNNY ISLES BEACH, MIAMI 305.933.6666

theworldsfinestpenthouse.com

OR AL REPRESEN TAT IONS CAN NOT BE RELIED U PON AS CORRECTLY STAT I NG REPRESEN TAT IONS OF T HE DEV ELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESEN TAT IONS, M A KE REFERENCE TO T HIS BROCH U RE AN D TO T HE DOCUMEN TS REQU IRED BY SECT ION 718.503, FLOR IDA STAT U TES, TO BE FU R N ISHED BY A DEV ELOPER TO A BU YER OR LESSEE . NOT AN OFFER W HERE PROHIBITED BY LAW. PR ICES AN D SPECIFICAT IONS ARE SUBJECT TO CH ANGE W IT HOU T NOT ICE . EQUAL HOUSI NG OPPORT U N IT Y.


EXCEPTIONAL RESIDENCES

610 WEST END AVE, 11B | $6,950,000 | WEB# 1576681

969 FIFTH AVENUE, 11/12TH FLOOR | $25,750,000 | WEB# 1546529

11 GRAMERCY PARK SOUTH, TH | $18,000,000 | WEB# 1479789

195 HUDSON STREET, 6A | $6,995,000 | WEB# 1589338

FROM UPTOWN TO DOWNTOWN, THE DE NIRO TEAM KNOWS NEW YORK CITY. RAPHAEL DE NIRO, SENIOR MANAGING DIRECTOR 212.460.0655 | deniroteam@elliman.com

#1 SALES TEAM AT DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE, 2010 & 2011


A Royal Estate of Affairs Celebrating the art of entertaining since 1919

Photo by Brett Matthews Photography

Estate & Gardens · Weddings & Celebrations · Guestrooms & Suites Bar & Restaurant · Historic Mansion Tours · Golf & Tennis On the Gold Coast of Long Island between New York City and The Hamptons 135 West Gate Drive · Huntington NY 11743 · 631-659-1400 www.oheka.com


HAMPTONS LUXURY LIVING Š2013 Douglas Elliman Real Estate. All material presented herein is intended for information purposes only. While, this information is believed to be correct, it is represented subject to errors, omissions, changes or withdrawal without notice. All property information, including, but not limited to square footage, room count, number of bedrooms and the school district in property listings are deemed reliable, but should be verified by your own attorney, architect or zoning expert. Equal Housing Opportunity.

THE DUCK POINT ESTATE

RARE WATERFRONT TROPHY ESTATE

Remsenberg | $9,950,000 | Classic, well-appointed, one-of-a-kind. The adjectives never end for this estate with waterviews from every angle. Sizable boat dock, Gunite pool with spa, and gardens make this the perfect address. Web# H54354. Enzo Morabito Team 516.695.3433

Southampton | $11,900,000 | Spectacular 10-acre waterfront estate on the highest point in Southampton. Completely renovated residence, the perfect secluded getaway on one of the largest parcels left. Web# H31856. Michaela Keszler, SVP 631.525.3810

SPECTACULAR OCEANFRONT OPPORTUNITY

OCEANFRONT WORK OF ART

Watermill | $8,500,000 | Perfect beach cottage with over 100 ft of ocean frontage. This 3-bedroom, 3-bath gem has been fully renovated with exquisite designer details throughout. Large open living room with views of Mecox Bay and private walkway to the ocean. Web# H29146. Lynda Packard, MBA/MA 631.204.2747

Westhampton Beach | $8,999,999 | Located on Dune road in between the bridges with 100 ft of ocean frontage. This home features open waterfront spaces, 6-bedrooms and right-of-way to the bay with dock access that holds up to a 20 ft boat. Web# H11049. Lynn November, VP 631.680.4111

NEW CONSTRUCTION WITH BAYVIEWS

BRIDGEHAMPTON SOUTH ESTATE

Watermill | $4,495,000 | This fantastic, new construction, Gambrel-style home features 7 bedrooms, 9 baths, formal dining room, great room, elevator, Gunite pool, pool house and tennis court. Web# H37544. Aaron Curti, VP 631.204.2744

Lockwood Manor | $8,250,000 | This gated 3.7 acre, 10,000 sf South-of-the-highway estate features 8 bedrooms, 8.5 baths, chef’s kitchen. Outdoor terraces overlook reserve, gardens and a 40 ft. Gunite pool. Room for Tennis. Web # H54681. Lori Barbaria, 516.702.5649 lbarbaria@elliman.com


A LANDMARK PROPERTY. A LANDMARK TRANSACTION. Cushman & Wakefield is proud to have represented 75 Plaza LLC in the 99-year, triple-net lease to RXR Realty at 75 Rockefeller Plaza, an iconic New York City landmark. A C&W team including Bruce Mosler, Chairman of Global Brokerage, Michael Rotchford, Executive Vice President, Corporate Finance & Investment Banking, Louis Wolfowitz, Executive Director, Corporate Finance & Investment Banking, and Helen Hwang, Executive Vice President, Investment Sales & Acquisitions, along with Arthur Mirante, formerly with Cushman & Wakefield, represented ownership in the transaction. We thank RXR Realty for its professionalism and commitment to New York, and 75 Plaza LLC for the confidence and trust in executing this assignment on their behalf.

www.cushmanwakefield.com


Experience Luxury. ONLY WITH US.

SOUTHAMPTON $18,250,000. WEB: 0055993 Southampton Brokerage, Pat Petrillo, Senior Global Real Estate Advisor, Associate Broker, 631.227.4916

EAST HAMPTON $14,900,000. WEB: 0036265 Bridgehampton Brokerage, Beate V. Moore, Senior Global Real Estate Advisor, Licensed Salesperson, 631.613.7316

®

southampton  $29,500,000. WEB: 0056135 Southampton Brokerage, Harald Grant, Senior Global Real Estate Advisor, Associate Broker, 631.227.4913

WATER MILL SOUTH $14,000,000. WEB: 0036809 Bridgehampton Brokerage, Beate V. Moore, Senior Global Real Estate Advisor, Licensed Salesperson, 631.613.7316

EAST HAMPTON $24,900,000. WEB: 0045139 East Hampton Brokerage, Ed Petrie, Senior Global Real Estate Advisor, Associate Broker, 631.907.8442/ Julie Wolfe, Licensed Salesperson, 631.907.8449

East Hampton $9,750,000. WEB: 0045836 East Hampton Brokerage, Ed Petrie, Senior Global Real Estate Advisor, Associate Broker, 631.907.8442 Julie Wolfe, Licensed Salesperson, 631.907.8449

bridgehampton

east hampton

sag harbor

southampton

631.537.6000

631.324.6000

631.725.6000

631.283.0600

Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Sotheby’s International Realty does not guarantee the accuracy of square footage or other information.

sothebyshomes.com/hamptons


Only Broker in the Hamptons to be Ranked Number One Nationally by The Wall Street Journal

Over One Billion Dollars Sold HARALD GRANT, Senior Global Real Estate Advisor, Associate Broker t. 631.227.4913 | c. 516.527.7712 I harald.grant@sothebyshomes.com SOUTHAMPTON BROKERAGE 50 Nugent St. | Southampton, NY 11968 | 631.283.0600 Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.

sothebyshomes.com/hamptons


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SAN FRANCISCO trailblazer

Aesop

a designing woman makes her mark

three style statements

“Coffee Bar in the Mission is the most minimalist space I’ve created so far. I can’t stand to have clutter or anything around me that doesn’t serve a particular function.”

Bay Area Shops, Bars and Eateries

4505 meats butcher shop

geremia: Molly DeCourdreaux; all other images courtesy

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auren Geremia designs interiors with the calm assurance of someone twice her age. A Bay Area talent in demand among tech companies (Asana, Rdio, Yousendit) and hip bars and restaurants (Coffee Bar, Umami, Churchill), she credits her studies at Rhode Island School of Design with instilling in her a strong work ethic. As evidenced by her sleek Emeryville home studio, she likes filling spaces with objects that are beautiful and functional. She’s proud to be part of a city with a vibrant creative community, and she often turns to other members for their expertise. Geremia admires designer Charles de Lisle (“for his impeccable eye”), gallerists Jessica Silverman and Eli Ridgway, and photographer Catherine Wagner. She dreams of someday creating spaces for businesses that touch the lives of many people —like a boutique hotel, a movie theater, even a bank or a pharmacy. Her recent jobs include a downtown building on Bryant Street, a forthcoming restaurant on Market Street, and a project with Danielle Fong of LightSail Energy in Berkeley (the two women were both on the Forbes list of “30 Under 30” innovators). Geremia has also worked with biotech firms, and she hopes to do more with health-care and science-related companies: She enjoys the challenge of devising office spaces that contain laboratories. In any case, the young designer’s future will undoubtedly be bright— her first lighting line launches next year. geremiadesign.com

“I am really proud of my design for the Citizen’s Band, a ‘fine diner’ in the South of Market neighborhood.”

1909 Mission Street 4505meats.com If you ever yearned to live in an era when every person had their own butcher, baker and candlestick maker, then Ryan Farr’s meat shop will fufill part of your fantasies. Shoppers can choose from local, pasture-raised, cutto-order steaks, terrines and cold cuts. Farr also occasionally offers his famous pork green chili and a delicious selection of hot dogs and sausages, including a ‘Zilla dog (bacon-studded hot dog with spicy chicharrones and Namu kimchi).

aesop

“I love being able to collaborate with my friends. For Yousendit SF, painter Jessica Niello created the paperplane installation, Anzfer Farms built the custom bar, and Ohio Design and Alexis Moran made the furniture.”

2450 Fillmore Street aesop.com The Aussie brand Aesop’s lightfilled, minimalist space (its first West Coast location) proudly showcases its wares on shelves crafted from repurposed-wood boxes. The hair, body and face products that this modern-day apothecary stocks are all packed

with antioxidants. Treat your skin to chamomile-, rosemary- and sandalwood-infused cleansers, toners and creams (its Moroccan Neroli Shaving Serum is a bestseller), and try out the company’s latest creation, the Parsley Seed Anti-Oxidant Hydrator with white tea and willow herb.

aggregate supply

806 Valencia Street aggregatesupplysf.com Magic can happen when friends come together. In the latest example of sensational synergy, home décor supplier Acacia, clothiers Turk+Taylor and natural skin care company Heliotrope have joined forces to create a Mission superstore. The brands’ shared love of locally made and sourced goods have turned this into a one-stop shop for green living. At Aggregate, you’ll find Heliotrope’s small-batch fragrant lotions, Turk+Taylor’s sustainable apparel, and Acacia’s striking, one-of-a-kind tables of reclaimed barn wood.

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Retail & restaurants


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Clockwise from top left: Nars’ 1970s glam summer makeup collection ($19 to $39); the dining room at M.Y. China; ravioli with oxtail, leeks and fava beans at Lungomare; riders enjoy a SoulCycle class.

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HELIOS BENCH

Galanter & Jones 715 Bryant Street galanterandjones.com Fog City dampness keeping you from enjoying your patio? The heated curves of the custom Helios bench ($4,900, available at Galanter & Jones) will ensure that you and your guests have a cozy alfresco fiesta. Made of cast stone, each lounge (which comfortably accommodates four) is handmade in San Francisco, and more than 20 color combinations are available.

lungomare

One Broadway, Jack London Square, Oakland lungomareoakland.com Lungomare means promenade in Italian, and it’s an apt name for this new waterfront restaurant that has a lovely outdoor patio to take in the bay views. Executive chef Craig DiFonzo has devised a Cinque Terre– inspired menu of coastal Italian seafood entrees and handmade pastas and pizzas. Before sitting down to dine, you can sip craft cocktails and custom beers (from Linden Street Brewery) in the spacious bar and lounge.

nars cosmetics

“Lungomare is an expression of our core values: Supporting local products and ingredients, and celebrating Oakland as a culinary destination,” owner Chris Pastena says.

M.Y. China

845 Market Street mychinasf.com Talk about playing with your food—at Martin Yan’s new restaurant, you can watch his chefs display the art of noodle pulling. You’ll enjoy their demonstration while you munch on juicy dumplings, crispy spring rolls, and, of course, the noodles in dishes like wild-boar scissor-cut noodles or beef hand-pulled noodle soup. The cocktail menu has its share of temptations, like Big Trouble in M.Y. China (a shot of Red Star er guo tou baijiu with Tsingtao beer), or Fire in the Wok (Azul tequila, lime juice, Fresno pepper, agave, club soda).

2050 Fillmore Street narscosmetics.com Cosmetic master François Nars, notorious for his cheekily named products—who can forget Orgasm or Barbarella?— has opened a sleek boutique in Lower Pacific Heights. The space stuns with snow-white walls, accented with flashes of black and high-gloss red (the same shade as his Jungle Red lipstick). Four makeup artists, trained by Nars, beautify customers with his products, including the 413 BLKR line created just for his shops. Don’t miss browsing through François’ Favorite Things, an eclectic mix of some of the books, photos and films that have inspired him over the years.

soulcycle

2095 Union Street and Marin Country Mart, Larkspur soul-cycle.com Fitness mavens Elizabeth Cutler and Julie West have taken their SoulCycle franchise west,

opening their first two Bay Area outposts (one in the Cow Hollow shopping district and another in the newly renovated Marin Country Mart). The cycling studio has become the obsession of celebs like Lady Gaga and Jake Gyllenhaal, who hammer the pedals for calorie-torching spin sessions led by fierce, self-affirming instructors and fueled by high-energy music. An expansion to northern California was inevitable for the brand. As co-founder Julie Rice explains, “Much like SoulCycle, San Francisco is a vibrant, energetic and joyful community.”

speakeasy tap room

1195 Evans Avenue goodbeer.com Motivated by its packed weekend happy hours, Bayview brewery Speakeasy Ales & Lagers has decided to open a space where they’re able to offer their brews all week long. The Taproom offers flagship beers Prohibition Ale, Big Daddy and Big Daddy I.P.A.,

NEW YORK

along with 10 other brews and an array of tasty snacks. True to its name, the dark and comfy spot, conceived and built by local artist and designer Kelly Maloney, has a speakeasystyle wooden door with a sliding peephole. If a round of drinks doesn’t quench your thirst, you can request a tour of the attached brewery or book the 30-seat tasting room for a private party.

trick dog

3010 20th Street trickdogbar.com This Mission bar is a design lover’s dream, from its bi-level interior—created by the Bon Vivants—that’s tricked out with colorful bar stools, iron banisters and found objects, to a cocktail menu that resembles a Pantone color guide. The drinks are named after actual Pantone shades like St. Elmo’s Fire (Flor de Cana rum, banana cordial, West Indies tincture, bitters) or Grandma’s Sweater (Beefeater 24 gin, Zucca Rabarbaro, blood orange and lime juices, mint, bitter lemon soda). The eats are just as memorable, and highlights include saltcod-wrapped Scotch eggs, excellent charcuterie and rectangular burgers cleverly served in hot dog buns.

more Bay area openings...

dujour.com/cities

m.y. china: hotel zetta; lungomare: Chris Pastena; all other images courtesy

CHICAGO

SAN FRANCISCO


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Time Teams

When you set your sights on a prestigious timepiece, selecting a watch dealer is as important as choosing a style. Considering you’re launching a partnership that will last for the lifetime of your watch, you want a boutique with expertise and a personal touch. You are picking a timepiece that could very well be passed on to future generations, so you need to preserve your investment. Here’s our guide to some of the best independent watch retailers found in our DuJour cities.

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Written by Rhonda Riche


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Time Teams

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Tick Talk

Panerai Luminor 1950 Marina 3 Days Automatic watch, price upon request, C.D. PEACOCK, cdpeacock.com.

We’ve picked some standout timepieces available from some of our favorite luxury watch salons.

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Breitling for Bentley Barnoto Racing chronograph watch, price upon request, KING JEWELERS, kings1912.com.

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Laurent Ferrier Galet Micro-Rotor watch, $46,500, MANFREDI JEWELS, manfredijewels.com.

Rolex Everose Gold Cosmograph Daytona watch, price upon request, MERIDIAN JEWELERS, meridianjewelers.com.

all images courtesy

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Backes & Strauss Piccadilly, price upon request, LEVINSON JEWELERS, levinsonjewelers.com.


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Time Teams

“We’re genuinely interested in where the client is from and their lifestyle because it helps us find the right watch for the customer.” ­—Robin Smith, Meridian Jewelers

C.D. PEACOCK Founded by Elijah Peacock

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Chicago’s oldest business, C.D. Peacock doesn’t rest on its history. The shop has built a reputation for innovative timepieces, which has only grown stronger over the centuries. In fact, it is the go-to destination for luxury watches in Chicago because of its selection and its trusted service center. And while C.D. Peacock has served everyone from Mary Todd Lincoln to Mick Jagger, its current clientele of renowned athletes and politicians has also come to rely on the retailer’s discretion: You wouldn’t want to turn up on the red carpet wearing the same Patek Philippe Reverso as your competition, would you? (Oakbrook Center and three other locations, 172 Oakbrook Center, Oak Brook, IL, 800-237-1837; cdpeacock.com) VITAL STATISTICS Established: 1837 Featured timepieces: 1837 Collection, Cartier,

Chanel, Corum, Hermès, Montblanc, Panerai, Patek Philippe, Rolex, Tag Heuer Specialties: Service and appraisals

KING JEWELERS Founded by Louis King

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Five generations of Kings have been supplying savvy collectors in Miami-Dade and Nashville with watches that stand the test of time. In its 101-year history, the store has sold important watches to VIPs like Babe Ruth and members of the Rat Pack. Buyers David and Jonathan King curate a selection of classic designs, limited-edition models and pieces made from precious metals. As one of the top appraisers in the state of Florida, Scott King knows which timepieces best hold their value. One of his greatest finds was an antique Chopard pocket watch, which King’s presented to Karl-Friedrich Scheufele, the president of Chopard, at Baselworld last year. John Omer, former president of Harry Winston, once said, “King Jewelers has the most exquisite collection of jewelry and fine Swiss timepieces that I have every seen under one roof.” (18265 Biscayne Blvd., Aventura, FL, 305-935-4900; kings1912.com)

VITAL STATISTICS Established: 1912 Featured timepieces: Bell & Ross, Breitling,

Breguet, Chopard, Chanel, DeWitt, Harry Winston, HYT, Jaeger-LeCoultre, JEANRICHARD, Montblanc, Roger Dubuis, Zenith Specialties: Estate timepieces and appraisals

LEVINSON JEWELERS Owned by Mark and Robin Levinson

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One of the country’s best-known independent jewelers, Levinson Jewelers draws clients from across the U.S. for its committed service and relationships with watch brands. Levinson’s connection with luxury vendors gives them a chance to bring something exciting to the store. For example, says Mark, “we are holding a special evening with Franck Muller, who will be introducing the 2013 collection in person.” In addition, sales staff and in-house, brandcertified watchmakers participate in ongoing training programs. With the growing popularity of vintage watches, says Levinson, a qualified watchmaker on-site is crucial for collectors who need to make sure parts used in repairs are accurate. (888 East Las Olas Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, FL, 954-462-8880; levinsonjewelers.com) VITAL STATISTICS Established: 1983 Featured timepieces: Backes & Strauss, Bedat

& Co., Bulgari, Corum, Franck Muller, Hermès, Jaeger-LeCoultre, TechnoMarine, Piaget, Pierre Kunz, Roger Dubuis, TW Steel Specialties: Limited-edition and estate watches,

online sales

MANFREDI JEWELS Owned by Roberto Chiappelloni

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Roberto Chiappelloni came to the world of watches as a collector, and he turned his passion into a business 25 years ago. Since he opened his Greenwich shop, he says, the excitement around timepieces has only grown. Clients now want to know everything about their investments— from details about complications to provenance of estate pieces. “It’s important to

keep the value and integrity of a watch,” he says, “which is why we have two watchmakers on the premises to authenticate, refurbish and provide full service.” A leader in bringing haute horology manufacturers to North America, Manfredi was the first Franck Muller retailer in the U.S. His watchmakers are encouraged to go out on the showroom floor to talk to clients about the timepieces. “We don’t just love the most recent creations,” adds Chiappelloni. “Vintage watches are a great way to buy a watch because they were made to last.” (121 Greenwich Ave., Greenwich, CT, 203-622-1414; manfredijewels.com) VITAL STATISTICS Established: 1988 Featured timepieces: Audemars Piguet, Blancpain,

F.P. Journe, Franck Muller, Girard-Perregaux, Greubel Forsey, IWC, Jaquet Droz, Maîtres du Temps, OMEGA, Parmigiani Fleurier, Richard Mille Specialties: Contemporary rareties, vintage watches

and one-of-a-kind pieces

MERIDIAN JEWELERS Owned by Robin and Kenny Smith

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Aspen is a laid back town, and Meridian Jewelers offers an appropriately relaxed atmosphere for shopping for fine jewelry and watches. “Our clients are on vacation and have more time to develop a relationship with us,” says co-owner Robin Smith. “What goes into creating a mechanical watch is amazing. That’s what justifies the expense in comparison to a quartz watch,” says Smith. “Our sales associates have been to Germany, Switzerland and all over the world to learn about jewelry and watches.” Meridian also offers aftersales service to protect your investment. Says Smith, “We want to sell you a watch that you’ll want to hold on to forever.” (525 East Cooper Ave., Aspen, CO, 970-925-3833; meridianjewelers.com) VITAL STATISTICS Established: 2003 Featured timepieces: A. Lange & Söhne, Cartier,

Harry Winston, Hermès, IWC, JaegerLeCoultre, Rolex SPECIALTIES: Selection and service


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Time Teams

“For questions, adjustments and service, or just to be wowed by the watches that customers are passionate about, a face-to-face relationship is key.” —Brent Seyler, Traditional Jewelers

TRADITIONAL JEWELERS Founded by Marion and Lula Halfacre

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When Marion and Lula Halfacre opened Traditional three decades ago, their mission was to bring luxe brands to Orange County so that the community wouldn’t have to travel far for exclusive watches. Traditional is now owned by independent chain Hyde Park, but the Halfacres’ commitment to community is still an important part of the business. According to store manager Brent Seyler, Traditional travels to international watch shows to select timepieces that reflect their customers’ sensibilities. They also offer an authorized, certified in-house technician and parts for many luxury watch brands. (203 Newport Center Dr., Newport Beach, CA, 949-721-9010; traditionaljewelers.com) VITAL STATISTICS Established: 1979 Featured timepieces: A. Lange & Söhne, Audemars

Piguet, Baume & Mercier, Bell & Ross, Breitling, Cartier, Chanel, IWC, Jaeger-LeCoultre, OMEGA, Panerai, Patek Philippe, Rolex, Tag Heuer Specialties: Selection, custom orders

WEMPE Founded by Gerhard Wempe

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Because Wempe has been in business since 1878 (a New York City store opened in 1981), the retailer holds long-established relationships with watch manufacturers, giving it access to the most desirable timepieces. Wempe’s bond with customers is even stronger. “We have five watchmakers right in the store,” says Ruediger Albers, president of the American Wempe Corporation. “I’m a master watchmaker myself, and I don’t hold a candle to these guys.” For example, he says, a customer came in with a minute repeater that wasn’t working. Wempe’s watchmaker had a look and fixed it with a quick adjustment the same day. “Otherwise, he’d have had to send

it to Switzerland and wouldn’t have seen it for several months.” Albers credits Hellmut Wempe, grandson of founder Gerhard, with cementing the store’s dedication to service. “He was a defender of the watchmaking tradition when everybody else was switching to quartz,” he says, “and we go to great lengths to honor that.” (700 Fifth Ave., New York City, 212-397-9000; wempe.com)

VITAL STATISTICS Established: 2012 Featured timepieces: Patek Philippe, Vacheron

Constantin, Panerai, Breguet, Blancpain, Harry Winston and A. Lange & Söhne Specialties: One of the largest offerings of Patek

Philippe, one-of-a-kind pieces from top brands

Well Established

VITAL STATISTICS Established: 1981 Featured timepieces: Audemars Piguet, Cartier,

Frédérique Constant, IWC, Jaeger-LeCoultre, Junghans, Panerai, Patek Philippe, Rolex, Tudor,

Boutique dealers are great, but national chains like Tourneau can also provide competitive selections of watches and first-rate service­—in convenient locations.

Vacheron Constantin, Wempe Specialties: Selection, in-store watchmakers Recommended watch: Limited-edition

Hellmut Wempe Chronograph

WYNN & COMPANY Founded by Steve Wynn

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The new kid on the block, Wynn & Company opened on the Las Vegas strip last year with a gamble: Instead of a traditional jewelry-store layout, the boutique presents the top luxury brands in a shop-inshop concept. They’ve also opened the first Rolex Experience store in North America. The motivation for this setup was to allow guests to “experience the DNA of the brand,” says Hedy Woodrow, senior vice president of Wynn Las Vegas and Encore. The layout encourages buyers to come in for a cup of coffee and a long conversation about watches. Another advantage is its selection of complicated timepieces for the ladies. “Women are becoming more sophisticated about movements,” says Woodrow. “It’s not just about styling.” Woodrow notes that Wynn & Company can also be the first point of contact for buyers if anything goes wrong. For Rolex customers, “we have a watchmaker in the store for service and to assist people who’ve already shopped with us so that the watches will last for generations.” (3131 Las Vegas Blvd., Las Vegas, NV, 888-320-7123; wynnlasvegas.com)

tourneau

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With over 8,000 styles and 100-plus brands, Tourneau will make watch enthusiasts feel like a kid in a candy store. In case the selection feels overwhelming, you can also go online to book a one-on-one consultation with a watch expert to help you choose the right watch for your wrist. Says senior vice president of retail Larry Barkley, “We help clients choose the right timepiece through an exploration of the brands we carry in each store. It is very important that we do not come off as pushy but as more of a knowledge source.” Another point of trust, says Barkley, is Tourneau’s relationship with its suppliers. “We are certified by most major brands to repair their timepieces.” While each store is equipped to perform minor service on timepieces, Tourneau also operates two of the largest timepiece repair centers of any retailer in the business— one in New York City and one in Las Vegas. (tourneau.com) VITAL STATISTICS Established: 1900 Locations: 35 stores across the U.S. Featured timepieces: Breitling, Breguet, Cartier,

IWC, Jaeger-LeCoultre, Movado, Panerai, Patek Philippe, Rado, Raymond Weil, Rolex, Tourneau, Vacheron Constantin


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Time Teams

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Patek Philippe Complications White Gold World Time Timepiece, price upon request, TRADITIONAL JEWELERS, traditionaljewelers.com.

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Wempe Chronometerwerke Glashütte i/SA, $8,500, WEMPE, wempe.com.

TNY Series 40 GMT Automatic, $5,900, TOURNEAU, tourneau.com.

A. Lange & Söhne Platinum Datograph Up/Down, $87,400, WYNN & COMPANY, wynnlasvegas.com.

Around the Clock

all images courtesy

Get your watch fix at any hour with these trusted online resources

Analog/Shift

A curated collection of certified, preowned watches (analogshift.com)

Antiquorum

This horology auction house offers online evaluations (antiquorum.com)

Hodinkee

Watch news and reviews, plus luxury strap and accessory sales (shop.hodinkee.com)

TimeZone

Brand forums, gossip and an online watch school (timezone.com)


FAMOUS LAST WORDS

Horror master Stephen King pens the most revealing sentences of his career—for our handwriting analyst

Look at the sharpness of the letter “n” in men and change. Angles like this signify intelligence and the tendency to say sharp things.

He uses the “t” in Stephen to strike out his own first and last name. That’s a classic act of self-negation and shows he’s self-critical; it’s often hard for him to relax.

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He has a unique, individualistic way of making a “g,” which is probably very different from what he was taught in school. This conveys a sense of defiance and rebellion.

King enters the lower zone with this “y,” but he abruptly stops his stroke. Stopping suddenly takes willpower and extra exertion; he is a hard worker who has great concentration.

The periods and the “i” dots are not hastily made slashes. Instead, King writes them carefully and slowly. He is extremely detail-conscious.

These are considered Greek “a”s; it’s a classic-looking letter and shows King’s cultural sensibilities.

He perfectly spaces his writing, indicating he’s sensitive to the impact he has on others. It also demonstrates that King has a strong visual sense.

“I

t’s smart, funny and insightful about the way men and women are,” says Stephen King, referring to Einstein’s quote, which he calls his favorite. “I think it encapsulates something that everybody feels about men and women.” W hen it comes to his 42-year mar riage to fel low w r it e r Tabit ha K i ng, he says, “I’ve changed a little bit, and she hasn’t changed a lot. My wife and I have reached a happy medium.” However, according to Toronto-based graphologist Annette Poizner, his handwriting doesn’t show much room for f lexibility. “There is a rigidity in his lettering which reveals perfectionism. It almost looks like a font that could have come out of a printer!” she says. “King

applies himself fully to what he takes on and maintains high standards right through to the end of every project.” At the moment, that project is Under the Dome, a TV adaptation of his 2009 novel, premiering June 24 on CBS. “I love the idea of people cut off from the world, trying to survive,” says King, also an executive producer on the 13-episode series. “It’s a chance to discuss the way resources run out and the environment gets polluted.” What’s surprising is that despite all of King’s success—he’s sold more than 350 million books, and his novels and stories have been turned into over 50 movies and TV shows and series—he’s concerned about how Dome will be received. “I hope

people like it,” he says. “I hope it will be a success.” Poizner notes that pessimism is present in his handwriting. “Look at the signature—the ‘King’ droops down below the line as if it’s falling,” she says. “A king is so noble, so strong, and yet here, he’s tumbling.” Still, the greatest message sent by the novelist’s handwriting is his unabashed individualism. “King often disconnects one letter from the next,” says Poizner. “In school, he must have been taught cursive, but like some writers, he defies the lessons of yesteryear rather than conform to norms. He does not bow to the consensus. He will decide for himself; he will do things his own way.”—LINDSAY SILBERMAN


e! lif g n rt i o p a s

Hermes.com


Summer 2013