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DUJOUR.COM

SEVEN DOLL ARS

FALL 2013

Ireland Basinger Baldwin By Bruce

Weber

THE NEW

NORMAL: MILLIONAIRE YOGIS

& TODDLER TYCOONS TV’S RICHEST STAR

JUDGE JUDY

MARRIED TO A PLASTIC SURGEON: THE WIVES BARE ALL!

DUJOUR .COM

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FALL’S ROMANTIC FASHION

DE NIRO WISDOM OF A WISE GUY

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C H I C A G O

B A L

H A R B O U R

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B O S T O N


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I N T R O D U C I N G

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4 MUSKETEERS CELEBRATE 80 YEARS OF TENNIS & STYLE

New York • Los Angeles • Miami • Las Vegas • Chicago Dallas • Houston • San Francisco • Honolulu Montreal • Toronto • Vancouver JOHN ISNER, 6 ATP titles – GUY FORGET, 3 Davis Cup titles – MATS WILANDER, 7 Grand Slam titles – GUSTAVO KUERTEN, 3 Grand Slam titles


I N T RO D U C I N G

OBJECTS OF CURIOSITY


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Left: Bridget Hall is ready for her close-up. Again. Shearling jacket, $5,498; Rollneck pullover, $1,198, RALPH LAUREN COLLECTION, ralphlauren.com. Small Tall hoop earrings, $150, WENDY NICHOL, 212-431-4171.

behind the scenes

Model behavior

S

ome of the greatest moments of the ’90s, as far as we’re concerned, took place within the world of modeling. Mark Wahlberg dropping trou for Calvin Klein. Stephanie Seymour in “November Rain.” Bridget Hall as the face of Versace. For much of that decade, in fact, Hall’s beauty was the epitome of American glamour, which is why brands like Versace, as well as Gucci, Ralph Lauren, Victoria’s Secret and Dior, all called on that face—and, let’s be honest, that body—to showcase their lines. After a few years out of the spotlight, Hall returns to fashion this season. We were thrilled to have the opportunity to photograph fall’s most exciting comeback in some of the season’s most romantic fashion. Hall spent much of her hiatus tucked away in her home on Long Island, kayaking daily. The bucolic East Hampton setting she knows so well, we thought, seemed an ideal backdrop for her first editorial shoot since 2010. She agreed. “It was casual and everyone was cool, so it was a nice way to come back,” she says. “It was also great to be close to home. Way better,” she adds with a laugh, “than making a 5 a .m. trip into Manhattan for a job!” With a series of new projects on the horizon, though, including a high-profile collaboration with Rag & Bone, those early call times may end up back on her schedule soon. Of course, if there’s anything we like just as much as a comeback, it’s a newcomer. While Ireland Bas-

Above: Ireland Baldwin, lost in reverie. Dress, $4,175, DOLCE & GABBANA, dolcegabbana.it. Micro-pavé-diamond stud earrings, $14,600, JACOB & CO., 212-719-5887. Stackable ring in 18-karat yellow gold with emeralds, $825, KWIAT, 212-725-7777. Right: A vintage Bruce Weber photo of Kim Basinger.

inger Baldwin has been in the public eye for most of her life, the daughter of headline-makers Alec Baldwin and Kim Basinger is no longer anyone’s little girl. Going on set with Br uce Weber is something of a family tradition for the 17-year-old, whose mother is a longtime favorite subject of the storied photographer, a frequent DuJour contributor. “I was honored!” Baldwin says of working with Weber. “Bruce was one of the nicest men I have ever met, and so professional.” Another job perk not to be underestimated: the handsome co-stars + more @ duJour.com Weber cast to pose alongside Baldwin. “I loved dancing with the professional bagpipe players,” she says of her photographic romp through the countryside. “And seeing all the male models in kilts!”

clockwise from top left: matthew kristall; bruce weber (2)

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DuJour seeks to discover the women behind the faces


800.929.Dior (3467) Dior.com

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contents STYLE

LIFE

ALL WRAPPED UP IN FENDI For 40 years, the fashion house has made cinematic history

50

BOLD FACE Large, men’s-inspired watches made for women

52

OPPOSITES ATTRACT Fall’s black-and-white accessories sport modern shapes and a graphic edge

54

RAISING SHELL Tortoiseshell frames; Schiaparelli’s revival; the art of peacocking; Max Irons and more

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FEELING USED What’s old is now more wanted than ever. Uncovering the ecstasy of high-end consignment shops—with no shame required

62

BUSY BODY Broncos star Eric Decker at Casa de Campo

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KYOTO, REFINED A Japanese city embraces luxe, modern living

76

THE FRENCH INVASION New York delivers classic charcuterie and duck à l’orange

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THE PRETERNATURALS Kids these days are big business—and worthy of a whole new social strata

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REMEMBRANCE OF THINGS PAST A Parisian apartment for the history books

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Take me home, Virginia

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PAGE 154

Sleeveless coat, $28,900; Short-sleeve pullover, $770; Skirt, $5,550; Belt, $940; Sandals, $1,775 HERMÈS, hermes.com. Sabbia 18-karat rose-gold and white-diamond pavé earrings, $7,300, POMELLATO, 800-254-6020. Labyrinth bracelet in 18-karat gold, price upon request, DAVID YURMAN, davidyurman.com. Knee High socks, $80, MARNI, saks.com.

THE BRIGHT STUFF Pearly whites are just the beginning

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MIND THE GAP Effortless ways to zap fat surge in popularity

98

FLIP THE BIRD Give boring, stay-put hair the swoosh

102

SCENT SET Fall fragrances bring enticing notes into the fold

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JASON SCHMIDT

BODY


Explore and Shop www.cartier.us - 1-800-cartier Š2012 Cartier


contents Eric Decker’s life

New dimensions

PA G E 7 3

PA G E 1 6 6

From top: Diva earrings in 18-karat white gold with diamonds, $48,600, BULGARI, bulgari.com. Lotus ring in platinum with diamonds, price upon request, HARRY WINSTON, 212-399-1000.

Thomas Mason button-down shirt, $148, J. CREW, jcrew.com. International HBR Explode shorts, $50, NIKE, nike.com. Sunglasses, $220, PERSOL, iloristyle.com. Subaqua Noma IV watch, $2,395, INVICTA, invictawatch.com.

CULTURE

TRACK STAR As a competitive race-car driver, actor Patrick Dempsey has entered a new ratings game

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BOOZE NEWS Barware gets an upgrade; Mexico’s first lady of tequila

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THE MANE EVENT Visiting the Hermès flagship while in Paris for famed jumping competition Le Saut

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TIME KEEPER One hundred rare watches began with a chance encounter

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THE OLD MAN & THE KEY Photographing Ernests at Florida’s 33rd Annual Hemingway Look-Alike Contest

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MASTERING MICHAEL SHEEN No subject is off-limits with the Welsh actor, next starring in Showtime’s Masters of Sex

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THE COMEBACK KIDS Treasured TV stars return to the small screen this season

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CANNES UP CLOSE Getting candid around the French Riviera with Ellen von Unwerth

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FEATURES

WORK POWER SEAT Never mind the toys. Acclaimed director Ron Howard’s L.A. office is where he gets serious

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THE DIVORCE WHISPERER Meet Laura Wasser, the lawyer on the front lines of front-page spills

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THE NEW BLING RINGS A breakdown of recent high-profile heists

124

ZEN, INCORPORATED Yoga makes an enlightened ascent into a higher tax bracket

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DE NIRO DEFINED The famously reserved actor Robert De Niro reveals what makes him tick. Finally, for once, he’s talking to you. By Anthony DeCurtis; photographed by Robbie Fimmano

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VA With former plantations and foxhunting in the fall, Middleburg, Virginia, exists as an oasis nearly untouched by time. By Lauren Waterman; photographed by Jason Schmidt

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SURREALITY The jewels you’re about to see are real—and have to be worn to be believed. Photographed by Jean-Pacôme Dedieu

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THE WIVES CLUB Being married to a plastic surgeon isn’t all free nips and tucks. Explore a world where imperfection isn’t an option. By Judith Newman; photographed by Alex John Beck

174

THE LUCK OF THE IRISH Ireland Basinger Baldwin heads to the countryside, encountering bagpipers, boxers and plenty of plaid along the way. Photographed by Bruce Weber

178

IN JUDY WE TRUST 190 Judge Judith Sheindlin found fame and fortune in an offbeat television courtroom, but her meteoric rise has been similarly unconventional. By Mickey Rapkin; photographed by James Day CHARACTER STUDY Taking inspiration from the season’s menswearinfluenced pieces, perennial beauty Bridget Hall plays the strong-and-silent type to perfection. Photographed by Matthew Kristall

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THE PECULIAR LIFE OF HUGUETTE CLARK Go behind the closed doors of the troubled heiress who lived in her own fairy tale. By Nina Burleigh

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On the cover: Suit, $1,895, POLO RALPH LAUREN, 212-6052100. Shirt, $345, GIORGIO ARMANI, 212-988-9191. Tie, $95, HUGO, hugoboss.com. Photographed by Robbie Fimmano; styled by Karen Kaiser.

RIGHT TO LEFT: CHRISTINE BLACKBURNE; KIRK EDWARDS

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PLAY

THE REVENGE OF ROBERT INDIANA Charting the comeback of the pop artist who abandoned the New York scene


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contents CITIES CHICAGO 210 A Windy City literary magazine; local tie companies; inspired arrivals in the hospitality realm DALLAS Picasso and Matisse masterpieces; Hublot and Maserati come to town; beauty buzz

212

HOUSTON 213 Custom suits for the sharp-dressed male; exotic-car rental; vintage cocktail recipes

From Indiana with love

PA G E 1 2 8

LAS VEGAS 217 The latest luxury showrooms; new eats at Mandalay Bay; decadent, upscale buffets LOS ANGELES 221 Ink.sack helps refresh LAX; Rao’s hits the city; a cult juicer opens in Silver Lake

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MIAMI 225 Hot spots for fashion and hospitality; 18-karat-gold statement pieces; high-rise fever THE IN CROWD 228 A Beverly Hills gala; Hermès parties in Miami; Dior meets Demarchelier in Orange County; Binn around the Hamptons and New York

Classic swoosh

PA G E 1 0 2

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HAMPTONS 241 Dine at the Gatsby-worthy Oheka Castle; off-season Hamptons retreats TRI-STATE 242 Where to stay, shop, and eat in Beacon; Jersey eats, including sandwiches and farm-to-table fare ORANGE COUNTY 243 Three do-gooding options, from an elephant parade to a shoe movement to a sports facility

How to peacock

PA G E 6 0

SAN FRANCISCO 244 Portable vaporizers; an indie auteur’s film favorites; bar and restaurant openings of note

BACK PAGE

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FAMOUS LAST WORDS Reverend Al Sharpton is known for saying exactly what’s on his mind. Here, even his handwriting speaks volumes

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TOP TO BOTTOM: PAUL KASMIN, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND PAUL KASMIN GALLERY; GETTY IMAGES (2)

NEW YORK Three new faraway perfumes; astrological pendants; Cipriani expands its legacy


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Behind duJour

Family, FRiends & Partners

Jason BInn

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T

he traditional gift for a first anniversary is made of paper, but when it comes to DuJour—a year old with this issue—paper is just the beginning. When DuJour launched, the concept involved not only a quarterly print magazine that revealed unique, untold stories, but also a seamlessly integrated digital product that reached the same coveted high-net-worth readers on their computers, tablets and smartphones. I’ve got to tell you: The plan worked. Content is Photo by Bruce Weber at king and our fearless team of editors has the photographer’s home in Golden Beach, Florida proved it. Since that first issue—featuring a stunning cover with one of the most admired supermodels in the history of fashion, Christy Turlington Burns, shot by Bruce our staff and management, investors or readWeber, who has been a consistent contributor— ers who’ve let us know how much they love the we’ve become known for smart, compelling con- product by sharing it with friends or engaging us via our always-buzzing social-media channels. tent, no matter the platform. In an age when it’s all about how much cover- It’s impossible to overstate how appreciative we age you get, what we’ve done hasn’t gone unno- are, considering we all made a leap of faith with ticed. With a print and digital circulation of over this business model, which has carved out a spe2.4 million, and over 2 billion press impressions cial place for advertisers to market their brands to date, DuJour has been featured in prestigious and businesses. I’m especially grateful to Kevin media outlets such as the New York Times, the Ryan, chairman and founder of Gilt, co-founder Wall Street Journal and Women’s Wear Daily, of 10gen/MongoDB and chairman of the Business as well as on Today, Extra and the Fox Business Insider, and James Cohen, president and CEO of Network. We’ve won awards, including a Webby Hudson Media and owner/member of the board (the Oscars of the Internet) for Best Home/Wel- of directors of Dufry AG, for believing in me come Page. (We were also honored—out of over and helping create a modern-day media hybrid in 11,000 applicants from around the world—for these competitive, challenging times. It’s been an exciting year. What started out Best Online Navigation and Structure.) Additionally, min, the media-industry newsletter, named as four people in a conference room has grown us one of the hottest websites to launch this year. into a thriving 60-person staff. And I am proud To think, in just 12 months, our coverage of to say ou r revenue percentages are up in the fashion, politics, culture, business and travel has double digits. So happy anniversary from everyone at Dubeen captured by amazing writers and the world’s most recognized photographers and has, in turn, Jour. What you’re looking at now may be paper, attracted unparalleled talent. In addition to this but you can visit DuJour.com (or follow us on issue’s cover, an interview with Robert De Niro, Twitter, Facebook or Instagram) to view the full we’ve featured in our digital issues top talent, scope of what we have to offer. Make sure to look including Carla Bruni, Victor Cruz, Nicole Richie out for our new app, launching this month. I’m and Diane Kruger. It’s clear that DuJour is at- confident you’ll find it to be an exciting, one-ofa-kind experience. tracting the best of the best in every way. No matter how you read us, thanks for your This is especially true of the people who’ve supported us, whether press, advertisers who’ve suppor t. Du Jour has been a great success on shared our vision and become marketing partners, paper and beyond.

“It’s rare to be part of a launch,” Kevin Ryan shares. “My hopes were that readers would love the product and advertisers would be supportive. Both have happened.” James Cohen is similarly

Jason Binn (center), with Kevin Ryan (left) and James Cohen. Where it all began, in February 2012

pleased, saying, “DuJour has achieved all of my expectations creating a new media-hybrid business model and has received great acclaim from across the media industry. My wife Lisa and I are proud to be partners with Jason, engaging his vision for DuJour.”

“I couldn’t do it without my family, including my in-laws—at times, outlaws—my wife, Haley, and our three children,” says Binn. “I feel like I’m in a Ralph Lauren campaign.”

Family portrait: leshem loft

Letter from the cEO


CARA DELEVINGNE “LOVE NY” by CURTIS KULIG @ DKNY.com Uptown 655 Madison Ave. 212.223.3569 Flatiron 168 Fifth Ave. 212.989.3438 Downtown 420 W. Broadway 646.613.1100


ALBERT KRIEMLER BWR’s Leslie Sloane

“TEEKAY TKTZelnik TKT TK” & Cory

co-ceos co-ceosCarlos CarlosAlberini Alberini& &Gary GaryFriedman Fried“restoration man hardware’s “restoration dreamhardware’s team”

Shauna Brook

Behind the velvet rope

BINN Shots

Follow on Twitter @JasonBinn with Vince, john & chris camuto at villa marie

“family first for vince camuto”

scott campbell, richard phillips, Tommy Hilfiger & lola montes schnabel “surfing, anyone ? ”

36

Benjamin & K athryn Jankowski “A master of transactions” # mastercard

ron frasch

Ari Hoffman & Carlo Tunioli “Benetton’s a-team”

“the hardest working man in the biz”

john horan, tony brand, stephen strick, marcia levine, Susan silver, john demsey, alina cho, cornelia guest & bibi monnahan “happy birthday, mr. demsey!”

At Milos with my dear friends, birthday girl Melissa Pordy and Richard Lefowitz

Etro’s Marco Pievani

Tom Bernard and Michael Barker “SOny + classic = sony classics”

Franco Campesato & Venanzio Ciampa “making the rounds in basel”

Denise De Luca, Fern Mallis & Jean zimmerman “ladies of style and substance”

Bruce Mosler “a commercial kingpin”

Team OZ: Keith Bloomfield, Mark Mullet, Daphne Oz, Lisa Oz, Dr. mehmet Oz

handpicked

Marshall Heyman Adina Kagan Alex Drexler Allison Hodge Ama Gordon Andrea Soriani Andrew Sasson Ari Hoffman Bob Westenberg Brent Lamberti Brian Henke Brian Kilmeade Brian Robinson Cecilia Dean Christina Sarganis Christine lacuzzo Chuck Townsend Cliff Fleiser Colleen Rizzo Cori Galpern Courtney Flint Crissy Barker Dario Parrilla David Levy Debbie Daniels Denise Incandela Ed Scheetz Faarah Grande Franck Muller Frank Cooper Graham Head Guglielmo Melegari Guillaume Pottecher Guillermo Suescum Guy Ben Zion Hanna Struever Izak Senbahar Jackie Hall James Fallon Jared Posner Jason Trubowitz Jason Weisenfeld Jay Penske Jeff Hirsch Jenne Lombardo Jennifer & James Esposito Jesse Cole Johanan Merino

with Jayma Cardoso “she’s always up for a tango” # surflodge

Michelle peluso “gilt’s fearless leader”

David Strom “a man who wears many hats seamlessly” # LVMH

Jason Weisenfeld & Niki del bene “they’ll take the coach”

Mallory Andrew, deb cavanaugh & Emily lorhman # moroccanoil #anntaylor  # bergdorfgoodman

Guy forestier-walker “mr. cyberspace”

Henri Barguirdjian & kirk posmantur “it’s all about jewels and Axcess”

Trent Fraser & Colin Cowie “always up for a toast”

carolina herrera’s Caroline Brown “tres chic”


Bryan Johnson & isaia’s Jim Shay

neil cole “a true icon (ix)”

with Charlie Walk & Ken Pilot “the trifecta”

roberto cavalli’s Jeff Weinstock, Josiane Goerl & Cristiano Mancin

Rebecca Minkoff

“the design genius is always trying new things”

BINN Shots

Follow on Twitter @JasonBinn Marshall Heyman “always one scoop ahead” # WSJ

Mark Brashear & Ward Simmons “hugo boss’ @ lordward”

John amato “billboard magazine’s leader”

ori zemer #alorwatches

blue flame’s ericka pittman = activation

38

with maserati’s jiannina castro, jeffrey ehoodin & andrea soriani “always on the road”

Eyal & Abraham lalo “like father, like son” # invicta

with Jacob Arabo (left) & partner Chris Del Gatto

montblanc’s president and ceo Jan-patrick schmitz & melanie griffitH

rohan oza “no introduction needed”

Emily coppock “lacoste lover”

Denise Incandela “always connecting dots” # saks

James Cohen “when he says ‘jump,’ i say, ‘how high ? ’”

Jane Hudis “never misses a beat”

Susan Anthony “Can’t get enough of david webb”

Richard Gellman, Hratch Kaprielian, Andrew Turrin & Michael Sandler “franck mueller comes to town & tourneau was in the thick of it” american media’s David Pecker

Sarrah candee “it’s all smiles and style at isaia”

James Mullaney & susan rutenberg “furla first”

Roger Ailes “sees fox run”

Jon Singer Jory Wood Syed J.P. Geoghegan Kate Betts Kim Walker Krista Florian Larry Altschul Lauren Kucerak Lauren Wrublin Laurice Rahme Lisa Hawkins Lizzie Grubman Lottie Oakley Louise Camuto Marc Berger Maria Tiu Massimo Caronna Matt Norman Melanie Hughes Melissa Beste Michael Daniels Michael Weaver Michelle Peluso Natasha Cornstein Nicki Berlyn Katz Niki Del Bene Pamela Baxter Pat Beh Werblin Pat Malone Paul Blum Peter Bonell Rachel Branch Richard Ash Richard Fields Rob Goldberg Rob Wiesenthal Robert S. Cohen Robert Schienberg Robin Paige Santé D’Orazio Scott Sartiano Shaul Nakash Shawn Sachs Steve Birkhold Tim Crout Thomas Venables Tracy Haffner Vincent Panzanella

Jhanvi shah & samantha lee

“elit by stolichnaya, anyone? ”

James C. Cox Jr. & Nicole oge #townresidential

Matt Norman and Kristie Busch “an eligible bachelor no more. he hit the jackpot! vegas, baby!”

Univeral Music ceo lucian grainge, liontree’s aryeh bourkoff & l.a. reid at Olivia Rebecca Bourkoff’s bat mitzvah at the bridgehampton tennis and surf club

dottie herman “it’s all about location”

Thierry Prissert “up, up and away” # breitling

Reed Krakoff

“a man with a plan”

Susan duffy & Jacqueline giusti “shoes, shoes and more Shoes”


A MOMENT WITH THE EDITORS

THOUGHTS DUJOUR for that. Between takes in a suite at the Greenwich Hotel, De Niro called down to the restaurant below, which he owns, and asked someone to bring up a

PAGE 178

glass of the best red in the house. As he sipped a Montepulciano and considered a heaping plate of

40

PA G E 1 5 4

K

EITH POLLOCK:

roast chicken at 11 A . M ., dressed in all his Brunello It’s not quite our style to pat

ourselves on the back—although the pre-tween social-media sensations in our “Preternaturals”

relaxed and most animated. This is a man who knows how to enjoy life.

portfolio on page 82 would have a thing or two to say

KP:

Character came up again in “VA,” a fashion story

about the benefits of self-promotion—but even we

shot in the Virginia countryside, for which photogra-

have to admit sometimes that making a magazine is

pher Jason Schmidt cast our model as the center of

no small feat. And that, well, Nicole and I do a pretty

a grand family reunion. Another highlight, “The Old

good job of it. Of course, we have plenty of

Man & the Key,” a photo essay about an annual look-

help from a team of talented, ambitious and

alike contest held in Key West, celebrates a collection

exceedingly devoted editors and writers who

of men who all aspire to emulate a singular character:

work many hours a week to make sure that

Ernest Hemingway. For our back page, the Reverend

we identify the subjects we want to cover and

Al Sharpton, perhaps one of modern American cul-

the stories we want to tell—and then go out

ture’s most dynamic personalities, talks about finding

and make it all happen.

purpose in life. You might think that Patrick Dempsey

NI C O L E V E C C H I A R E L L I :

is in character in the opening spread of automotive This summer, we spent

a lot of time talking about the art of making

column “Track Star.” He’s not: In real life, the actor doubles as a race-car driver—seriously.

things happen. Just because you have a great

NV: Keith and I also had the idea to approach photog-

idea, or a connection to a person or place,

rapher Bruce Weber about teaming up with Ireland

doesn’t mean it’ll necessarily make a great

Basinger Baldwin, the 17-year-old daughter of Alec

story. You have to ask: What’s the hook?

Baldwin and Kim Basinger, for a fall fashion story that

Who’s the star? What or who is the main

celebrated the luck of the Irish. Weber could not have

character? Why do we care?

been more into the idea, pulling together a shoot in

KP : Using this lens, the fall issue came

PAGE 148

Cucinelli finery, we saw De Niro at both his most

his usual no-holds-barred manner, enlisting boxers, ex-cops, authentic Irish-American bagpipers and more

together along the theme of character. Our

kilts than you’ve ever seen in a fashion spread to bring

culture tends to think of characters as those

into existence a most magnificent world.

who have a strong or otherwise unforgettable per-

KP:

sonality. Maybe they’re a little “out there.” But there

we read in contributor Mickey Rapkin’s profile of the

are other qualities that align to create a memorable

inimitable Judge Judy Sheindlin, the Judy we see on

person—or place, or thing, because things can be

television is most definitely not a character—that’s

characters too. We see this, for example, in “All

her. In this way, through her life and her astonish-

Wrapped Up in Fendi,” which explores the fashion

ingly successful career, Sheindlin shows us that

house’s longtime relationship with cinema. In that

unwavering authenticity may be the most powerful

case, the clothes become characters.

character trait of all.

NV: This issue has quite an extensive cast of characters

for sure, but we had a specific star in mind from the beginning. Keith and I spent a lot of time plotting how we might persuade Robert De Niro to agree to be the very first man on the cover of DuJour’s print edition. Turns out, it wasn’t that difficult to make our case: We were thrilled, and humbled, to learn that he is a fan of ours as well. We think Robbie Fimmano’s photographs show a different side of the De Niro everyone thinks they know, and we have the actor himself to thank

And sometimes character is simply inherent. As

COUNTER CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: BRUCE WEBER; JASON SCHMIDT; ROBBIE FIMMANO; THOMAS WHITESIDE

Above: Ireland Basinger Baldwin in Bebe, Lorry Newhouse and Band of Outsiders. Middle: Model wears Prada. Bottom: Robert De Niro in Brunello Cucinelli.


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Co-Editor in Chief Keith Pollock

Co-Editor in Chief Nicole Vecchiarelli

Chief Revenue Officer Alan Katz

Sales

Art Director Stephanie Jones

Executive Directors Cat Dewling Gayle Perry Sobel Ron Stern Phil Witt Erik Yates Sylvie Durlach, S&R Media (France) Susy Scott (Italy)

Executive Editor Nancy Bilyeau Editor at Large Alyssa Giacobbe

Features Deputy Editors Daryl Chen (Features), Natasha Wolff (Cities)

Project Manager Isabelle McTwigan

Articles Editor Adam Rathe

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*

DuJour (ISSN 2328-8868) is published four times a year by DuJour Media Group, LLC., 2 Park Avenue, NYC 10016, 212-683-5687. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. The publishers and editors are not responsible for unsolicited material and it will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication subject to DuJour magazine’s right to edit. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, photographs and drawings. Copyright © 2013 DuJour Media Group, LLC. For a subscription to DuJour magazine, go to subscribe.dujour.com, call 954-653-3922 or e-mail duj@themagstore.com.


contributors

Getting to know some of the talent behind this issue—lunch order and all

HENRY HARGREAVES

photographer, “the old man & the key,” p. 132 Soup DuJour: Cauliflower The Annual Ernest Hemingway Look-Alike Contest sounded so intriguing, photographer Henry Hargreaves headed to Key West to experience it himself. Twenty-two contestants agreed to be photographed for his story. “It was a real cross section of society,” he says. “There were people from all over the world, brought together not by education or socioeconomic background, but because they look just like Hemingway. It was awesome.” Hargreaves’ exhibit “No Seconds—Comfort Food e Fotografia” opens in Venice, Italy, on September 7.

writer, “kyoto, refined,” p. 76, “Mastering Michael Sheen,” p. 134, “Famous Last Words,” p. 256 Soup DuJour: Chicken Tortilla “One minute I was having drinks with a geisha in Kyoto, and the next I was talking to Al Sharpton about his brush with death,” says DuJour staff writer Lindsay Silberman. She also sat down with Michael Sheen to discuss the “uncomfortable” moments that transpired while filming his risqué TV series Masters of Sex. Silberman, who’s previously written for GQ, Men’s Fitness and Playboy, says the subject matter she covered was “arguably the most random—and fascinating— since DuJour’s launch. I wouldn’t have it any other way.”

RObbie fimmano

photographer, “de Niro Defined,” p. 148 Soup DuJour: Lentil Soup with Pasta Photographer Robbie Fimmano had a sense of familiarity with his subject, Robert De Niro, right off the bat. “When I first saw him, he reminded me of my father,” Fimmano says. “I wasn’t nervous about shooting him. For me, it’s exciting to meet someone of that caliber, when you consider all the films he’s done and the history he has in the industry.” Fimmano, whose editorials have appeared in Interview and Details, recalls the most memorable moment of the shoot: “After we wrapped, De Niro patted me on the back and said, ‘Good job.’ ”

Lauren waterman

writer, “vA,” p. 154 Soup DuJour: Miso Lauren Waterman has a particular affinity for Virginia—she grew up an hour from Middleburg (where our story was shot) and attended UVA. “It’s unspeakably beautiful and peaceful there,” says Waterman, who currently lives in Brooklyn. “It’s great when you plug into what’s going on locally. One time I ended up at a Civil War reenactment—they recreate a specific battle and the outfits are exact replicas. These people are committed!” Waterman is a freelance writer whose work has appeared in Vogue, Details and New York magazine.

*du jour [doo zhoor] adjective [from French: of the day] Example: What is your soup du jour?

from top: Hargreaves: Brandon Schulman. silberman: JANE KIM. WATERMAN: Dan Eckstein.

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Lindsay Silberman


MOëT & ChANDON ® ChAMpAGNE, © 2013 IMpORTED BY MOëT hENNESSY USA, INC., NEw YORK, NY. CELEBRATE RESpONSIBLY - DOMpERIGNON.COM

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deborah watson

stylist, “the luck of the irish,” p. 178 Soup DuJour: Butternut Squash “He really has this way of transporting everyone to a magical place,” stylist Deborah Watson says of working with photographer Bruce Weber, her friend of 22 years. “I have fun taking that vision and making the clothes become a part of it.” For Watson, choosing the clothes—a selection of plaid, tweed and floral prints— for Ireland Baldwin and the Irish theme was easy. The hard part? “We shot these heavy pieces out in Montauk during the heat wave! But Ireland and the guys with bagpipes were troopers,” says Watson, who’s styled editorials for W, Vanity Fair and French Vogue.

jason schmidt

tyler spangler

designer, “opposites attract,” p. 54, “Raising shell,” p. 58 Soup DuJour: Clam Chowder Until a few months ago, graphic designer Tyler Spangler was working full-time at a surfboard shop in Southern California. “I went to art school for a year, but I got really bored of designing corporate logos. So I dropped out.” Now, with the help of social media, his career is exploding. In fact, we first discovered Spangler on Instagram. “A few years ago I started posting designs on my Tumblr page. People reblogged my work and eventually it spread like crazy,” he says. Spangler describes his style—seen in our story on black-andwhite accessories—as “desconstructivist.”

judith newman

writer, “the wives club,” p. 174 Soup DuJour: Matzoh Ball When freelance writer Judith Newman sat down with the wives of high-profile plastic surgeons, she found the women to be surprisingly candid about their own procedures. “In a way, it’s their duty to be open about surgery because it’s good advertising—they want the word of mouth for their husbands,” says Newman, whose work has appeared in the New York Times, Newsweek and Vanity Fair. “I personally couldn’t imagine being married to a plastic surgeon. It’s frightening to me. I would be way too self-conscious.”

*du jour [doo zhoor] adjective [from French: of the day] Example: What is your soup du jour?

from top: WATSON: Stewart Shining. SPANGLER: TYLER SPANGLER. NEWMAN: Laurie Lewis.

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PHOTOGRAPHER, “va,” p. 154 Soup DuJour: Gazpacho “Middleburg was a five hour drive from New York, but it felt like another world. It harkens back to another era,” says photographer Jason Schmidt of the subdued yet regal region. He was most impressed by the Piedmont Hunt—America’s oldest foxhunting club—and its current huntsman, a former Marine named Spencer Allen, whom he shot among his hounds. “He recognizes the voice and distinct bark of each one of his 98 hounds. I’d love to go back on a hunt with that guy,” he says. Schmidt’s work has been featured in the New Yorker, V and Harper’s Bazaar.


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1| Mink coat worn by Madonna in Evita 2| Mink coat worn by Gwyneth Paltrow in The Royal Tenenbaums 3| Pergamena vintage luggage set featured in Mahogany with Diana Ross 4| Ermine cape worn by Teresa Stratas in La traviata 5| Red fox cape worn by Halle Berry in Die Another Day 6| Shearling-and-goat cape worn by Jessica Lange in Titus 7| Mink coat worn by Marisa Berenson in Io sono l’amore (I Am Love)

Kinmonth Monfreda also designed two shows for the Metropolitan Museum’s Costume Institute: Dangerous Liaisons in 2004 and Anglomania in 2006.


all wrapped up in fendi

For 40 years, the fashion house has made cinematic history. Harriet Mays Powell takes a peek. PHOTOGRAPHED by alessandro dobici

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“fellini, in particular, was very close to the fendi sisters.”

Among Silvia Fendi’s favorite furs is Silvana Mangano’s silk raincoat lined in sable: “It was unheard of to conceal fur on the inside of a garment.”

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f you’ve ever seen a fur coat in a movie, chances are it was made by Fendi. The famous Italian luxury-goods company has a history of collaboration with the cinema that dates back to the 1970s, a time when Rome’s Cinecittà studio was known as Hollywood on the Tiber. This heritage will be marked in September by a month-long exhibition, “Making Dreams—Fendi and Cinema,” at Milan’s historic Teatro Manzoni (timed to coincide with Milan fashion week), detailing Fendi’s involvement with the gilded world of Italian cinema. Beginning in the 1960s, premier designers such as Piero Tosi and Umberto Tirelli would haunt the Fendi workshop on Rome’s Via Borgognona, and through them the five sisters met directors like Luchino Visconti, Federico Fellini and Mauro Bolognini. As Silvia Fendi, the firm’s current creative director of accessories and menswear, recalls: “At that time, everything used to start with relationships, rather than a marketing strategy. My mother was great friends with designers, actors and directors. They used to go out for dinner together and talk informally about projects and ideas.” Fellini, in particular, was very close to the Fendi sisters, giving them the nickname le mie Fendine (my little Fendis). He was a passionate fan and often talked about a historic fashion show that Fendi staged in Cinecittà’s studio five. Notable examples of Fendi’s contribution to cinema span genres and decades, ranging from the ermine cape worn by Teresa Stratas in La traviata to Madonna’s mink coat in Evita (an exact replica of the original Fendi owned by Evita Perón) to Halle Berry’s red fox cape in the James Bond movie Die Another Day. “There is a kind of poetic symbiosis between the arts of making cinema and making fur. Both involve cutting, splicing, editing, reassembling,” says Patrick Kinmonth, who designed the exhibition with Antonio Monfreda through their internationally renowned design firm, Kinmonth Monfreda, whose work includes the stunning 50th-anniversary retrospective Valentino: Master of Couture, staged at London’s Somerset House in 2012. He and Monfreda have constructed this exhibition across seven separate modules, one of which will show a film of the craftsmanship involved in the creation of a Fendi fur. Other modules will display desig n sketches, a selection of furs and accessor ies created for movies and a documentary featuring interviews with Tosi and legendary director Bernardo Bertolucci. The centerpiece, however, will be a restored version of Visconti’s 1974 movie Gruppo di famiglia in un interno (Conversation Piece), starring Burt Lancaster and Silvana Mangano, for which Fendi did the costuming. As Tosi recalls, “Mangano’s role was that of a wealthy f lamboyant woman, a woman who likes to f launt her wealth. I thought of the Fendi sisters. Visconti said, ‘Absolutely perfect. The important thing is for Silvana to agree as well.’ ” Mangano traveled to Rome to see Fendi’s haute-couture show. As Carla Fendi, one of the five original sisters and today honorary chairwoman of the label, recalls: “It was a triumph. She said, ‘I don’t just want to wear all the Fendi furs: I want their blouses, accessories, pants. I want everything.’ ”


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Clockwise from top left: Ronde watch, price upon request, FRANCK MULLER, franckmuller. com. Star Classique Lady Automatic, $5,400, MONTBLANC, 973-258-9277. Grande Reverso Lady Ultra Thin Duetto Duo, $12,100, JAEGER-LECOULTRE, jaeger-lecoultre. com. LadyCat Royal Oak Offshore Chronograph, $30,700, AUDEMARS PIGUET, audemarspiguet.com. Classic Fusion Chronograph, $13,100, HUBLOT, hublot.com. Transocean Chronograph 38mm, $6,350, BREITLING, Wempe Jewelers, 212-397-9000.

TIMEPIECES

BOLD FACE

Large, men’s-inspired watches made for women? It’s about time.

HAND MODEL: MELISSA JACKSON AT PARTS MODELS

PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHRISTINE BLACKBURNE

The first true wristwatch was a diamond-set case-concealed dial timepiece created for the Countess Koscowicz of Hungary by Patek Philippe in 1868.


MAXMARA.COM 1.866.MAXMARA

BeveRly Hills BOstOn CHiCAgO HOustOn MAnHAsset nAPles new yORk nORtHBROOk PAlM BeACH PAlO AltO sAn DiegO sAn FRAnCisCO sCOttsDAle sHORt Hills sOutH COAst PlAzA tOROntO tROy tysOns gAlleRiA vAnCOuveR wAikiki


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From left: Booties, $875, ROGER VIVIER, 212-861-5371. Pumps, $540, CH CAROLINA HERRERA, 212-744-2076. Lipid boots, $485, STUART WEITZMAN, 212-750-2555. Ankle Cuff sandals, $1,095, REED KRAKOFF, reedkrakoff.com.

opposites attract on trend

Fall’s black-and-white accessories sport modern shapes and a graphic edge Art by Tyler Spangler


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“All colors are the friends of their neighbors and the lovers of their opposites.”

From top: BabyGraff Trilogy Collection emerald-shaped diamond watch, price upon request, GRAFF, 212-355-9292. Celtic Noir earrings in 18-karat white gold with stainless-steel nautical cable and diamonds, $1,095, CHARRIOL USA EXCLUSIVELY BY ALOR, charriolusa. com. Maillon handbag, $1,895, BALENCIAGA, Bergdorf Goodman, 888-774-2424. (Left) Sella bag, $2,665, TOD’S, tods.com. (Right) Bag, $1,815, VIONNET, vionnet.com.

flower hat image: Getty

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–Marc Chagall


New York BeverlY Hills BeverlY CeNTer HousToN Galleria THe Palazzo ala MoaNa CeNTer asPeN BellaGio CiTYCeNTer Caesars PalaCe Bal HarBour aMeriCaNa MaNHasseT leNoX sQuare sHorT Hills souTH CoasT Plaza roYal HawaiiaN sHoPPiNG CeNTer 1800 336 3469 FeNDi.CoM


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RAISING SHELL TREND WATCH

The bright days of summer are behind us, but good sunglasses never go out of style. This season, invest in a smart-looking pair of tortoiseshell shades to up your frame game and see things in a whole new way. ART BY TYLER SPANGLER

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From left: Sunglasses, $480, BOTTEGA VENETA, bottegaveneta.com. Bold 2 sunglasses, $325, SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE, solsticesunglasses.com. Aviator sunglasses, $355, GIVENCHY, MesmerEyes, 702-731-0300. Sunglasses, $380, ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA, MesmerEyes. Sunglasses, $195, CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION, marchon.com.

HIGH STYLE

esigner Christian Lacroix has revived the house of Schiaparelli with a oneoff collection that brings Elsa’s eccentric aesthetic to the modern age and his own extraordinary talent back into the spotlight. Inspired by some of Schiaparelli’s favorite carnival fairs in Paris, the 18look couture collection was shown in the Pavillon de Flore of the Arts Décoratifs museum. And though the clothes will not be for sale, they’re the first of many artistically driven projects aimed at breathing new life into the Schiaparelli label and marking a new trajectory for the iconic fashion name. —BROOKE BOBB

Elsa Schiaparelli was so self-conscious that she once planted flower seeds in her ears, mouth and nose in hopes that she would blossom beautifully.

COUTURE: SARAH AUBEL

D

COUTURE COMEBACK


www.brunellocucinelli.com

877 3308100

Our fathers have told us


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Donegal Cable Crew sweater, $98, PERRY ELLIS, perryellis.com. Suit, $3,395, ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA, zegna.com. Carrera 39mm Automatic watch, $2,800, TAG HEUER, tagheuer.com. Ragg sock, $19, L.L. BEAN, llbean. com. Samba sneakers, $65, ADIDAS, adidas.com.

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FEARLESS FASHION

TURNING HEADS

Mastering the art of peacocking is no easy feat—pile on the eccentric accessories and you’ll risk looking like a sideshow act rather than a street-style star. This season, however, is ushering in a more refined form of attention-grabbing dress, with pieces like Dolce & Gabbana’s heels, Lanvin’s bold-type chain necklaces and Fendi’s puppet-inspired bags. Finally there’s good reason to wear a little shock value on your sleeve.—B.B.

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DUJOUR.COM HIGHLIGHT

s King Edward IV on The White Queen, the romantically charged historical drama on the Starz network, Max Irons spends his fair share of time sporting armor. And while a suit of protective metal might not be a staple in the modern man’s wardrobe, the textured knit sweater Irons wears here—a must-have for fall—definitely should be. That 27-year-old Irons, whose upcoming projects include Posh, a film about

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Oxford’s secret societies, and the U.K. premiere of the play Farragut North, is sartorially sophisticated is no surprise; his dad is the famously dapper actor and recent Berluti model Jeremy Irons. While inheriting a sense of style might be genetic, for Irons fils, stepping into the family business was more of a discovery. “I always wanted to be a teacher,” he says. “But once the acting bug got me, I thought, this is dangerously good fun.”—ADAM RATHE

REDUX

OLD IS NEW

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1. Sunglasses, price upon request, TORY BURCH, 212-510-8371. 2. Floral Caged Wedge dolcegabbana.it 3. Street-style star Miroslava heels, $6,900, DOLCE & GABBANA, dolcegabbana.it. Duma does peacocking best, this time with a bold collar. 4. A woman shows off her bookish side with a Sylvia Plath-inspired clutch. 5. Crazymals Pig ring in pink gold with diamonds and pink sapphires, price upon request, DE GRISOGONO, 212-439-4220. 6. Mini baguette, $4,450, FENDI, 212-759-4646. 7. Hat, $3,675, CHANEL, 800-550-0005. 8. Happy necklace, $1,195, LANVIN, lanvin.com. 9. Elena Perminova tops it off at the Jean Paul Gaultier show. 10. Pom-pom clutch, $2,595, JIMMY CHOO, jimmychoo.com.

Coat, $4,125; Sweater, $1,375; Pants, $1,065; Shoes, $550, GIORGIO ARMANI, 212-988-9191.

eginning this season, Giorgio Armani is bringing back the classics by introducing a limited-edition reinterpretation of some of his most recognizable designs. As the master himself describes it, the clothes will be “dedicated to the working woman with a keen eye for fashion and created with the most refined fabrics that always possess a surprising touch of modernity.” The “Capsule Classique” will be available twice a year and will incorporate Armani’s iconic shapes that have been revisited with what the designer calls “a subtle continuity.” It’s those clean-cut lines and that progressive thinking that have helped hold Armani in the highest regard since he started the label in 1975. Who says you can’t move forward by looking back?—B.B.

peacocking [pea-cock-ing] verb—to make a vainglorious display; to strut like a peacock or dress for attention, like a peacock uses feathers to get a mate.

TURNING HEADS: #3, #9: GETTY IMAGES. #4: COURTNEY D’ALESIO. IRONS: ANNELISE HOWARD PHILLIPS, STYLED BY PAUL FREDERICK. ARMANI: ALEX JOHN BECK, STYLED BY PAUL FREDERICK.

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Main Floor 212 753 2577 #BGOBsessed


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very time I enter a swanky soiree in the dead of wi nter, I half expect a hushed, snoot y voice behind me to What’s old is now more wanted than whisper, “OMG, there goes my coat!” ever. Lynn Yaeger uncovers the This is because my Russian sable darling, ecstasy of high-end consignment my pride and joy, used to belong to someone else—a wealthy dowager or maybe a shops—with no shame required. fickle social girl who coldly traded in my Illustrated by luke best baby for a younger model. When I bought my coat on eBay roughly a decade ago, that site was pretty much the What led up to this momentous shift in the colonly place to f ind such items on the Internet. Back then, the process of wealthy people unload- lective consciousness? Many factors, which can ing their unwanted jewelry and clothing was still be summed up thusly: It’s no longer embarrassing cloaked in the tattered raiment of shame. eBay to be cheap. When I was growing up, you didn’t was one step up from the pawn shop—you could even admit to shopping at discount stores—even hide behind a quirky pseudonym, and at least you Loehmann’s was slightly suspect. Now ask the didn’t have to talk to a guy sitting behind a cage. coolest girl at the charity gala what she’s wearBut stick around long enough and anything can ing and she crows, “Margiela for H&M!” or, “I happen. (It’s one of the chief—maybe the only— fished it out of a bin at the Prada sample sale!” If benefits of being old.) In the 10 or so years since there is any shame these days, it lies in overbuymy sable angel entered my life, there has been an ing, overconsuming. We are all supposed to be incredible shift: Plenty of websites now trumpet hyperaware of wastefulness and the environment the Richie Riches who once owned your new best and stay up nights worrying about our humonfriend. There is Walk In My Closet, where people gous carbon footprints. It is actually considered of some renown, at least in fashion circles—Julia virtuous to get rid of the multitudes of merch you Restoin Roitfeld, Virginie Courtin Clarins, et al— don’t wear, and it’s fine to crow about it. Even when anonymity is at a premium, the are proud to brandish their bombs. On Yoox, individuals like Iris Apfel and Margherita Maccapani whole experience of selling your unloved goods Missoni happily hawk their hauls. Vaunte flaunts has changed. At Circa, a company that will fork the detritus of a welter of socialites and editors, over an instant check for jewelry with no wait, Natasha Cornstein, the company’s director of whose pretty faces accompany their offerings.

cor porate com mu nications, recalls that back in the old days, selling baubles was frequently the result of three miserable Ds: death, divorce and debt. These tearful reasons have been replaced in many cases by exuberant, fun people who want to get rid of their old trinkets so they can buy…more stuff! Circa has 13 branches worldwide and operates out of glamorous offices (gray velvet sofas, warm, smiley greetings from the receptionist, private selling rooms) aimed at making selling jewelry as discreet, as glam, as delightful as, well, buying jewelry. Ever y chic st reet i n ever y chic tow n now boasts at least one resale store bursting with the rejects of fancy closets, some still sporting their tickets. (Is there anything more depressing than getting rid of items, once bought with such hopefulness, such optimism, with their original price tags still dangling?) But Ina Bernstein got there first: The high-end-resale pioneer opened her first eponymous shop in SoHo two decades ago (there are now five INA stores). Milo Bernstein, Ina’s son, concurs that there has been a major shift in the attitude of consignors. He credits the 2008 economic downturn with finally shattering any humiliation once attached to raw buying and selling. “At the time, resale stores got a lot of press—the idea was that even rich people, suddenly conscious of their budgets, would spend instead of $6,000, maybe $3,000 on a handbag, thereby cont r ibuting to the (continued on page 64)

L.A.–based Beverly Loan’s previous pawn sales include art by Andy Warhol, pink diamonds and Coolio’s 1996 AMA award for Favorite Rap/Hip-Hop Artist.


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betterment of society,” he says with just the faintest wry chuckle. In the beginning, he recalls, though the store had a lot of celebrity and socialite consignors, it was hard to get referrals, since people didn’t really want to share this dark secret with anyone. Now his clients happily pass on the info to their tony colleagues, which means that his mom has so much good merchandise that she has to keep opening more stores. Kate Sekules, the owner of the site Refashioner, which began as a sort of online swap meet and has evolved into a more conventional selling venue (it describes itself as a “curated fashion eco-mmunity”), says that when she launched in the fall of 2012, there was still some stigma

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attached to selling. Sekules coined the expressions “haute-cycle” and “collaborative consumption” to describe the powerful tsunami of clothes now circling the globe in endless waves. But she is not, she confesses, a particular fan of celebrities attaching their names to their rejects. “It’s going a little too far; it’s not even humble-bragging. It’s a little bit creepy. On Refashioner we prefer the story of the items—ones that have their own personality. That’s what counts for me.” Me too, Kate! I don’t care who used to own those 20 pieces of 1940s Vuitton luggage, that Chanel couture coat, that 20-carat marquise diamond ring. I am ready to jump on the haute-cycle and peddle right over, wads of cash in hand.

sustainability

baubles

Generous GEMS

Shake It up

Say so long to suites: Modern jewelry is all about mixing

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PHOTOGRAPHED by Christine BlackBurne

From top: Hoop earrings in 18-karat yellow gold, $24,000, DAVID WEBB, 212421-3030. Bracelet in 18-karat yellow gold with pearls, price upon request, ANGELA CUMMINGS FOR ASSAEL, 212-819-0060. Incroyables et Merveilleuses Oiseau ring in yellow gold with diamonds, tsavorite, garnets, sapphires, aquamarine and pearls, price upon request, DIOR FINE JEWELRY, 800-929-3467.

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t was the stones themselves that inspired an ethical eureka moment. The inspiration came from the color of the emeralds that mining conglomerate Gemfields unearths at its Zambian location. “The whole world was talking green— ethical, social—so we decided to make them green at heart,” explains CEO Ian Harebottle. His firm, a prestigious source for colored stones, is now at the forefront of sustainable mining: Old pits aren’t f illed in but f illed with water and f ish for food, while 300,000 trees are planted as carbon offsets. Workers are well paid, with clinics and schools established for their families. Gemfields isn’t alone in focusing as much on ethics as aesthetics. Tiffany & Co. was among the first of the major jewelers to discontinue selling or using Burmese rubies and coral, for political and environmental reasons. It even set up its own diamond unit, Laurelton, to monitor the supply chain. As for Bulgari, it carries sustainability through to its sister hotel brand—the London property even has bird- and bat-nesting boxes on the roof and electric-car charging stations. This movement could well accelerate, says Marc Choyt, who runs the group Fair Jewelry Action, which campaigns for ethical practices. “Engagement rings represent love and commitment, but the gold could have been produced by child labor or destroyed massive ecosystems,” he says, “It doesn’t feel good.” As Ian Harebottle puts it, a sustainable stone can be judged by more than just the four Cs (cut, clarity, carat and color). “This gives you the fifth C: confidence.”—Mark Ellwood

What’s the secret to a discount at Prada? Reading Mark Ellwood’s Bargain Fever, which delves into the world of designer deals.


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expedition

Busy body

Broncos football star Eric Decker touches down at Casa de Campo PHOTOGRAPHED by Kirk Edwards Styled by Sarah schussheim

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ric Decker’s athleticism extends far beyond the football field. As we discovered during his recent Caribbean getaway, the Denver Broncos wide receiver is also an amateur f isherman, equest r ian, cliff diver and golf-car t speed racer (not to mention soon-to-be TV star, with a new reality show premiering September 29 on E!). At Casa de Campo, a luxury resort in the Dominican Republic that promotes “the sporting life,” Decker tackles some offseason adventure.

Thomas Mason Ludlow shirt, $148, J.CREW, jcrew.com. Versa shorts, $129, VENROY, venroy.com.au. Sunglasses, $220, PERSOL, iloristyle.com.

The video for Drake’s hit “Started from the Bottom” was filmed at one of Casa de Campo’s 35,000-square-foot villas—the pad is listed for $19.5 million.


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HORSE PLAY “The head of the polo team at the resort gave me his bestlooking, most athletic horse,” he says. “Growing up I had a friend with a ranch and a few horses, so I had some experience riding. I was a little nervous in the beginning, but I

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got comfortable pretty fast.”

ROCK CITY “We took a motorboat to this amazing private island — it had a ladder to climb up and sightsee. But the best

SMALL-TOWN CHARM

part was diving back down.”

“My fiancée, Jessie, and I explored the old town on the proper t y. The cobblestone streets and antique buildings were beautiful. I’ve never been to Italy, but it felt like an old Italian village.”

photo credits teekay

built into the rocks so we were able


“the last time i rode a horse was 12 years ago. sprinting across a polo field was freeing.”

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CRUISE CONTROL “The resort has every sport imaginable—even a Shooting Club. We tried to do everything! We lay out poolside, explored the town and

photo credits teekay

golfed...which eventually led to a serious golf-cart race.”

(In water) Swim trunks, $89, VENROY, venroy.com.au. Boxer briefs, $40 for four, TOMMY HILFIGER, macys.com. (Riding horse) Shirt, $98, POLO RALPH LAUREN, ralphlauren.com. Pants, $120, SEAN JOHN, macys.com. Dredoso T-shirt, $55, HUGO, hugoboss.com. Rookie socks, $12, RICHER POORER, richer-poorer.com. Hiking boots, $1,425, HERMÈS, hermes.com. (Standing with horses) Syrma Fleece, $365, DIESEL BLACK GOLD, diesel.com. Braddom jeans, $298, DIESEL, diesel.com. Hiking boots, $1,425, HERMÈS. (On golf cart) Robe, $6,750, TOM FORD, 212-359-0300. Pants, $495, EMPORIO ARMANI, armani.com. Boxer briefs, TOMMY HILFIGER. Hat, SUPREME, supremenewyork.com. Sunglasses, $375, GUCCI, solsticesunglasses.com. CEO Tech David Coulthard Edition watch, $925, TW STEEL, twsteel.com. (Walking) Long-sleeve polo shirt, $795, BURBERRY PRORSUM, burberry.com. Pants, $168, TOMMY HILFIGER. Lace-up shoes, $625, TOD’S, tods. com. Groomer: Giselle Jimenez.

Decker made a swift return to Denver thanks to an on-property airport that serves international JetBlue flights.


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Left: The 25 cottage-style suites are connected by a stone path. Below: In a traditional Japanese tea ceremony, finely milled green-tea powder (called “matcha”) is whisked with hot water until it reaches a frothy, soup-like consistency, then served to honored guests. The ritual is an elaborate art that takes years to properly master.

discovery

KYOTO, REFINED

A city full of history embraces luxe, modern living. Lindsay Silberman sees a different side of Japan.

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Photographed by Hisashi Murayama

Getting there may take 16 hours, but it’s relatively hassle-free. Ameriyoto has long been considered a tranquil alternative to hyper-stimulated Tokyo, but now the imperial city is taking on a new identity can Airlines flies direct from New York to Haneda, a more convenient among travelers: a luxury destination that fuses ancient tradition alternative to Narita. After a one-hour connecting flight to Kyoto or three hours on Japan’s signature Shinkansen bullet train, a guide will escort you with modern f lair. The “old-meets-new” concept is quickly gaining traction throughout to the property. Perched on the banks of the Hozugawa River, the hotel is only accessible Kyoto. A number of companies are restoring historic merchant houses and converting them into art galleries, restaurants or upscale vacation rentals via boat. The trip is a scenic rite of passage that culminates on a private dock, complete with concierge services. Years ago, these properties would have where staff members welcome guests with deep, synchronized bows. Hoshibeen demolished to make way for new construction—but today, they offer noya fashions itself as a traditional Japanese inn—known as a ryokan—with well-heeled travelers a lavish way to embrace authentic Japanese culture. a luxury twist. Suites are outfitted with heated floors and intricate handIt’s a similar experience for guests at Hoshinoya, a charming hotel on painted wallpaper; bathrooms have a sunken cedar tub and a high-tech toilet the Western edge of the city. Fusing history and elegance seems especial- that opens automatically as you approach. The Japanese-style bed is startling ly apropros at Hoshinoya, given its location in a region once considered at first glance—it sits on a flat wooden platform—but fluffy pillows and a an imperial retreat for aristocrats during the Heian Period, from a.d. 794 plush mattress instantly yield a change of heart. The room’s greatest asset, to 1185. Today’s guests relish the opportunity to don linen loungewear and though, is an oversize sliding glass window. It provides picturesque views raw silk robes (provided in each room), participate in ancient tea-making and a flowing-river soundtrack that turns sleeping into a spiritual experience. In Japan, the simple-yet-refined philosophy comes naturally. ceremonies and take in the hotel’s history.

Japan’s oldest whiskey distillery, Yamazaki, is located 20 minutes south of Kyoto. It was established in 1923.


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foodie files

The French invasion Gael Greene longs for classic charcuterie and duck à l’orange— and finds New York almost delivers

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hen I insist that New York City is the best place in the world to eat, some of my sophisticated pals are shocked. Not Paris? No. Not for me. Paris never comes close to the variety of our grand bouffe. I’ve always loved how New York City embraces all the world’s cuisines, from Croatian to Sri Lankan to Mongolian. I’ve not been to Himalayan Yak in Jackson Heights. It’s enough to know it’s there. Amazingly, Paris, after pooh-poohing anything American for so long, has taken to heart hot dogs, burgers and food trucks as well as neo-Brooklyn-style cuisine. Chicago-born Daniel Rose is the poster boy at the impossible-to-reserve Spring. (I can only imagine the recession has the people so depressed and demoralized that they want to feed on our energy.)

When I first noticed some new, scattered devotion to French-influenced menus here in Manhattan, I thought it a f luke. But this retro f lare-up has exploded into a certified trend, surprising and, then, definitely worth pursuing. Why are young hot-shot chefs and restaurateurs looking backward? Most of the grand temples of haute snub that ruled ’60s dining are gone. Le Pavillon. Le Caravelle. Cafe Chauveron. Only La Grenouille survives from those innocent ancienne days. Moreover, we are still rich in established Gallic masters: Eric Ripert at Le Bernardin, Jean-Georges, Daniel Boulud and his empire, the near-French David Bouley and Terrance Brennan at French-inf lected Picholine. But that’s not what’s up with this flurry of more modest newbies. They weren’t necessarily born French, and

It was reported that in 1982, legendary Manhattan French restaurant La Grenouille had an annual flower budget of $75,000.

stylist: caitlin levin

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PHOTOGRAPHED by henry Hargreaves


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they don’t feel bound by Escoffier, much less Paul Bocuse, as they riff on lobster thermidor or lighten the blanquette de veau. A few words of French can suffice. Take, for example, Cherry, a sexy underground venture by Jonathan Morr of Bondst and Eugene Morimoto. With a Korean chef and sake sommelier, the house is Asian but with a few Frenchifications. Foie-gras short-rib gyoza. Yuzu beurre noisette. Crispy almond shrimp that tastes as if slathered in marzipan. I can’t wait to go back. Is this play on France just a reach for something new? Regional Italian has had its decades. Nuovo Scandinavian is not for everyone. And aren’t there muchos gringos cooking Mexican and Thai? A resurgence of Chinese heat populates the side streets. Perhaps now that the city seems to be emerging from recession doldrums, this is the right time for “French with a twist”? Alert foodies on the prowl got their fi rst taste of what was to coalesce into a French revival a year ago at Calliope, on the corner of Second Avenue and Fourth Street. “French but fun,” the married owners called it. Daringly, the two cooks risked cured pig’s head and tongue and a personal version of torchon de foie gras—glorious charcuterie on a small tailored menu. The pastas by wife Ginevra Iverson made the theme more Northern European, chef-owner Eric Korsh suggested. Add in stuffed cabbage and chicken-thigh farci, and baba au rhum. “I want it to feel like someone’s grandmother’s in the south of France,” Korsh said. The drumroll of “Le Marseillaise” could not yet be heard. Then this spring, new restaurants, mostly small and modestly fitted out, announced Frenchish intentions: Montmartre. Le Philosophe. Little Prince. Cantine Parisienne. The season’s splashiest arrival was Lafayette, Andrew Carmellini’s brasserie-cum-bakery, not just a big deal but a noisy one, drawing eclectic crowds to its sweeping space. After those instant raves at Locanda Verde and the Dutch, Carmellini told me he needed to exercise the Frenchness he channeled at Café Boulud. But it was…just French. Modest. Restrained. The rotisserie chicken for two was a steal at $44 compared with the $79 bird with foie gras and black truffle wrapped in brioche at NoMad. The place was French, but maybe it was not French enough? I’ll be back, of course, because I can’t imagine Carmellini will settle for ho-hum. For me, the little-bit-French approach has been disappointing. Tiny Le Philosophe, with its wall of French philosophers, winks at tradition. It racked up some positive reviews, but I found the reimagined blanquette de veau wasn’t bet ter than the classic, and I hated the barely cooked carrots. Really modest French wi nes were a pleasant surprise, as was an island of crème fraîche floating in luscious chilled pea soup with Espelette croutons. But a few mangy snails in a garlicky chickpea stew was a pitiful stand-in for classic escargots in garlic butter. I was hungry for duck à l’orange—a whole roasted duck in a sweet-andsour gastrique, with candied orange. Not this rare, perfectly cooked magret with a couple of fresh segments of citrus. Am I being a pill, wanting it either more French or less French? Former Má Pêche chef Tien Ho’s vision of French-American at Montmartre was so lame, owner Gabriel Stulman commanded a redo. I went early and didn’t have the appetite to try again, even after the New York

PERHAPS THIS IS THE RIGHT TIME FOR “FRENCH WITH A TWIST.”

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Black-and-white images of French thinkers cover a wall at Le Philosophe.

Times’ Pete Wells gave it two stars for a sincere effort. Instead I took friends to Little Prince, just 38 seats crowded together on a quiet stretch of Prince Street in SoHo. I’d heard great praise from pals whose mouths I trust. And the French-onion-soup burger already has its own buzz. The night we tasted the raucously over-baconed frisée salad, the rare duck breast was beautifully cooked, but it wasn’t close kin to old-fashioned duck à l’orange. Was I the only one seeking a taste of yesterday? Still hopeful, I rushed to Casimir & Co, seed of a popular French bistro on the Lower East Side, the week it opened at 1022A Lexington Avenue. The steak tartare mixed table-side was pretty good. But maybe I jumped the gun. There weren’t enough servers, and ours had a way of disappearing. Everything took forever. I was so annoyed by the end of the evening that the excellent tarte tatin, with its slightly burned caramelized taste, did not soothe my shattered spirit. After this French-accented reverie, I circled back to my favorites— French houses with imported chefs—for the original. Benoit has had ups and downs since Alain Ducasse moved into what had been the last address of La Côte Basque and redesigned. It’s been riding high under chef Philippe Bertineau. I’d take his $48 chicken for two anytime or the skate with lemony smashed potatoes and the tarte tatin for two. But if a friend were nostalgic for French country cooking and I could choose only one place, I’d send him to La Mangeoire. Since the legendary master Christian Dulouvrier took charge of the closet-size kitchen, the foie-gras terrine has blushed pink and perfect. With one satiny bite, I can imagine I am in France. No one’s cassoulet I’ve tasted in New York City is better than his. When that wintry casserole rotates off the menu, I order the crusty roasted chicken for two with Bibb lettuce salad and sensational crisp fries. I put the chicken on top of the greens with a tablespoon of the buttery sauce to wilt them, celebrating how lucky we gourmands are to see the rebirth of a rather ordinary French bistro after 35 years on Second Avenue. I’ll be back again at Calliope, of course. I’ll check in to Lafayette because I have faith in the chef. I might surrender to brunch for a foiegras egg McMuffin at Little Prince. I’ll restore my taste buds every few months at La Mangeoire. And I’ll follow my neophiliac lifestyle wherever it takes me. That’s my job.

Julia Child, famous for the book Mastering the Art of French Cooking, once said, “With enough butter, anything is good.”

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the preternaturals

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Kids these days have everything bigger, better, sooner, from careers to personal stylists to blogs. In fact, as these modern-day progeny prove, being a kid isn’t fun and games at all anymore. It’s big business—and worthy of a whole new social strata. Photographed by Alex John Beck

the image

Petite-A-Porter

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lonso Mateo looks good in a bow tie and knows it. The 5-year-old Instagram sensation (44,000 followers and counting) rocks high-end designer ensembles, Gucci loafers and the occasional neck accessory for an eager audience of sartorially minded pre-tweens—and their parents—who appreciate his view that you’re never too young to look good. Now, these fashion-forward fans are enlisting professional help to make it happen. Personal shopper and stylist Stephanie Steinman, who works with kid clients in Los Angeles, New York

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the pitfalls

public domain

What it’s like for kids growing up in the shadow—or bright light—of success. By Peggy Drexler, Ph.D.

the image (cont’d) and Seattle, spent the summer styling several camp wardrobes. “For many of my clients, hiring a personal stylist is done out of convenience. Besides,” she says, “ ‘playclothes’ don’t even cut it for camp anymore.” L.A. stylist Aly Scott says many tots come to her with a specific look in mind, pulled from street-fashion blogs like Children With Swag, Ladys & Gents and the {Tiny} Times, which show stylized mini-models wearing high fashion–in-

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spired clothing and accessories such as varsity jackets, mirrored aviator sunglasses and drop-crotch pants. “Kids will also bring tear sheets of the celebrity whose style they admire,” says Scott, who points to Taylor Swift and Beyoncé as chief among the most requested celeb looks. And in many cases, like Alonso’s, the kids become muses themselves. More and more designers—both inspired by fashionable kids and in response to increasingly vocal demand from parents—have been adding children’s collections to their ready-towear lines, including Lanvin, Stella McCartney and Fendi. Kim Kardashian, meanwhile, is rumored to be designing a line for kids following the recent birth of little North. Kardashian’s stylist, Monica Rose, dresses her own 3-year-old daughter, Alaia, in Céline and Balenciaga. She then posts Alaia’s photos online. “Many people thank me for giving them ideas and inspiration,” says Rose, who insists that she lets Alaia choose her own outfits, but will later “tweak them,” tucking in her blouse or perhaps adding an accessory. “I’ve even seen some re-creations of Alaia’s outfits worn on older girls! It’s a bit crazy, but cute.” —Melissa Magsaysay

At 12, Sam was bright and eager but sad, almost clinically so. His mother and father did not fall into that category of wealthy parents we’ve begun to indict for working too much and pressuring their kids to perform. They were encouraging but mindful not to push too hard. They wanted him to be happy—except, of course, he wasn’t. For one thing, Sam had a difficult time making friends. Most of the kids at his Brooklyn school were fairly well-off. But Sam’s family was rich, while his mother, who was constantly making headline news as the CEO of a large tech firm, was as maligned as she was celebrated. Sam knew from an early age that his mother was sort of famous and that maybe not everyone liked her. But as his parents explained to Sam, the only mom that should matter to Sa m was t he mom he knew at home. And for a long time, that was the only mom that mattered. Until Brooklyn. Listening to him describe how he’d t r ied to ma ke f r ie nd s, start conversations, form connections, I could tell he wasn’t a show-off or boring or desperate and trying too hard. I got the sense that kids disliked him for one reason only: because of who his mother was—or who they thought she was. Many children who grow up “having it all” find themselves burdened by a notorious surname, being recognized by nearly everyone as “so-and-so’s child.” And when that parent is in the news—observed, scrutinized—so, too, is the child. Having raised two children whose father garnered a great deal of success early on in his career, I’ve had to address these issues personally. One of the ways that I dealt with my husband’s high profile was to pretend it wasn’t a factor, almost that it didn’t even exist. In a way, this approach worked, and I think it benefited my children as they grew up. There was never the sense, or so I hoped, that fame or money was what our lives revolved around. But this approach is usually powerless at protecting kids from the words or actions of everyone else. There were times when I suspected my children felt pressure to act a certain way because of who their father was. As many kids do, they felt his successes as well as his disappointments. More than 10 years ago, when my husband lost his job in a very public way, our son took it quite personally. He made the battle

his own, feeling intensely betrayed by those who’d done the firing. We tried to be honest and straightforward about what had happened without getting into details, but kids assume their own burdens. They face them, too. W hen her parents were divorcing, Natasha, the daughter of a famous fashion designer, was instructed not to read any of the stories. Twelve at the time, she had no intention to—until a classmate handed her a magazine with her mother on the cover. Natasha told me, “The girl said, ‘I just thought you might want to see this.’ I read it and burst into tears. Knowing that everyone at school was aware of my family’s problems was horrible.” Child ren of the ver y successful also often find themselves livi ng i n the shadow of their parents. As Natasha said, “I like clothes as much as the next girl, yet it never occur red to me to pursue a career in fashion. But I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been asked, ‘Why didn’t you go into fashion?’ Everyone thinks of me first as her daughter, instead of who I am.” In such cases, a child may benefit from distancing herself from the family, especially in those early adolescent years when she’s wont to do that anyway. My son often denied who his father was if people asked too eagerly, and that was fine. Imposing a moratorium on reading news stories about the family is always a good idea, too, at least until you can read them together. And it’s important to run through scenarios so that kids will be prepared for certain sit uations. For example, if someone asks about something in the papers, the best response is often a casual “I have no idea what my parents do” or “My dad’s great at his job, but I don’t get involved.” Nothing defensive, but it clearly sends the message: I’m my own person. Most of all—and this counts double for parents of teenagers— don’t discount what they’re feeling or try to explain it away. Don’t say something like, “Stop complaining: This last name pays for Exeter/your trip to Cabo.” Make sure they know that your battles aren’t theirs to fight and, in particular, that their famous name isn’t one to be lived up to or ear ned. It’s simply the one they have. Names have been changed to protect clients’ privacy.

“when a parent is in the news, so, too, is the child.”


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With the help of their hip, highprofile mothers, some babies are born boldfaced names Photographed by Pamela Hanson

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omy doesn’t quite recognize herself in photos yet, but she will soon. The 15-month-old New Yorker has a Polaroid from every day of the first six months of her life—each one scanned and saved onto two external hard drives. She’s in portraits, paintings and illustrations created by friends of her mother, 32-year-old art director and model Julia Restoin Roitfeld (daughter of former French Vogue editor Carine Roitfeld). And she’s the headliner of Roitfeld’s motherhood website, Romy & the Bunnies. Romy is part of a generation of babies growing up not just in front of cameras, but also with an immediate online following. Websites like Romy & the Bunnies and Annemarie Lawless’s A Little Muse arose as creative, well-connected and often-photographed women became moms and wanted to present their little ones to the world. “She’s my inspiration,” says Roitfeld. “I want to share her because I’m so in love with her.” But Romy & the Bunnies—the name of which is a nod to both Romy’s stuffed animals and Roitfeld’s love of vintage Playboys—is as much a service as it an homage. Roitfeld posts stylish baby finds, throwback photos and interviews by and with other “industry” moms, like Fabiola Beracasa and Pippa Vosper, and those within her own social circle, which is conveniently full of new mothers. “Thank God,” she says, “because I didn’t know anything—I’d never even babysat.” (Her baby-shower list came together thanks to a close friend who’d just had her own first child.) Now it’s comparing “what you’re using for stretch marks, how you’re losing the weight and whether you are letting your baby cry” says Roitfeld. “It’s good to have friends who have the same kind of lifestyle so you can ask for advice.” And, of course, for the occasional stunning portrait. —Krista Soriano

the trend

return of fun

Today’s kids are often academically accomplished, but can forget one thing: hot to be a kid. This is why a new breed of consultants is commanding as much as $500 an hour to help children navigate playtime. “Fun is a big part of intellectual development,” says educational consultant Dana Haddad, a former associate director of admissions at Horace Mann. “Unfortunately, many of these kids are so stressed out because their parents are.” Playing “correctly,” meanwhile, can be essential for getting into the best schools. One Manhattan mom tells of a friend’s daughter who bombed the playdate portion of an entrance exam after beelining for the play kitchen: “They didn’t want girls who were attracted to the kitchen.” As Haddad says, “It takes practice to nail the playdate.”—ALYSSA GIACOBBE


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the branding

twitter for tots

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t’s a stretch to suggest Fulano Librizzi was “just a regular kid” when he was discovered, at age 8. By then, the Manhattan pre-tween had already been spinning for three years, holding his birthday party at SubMercer and posting his mixes online. Every morning before school, he’d tweet to his idols, including fashion-industry favorite DJ Cassidy, who’s since become his mentor and manager. Although Fulano has entrepreneurial creativity in his genes—his mother, Latham Thomas, is the founder of the wellness site Mama Glow while Dad is artist Nemo Librizzi—his parents say Fulano’s early drive was his own doing. “As far as we were concerned, Twitter was a place for him to express the things he thought were fun: music, the environment, snakes,” says Thomas. “But it very quickly turned into a way for him to market himself.” He keeps nearly 4,000 Twitter and Instagram followers up to date on his projects as a DJ, model, and “kid inf luencer” for clients that include Gap Kids, Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week, VH1 and the Clinton Foundation. This summer, he took time off from recording his debut album to celebrate turning 10 with a party at Manhattan hot spot No. 8 sponsored by Flips Audio and covered by the New York Post. Taking note of the massive role the Internet has

played in helping some of today’s most famous, and most profitable, underage celebrities (Justin Bieber, Cody Simpson) break through to the mainstream from obscurity, kids these days don’t sit around waiting to be discovered. Instead, those with ambition are learning to tweet, blog and otherwise post wherever and whenever, pretty much as soon as they learn how to write. “Instagram-famous” Benjamin Lasnier, a 14-year-old Danish kid with good hair and a smartphone, landed a deal with Sony Music while on his way to racking up more than a million followers. Hot on his heels: photogenic 15-year-old Brent Rivera of Los Angeles, a self-described actor and hockey player, but otherwise unknown, with nearly 600,000 followers. And who could forget junior journalist Tavi Gevinson, who at the age of 11 helped usher in the fashion-blogger phenomenon from her suburban Chicago bedroom? She launched the online magazine Rookie with a staff that included more than one New York Times vet, published a Rookie anthology (with a second volume due in October) and was twice named to Forbes’ “30 Under 30” list—and she hasn’t even graduated from high school yet. “These days, entrepreneurs don’t have to go to the audience,” says Boston-based social-media consul-

tant Lane Sutton, who is 16. “The audience comes to you.” Kids, Lane says, inherently understand this idea. Lane was 12 when he began using social media to promote his culture and product-review website, KidCriticUSA, and to network with mommy bloggers and advertisers. Soon, he began getting requests from those seeking help with social-networking efforts and scored his first paying client, a sixtysomething entrepreneur, the same year. He now consults for attorneys, realtors, business execs and college counselors and is a paid speaker on the social-media-marketing circuit, with recent appearances at South by Southwest and the Digital Family Summit. What’s most ironic, says Lane, is that when he went looking for a part-time job this summer, he was repeatedly turned away. “I couldn’t even get a job in a cupcake place,” he says. “For kids, you’ve got being a cashier or scooping ice cream. But why, if you have the mind for something more? I had no choice but to open myself up to an adult’s world.” While Lane declines to suggest how much cash he’s banked for his college education, he admits that being an entrepreneur has built up both his confidence and his nest egg. “It’s nice to know that if I, say, want a cool watch, my parents don’t have to buy it for me,” he says. “I can cover it myself.”—A.G.

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ON LOCATION

REMEMBRANCE OF THINGS PAST

Exquisite antiques and an expert eye make this Parisian apartment one for the history books. Daryl Chen takes a look inside. PHOTOGRAPHED BY FRANCIS HAMMOND

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ntiques dealer Sylvain Lévy-Alban lives like royalty. Take the inlaid marble on the floor of a passage in his Paris apartment. “It’s Sicilian from the 18th century,” he says, “probably from a palace.” The tapestry in the sitting room of Emperor Constantine going into battle? “It’s 17th century; it belonged to Louis XIV.” And the footstool in the library? “That’s what the Duchess of Windsor used to put her feet upon.” Lévy-Alban has no delusions of grandeur, however. If he suffers from anything, it’s a deep love of history. In his shop—a must-stop for designers like Penny Drue Baird, Michael S. Smith and Charlotte Moss—on the antiquar-

Opposite page: The sitting room, with a Louis XIV tapestry; most of the paintings are portraits from the 17th and early 18th centuries. This page, from left: Lévy-Alban’s library, with new bookshelves that he had constructed for the room; the passage with the Alidad fabric and Sicilian marble floor

“If it’s worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.”—Ayn Rand

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ian-dense row of Quai Voltaire, he specializes in 17th-, 18th- and early 19th–century European furnishings and decorative objects. Why that period? “Because I like it,” he says. When questioned about his choices, that’s often his answer. But he’s not being elusive or difficult; his preferences are simply second nature to him. And while many people regard their most precious antiques as too valuable to handle, exiling them to climate-controlled cases, Lévy-Alban has sprung these treasured relics from the caste of untouchables and brought them to life once again in his home. Located on a quiet street in the center of the city, behind the Palais Royal, his two-bedroom apartment, in a building constructed in 1778, has the soaring 15-foot ceilings and windows typical of the era. Lévy-Alban’s home is decorated in a way that flies riotously in the face of minimalism: It’s sumptuous, layered and full of vivid colors, rich textures and history. This exaggerated style has recently become associated with another Parisian, designer Jacques Garcia, he of the impeccable taste and high-profile projects. Garcia has created the opulent interiors for Manhattan’s NoMad hotel, Paris’ Hôtel Costes and La Mamounia in Marrakech. A book showcasing his personal pièce de résistance, the Château du Champ de Bataille in Normandy, will be published by Flammarion next year. Garcia and Lévy-Alban have been friends for three decades, drawn together by their similar tastes in art and antiques. “Jacques is a good customer of mine,” adds Lévy-Alban, who purchased his apartment in 2010. Throughout its renovation and design, Garcia served as informal adviser and sounding board. “He gave me many ideas and many little drawings,” Lévy-Alban says. LévyAlban’s general goal was “to give the ambience of a Parisian home from the period [when it was built].” Every room is chockablock with stuff, and in the sitting room, dozens of 17th- and 18th-century oil paintings, ranging in size from a few square inches to a few square feet, line the walls. Rather than feeling like gaudy excess, the overall effect is luxurious and captivating. But how does he decide when too much is too much? “When you


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want to get out as soon as possible,” he says. “Sometimes I’m in people’s homes who’ve arranged things neatly, but the way they put them makes you want to run. There’s a complete lack of harmony.” To achieve balance, he relied on intuition, adjusting the placement of items until everything felt just right. To cover the wall behind the tapestry, Lévy-Alban followed his instincts (and Garcia’s) and used two different 18th-century fabrics. “I didn’t have enough for [the entire wall], so Jacques said, ‘Mix them and it will look good.’ ” The red-andgold material has an intriguing provenance: It hung in the bedroom of the famously fashionable Carlos de Beistegui. Doesn’t LévyAlban fear that light will destroy the rare cloth? “It will last as long as me. It will rot, and that’s it,” he says. This attitude—that the things we cherish should be seen and used—is what makes his home so inviting. Nothing is off-limits, and you get the sense that life in Lévy-Alban’s apartment is to be lived and enjoyed. In the passage, he commissioned built-in closets and converted 18th-century Chinese lacquer panels to serve as their doors. Part of the facing wall is covered with a multipatterned fabric; it’s not an antique. “I like to mix things,” Lévy-Alban says. “I’m not obsessive.” The cloth was made by another aesthetically inclined friend, London designer Alidad. In the dining room, Garcia’s inf luence can be seen in its color palette and in the Versailles-style mirrored doors (they’re purely decorative) that LévyAlban commissioned and placed in the corners to ref lect the light and enlarge the space. Since his apartment faces south, that room

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Clockwise from top: Some pieces from Lévy-Alban’s collection of 18th-century Chinese-export armorial porcelain; his dining room, where the decorative mirrored doors complement the 1940s mirrored table; the other end of the sitting room, showing its mid-18th-century rock-crystal-and-gilt-bronze chandelier and a mid-18th-century chinoiserie gilt wood mirror from Genoa; Lévy-Alban in his shop in Paris

and the others are usually filled with light in the mornings, which was a draw for Lévy-Alban. But one of his favorite times of day is after the sun has set and he closes up his shop on the Left Bank, when he takes the 10-minute walk home, opens his door and steps into the peaceful world he’s created and filled with beloved objects from the past and present. “I feel happy,” he says. “I relax as soon as I arrive.”

In 1951, Carlos de Beistegui held a masquerade ball in Venice. Invites went out six months in advance so that guests had time to rehearse their entrances.


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men’s grooming

The BRIGHT stuff

Ready to lighten up? With these products in your arsenal, pearly whites are just the beginning.

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PHOTOGRAPHED by Christine Blackburne

Clockwise from top right: Pro Light Teeth Whitening System, $44, LUSTER PREMIUM WHITE, duanereade.com. Serum, $82, SOMME INSTITUTE, sommeinstitute.com. Arctic eye drops, $5, ROHTO, drugstore.com. The Brightening Essence Intense, $290, LA MER, cremedelamer.com. Face Ultra, $315, CELLMEN, saks.com. Polish Up pomade, $15, REDKEN FOR MEN, redken.com. Luster NOW! Instant Whitening toothpaste, $8, LUSTER PREMIUM WHITE.

Tom Ford’s laws of attraction don’t stop with the suit seams: The designer is launching a men’s grooming line with a bronzer and a concealer.


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vanity

mind the gap

Procedures that promise an effortless way to zap fat are surging in popularity. Alyssa Giacobbe gets the skinny.

“my jeans still rub, but a little more quietly.” treatments promises to get rid of such stubborn areas with no surgery, no downtime and (mostly) no side ef fect s. W h ich mea ns a thigh gap, for me, may no longer be so impossible a dream. Hooray? “In the last few years, body-sculpting technology has made vast improvements,” says Boston dermatologist Dr. Jeffrey Dover. It’s most effective, he adds, for people who are at, or close to, their ideal weight, but who have localized pockets of fat they can’t seem to ditch. “The best candidates have concentrated areas of soft or jiggly fat—firm fat is way less responsive,” says Dover, meaning that spots like muffin

version of the technology used in diagnostic imaging—to heat and destroy fat cells, which are, again, processed and expelled. Results can be seen more quickly, but in return, the procedure is more aggressive (and pricier: an average of $2,500 per session versus CoolSculpting’s $1,000–$1,500; Sadick offers both). For treatment of her below-the-rear area, Nicole is given two Percocet and a warning that the next hour will be no day at the spa, and it’s not, with some stubborn post-treatment br uising. (“Legs are purple,” she reports.) But eight weeks later, she’s lost an inch and a half on each leg. So the question is: How much are you willing to endure, and pay, for an inch less of fat? Dover notes that, while safe, Liposonix is “poorly tolerated” by some patients. And Miami vascular and inter ventional radiologist Dr. Adam Gropper cautions that any procedure carries some risk. For instance, (continued on page 100)

In July of this year, a 15-ton ball of congealed fat and garbage, nicknamed “The Fatberg” and said to be the size of a bus, clogged a London sewer.

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he thigh gap, in case you haven’t heard, is exceedingly trendy. Vice magazine called the gap—that airy divide between a thin person’s upper thighs—“the most desirable fashion accessory” and “the new cleavage.” Model Cara Delevingne’s perfect concavity has inspired @CarasThighGap, which tweets about craving peanut butter and working out daily “to stay this perfect,” while the Tumblr blog FuckYeahThighGap is dedicated to inspirational pictures of thighs that don’t touch and probably never will. Even the relatively highbrow online magazine Slate has wondered, “Do you have thigh gap?” I don’t; not even close. Even at my thinnest—like t h at mont h i n col lege I p r o b a bl y h a d E p s t e i n Ba r r — my uppe r t h ig h s have remained persistently chummy, the bane of every single pair of expensive jeans I’ve ever owned. But a g row i ng me nu of noninvasive fat-reduction

tops and inner thighs tend to respond better than larger, firmer areas like the outer thighs and rear end. To be clear: I’m not interested in looking like a waif, even if that were physically possible, but it’d be nice to own a pair of jeans for longer than six months. And so I opt for CoolSculpting, the most popular of the treatments on offer. How it works: A vacuum-like device suctions the target area and freezes the fat beneath the skin. The crystallized fat cells are gradually broken down, releasing their lipids, which are then eliminated via the body’s lymphatic system. (Other cells remain unharmed, Dover says, because fat is far more cold-sensitive than the skin itself.) Though the FDA has cleared CoolSculpting for use on belly fat and love handles, doctors have recently begun using the device on areas such as the upper arms, bra line and thighs. And research shows it actually works: In one clinical trial, patients saw their fat layer decrease by an average of 22 percent within four months. At Dover’s office, I assume the birthing position as a tech attaches two suction devices to my inner thighs. During the hour-long session, my legs feel as if they’re being iced, but there’s no pain. There is, however, some initial post-treatment redness, and in the two weeks that follow, my thighs experience sensations that range from mild tingling and numbness to massive chafing. Dover says this is normal, and “nothing to worry about!” Though, yes, it sounds pretty serious. Full results can take up to six months to appear, but two months in, I’ve already lost a quarter inch on each thigh. My jeans still rub, if a little more quietly. At the Upper East Side office of Manhattan dermatologist Dr. Neil Sadick, meanwhile, my editor tries out Liposonix, which uses focused ultrasound—a more intense


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ultrasound-based treatments have the potential to dest roy small ar teries, veins and nerves and cause pockets of f luid called seromas to form under the skin. These seromas—which in some cases may even become i n fected — ca n requi re add it ional procedu res to correct. “This is rare in well-t rai ned hands, bu t m a ny p e r fo r m i ng these procedures are not very experienced,” says G ropper. “A t horoug h inquiry into the level of experience and training of the physician should

be ma de beforeha nd.” But probably the most common “complication,” he points out, is that of unrealistic expectations. “ M a ny p a t ie nt s d o n’t understand the limits of what these procedu res c a n a c c o m p l i s h ,” h e says. “These ‘sculpting procedures’ are just that: contouring for patients who are at or near their ideal weight, not weightloss or fat-reduction procedures like liposuction or bariatric surgeries.” Even so, doctors predict that within the next few years, body sculpt-

ing will catch up to Botox and fillers as one of t he most popu la r cosmetic treatments among bot h men a nd women. (As Dover says, “Botox was the same. Early adopters were shunned by friends who couldn’t bel ieve a nyone wou ld inject poison into their f a c e s .” ) A t t h e v e r y least, the options available, considerably cheaper and less intense than surgery, if also less ef fect ive, open up t he p os sibi l it y of t h i n ne r thighs to a much, well, wider audience.

MAKEUP

MAKING A MARC

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It’s no secret that everything Marc Jacobs touches turns to gold, and now the designer blows a kiss to the beauty business with a colorful 120-piece collection poised to move him from clothing genius to cosmetics giant. From lipsticks to nail polish to concealer and

more, these items—found at both Sephora and Marc Jacobs stores—are sure to sell out as quickly as the It bag you carry them in.—BROOKE BOBB

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SKIN

REINVENTING THE WHEEL

Some of the biggest names in skin care are embracing change and updating their classic, tried-and-true formulas. Building on the basics with new science, these labels boast faster-acting, more soothing ingredients, all of which are just as addictive as the originals. Who says you can’t fix it if it ain’t broke? LANCÔME RÉNERGIE LIFT MULTIACTION REVIVA-CONCENTRATE Lancôme’s latest addition to its popular and proven anti-aging Rénergie line, this debut formula includes breakthrough absorption technology to ensure that the skin is left tightened but still soft, diminishing almost all imperfections and signs of fatigue.

ESTÉE LAUDER ADVANCED NIGHT REPAIR SYNCHRONIZED RECOVERY COMPLEX II Even with the plethora of nighttime serums currently on the counter, Estée Lauder’s Night Repair remains a staple. Now they’ve made it even more efficient by adding new technology aimed at speeding up the renewal of skin cells.

Rénergie Lift Multi-Action Reviva-Concentrate, 1.0 oz, $120, LANCÔME, lancome.com

Advanced Night Repair Synchronized Recovery Complex II, 1.0 oz, $62, ESTÉE LAUDER, esteelauder.com

JURLIQUE HERBAL RECOVERY ADVANCED SERUM A well-trusted all-natural revitalization serum inspired by the cult favorite gel version, it now includes a new Bio-Intrinsic process that breaks down its elements to their most natural states for even more powerful benefits.

CLINQUE DRAMATICALLY DIFFERENT MOISTURIZING LOTION+ After 45 years of success, Clinique dermatologists decided to add urea, glycerin and hyaluronic acid to their topselling lotion to ensure that the skin holds moisture for an even longer time.

Herbal Recovery Advanced Serum, $54, JURLIQUE, jurlique.com

Dramatically Different Moisturizing Lotion+, 4.2 oz, $26, CLINIQUE, clinique.com

The ponytail is back in business for fall, with inspired options ranging from the Pebbles-esque high pony or the slicked back look, à la Cher.

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inspiration

Give boring, stay-put hair the swoosh PHOTOGRAPHED by RENE MESMAN

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fter years of f lat-ironing, smoothing, de-frizzing and willingly submitting to—and actually paying for—chemical straightening treatments that also, by the way, work to preserve dead people, the moment has at last arrived to declare the official end of perfectly straight hair. It was fun while it lasted. In its place, the blowout’s total nemesis: the swoosh, an imperfect, nonchalant, don’t-hate-me-because-my-hair-is-great style that both aims to please and couldn’t care less. Hair that says, in no uncertain terms, that you’re above it all. Showing up on models like Karlie Kloss and Daria Werbowy and on style gurus like Into the Gloss’s Emily Weiss and the Man Repeller,

Swoosh seen ’round the world: (left) atop a feathered friend; (top) seen on Daria Werbowy on French Vogue’s August issue; (above) on model Sophie Vlaming

Leandra Medine—Pink and Bieber have it too, by the way—the swoosh is an intentional mess of a look, an updo with out the do. The classic bob’s one-way ticket to cool works for every type: curly, straight and everything in between. Best of all, the swoosh is easy to pull off—nothing more than running your fingers through your hair and f lipping it over—relying on zero forethought, no product, just a free hand + more @ and a little bit of attitude. Got some grays? Swoosh duJour.com it over. Forgot to wash it? Swoosh. Just got out of bed? You get it. Maybe it’s “done,” maybe it’s not. You don’t care either way.—A.G.

Cameron Diaz sported an extreme version of the swoosh in There’s Something About Mary—she said the hairstyle stopped traffic on set.

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Flip The Bird


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FragranceS

SCENT set

Whether it’s apricot for women or amber for men, these fall favorites bring enticing notes into the fold PHOTOGRAPHED by Christine bLackburne

Clockwise from top left: Private Blend Shanghai Lily, $210, TOM FORD, neimanmarcus.com. Le Parfum, $84, CARVEN, saks.com. Modern Muse, $78, ESTÉE LAUDER, esteelauder.com. Brit Rhythm, $79, BURBERRY, bloomingdales.com. Velvet Tender Oud, $270, DOLCE & GABBANA, saks.com. Pour Homme, $80, BOTTEGA VENETA, nordstrom.com. Downtown, $45, CALVIN KLEIN, macys.com. Polo Red, $76, RALPH LAUREN FRAGRANCES, ralphlauren.com.

“I would like to put an official ban on celebrity fragrances,” Maroon 5’s Adam Levine tweeted in 2011, two years before his own scent was released.


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PLAY

Dempsey in a Bell helmet, custom-painted by Troy Lee Designs.

RACING

TRACK STAR

n the eve of the world’s most famous automobile race, a procession of vintage convertibles, each carrying three race-car drivers, creeps through the narrow streets of downtown Le Mans, France. It’s a Mardi Gras–like atmosphere where the wine is f lowing and beaded necklaces are f lying. Half a million revelers cover every spare inch along the Grande Parade des Pilotes route, hanging over barricades, scaling lamp posts and perching in windows to catch a glimpse of the competitors in tomorrow’s 81st running of the 24 Hours of Le Mans, sponsored by Rolex. As the cars round a corner, Team Audi’s Tom Kristensen, the all-time record holder for wins at the endurance race, draws a raucous response, but another car whips the crowd (especially the teenage girls and middleaged women) into a particular frenzy. A groundswell of security and media precedes the car shuttling this race’s only all-American team: Porsche Factory driver Patrick Long, veteran driver Joe Foster, and the actor best known as “McDreamy.” No, he’s not there shooting pickup

footage for a romantic comedy set at Le Mans; Patrick “Dr. Derek” “The Woo Woo Kid” “Extra Anchovies” Dempsey is, in fact, here to compete. And with each rotation of the antique car’s hard rubber tires, he’s inching closer to a personal goal he set nearly a decade ago—to find his place among the countless drivers who have come to Le Mans to conquer what Il Commedatore himself, Enzo Ferrari, referred to as the “race of truth.” Although a car enthusiast since boyhood, Dempsey had his fi rst significant racing experience in 2004 when his wife, Jillian, gifted him a course at the Skip Barber Racing School. Since then, while Grey’s Anatomy has sat atop prime-time ratings (the ABC medical drama is about to premiere its tenth season), Dempsey has been quietly and methodically climbing racing’s ranks, competing in celebrity pro-ams as well as more serious contests, like the Grand-AM and the American Le Mans Series (ALMS). Although he raced at Le Mans in 2009, with his team fi nishing ninth in his qualifying class, the media hubbub surrounding him still elicits whispers that dismiss him as just another “gentleman driver”—an American

Call it the race-car diet: Dempsey lost 17 lbs in preparation for this year’s race, using a program of running, cycling and core training.

RICK DOLE

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As a competitive race-car driver, actor Patrick Dempsey has entered a different sort of ratings game. Paul Biedrzycki tunes up.


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actor, a dilettante of means for whom racing is just a hobby. A four-part documentary, Patrick Dempsey: Racing Le Mans, premiering August 28th on Discovery’s Velocity channel, provides a strong case to the contrary, depicting him as not only a driver and team owner, but also a reverent student of the sport who is as knowledgeable as he is committed. The comparisons to actors such as Steve McQueen (who never actually competed here, though he made the definitive film about Le Mans and his likeness currently graces every conceivable piece of merchandise in the track’s gift shops) and Paul Newm a n (w h o f i n i s h e d first in his racing class and second overall in 1979, but vowed never to ret ur n due to the media onslaught that made him feel “like a piece of meat”) are inevitable, but Dempsey says much of h is i nspi ration also comes from groundbreaking American drivers such Media swarm Dempsey’s car during pit stops. as Phil Hill and Dan Gurney, who each won at Le Mans nearly half a century ago. The camaraderie and fellowship among those who have thrown themselves into the crucible that is Le Mans, a race first run in 1923 in which three-driver race teams battle physical and mental fatigue to drive roughly the distance between New York City and Los Angeles in a 24-hour period, overshadow the desire to compare himself to others; Le Mans, he says, is a personal quest. “It’s about overcoming conf lict,” says Dempsey. “How do you individually handle adversity and come out the other side? It’s the great metaphor for what endurance racing is about, an attitude toward life that manifests on the racetrack. Life is about endurance.” In showing up a second time at Le Mans—now with his own team, Dempsey Del Piero Racing—the actor is poised for longevity in the sport. He understands that his notoriety outside of racing only goes so far in the garage. “Ultimately you want respect from your fellow competitors, but you have to earn it,” he says. “I don’t think a lot of drivers here watch Grey’s Anatomy—it’s not necessarily their demographic—but through time and results we’ll earn credibility.” During the race, Dempsey’s a stark and sentient competitor who vibrates like a tuning fork—focused and present. In addition to physical training, for the past five years he’s worked extensively with Dr. Jacques Dallaire, a performance specialist who has helped hundreds of professional drivers (including three-time Formula One champion Ayrton Senna) hone their mental skills on the track. Together the two have developed a methodology that is coincidentally analogous to Dempsey’s craft in front of the camera; both involve a process of self-evaluation and correction. Focus on the task at hand, pick a direction and commit; figure out what’s not working and do another take (or lap). After battling a def lating tire late in the race, the #77 car of team Dempsey Del Piero Racing ultimately finishes fourth in class, but with much reason to celebrate. Afterward, Dempsey, still in his sweat-drenched fire suit, morphs from steely pilot back to the easy-going and approachable mega-star. He invites everyone into the team’s hospitality tent to

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eat and drink; the pit crew, the camera men, inter ns, Porsche big-wigs, security personnel, everyone. Dempsey is a guy who simply loves racing, and it turns out he can actually drive. And although having one of their top stars whizzing around a race track at 200mph in the middle of the night might make the Holly wood st udio execs ner vous (Dempsey’s insurance premiu ms are th ree ti mes those of other drivers), the motorsports world is th r illed to have him both as a competitor and impassioned representative of the As the race enters its final hour, the team strategizes to spor t. “In addition to demonovercome a deflating tire and rain storms. strating an unmatched ability to generate worldwide media attention, he also validated himself as a worldclass race driver who’s worthy of racing at Le Mans on his skills—and not because of his Hollywood-actor status,” says Scott Atherton, President and CEO of ALMS. “He has a lot to be proud of.” Dempsey, for his part, says if the opportunity to quit acting and race full time presented itself, he would do it. And, a few weeks later, he’s already thinking about next year’s competition. “I’m a little disappointed that we didn’t get on the podium,” he tells me, “but I’m very proud that we didn’t crumble under pressure. That changes you and gives you more confidence. I want to win. Now I know we can do it. It’s not a question of if, it’s when.” For now, there is a juggling act between his two careers. (Worth noting: before his acting career took off, Dempsey tied for 2nd place in the 1981 U.S. Juggling Nationals.) His demanding acting schedule makes it difficult to get the seat time he needs to progress as a driver. With each race he can fit in, though, he’s proving he belongs. As Dallaire says, “You give the man the seat time he needs and you better watch out, because you will be mistaken if you take him for a gentleman driver. He will hunt you down and leave your carcass on the side of the road.” In the middle of the night, Dempsey drives through the Ford Chicanes section of the track, with the landmark Le Mans Ferris wheel seen in the background.

Nine-time Le Mans champion and Rolex Testimonee Tom Kristensen of Team Audi doesn’t mind the traffic, saying “you race the track, not the other cars.”

clockwise from left: paul biedrzycki (2); Rolex/stephan cooper

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”WELCOME TO OUR WORLD”

The seven pilots of the Breitling Jet Team belong to the international elite of aviation professionals. In performing their aerobatic figures at almost 500 mph, flying 7 feet from each other and with accelerations of up to 8Gs, errors are not an option. It is for these masters of audacity and daring exploits that Breitling develops its chronographs: sturdy, functional, ultra high-performance instruments all equipped with movements chronometer-certified by the COSC – the highest official benchmark in terms of reliability and precision. Welcome to the Breitling world.

CHRONOMAT 44 FLYING FISH


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enter the dragon lady Mexico’s first lady of tequila has a kick all her own

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Fresh updates on old favorites include the Glencairn Whisky Glass, a Tørst beer glass and Riedel’s tequila flute and vodka glass.

booze

Glass Act

It’s officially time to change out your crystal. Nowadays, spirits and even beer are being served in improved barware. At Tørst, a high-end Brooklyn beer bar, brews come in modern goblets. “You can drink beer out of a pint glass, but you won’t get the same flavor,” co-owner Jeppe Jarnit-Bjergsø explains. Spirits are also upgrading to specific stemware. “People can’t believe their favorite beverage can change so easily,” says Maximilian Riedel, CEO of his family’s Riedel glassmaking company. “They say, ‘My God, I never thought my drink could change due to the glass.’” Choose wisely and drink up.

Dragones—the $275-per-bottle booze beloved by fans like Oprah and chef Eric Ripert—she’s become a player on the luxury circuit as well as the personification of Mexican business acumen. “She’s wildly articulate, knows what she’s doing and she’s got a real passion,” Pittman, an MTV founder, says. After a fortuitous meeting at a party, he suggested González quit her job as a spirits executive and join him in business. And so she jumped. “I’ve always wanted to be an entrepreneur,” González says now, alluding to her early days selling makeup to classmates, importing designer clothing and brokering deals between international publishers and local printing presses, all before the age of 20. + more @ That entrepreneurial spirit is duJour.com poured into Casa Dragones, which is helmed by Maestro Tequilero Benjamín García, whom González dragged out of retirement. It’s made from the underutilized joven blue agave tequila, farmed at 4,000 feet in Jalisco’s Eje Volcánico Transversal, and hand-finished with extra añejo, aged five years in American oak barrels. The result is a warm, wince-free liquor sold in hand-blown, lead-free crystal apothecary bottles that competes against top cognacs, single malts and the category-defining Patrón. Despite these odds, González has boosted production to 24,000 bottles annually, mainly by using her own charm—and Pittman’s Rolodex. In González’s eyes, the international tequila market isn’t as much a hurdle as an opportunity. “I’ve always been selling things,” she says. “I like making my own money.”—MICHAEL SLENSKE

The rarest bottles of Casa Dragones might be those created by artist Gabriel Orozco: They feature his “Black Kites” skull and cost up to $1,850 each.

glasses: nicholas duers. gonzález: david x. printing/bfa

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ressed in crisp summer whites, Bertha González Nieves is holding court at Mexico City’s premier power-lunch spot, Contramar. Despite a room full of bigwigs, González remains the center of attention. And why not? Since 2009, when González teamed up with Clear Channel CEO Bob Pittman to found super-premium tequila brand Casa


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TM & © 2013 Cable News Network. A Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.


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deconstructed

The Mane Event

In Paris for famed jumping competition Le Saut, Natasha Wolff visits the Hermès flagship, where she learns the horse is always right

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PHOTOGRAPHED by Grant Cornett

Cavale saddle, $8,050, hermès, hermes.com.


©2013 Badgley Mischka

24 EAST 64 TH STREET AT MADISON AVENUE BADGLEYMISCHKA.COM


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painstaking process: Each saddle made at Sellier takes no fewer than 25 hours to complete. First, in a massive room dedicated to reams of calfskin leather sourced from tanneries in Limoges, Biarritz and Haux and hand-dyed in rich shades of chestnut brown and black, individual pieces are cut to size. Then the leathers are sent across the hall to a room where the saddles, known for their lack of visible seams, are hand-stitched together by workshop artisans using the same technique as for the label’s fabled handbags. Each is numbered and recorded into a log, with entries going back to 1909, for inventory purposes. This impeccable, almost obsessive care with details is why fans, including competitors like Delestre a nd Spa n ia rd Pilar Cordon, pony up $8,050 for a Cavale—and much more for a made-to-order original. In leafing through the registry, one item, commissioned by an unnamed Arab royal, stands out: a black leather saddle festooned with all-platinum hardware. Most any saddle, even those not custom-made, can be commissioned to meet specifications from the customer. And, of course, many riders who don’t compete professionally still wear the brand’s equestrian ready-to-wear, from jodhpurs to blazers, and use its saddlery. “The idea is that everyone can come to a store and get something adapted for them,” says Goblet. “But our first client will always be the horse. That is the Hermès way.”

“There are no superfluous layers; Everything serves a purpose.”

Scenes from Le Saut Hermès at the Grand Palais in Paris, April 2013

Dressage events are often stocked with famous faces—and names. Riders include Jessica Springsteen, Georgina Bloomberg and Jennifer Gates.

prop stylist, opposite: Janine Iverson. © alfredo piola.

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nside the Hermès Sellier workshop, a light-filled space above the brand’s Rue du Faubourg SaintHonoré f lagship in Paris, a dozen artisans labor over a dozen meticulous workstations. Their posture reveals the sort of focus and precise attention to detail that one might expect from the storied French house. Except the coveted target customers for those working here aren’t European royals or even Upper East Side ladies-who-lunch, but rather the brand’s original VIP: the horse. Although most people have come to think of Hermès as synonymous with Birkin bags, silk scarves and enamel bracelets, the house was actually created in 1837 to cater to the stable set. And during my stay in Paris for Le Saut, the five-star international jumping competition held each April and sponsored by Hermès, this could not be clearer. After a two-year development phase that included countless design meetings, perfectionist-minded fittings and extensive road testing by competitive riders, Hermès is debuting the Cavale saddle, its new high-level jumping model, here at Le Saut. Conceived and executed in collaboration with Hermès-sponsored riders, including Frenchman Simon Delestre, the Cavale features a deep, seamless calfskin seat, wide gullet, panels injected with latex for comfort and padded f laps to increase stability for both the rider and the horse, especially when flying over fences. “There are no superfluous layers,” says Hermès master artisan Laurent Goblet. “It is pure and simplified. Everything serves a purpose.” Indeed, Hermès’ craftsmanship is on best display in its saddlery. There are currently eight styles on offer, plus custom creations. As the only thing between horse and rider, a saddle must be precise— secure, but also streamlined. And it must be comfortable, one reason the house consults with veterinarians on every design. Production is a


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TIME KEEPER

as a smattering of prime t was what Paul Boutros designs from Cartier and calls his “shimmering IWC. No brand is more of moment.” In 1986, as a One hundred rare watches ten-year-old boy, he was began with a chance encounter. an obsession, though, than Audemars Piguet. trudging along Fifth AvMark Ellwood meets a master. That singular passion enue in New York behind began when an unsush i s c oi n - c ol le c t i ng fa PHOTOGRAPHED BY WESTON WELLS pecting dealer produced a ther; suddenly, he caught a glimpse in a jeweler’s window of a watch. “I was timepiece, pronouncing it a fine “Odemars Pijooet.” hooked; it was love at first sight,” he says, remember- Cannily, Boutros snapped up the $14,000 watch for ing the salesman patiently displaying “the beauty of just $800. “Everything about it was perfection: the the movement, the ticking balance wheel, the shining tiny hands, the subtle curvature tip to the tail. I just jewels and bridges.” Soon afterward Paul was poring felt the quality.” Since then, he’s been single-minded over ads in newspapers, calling numbers and request- about acquiring outstanding examples of Audemars ing catalogs, learning everything he could about high- workmanship. The Jules Audemars Skeleton Equation end wristwatches. He shared the hobby with his father, of Time watch is a standout in his hoard: Ultra-thin a true bonding experience, until the elder Boutros died with a complex movement, he calls it “as good as when Paul was just 26. “What brought us together was Swiss watchmaking gets.” The model that has so far this passion for watches—when we were hunting for eluded him is a vintage Classique Day Moonphase them, talking and learning about them together. Hap- chronograph. “It’s rare as hell and the epitome of piest moments in my life. Since then, I’ve been head beauty,” he says. Boutros isn’t a cold-blooded collector, though. over heels into watches, perpetuating his legacy.” Indeed, Bout ros is now one of A merica’s most These are passion pieces rather than pure investments, passionate —and prolif ic—watch collectors. “Any and he cycles through the holdings to wear each in time or extra money I get goes into watches, and hon- turn. “When I get a new watch, it’ll come to bed with estly, I take fewer vacations than most people do,” me: I put it on the nightstand and wake up in the mornsays the now 37-year-old business developer from ing to see it,” he says with a laugh. A parent himself, the East Coast, who also writes about timepieces, he now has a bond with both of his children via those runs a monthly watch club and is a moderator on fan watches. “My daughter is 7, and she just loves it,” he site TimeZone.com. His more than a hundred–strong says. “She could tell you how a watch works and she collection includes multiple vintage Rolexes, Patek is just so happy to talk about it.” No doubt his own Philippes, Vacheron Constantins and Omegas, as well father would be proud.

BUY IT NOW I’VE BEEN GIVING MY DESIGNER CASTOFFS TO TWO OF MY “DOWNTOWN” FRIENDS, BUT I JUST FOUND OUT THEY’VE BEEN HAWKING THEM ONLINE. SHOULD I ASK FOR THE CLOTHES BACK? Was that your canvas toile Gucci I just snapped up on Vaunte? (A steal, I might add, and in such good condition!) Anyway, how sweet of you to use your reject pile to play dress up with your dolls—er, friends—so that they may be chicer, but of course not too chic, in your presence. Did you ever consider, though, that your Marni makes them look hippy or that even the needy don’t want those Céline fur-soled Birkenstocks? And that perhaps they’re just too polite to tell you so? Don’t ask for the clothes back. If your intention was to help out friends less fortunate, you’re doing just that, whether or not they’re using the Chloé to pay ConEd. If you want to be a real pal, have them over during your next closet purge to pick out items they might actually enjoy. Of course, if that doesn’t work, don’t worry about being polite when they show up to Sunday brunch wearing last season’s Ann Taylor. You tried.

In his 2011 song “Marvin’s Room (Freestyle),” rapper Lil Wayne said, “I told her ‘Sorry for the wait,’ I value her time like an Audemars Piguet.”

CONDÉ NAST ARCHIVE/CORBIS

Highlights from Boutros’ famed collection

MY BEST FRIEND’S FIANCÉ ACCIDENTALLY SEXTED ME. I MEAN, I THINK IT WAS ACCIDENTAL. SHOULD I REPLY? Since we know from Huma that ignoring the Weiner, so to speak, can only last so long, the way I see it, sweetie, you’ve got two options. Both address the issue head on (sorry, couldn’t help myself). Depending on your mood and how much you’re getting at home, you might consider using this opportunity to settle the score with your friend over that Josh Kushner incident from back in ’09. What’s a few dirty tweets between future besties-in-law? (Just don’t send photos of any body part you wouldn’t care to see on TMZ.) Better, though, is to let little Carlos Danger–ish know that you assume his missives must be a mistake, and that while his secret is safe with you—for now—he needs to spill to his betrothed soon, like before she gets the Herrera taken in for sure, and for the love of the NSA, not via text. Or else you will. And while you’re at it, let the poor fellow know a little manscaping never hurt anyone. Just a hunch.


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power seat

ron Howard

Never mind the toys. The Oscar-winning director’s L.A. office is where he gets serious. PHOTOGRAPHED by spencer lowell

Rush follows the lives of Formula One racers, but Howard is no speed freak. “I’m not a car guy,” he’s said. “I did have a fast car.... I didn’t keep it long.”

prop stylist: juliet jernigan

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f all the mementos Ron Howard keeps in his Beverly Hills work space, the most eyecatching isn’t an award, it’s a can of beer. “I did a couple of cameos on The Simpsons that I’m particularly proud of,” Howard says, explaining the tallboy of the cartoon’s fictional brew on his desk. “Don’t try to take my Duff Beer can away from me!” It’s a whimsical keepsake for the moviemaker to hold on to, but not a surprising one. Howard infuses his work with a sense of joy, evidenced by a banana-emblazoned plaque leaning against his wall. It commemorates another tongue-in-cheek TV role, this time as the executive producer and narrator of Arrested Development. But make no mistake. When the New Yorker, who keeps homes in Manhattan and Westchester County, inhabits this West Coast office, he’s in workaholic mode. “In Los Angeles, these are intensive work periods,” says Howard, 59, who shares the office space, including a much-used conference room, with his 30-strong Imagine Enter tainment staff. “I wanted an off ice that was a good environment for story sessions and analyzing the creative components of a project.” Howard has been working from this 1960s bu ild i ng, wh ich boast s a west wa rd v iew of Wilshire Boulevard, for more than a decade, using it as a headquarters while making Frost/Nixon, The Da Vinci Code and A Beautiful Mind, as well as his latest, Formula One action drama Rush. “I used to think an office needed to be cool, casual and a great place to hang out. Then it became a place to get things done,” Howard says, noting how the space has changed. “This office is for coming into the hotbed that is Hollywood, rolling up my sleeves and getting work done.” Indeed. Tokens of completed projects—from the Apollo 13 podium to the souvenir baseball caps, a Howard trademark—are ever ywhere, sprinkled among family portraits and works by Salvador Dalí and Winslow Homer. Howard also has a taste for decorating with gold. On his desk are Director’s Guild plaques for A Beautiful Mind and Apollo 13 and an Emmy for Curious George. “I do have a few awards,” he says sheepishly, “but the Oscars are at my house.”—ADAM RATHE


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Publishing

write on time

For three celebrated novelists, the latest book was years in the making

were more like outdoor furnit u re —they fought vehemently over them. I couldn’t Q&A b el ie ve how mu ch t i m e I billed over those peacocks. But it turned out neither was allowed to have peacocks at Meet Laura Wasser, the lawyer on the places they moved, so then they tried to give them the front lines of front-page splits to the other person! hen movie stars and chart-toppers call DJ: What’s been your toughest case? it quits on their marriages, they know lw: I had a case where a couple of years after that their fortunes, families and repu- a child was bor n, the sper m donor wanted tations are on the line. They want the stron- some custodial rights. In California law, a gest representation possible, and for Angelina sperm donor has no rights or responsibility. Jolie, Kim Kardashian, Heidi Klum, Britney But it was sad, because the father had already Spears and Stevie Wonder, the attorney of established a relationship with the kid. I repchoice has been Laura Wasser. The unmarried resented the mother and we prevailed. I think mother of two is a second-generation divorce it’s on appeal. The father is trying to figure lawyer, and her first book, It Doesn’t Have to out how to get the law changed. It was an inBe That Way, will be published in October. teresting case for me because I might have —interviewed by SHARON KUNZ personal feelings about it as a parent, but as an officer of the court, it’s my job to uphold the law, and the law is clear. D u j our : Is there a busy period? L aura W asser : January. People go through the DJ: T here’s been a recent t rend of people holidays and think, When I start the new year, I throwing divorce par ties. Do you ever get want to start fresh. Also at the end of the school invited? year. When people’s kids go to camp or they lw: Yes, I’ve been i nv ited but I don’t go. take a vacation, they have more time to deal [Laughs] I think it’s a little strange, but I don’t with personal issues. judge. In this profession, you can’t. DJ: It must be tough to be a divorce lawyer to DJ: Do you keep in touch with your clients? this crowd. What qualities are most important? lw: Not usually. But I had one client around 15 lw: Patience. And you need to be compassionate years ago—he had a little girl, and his wife but not too compassionate. I’ve seen attorneys wanted full custody. They had a big f ight, burn out because they want to be best friends but he got 50/50 custody. Every year I get a with all their clients. That’s unrealistic. I can do Christmas card with a photo of his daughter. some hand-holding, but making you feel better Once he wrote, “I want you to know that I after he put a picture of a new woman on his wouldn’t be the parent I am and my daughter wouldn’t be the person she is if it weren’t for Facebook page, that’s not my job. DJ: What’s the craziest thing a client has argued you having been there.” On days when I feel like, “Ugh, what am I doing? This is a terrible about in a divorce? lw: I had one client with peacocks. Even though job. People are miserable,” that makes me the couple didn’t treat them as pets—they think, I made a difference, and it feels good.

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The Lowland The first novel since 2004 from Pulitzer Prize winner Jhumpa Lahiri, this book follows two brothers, Subhash and Udayan Mitra, who are initially inseparable but later find themselves on divergent paths. The captivating story makes strong, beautifully rendered observations about family and identity. Sept. 24 Bridget Jones: Mad About The Boy Helen Fielding’s first novel in a decade catches up with the British author’s most famous character, whose seemingly quaint 1990s worries have been replaced by more modern problems: However will the notoriously neurotic Jones handle skinny jeans or sexting? Oct. 15

The Goldfinch In this 784page third novel from Donna Tartt, a young man reeling from the loss of his mother falls into the seedy underbelly of the New York City art world. Tartt, the beloved if reclusive author of The Secret History, was last heard from in 2002, the year her sophomore effort, The Little Friend, was released. Oct. 22

”I am a marvelous housekeeper. Every time I leave a man, I keep his house.”—Zsa Zsa Gabor, who’s been divorced seven times (and had one annulment)

wasser: steven pan. illustration: luke best.

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the DIVORCE whisperer

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ome authors are celebrated for the sort of prolific writing that puts a new tome on fans’ nightstands every year. Others count as part of their appeal the opposite: a Valium-slow output that makes each new novel, no matter why it was waylaid, an event. Here are three such books, soon to hit the shelves.


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The new bling ringS by the numbers

A breakdown of recent Hollywood-esque heists

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ave we entered a new golden age for jewel thieves? In May, $1.4 million worth of Chopard gems were stolen from a hotel just off the Croisette during the Cannes Film Festival. Within a week, a necklace valued at $2.6 million vanished from a party at the Hotel Du Cap-Eden-Roc, in nearby Cap d’Antibes, where Sharon Stone, Chris Tucker and Paris Hilton were among the guests. Adding a touch of absurdity to the intrigue, the first robbery came hours after Sofia Coppola’s The Bling Ring premiered at Cannes. Two months later, in a crime that would have broken Holly Golightly’s heart, Tiffany executive Ingrid Lederhaas-Okun of Darien, Connecticut, was arrested for stealing more than $2 million from the famed company—including diamond rings, earrings and bracelets, which she then resold. (Lederhaas-Okun pleaded guilty.) And in a heist that would have impressed the Ocean’s Eleven gang, Inspector Clouseau and Cary Grant, an armed suspect in Cannes stole a reported $136 million in jewels from the Carlton Hotel in July—the biggest robbery in French history. The Carlton, of course, was the setting for Alfred Hitchcock’s 1955 romantic thriller To Catch a Thief, and, in another twist, police believe the culprit may be a member of the notorious “Pink Panther” ring. Here, a look at how it all adds up.—MICHAEL SOLOMON

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Estimated number of Pink Panther–related robberies

Number of Tiffany’s $525 Infinity bracelets you’d need to sell to afford a home in Darien, CT

$121K10

Average salary of a Tiffany & Co. vice president:

30 %

increase in the average price of diamonds per carat, compared to a year ago

$750,000

Audrey Hepburn’s earnings for Breakfast at Tiffany’s (it made her the second highest-paid actress in Hollywood, per film, after Elizabeth Taylor)

$1,124,774,054

49¢ Cost of a movie ticket in 1955, when To Catch a Thief was released

minutes into To Catch a Thief, Alfred Hitchcock makes a cameo, sitting next to Cary Grant on a bus

­­­­worldwide gross for the Ocean’s Eleven trilogy

18,256 25 Consecutive blackjack hands George Clooney lost gambling during his downtime on the set of Ocean’s Eleven:

eBay listings for “Tiffany & Co.” fine jewelry


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the near-impossible yogic axiom of “awareness without judgment”—and that means resisting the temptation to ascertain whether your spiritual guru is sporting a newer Lululemon getup than you are. Or does it? Certainly, finding yourself admiring your teacher’s $600 Fiorentini + Baker boots fits an uncomfortable elitist stereotype that practitioners during the swami-centric ’60s and ’70s would have mocked, or at least discouraged. But over the course of half a century, that version of yoga has undeniably transformed into something much broader, evolving to adapt to the tastes of those who practice it—and pay for it—most. Colleen Saidman, proud owner of those boots, is the blonder half of the world’s most famous yoga couple (she’s married to mega-yo— CELEBRITY INSTRUCTOR gi Rodney Yee). As part of the royalty crowned COLLEEN SAIDMAN to reign over the cottage industry of Western yoga, her tastes are comfortably aligned with those of many of her students at Yoga Shanti—where she’s taught Karan, along with Christy Turlington, Russell Simmons and power agent Esther Newberg. Saidman says her students appreciate the fact that she’s not about to advise them to cash out in favor of a life of moderate means. Not even close. “Living ever y moment to the f ullest is yogic,” she says. “Actually, it’s all yogic, but I prefer to be yogic in beautiful shoes.” She and Yee gladly admit they enjoy the fruits of their labors—like with the $700 Yves Delorme sheets that Saidman calls her “best investment ever.” Clearly, we’re not in India anymore. In the modern, $10 billion–yoga-industry era, the centuries-old spiritual discipline might net top instr uctors—like Baron Baptiste, who holds court over a multimillion-dollar yoga empire—seven figures a ZEITGEIST year, according to yoga agent Ava Taylor. Premier studios like New York’s Exhale and Sync command nearly $30 per class. And next month at the Smithsonian, the first exhibition on the visual history of the practice, “Yoga: The Art of Transformation,” is being ushered in with star wattage: Alec Baldwin and Yoga makes an enlightened ascent into a yogini wife, Hilaria, will co-chair the opening gala, with tables higher tax bracket. Erin Graham hits her mat going for $50,000. in search of far more than just inner peace. “We must be in the dance of generating energy through receiving, giving and spending money in ways that are life affirmILLUSTRATED BY LUKE BEST ing,” says Baptiste, putting a New Age spin on a classic capitalist here’s a perfectly nice yoga studio down the street: air-conditioned, with a motto. “We then create a pathway between material pleasure and what matters creaky hardwood f loor and the lingering scent of incense, body lotion and most.” Baptiste devotes his dollars to scuba diving in Kona and Zanzibar—and exertion. It’s got a communal changing room, mats for people who forgot to to sprucing up his home, which is tucked away in the middle of the mountains. “Get over the guilt,” he says. bring theirs and coconut water for sale. In terms of reconciling a quest for spiritual simplicity with the appreciation And then there’s the personal yoga studio in Donna Karan’s 7,000-squarefoot apartment overlooking Central Park West. It’s a space inspired, at least of a physical existence rich in luxury, it seems that yoga isn’t part of the conflict in part, by the fashion magnate’s go-to Hamptons studio, the East End celeb at all; it’s part of the solution. Yoga encourages practitioners to find their hapfavorite Yoga Shanti, where sunlight pours in from massive windows, reflecting piness in the immediate moment, to “be here now”—which means anyone, off the gold ceiling and gleaming wood f loors. The sweaty woman in dolphin anywhere, at any time. The mistress of yoga 2.0, social-media guru Sadie Nardini, describes herself as a “healthy-hedonism advocate,” having made peace pose one mat over, meanwhile, bears one of the world’s most famous faces. with the seemingly disparate concepts of material comfort and spiritual underThere are yoga studios, and there are yoga studios. It’s an unspoken rule in yoga that you aren’t supposed to evaluate your standing. “If you feel better with a little meat, wine, even a cigarette here and teacher’s pedicure, or anything else. Being on your mat means that you practice there,” says Nardini, “who are we to make you feel guilty about it?”

“I PREFER TO BE YOGIC IN BEAUTIFUL SHOES.”

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on exhibit

the revenge of robert Indiana

When critics turned their backs, the pop artist abandoned the New York scene. Alexandra Peers charts his comeback. Portrait by irvin serrano  interiors by douglas friedman

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hen I finally reach Robert Indiana at his home on the island of Vinalhaven, Maine, he is munching from a Zabar’s gift basket his art dealer, Paul Kasmin, has sent him and is very apologetic. “I’m sorry—for long periods of time, I don’t answer the phone,” he explains, of a symphony of missed connections, canceled trips and lost messages. The 85-year-old artist has very pointedly left the art world, and Manhattan, for the pleasures of isolation, he says, and wants to keep it that way. But as we chat about art, politics, his casting the I-Ching for Andy Warhol back in the 1960s and how the fog in Maine makes you a better painter, he is warm and friendly. And, perhaps, is there a touch of gloating? In September, a retrospective of his life’s work opens at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York. It is, by some accounts, long overdue.

For decades, you couldn’t have been considered any more “out” than Robert Indiana. It was a backlash equaled to his early success in its intensity. The painter and sculptor was so wildly embraced at the beginning of his career that, among other highlights, the Museum of Modern Art in New York used his now-iconic red-green-and-blue LOVE, with the tilted O, for its holiday card in 1965. The image soon adorned the weepy megaseller Love Story, plus one of the most successful U.S. stamps ever issued. Considered a pioneer in the Pop Art movement, Indiana didn’t transition like Warhol and Donald Judd, both born the same year, managed to do. In the ’80s and early ’90s, his works didn’t sell at auction or were consigned to the “day” sales with artists less well-known and emblematic. In art-history texts of

the last decade he was, quite literally, a footnote, despite being one of the few postwar artists to create art with a political or civil rights theme. What’s changed? In today’s roaring art market, collectors have no issue with an artist being commercial. Far from it. There’s also the current vogue for word-based art (blame it on the texting generation) and street art. Add to that a nostalgia for a kind of particularly American imagery that’s disappearing—road signs and the like—plus the renewed interest in political art, and Indiana is being taken seriously again. Well-known names in the art world, like dealers Marianne Boesky and Asher Edelman and art consultant Todd Levin, are advocating for his work, seeing it as historically important, not to mention ridiculously undervalued compared with his contemporaries—and thus likely to rise.

The island of Vinalhaven, Maine, where Indiana lives, has just 1,200 year-round residents.


Hanging in the living room of Indiana’s Victorian home—which was previously an Odd Fellows lounge—are two prints from his “KVF Series (Hartley Elegies).”

New York’s nightlife never much interested Indiana: The artist has said he visited the celebrated nightclub Studio 54 only once.

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Previous page: Indiana at the Star of Hope Lodge, his Vinalhaven, Maine, home, which doubles as his archive, with paintings from the “Coenties Slip” series. Above: Alphabet Paintings in the artist’s studio. Right: A LOVE print and marble LOVE sculpture displayed in his library


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Courtesy of the Whitney Museum

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Indiana’s The Sweet Mystery 1960-62, which will be featured in the Whitney retrospective, showcases his interpretation of gingko leaves.


“The simplicity of his work is the power of it.”

The artist saves newspaper clippings and reviews of past shows in his home.

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recently decorated the gardens T h at’s a re a son able b et: of the Emirates Palace in Abu The Whitney retrospective is Dhabi. curated by Barbara Haskell, T h e a r t i s t ’s r e e m e r g e n c e whose widely acclaimed 2009 began with a show at the Farnshow almost single-handedly swor th Museu m in Rockland, pushed Georgia O’Keeffe out In 1973, the U.S. Postal Service created a LOVE stamp—and more than 300 million were printed. Maine, in 2009 and also with his of t h e m u s e u m - g i f t- s h o p involvement in the Obama campostcard set and back into arthistory texts. This show, similarly, does not mess minimalist legend Agnes Martin. Cut to 1961, when paign. Coining HOPE, a stacked-letter twin sister to around. Titled pointedly “Beyond LOVE,” it argues MoMA bought his “American Dream, I,” its first LOVE, he reproduced the word on campaign memothat the iconic image eclipsed the public’s under- pop ar t painting purchase —at the time, he was rabilia; sales topped $1 million, he says. In Manhattan this fall, he’s looking forward to standing of the “emotional poignancy and symbolic only 33. Soon followed his first major public commission, seeing Kelly and Edward Albee, whose play Americomplexity” of Indiana’s art. He “addresses the most fundamental issues facing humanity—love, this time for the New York State Pavilion at the 1964 can Dream inspired his painting sold to MoMA. He death, sin and forgiveness—giving new meaning World’s Fair. Reflecting his mom’s years of working wants to visit Ground Zero, since one of the rare to our understanding of…the American Dream.” In in diners, Indiana’s giant lighted sign read “EAT”— times he’s been to New York City in recent decades other words: Come home, Bobby. All is forgiven. but it was a f lop and was unplugged shortly after. was on September 11. But there will be “a roomful Hungry fairgoers mistook it for restaurant signage of people I don’t know, and that’s depressing,” frets By you. We hope. The wide gap between prices for Indiana’s work and were annoyed to find otherwise. Meanwhile, the artist, as so many friends have passed away. and those of other 1960s ar tists is nar rowi ng: the sheer ubiquity of his imagery devalued his work He wor ries that fans and ar t lovers will request In June, a 78-inch-high sculpture of the number in critics’ eyes. Burnt out, Indiana headed to New autographs, which he finds tiring. I offer to put in eight exceeded its estimate at Christie’s, selling England and continued to paint and sculpt “work this story a request—“No autographs”—and he is for $461,000. And a recent “season” suite of his that’s been around for years and years and years, but delighted. The Whitney show may be overdue, but so is no one wanted to show it— wo r k s d i s pl a ye d a t except the Swiss,” he notes, something else, says Indiana. While HOPE was a the Four Seasons ressomewhat sadly. His art sales money-raiser for the Obama campaign, he’s never taurant, not far from remai ned con siste nt , but gotten a thank-you. He’s waiting. a Picasso, was priced The ball’s in your court, Mr. President. mostly outside the snobby at $1.6 million. Nick New York Korniloff, director of art world. the Art Miami and Art Indeed, S ou t h a m p t o n f a i r s , –Nick korniloff fo r m a ny says dealers someinf luentimes buy inventories prior to an influential exhibition—he saw it for John tial collectors, Indiana’s “easy” Chamberlain’s retrospective at the Guggenheim word art was simply the perfect Museum—and then sell into the popularity of the gateway to pop art. When Chrisshow. “The simplicity of his work is the power of t i na a nd Joh n Cha nd r is bega n it,” says Korniloff. Love is “just a word, but he’s assembling the art collection for Celebrity Cruises in 1990—now clearly gotten that word around the world.” Born Robert Clark in 1928 in New Castle, Indiana, valued at eight figures and feathe artist spent his childhood watching suburbia turing works by Jeff Koons and roll by from a car seat: His family had moved 20 K ik i Smith — one of their f irst times before he turned 18, the year he joined the purchases was created by IndiAir Force for, ironically, stability. Then came art ana, says cu rator Mar ieangela schools and stints in Maine, Scotland and Chicago, Capuzzo. LOVE sculpt ures are as well as friendships with Ellsworth Kelly, a neigh- displayed around the world. And a bor in Lower Manhattan’s Coenties Slip lofts, and suite of Indiana’s “number” works


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Hemingways were everywhere at Sloppy Joe’s Bar in Key West, Florida, which held its 33rd Annual Hemingway Look-Alike Contest in July. Stephen Terry of Palm Harbor, Florida, won first place, trumping 123 Papa impersonators. Henry Hargreaves photographed the competition, learning the importance of being Ernest.

1. Wally Collins, a pub owner from Arizona 2. W. Boyd Hughes, a lawyer from Pennsylvania 3. Tom Vanek, a journalist from Ohio 4. Thomas Dwyer, a customer service coordinator from Texas 5. Contest winner Stephen Terry, a software developer from Florida 6. Robert Orlin, an artist from Florida 7. Richard Wells, a fisherman from Florida 8. Richard Filip, a real estate agent from Texas 9. Pete De La Garza, a member of the U.S. Army from Texas 10. Michael Groover, a harbor pilot from Georgia 11. John Davidson, a rancher from Texas 12. Ernest Hemingway, a writer from Florida 13. Hardy Good, a CEO from Arizona 14. Gerrit Marshall, a broadcast engineer from Wisconsin 15. Jack Heller, a school administrator from Indiana 16. Fred Johnson, a physician’s assistant from Florida 17. Dusty Rhodes, a marine biologist from Florida 18. Don Hoyt, a nuclear engineer from California

Country-music icon Dolly Parton has said she once entered a Dolly Parton look-alike contest. The singer came in second place.

look-alikes: henry hargreaves, 2013. the original: © yousuf karsh, 1957.

community


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SPOTLIGHT

I

During the course of their research, Masters and Johnson observed more than 10,000 orgasms.

MEG RYAN: COLUMBIA PICTURES/EVERETT COLLECTION

MASTERING MICHAEL SHEEN

The Welsh actor, who is known both for h is screen-steali ng biopic per form a n c e s ( F r o s t / N i x o n , T h e Q u e e n) a n d h i s We s t E n d t h e a t e r g r a v i t a s No subject is off-limits with the Welsh actor, next (Caligula, Hamlet), is dressed in a tailored charcoal suit and a freshly pressed starring in Showtime’s racy new drama ‘Masters of Sex.’ shirt, ready to recount some of the more Lindsay Silberman gets the salacious details. risqué moments on set. While the series PHOTOGRAPHED BY HIROYUKI SEO STYLED BY SARAH SCHUSSHEIM is not a comedy, shooting it yielded a few light moments. Such as those on-set tricks orchestrated by his co-star Lizzy Caplan, who plays Masters’ research partner, Virt’s lunch hour at a chic brasserie in Beverly Hills—the kind of place ginia Johnson. “I’d find ‘presents’ in my trailer…like giant replicas of where Botoxed women in spandex share salads and businessmen hov- penises,” he says with a snicker, combing his fingers through a tuft of er over laptops and steak frites. Michael Sheen and I are discussing salt-and-pepper hair. “I guess we knew what we were getting into when female orgasms and dildos. Of course, the topic might seem inappro- we signed on because of the subject matter, but I would imagine if we priate under ordinary circumstances, but given Sheen’s latest role—he didn’t have the same sense of humor it would be incredibly awkward. plays the real-life human-sexuality pioneer Dr. William Masters in We really developed a bond through dealing with bizarre situations.” “Bizarre” might be an understatement. In the pilot episode of the Showtime’s new series Masters of Sex—our conversation doesn’t feel show, the duo stands behind a two-way mirror with a stopwatch and quite as dirty as it otherwise would.


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clipboards, documenting women while they masturbate and couples as they have sex. According to Sheen, that’s only a small fraction of what’s to come. Masters of Sex is based on Thomas Maier’s 2009 biography of Masters and Johnson, chronicling their controversial lives and the groundbreaking work that helped launch the sexual revolution of the 1960s. “Masters had a very thick outer layer that people couldn’t get through. Even at the end of his life, people said no one really knew him,” says the 44-year-old, with an accent far less pronounced than one might expect from a Welshman. “He’s opaque—a closed book, emotionally. He’s secretive and very reserved.” Sheen, it seems, is quite the opposite. By the time we’re finished with lunch, he’s showing off iPhone photos of his parents dressed like medieval k nights on a party bus he rented to transport his family and friends to a Medieval Times in Buena Park, California. He gushes over his daughter, Lily, a creative 14-year-old who loves to write and has taken up acrobatics. (“Just unbelievable!” he says of her recent performance.) Sheen’s candor is refreshing and unexpected. He rarely, if ever, gives interviews and is seen in tabloids only when photographed alongside whatever A-list actress he’s dating—he had Lily in 1999 with his then-girlfriend Kate Beckinsale, and split from Rachel McAdams in February of this year. “I’m happy with where I’ve gotten to at this point, and it hasn’t really been based on me doing publicity,” he says. “I don’t give much of a shit about that.” Sheen would much rather focus on his work. The first of Masters’ 12 episodes premieres on September 29; until then, Sheen will be anticipating America’s reaction. “If people have the wrong expectations about it, that could really backfire on us,” he says. “It’s not a romantic comedy;

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it’s not Sex and the City or Mad Men…and it’s not about perfect people having perfect sex. The whole point of the series is to explore a subject that has so much mythology and romance surrounding it.” He pauses, glancing toward the gaggle of thin, plastic women: “And to try and cut through all of that and show what’s real.”

THE COMEBACK KIDS

Treasured TV stars return to the small screen this season. Here are five of our favorites.

CHRISTIAN SLATER

MINNIE DRIVER

ROBIN WILLIAMS

GILLIAN ANDERSON

KRISTIN DAVIS

Beloved As: A film star whose TV turns—My Own Worst Enemy, The Forgotten— never quite soared.

Beloved As: Dahlia Malloy, an excon trying to pass in an upper-middle-class town in The Riches.

Beloved As: The titular alien on the 1970s phenomenon Mork & Mindy.

Beloved As: Agent Dana Scully on conspiracy-theorist fave The X-Files.

Latest Role: Mind Games’ Ross Edwards, a businessman specializing in psychological manipulation, and not only on the clock. [ABC]

Latest Role: Emotionally fragile but alluring Fiona, a yogapracticing mom, in About a Boy, based on the Nick Hornby novel. [NBC]

Latest Role: Advertising exec Simon Roberts, toiling alongside his daughter (played by Sarah Michelle Gellar) on the workplace comedy The Crazy Ones. [CBS]

Latest Role: Meg Fitch on Crisis, a political thriller following a rookie Secret Service agent among powerful Washingtonians mired in international treachery. [NBC]

Beloved As: Charlotte York, the WASPy, sensible (albeit twice married) one on Sex and the City. Latest Role: Ginny on Bad Teacher, a sure-to-be-raunchy comedy about a recent divorcée working as an indecorous educator. [CBS]

In 2003, Sheen shared a London apartment with fellow Welsh actor Matthew Rhys. The friends considered buying their favorite pub, the Black Lion.

ILLUSTRATION: LUKE BEST

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scene

CANNEs up close

Getting candid around the French Riviera PHOTOGRAPHED by ellen von unwerth  Written by Adam Rathe

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utside of the applause—and, of course, the occasional jeer—that punctuates the end of any hotly anticipated world premiere, the most familiar sound at the Cannes Film Festival might be the snap of Ellen von Unwerth’s camera. The Paris-based photographer has been making the rounds at Cannes, capturing the world’s most famous faces—and those about to join that echelon—for the past 13 years. Starting with her first visit, the dazzling spectacle of the French Riviera’s annual fete captivated her. “There’s so much energy—you run into so (continued on page 141)

photo credits teekay

Clockwise from top: Ellen von Unwerth at the carousel at Croisette Beach Hotel; Ahna O’Reilly, of Fruitvale Station and As I Lay Dying, who fondly recalls, “James Franco’s production company threw me a party. Just a party in honor of me, which I couldn’t believe anyone was doing. I had all my As I Lay Dying family and Fruitvale Station friends there.”

Ahna O’Reilly wears a dress by DIANE VON FURSTENBERG. Makeup: Emma Day for Chanel at The Milton Agency. Hair: Johnnie Sapong using Leonor Greyl at Jed Root.


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Clockwise from top left: Robin Wright, in Cannes for The Bling Ring; actress Anna Anisimova, who says, “The whole experience was pretty over the top and glamorous, but one night was particularly surreal. We left where we were staying and took a boat to Paul Allen’s party, which was on this magnificent yacht. Then we took another boat to another gorgeous yacht for the Chopard party. Both of them were so different and had such interesting guests. I was thinking, ‘Where am I? What is this world?’”; Paz Vega, who adds, “It’s fantastic to see the people you do in Cannes. Like Jane Fonda—I hadn’t seen her in months. She is a fascinating woman and we had an amazing dinner at Tetou, where you can eat the best bouillabaisse.”

Robin Wright wears a dress by CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION. Emma Watson wears a dress by CHANEL COUTURE. Anna Anisimova wears a jacket by AKRIS and a dress by VICTORIA BECKHAM. Paz Vega wears a jumpsuit by ALEXANDRE VAUTHIER.

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The Congress; Emma Watson at the premiere of her movie


many people and everybody’s talking about movies with such great liveliness,” she says. This year was no exception. The photographer hit the festival—premieres, parties, yachts and all—to shoot some of the most exciting and promising talent for DuJour. “I t r y to catch a moment, a lit tle slice of life when people have some emotion and when something exciting is happening,” she explains. “What I like about it is this pressure: You have to connect with the person and get something out of them—I like the adrenaline shock. And it’s not like having someone to photograph for the (continued on page 142)

000 141 The Great Gatsby star Elizabeth Debicki says, “At every party I went to, I walked past people who have only ever existed to me on a screen or in my imagination. I walked right past them and tried to be very well behaved.” Rising Australian actor Alexander England remembers his best experience at the festival: “I recall standing on a balcony at the Gatsby party, looking down at Florence Welch, from Florence and the Machine, performing. I had a very tasty cocktail and I think cannons went off. That

photo credits teekay

struck me as a pretty amazing moment.”

Elizabeth Debicki wears a suit by REED KRAKOFF, and shoes by GIORGIO ARMANI. Makeup: Emma Day for Chanel at The Milton Agency. Alexander England wears a shirt and tie by HUGO BOSS.


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Israel Broussard wears a suit, belt and shoes by SALVATORE FERRAGAMO.

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whole day. In Cannes you have three minutes, so you just do it.” Occasionally, there are situations that spin beyond even her control. “This year, The Great Gatsby party was amazing—even though it was pouring rain,” says the photographer, who counts the Hôtel du CapEden-Roc among her favorite Cannes haunts. “It looked like a movie set, with all the girls staggering around in their high heels and their party dresses. The umbrellas f lipped over and it actually looked like a movie.” She adds, “Cannes is great when you’re outside and can go to the parties at the beach and the parties on the boats.” Of course, it’s not all about revelry—people are here for work, too. The 2013 festival featured 20 movies in the competition, including Roman Polanski’s Venus in Fur, Joel and Ethan Coen’s Inside Llewyn Davis and Palme d’Or winner Blue Is The Warmest Colour, judged by the likes of Steven Spielberg, Ang Lee and Nicole Kidman. Part of what keeps von Unwerth returning is (continued on page 144)

Israel Broussard, the 19-year-old star of The Bling Ring was thrilled to be in Cannes. “This was my first trip out of the country, so it was definitely something to be excited about,” he says. “I didn’t know much about Cannes. I was Googling it on my way to the airport, trying to get some background, and I was like, Oh, my gosh. I didn’t feel like I was ready for that.”


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Clockwise from right: Eva Longoria at the Facebook party on Anna Anisimova’s yacht; filmmaker Sofia Coppola with Paris everyone I know from around the world is there every single year. It’s really great just to catch up with old friends. The parties are incredible”; actress Claire Julien, who recalls, “We stayed at the Hôtel Martinez, so every single day there would be

Eva Longlsdfkj

Hilton, who says, “Cannes is so fun during the festival because

women coming down the stairs in huge ball gowns. It was magical”; musician Bryan Ferry, a contributor to the soundtrack for The Great Gatsby, with his sons.

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Paris Hilton & Sophia Copt ke

photo credits teekay

Eva Longoria wears a dress by MARIA LUCIA HOHAN. Paris Hilton wears a dress by HERVÉ LÉGER. Sofia Coppola wears a dress by LOUIS VUITTON. Claire Julien wears a top and skirt by EMILIO PUCCI. Bryan Ferry and sons wear pieces from ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA, BURBERRY and CANALI.


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the passion actors have about the projects they’ve brought to the Côte d’Azur. “Everyone’s really enthusiastic about the films and about the storytelling,” she explains. “You can shoot some people nobody knows, and then they’re the biggest actors out there. That’s exciting: You photograph them and suddenly they become huge.” After a week of party-hopping and air-kissing, however, even the most tireless Cannes cheerleader can have her fill of glitz and glamour. “Every year I say, ‘Oh, I don’t think I’m going to go next year, this is really tiring,’ ” von Unwerth says with a laugh. “But then when the time comes, I always go back again.”

Legendary producer Jerry Weintraub, at the festival premiering Behind the Candelabra, is a Cannes veteran: “I’ve been going to the festival for at least 35 years. I’m usually on a yacht or with friends in the south of France, and then I sail up to Italy and

Jerry Weintraub wears a jacket by BRIONI, shirt by JOHN VARVATOS, jeans by DIESEL and shoes by NIKE.

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around Sardinia and so on.”


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DE NIRO DEFINED

The famously reserved actor never lets the outside world get too close. But just as he’s turning 70 and with A new film, The Family, in theaters, Robert De Niro opens the door and reveals what makes him tick. Finally, for once, he’s talking to you. WRITTEN by Anthony DeCurtis  PHOTOGRAPHED by Robbie Fimmano  styled by Karen Kaiser


was a tinderbox that a wrong word, a thoughtless gesture, an unconsidered act would inevitably ignite. As a viewer you carried that awareness as you watched him in every scene. He never signaled it, and he never needed to. It was with him every step that he took. In De Niro’s new film, The Family, his relationship with violence takes on another compelling dimension. He plays Giovanni Manzoni, a mobster who f lees America with his wife, played by Michelle Pfeiffer, and two children to France as part of the witness protection program. In one scene, the renamed “Fred Blake” is grilling meat at a cookout organized in their village. Fred does his best to behave himself, but as his guests begin to display the casually condescending rudeness at which the French excel, director Luc Besson (La Femme Nikita, Taken) allows us glimpses into Fred’s fantasy life. As Fred grins and mumbles cordial responses, he imagines grabbing one of his interlocutors by the scruff of his neck, slamming his face against the burning-hot grill and holding it there. That contrast between an explosive past in which such assaults would have routinely taken place and, at least theoretically, a more sedate present encapsulates the struggle Fred contends with—and in some metaphoric sense it’s De Niro’s struggle as well. Everything he does at this stage of his career is inevitably compared with his groundbreaking performances of the past. But what sense do roles like those make for a man who has just turned 70? On a summer afternoon I arrive at De Niro’s Tribeca production office to interview him about The Family. Meeting him is a thrilling prospect but a bit scary, as if I were meeting someone whom I’d somehow known my whole life. He’s earned a reputation as a notoriously difficult interview, so I had no certainty that my personal identification with him would help at all. I remember seeing De Niro at a press conference with Scorsese in New York in 1990 to discuss Goodfellas with a group of reporters. Seated on a dais, he writhed in agony even when asked the most innocuous questions. He stammered and gestured helplessly, his eyes pleading for the ever-voluble Scorsese to bail him out. As recently as 2010, a television appearance with Dustin Hoffman on Late Show with David Letterman to promote Li t t l e Fo c k e r s o n c e again fou nd De Niro so taciturn—and Letterman so thoroughly unsettled—that Hoffman described himself as “the De Niro whisperer” and offered to answer any of the questions Letterman intended for his fellow guest. De Niro’s office is spacious and airy but at the same time lived-in. It’s obvious that a real human being actually works here, and the books, DVDs, magazines and movie posters all ref lect his interests. The shyness that everyone who knows him immediately mentions is evident but so is an easy graciousness. Dressed in khaki pants and a white shirt, he’s very much a gentleman in the old-world sense. I offer him a book I worked on with Clive Davis, and he thanks me, saying, “I was interested in this book,” and then, “Did you inscribe it?”

“You just have to say, ‘I made this choice.’ ”

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obert De Niro wants to know where I live. Or, more precisely, where I used to live. We are talking about the New York City neighborhood where De Niro was born and raised, Greenwich Village, and, specifically, the public pool that runs nearly a block from St. Luke’s Place to Clarkson Street, just west of Seventh Avenue South. Apart from its legitimate use during the day, the pool provided a welcome respite from the summer heat when kids like De Niro climbed the black wrought-iron fence that enclosed it and swam until the cops came to chase them away. Growing up in the same neighborhood less than a decade after De Niro, I took those night swims in Carmine Pool and, more disturbingly, experienced the same complicated contrast between the tough Italian-American street environment and the alternative bohemian culture that suffused the Village in the 1960s and 1970s. Crime, reform school and prison loomed menacingly in the shadows of the artistic life that made the neighborhood known to the larger world around us. The child of painters who divorced when he was three, De Niro straddled the two realms precariously. Running with the toughs, he became known on the street as “Bobby Milk” because of his pale complexion. As we explore those dynamics, De Niro has a question. “You grew up on 10th and Bleecker?” he asks. “Which corner?” It’s his trademark obsession with detail, the attention to authenticity that has informed his acting for 40 years, since he played the smalltime thug Johnny Boy in Mean Streets (1973), the first of eight films he has made with Martin Scorsese. “I was in the street thing, and then I just realized that I’m not going to get anywhere if I do this,” De Niro says. “I remember telling my friends I wanted to be an actor. Some of them were responsive. Some of them were nonplussed. They didn’t know what to think about it. Actually we shot Mean Streets right on the block I used to hang out on. We used some of the guys I used to know in the film, and Marty used some of the guys he knew too.” For anyone who grew up in that world, Mean Streets was a revelation, not because of what it told you about yourself but because of what it told everyone else in America about you. As Bruce Springsteen did for the rudderless working-class kids on the Jersey Shore, De Niro and his friend Scorsese found meaning and beauty in lives that had never before been deemed worthy of artistic treatment. In film after film—in The Godfather: Part II, Taxi Driver, The Deer Hunter, Raging Bull, Goodfellas, Cape Fear and Casino—De Niro embodied characters for whom violence roiled within their inner lives. Each


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“I didn’t, but I certainly would be happy to.” “Do that,” De Niro says. “And date it.” I do so, but not before silently working out if there were some way I could wrangle a week or so to figure out what I might actually want to say to Robert De Niro in such a context. I settle on “For Robert De Niro, an inspiration.” He reads it and, once again, thanks me. Until I determine where I would be most comfortable in his office, De Niro does not sit down. Then we start talking. It’s a sacred tenet of media training that interview subjects should politely listen to questions but then say whatever they want to say in response with no regard for what was asked. De Niro is nothing like that. He refuses clichés, and there is nothing glib about him. He won’t just rattle answers off the top of his head. When asked about how he dealt with the violence in making Taxi Driver— perhaps his most iconic film but also his most graphic—De Niro says, “When we were shooting the last scene, the shootout in the hallway and all that, we would always make jokes between takes because it’s such a gruesome thing. You hear about surgeons who are doing these sort of gruesome triages on soldiers and they’re joking as they do it, because what else can you do? It’s not going to change the situation. It makes it easier for you, and at the same time, you’re getting the job done.” Another striking aspect of De Niro is his support of other actors and directors. He says of both of his co-stars in The Family, Michelle Pfeiffer and Tommy Lee Jones, that he was “lucky” they agreed to appear in the film and praised Pfeiffer’s depiction of a mob wife as “terrific.” Such generosity is extended to James Gandolfini, who had died at age 51 a few days before our interview. Gandolfini’s role as a mob boss in The Sopranos has been compared to De Niro’s work, but De Niro shows no hint of competitiveness. Instead, he praised the late actor’s performance in the Broadway play God of Carnage and says, “It’s terrible. He was too young. I wish that he had been more maybe proactive about his health. I don’t know what he did about that, but I wish he had been. It shouldn’t have happened.” Working as an actor his entire life means that De Niro sees everything through that lens. In describing his steadfast support for Barack Obama, he compares the president’s challenges to a filmmaker’s. “He’s a good person, period,” he says. “He’s trying his best. He’s going to do things that people feel are not right or violating one right or another. But at the end of the day, he represents, I think, the best of the type of people that I would like to see running the government. He has to play that game, the political game. They all do. They make statements they can’t honor because they’re impossible to honor.

have that shot, and if I use this shot that’s better here, it impacts on this one and it’s a story point.’ In other words, it can’t be done. You have to make these choices with the government, and you’re going to be criticized. If you took the time to explain it all to the public, they’d say, ‘OK, I get it.’ Can you explain to everybody? No. You just have to say, ‘I made this choice because I felt it was the right choice.’ ”

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ean Streets was not De Niro’s first acting gig. At the age of 10 he played the Cowardly Lion in a Saturday stage production of The Wizard of Oz in New York City: “I was a kid and they gave me that part to do.” His knowledge of the city’s cultural life is encyclopedic, beginning with the stage and movie theaters he haunted as a teenager. “In those days, you had the Loews Sheridan and you’d see the double bill,” De Niro says. “You had Suddenly, Last Summer. Then On the Waterfront…. A Place in the Sun and all the movies that really affected me, if you will.” Reminiscing, he says, “Did you ever know the Elgin Theater on Eighth Avenue? There was another theater up the street that also had old films, not like the Loews with the first run, but on the east side, like in the low 20s—off 23rd Street. Then there was the Waverly, which used to have great art films. The audiences would laugh at things that a typical audience wouldn’t laugh at. It’s interesting.” The favored places of his youth made appearances in his movies, such as the Carmine pool he broke into at night. Locals of De Niro’s vintage invariably refer to it as Leroy Street Pool, though, in typical downtown New York City fashion it is located neither on Carmine nor Leroy street. No matter what it’s called, the pool was in a crucial scene in Raging Bull. De Niro’s character, boxer Jake LaMotta, meets his soon-to-be-wife, Vickie, played by the beautiful Cathy Moriarty, as she sits on the edge of the crowded public pool, cooling her feet in the water. It’s a rare lyrical moment in an otherwise brutally violent film. “That’s why we shot it there,” he says, of his personal connection to the Greenwich Village pool. High-end boutiques and cupcakeries have replaced the grocery stores, junk shops, butchers and vegetable stands that lined the neighborhood’s streets. “That whole world has changed, you know, over by Little Italy—totally changed,” he says. “And Bleecker, I pass it every day taking my kids over to school. Mulberry Street—totally different world.” But De Niro always adapts. The Tribeca Film Festival, which he launched as a means of reviving downtown Manhattan after September 11, is thriving, as is his TriBeCa production company. He was living in the neighborhood at the time of the attacks and has a vivid recollection of them. “I had two huge windows, so I saw everything right out my window,” he says. “I saw first the north tower go down, then the south. I couldn’t believe it. I was looking at it, and I had to look at the television to confirm what I was seeing with my own eyes.” His efforts on behalf of the city have gone well beyond the world of film. His investments include the Greenwich Hotel and the restaurants Tribeca Grill, Locanda Verde and Nobu. The restaurants and the hotel showcase the paintings of De Niro’s father, Robert De Niro Sr., whose estate he oversees. De Niro and his wife, Grace Hightower, have two children, and he has four children from a previous marriage and another relationship. A great deal is happening with his film career. Just last year he received an Oscar nomination (his seventh) for his deeply affecting performance as an overbearing father obsessed with the Philadelphia Eagles in Silver Linings Playbook. As for The Family, viewers looking for the easy Mafia yuks of Analyze This will be stunned by the film’s unflinching, unapologetic violence. And anyone hoping

“I was in the street thing, and I realized I’m not going to get anywhere.” Once you get into that Washington machinery, you’ve just got to figure it out and swim against the current and grab onto this rock and that, and just try to maintain your course. “You know, it’s one thing to be a critic,” he continues. “It’s another thing to be directly involved. It’s like directing a movie and you edit the film and then someone will give you a suggestion: ‘You could do this, you could do that.’ You look and you say, ‘Yeah, but the reason I can’t do that is because I don’t


151 Overcoat, $2,350, GUCCI, Barneys New York, 212-826-8900. Dress shirt, $345, ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA, zegna.com. Pants, $275, ARMANI COLLEZIONI, Bloomingdale’s, 800-232-1854. Rockstud sneakers, $795, VALENTINO, valentino.com. Watch, PATEK PHILIPPE, his own.


photo credits teekay

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Opposite: Shawl-collar tuxedo, $5,380, BRUNELLO CUCINELLI, 212-627-9202. Dress shirt, $425, RALPH LAUREN PURPLE LABEL, 212-606-2100. The John Drake bow tie, $120, DAVID HART, davidhartnyc.com. Oval cuff links in sterling silver, $250, TIFFANY & CO., tiffany.com. Groomer: Lynda Eichner. Fashion assistant: Julia Chu. Prop stylist: Nick Des Jardins at Mary Howard Studio. Produced by Lauren Alderman at the Production Club. Photographed on location at the Greenwich Hotel.

Irish-American mobster Jimmy Burke depicted in Nicholas Pileggi’s Wiseguy. Burke is believed to have engineered the Lufthansa heist, an infamous robbery at John F. Kennedy Airport. The book and the movie Goodfellas center on Henry Hill, who worked for Burke before turning informant. Hill recalls De Niro relentlessly grilling him about every aspect of Burke’s life. The actor would be “on the fuckin’ phone constantly,” Hill states in a 2006 documentary about his life. “I mean, like fuckin’ seven, eight times a day. He wouldn’t leave his fuckin’ trailer without talking to me twice. ‘How did Jimmy hold his cigarette?’ I thought he was a fuckin’ nut job.”

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n his 90-plus films, Robert De Niro has portrayed a Jesuit missionary, an architect, a soldier in Vietnam, an oncologist, a retired CIA officer and many, many other characters. But he is perhaps most closely associated with organized-crime figures. Asked what people find so compelling about their gory tales, De Niro says, “Well, for me as an actor, they’re all fascinating characters. I did feel with something like The Godfather that the reason it was so popular is that that was a time the country was in a lot of discord. So the family actually had more of a code of ethics than the outside world, which was going crazy with demonstrations and the Vietnam War and all that. It had a finality to it, a code of ‘You did wrong, you paid for it.’ You didn’t, you were rewarded. It was a romantic idea, but there were many truths in essence about what people feel and want to aspire to.” In a way, The Family adheres to a similar code in a thoroughly complicated time. Ultimately, the film is about a marriage and a family that has stuck together through impossibly difficult circumstances, sometimes of their own making. They’re scarred and they’re hardly perfect, but they have survived. In addition to The Family, De Niro has the comedy Last Vegas, in which he stars with Michael Douglas, Morgan Freeman and Kevin Kline, coming out soon. He’s also working on a stage musical version of A Bronx Tale, the first

“You’re like, ‘Damn, how does he do that?’ De niro never forces it.” —Michelle pfeiffer

film he directed. “I probably shouldn’t say that,” he says about the project, “because something always comes up and then it doesn’t happen. But we’ve been working on it, and it’s been going well. It’s coming along.” So De Niro is working as hard as he ever has. No one takes filmmaking more seriously. Who, other than Robert De Niro, could publicly confront Jay-Z at a party for not returning his calls? It seems that Jay had agreed to give De Niro a song for a project and then went missing, despite De Niro’s attempts to contact him. At a birthday party for Leonardo DiCaprio last November, De Niro let the rapper know in no uncertain terms that he was not happy about getting blown off. It was a matter of respect between two Kings of New York, and not something De Niro was going to let pass without speaking his mind. “When I was 17, the head of the dramatic workshop I was in asked me, ‘Why do you want to be an actor?’ ” De Niro recalls. “I said, ‘I just want to be an actor.’ I really didn’t know what acting was. And he said, ‘To express yourself.’ And I thought, ‘Yeah, that’s right.’ And that was it.”

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for Goodfellas II—the English title of the Tonino Benacquista novel on which the film is based is Badfellas—will be surprised by the sweetness of De Niro and Pfeiffer’s relationship and the humor, domestic and otherwise, that earns the film its punning title and its billing as a comedy. That tonal complexity is part of what De Niro likes best about The Family. “The movie is, what would you call it? Is it a comedy?” he asks as he leans back on a black couch in his office. “I’m not sure. It kind of reminds me of the Italian comedies. There’s definitely a European feel to it, which is not a surprise from someone like Luc.” Lightness of touch is a central theme in De Niro’s conversation. As for so many artistic masters, his decades of experience haven’t led him to bravura performances but to a quiet internal understanding of how to determine exactly what needs to be done and then doing just that and no more. That approach was evident on the set of The Family, Pfeiffer says. “What is amazing about watching him work when you’re there with him on the set is that it seems like he’s doing so little,” she recalls. “And then you see it on the screen and he just has all of these dimensions that you didn’t pick up on. You’re like, ‘Damn, how does he do that?’ He never forces it. It’s a lesson that all actors can take.” That restraint is essential, De Niro believes, particularly in a film like The Family, where both the violence and the comedy could easily topple into parody. “You can’t do any more than is asked of you to do,” he explains. “There’s a delicate balance of how far to push it and how far to pull back. Not to try to show the feeling and the texture of the scene but to let it happen and unfold and trust that the texture will be there. What the scene is about will come out more easily than you think.” The prospect of directing De Niro was especially enticing for Besson. “I saw Mean Streets and Taxi Driver when I was 15,” the director says, “so to be able to work with Robert was a big privilege for me. At the same time, after a couple of minutes you just have to roll up your sleeves and get to work. What’s the point of having Robert De Niro aboard if you do nothing special with him? He’s a hard worker. He’d be calling me on the phone, asking me questions all the time.” It’s that attention to detail again. He builds his characters from the outside as well as from the inside. Nothing is superf luous; everything is telling, even crucial. He took outward transformation to extremes with Raging Bull, when he gained 60 pounds to play Jake LaMotta in his decline. He could have worn a fat suit, but that was not the way he did things. In fact, it was LaMotta’s weight that first intrigued De Niro and made him want to tell his story. “I ran into Jake LaMotta when I was in my late teens,” he says. “I was going down Broadway and I saw him working as a bouncer in a kind of gentleman’s club. He was heavy.” De Niro holds his hands in front of him to convey LaMotta’s girth. “It was like, ‘Jesus, he was a fighter and now he’s here and he’s so heavy.’ It was just interesting to me, the whole thing.” Jump forward to the mid-1970s, and De Niro was in Italy, shooting 1900 with Bernardo Bertolucci, when he read the memoir co-written by the middleweight champion boxer, called Raging Bull: My Story. “I called Marty and said, ‘You should read this. It’s not a great book, but there’s something about it. It’s got a lot of heart’...I thought maybe I could do it as a play, like a one-man, stand-up play.” Instead, De Niro and Scorsese took a screenplay that Paul Schrader had written and shaped it to their own ends. Scorsese has described making Raging Bull as “kamikaze filmmaking.” “I threw everything into it,” he said, “and if it meant the end of my career, then it would have to be the end of my career.” The film today is considered one of the most powerful ever made and won De Niro the Academy Award for best actor. Ten years later, De Niro played a real-life person from another book, the


154 With former plantations and foxhunting in the fall, Middleburg, Virginia, exists as an oasis nearly untouched by time. But now even the most modern visitor can find untold surprises. written by lauren waterman PHOTOGRAPHED by Jason Schmidt Styled by David Vandewal


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The legacy

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ewer than 700 residents live in Middleburg, Virginia, but the town is rich with heritage. For instance, take Welbourne, once the private home of Colonel Richard Henr y Dulany, a Civil War veteran who founded both the oldest horse show and the oldest foxhunting organization in the U.S. The estate is now a bed-and-breakfast owned by Dulany’s great-great-grandson, Nat Morison. (That’s him on the left, seated in the white rocking chair; behind him stands his son Josh and daughter-in-law, representing the eighth generation of the family to live on this particular plot of land.) Portions of the house, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, were built as far back as 1770, and the surrounding grounds are composed of acres of green pastures extending to Goose Creek, a tributary of the Potomac River.

Cable-knit sweater, $2,800; Cable-knit skirt, $5,500; Sandals, $870, CHRISTIAN DIOR, 800-929-3467. Sabbia 18-karat rose-gold and white-diamond pavé earrings (worn throughout), $7,300; Tango Knot Ring in 18-karat rose gold and diamond pavé, price upon request, POMELLATO, 800-254-6020. Knee-high socks (worn throughout), $80, MARNI, saks.com.


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The landscape

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ome things have changed since Thomas Jefferson’s day: The state where he failed, season after season, to grow enough grapes to make a European-style wine can now be considered a destination for oenophiles. Just a short drive from Welbourne is RdV, a smallish vineyard (pictured above) located on a hillside in Delaplane that, in recent years, has begun producing two of the region’s most well-regarded wines. The owner, a Dutch-bor n former marine named Rutger de Vink—who sleeps in a silver Airstream trailer parked on the grounds—requires reservations from would-be visitors. But advance planning is rewarded with a blind tasting experience in which he pits his own blends, Lost Mountain and Rendezvous, against world-class fine wines from Napa and Bordeaux. If the success of de Vink’s sold-out 2009 vintage—in addition to the state’s 227 wineries—is any indication, Virginia is quietly proving it can hold its own against wine regions of longer standing. Above: Jacket, $3,698; Turtleneck sweater, $1,598; Shirt, $698; Pants, $1,098; Fisherman’s cap, $195, RALPH LAUREN COLLECTION, ralphlauren.com. Opposite: Sweater; Polo shirt; Skirt; Boots, all price upon request, TOMMY HILFIGER, 212-223-1824. Flapbag, $4,900, CHANEL, 800-550-0005.


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Top, $7,630; Skirt, $2,900; Bug brooch, $1,890; Chain necklace, $1,990; Hot necklace, $2,790, LANVIN, 646-439-0380. Oval Pearl brooch, $120; Bead brooch, $120, BEN AMUN, ben-amun.com. Safety Pin cuff, $650, JENNIFER FISHER, jenniferfisherjewelry.com. Labyrinth bracelet in 18-karat gold, price upon request, DAVID YURMAN, davidyurman.com. Mary Jane pumps, $995, DOLCE & GABBANA, dolcegabbana.it. On lips: Rich Lip Color in Crimson, $25, BOBBI BROWN, bobbibrowncosmetics.com. On eyes: So Intense Mascara in black, $66, SISLEY-PARIS, saks.com.


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The HOUSE

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uch of the area’s considerable charm comes from accommodations that appear to be almost entirely untouched by the 21st centur y. At Welbour ne, moder n-day visitors feel (often rightly) that they are sitting upon the identical settees employed by distinguished previous guests such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Thomas Wolfe. Both writers came to Welbourne in the 1930s at the behest of their mutual editor, Max Perkins, who was a longtime friend of then-owner Elizabeth Lemmon. (The current proprietor’s great-aunt, Lemmon was a fascinating woman in her own right: Letters from the socialite’s decades-long correspondence with Perkins, who also edited Zora Neale Hurston and Ernest Hemingway, were collected in a 2003 book.) It’s said the editor’s hope was that, at the private inn, Wolfe would finish a novel-in-progress, while Fitzgerald was sent to dry out. Instead, each of the writers (who visited separately) subsequently wrote a short story that used Welbourne as a setting. Today, the five guest rooms still contain wood-burning fireplaces, and, in keeping with a Fitzgerald-approved tradition, cocktails are served each evening.

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The Hospitality

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lsewhere i n t he cit y, cha r m abou nd s. T he Goodstone Inn, located on the site of an 18thcentur y plantation, offers an unspoiled environment—265 acres of verdant fields and woodlands (opposite), crisscrossed by walking trails and a babbling creek—but with contemporary amenities, including a spa, a restaurant and a heated swimming pool. Visitors with an eye to buy could look to a historic Civil War–era estate like The Maples, seen above, a 60-acre property on the market last year for $5.3 million. Above: Coat, $3,700; Dress, price upon request, LOUIS VUITTON, louisvuitton.com. Necklace in 18-karat rose gold with rock crystal pyrite, $8,700, POMELLATO, 800254-6020. Victorian Plaza Pendant necklace, $288, LULU FROST, lulufrost.com. Oval Pearl brooch, $120; Crystal Twist brooch, $230, BEN AMUN, ben-amun.com. Opposite: Dandelion printed dress, $2,430, THAKOON, Ikram, 312-587-1000. Stole, $750; Brooch (worn on necklace), $1,075, CHANEL, 800-550-0005. Majorelle Gardens necklace in 18-karat gold vermeil, $1,035, AURÉLIE BIDERMANN, aureliebidermann.com. Socks, FALKE, falke.com. Original boots, $225, HUNTER BOOT, hunterboot.com. On skin: Teint Visionnaire skin-correcting makeup, $60, LANCÔME, lancome-usa.com.


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hen in Middleburg, foxhunting is the main spor t on the agenda. Founded in 1840 by Welbou r ne’s Col. Dulany, the Pied mont Hunt is the oldest foxhunting club in the country. Highly trained hounds pursue their vulpine quarry, attended by horse-riding hunters, until the fox goes to ground. (Of course, back then, the fox was usually killed. The spectators, also known as hilltoppers, keep pace in their cars, another modern alteration.) The current huntsman, Spencer Allen (pictured at right with some of his 98 hounds), wasn’t born into the job—he came from out west, working cattle and riding broncos, and served as a marine in Iraq before discovering the sport. Participation tends to run in families, and it’s not uncommon to find several generations riding together every fall, continuing a tradition that’s changed little over the past century and a half.

Above: Jacket, $3,990; Tunic dress with fringe, $3,990, AKRIS, 212-717-1170. Classique Fringe necklace, $250, FALLON, fallonjewelry.com. Tango Knot Ring in 18-karat rose gold and diamond pavé, price upon request, POMELLATO, 800254-6020. Sandals, $1,775, HERMÈS, hermes.com. Opposite: Top, $915; Sweater, $770; Skirt, $855, PRADA, prada.com. Earrings, $760, CHANEL, 800-550-0005. Necklace, $1,150, MIRIAM HASKELL, miriamhaskell.com. Bracelet, $495, OSCAR DE LA RENTA, 212-288-5810. Labyrinth bracelet in 18-karat gold, price upon request, DAVID YURMAN, davidyurman.com. Taken cuff, $425; Buckle cuff, $680, JENNIFER FISHER, jenniferfisherjewelry.com. Hair: Andre Gunn at The Wall Group. Makeup: Maki H at The Wall Group using Koh Gen Doh. Model: Dorothea Barth-Jorgensen at Elite. Casting: Oliver Ress at artforum group. Produced by Stormy Stokes-Hood.

Fashion Assistant: Daniel Edley. Special thanks to Stormy Stokes-Hood, Lucy Liebert and Gumtree Farm.

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The Pastime


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DON’T ADJUST THE PAGE. THE JEWELS YOU’RE ABOUT TO SEE ARE REAL—AND THE MOST PRECIOUS OF THEM HAVE TO BE WORN TO BE BELIEVED. ADD ANOTHER DIMENSION TO YOUR LOOK WITH SOME OF THE SEASON’S MOST ORIGINAL DISCOVERIES. PHOTOGRAPHED BY JEAN-PACÔME DEDIEU

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SURREALITY


Model on left: Paisley print dress, $159, ANNE KLEIN, anneklein.com. Culte sunglasses, $390, MIU MIU, Ilori, 212-226-8276. Mini Lily bag with tassels, $670, MULBERRY, intermixonline.com. 18-karat yellow gold cuff, $11,000, JENNIFER FISHER, jenniferfisherjewelry.com. Belt stylist’s own. Model on right: Silk blouse, $295, stretch twill wide-leg pant, $99, ANNE KLEIN, anneklein.com. DBS sunglasses, $380, OLIVER PEOPLES,

photo credits teekay

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This page: Birds of Paradise Collection Oiseaux de Paradis necklace in 18-karat white gold with diamonds and pink and blue sapphires, price upon request, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, vancleefarpels.com. Opposite: Gypsy Collection Multi-shape earrings with emeralds and diamonds, price upon request, GRAFF, 212-355-9292.


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(On model, from left) Miss Dior ring in yellow gold with diamonds and citrine, $15,500; Ancolia ring in yellow gold with diamonds, yellow tourmalines, rubellite and lacquer, $56,000, DIOR FINE JEWELRY, 800-929-3467. (On pedestal) Pineapple ring in platinum and 18-karat yellow gold with sphenes, tsavorites and sapphires, price upon request, CHOPARD, chopard.com.


171 (From top) Willow ring in 18-karat gold with blue topaz and diamonds, $5,900, DAVID YURMAN, davidyurman.com. Diva necklace in 18-karat pink gold with diamonds, amethyst, peridot and rubellite, $88,000, BULGARI, bulgari.com.


photo credits teekay

172 Enchant Scroll earrings in platinum with diamonds, $10,000, TIFFANY & CO., tiffany.com. On nails: Nail lacquer in Merino Cool, $8, ESSIE, essie.com.


173 (From top) Iris ring in 18-karat rose gold with diamonds, $13,200, H. STERN, hstern.net. Shanghai bangle in 18-karat yellow gold with diamonds, topaz, citrine, amethyst, prasiolite and smoky quartz, $11,700, ROBERTO COIN, Neiman Marcus, 310-550-5900. Set design: Mary Pierre Favre. Assistant: Flavien Perrottey.


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Doctors’ wives, clockwise from top left: Muffie Potter Aston wears a J.Crew tank, Roberto Coin earrings and a David Yurman necklace; Gayle Sobel wears a Valentino dress; Melissa Matarasso wears a Trina Turk shirt and her own jewelry; and Laura Tisch Broumand wears an Etro dress.


The Wives club Being married to a plastic surgeon isn’t all free nips and tucks. explore a world where imperfection isn’t an option. written by judith newman   PHOTOGRAPHED by Alex John Beck

“My husband is about to have the perfect wife,” says Muffie

“there is no shame.”

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Potter Aston cheerfully. Ooh. What does that mean? Since Potter Aston, a doyenne of the New York social circuit, is also married to Sherrell Aston, one of the leading plastic surgeons in the country, naturally my thoughts turn in one direction. Is she getting sculpted abs? The new pert breasts of a 16-year-old? Potter Aston laughs. “No, no, I’m having vocal-cord surgery,” she says. “I won’t be able to talk for a week. Sherrell will be a very happy man.” Potter Aston is making a wee joke, of course, but her sly humor raises a question that’s occurred to many who live in this beauty-obsessed culture: What’s it like to be the wife of a prominent plastic surgeon? I’ve written about this medical specialty for years, attended dozens of conferences, and every time I’m at a gathering of these guys (and they’re overwhelmingly guys), I’m reminded of lines from T.S. Eliot’s The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock: “In the room the women come and go/ Talking of Michelangelo.” The spouses are, in a sense, married to the Michelangelos—and they are often their husband’s works of art. Look at the wife and you see the aesthetic of the husband. I could never say that about any other medical specialty. Generally, doctors in other areas don’t operate on family members, let alone their mates. But plastic surgeons? There is not a woman I’ve talked to who wouldn’t go to her spouse for rejuvenation and modification. Recently Potter Aston, a fiftysomething whose cool Hitchcock-blonde looks belie a warm and witty demeanor, had a face-lift courtesy of her husband. When I mention the somewhat disturbing thought of a husband peeling off his beloved’s face and sewing it back on, she waves it off. “I never gave it a second thought,” she says. “I’ve seen his work. I’ve seen him at work. I know he’s a perfectionist. Why would I go elsewhere?” First, there’s a sense of obligation felt to be a team player. Lisa Hochstein is the newest (and at 30, the youngest, she’s quick to tell me) of the Real Housewives of Miami; her husband


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From left: Gayle Sobel wears an Etro dress, her own necklace, a Cartier bracelet and Sergio Rossi shoes. Laura Tisch Broumand wears a J.Crew top, her own pants, a Rolex watch and Christian Louboutin shoes. Melissa Matarasso wears a Trina Turk top, a Club Monaco skirt and her own jewelry and shoes.

counts Katie Couric among his clients and was once called the King of Lipo by W magazine. They met when Gayle was his patient about 20 years ago and 10 years later, when both were single, started to date. By the nature of that situation, she thought she might be his lifelong project. “I thought he would be like, ‘OK, we’ll start over here and work our way up.…’ And who k nows? Maybe when I get older he’ll be telling me, ‘You need tightening.’ ” But now, she says, the very opposite is tr ue. “Howard stops me from getting stuff done all the time,” Sobel says. “I’ll ask, ‘Should I fill these lines?’ ” She points at her forehead. “He’ll be like, ‘Gayle.’ Or I’ll think someone who’s just had a lip filler looks good, and he’ll tell me, ‘That’s a little too blowfish.’ He prefers a much more natural look.” Su rely t he re ha d to be some approval-seeking and concern? “I did wor r y that he’d be critical,” admits Hochstein about her husband. “He’s seen more breasts than Being married to a plastic surgeon—as Gayle Sobel, Laura Tisch Broumand and Melissa Matarasso are—is a complicated business. any man in this world. I hoped he approved of my breasts, but I got is plastic surgeon Lenny Hochstein, known around town as over that quickly.” Well...sort of. Lisa Hochstein had underthe Boob God. Lisa has had her husband do her breast im- gone a bad breast job prior to dating Lenny. “They looked plants. (Her nose is courtesy of another surgeon she’d gone to awkward—too close together, sat low. I had to have him redo before dating Lenny.) She says she hasn’t had any other work them. I didn’t want to walk around and have people think this but is pretty sure there will be more in her future: “There is was my husband’s work.” Yet the wives feel my skepticism is misplaced. Being obserno shame. Everyone on the show has someone or something they are promoting, and by looking like this, I promote my vant isn’t the same as being critical, the women explain. Potter Aston recalls going on a date with Sherrell more than 20 years husband’s business.” There is also, simply, a sense of pleasure and pride in hav- ago. When he told her she was pretty and she demurred with ing the big macher doc that goes beyond being a loyal wife. “Oh, you don’t even know what color my eyes are,” Aston reAs Potter Aston puts it, “There’s something about being mar- plied, “They’re bright blue, and your left eye is slightly smaller ried to a man who can affect one’s beauty and turn back the than your right eye.” “And I ran to the mirror and he was right!” she says. As someone who has always counted bad eyesight hands of time.” But here’s an inescapable thought: Consider being in bed as a huge bonus in a mate, I found this story deeply alarming. with a plastic surgeon. Is that not terrifying? They spend all Potter Aston, whose own father was a surgeon, was impressed. “I was older when we met, already in my thirties, and had their time looking at women as fixer-uppers. How the hell do they turn that off at the end of the day? Can their clini- two children,” adds Laura Tisch Broumand, wife of New cal selves, whose response to jiggling thighs in their office York–based plastic surgeon Stafford Broumand. “I definitely involves a suction machine and a cannula, walk into their felt he was attracted to me for me. I didn’t feel he was lookhouses and see imperfections as endearing and not problems ing at my f laws. I actually don’t feel he’s looking at anyone’s f laws. He always feels he’s looking to enhance what’s there.” that demand an SOS? Are these women supremely self-confident, delusional or Apparently, insist their wives, they do. “Alan’s not critical at all. He looks at me the same way as he did when he met me,” both? Hard to say. A Medscape physician lifestyle report sursays Melissa Matarasso, 56, who 27 years ago met husband veyed almost 30,000 doctors in 25 different specialties, askAlan Matarasso, the Upper East Side plastic surgeon rumored ing them to rate their lives on a scale of one to seven. Plastic to be the man behind the faces of everyone from Diane Sawyer surgeons, it turns out, are less happy than the average physician (seventh from the bottom on the specialty list) and have a to Kathleen Turner. “I’m far more critical of myself than he ever is,” adds Gayle higher divorce rate than most other specialties. (Psychiatrists Sobel, 41, whose husband, dermatologic surgeon Howard Sobel, have an even higher rate.)


This makes sense; after all, these men have a lot of opportunity to screw up their marriages. Consider the amount of admiration-bordering-on-worship plastic surgeons get. Now consider how demanding the specialty is—how many of them were too busy studying to get laid. Now, their geekiness has evolved into that most useful of social skills: making women happy. Draw your own conclusions. While the wives dismiss my theorizing, they do cop to feeling more pressure to be just so. They are no strangers to dieting, exercising and all manner of personal grooming. (Though one could argue that this is not so much the result of being married to plastic surgeons as being the kind of women these men are drawn to in the first place. Who’s a plastic surgeon going to fall in love with? Jane Goodall?) They have a lifetime of free injectables and—particularly for those with husbands involved in clinical trials with various companies, as many of these men are—access to every new laser and filler. Sometimes they worry that people will think they’ve had more work than they actually have had. “I’ve had my nose and my breasts done and nothing else,” says Hochstein, who at one time posed for Playboy. “My figure is hard work, dedication, eating well and working out.” “I guess people do look at me as an advertisement for my husband,” says Broumand. (She notes that her very favorite treatment from her husband isn’t exactly for beauty. “Botoxing under your armpits—it stops you from sweating!” she enthuses. “It’s fabulous, to be able to wear that little black dress and not worry.”) “If friends like the way I look, it means they’re wanting subtle improvements, nothing radical,” she says. But they do all know radical, those wives of surgeons who’ve helped themselves a little too generously to their husband’s bag of tricks. I recall going to one plastic-surgery conference a few years in a row and playing a guessing game with myself about how much larger one surgeon would make his wife’s breasts; after a few years he got a new wife, and her cup size began its upward trajectory. “We all see them at parties, the ones who never saw a needle they didn’t love,” says one wife. Another adds, “There are the serial liposuctioners: They get it done, gain a few, then go back to get it taken out again.” With all these benef its, however, comes a sense of responsibility. It seems the number-one credo of the plastic surgeon’s wife is full disclosure. You aren’t allowed to get some work and tell your friends, “Oh, I just had a relaxing vacation.” You’ve got to spill. “Times have changed a lot,” says Broumand, who grew up on Long Island as the daughter of financier Saul Steinberg. “When I was a kid, everyone was so secretive. Whole families on Long Island had nose jobs so the girls would look the same.” Broumand, who is 50, credits good genetics to her not yet needing a face-lift, but eye work may be in her immediate future—“and, yes, of course, I’d never hide it.” “I tell everyone: My breasts are mine; my face is his,” says Potter Aston. “There is nothing to be ashamed of. We get our hair colored, our nails done—this is all on a continuum. And look, if you have a great hair colorist or dressmaker, you want to share. It’s the same for this. I weigh 125 pounds,

I’m muscular, I keep fit, I swim, I eat healthy…to me this is one more thing. It would be silly if I pretended I look great and did nothing.” The job of the plastic surgeon’s wife, they say, is not to encourage people to go under the knife but rather to quell anxiety, to make those who are considering surgery feel “like they are not totally bonkers,” notes Melissa Matarasso. “I see myself as a soother—but not, like, ‘Oh, my God, why did you take so long?’ It’s a fine line.” At the same time, there’s a keen awareness of the dangers: “It’s not a candy store to me,” adds Matarasso. Today, in her mid-fifties, Matarasso has not had a face-lift or much besides

“my breasts are mine; my face is his.”

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Botox and fillers and lasers. She doesn’t say she won’t, but she is pleased her daughters like her lines and says of Alan, “The less I do, the happier he is.” Sometimes the simplest solution works. “I just don’t believe in trying every new thing that comes out on the market,” says Broumand. “I have a lot of skin sensitivities, so I stick with the gentlest products, like Cetaphil for washing my face.” While all the wives say their husbands are ver y popular din ner companions —who doesn’t love a good surgery chat?—I was curious about how the women deal with being cornered at a party and asked, “What do yo u t h i n k I s h o u l d have done?” Is there some sor t of w ifely etiquette? “Of course I’m like anyone else,” says Potter Aston. “I may have the thought, Oh, you could be pretty if you just let my husba nd shave your nose. But I would never suggest you have something done. Plastic surgery is such a personal decision— and it should be.” Melissa Matarasso agrees. “Because here’s the t r uth,” she says, “No one really wants you to be honest.”

Muffie Potter Aston wears a J.Crew tank, an Oscar de la Renta skirt, earrings by Roberto Coin, a necklace by David Yurman and her own bracelets and shoes. Hair and makeup for Gayle Sobel: Valery Joseph Salon. Photographed at the Chatwal New York.


PHOTO CREDITS TEEKAY

178 000 Coat, $7,400; Dress, $2,960, LOUIS VUITTON, louisvuitton.com. Micro-pavé-diamond stud earrings (worn throughout), $14,600, JACOB & CO., 212-719-5887. Pendant necklace in 18-karat white gold with emerald and diamond, $7,900, KWIAT, 212-725-7777. Hat, stylist’s own.


A young lass heads to the countryside, encountering bagpipers, boxers and plenty of plaid along the way. EXPERIENCE

THE

LUCK OF THE

through the eyes of

IRELAND BASINGER BALDWIN

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY

STYLED BY

DEBORAH WATSON

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IRISH


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Topcoat, $2,195, DAVID HART, davidhartnyc. com. Coat (worn underneath), $6,495, VERSACE, 888-721-7219. Gown, $825, BAND OF OUTSIDERS, 212-965-1313. Knit Turban, $225, BAND OF OUTSIDERS, Bird, 718-388-1655.


Coat, BROOKS BROTHERS, brooksbrothers.com. Double-breasted coat, $2,895, POLO RALPH LAUREN, ralphlauren.com. Knit Turban, $225, BAND OF OUTSIDERS, Bird, 718-388-1655. Milton sweater (worn over shoulders), $1,295, BELSTAFF, 212-897-1880.

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(On her) Coat, $6,495, VERSACE, 888-721-7219. Gown, $825; Pleated skirt (worn underneath), $595, BAND OF OUTSIDERS, 212-965-1313. Knit Turban, $225, BAND OF OUTSIDERS, Bird, 718388-1655. Stackable ring in 18-karat yellow gold with emeralds, $825, KWIAT, 212-725-7777. Riding boots, $198, VINCE CAMUTO, vincecamuto. com. (On guys, from left) Clay T-shirt, $142, IRO, iro.fr. Shirt, $95, BOSS, hugoboss.com. Hat, model’s own.


Coat, $5,200, CÉLINE, 212-535-3703. Scarf, stylist’s own. On eyes: Pure Chromatics Wet and Dry Eyeshadow in 08, $55, YVES SAINT LAURENT, sephora.com. On face: Magic Nude Liquid Powder Makeup, $13, L’ORÉAL PARIS, lorealparisusa.com.

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This page: (On her) Sweater, $995, MARC JACOBS, marcjacobs.com. (On him) Shirt, $95, BOSS, hugoboss.com. Hat, model’s own. Opposite: (Top) Button-down shirt, $250, BURBERRY LONDON, burberry.com. Vest, $498, JOHN VARVATOS, johnvarvatos.com. (Middle) Sweater, $225, J.CREW, jcrew.com. (Bottom) Topcoat, $3,395, ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA, 888-8803462. Short-sleeve henley, $150, BURBERRY BRIT, burberry.com. Hat and jewelry, model’s own.


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photo credits teekay

186 (On her) Cape, $1,495, BAND OF OUTSIDERS, La Garรงonne, 866-887-8707. Ball Gown, price upon request, LORRY NEWHOUSE, 917-213-9566. Peasant top, $67, BEBE, bebe.com. On hair: Sleek and Shine Straightening Mist, $4, GARNIER, garnierusa.com. (On him) Sweater, $225, J.CREW, jcrew.com.


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189 (On her) Dress, $4,175, DOLCE & GABBANA, dolcegabbana.it. On lips: Perfect Rouge Tender Sheer Lipstick in Society, $25, SHISEIDO, shiseido.com. (On him) Button-down shirt, $250, BURBERRY LONDON, burberry.com. Vest, $498, JOHN VARVATOS, johnvarvatos.com. Kilts and accessories throughout courtesy of THE CELTIC CROFT, kilts-n-stuff.com. Hair: Zaiya Latt at Bryan Bantry. Makeup: Regine Thorre at 1+1 Mgmt. Set design: Dimitri Levas. Production: Little Bear, Inc. On-site producer: Dawn Boller. Talent: Ireland Basinger Baldwin/ IMG. Men: Henrik Falleniu, Leo Jason, Peter Johnson, all at Soul; Connor Moxam/Click, Clark Bockelman/Al David, Brendan Jane/Panache. Bagpipers: Chris Love, Colm Magner, Dan O’Callahan, Joe Hauswierth. Photographed on location in East Hampton, NY. Fashion assistants: Ali Malter, Paul Frederick.


Photos: Styled by Laura Thompson

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IN JUDY WETrust

Irascible, intelligent and rich beyond belief, Judge Judith Sheindlin found fame and fortune in an offbeat television courtroom, but the exceedingly private star’s meteoric rise has been similarly unconventional

prop stylist: laura thompson

J

udy Sheindlin shuff les a deck of cards like she’s mad at it. We’re in her dressing room at Sunset Bronson Studios in Hollywood, where she’s taped her popular cour troom show for nearly two decades. Judge Judy is the most-watched day time program on television, averaging about 9 million viewers daily. The show often beat Oprah Winfrey’s final season in the ratings and reportedly earns CBS more than $200 million every year. This money is not spent on the dressing room, which looks like a suite at a Holiday Inn. The lighting is less than flattering. And there’s a sitting area with nondescript furniture where, between cases, Sheindlin, 70, plays hands of gin rummy to keep her energy up. “My maternal grandmother taught me to play,” she says, barely looking up as she shuffles. “She didn’t let me win. And I don’t let my grandchildren win!” Sheindlin doesn’t let her staff win, either. One longtime employee has been playing gin with Sheindlin for years and says, “She’s happy to take my money.” Not that Sheindlin needs it. In April, she extended her contract through 2017, adding an additional two years and $90 million. She is the highest-paid person in daytime television. She works exactly 52

days a year. It appears she’s worth it. While most other courtroom shows on television—such as The People’s Court and the now-canceled Judge Joe Brown—took a ratings hit in 2013, Judge Judy held firm. The program finally won a Daytime Emmy this year, after 14 consecutive losses. How was the ceremony? “I haven’t gone for years,” Sheindlin says, smiling. “I like to watch it from my bedroom.” Which one? Judge Judy has made Sheindlin a very wealthy woman, with a family spread in Wyoming and homes in Los Angeles and Naples, Florida, not to mention a 20,000-square-foot colossus in Greenwich, Connecticut—complete with eight bedrooms and 10 marble fireplaces. She is said to have paid $13.2 million for the estate in 2007 and promptly demolished the existing residence, re-building from scratch. (Her property taxes alone are $230,000 per year.) In June, Sheindlin was spotted driving a Bentley convertible around Greenwich. When asked about the car, she downplays the extravagance, saying: “It’s an old Bentley.” Besides, she says, she prefers her Lexus wagon. In a testament to her iconic status, earlier this year Reader’s Digest named Sheindlin one of the most trusted people in America, behind Tom Hanks

and Sandra Bullock. Jimmy Kimmel, in a recurring segment called “Lie Witness News,” announced that President Obama had just appointed Judge Judy to the Supreme Court. One viewer apparently agreed with Obama, lovingly describing Judge Judy as “gangsta.” Sheindlin got a kick out of the segment and called Kimmel herself to say so. “Being called gangster was a first for me,” she says. If there’s something gangster about Sheindlin— and no one doubts there is—it may be her bling. While she shuff les the cards, one can’t help but notice the emerald-cut, Kardashian-size diamond ring she wears. “I didn’t get a ring when I became engaged,” she says. “I got one later in life. I bought a smaller one when I first started [the show]. My husband said, ‘Really, you need a bigger one.’ He bought it for me for a birthday.”

T

wice a month, Judy Sheindlin travels to Los Angeles for two to three days of filming. In that time, she’ll preside over 20 or 30 cases—real cases, researched and recruited by a team of more than 60 scattered across the country. The participants are flown to L.A., where they agree to binding arbitration. (The cases cannot exceed $5,000.) Nothing is

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WRITTEN by MICKEY RAPKIN   PHOTOGRAPHED by James Day


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scripted. Not even Sheindlin’s enviable one-liners. At this point, she says, “It���s second nature.” I am about to find this out for myself. It’s the end of June when I meet Sheindlin in the lobby of the Montage, a residence hotel in Beverly Hills, where she recently closed on a condo that cost a reported $10.7 million. After years of staying in hotels—first the Peninsula, then the Beverly Wilshire, made famous in Pretty Woman—she decided to put down roots. Why now? “Because we could.” OK, but $10.7 million? “All the kids were taken care of and the grandchildren are taken care of. It’s like a hotel, but we don’t have to move our stuff.” It’s worth noting Oprah is said to also have an apartment in the building, though they’ve yet to run into each other. That’d be fun, I say. “Sure,” she says, not wanting to engage. Sheindlin, wearing a navy suit jacket and slim black pants, is just over five feet tall and toned. Last year, around her 70th birthday, she went on Katie Couric’s show and debuted a recent photo of herself in a white bathing suit. When I compliment her, she says: “It was incredibly smart of me to put on a cover-up.” Shifting uncomfortably in her chair, she reaches for a small silver key chain. Sheindlin suffers some lingering pain from a past back surgery, and she hopes an Aleve will do the trick. She notices me noticing her stylish undercover pill case. “Florida,” she says, by way of explanation. “In Florida we have more pill holders than any place else in the world. We don’t have a big selection of condoms! We have a big selection of pill holders.” She takes a sip of water. “OK. Let’s go!” She’s been impatient from the start. The facts of the case: Born Judith Blum in Brooklyn, New York, in 1942 to Mur ray, a dentist, and Ethel, a homemaker. “Luxury was going to the Catskills,” Sheindlin says, “and taking two cha-cha lessons with the dance instr uctor in a weekend instead of one.” They were comfortable, not to mention progressive. Sheindlin’s father encouraged her to pursue an advanced degree; just as important, he taught her comedic timing. While still in law school, she married Ronald Levy, a lawyer, in 1964. Her first job, at a cosmetics company, didn’t take. Neither did her first marriage. Her husband treated her career as “something to keep me busy—like bridge,” she has said. They had two kids together, but after 12 years of marriage they called it quits. Three weeks later she met Jerry

Sheindlin, a criminal-defense lawyer, at a bar. In one of many apocryphal stories about Judge Judy that turn out to be true, she walked up to him at the bar, put her finger in his face, and said, “And who is this?” He replied: “Lady, get your finger out of my face.” They began dating, and when he wouldn’t commit to marriage, she pulled out her datebook and cornered him. “I did propose to him,” she says now. “I said to him, ‘Where is this relationship going?’ And he tried to weasel out of it, with his, ‘Well, you know, why do we have to get married?’ Whatever. He finally capitulated. I told him to pick a d ate. He picked Flag Day.” The two married in 1978; between them, they have five children. I f t h at h a d b e e n t he end of the story, Sheindl i n s ay s it wou ld h ave b e e n e noug h. I n 1993, she was working in family cou r t, making $113 , 0 0 0 a y e a r. S h e ate Egg McMuff ins for breakfast ever y day: “I st il l t h i n k a n Egg Mc Muffin is the best breakfast.” She drove a Nissan Maxima to work. “We’d get a new Maxima every four or five years,” she says, “and we had an old second car.” As a judge in family court, the mandator y retirement age is 70. “My husband and I had envisioned a ver y pleasant retirement with two small pensions, some Social Security and a small apartment a couple of blocks off the beach in Florida. I would have been very happy.” Here is the rare moment she pauses to smile. “But this certainly was a more interesting adventure,” she says. How does a New York City family-court judge, in pre-Internet days, wind up with a national television show? Start by having a big mouth. Ed Koch appointed Sheindlin to the bench in 1982, where she quickly earned a reputation for, well, basically what you see on TV every day. Catchphrases like “Sir, has anyone told you the story about Pinocchio?” started here. Custody fights, 10-year-olds committing assault, family dysfunction: Those were the story lines that played out in her courtroom, and Sheindlin was far from sympathetic, making enemies of lawyers, often by cutting them off. The system was overcrowded, and there simply wasn’t

time for hand-holding. In 10 years, she presided over something like 20,000 cases. Her no-nonsense approach led to a profile in the Los Angeles Times, as part of a series on social innovators. To be clear, Sheindlin wasn’t looking for publicity—not for herself, anyway. She was looking to expose the cracks in the system. “Family court was sort of a dumping ground for bad, bad judges—because it was closed to the public,” she says. “If you wanted to hide somebody—if you owed somebody a favor and wanted to hide them—family court was the place.” She was happy to let a little light in.

“Luxury was going to the Catskills and taking two cha-cha lessons with the dance instructor in a weekend instead of one.” –Judy Sheindlin The Los Angeles Times piece—featuring Sheindlin zingers like “I can’t stand stupid, and I can’t stand slow” and “I want first-time offenders to think of their appearance in my courtroom as the secondworst experience of their lives…circumcision being the first”—led to a 60 Minutes segment. (She’s still opinionated. Her views on gay marriage: “I’ve always felt the same way about Americans who work and pay taxes. And do the right thing. Why do we care about this? It should be a non-issue. It’s a nonissue.”) Then Hollywood showed up. After 17 years on air, when Sheindlin catches a rerun from the early days of Judge Judy, she’s critical, though not for the reasons you might think. “I say to myself, ‘You know, you should have let somebody else do your hair.’ I did it at the beginning. They used to call me the Kitchen Beautician. I went to the drugstore and got some wash-in color. I didn’t think it mattered. Truth is, it does matter.” Despite her lifestyle and earning power—she tied Katy Perry on Forbes’s 2012 list of highestpaid women in Hollywood—Sheindlin seems intent on holding firm to her Brooklyn roots. I ask about another of those apocryphal stories—that her


Times, USA Today, and the New York Times, usually in that order. “The plane has WiFi, so I catch-up on e-mails.” Has she read any good books lately? “My own!” she says. (Her sixth book, What Would Judy Say?, was published in April.) Her husband, the retired judge Jerry Sheindlin, accompanies her, making good use of the Montage’s gym. (“He’s buff,” Judy says.) They fall asleep at night watching reruns of Criminal Minds. “I don’t like to leave things hanging,” she says. “I’m not saying in the morning, What did I miss? I’ve seen it before.” Do she and her husband argue? “All the time,” Sheindlin says. About what? “Everything. Nothing that I’m going to discuss with you.” Shifting in her seat, she issues her verdict: “Are we almost finished? I’m exhausted.” OK. Last question: What does the staff on the private jet call you? Mrs. Sheindlin? Judge Judy? She smiles, finally: “To my face or behind my back?”

“M

ove!” Sheindlin is perched on her stand, presiding over a landlordtenant dispute — her fou r th or fifth case this morning. In person, the “courtroom” appears as you’d expect: It’s like the set for a com-

munity production of 12 Angry Men, populated by “extras” who—while Sheindlin is backstage playing hands of gin—argue amongst themselves about the verdicts and the judge’s awesomely personal barbs. The case we’ve just seen concerns a 39-year-old tattoo ar tist and his 23-year-old girlfriend who rent a one-room bu ngalow in Los A ngeles, for which they pay $765 a month. Or at least that’s what they’re supposed to pay. They haven’t written a rent check in months, citing rodents, mold and a disagreement over the electricity bill as reasons to shirk. Sheindlin has little patience for them, or most other litigants. If the disputes are mundane and the litigants less than charismatic, no worries. Sheindlin’s skill is in the well-timed personal attack. Viewers love to see her put deadbeats in their place. Nearing a verdict, Sheindlin says: “You don’t have a lease. You’re not trapped. You’re not happy? Move. Move!” The man backpedals, but Sheindlin puts it in terms he can understand, accusing him of going out for a steak dinner and not paying the bill. “You want to live with a 23-year-old who doesn’t work?” she says, smelling blood. “That’s your prerogative. You ate the steak. You have to pay.” Next! There’s a second case—a dispute between two sisters. When one sister had her car repossessed, the other sent her a $1,600 Walmart MoneyGram. Was that a gif t? Or a loa n? (Shei nd l i n’s ve rd ic t: Pay it back!) Then one about a young man from Atlanta driving an uninsured car. The cases are enter taining enough. But Walmart MoneyGrams? Disagreements over $765 studio apartments? T h i s i s m o r e K it ch e n B e a u t ic i a n than Greenwich millionaire. W hen she’s back in her dressing room playing cards, I can’t help but wonder if Sheindlin can still relate to her constituents. “I understand the question,” she says. “But I don’t like the direction!” Then she lets out a very large laugh. Sheindlin will make nearly $1 million today—or, roughly $100,000 per verdict. Nice work, if you can get it. But at age 70, wouldn’t she rather be kicking back? “I still love to go to work every day,” Sheindlin says, turning it on us: “Don’t you?”

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20,000-square-foot home in Connecticut was built in only three months, with construction workers toiling around the clock, seven days a week. “That’s not true,” Sheindlin sniffs. “It was built in short order,” she says, pointedly, “in less than a year. But that’s not true.” Still, how’d it go up so quickly? “You have to be able to say, You know what? That color marble isn’t so important. If you can’t get this one, get something that’s close. You can’t get that wallpaper, get something close. You have to be f lexible if you want to get in and enjoy it.” Seriously, that’s it? The estate has gold-plated fixtures and what’s been called a mile of paved walkways. Sheindlin will concede: “When we drive through the gates to get to the house, there’s something almost fairy-tale about it. All from a little TV show.” The high life hasn’t much changed Sheindlin, says longtime friend and gossip columnist Cindy Adams. “Judy is very easy; she had it a hundred years before everything hit for her, so she knows what it’s like to be a normal, regular person,” says Adams, who was introduced to Sheindlin when their shared banker recommended the judge offer her advice on training Adams’ ungovernable Yorkies. “Maybe she wears better shoes now. Or better clothes. But nothing else has changed.” This fall, the 18th season of Judge Judy begins airing. What’s more impressive than her schedule (52 days a year! $45 million salary!) is that she’s negotiated it all without an agent. Of her schedule, she says: “It’s not something I like to talk about. We tape 50 days a year. That doesn’t mean that’s all you work.” But she is more direct on the topic of representation: “Nobody understands your own worth more than you do,” she says. By the time her contract expires in 2017, she will be 75 years old. It may sound like a nice round number. But her longtime producer, Randy Douthit, can’t imagine Sheindlin walking away, even then. Yes, the travel will take a toll as she continues to age. She has to f ly to L.A. twice a month. “In her private jet,” he adds, with a smile. Sheindlin has f lown private since just after 9/11. “If I’m going to continue to work,” she says, “I really have to make it easy for me to get to and fro.” She lives in Florida from October through May and spends the rest of the year in Greenwich. The family bought the place in Wyoming in 2011 so the kids could ski. On the private jet, Sheindlin preps her cases, then reads the New York Post, the Financial


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Character study Bridget Hall, a onetime star of the supermodel constellation, makes a return after a self-imposed hiatus. Taking inspiration from the season’s menswear-influenced pieces, this perennial beauty plays the strong-and-silent type to perfection. PHOTOGRAPHED by Matthew kristall   styled by catherine newell-hanson


Topcoat, $2,950, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO, 866-337-7242. Thomas Mason ButtonDown shirt, $148, J.CREW, jcrew.com. Tiny Treasures disc pendant in 18-karat yellow gold with diamonds, $620, ROBERTO COIN, robertocoin.com. PerlĂŠe pendant necklace in 18-karat white gold with diamonds, $5,100, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, 212-896-9284. Ring worn throughout, her own. On skin: Luminous Silk Foundation in 4, $60, GIORGIO ARMANI BEAUTY, giorgioarmanibeauty-usa.com. On lips: Joli Rouge Lipstick in Royal Plum, $26, CLARINS, clarins.com.

photo credits teekay

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photo credits teekay

196 Carrara Teddy Bear coat, $3,250, MAX MARA, 212-879-6100. Classic Western shirt, $50, GAP, gap.com. Starlet Straight jeans, $79, GUESS, guess.com. Vintage belt, $98, WHAT GOES AROUND COMES AROUND, 212-343-1225. Necklace, her own. On hair: Volumizing Mousse, $28, MOROCCANOIL, moroccanoil.com.


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Jeans shirt 1, $190; Jeans 22, $190, BLK DNM, 212-966-6258. Small Tall Hoop earrings, $150, WENDY NICHOL, 212-431-4171. Perlée pendant necklace in 18-karat white gold with diamonds, $5,100; Perlée signature ring in 18-karat white gold, $2,400, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, 212-896-9284. Concho 153 belt, $1,500, VICKI TURBEVILLE, southwesternjewelry.net. Penny boots, $295, ASH, 646-422-7098.


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Left Bank Double Breasted blazer, $750; Contour pants, $475, 3.1 PHILLIP LIM, 31philliplim.com. Baby Box Chain in 18-karat yellow gold, $1,650, DAVID YURMAN, davidyurman.com.


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Topcoat, $2,950, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO, 866-337-7242. Thomas Mason Button-Down shirt, $148, J.CREW, jcrew. com. Utility Slim pants, $890, REED KRAKOFF, reedkrakoff. com. PerlĂŠe signature ring in 18-karat white gold, $2,400, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, 212-896-9284. Rackf shoes, $585, ROBERT CLERGERIE, robertclergerie.com.


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201 Opposite: Shetland coat, price upon request, LOUIS VUITTON, louisvuitton.com. Perlée pendant necklace in 18-karat white gold with diamonds, $5,100; Perlée ring with large beads in 18-karat white gold, $2,150, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS, 212-896-9284. Rackf shoes, $585, ROBERT CLERGERIE, robertclergerie.com. Above: Jacket 22, $995, BLK DNM, 212-966-6258. Distressed Boy tee, $195, R13, shopbop.com. Boyfriend jeans, $220, RAG & BONE, rag-bone.com. Tiny Treasures disc pendant in 18-karat yellow gold with diamonds, $620, ROBERTO COIN, robertocoin.com. Perlée pendant necklace in 18-karat white gold with diamonds, $5,100, VAN CLEEF & ARPELS. Hair: Andre Gunn at The Wall Group. Makeup: Tracy Alfajora at Art Department. Model: Bridget Hall/One Management. Fashion assistant: Jordan Highsmith. Shot on location at Fairview Farm in Bridgehampton, NY.


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The

We’re all fascinated by the troubled heiress, who chose solitude and a doll collection over her mansions and immense fortune. now go behind the closed doors and discover who, exactly, was the woman living in her own fairy tale. Written by nina Burleigh

Opposite: Antique French doll by Jumeau purchased in a pair by Clark for $30,000

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peculiar of life Huguette Clark


Her Fifth Avenue apartment, left empty for 20 years

photo credits teekay

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T

he French Consul General was looking over the guest l i s t f o r h i s c o n s u l a t e ’s Ch r istian Dior show when he spotted a familiar name. It wa s t he l a t e 1950 s a nd t h e d i plo m a t w a s a d e n i zen of Fif t h Avenue, w it h it s u n ifor med chau f feu r s, white gloves and American aristocrats. He recognized t he n a me not b e cau se t he woman was social—she was decidedly not—but because s h e w a s h i s a u nt by m a rriage. Huguette Clark, heiress to a $200–$250 million copper fortune (equal to about $3.4 billion today), occupied an entire f loor of a Fifth Avenue apartment building, not far from the consulate. The diplomat also knew she was a recluse. “Look, she’s not going to come,” he told a Dior representative. “She’s my aunt, and she never goes out.” The representative corrected him. “Oh, yes, she will. She wants to see the dresses. For her dolls.” Clark, then in her fifties, was one of the wealthiest women in America. At first glance, she’d seem to be a member of a club featuring such swashbuckling, globe-trotting heiresses as Mabel Dodge, Peggy Guggenheim and the rich-by-marriage New York culture maven Brooke Astor. But unlike any of those ladies, Clark, a tiny blue-eyed blonde, was neither scandalous nor inf luential. She could have lived anywhere in the world, entertained lavishly in several mansions, and probably bought herself a new Latin lover every year. Instead, she chose to stay behind locked doors, building herself an intricate alternative universe out of dolls. Clark did indeed attend the Dior show, as she would other French haute-couture shows in the 1950s. Arriving alone, she barely spoke. Few people remembered her. Later she would cable orders to Paris for scale replicas of the season’s styles to be sewn for some of her 1,100 dolls. They would have nothing but the best. The elegant Huguette Clark was the younger daughter of a self-made Gilded Age mineral magnate named William A. Clark. She spoke with a touch of French on account of being born and educated in Paris. Her long life spanned the disaster of the Titanic (for which she had an unused ticket) to the falling of the twin towers. She’d been married once, in her early twenties, divorced and lived with her adored mother until her mother’s death, after which she became ever more homebound, associating mainly with her staff. The massive—and meticulously dressed—doll and dollhouse collection that filled whole rooms of Clark’s vast Manhattan apartment was undeniably eccentric, but it was arguably not the most bizarre aspect of her life. Obsessed with privacy, Clark chose to spend her final two decades not in her


“she is the boo radley of all boo radleys.”

Fifth Avenue apartment or her luxurious mansions in Connecticut and California but sheltered in a darkened 14-by-24foot standard two-bed hospital room in New York City. To be able to live in a hospital would seem a practical choice for someone with chronic health issues and deep pockets. Yet for the majority of the time she resided at Beth Israel Medical Center, Clark had nothing wrong physically. Her daily intake of medicine: a single vitamin. Clark’s passion for privacy was such that her saga could have gone unnoticed by the world. But not long before she died, journalist Bill Dedman began to research her. Dedman’s eventual book, Empty Mansions: The Mysterious Life of Huguette Clark and the Spending of a Great American Fortune, is being published this month, in time for the opening days of a trial scheduled to pit her legatees—a small number of caretakers and the foundation she established in her will—against distant relatives who are alleging that her will was obtained by undue inf luence and fraud. Dedman discovered Huguette Clark while hunting for a house a few years ago. “I always enjoyed looking at the most expensive homes for sale,” he said, even though he wasn’t in the market to buy one. When he noticed a $24 million house on 52 acres called Le Beau Château in New Canaan, Connecticut—situated between houses owned by Harry Connick Jr. on one side and Glenn Beck on the other—he couldn’t resist the pull of curiosity. He drove over and poked around the ivy-draped stone walls that edged the estate. “I couldn’t see any house, just little caretaker cottages,” he recalled. “The caretaker came out and said he had worked there for 20 years and never seen the owner. I learned that no one had occupied it for 60 years. Then he asks me, ‘Do you think she’s still alive?’ And I thought, ‘News is being committed here.’ ” Dedman eventually followed his nose to another of Clark’s “empty mansions,” an even more lavish and sprawling pile than the New Canaan property, called Bellosguardo, in Santa Barbara, California. With 21,666 square feet on acres facing the Pacific, and no owner seen on the property for decades, Bellosguardo was steeped in lore. Locals told stories of 1930s-vintage cars parked in the garage (true) and a table always set for dinner, Miss Havisham–style (false). The home’s mystery attracted even the Shah of Iran, who tried to buy it. After learning the owner of these fabulous properties was an elderly woman living in a hospital in New York, Dedman connected with a distant relative of Clark’s, a second cousin named Paul Clark Newell Jr. (who went on to co-author Empty Mansions with Dedman). Newell told Dedman he spoke with the elusive woman frequently and that she was healthy and seemed sharp as a tack. But some of Clark’s distant relatives think otherwise. This September, a jury is scheduled to hear arguments from lawyers of the relatives who say her will—leaving most of the wealth to charity, not family—should be thrown out. A jury will be asked to decide, essentially, whether Clark, who died in 2011 at the ripe age of 104, was non compos mentis. But this is far from a simple question.

O

ne must t ravel back to the 19th cent ur y to begin to understand the woman who lived at Beth Israel Hospital. The daughter of Clark’s young second wife, she was born in Paris—her parents lived on the Avenue Victor Hugo in the fashionable 16th arrondissement, hence “Huguette.” When she was 5, the Clarks moved Huguette and her older sister Andrée home to the biggest house in New York City, a six-story mansion overlooking Central Park with a special hideaway on the top f loor in case an epidemic hit the city. W.A. Clark was born in Pennsylvania and made a fortune mining in Montana, becoming a U.S. senator and a major art collector before his death. His first wife, with whom he had five children, died in 1893, after which he took up with a series of younger women, including Anna LaChapelle, who was around 15 when they met. He married her in 1901, when she was 23 and he was 62. Huguette was born in 1906. Huguette adored her mother, and they lived together for decades in an apartment on Fifth Avenue at 72nd Street. Her attachment was so intense that when Huguette was hospitalized, well after her mother had died in 1963, she remodeled one of the bedrooms to be an exact replica of A n na’s. Although the work was completed at a cost of $400,000, Huguette remained in the hospital and never once saw the room in person. Upon turning 18, Huguette inherited her portion of W.A. Clark’s financial fortune and went on to purchase real estate in New Canaan and Manhattan, also inheriting the Santa Barbara property when her mother died. Like her father, she was an avid art collector, especially of French Impressionists. But her real passion was dolls—and privacy. W.A. Clark had weathered some very public scandals in his political life. Perhaps that explained his daughter’s shyness. In any case, Huguette’s desire not to be in the papers was so strong that when Citibank auctioned off a safe deposit box of millions’ worth of her mother’s jewelry without informing her, she refused to sue, according to Empty Mansions. Similarly, when someone stole a French impressionist painting—a Degas ballerina—and the oil turned up on the wall of tax man Henry Bloch’s living room in Kansas, she didn’t want the attention surrounding a retrieval, so she arranged a deal to keep the painting in its same location, asking only for a photograph so she could enjoy looking at it. As she aged, Clark grew increasingly isolated, like a female Howard Hughes without the germophobia. A doctor called to her Fifth Avenue apartment in March of 1991 found her emaciated and wrapped in a filthy bathrobe, her face disfigured by untreated skin cancer. After several months in a hospital, she was pronounced cured, but she would never again leave Beth Israel Medical Center. Some might view her behavior as a sign of dementia, but Dedman came to believe Clark’s lonely years of untreated illness and her choice to remain (even when cured) in a hospital room, for which she paid between $800 to $1,200 a night, had more to do with shyness.

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photo credits teekay

—Author bill dedman


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A man was paid $90 an hour to create and catalog rooms for 1,157 dolls. “She is the Boo Radley of all Boo Radleys—if Boo Radley’s parents had been millionaires,” says Dedman. “She was skittish. I don’t think any diagnosis fits her. When she got into her eighties, she was living alone in this 15,000-square-foot space. The staff was dwindling. She didn’t do too well with new people, so she didn’t replace them. She had a staff of 12 and that went down to three, then down to one. She outlasted her doctors, and she wasn’t going to go out and find a new doctor. Then she got some skin cancers and went through a period where it was drastically untreated.” Once she had been moved to Beth Israel, her hospital bed was her command center: She communicated regularly with lawyers and other staff, oversaw her properties, corresponded by letter with friends around the country and in Europe and played with her doll collection by proxy, using employees to dress and maintain them. Clark’s dolls and dollhouses were unlike any a child might collect. She avidly monitored Sotheby’s and other high-end auction houses for antique dolls, bidding tens of thousands by phone. Artists and workmen around the world designed domestic models to her exacting specifics, which she calculated based on readings of fairy tales and Japanese medieval literature. “These one-of-a-kind tabletop models were texts, story houses, theaters with scenes and characters painted on the walls,” Dedman wrote. “And, like her father with his art collection, Huguette spared no expense. She commissioned religious houses with Joan of Arc, forts with toy soldiers, cottages with scenes from old French fables and house after house telling her favorite fairy tales: Rapunzel, the maiden with the long hair trapped in the tower. Sleeping Beauty, the princess stuck in sleep until a handsome prince awakens her with a kiss. Rumpelstiltskin, with the girl forced to spin straw into gold.” Her collection grew so large it needed a full-time caretaker, and Clark eventually employed a middleaged Brooklyn father to work five days a week organizing and overseeing the houses. This “man Friday,” Chris Sattler (who, like most everyone involved except the lawyers, refuses to speak to the media), was paid $90 an hour to create and catalog roomfuls of her 1,157 dolls and doll furniture. His special duty, though, was creating dollhouse scenes exactly as requested by the woman whom he and the rest of the staff always called Madame. This was no mere child’s play, however. Sattler and others who worked for Clark came to regard the dolls as her form of art. When she was 58, Clark cabled a Bavarian artist who made and sold fairy-tale dolls: “Rumpelstiltskin house just arrived. It is beautifully painted but unfortunately is not same size of last porridge house received. Instead of front of house being 19 3/4 of an inch wide it is only 15 1/2 inch wide. Please

make sure religious house has front of house 19 3/4 of an inch wide. Would also like shutters on all the windows. Would like another Rumpelstiltskin house with same scenes with scene where hay is turned to gold added as well as scene before hay is turned but with wider front and also wooden shutters on every window. With many thanks for all your troubles and kindest regards.—Huguette Clark, 907 Fifth Ave NYC.” How seriously did the reclusive woman treat these fantastical creations? One of her former assistants told Dedman that Clark asked a craftsman to raise the ceiling on one of the dollhouses an inch or two, complaining, “The little people are banging their heads!” “Her assistants will tell you that, and they see the look on your face and say, ‘No, no, no! You think she’s crazy and she wasn’t at all!’ ” Dedman said. “My coauthor Paul talked to her on the phone for nine years, and he thought she was lucid as anyone else. She was not having any trouble telling fact from fiction. She recalled both that his granddaughter was taking ballet lessons and the tickets on the Titanic. She had a sense of humor. She kidded him about finding a girlfriend.” Clark was especially fascinated with 18th-century Japan. She collected tiny dolls in historically precise costumes and employed a Japanese artist for the express purpose of going to temples and castles to do scale drawings. “Just as Americans would k now a figure of Abraham Lincoln immediately from his top hat and beard, Huguette would know the figures from the Tokugawa shogunate, specifically those from the 1770s,” Dedman wrote. In a deposition, Sattler told of how, when Huguette was 97 and lying in her hospital bed, she described six books in her collection on Japanese theater history, calling each one by title, even though she hadn’t seen them for years. “She was deep into a two-month project on Kabuki, creating a mock-up of a theater to be sent to the elderly artist in Japan, who would make a tabletop theater to her specifications,” Dedman wrote. Everything had to be perfectly to scale and historically accurate. Her written instructions were exacting for Sattler, who had received an undergraduate degree in history and literature from Fairfield University in Connecticut and then found himself, as Dedman puts it, “enrolled in the Huguette Marcelle Clark Graduate School of Japanese History.” Sattler would follow her instructions—“Find all the ladies-in-waiting of medium size.... Find all the court ladies who are playing cards”—construct the scenes, take hundreds of snapshots of the figurines and scenery posed just so and deliver them to the hospital. Only after she approved the photographs would he assemble and bring the entire model to the hospital, for a few hours or a couple of days. “Then she would be in heaven there for a while,” Sattler said in a deposition.

W

hile she was alive—and even after her death in 2011—Clark was a woman of unyielding benevolence. She gave her nurse, Hadassah Peri, a Filipina immigrant, $30 million in gifts, property and cash, and bequeathed her an additional $40 million of her assets in her will. She reportedly gave $1 million in gifts to the night nurse who brought her warm milk to her hospital bed and sent $30,000 to a home health-care nurse she’d never met because she heard the woman took care of Clark’s stockbroker in his final years. “This woman is home in Queens and Huguette’s lawyer shows up and says, here is a letter, but you must never tell anyone about it,” Dedman said. “She had this incredible generosity. She liked to give money to the people close to her.” It is that very generosity that will be examined in the legal battle scheduled for September 17. Clark specifically stated in her will that she had no connection to her family and didn’t want them to have any of her money. Instead she granted most of her fortune to a charitable foundation, which doesn’t yet exist, with other sizable bequests going to various caretakers involved in her life until the very end. The chief claimants in the lawsuit are grandchildren and great-grandchildren of her father from his first marriage, people she knew but who allegedly had not seen her in person for decades, and then only once at a funeral when some were still small children. “The last time any of them were in her presence and talked to her was 1951,” Dedman said. “But that doesn’t matter. If they can knock out the will, they win. They are claiming that she was incompetent.” For evidence, the claimants point to her obsession with dolls, her choice to live out her days in a hospital bed and the empty mansions themselves. What sane person would choose a darkened, small room instead of sumptuous estates with staff and landscaped grounds? But relatives will have to explain other aspects of Clark’s later years that allude to her sanity. She “had lots of pen pals,” says Dedman, and wrote 4,000 pages of letters in French from her hospital room, in addition to overseeing properties and the exacting manipulation of dollhouse scenes. She had a niece she spoke with on holidays and a goddaughter on whom she doted (and who is included in the will). And Clark never told people she was living in a hospital, perhaps out of embarrassment, or to protect her cherished privacy. New York lawyer John Dadakis, who represents Wallace Bock, Clark’s attorney and the lawyer who wrote her will, says he has ample evidence that Clark was of sound mind. “The record is replete with factual information as to Huguette Clark’s competency,” he told DuJour. “She continued to be up and about almost to the end of her life and those that saw her on a daily basis have indicated that she was fully competent.”


doll: courtesy of sotheby’s, london. 907 fifth avenue: weston wells. Portrait of clark: the estate of huguette m. clark.

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Among Clark’s occasional correspondents in the ’80s and ’90s was former Santa Barbara Mayor Sheila Lodge, who never met Clark but wrote back and for th to the heiress and her lawyers about Bellosguardo, local property improvements and other matters. Lodge knew Clark through letters and holiday cards—the latter without much imagery but densely packed with Clark’s “firm and distinctive” handwriting. “She was a genuine eccentric as best I could tell, but she did not seem to be one bit short on her mental capabilities,” Lodge said. “She cared deeply about her place, although she hadn’t been here for decades. She had very specific directions about what should be done, and she called her staff here regularly.” Lodge recalled that to the end of her life, Clark maintained ties to the community, where she held membership in the Santa Barbara Museum of Art and belonged to the city’s Friends of Contemporary Art and Friends of Asian Art and was a charter member of the best golf club in town, although she never made an appearance. “The ju r y will hear all this,” Ded man said. “A nd you can start a bar fight over it. Should the nurse have accepted $30 million? She has six houses herself now, one of them empty. People would say that’s over the line. But then you say, well, she worked for 20 years, seven days a week without a day off for a decade of it. And it’s very clear Huguette cherished her. If you say it that way, a jury would say she can give her money to anybody she wants.” Dadakis points out that the 19 relatives objecting to the will prepared by his client in 2005 barely knew her. “Only one of the 19 had ever reached out during the period from 1991 through 2008 to speak with Huguette,” he says. “The others have indicated that they had no contact with her during that period and before.” The attorney for the relatives, John Morken, did not return repeated calls for comment. In the end, Dedman said his investigation could only go so far into the mind and motives of the recluse. He admits he never uncovered her “Rosebud”—the possible psychic wound that left her choosing isolation over society, and a hospital bed over a mansion. But he came to some surprising conclusions. “She grew up in the biggest house in New York City, where you have money like water, where there was a different bathroom for every day of the month,” he says. “There’s a warping effect of such wealth. She’s shy and artistically inclined. Publicity was not good to her father. She got into a situation where she valued privacy more than she valued even her Degas when it shows up on a wall in Kansas. Imagine having a $10 million painting stolen and you won’t sue to get it back.” More to the point: Imagine going to such lengths to hide from the world and then, after death, having your life examined in a media-filled courtroom. Because that is what is about to happen to Huguette Clark.

One of the rare photographs of the mysterious heiress, pictured here around age 37


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THE FOUNDER: After stints in investment banking (Merrill

ESTABLISHED: 2010

Is there any type of story you’d never print? BASKIN: We’ll publish stories on any topic, as long as the author challenges us and our readers to think differently than we might otherwise. But our favorite articles are about the subjects that concern almost everyone: parenting, love, eating, Facebook, etc.

ESTABLISHED: 1995

Lynch) and advertising (Leo Burnett), Harvard MBA Lee Allison decided to create a cravat company. TAGLINE: “Remove before sex.”

TAGLINE: “He’s the well-dressed rebel.

Any well-known readers? It was an honor to learn Ethan Coen ordered the back issue that featured the “What is film for?” symposium. [Sociologist] Todd Gitlin is a subscriber, as is the editor of the Paris Review, Lorin Stein.

He’s the tailored misfit.”

ZWICK:

KNOWN FOR: Classic yet nonconformist style THE LOOK: Striking,

graphic patterns of everyday manly American items: six-shooters, shaving blades, cleavers and spark plugs

KNOWN FOR: Elegant designs and a naughty sense of humor THE LOOK: Classic

stripes and dots; unassuming ties that reveal, upon closer inspection, something along the lines of unclad ladies or romping rabbits

VIP FANS: Rahm

and the Alinea staff: On getting three Michelin stars, Achatz gave his staff ties.

Emanuel and President Obama

VIP FANS: Grant Achatz

FOR THE GREATER GOOD: A custom

Jon Baskin, Jonny Thakkar and Etay Zwick

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tie to commemorate the 75th anniversary of Cincinnati neurosurgery center the Mayfield Clinic, with all proceeds going to its foundation (The Butcher silk tie, $89, artfullydisheveled.com)

FOR THE GREATER GOOD: Donates

ties as silent-auction items to more than 20 local schools and charities; hosts wine tastings in the company’s Bucktown loft with proceeds going to area nonprofits like Marwen, Landmarks Illinois, SGA Youth & Family Services and METROsquash (Silk-and-cotton tie, $90, leeallison.com)

TOP TO BOTTOM, ESCARGOT: DAVIES AND STARR/GETTY IMAGES; THE POINT: SHAWN LOWE; JASON SMITH; ARTFULLY DISHEVELED: MARIA PONCE (2); ALLISON: COURTESY; KENJI KERINS

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Pick-up artists, improv, Twitter, cave trout: There are few topics that literary magazine The Point won’t take on in its scholarly yet accesOne-year subscription, $18 sible pages. Founders and University of Chicago graduate students Jon Baskin, Etay Zwick and Jonny Thakkar launched their first issue in 2009; today The Point is distributed around the globe. thepointmag.com


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site seeing

Check out these inspired arrivals, online and off A reborn Hyatt 151 East Upper Wacker Drive The overhaul of the Hyatt Regency has left no corner untouched. After three years and $168 million of work, the city’s biggest hotel has a host of new features, like a 24-hour market, Stetson’s Modern Steak + Sushi restaurant and a redone Skybridge (connecting to the McCormick Place convention center) that’s wired for WiFi. chicagoregency.hyatt.com

Farther Afield Iron Horse Hotel 500 West Florida Street Milwaukee, WI

THe Langham Opening

e-commerce

all images courtesy

330 North Wabash Avenue For Dirk Lohan, working on Chicago’s IBM Building is something of a family tradition. His eminent grandfather, architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, designed the 52-story landmarked structure (completed in 1972). Now Lohan, an architect who’d assisted van der Rohe on the project, is getting a second opportunity to make his mark there by spearheading its conversion into a luxury hotel. The 316-room Langham Chicago contains a 22,000-square-foot fitness studio and spa, a screening room, a bluechip art collection with works by Anish Kapoor and Claes Oldenburg, and a David Rockwell–designed restaurant and bar. “I felt very strongly that whatever was done should be done in a sympathetic and harmonious way with the original aesthetic,” Lohan says. He pays tribute to his grand-

What sparked Storied? We saw beautiful hotels with lackluster stores. We decided we wanted to transform that neglected part of the business.

What’s your approach? We want each shop to be about the place where it’s located. For Iron Horse, we are working with local and Midwest vendors, and all products are made in the U.S.

father in the hotel’s lobby, which has walls made from the building’s original travertine and couches and chairs based on family-owned van der Rohe designs that have never been available to the public. Seven-foot-tall lamps and a cus-

tom check-in desk were inspired by the architect’s famous Farnsworth House, in Plano, Illinois. For Lohan, the project has been a true labor of love. “I was committed to making it right,” he says. chicago.langhamhotels.com

From top: Stetson’s restaurant at the Hyatt Regency; the Travelle lounge at the Langham Chicago

What can we find at Mercantile? Our inspiration was a general store with a higher-end mix of basics and artisan goods. It has Canvas housewares, Further soaps, Field Notes, Indulgence chocolates, Chicago’s Lillie Q’s BBQ sauce and much more.

Apartmentnumber9.com

Augustgeneralstore.com

As enticing as the brick-and-mortar shop, this new e-commerce site for men makes it easy to browse the likes of Maison Martin Margiela, Billy Reid and Relwen. With stories like a profile of Bon Appétit’s editor in chief, Adam Rapoport, it’s also great reading.

Bookmark this e-site, launched earlier this year, for a curated selection of products sure to appeal to design snobs. Shop for Brahams Mount blankets, Common Good and Co. soap, industrial light fixtures and hand-painted pillows from founder Jannie Eckhert.

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Hotels can be so much more than a place to sleep. With Storied, Mary Beth Malone, founder of Chicago’s Elysian Hotel, and Sarah Blessing, owner of menswear boutique Apartment Number 9, work with hotels to create tightly conceived and curated shopping experiences. DuJour talked to the duo about Storied’s history and their latest project, the industrial chic Mercantile shop within the Iron Horse hotel. theironhorse hotel.com; storiedco.com


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Brad Oldham (designer Todd’s brother ) has unveiled 24 stainless steel sculptures at the Hotel Lumen (hotellumen.com ).

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MODERN MASTERPIECES

Think smarter, drive faster and dress better

Henri Matisse, Bathers By a River (1909–17), at the Kimbell Art Museum

HUBLOT 8687 North Central Expressway Swiss watchmaker Hublot recently opened its first Lone Star State location—a sleek black boutique that epitoTitanium MP- 02 Key of mizes the brand’s passion for Time watch, $276,000, mechanics and engineering— HUBLOT, 469-232-9449 at NorthPark Center. Stop in to browse, check out the recently launched MP-02 (the second design from the Key of Time Masterpiece collection) and kick back in the VIP lounge. hublot.com

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The 2014 Maserati Quattroporte

READ MORE ABOUT THE NEW MASERATIS ON DUJOUR.COM

PARK PLACE MASERATI 5760 Bryant Irvin Road, Fort Worth The Italian automotive masters at Maserati have chosen Park Place for their latest showroom and service center. At the staggering 46,000-square-foot space, you can test-drive two of the company’s latest sports cars: the Quattroporte and the Ghibli. “This new dealership is all about comfort, The 2014 Maserati Ghibli luxury and style, just like what you’ll find in the car itself,” says Ken Schnitzer, the dealercars. With a Ferrari-produced engine and technolship’s owner. ogy similar to the pricier Quattroporte, the sporty That much is clear behind the wheel of the Ghibli is a relative steal at $65,600, plus it stands Ghibli, Maserati’s new sedan, manufactured in line to compete with the Mercedes E class and BMW with the company’s century-long tradition of GT 5 series. maserati.com

DEAR CLARK

ESPA AT THE JOULE

SUSAN POSNICK COSMETICS

It takes a Texas woman—make that two—to truly appreciate the importance of good hair. Holly Dear and Kaycee Clark have expanded their salon with a blow-dry lounge, a braid bar (a first in Dallas) and their own line of must-have products.

Sink in at the new ESPA spa, where the massage tables have a cushy six inches of memory foam. There’s also a crystal steam room and a vitality pool whose air loungers invite you to lean back and relax your shoulders.

The former makeup artist has expanded her cosmetics empire—Dallas resident Angie Harmon is a fan—to include rich lipsticks with a magnetic closure and vitamin-packed ColorFlo mineral foundation.

Elixir, Balm and Rinse, $22–$24, DEAR CLARK, dearclark.com

Body and hair products, $47–$88, ESPA, espaonline.com

ColorFlo foundation, $68, Color Essential lipstick, $19, SUSAN POSNICK, POSNICK susanposnick.com

MATISSE: © 2012 SUCCESSION H. MATISSE/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

3333 Camp Bowie Boulevard, Fort Worth “The Age of Picasso and Matisse: Modern Masters from the Art Institute of Chicago” (October 6 through February 16, 2014) showcases more than 100 masterpieces of painting and sculpture. The works featured in the exhibit were made in the first half of the 20th century and include abstract and surrealist artists such as Chagall, Duchamp, Miró, Klee and Dalí. kimbellart.org

BEAUTY BUZZ

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KIMBELL ART MUSEUM


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Houston was recently named one of the 10 greenest cities in the U.S.

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the space maker

house: artpartner-images/getty images; rottet: Delise Ward; philippe: Shannon O’Hara; RBS & Boone: Benny Chan; all other images courtesy

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Philippe Restaurant + Lounge

Haynes and Boone

Royal Bank of Scotland

“Houstonian Southern hospitality meets French gourmet cooking. We did a concrete floor downstairs and kept it more formal upstairs, paying homage to the French everywhere from the wallpaper to the doors. Overall, it’s not too formal or off-putting.”

“This law firm falls into the profoundly quiet category. It’s a powerful two-story space, bright and mostly white, that looks out over downtown Houston, but it has pretty simple finishes— except for the green stone wall in the reception area.”

“This was a very traditional project, but they quite liked our contemporary spaces. There’s tartan plaid running through, of course, but there are also cuts into the ceiling to make it feel more special and tall. We made the formal attitude a little less formal.”

Living the DR34M

Hall of Famer Hakeem Olajuwon follows his passion for design With former Houston Rockets center Hakeem Olajuwon’s basketball days in the past—he retired in 2002—his career in fashion has been gaining momentum. Having long designed custom clothes and shoes for himself, the slim 7-footer recently debuted his DR34M collection of suits, leather goods and other accessories in the historic West Mansion. Designed by architect Joseph Finger in the late 1920s, the 17,000-square-foot landmark estate was restored by Olajuwon and then converted into a store. “It was a natural transition for me to create a luxury designer brand, which would require a beautiful space for my idea of a luxurious shopping experience,” he says. In addition to stocking his lines of casual clothing (T-shirts, polos and denim), sneakers and apparel for men, the shop also contains a few elements of sports history, including a piece from the floor of the Summit where Olajuwon led the Rockets to back-to-back NBA Championships. As a bonus, helicopter service (from any helipad in the Houston, Dallas and San Antonio areas) to the Mansion is available for VIP shoppers, so they don’t have to waste a moment sitting in traffic. dr34m.com

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Leather Emanuela bag, $925, slim wallet, $155, and zipper pouch, $135, DR34M, dr34m.com

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rottet’s style statements

Interior designer Lauren Rottet calls Houston home Building moments of “quiet discovery” and “artistic exploration” into her modernist interiors is something Lauren Rottet loves to do. “When you walk someone through my spaces,” the architect and designer explains, “it crescendoes and then quiets down again like a musical score.” Lauren Rottet The Waco-born UT grad and mother of two calls Houston home when she’s not busy working on projects—often hotels (like New York City’s Loews Regency), cruise ships and corporate interiors—around the world or in one of Rottet Studio’s other offices, in NYC and Los Angeles. And while work emphasizes the modern, home is a 1920s colonial near Upper Kirby. “I almost always live in old homes,” she confesses. Rottet, who is launching her first 20-piece residential furniture collection this fall, has filled the rooms of her house with a mix of vintage furniture and prototype pieces from the forthcoming lines. “My whole quest is to make spaces more dynamic and less static,” she says. “I don’t like a lot of clutter, but I like interest, things you discover over time.” rottetstudio.com

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Rye 51

make it a double Eleven XI Restaurant & Bar

a man’s world

Let Houston be your playground— with a little help from this trifecta The Newfangled Old-Fashioned 1 ½ oz Ransom Old Tom Gin ½ oz simple syrup 2 dashes of bitters (cherry, orange or rhubarb) 1 muddled cherry 1 muddled orange wedge Mix ingredients in a highball or rocks glass. Finish with club soda.

Sartorially Yours

Sharp-dressed men can multitask by going to West Ave’s side-by-side brother boutiques Q Clothier and Rye 51. Together they comprise 2,700 square feet of made-to-measure casual and business clothing for guys with “a discerning taste in fashion,” says owner and Dallas entrepreneur Raja Ratan. On the Q side, it’s all about custom suits constructed from any of more than 3,000 luxury fabrics (from Loro Piana to Zegna), with an in-store soundtrack of Al Green and Miles Davis. “We set ourselves apart by offering our clients unique garments that are designed and handmade for them,” Ratan explains. “They have the chance to interact with us on every garment and specify exactly how it’s cut.” Meanwhile, Rye 51 offers a wellcurated selection of contemporary sportswear from

more on houston @ dujour.com/cities

A Lamborghini Gallardo Spyder from Platinum Motorcars

lines like John Varvatos, Diesel and Rye Reserve, as well as accessories, leather goods, apothecary products and shoes. Need a break from taxing fashion decisions? There’s a pool table and a full bar (which, of course, serves rye whiskey). Still can’t make up your mind what to buy? The stores’ salespeople can make house calls. qclothier.com, rye51.com Sweater, $248, diesel, 713-523-8222

Making Vroom

New exotic- and luxury- car rental service Platinum Motorcars is ready for topdown season with plenty of hot wheels—from Mercedes to Lamborghinis—to take for an autumn spin. “We have a wide variety of convertible choices available,” says owner and partner Benny Black. Try out a Maserati GranTurismo, Ferrari 430 Spyder, Bentley GTC or Porsche 911 Turbo Cabriolet. Door-to-door delivery is available. platinummotorcars.net

The 11 Cherry Limeade 1 ½ oz Grey Goose Cherry Noir 1 ½ oz simple syrup 1 teaspoon acid phosphate Juice of half a lime Put ingredients in a Collins glass. Fill with shaved or pellet ice and then top with Topo Chico (or other mineral water) and garnish with an orange slice.

cocktails: Michael Paulsen; all other images courtesy

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Serving up chef Kevin Bryant’s Southern coastal cuisine—think pan-seared halibut cheeks with citrus pico de gallo and grapefruit gastrique—Montrose’s Eleven XI Restaurant & Bar is garnering raves for its clever vintage cocktails, including DIY Manhattans made with housemade bitters (elevenx1houston.com  ). It also has an extensive wine cellar, with offerings from $28 to $1,000 a bottle. Here are two of our favorite potent potables:


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CrystalsAtCityCenter.com • Located next to ARIA Resort & Casino • Clothing and Accessories provided by Donna Karan • Jewelry provided by Bulgari


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Testing has begun on the High Roller, the largest observation wheel in the world. At 550 feet, it will be taller than the London Eye and the Singapore Flyer. It opens in early 2014.

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WORTH YOUR TIME

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Nano-ceramic and diamond RM 52-01 Skull Tourbillon watch, $795,000, RICHARD MILLE, richardmille.com

Where to find the latest luxuries in Las Vegas NEW BOUTIQUES AT THE SHOPS AT CRYSTALS

LONDON EYE: OLI SCARFF/GETTY IMAGES; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

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3720 Las Vegas Boulevard South Change is afoot at The Shops at Crystals, with a handful of new openings and expansions. Just in time for daylight savings, the Swatch Group has opened its largest Tourbillon boutique to date, carrying brands like Breguet, Blancpain and Omega, and Christian Dior will double in size. Thanks to architect David Chipperfield, Valentino’s 3,000-square-foot store is as impeccably designed as one of the house’s signature dresses; the intimate space features black-and-white windowpane floors, molded gypsum curtains and layered mirror-glass walls. For high design, it’s surprisingly cozy. Every Valentino style is on offer, including ready-to-wear, handbags and shoes. Cashmere helicopters are the new silver spoon of baby presents. Part of Loro Piana’s new gift collection, the toy is one supersoft luxury amid many (there’s also the cashmere sleeper, for something more pragmatic), and leather goods include sporting bags for tennis and ski gear. For other LP enthusiasts, the boutique is flush with the full line of baby cashmere sweaters, outerwear, scarves and capes, as well as clothing made from other fine natural fibers, including vicuña from Argentina and Peru. Innovative haute horologist Richard Mille unveils its second store in the U.S. this month at Crystals. “The luxury shoppers in Las Vegas hail from all over the world,” says John Simonian, CEO of Richard Mille Americas, “and we think they appreciate encountering exclusive or difficult-to-find items when they come here.” Case in point: the RM 52-01 Tourbillon Skull watch, comprising diamonds, titanium, a skull sculpted of 18-karat red gold and a nano-ceramic case. The sole model can be found at the new showroom, an industrially elegant space with ebony wood, leather, steel and glass. Inside, check out the impressive suspended sculpture, which mimics the movements of a mechanical watch. crystalsatcitycenter.com

China Vitello Rockstud tote, $2,395, VALENTINO, 702-737-7603

Vicuña Icer jacket, $16,995, LORO PIANA, loropiana.com

RX BOILER ROOM

KUMI JAPANESE RESTAURANT + BAR

Chef and restaurateur Rick Moonen’s upstairs room at RM Seafood in the Shoppes at Mandalay Place has reopened as steampunk-themed Rx Boiler Room (Rx is shorthand for Rick’s). It has a lab-style space, an apothecary lounge and sexy velvet drapes. We recommend the braised oxtail croquettes and kampachi tartare tacos.

The Light Group has opened Kumi by Akira Back, serving Korean-inflected Japanese food. Drawing on childhood food memories, Chef Akira has created unique rolls like the Seoul Garden, a take on bibimbap with a sweet and spicy sauce, and the 007 Octopussy, octopus with bamboo shoots, ginger and mushrooms.


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BRINGING BACK THE BUFFET

Drink, dine, repeat. No longer lowbrow, all-you-can-eat makes a decadent, upscale comeback

THE BUFFET AT THE WYNN

CLAIMS TO FAME: An airy, sky-lit space and a completely reinvented menu, thanks to recently poached Bacchanal chef Scott Green THE ROOM: Carmen Miranda meets Willy Wonka, with a delightful central atrium and 16 cooking stations DON’T MISS: Waffle-battered fried chicken, Wagyu lasagna, cardamom-poached pears OFF THE MENU: Name it and the cooks will make it for you sans dairy, sodium, gluten or sugar—plus, the restaurants at Wynn and Encore both have vegan menus. DRINK UP: $15 for unlimited wine (regular and sparkling) and mimosas COST: Breakfast, $21; dinner, from $39; champagne weekend brunch, $48 3131 Las Vegas Boulevard South, wynnlasvegas.com

The buffet serves 186,265 pounds of crab legs (nearly 100 tons!) annually

BUFFET AT ARIA CLAIMS TO FAME:

11 specialty stations, including a fish market and Latin cuisine space with an expansive museum-cafeteria feel DON’T MISS: Custom taco and pasta bars, cheese grits, tomato soup and mini grilled cheeses at the American station and a variety of gluten-free options OFF THE MENU: Chefs are on hand to toss salads to guest specifications. DRINK UP: $13 for unlimited mimosas, Bellinis, Bloody Marys, beer, sangria, wine and sparkling wine COST: From $19 (breakfast) to $40 (weekend dinner) 3730 Las Vegas Boulevard South, arialasvegas.com

Find hot naan at the only buffet-line tandoor oven on the Strip

MOZEN BISTRO AT MANDARIN ORIENTAL

MOzen Bistro isn’t designed to be a buffet restaurant, but it can transform into one that accommodates 77 people at a time. THE ROOM: Floor-to-ceiling windows provide a great view of CityCenter. DON’T MISS: An elaborate seafood station with an extensive raw bar, japchae (Korean sweetpotato noodles) with bulgogi, Hong Kong–style steamed grouper, Indian murgh makhani OFF THE MENU: The party never has to end—after brunch, diners can relocate to the 23rdfloor Mandarin Bar from 5P.M. to 8 P.M. DRINK UP: $35 for free-flowing Veuve Clicquot or $19 for unlimited mimosas, and Bloody Marys infused with Thai chili and garlic COST: $58 3752 Las Vegas Boulevard South, mandarinoriental.com CLAIM TO FAME:

The chefs now make fresh mochi ice cream

BACCHANAL BUFFET AT CAESARS PALACE

CLAIMS TO FAME: With a new $17 million buffet, Bacchanal now has nine kitchens, 600 seats and upwards of a 500 different dishes daily THE ROOM: Bacchanal is truly massive. Think you’ve finally reached the end of the line? Turn the corner to find more. DON’T MISS: Dim sum all day, Mexican pork carnitas, black soup chicken, an oystershucking station OFF THE MENU: There are at least six daily chef’s specials, as well as gluten-free, sugar-free and vegan items and the room can be partly converted for private dining. DRINK UP: $16 for unlimited wine and beer COST: From $26 (breakfast) to $51 (weekend dinner) 3570 Las Vegas Boulevard South, caesarspalace.com

The buffet employs 126 cooks

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CRAB: E+; NAAN: JESSICA BOONE; MOCHI: FLICKR; CHEF HAT: VINCENZO LOMBARDO/ALL GETTY IMAGES; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

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THE ROOM: A sprawling


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What’s in a name? The Shirley Temple, Cobb Salad and French Dip all got their starts in Los Angeles.

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BUZZWORTHY BRANDS

The fall crop of local beauty and fashion must-haves THE MANE EVENT

Diane Kruger being shot by Peter Lindbergh for the ad campaign

DIANE KRUGER’S NEW ROLE SALAD: ULTRA.F/GETTY IMAGES; RENFREW: LUKE WOODEN FOR BEAUTY COUNTER; JEANS: SHAWN LOWE; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

With her flawless complexion and natural poise, it’s not surprising that Chanel tapped Diane Kruger, 37, as the face of its new skincare line. This is the third time that the German-born, L.A.-based actress, who often dons the French fashion house’s creations, has posed for the brand—first for its Allure fragrance campaign in 1996, then again for the Paris-Biarritz handbag advertising campaign, shot by Karl Lagerfeld in 2007. DuJour chatted with Kruger, now starring in FX’s The Bridge, about her love for Lagerfeld and her hatred of the gym. How long have you had a relationship with Chanel? I’ve had a bond with the house since I was 15. My first shoot as a model was for Karl Lagerfeld! I immediately fell under the charm of his kindness and his sense of humor, and, of course, our German roots brought us closer. This happy coincidence gave us an inseparable connection. What do you do to stay in shape? I’m not really athletic. I hate going to the gym. Exercising only makes sense if I get pleasure out of it. But pleasure comes from real life, not from staying in a bubble. Whenever I get the chance, I go hiking. Do you feel more beautiful now than you did when you were 20? Actually, I would say that I’m kinder to myself. Even though I loved being 20, I’m not nostalgic about my beauty at that time. However, I am nostalgic about all of my first times: the first time that I kissed someone, the first time that I saw New York.... I realized that I had to live fully in the moment and open myself to others or life would pass me by. If I’m happier now, then I’m more beautiful than I was before. Le Jour de Chanel, $85, La Nuit de Chanel, $85, and Le Weekend, $115, CHANEL, chanel.com

THE NATURALS Toxin-free ingredients are the priority of two new L.A. skincare companies. Beauty Counter, from Santa Monica’s Gregg Renfrew, consulted environmental experts and chemists in developing products that are good for people and the planet. Meanwhile, the Venice-based Gregg Renfrew of Beauty Counter mother-daughter team behind Purity of Elements takes a cross-generational approach, offering a preventative line for younger complexions and a restorative collection for the mature set. beautycounter.com, purityofelements.com 

JEAN GENIUS Londoners Jens Grede and Erik Torstensson both have a deep respect for L.A.’s denim heritage. “This city has the best craftsmanship and the most knowledge,” says Grede, explaining why the duo opted to produce their U.K. line, Frame Denim, in Venice as opposed to Le Luxe Now in St. Germain, $229, Shoreditch. Since launching Le Luxe Noir in Grey Marble, $219, last winter, the collection FRAME, at Barneys New York has received accolades from the fashion flock (supermodel Karlie Kloss even collaborated on a special long-leg edition). This season, they plan to debut a handful of new silhouettes. “We’re doing some rip and repair but all very subtle and tone-on-tone,” says Grede. “It’s got to be good-looking. That’s our mantra.” frame-denim.com 

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Chanel’s new skincare spokesmodel proves beauty’s not just skin deep

Kazu Namise developed her popular hair-care line, Phylia de M., around a formula created by her godfather, a scientist who had a knack for herbal remedies. “I was first introduced to it when I was 19, and it made such a Clean, $35, Condition, $40, and profound difference,” she says of the Connect, $60, PHYLIA DE M., phylia.com special blend of aloe and humic-free fulvic and tannic acids. Designed to improve the health of the hair by nourishing its keratin, the line consists of a shampoo, conditioner, two scalp treatments and nutritional supplements. “You’ll see immediate results in softness, shine and volume,” says Namise of the regimen, which counts Jessica Alba as a fan. phylia.com 


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THE JUICE IS LOOSE

The best of restaurant, hotel and nightlife openings

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1 World Way A sorely needed part of this year’s renovation of LAX’s Tom Bradley International Terminal is its food court, with fare from top local restaurants. Among the most anticipated outposts is ink.sack, a branch of Michael Voltaggio’s Melrose Avenue shop. Sandwiches, including cold fried chicken, spicy tuna albacore and Voltaggio’s personal pick, the tortilla Española, will be served alongside Maryland-crab chips and watermelon. A breakfast menu will also be available. “There’s a new line of egg sandwiches,” says Voltaggio, “which happen to be my favorite ones now.” mvink.com

MOON JUICE 2839 Sunset Boulevard

Meatballs with pasta at Rao’s

RAO’S HOLLYWOOD

Michael Voltaggio

1006 Seward Street “It beckoned to us,” explains restaurateur Frank Pellegrino Jr. of his decision to open an outpost of his exclusive New York City Italian restaurant, Rao’s, on the West Coast. Taking design cues from the original location, the new space has a hammered tin ceiling, twinkling table lamps and an earthy red color scheme. The establishment also plans to follow Rao’s custom of leaving the choosing to the professionals. “You can forego the menu and let me or our GM, Patrick Hickey, take you and your guests on a southern Italian experience,” says Pellegrino. raoshollywood.com

Cult Venice juicery Moon Juice has opened a spot in Silver Lake. Old favorites, like Beet Aid and Golden Milk, are accounted for, along with the flavorful Rainbow Cleanse. In November, founder Amanda Bacon introduces a flexible Holiday Support package so you can juice and still enjoy the season of eating and drinking. moonjuice shop.com

PALIHOUSE SANTA MONICA 1 OAK 9039 Sunset Boulevard On the heels of successful launches of 1 Oak in Las Vegas and Mexico City, Richie Akiva and Scott Sartiano are bringing their popular NYC nightlife concept to Hollywood. “This is the first time that the city can experience a true form of New York entertainment, style and energy,” says Akiva. Located in the former Key Club, the venue will adhere to its signature tight-door policy and anything-goes atmosphere. 1oakla.com

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A bedroom at the Palihouse Santa Monica

1001 Third Street When it opened this spring, Palihouse Santa Monica, the design-forward boutique hotel, won enthusiastic reviews even though the penthouse wasn’t finished. Now, after months of construction and decorating, the sprawling three-bedroom, threebath suite is ready for its closeup—and guests. “Its look is 1920s Spanish Colonial infused with some unexpected, curious, quirky, chic, European-inspired design elements,” hotelier Avi Brosh says of the space, which has a balcony with ocean views. palihousesantamonica.com

VOLTAGGIO: ED ANDERSON; PALIHOUSE: DYLAN + JENI; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

VOLTAGGIO: ED ANDERSON; PALIHOUSE: DYLAN + JENI; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

CLUB KIDS


ATLANTA

LAS VEGAS

LONDON

LOS ANGELES TOGRP.COM

MIAMI

NEW YORK

WASHINGTON D.C.


MIAMI CHICAGO

DALLAS

Art Basel picked the perfect spot. Of ARTnews’ top 200 active art buyers for 2013, nine hail from the Magic City.

HOUSTON

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TALKING SHOPS

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ART BASEL: MALCOLM MORLEY, REGATTA, (2012), COURTESY SPERONE WESTWATER, NEW YORK; ETRO RUNWAY: IMAXTREE.COM; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

Clockwise from left: The latest store offerings from Etro, Audemars Piguet and Chanel

Bal Harbour gets an upgrade

With all its new boutique action, Bal Harbour Shops is practically a September fashion issue come to life. Brazilians, who’ve been flocking to Miami lately, are making a beeline for Etro’s new address. The house’s heritage paisley is on display for sharp-dressed men looking to expand their collection of dress shirts or needlepoint slippers. Ladies may explore their dark side with cyber- and geometric-printed pieces with daring midriff cutouts and equally edgy footwear with spike heels and zippers. Chanel, which has been in Bal Harbour since 1994, looked to retail architect extraordinaire Peter Marino for its latest 8,000-squarefoot concept. He based its gleaming white facade on the Chanel No. 5 perfume box, while graphic black-and-white interiors are plucked straight from Mademoiselle Chanel’s Parisian apartment. Shoppers can sink into tweed seating, strewn with quilted leather pillows, while trying on shoes and then take a stroll across stone tiles inspired by her original beachside boutique in Deauville. The fine-jewelry section’s enormous chandelier nods to Chanel’s fascination with rock crystals, a theme Marino carried over by artfully deploying her signature crystal balls in the setting. Men have an influx of retailers catering to them, too. Brioni relocated to a new space with posh ribbed walls, black glass and silk panels. The venue doubles the space

THE UNDER-BELLA

From left: an Etro fall runway look; Brioni's new digs

for items like sunglasses and wallets. Venerable watchmaker Audemars Piguet carries the same classic timepieces but has elevated the shopping experience by installing a lounge area with full bar. In an area of the boutique devoted to the manufacturing process, a display showcases the detailed craftsmanship that goes into every watch. Nearby, Swiss jeweler de Grisogono has brought in the big, colored stone baubles and high-tech watches for its second U.S. location. Scoop NYC expanded from its original shop at the Shore Club, offering the latest from John Varvatos, DVF and Just Cavalli. And Saint Laurent has added a dedicated men’s section to its new Hedi Slimane—designed boutique concept. balharbourshops.com

Bra, $105, and thong, $43, COSABELLA, 305-534-4731

Cosabella has created a lingerie collection inspired by the sultry Miami-set Starz series Magic City, now in its last season. Show creator Mitch Glazer, a graduate of Miami Beach High School, couldn’t have found a collaborator that better understands the sex appeal, Cuban flair and glamorous hospitality that typified the city in its golden years of the ‘50s. Based on the show’s female stars, the vintage styles will be carried at department stores nationwide and at Cosabella’s South Beach flagship. shop.cosabella.com

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STAY & DINE A WHILE

A look at the season’s hot spots for fashion and hospitality around Miami

Clockwise from left: The rooftop and pool area at the Gale; the bar at Bulla; a key-lime tart at SushiSamba

BULLA GASTROBAR 2500 Ponce de Leon Boulevard It’s tough to choose among Bulla Gastrobar’s two dozen tapas. Our top picks include the ahi-tuna tartare flavored with bits of mango and avocado in a soy-sesame dressing with a spoonful of chive Greek yogurt and homemade potato chips layered with Serrano ham, a fried egg, potato foam and a drizzle of truffle oil. bullamiami.com

GALE SOUTH BEACH & REGENT HOTEL 1690 Collins Avenue Don’t be fooled by its cozy, low-key feel: The Gale South Beach & Regent Hotel offers plenty of amenities. The design fuses retro (black-and-white photos

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of the owners’ families) and modern (eco-friendly rooms with iBAHN, a state-of-the-art mobile digital and entertainment network). The seasoned LDV Hospitality—the group behind New York City’s Scarpetta and No. 8—offers guests a trio of dining and imbibing options. “Out of all of our venues, Dolce Italian is the one I enjoy the most,” says John Meadow of LDV. “The elegant cuisine, classic cocktails and comfortable yet decadent ambiance make it an indulgent place to eat.” After supping on pastas and pizzas, you can go to the Prohibition-inspired Regent Cocktail Club for Sazeracs or to the basement’s Rec Room, where DJs spin oldies. galehotel.com

SUSHISAMBA

LIPPI 600 Brickell Avenue This is the ambitious restaurant by Tunu Puri, a partner in Zuma and London’s Coya. Named after a Renaissance painter, the New Americanmeets-Mediterranean concept boasts a staggering number of options: more than 75 dishes, 10 desserts and eight ice creams and sorbets. “We learned

In his decade-plus in the jewelry business, Brazilian-born Luis Morais has mastered the art of contrast. He combines the most precious elements with the non-precious (think diamonds and skulls) into statement pieces sought after by Hollywood rock stars and South Beach denizens. Now the Miami designer emerges with a new 18-karat gold collection—studded earrings, ID bracelets and diamond pendants executed with superior craftsmanship and an edgy yet delicate aesthetic. “People inspire me,” the jeweler says. As for the driving force behind his concept: “Customers who have a sense of humor and like to be amazed.”

180 Aragon Avenue The long-overshadowed Coral Gables culinary scene is finally taking a step into the spotlight. At the city’s second location of SushiSamba, South Beach antics have been toned down for this neighborhood’s more low-key audience. DJs spin subdued beats as diners dig into dishes that include the Instagramperfect heirloom tomato and watermelon salad sprinkled with Paradise Farms microgreens. Finish your night with a deconstructed key-lime tart, whose hardened sugar bulb is pure joy to crack open. sushisamba.com

18-karat gold bracelet, $5,625, and necklace, $15,625, LUIS MORAIS, Alchemist, 305-531-4653

ALL IMAGES COURTESY

2330 Salzedo Street Cuban gastropub Bread + Butter has made a name for itself with dinner items like pickled shrimp and lentils laced with clams. Chef-owner Alberto Cabrera’s Sunday brunch displays a similar fusion with entrées like guava torejas and vaca frita hash smothered in hollandaise sauce. “My inspirations were the Cuban cafeterias my father frequented daily. I imagined, What would happen if a gastropub landed in Havana?” he says. By year’s end, he plans to open the nearby Frita Shop, a Cuban take on the hamburger stand. breadandbuttercounter.com

THE MIDAS TOUCH

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BREAD + BUTTER

from our other ventures that people like a lot of quality choices,” says Puri of offerings ranging from crudo to Tomahawk steak and roasted chicken. “We’ll launch an equally impressive weekend brunch in November.” An onyx bar and a mural depicting scenes from the Roaring Twenties stand out amid the neutral décor. The terrace is the preferred perch for neighborhood diners. lippirestaurants.com


C H I C AG O

DALLA S

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LA S V EGA S

L O S ANGELE S

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large and in charge

Two residential projects are fueling high-rise fever

Mansions at Acqualina

1 hotel & residences

all images courtesy

Green is queen at the 1 Hotel & Residences South Beach. Partners Starwood Capital Group and LeFrak are in the process of a $100-million-plus renovation of a 1970s property. “Everything’s being redesigned, and we’re adding a farm-to-table restaurant and other sustainability initiatives like water conservation and retrofitting units with energy-efficient casement windows and sliding glass doors,” says LeFrak chairman and CEO Richard LeFrak. Located along 600 feet of beachfront north of the W Hotel South Beach, the 161 residences (up to four bedrooms and 4,280 square feet in size, priced from $950,000 to $12 million) sit above a 425-room hotel managed by SH Group. Starwood Capital Group chairman and CEO Barry Sternlicht, the visionary behind W hotels, identified wellness and eco chic as the newest luxury categories and responded by developing 1 Hotel. The building offers all the customary perks—but on a grand scale. There are four swimming pools, ranging from one of Miami Beach’s largest, at 3,700 square feet, to a rooftop oasis with panoramic views. The spa and fitness center span 38,000 square feet. And chef and restaurateur Tom Colicchio will helm 1 Hotel’s food and drinks side, which includes the launch of a new signature restaurant concept. 2399 Collins Avenue, 1hotels.com A view of the 1 Hotel & Residences from the ocean

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The entrance of Mansions at Acqualina

Take a Pilates class. Watch the latest CGI spectacular. Relax at a hammam. Enjoy some stogies with friends in a cigar lounge. Imagine this: If you lived at the Mansions at Acqualina, set to open in late 2014, you could do any of these things without even leaving your building. What’s more, the apartments themselves are as spacious as private houses. The 79 units start at 4,600 square feet and $7.7 million (and max out at 20,000 square feet). “We sensed a demand for large oceanfront homes as primary residences,” says Michael Goldstein, president of development firm the Trump Group. Their prediction was spot-on: 90 percent of the inventory sold in 23 weeks without advertising. Besides their size, the apartments have many other attractions: unrestricted access to hotel amenities, gas-burning fireplaces and personal outdoor spas with waterfalls and summer kitchens. The six units of the Penthouse Collection, which range from $25 million to $55 million, raise the bar even higher. They all possess an over-the-top, only-in-Miami feature: an indoor pool. “It’s vital to offer something totally wow,” says Goldstein. The collection’s pièce de résistance, Palazzo d’Oro’s six-bedroom mansion, occupies the 46th and 47th floors and is available with a $5 million turnkey package completely furnished by Fendi Casa. 17749 Collins Avenue, mansionsatacqualina.com


CITIES // THE IN CROWD

Nancy Crown, Marianne Lafiteau, Henri Barguirdjian and Eve Rogers

Un Moment Merveilleux Gala (sponsored by Graff)

Alexandra and John Nichols

CHICAGO

WHERE: The Art In-

stitute of Chicago

WHY: To celebrate the opening

of the “Impressionism, Fashion and Modernity” exhibit, after its run at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art

Caryn and King Harris

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CHAIRS: Ann Grube, Alexandra and John Nichols PARTY PERK: Guests could try on glittery Graff gems.

Marilyn and Larry Fields

Gloria Groom and Ann Grube

Pam and Roger Weston

William Ivey Long and Melissa Sage Fadim

Facing History and Ourselves Benefit Gala

Peter Copping, Ikram and Josh Goldman

The Walk, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago Benefit WHERE: Millennium Park Chase Promenade CHAIRS: Stephanie Sick, Roopa Weber SPECIAL GUESTS: Rodarte designers Kate and Laura Mulleavy, who received the Legend of Fashion Award RAISED: More than $500,000

CHICAGO

Ron and Christina Gidwitz

WHERE: Grand Ballroom, Hyatt Regency Chicago CHAIRS: Rachel Kohler, Mark Hoplamazian, Judy Wise, Gigi Pritzker Pucker, Michael Pucker SPEAKER: Sonja Sohn of The Wire RAISED: More than $1.7 million

CHICAGO

One of the evening’s models

TOP ROW:

Bonnie Oberman, Mark Hoplamazian, Rachel Kohler, Gigi Pritzker and Michael Pucker; Lisa Madigan; a student from North-Grand High School BOTTOM ROW: Tom Wilson and Toni Preckwinkle; Sonja Sohn and Judy Wise

UN MOMENT MERVEILLEUX & FACING HISTORY GALAS: ROBERT CARL & DAN REST; ART INSTITUTE: ROBERT CARL & SARA CONDO

Aleksandra Bush, Brian Dukerschein and Mel Muoio


Nasiba Adilova and Tina Craig

Booting Up Nasiba Adilova held a dinner for Mary Katrantzou at her residence at the W hotel. Clad in the London designer’s colorful creations, local socialites joined DJ and entrepreneur Hannah Bronfman to welcome Katrantzou. Highlights of her trip: “I went to the Art Ball, ate ribs and even bought myself a pair of cowboy boots!” she said.

DALLAS

Deborah Scott, Capera Ryan and Lisa Brown

James Cope and Christen Wilson

Hannah Bronfman and Mary Katrantzou

Artful Entertaining

The Arts District embraced more than 8,000 guests at the Fashion Industry Gallery for the fifth annual Dallas Art Fair, showcasing modern works from galleries around the world. The preview gala benefited the Dallas Museum of Art, the Nasher Sculpture Center and the Dallas Contemporary.

DALLAS

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Kira Plastinina, Jessica Nowitzki and Rebekah Finley

Morgan O’Hare, Zack Shuwas and Mackenna Scripps

Walter Van Beirendonck and Peter Doroshenko

The DMA Does Downton Untitled: Art Ball kicked off with the short film Downtown Artsy, a Downton Abbey parody with co-chairs Jennifer Karol, Catherine Rose, Maxwell Anderson, Deedie Rose and Cindy Rachofsky. Caitlin Moe and D.J. Mia Moretti of the Dolls performed, and a silent auction helped bring in $2.25 million.

ART FAIR: JASON ACTON & PAUL LASTER; KATRANTZOU: KRISTI & SCOT REDMAN; VIKTOR & ROLF: JASON ACTON; ART BALL: BRUNO & STEVE FOXALL

DALLAS

Capera Ryan, Howard Rachofsky and Julie Lieberman

Dutch Treat

Rolf Snoeren, Brian Bolke and Viktor Horsting

FROM TOP:

John and Jennifer Eagle, Laura Noble and Dogan Perese; Ken Downing and Sam Saladino; Deedie, Catherine and Lela Rose

Stephanie Roberts and Lisa Runyon

A champagne tower set an effervescent note as guests entered the home of Howard and Cindy Rachofsky. Forty Five Ten’s Brian Bolke and the Rachofskys hosted a dinner for Dutch duo Viktor Horsting and Rolf Snoeren of Viktor&Rolf. Of their fall line, Snoeren said, “The silhouette is shorter, the mood is tougher, but the pieces are created in a couture way.” Horsting’s favorite item? The embroidered tux. “It’s our version of rock ‘n’ roll.”

DALLAS

A fall look by Viktor&Rolf


CITIES // THE IN CROWD

Inspiration and Education Elaine Wynn, Ali Larter, Amy Smart and others gathered at the Beverly Hills home of Lisa and Joshua Greer, philanthropist and media entrepreneur, for the third annual gala for Communities in Schools of Los Angeles (CISLA), a nonprofit that serves 16,000-plus students. “I love the work CIS is doing,” enthused Smart. “They’re inspiring kids to graduate, but they also give them the support and confidence they need to have a future.” Moving speeches from teachers capped off the night. “It was a beautiful evening in a great space,” said Joy Bryant.

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LOS ANGELES

Elaine Wynn and Bianca Levin

Amy Smart and Ali Larter

Joy Bryant and Dave Pope

DJ Bobby French

Bonnie Somerville and Holt McCallany

Andrew and Deborah Marcus

Perrey Reeves and Murray Hidary

Daniella Shina, her students from Clinton Middle School and Jacqwel “Q” Brown

WIREIMAGE

Hayes MacArthur and Josh Meyers


Leandro Erlich, Véronique Nichanian, Craig Robins and Robert Chavez

The Masculine Mystique Only Hermès could throw a party in the off-season and still manage to get hundreds of clients and fashionsavvy revelers to show up. Men’s artistic director Véronique Nichanian and Argentine artist Leandro Erlich collaborated on a collection of 10 installations at the Moore Building, complete with actors in posed vignettes, aerialists and an Hermès Yamaha motorcycle in an elevator bank. “It was an over-the-top, interactive sensory extravaganza,” attendee Marcella Novela raved.

MIAMI

Véronique Nichanian

The brand’s summer attire

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MIAMI: SETH BROWARNIK/WORLDREDEYE.COM; ORANGE COUNTY: DONATO SARDELLA/WIREIMAGE

A black-tie ensemble

A sporty take on menswear

A tailored suit

Leandro Erlich and models

Patrick Demarchelier, Elizabeth Segerstrom and Karen Watkins

When Dior Met Demarchelier Elizabeth Segerstrom hosted cocktails at the brand’s South Coast Plaza store for the Dior Couture Patrick Demarchelier show. The exhibit, which has traveled to Shanghai, Beijing and Moscow, contains the photographer’s portraits of Dior’s couture designs, from the nipped-waist “New Look” frocks of the 1940s to the showstopping gowns from current artistic director Raf Simons.

ORANGE COUNTY

TOP ROW:

Di Li and Jing Tian; Anton and Jennifer Segerstrom MIDDLE ROW: Debra Gunn Downing and David Grant; Lauren Muzinich, Lisa and Jason Williams; Cali Xu and Anne Zhang BOTTOM ROW: Susan Franklin, Ashley Zarlin, Lauri and George Peterson


cities // binn shots

Binn around the hamptons Snaps from DuJour’s summer kickoff party, sponsored by Borgata

Memorial Day weekend is the traditional start to summer, which made it the perfect time for DuJour to celebrate its summer issue at the Bridgehampton Tennis and Surf Club. Thanks to sponsor Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa (save the date for the November 9 Savor Borgata food and wine event), guests like Brooke Shields, Lew Frankfort and Beth Stern enjoyed playing a variety of table games. For Stern, a round of blackjack with Jason Binn was her highlight: “I won every hand. It was such a fun way to kick off the season.” Even better, winnings from the tables went to the Peconic Land Trust, a nonprofit that focuses on land conservation in Long Island.

HAMPTONS

Star Jones

Eleanor and Rodney Propp and Jo Ann and Bernard Kruger

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Matt Blank and Jerry Lefcourt

Beth Stern

Alex Drexler

Alana and Lew Frankfort and Michael and Erica Karsch

Desiree Gruber, Kyle and Callum MacLachlan

Matteo Rignanese, Courtney Culkin, Rosanne Caruso and Chris Yackle

Valerie and Graziano de Boni

Maryam Abdullina and Khajak Keledjian

Melissa Behrens, Tom Sansone and Patty Tanner

Stephanie, Nicole and Ron Kramer

Michael Clinton and Emre Erkul

James Cohen, Brooke Shields and Lisa Cohen

Beth Stern and Joe Lupo


Binn around new york

DuJour’s Jason Binn shares some of his favorite moments

Andrea Soriani and Jiannina Castro at the Maserati Seven Notes World Tour event

Lauren Bush Lauren

Bryan Provo, Maxwell and Jon Singer at the Versus by J.W. Anderson collection launch party

Rachel Branch and Bronson Van Wyck at a cocktail party at Sting and Trudie Styler’s apartment François-Henry Bennahmias and Maverick Carter on the roof of the Hudson hotel

Wyclef Jean at Mr. Chow in Tribeca

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Jarrod Weber, Ina Simmel and Mark Weber at Weber and Simmel’s Plaza wedding

Sheldon Brody, Candace Krauss, Maria Buccellati, Jon Singer and Missy Brody at Harry Cipriani

Matthew Morrison performing

John Dempsey and Steve Sadove

Smokey Robinson and Matthew Morrison

Melissa Little, Rosanna Scotto and Jill Martin at Lacoste’s shopping event to benefit Phoenix House

Eric Podwall and Andy Cohen

Tom Jarrold and Rory Hermelee at Harry Cipriani

Matthew Morrison’s Album Celebration Smokey Robinson and Andy Cohen feted Glee star Matthew Morrison and his new album, Where It All Began, at the Friars Club. To the delight of the crowd, he performed five Broadway classics, including “The Lady Is a Tramp” and “Singin’ in the Rain.”

DuJour’s Party for Julianne Moore Julianne Moore

Partygoers sipped on Mai Tais and feasted on coconut shrimp, fish tacos and Key lime tarts at the tiki bar, lounge and restaurant at the new Marlin Bar, located above the Fifth Avenue Tommy Bahama store. The soiree was in honor of Julianne Moore—resplendent in fitted and flared Stella McCartney—and her summer DuJour cover.


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NEW YORK CHICAGO

DALLAS

HOUSTON

LAS VEGAS

Upper East Side restaurateurs Michael and Susy Glick have taken over the space previously occupied by iconic watering hole Elaine’s for the Writing Room.

LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

SAN FRANCISCO

HAUTE HOSPITALITY

ARTFUL SPACES

From galleries of Gaultier to the ‘Girl with a Pearl Earring’

THE VICEROY

Top: Milla Jovovich in Jean Paul Gaultier in a scene from The Fifth Element (1997). Left: René Magritte's The Lovers (1928)

Johannes Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring (c. 1665) at the Frick

1

JEAN PAUL GAULTIER GREATS

On October 25, “The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk”—which has spent two years traveling the world, from Montreal to Rotterdam—arrives at the Brooklyn Museum. The iconoclastic designer took us behind the scenes of his spellbinding show. Just don’t call it a retrospective! Does the exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum differ in any way from how it ran at other museums? In Brooklyn, there’s a new section dedicated to my muses. I’ll show the Americans, Leslie Winer, Linda Evangelista or Karlie Kloss nowadays, who inspired me. Where did these works come from? Most are from our archive, but there are also loans. Some are even from my friends who kept the pieces long after they wore them.

When you were putting together this retrospective, what considerations did you give the most weight? The fact is, it’s not a retrospective but a new creation. A retrospective happens when you’re no longer around. I decided I wanted to be a couturier on seeing the film Falbalas by Jacques Becker, and I’ve always thought that clothes need to be shown on models, that they need to be in movement. I didn’t want a monument; rather, I wanted an exhibition that was living and breathing. What are your favorite pieces? It’s difficult to choose—they are all my children. brooklynmuseum.org

2

GOING DUTCH

The American tour of paintings from the Royal Picture Gallery Mauritshuis in the Hague makes its final stop at the Frick, following time in Japan. Starting October 22, 15 Dutch masterpieces will be on view, including Johannes Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring. frick.org

3

MAGICAL MAGRITTE

From September 28 until January 12, MoMA will host “Magritte: The Mystery of the Ordinary, 1926–1938,” an exhibit of the Belgian artist’s most beloved creations—paintings, photographs and commercial works—from his Surrealist years. moma.org

Viceroy Hotel Group makes its debut this fall with a 240-room, 29-story tower. Of-the-moment design duo Roman and Williams, tapped to oversee the property, crafted a glamorous exterior that will be fabulously lit at night; inside, it’s all about simple luxury. Classic woodwork and black brick are complemented by custom furnishings in neutral colors. The top 18 floors boast unobstructed views of Central Park, as does the restaurant and rooftop bar. viceroyhotelsandresorts.com

SISLEY FACIALS AT THE CARLYLE’S SENSE SPA 35 East 76th Street The Sense Spa has introduced the Sisley Supremÿa Anti-Aging Experience, a two-hour treatment to smooth, tighten and restore the skin’s youthfulness ($650 ). The facial uses two anti-aging potions, Supremÿa Night and Supremÿa Eye, both of which contain the patented Phyto-Complex LC12, an ingredient that’s been shown to boost radiance and reduce sagging and crow's-feet. rosewoodhotels.com/en/carlyle

MICHEL RICHARD AT THE NEW YORK PALACE 455 Madison Avenue Renowned French chef Michel Richard is making his NYC entrance with a special two-in-one culinary offering. His Villard Michel Richard, located in the newly renovated New York Palace, comprises the bistro, with casual fare, and the Gallery, featuring Richard’s more rarefied tasting menu. In the lobby, the grab-and-go Pomme Palais will sell handmade sweets. newyorkpalace.com

MORE ON NYC @ DUJOUR.COM/CITIES

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ALLEN: MARC HAUSER PHOTOGRAPHY LTD/GETTY IMAGES; VERMEER: ROYAL PICTURE GALLERY MAURITSHUIS, THE HAGUE; GAULTIER: © COLUMBIA PICTURES/SONY PICTURES ENTERTAINMENT/PHOTOFEST; MAGRITTE: © CHARLY HERSCOVICI–ADAGP–ARS, 2013; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

120 West 57th Street


CHICAGO

DALLAS

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LOS ANGELES

MIAMI

NEW YORK

ORANGE COUNTY

SAN FRANCISCO

where to watch the game

NYC sports bars have transcended chicken wings and big-screen TVs—the newest ones are high-end venues with menus to satisfy the most finicky palates. Here, the highlights.

A menswear moment

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Vintage athletic wear informs a new Todd Snyder line

Designer Todd Snyder has partnered with athletic brand Champion on a sportswear collection this season. Snyder, who played football and baseball and ran track when he was growing up, referenced vintage photos of the New York Athletic Club, particularly the casual style and swagger of oldschool boxing champs. “I liked how simple and cool they looked,” he said of their no-fuss sweats. There are plenty of hoodies and shorts, but this maiden run also includes varsity-styled outerwear, slub blazers and dyed T-shirts. Of the collaboration, Snyder says, “I liked the idea of taking a utilitarian sports heritage brand and mixing it with my collection.” Despite the line’s throwback feel, a more contemporary aesthetic infuses pieces like the very-modern waxed duffle coat and the oxford button downs with knit sleeves. But Snyder’s favorite—the reverse-weave sweatshirt—can easily transform a more traditional outfit. “My styling trick is to pair it underneath a suit or sport coat.” toddsnyder.com

foodie playground Five favorites expand into new territory

Ainsworth park 111 East 18th Street ainsworthparknyc.com

the 40/40 club 6 West 25th Street the4040club.com

Windsor Gansevoort Park 420 Park Avenue South thewindsornyc.com

The vibe: Rustic chic—dark bar

The vibe: Glossy and spacious,

The vibe: Sophisticated and

stools, leather booths and

thanks to two floors and a $10

streamlined, with leather

exposed-wood walls

million renovation by Jeffrey

booths, dark wood floors, pin-

The grub: Roasted beet and kale

Beers that introduced perks like

striped wallpaper and antique-

salad, spicy jumbo prawns and

stadium seating

white ceilings

truffled mac-n-cheese

The grub: Comfort-food favorites

The grub: Tuna-steak BLTs and

truffle grilled cheese

The drinks: Beers are plentiful,

with a down-home twist, like

but mixed drinks like the Moët

southern-fried shrimp, collard

The drinks: Mixologist Ben Scorah

Margarita (a cocktail of Don Ju-

greens with Tabasco butter, and

uses fresh juices and syrups

lio tequila, Grand Marnier, lime

sweet potato doughnuts

(vanilla, agave) for his cocktail

juice and simple syrup topped

The drinks: 16 varieties of martini

concoctions, like Bling, which

with Moët & Chandon Imperial

Celeb fans: Rihanna, Jake

mixes Voli Vodka, cinnamon-

champagne) will sate cravings

Gyllenhaal; President Obama

infused agave, and fresh apple

for something stronger.

held a 2012 fundraiser here,

and lime juices.

Celeb fans: Gerard Butler,

hosted by owner Jay-Z and

Celeb fans: Spike Lee, Cuba

Ryan Lochte

the missus

Gooding Jr., Taylor Kitsch

Bubby’s

Quality italian

73 Gansevoort Street TriBeCa’s beloved brunch joint Bubby’s has landed in the Meatpacking District. This satellite—its second in Manhattan and third worldwide (there’s one in Japan, too)—will boast outdoor seating and the same menu of sourdough pancakes, savory burgers and decadent peanut-butter-chocolate pie. bubbys.com

57 West 57th Street Restaurateur Michael Stillman has opened his first offshoot of the Quality Meats steakhouse brand, Quality Italian, serving chef Scott Tacinelli’s signature dishes (cream-spinach carbonara, octopus saltimbocca and dryaged porterhouse agnolotti). “You get a sense of the old world mixing with more modern interpretations of Italian and steakhouse fare,” says Stillman. qualityitalian.com

JUICE JAM

Casarecci Al Nero at Ristorante Morini

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New Yorkers’ never-ending thirst for fresh juices might soon be quenched. Marcus Antebi’s Juice Press, which has customers like Jessica Biel and Hugh Jackman, is opening three new locations (Upper West Side, TriBeCa and Lower East Side), all stocked with the company’s organic cold pressed juices, super-food smoothies and vegan dishes. Meanwhile, the Daniel Craig– and Natalie Portman–approved East Village juicery Liquiteria is bringing its formulas and cleansing coaches to Union Square and Chelsea. juicepress.com; liquiteria.com

Ristorante Morini 1167 Madison Avenue Soho eatery Osteria Morini is expanding with a more upscale Upper East Side iteration in the former Centolire. The newest venture from Michael White, Ristorante Morini showcases the creations of Michelin-star recipient Gordon Finn, whose extensive Italian menu is inspired by the entire country. The elegant bilevel outpost is accented by dark mahogany panels, lush suedes, a beige palette and grand Flos chandeliers. osteriamorini.com

hoodie: shawn lowe; AINSWORTH: Paige Hospitality Group; WINDSOR: Melissa Hom; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

An antique photograph that influenced Todd Snyder’s new collaboration; hoodie, $195, TODD SNYDER + CHAMPION, toddsnyder.com


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LITTLE LUXURIES

FRAGRANCE NOTES

Three new perfumes bring the glamour of far-flung destinations to New York City

10-karat gold necklaces, $995, MINOR OBSESSIONS BY FINN, barneys.com

WHAT’S YOUR SIGN?

DANNY SEO RESERVE

TERRY DE GUNZBURG

THE POTION:

THE POTION:

THE POTION:

Bond No. 9’s Perfumista Avenue (the brand’s 59th fragrance) has top notes of nutmeg and red plum and bottom notes of patchouli, musk and amber that hail from Indonesia, Brazil, Morocco, Turkey, India, France and Spain. “I wanted to incorporate New York’s state flower, the rose, and build around that,” says founder Laurice Rahmé. “The scent is strong and determined yet feminine and fresh.”

Danny Seo Reserve Global, wellness and green-living guru Danny Seo’s debut fragrance, will use NaturePrint technology, which is meant to capture the most potent fragrance notes in their natural habitat. The first scent features a refreshing combination of the purest, bestsmelling roses of Grasse, France, the most luxurious, earthiest vetiver found in Haiti, and the sumptuous Tiarés of Tahiti.

Each of the five scents in Terry de Gunzburg Haute Parfumerie, the collection of fragrances, all exclusive to Barneys New York, by Terry de Gunzburg, delivers a distinct aromatic experience. Parti Pris, for example, packs an exotic medley of Indian tuberose, Turkish tobacco, Tunisian orange blossom and more, while Ombre Mercure is all about total seduction with a rich blend of Moroccan iris butter, Italian bergamot and Indonesian patchouli.

THE INSPIRATION:

THE INSPIRATION:

This anniversary scent, which is available as an eau de parfum, candle and body lotion, was created in honor of not just the company’s 10-year birthday but also its fans in New York. Rahmé says, “I decided to create a fragrance that was exquisitely beautiful and accomplished, like all New York women.”

“It truly is one of the most intelligent, labor-intensive and science-driven scents to ever come to market,” says Seo, who partners with Tru Fragrance and perfume powerhouse Firmenich, Nobel Prize winners for chemistry in 1939. “These living notes smell vibrant and alive instead of artificial.”

THE INSPIRATION:

THE DETAILS:

THE DETAILS:

THE DETAILS:

Perfumista Avenue body silk, $110, BOND NO. 9, bondno9.com

Eau de parfum, $69, DANNY SEO RESERVE GLOBAL, hsn.com

TERRY DE GUNZBURG,

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The goal was to create a range of perfumes that can be worn whenever, wherever. “These fragrances can all be used by the same woman on different occasions, depending on her mood,” de Gunzburg explains. “But they were specially designed for passionate characters who want to leave a trail behind them.”

Parti Pris eau de parfum, $195, barneys.com

DIOR SKINCARE SUITE AT BERGDORF’S Dior Beauty has debuted the first U.S. outpost of its Dior Skincare Cabine on the beauty floor of Bergdorf Goodman, bringing with it appointment-only treatments from Dior Skincare specialist Maria Dolanescu and the transformative L'Or de Vie Facial. The 45-minute ritual incorporates the anti-aging properties of the brand's recently launched six-piece L'Or de Vie collection. The secret ingredient? Sap from the grapes of Château d’Yquem, known for its powers of longevity. 212-872-8980

SEO: SHELLY STRAZIS; DIOR: SHAWN LOWE; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

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BOND NO. 9

Candice Pool, of whimsical fine-jewelry brand Finn (which counts Naomi Watts and Gisele Bündchen among its fans), has created Zodiac discs for its Minor Obsessions by Finn diffusion line, 10-karat gold jewelry inspired by astrology. “Everyone feels a connection to their star sign,” the designer says. “Some feel strongly enough to get a tattoo. For me, a necklace that I never take off is just perfect.” Vintage-inspired pendant necklaces featuring the zodiac are the main attraction (Pool wears a Libra, plus an Aries charm for her boyfriend, filmmaker Casey Neistat), but simple star motifs will appeal to those who are less astrologically inclined. minorobsessions.com


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239 Maggio, Arrigo, Giuseppe and Ignazio Cipriani

Pucci Scafidi

W

The Italian Job

tional know-how would carry them through. “Core values hen Giuseppe Cipriani established Harry’s Bar in Venthat were good in 1931 are still good today,” Maggio says. ice in a former warehouse on May 13, 1931, it’s safe “Of course, each generation of the family has added some to say he had no idea what he was starting. That tiny personal ways of looking at things and keeping the brands bar and eatery would become a hangout for the rich and Cipriani expands its legacy in line with the times.” famous likes of Ernest Hemingway, Noël Coward and ArThe duo has also been largely responsible for the unveiling of their company’s istotle Onassis; the birthplace of two Italian culinary classics (the Bellini and carpaccio); a family business that’s employed four generations (and counting) of first restaurant in Miami this past spring. The town’s see-and-be-seen personality is Ciprianis; and a 12-city global hospitality empire that consists of 18 restaurants, a great match for Cipriani’s high-gloss hospitality, and Maggio and Ignazio chose three clubs, residences and a hotel. “Our company is a wonderful mix of tradition, a bilevel space in the Icon Brickell luxury complex, where guests have fantastic timeless values, new energy and a lot of hard work,” says Giuseppe Cipriani, 47, views of Biscayne Bay from the outdoor patio or through the floor-to-ceiling windows. The maritime-themed eatery has a crisp blue-and-white color palette, portgrandson of the original namesake. This year, that hard work has included opening a nightspot in club-clogged Ibiza. hole windows, Murano chandeliers and shelves of beautiful art books. But as with Giuseppe, who managed the Spain rollout, learned the ropes by watching his father, the family’s other hot spots, the brothers know that looks alone won’t keep diners Arrigo, and his grandfather build their dynasty from the bottom up. Now he’s groom- coming back. So they’ve made sure that the Miami kitchen produces the same sating his two sons (Ignazio, 25, and Maggio, 23) to continue. And there’s no coasting isfying meals that are their brand’s trademark: homemade pastas, flown-from-Italy allowed. As an inaugural project, his children were given a real challenge: to spear- cheeses and that famed carpaccio alla Cipriani. Other young men might want to take a break and rest on their laurels a bit head the development of the 137-room Mr. C hotel in Beverly Hills, steps away from after pulling off such a launch, but not the Cipriani siblings. The pair are deterRodeo Drive and soon to have five 3,000-square-foot, multifloor bungalows. Mr. C, which opened in June 2011, has been a success. While it was a risky move mined to expand their family’s reach; they’re always looking for the next hit. for twentysomethings who come from a family better known for their innovations in “There are locations all over the world where we could fit,” Ignazio adds. “One bars and restaurants, Maggio and Ignazio had the confidence that their multigenera- thing at a time, though.” cipriani.com

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Quality Italian


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Tate’s Bake Shop is expanding its Southampton operations to include a 3,000-square-foot space dedicated strictly to its gluten-free offerings.

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eastern exposure

Castle eats and off-season Hamptons retreats oheka castle debuts otto’s restaurant

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135 West Gate Drive, Huntington Huntington’s storied Oheka Castle hotel—site of many celebrity weddings (including those of a former ’NSync-er and a Jonas brother) and an inspiration for Gatsby’s estate in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby—is unveiling its first open-to-the-public restaurant this fall with Otto’s at Oheka. The Italian kitchen with a Tuscan-steakhouse twist, named for Oheka’s original founder, Otto Hermann Kahn, and Oheka Castle owner Gary Melius’ black Labrador, will offer what Melius calls “fine dining, but not stuffy.” Expect meatballs in martini glasses, steaks and chops, scallops wrapped in applewood bacon and osso buco angiolotti. oheka.com

all images courtesy

Inn at Windmill Lane’s new cottage 23 Windmill Lane, Amagansett Amagansett’s homey, tranquil Inn at Windmill Lane has opened the 21 House, a fourbedroom cottage located just off the main house. “Great care and time were dedicated to restoring the building to reflect the peaceful and relaxed environment next door,” says innkeeper Erin Harris. To that end, the interior was outfitted with handmade Carrera marble tiles, custom-milled fir flooring and four wood-burning fireplaces. Bonus: This $4,900 a night (with a week-long minimum stay) home-away-from-home has a basementlevel gym and private spa. innatwindmilllane.com

a new montauk hideaway 55 South Elmwood Avenue The easternmost town on Long Island has come a long way from its days as a sleepy fishing village. The Montauk Beach House, a new Euro-chic, members-only resort, boasts 33 rooms, two pools, a beach club and 120 cabana beds—in addition to a café, a bar, restaurants and a fleet of vintage Vespas. “It’s like someone’s house—a little microorganism. Ibiza meets Montauk meets Soho House,” says owner Chris Jones. thembh.com

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Fitness chain Flywheel Sports is opening two upstate locations this fall: Mt. Kisco and Scarsdale ( flywheelsports.com ).

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BEACON’S BEST

The Roundhouse, Beacon Falls

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Where to go in this Hudson Valley town

The wares at Reservoir & Wood

Poppy’s burger and fries

STAY: Once its renovation is complete in 2014, the Roundhouse’s six-acre hotel and spa will be Beacon’s premier place to stay. The 14 modern rooms and three dining outposts that are currently open are complemented by the Hudson Valley’s picturesque landscape; 27 additional guest rooms in a converted mill will be available by year’s end. In the works are a full-service spa and a yoga program. 2 East Main Street, roundhousebeacon.com SHOP: Designer Erin Murphy moved her burgeoning womenswear line, {EM} Reservoir, from NYC to Beacon last year, leading her to open a boutique, Reservoir & Wood. It features Murphy’s own flirty dresses, plus blazers in vibrant prints and sharply tailored shirts from Brooklyn-based label Fischer. 460 Main Street, em-reservoir.com EAT: Burger joint Poppy’s from Chopped winner Paul

Yeaple reopened in June. The expanded space can accommodate the throngs who visit this local hangout for the grass-fed beef patties (sourced from nearby Kiernan Farm) and addictive sweet-potato chips. 184 Main Street, poppyburger.com

Alighiero e Boetti, installation view, at Dia:Beacon

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SEE: The 2003 arrival of Dia:Beacon—a satellite of the original in NYC’s Chelsea—cemented the town’s identity as a contemporary-art destination. Its yearlong 10th-anniversary extravaganza kicked off in May with an exhibition of embroidered pieces and large-scale works on paper by late Italian artist Alighiero e Boetti (on view through February 17, 2014). 3 Beekman Street, diaart.org

G GRAB AND GO 260 Talmadge Road, Edison Since coming so close to winning Bravo’s Top Chef All-Stars, Jersey native Mike Isabella, now based in Washington D.C., has teamed up with his sister and brother-in-law for sandwich outfit G Grab and Go in Edison. Foodies will salivate over new takes on classics, like the Almost Cuban with its ham, roasted turkey, Swiss cheese, Dijon mustard and half-sour pickles. Isabella told us he loves to pair the Almost Cuban with the house watermelon salad. Sounds like a win. g-grabandgo.com

THE FARM AND FISHERMAN TAVERN & MARKET 1442 East Route 70, Cherry Hill Josh Lawler’s Philly favorite, the Farm and Fisherman, crosses state lines this fall with an offshoot, the Farm and Fisherman Tavern & Market, in Cherry Hill, where Lawler and his family live. The charming 30-seat restaurant showcases the chef’s farm-to-table, head-to-tail style with seasonal specialties and local products like craft beers and house-made pasta and salumi. thefarmandfisherman.com

INSTALLATION: CATHY CARVER/COURTESY DIA ART FOUNDATION, NEW YORK, © ALIGHIERO BOETTI BY SIAE/ARS, 2013; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY

The Riggio Galleries at Dia:Beacon


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Chill out: A recent study revealed that Long Beach residents consume the most ice cream in the nation.

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DO-GOODERS

TRUNK SHOW Presented by the Resorts of Dana Point, the open-air Elephant Parade makes its much-anticipated U.S. debut in SoCal. The 10-week exhibition is focused on saving the endangered Asian elephant and will showcase dozens of life-size fiberglass elephants decorated by celebrities and artists like Katy Perry, Tommy Hilfiger and Diane von Furstenberg. elephantparade.com

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ICE CREAM: YAMADA TARO/GETTY IMAGES; DANA POINT: © ELEPHANT PARADE INTERNATIONAL B.V. 2013; ACADEMY OF SPEED: HOWARD KINGSNORTH/GETTY IMAGES; THE PEOPLE’S MOVEMENT: JADE SALONY

Three OC endeavors that are making a difference

THE PEOPLE’S MOVEMENT Another fashion company has followed in the philanthropic footsteps of Tom’s. Launched in 2011, Solana Beach label The People’s Movement has created sneakers that aspire to look good and benefit the world. The brainchild of a trio of activistinclined surfers, the line features men’s and women’s styles that are both vintage-inspired (high-tops, track shoes) and modern (wedges, ballet flats). Constructed with sustainable materials like organic cotton and water-based glue, the shoes are packaged in recycled plastic bags. A portion of every sale benefits nonprofit 5 Gyres, which works to end plastic pollution in oceans. Organic-cotton canvas sneakers, THE PEOPLE’S MOVEMENT, from $70, thepeoplesmovement.com

ACADEMY OF SPEED In 2011, Pierre Keyser, then CEO of American Optical Services, founded Academy of Speed (AOS), a sports facility for kids and adults in Rancho Cucamonga, with the mission “to create faster, more coordinated athletes.” With USA Track & Field–certified coaches and the state’s largest indoor track, it has produced world-class competitors such as 2012 Olympic boxer Joey Diaz. Equally impressive are its scholarships for promising youth like Kayla and Kyla Richardson, 14-year-old twins and record-breaking sprinters. “AOS has given them what most programs can’t: individual attention,” says coach Jon Gilmer. academyofspeed.org

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Break out the bubbly: Six of the 2013 James Beard food and drink award winners are based in the Bay Area.

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ART & INNOVATION Where there’s smoke, there doesn’t always need to be fire. Just ask James Monsees and Adam Bowen, founders of Ploom portable vaporizers. The duo, who met while studying product design at Stanford and have, between them, worked at Apple, Wal-Mart and K2 Sports, created sleek, Appleesque accessories that allow the indoor consumption of tobacco and other products without heat, additives, smoke or odor. Now ubitquitous in medicalmarijuana-friendly California, Ploom heats real tobacco to a low temperature, which helps release its various qualities. “For me, it’s about relaxation and having a moment to defocus,” Monsees says. Two devices are available: the brand-new model Two, a magic-marker-size product that burns the company’s tobacco pods (in comparison, e-cigarettes

Hope in front of the Castro Theatre

HERE’S HOPE-ING

One Bay Area resident pushes the boundaries

The modelTwo device, $40, PLOOM, ploom.com

burn synthetic nicotine and propylene glycol), and the larger Pax, a packit-yourself, loose-leaf vaporizer. And with a city full of reformed hippies, we bet you’ll be seeing more of these devices around town. ploom.com

HERE’S HOCKNEY

Walking and Talking. In The Bedroom. Adventureland. Producer Ted Hope’s résumé is packed with some of the most influential independent films of the past two decades. For the past year, however, he’s taken on a different, supporting role in the cinema, as the executive director of the San Francisco Film Society, where he runs its annual festival and educational programs. The transplanted New Yorker has made himself right at home here; perhaps it’s because, like Gotham, San Francisco has served as the backdrop for many films (Woody Allen’s Blue Jasmine is one of the latest). Here, Hope lists his local film favorites.

“YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE IN HOLLYWOOD OR NEW YORK TO HAVE AN IMPACT.” Best film venues: I love hosting SF Film Society events at the Castro Theatre and Sundance Kabuki Cinemas. I also love the Embarcadero, the Roxie and the Clay. Favorite films set in SF: Vertigo has to be one of my favorite movies of all time, and it’s a film that really captures the feel of the city. I was also profoundly influenced by Play It Again, Sam.

“David Hockney: A Bigger Exhibition” opens at the de Young Museum on October 26. More than 300 works will be shown in 18,000 square feet of gallery space—the largest show in the museum’s history. deyoung.famsf.org

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5 OF HIS HITS

Inspiring SF indie films and filmmakers: Barry Jenkins and his Medicine for Melancholy. I was especially moved by the larger legacy of Jenkins and the Fog City Mavericks. They represented a whole other way of thinking: You don’t have to be New York, you don’t have to be Hollywood, and you can still have a profound impact on culture.

THE BROTHERS McMULLEN (1995)

THE ICE STORM (1997)

HAPPINESS (1998)

21 GRAMS (2003)

ETERNAL SUNSHINE OF THE SPOTLESS MIND (2004)

CHAMPAGNE: TS PHOTOGRAPHY/GETTY IMAGES; STOCKWELL: AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL PICTURES/AUTHENTICATED NEWS/COURTESY OF GETTY IMAGES; PLOOM: COURTESY OF PLOOM; HOCKNEY: BIGGER TREES NEARER WARTER (2008) © DAVID HOCKNEY, 2013; HOPE: CHRIS LEE, COURTESY OF SAN FRANCISCO FILM SOCIETY; FILM STILLS: EVERETT COLLECTION (5)

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Changing the landscape for free spirits among us


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Clockwise from top left: Hokkaido butter corn-miso ramen with ground pork belly, soy-marinated egg, wood-ear mushrooms and shungiku at Ramen shop; Padrecito; the bar at Hard Water

Ramen Shop

The best new places to drink and dine—and a new salon to boot

Dixie cocktail with Old Forester bonded bourbon and enjoy the bay view from the massive windows. hardwaterbar.com

clockwise, from left: Aya Brackett; Peter Prato; courtesy of hard water

Alex Chases Salon 2895 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park Glam has finally come to the tech set. Stylist Alex Chases, owner of the always bustling Union Square salon, expanded to the Sense spa at Rosewood Sand Hill. His sleek new space accommodates eight clients at a time. 650-561-1562

Hard Water Pier 3, Embarcadero With 47 seats and the lure of 150 brands of private-barrel and out-of-production American whiskey, Hard Water can be hard to get into. But it’s worth booking in advance in order to taste Charles Phan’s Southern-inspired dishes, like seafood gumbo, cornmeal-crusted alligator and okra étouffée. Still, if you’re more of an on-the-fly type, show up, take a seat at the marble bar, order yourself a mint julep with Weller 107 or a

Le Marais Bakery 2066 Chestnut Street Carbs have invaded the Marina, and even those who’ve sworn them off may make an exception for the breads and pastries from this new French bakery. Boulanger Justin Brown bakes everything from country-style levain loaves and baguettes to turnovers and specialty croissants like banana-chocolate, while pâtissier Phil Ogiela turns out traditional desserts such as tartlets, pain perdu and macaron. The interior is a treat, too, thanks to French limestone floors, redwood counters and tables and reclaimed ironwork. lemaraisbakery.com

Padrecito 901 Cole Street What’s the number-one reason to go to friendly, out-of-the-way Cole Valley? Padrecito. From the team behind

Mamacita, Tipsy Pig, Umami and Blue Barn, this eye-catching Mexican mecca highlights local produce and sustainably raised meats in its offerings, which include lamb meatballs with a guajillo mole, duck carnitas with kale and fava beans and spring onions, as well as killer cocktails like the namesake Padrecito (blanco tequila, mezcal, agave and lime) and the adventurous Dia de los Muertos (blended scotch, herbal liqueur, fortified wine, blood orange and lemon). padrecitosf.com

R+D Kitchen 6795 Washington Street, Yountville Good food comes to those who wait. Three years after its announcement, Hillstone Restaurant Group has opened R+D Kitchen in Napa Valley. The menu features appealing options like the cheeseburger (house-ground each morning), Mediterranean seared tuna salad and fresh fish. hillstone.com

Wine Kitchen 507 Divisadero Street The once gritty Divisadero Corridor has experienced a bit of a renewal lately, establishing NoPa as a great dining and drinking destination. Wine Kitchen, from co-chefs and owners Greg Faucette and Jason Limburg, is one of the latest attractions. Working from a former garage, the duo—whose cumulative CV includes stints at Per Se, Bar Tartine and Spruce— built this relaxed space with a seasonal menu and a sharp wine list. Pair the 2012 Le Cengle Syrah/Grenache Rosé with scallops à la plancha, summer squash, grapes and yuzu kosho, or just enjoy an evening glass of one of Faucette’s favorites, the 2011 Domaine A. Clape Syrah. winekitchensf.com

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openings of Note

5812 College Avenue, Oakland If you’re interested in dining at this rustic Japanese spot, a partnership from a pair of Chez Panisse alums (Sam White and Rayneil de Guzman) and Jerry Jaksich, follow these directions: Leave work early and jump on a train to Oakland. After you get to Ramen Shop, put your name on the clipboard and enjoy a Silver Dollar Sour (silver tequila, lemon, strawberry puree, sasho peppercorn) as you wait to be summoned. Once seated, order a ramen and a sour beer. Finish with a black-sesame ice cream sandwich. Repeat as needed. ramenshop.com


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CHIC TYPE

With iconic retail locations across the globe, Westfield makes it easier to get your luxe fix wherever you may be. We sent four of fashion’s most followed to shop for fall trends in some of Westfield’s flagship U.S. locations, expressing their style in 140 characters or less. Also be sure to check out Westfield’s newly launched site The Edit, a collection of fashion stories from some of the most influential bloggers and tastemakers, like featured contributor Rumi Neely. See it at theedit.westfield.com.

Rumi Neely THE PROFILE:

Style blogger, model and founder of Fashiontoast.com ON THE TWITTER FEED:

“Don’t dress according to what’s cool, find your own vibe each season.” PERSONAL-STYLE HASHTAG:

#Dreamy

FOURSQUARE CHECK-INS:

Miu Miu and Dior @WestfieldStyle

“ There’s no right answer to style.”

@rumineely pinterest.com/rumineely/ facebook.com/fashiontoast


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“A ladylike dress will throw me off and I won’t know how to behave.”

Zanna Roberts Rassi THE PROFILE:

Fashion editor, stylist and television personality ON THE TWITTER FEED:

“Know what flatters you, and dress in anything that makes you feel your best.” PERSONAL-STYLE HASHTAG:

#Tomboy

FOURSQUARE CHECK-INS:

Burberry and Mulberry @WestfieldStyle

@zannarassi facebook.com/zrobertsrassi


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“I absolutely love the polarizing qualities in the way I dress.”

Athena Calderone THE PROFILE:

Lifestyle designer and founder of Eye-Swoon.com, a destination for creativity, food and design ON THE TWITTER FEED:

“Release the inner you and give yourself license to express yourself.” PERSONAL-STYLE HASHTAG:

#Unexpected

FOURSQUARE CHECK-INS:

Tiffany & Co. and Jimmy Choo @WestfieldStyle

The Westfield Experience @athenacalderone

pinterest.com/eyeswoon/

@eyeswoon

facebook.com/athena.calderone

Bloomingdale’s • Burberry • Burberry Brit • Cartier • Giorgio Armani • Gucci • Henri Bendel • Hervé Léger • Hugo Boss • Jimmy Choo • Karen Millen • Kate Spade • Louis Vuitton • Michael Kors • Miu Miu • Montblanc • Mulberry • Neiman Marcus • Nordstrom • Omega • Prada • Red Valentino • Tiffany & Co. • Tourneau • Tory Burch * Not all brands in all locations


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“I treasure the few investment pieces in my closet because they are timeless.”

Jeanann Williams THE PROFILE:

Former fashion PR pro turned celebrity stylist ON THE TWITTER FEED:

“Style is about being who you are...so care, and of course have fun with it!” PERSONAL-STYLE HASHTAG:

#FrenchChic

FOURSQUARE CHECK-INS:

Gucci and Cartier @WestfieldStyle

PARAMUS, NJ

SAN FRANCISCO, CA

SILICON VALLEY, CA

@jeanannwilliams

pinterest.com/jeanannpins/

@jeanannwilliams

facebook.com/jeanann.williams

LOS ANGELES, CA

LOS ANGELES, CA

WESTFIELD GARDEN STATE PLAZA

WESTFIELD SAN FRANCISCO CENTRE

WESTFIELD VALLEY FAIR

WESTFIELD CENTURY CITY

WESTFIELD TOPANGA

One Garden State Plaza (201) 843-2121

865 Market Street (415) 495-5656

2855 Stevens Creek Blvd. (408) 248-4451

10250 Santa Monica Blvd. (310) 277-3898

6600 Topanga Canyon Blvd. (818) 594-8732

*

New luxury wing now open


“THE WORLD’S GREATEST GOLF COURSE”

2013 SEASON BOOK NOW Weekday Green Fee £195 Per Player Weekend Green Fee £215 Per Player Membership & Corporate Packages Exceptional Driving Range & Practice Facilities Luxury Accommodation T: +44 (0) 1358 743300 E: bookings@trumpgolfscotland.com www.trumpgolfscotland.com Trump International Golf Links, Scotland Menie Estate, Balmedie, Aberdeenshire AB23 8YE


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Time Lords

getty images

Any good watch will get you to work or the plane or church on time. But luxury watchmakers mine generations of horological tradition to create wrist-size masterpieces— tomorrow’s heirlooms. In the following pages, our guide to retailers that prize quality, service and innovation as much as fine timepieces themselves. Written by Rhonda Riche


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TIME LORDS

WATCHED CLOCKS

A selection of classics—present, past and future—from our favorite watch boutiques

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Richard Mille 010 Le Mans Classic, price upon request, SILVER THREADS, silverthreads boutique.com

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Franck Muller Cintrée Curvex Classic 5852 in 18-karat rose gold, price upon request, TRABERT & HOEFFER JEWELS, trabertandhoeffer.com

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Chopard Happy Sport Automatic in 18-karat rose gold, price upon request, BACHENDORF’S, bachendorfs.com

5 Hublot Big Bang Ferrari King Gold Carbon 45mm, $43,600, ZADOK, zadokjewelers.com

ALL IMAGES COURTESY

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Patek Phillipe 5227 Calatrava in rose gold, $37,300, LONDON JEWELERS, londonjewelers.com


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time LORDS

“We won’t bother the customer with 30 to 40 different brands— there aren’t that many great ones. We want only the best.” ­—Larry Sands, Silver threads

Silver Threads

Aspen, Colorado Founded by Larry and Christina Sands

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One of Aspen’s most eclectic boutiques, Silver Threads was founded to showcase the work of local artisans. Now-owner Larry Sands carefully curates the shop’s luxury watches. “We won’t bother the customer with 30 to 40 different brands because there aren’t 30 to 40 great brands,” says Sands. “We want only the best.” Silver Threads, which also has a Malibu location, favors newer, innovative watchmakers such as Richard Mille, founded in 2001—Sands says the RM0101 and RM011 are already classics—but is rigorous about the craft. “We tell the customer everything we know about our brands, sometimes showing them short films of the manufacturing process,” Sands says, adding that all Silver Threads employees have been extensively trained by experts from each brand. (308 Galena St., Aspen, CO, 970-429-4670; silverthreadsboutique.com)

VITAL STATISTICS Established: 1975 Featured timepieces: Bell & Ross, Ernst Benz,

Giuliano Mazzuoli, Maîtres du Temps, Richard Mille Specialties: Limited editions and special order

Trabert & Hoeffer Jewels

Chicago, Illinois Founded by Randolph Trabert, William Howard Hoeffer

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First opening its doors at the height of the Jazz Age, Trabert & Hoeffer remains a treasure trove of the finest jewels and watches. And when current owner Donald Levinson took over in 1968, the store quickly became Chicago’s top destination for haute horology. According to executive vice president Susan Levinson, Trabert & Hoeffer’s salon-style showroom and rich heritage— many sales associates have worked here for decades—translate to a luxurious shopping environment where one can get a great timepiece and a world-class education in high-end watchmaking. (111 E Oak Street, Chicago, IL, 312-787-1654; trabertandhoeffer.com)

VITAL STATISTICS Established: 1926 Featured timepieces: Breguet, Cartier,

Jaeger-LeCoultre, Franck Muller, Piaget, Vacheron Constantin Specialties: Women’s watches, repairs and custom

design

Bachendorf’s

Dallas, Texas Founded by Harry Bock

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The late Harry Bock once said that honesty and integrity are the cornerstone of Bachendorf’s: “The merchandise has to speak for itself.” There’s perhaps no greater proof of the company’s commitment to authenticity and quality of service than its longevity—the Bock family has been in the global jewelry business for more than a century. Amid its incredible selection of luxury brands, even the most blinged-up beauties beat with the heart of a thoughtful precision timepiece. And at Bachendorf’s, watches with serious complications aren’t just for men. Women will be pleased to find a true selection of ladies watches with far more than quartz movements. (8400 Preston Road, Dallas, TX, and two other locations, 214-692-8400; bachendorfs.com)

VITAL STATISTICS Established: 1977 Featured timepieces: Chanel, Chopard, IWC, Omega Specialties: Women’s watches and service

Zadok Jewelers

Houston, Texas Founded by Helene and Dror Zadok

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When Jonathan Zadok says his family’s store is a mecca for watch fans across Texas, he means it. Customers drive hours—or even fly—to Houston to shop the selection of more than 25 fine Swiss brands. But Zadok emphasizes quality over quantity: “We have the best of the best. Everything from tourbillons to minute repeaters.” In the business for seven generations, the Zadoks

prioritize education, sending sales associates to the factories to learn the details of each movement, and craftsmanship, employing the area’s top watchmakers to service and maintain timepieces. Zadok admires the ageless appeal of fine timepiece technology: “The Breguet tourbillon was invented 200 years ago,” he says. “And it’s still an amazing technological achievement.” (1749 Post Oak Blvd., Houston, TX, 713-960-8950; zadok.com)

VITAL STATISTICS Established: 1978 Featured timepieces: Breguet, Hublot, F.P. Journe,

Montblanc, Hublot, TW Steel SPECIALTIES: Selection and service

London Jewelers

Long Island, New York Founded by Charles London

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Owners Mark and Candy Udell know that everyone who walks into the 4,000-square-foot Watch Salon at London Jewelers Americana Manhasset wants something unique and different. As propieters of an independent, family-run business, the Udells enjoy spending one-on-one time with customers to learn their taste and needs, whether that’s a sports watch, a dress watch or a limited-edition piece for a collection. London, which boasts a walk-in humidor, works closely with the brands they carry to plan special events, including an annual watch fair, that introduce their clientele to the latest collections. The Udells cherish the heritage of the watches they sell, citing the Patek Philippe Calatrava as an example of a classic dress watch that will never go out of style. Which is in keeping with the brand’s motto: “You never actually own a Patek Philippe. You merely look after it for the next generation.” (Americana Manhasset, 2046 Northern Blvd., Manhasset, NY, 516-627-7475, and four other locations; londonjewelers.com)

VITAL STATISTICS Established: 1926 Featured timepieces: Cartier, Audemars Piguet, Bell

& Ross, Chanel, Hermès, Patek Philippe Specialties: Selection and events


TIME LORDS “Our desire is to build long-term relationships, just as you would with your doctor or hairstylist.” —GLENN ROSS, SHREVE & CO.

WESTIME

Los Angeles, California Founded by John Simonian

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Walking into one of Westime’s three Los Angeles locations, you might feel like a kid in a candy store. That’s because its extensive collections of timepieces “allow our customers to take a journey of discovery on every visit,” says president Greg Simonian, who says Westime caters both to those “who know what they want, and those willing to step outside the comfort zone.” Whether you’re in the market for a niche limited-edition or a trendsetting piece, the laid-back, friendly ambience makes for an ideal shopping experience. Westime has three full-time watchmakers on staff, and its dedicated team has been known to deliver watches to clients at hotels, airports—or to the comfort of home. (1227 Prospect St., La Jolla, CA, and two other locations, 858-459-2222; westime.com)

Beach shops (Hamilton also has boutiques in New Jersey) offer different experiences: “On Worth Avenue, our presentation is exclusively Patek Philippe, IWC, Breguet, Bulgari and Ralph Lauren,” says current president and CEO Hank Siegel, the third generation of Siegels to serve as CEO. Palm Beach Gardens, he says, covers more brands—Zodiac, Cartier, Panerai, Baume & Mercier, Tag Heuer, Breitling and Chanel. Hamilton’s bonds with brands have led to a noteworthy collaboration: The company so loves the Breitling Chronomat 44, particularly the “extraordinary” technology, that it partnered with Breitling to create a special version of this “sure future classic” for Hamilton’s centennial, says Siegel. Limited to 30 pieces, the watch has an engraving of the Hamilton 100th-anniversary logo on the case back. (215 Worth Ave. and 3101 P.G.A. Blvd., Palm Beach, FL, 561-659-6788 or 561-775-3600; hamiltonjewelers.com)

VITAL STATISTICS Featured timepieces: Patek Philippe, IWC,

Breguet, Bulgari, Ralph Lauren, Zodiac, Cartier,

Established: 1979

Panerai, Baume & Mercier, Tag Heuer, Breitling,

Featured timepieces: A. Lange & Söhne, Audemars

Chanel

Piguet, Baume & Mercier, Bell & Ross, Breitling,

Specialties: Estate watches and selection

Cartier, Chanel, IWC, Jaeger-LeCoultre, Omega, Panerai, Patek Philippe, Rolex, Tag Heuer

HAMILTON JEWELERS Palm Beach, Florida Founded by Irving Siegel

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Florida watch fanatics flock to Hamilton Jewelers. Part of the reason is its history. Hamilton has deep roots with manufacturers—its relationship with Patek Philippe, for example, goes back 75 years. Then there’s Hamilton’s staff. Everyone is well trained by watch manufacturers and agencies, but they also study at Hamilton Jewelers University, a series of weeklong programs in hospitality. And the two Palm

VITAL STATISTICS Established: 1852 Featured timepieces: IWC, Patek Philippe, Rolex Specialties: Selection and follow-up service

A REGIONAL JEWEL

We laud independent retailers, but don’t discount all chains. Mayors, for instance, has selection and service that spans state lines.

Established: 1913

VITAL STATISTICS

Specialties: Selection and custom orders

as you would with your doctor, hairstylist or dentist.” That ethos is reflected in the tenure of the sales team, some of whom have been selling watches for 20 years. “No amount of education can buy this level of knowledge. Many of our team members have seen every watch manufactured by our watch brands over a vast time period, so they are ideal representatives,” says Ross. (200 Post St., San Francisco, CA, 415-421-2600, and two other locations; shreve.com)

SHREVE & CO.

San Francisco, California Founded by George Coates Shreve and Samuel Shreve

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A shrine to luxury, Shreve & Co.’s San Francisco store has been catering to the city’s elite since the days of the gold rush. But don’t mistake it for stuff y. President Glen Ross says the goal is “a fun and exciting experience, one that’s also educational.” Pointing to the overwhelming amount of information—and misinformation—out there, especially online, Ross says that Shreve specializes in eliminating confusion through thorough, thoughtful service. “Our desire is to build long-term relationships with our clients, in the same context

MAYORS

Georgia and Florida

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At Mayors, clients can expect an elegant setting of deep-green Italian marble and plush carpeting. The company, founded more than a century ago in Ohio and now part of Birks, itself founded in the 19th century, aims to make each of its 24 locations in Georgia and Florida an exercise in opulence. But its most important asset is its clientele. Seeking to enhance an atmosphere of sumptuousness with comprehensive professional services, Mayors offers complimentary expert appraisal with any purchase of $2,500, as well as insurance, estate, fair-market valuations and collateral appraisals on any timepiece or item of jewelry. (mayors.com)

VITAL STATISTICS Established: 1910 Featured timepieces: Corum, Panerai, Rolex,

Zenith Specialities: Previously owned watches, appraisals


promotion

TIME LORDS

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Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Offshore Chronograph, $40,000, WESTIME, westime.com.

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Breitling Chronomat 44 Hamilton 100th Edition, $8,650, HAMILTON JEWELERS, hamiltonjewelers.com

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IWC Portofino Hand Wound 8 Days in 18-karat red gold, price upon request, SHREVE & CO., shreve.com.

Rolex Oyster Perpetual Submariner Date in Stainless Steel, price upon request, MAYORS, mayors.com.

HAMMER TIME

Auctions are emerging as a hot marketplace for collectible high-end watches. Below, some notable moments from the most prestigious houses.

ALL IMAGES COURTESY

CHRISTIE’S

Last November in Geneva, a seven-hour auction of pieces once owned by collectors such as Eric Clapton brought in $28,557,223. (christies.com)

SOTHEBY’S

In 1999, the Patek Philippe “Supercomplication” watch, built over five years in 1933, sold for a staggering $11,002,500— the world record. (sothebys.com)

BONHAMS

The 2011 auction of Heuer enthusiast Arno Haslinger’s 81-watch collection led to a global spike in demand for vintage Heuers. (bonhams.com)

ANTIQUOROM

Last fall a rare diving-watch prototype came to auction for the first time and fetched $523,235, the most ever paid for a Rolex sports watch. (antiquorum.com)


FAMOUS LAST WORDS

Reverend Al Sharpton is known for saying exactly what’s on his mind. Here, even his handwriting speaks volumes.

“He deviates dramatically from the standard structural form of the letter r. It shows a sense of defiance. He makes his own rules.”

“The way he connects these three letters is an example of ‘simplification.’ Simplification shows a fluid, economical connection.”

“Sometimes he dots his i’s, but often he doesn’t. He sets his own standards—a non-conformist!”

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“Large-size writing typically belongs to someone who enjoys being the center of attention—a bit of a performer or extrovert.”

“Rather than the traditional e, his is a Greek letter. People who use that particular letter formation have a sensitivity to the arts and an interest in cultural expression.” “Despite commonly accepted rules of grammar, he sprinkles capital letters throughout his words. This is an expression of rebellion.”

“T

he key to life is finding a purpose,” says Reverend Al Sharpton. “I’m living for an overarching purpose that’s not based on the seasons in life, but based on what I feel is my reason for being on earth: social justice and standing up for human rights. It’s something I focus on in meditation every morning.” Sharpton discovered his life’s purpose 22 years ago, after he was already in the public eye. He was in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, preparing to lead a protest over the racially motivated murder of a black teenager, when he was stabbed in the chest by an attacker. “When you have a brush with what could potentially be mortality, it focuses you,” he says.

“As I lay there in the hospital I thought, ‘What am I here for? What do I ultimately want my legacy to be about?’ It was a defi ning point for me.” The Reverend’s handwriting for the quote he coined himself mirrors his passionate, often polarizing attitude, according to graphologist Annette Poizner. “The strokes are thick and bold. That’s a strong-willed individual with a strong message. He says things with great emphasis,” she explains. In his forthcoming book, The Rejected Stone, due out October 8, Sharpton explores his evolution, which has seen him move seamlessly from civil rights activist to cable news presence to onetime presidential candidate.

“He’s using a marker, which makes for a writing trail that’s darker, more pronounced, more emphatic. This writer is a force to be reckoned with.”

It’s no surprise then that the 59-year-old is both an author and a speaker—he blends print and script in his writing, which indicates he’s a communicator, says Poizner. She also points out that the S in Sharpton’s signature creates a figure eight formation. “It’s a simplified, stripped-down way to make a letter. It shows above-average intelligence. He sees through to the essential issues, retaining what’s important and discarding anything extraneous,” she says. Sharpton’s the first to admit he’s far from perfect. “I’m clear in what my goal is,” he says. “But the way in which I achieve it is always a work in progress.”—LINDSAY SILBERMAN


New York Boston Dallas 877 700 1922 Explore the Akris Boutique at www.akris.ch


PO A S

1-800-441-4488 Hermes.com

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LIF ING

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Fall 2013