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NOTES OF

IMPACT

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YOUR LIFELONG LEARNING PARTNER The latest news from the University of Denver’s University College.

Strategic planning for the next five years and beyond pg. 4 Meet the Colorado Poet Laureate, also serving as academic director for Professional Creative Writing pg. 8

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WHAT TO EXPECT IN THIS ISSUE

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE NOTES OF IMPACT VOLUME 2 ISSUE 2 | SPRING 2018

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Share Your Story Have you recently earned a promotion, changed to a new job, or been selected to speak at a conference? We want to hear from you! Visit universitycollege. du.edu/inq/alumni or email ucolsupport@du.edu. If you’re a faculty member, submit your latest accomplishments at universitycollege.du.edu/inq/faculty.


NOTES FROM THE DEAN

Dear Friends, In this second issue of Notes of Impact, I’m pleased to introduce our new strategic direction to our University College community. We spent several months gathering input from staff, faculty, and students to help develop a forward-thinking plan that aims to elevate our presence in Denver, on the Front Range, and on the national stage. I invite you to review our strategic direction (page 4) and share your thoughts. You’ll find an in-depth overview at www.universitycollege.du.edu/strategicplan where there is an opportunity to submit comments. Whether advocating for patients (page 10) or spreading cultural awareness across the state (page 8), our community members helped to inspire the new strategic direction. The stories you’ll find in this issue remind me of the impact our community members have and the value they bring to their work, our college, and the world around us. Please share your stories of success with us because when you accomplish something special, it is a strong reminder of why we do what we do here at University College. Sincerely,

Michael McGuire Dean

@DUucoldean

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IT’S THE ERA

WE’VE BEEN PREPARING FOR In 1938 the University of Denver had the progressive foresight to introduce University College programming to help working adults earn degrees by attending classes in the evenings and on weekends. Today, we are poised to reaffirm this heritage of forward thinking for a new era in higher education and offer more opportunities for engagement. For 80 years, University College has been honing our expertise in delivering practice- and problem-based curricula in order to serve adult learners. Through bachelor’s completion, master’s degrees and graduate certificates, and personal and professional development, University College has been your partner for lifelong learning. We aim to solidify this distinction by forging new partnerships, amplifying our impact on the community, and providing you with career-focused programming that makes an impact. Now more than ever, continuing education is needed to satisfy employer demands and propel careers forward. Career paths are far less linear than those of previous gen4

erations and adult students are becoming the new majority in higher education. With increasing innovative, market-driven options available to learners, whose demands are becoming more and more sophisticated, University College will stand as the clear choice for adult learners seeking professional and personal development throughout their lifetime. This new era presents a game-changing opportunity for University College and we’re here to serve you—our alumni, our faculty, and our friends in the community. We are envisioning a future of profound impact that reinforces the personalized and high-value experiences expected here at the University of Denver. In other words, it’s the era we’ve been preparing for.


STRATEGIC DIRECTION

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STRATEGIC DIRECTION

CONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION

University College’s passion for providing programming to help adult learners reach their professional and personal goals through continued education is what makes us tick. Our goal is to become the preferred provider of continuing and professional education in Colorado and beyond. Our strategic direction will guide us toward that goal.

1 | Expanding Opportunities We plan to add to our high-value programming by continuing to build a robust catalog of credit and non-credit offerings. For example, the Center for Professional De velopment will strengthen our connections to our community by providing relevant and timely short courses that serve professional needs.

2 | Being Market-Relevant The Institute for the Future predicts that 85% of all jobs in 2030 haven’t even been invented yet. That means professionals need to prepare for whatever the market demands. Our programming will continue to be market-relevant, preparing our graduates (and alumni who need another credential) for today and tomorrow.

3 | Engaging Alumni We will develop and implement a community engagement platform that helps

our alumni find programming and connections that advance their careers and satisfy their curiosity—no matter their age or stage!

4 | Pioneering Adult Learning Research Our community understands that adults have different learning needs. Our goal is to pioneer research and development in this area, hosting symposia and encouraging faculty to be innovative in their teaching techniques.

5 | Leading the Continuing Education Field Continuing education continues to evolve, often innovative in both content and delivery. We will lead the professional and continuing education field into the new era for higher education by implementing a holistic approach to engagement. 6


STRATEGIC DIRECTION

ACCESS

EXCELLENCE

ENGAGEMENT To read a more in-depth outline of the University College strategic plan, please visit universitycollege.du.edu/strategicplan 7


FACULTY: MAKING AN IMPACT

ONE-ON-ONE

W I T H T H E C O L O R A D O P O E T L A U R E AT E

Joseph Hutchison, academic director for the Professional Creative Writing program, received a one-year extension of his term as Colorado Poet Laureate—a multi-year stint that took him around the state of Colorado sharing stories, poetry, and culture. What is the state of our arts and culture scene in Colorado? Colorado is frankly in the midst of a renaissance in arts and culture. Art, music, and literary events are taking place north and south, on both sides of the Continental Divide. This scene is happening because the state is attracting and nourishing artists through arts and culture organizations large and small. It’s not a top-down effort, but a bubbling up within communities. From my point of view, this makes the current scene more than a trend; it is foundational—something artists and audiences can build on far into the future.

What surprised your most about your experience as Poet Laureate? Aside from my surprise at being nominated and then appointed by Governor Hickenlooper, who it turns out made the final choice himself (yes, he’s actually a reader), there has been the continual discovery of excellent poetry being produced around the state. I have to say that I’ve never considered myself a “Colorado poet,” only because my roots are more local. I’m a Denver poet for sure, maybe a Front Range poet. As Poet Laureate, I’ve been able to connect with poets I may never have encountered except online—poets who speak from and for other localities, other communities. I’m certainly more of a “Colorado poet” now than I was before the gift of this position.

What do you envision for the future of poetry and creative prose writing? The writing and reading life is in transi8

tion—into what, I’m not sure. On the one hand, readers are demanding an adherence to tested genres; on the other, writers are pushing, even shattering, the boundaries between genres. The old system of publishing, rooted in New York and distinctly urban in nature, is in a late stage of collapse, and smaller independent presses, as they did in the 1960s, are springing up everywhere to fill that expanding void. Although I’m dubious about such innovations as e-readers and online fan fiction, I believe there’s never been a better time to be a writer. But then writing always flourishes in times of rapid change.

What advice to you have for emerging and long-time writers? First and above all, writers need to write. Emerging writers in particular should never turn down an opportunity to write, whether it’s in their favored genre or not. What looks like an exercise can easily turn out to be a breakthrough. Long-time writers—a category I fall into—have a different challenge. The technological imagination most emerging writers have grown up with is a challenge for long-time writers. I’m not sure it can actually be acquired in a deep way once one has developed certain sustaining writing habits. That’s why I generally advise long-time writers to choose their projects on the basis of passion, which means saying no to anything that doesn’t serve that passion. And for both emerging and long-time writers: Don’t confuse publication with success. If the history of literature teaches us anything, it’s that quality writing ultimately finds its way to the readers it was meant to please.


FACULTY: MAKING AN IMPACT

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ALUMNI: MAKING AN IMPACT

FROM PATIENT TO ADVOCATE

“I started DU’s grad program while in recovery knowing I would go back into the workforce retooled and well prepared to focus on my new calling helping people with healthcare challenges.” — JC Montañez, ‘18 graduate 10


ALUMNI: MAKING AN IMPACT Failure is what led Juan Carlos “JC” Montañez back to school. Not a typical type of failure like in a career or academia, but rather, kidney failure. JC was working on a multi-million dollar architecture project in Latin America when he had to start his life over. After beginning dialysis treatment back in the U.S., JC was placed on a kidney transplant list. It was at this time he decided to go back to school to study nursing and healthcare systems. “I needed to find a way to occupy my mind or I would lose it,” he explained. While on the transplant list, JC earned his associate’s degree in nursing at the Community College of Denver. Still waiting for a kidney, he continued on at Metropolitan State University for his bachelor’s in healthcare management. Waiting still, JC decided to apply to the MS in Healthcare Leadership through the University of Denver’s University College. The summer before starting his master’s degree and six years into dialysis, JC underwent his kidney transplant. “I started DU’s grad program while in recovery knowing I would go back into the workforce retooled and well prepared to focus on my new calling helping people with healthcare challenges.” While in the Healthcare Leadership program, JC expanded his healthcare knowledge and developed a robust professional network. Recipient of several recognitions and scholarships—including the ACHE Congress on Healthcare Leadership Scholarship and the ACHE Albert W. Dent Graduate Student Scholarship—JC recommends

all students get involved with professional organizations to help them cultivate their soft skills. “As a non-traditional student who has already been in the workforce and having been a hiring manager, I know your education is very important,” he said. “But it’s the professional organizations and networking opportunities that are invaluable in rounding out our academic accomplishments.” JC found his niche in healthcare policy and legal issues, learning from attorneys and healthcare professionals in his University College courses. In addition to his coursework, JC has been working pro bono as a legislative healthcare policy advisor embedded in the Colorado State Capitol. “Going to hang with our representatives is like going to a live lab,” he said. “I’ve earned the trust of high-profile healthcare champions, and having navigated kidney failure, I know what is good and what is not so good in healthcare, so I am able to offer first-hand insights.” That first-hand knowledge is what inspired JC to change careers and pursue a role as a patient advocate. He’s already working as a change consultant, putting what he learned in the classroom into action in the workplace. Now that JC has graduated, he is pursuing opportunities to lead a hospital system in the U.S. or Latin America and waiting for an offer. And based on JC’s experience, it’s amazing what can be accomplished when you’re waiting.

Career & Professional Development Alumni Relations career.du.edu du.edu/alumni Use the Pioneer Careers database to search job opportunities, connect with DU alumni through Pioneer Connect, and make an appointment with a career counselor.

Find an alumni event near you, attend career and professional development sessions or view recorded sessions, and 11 find ways to connect with your fellow alumni online or in person.


STUDENTS: MAKING AN IMPACT

BUMP, SET, SPIKE, STUDY COACH KATELIN BATTEN SHARES HER DU EXPERIENCES ON AND OFF THE COURT

We often hear stories about student athletes balancing their time between the classroom and the field or court, but what about student coaches who do the same? At University College, we’re proud of our students who are pursuing their education while also serving as coaches at the University of Denver. From golf to volleyball, hockey to soccer, University College students can be found across DU athletics! “This was one of the best experiences I’ve ever had and one of the best investments I ever made in myself,” explains Katelin Batten about her MS in Leadership and Organizations. Serving as the associate head coach for women’s volleyball at the University of Denver, Katelin is a Pioneer through and through. In fact, she enjoyed her experience at University College so much, she chose to continue on as a graduate student and is currently pursuing a graduate certificate in HR Employment Relations. “My motivation was just to further my career as I saw it as an investment in myself and in my coaching career,” she said. “And it really truly made me a better coach for my players.” Finding the motivation to work full-time as a coach while attending graduate school was easy for Katelin, who transforms lessons learned in class and applies them on the court (and vice versa). Katelin’s coaching career started early, being mentored by great figures who she refers to as “legends” in the field. She took a coaching position at the University of Denver when she was 23 and hasn’t looked back. “I love being able to love what I do.” Coaches are particularly drawn to the Leadership and Organizations and Strategic HR programs, which focus on cultivating collaborative leadership skills that help add value to organizations and teams. The programs dig into issues like change management, human relations, risk assessment, handling crisis, and the promotion of values. “Part of a coach’s job is to provide leadership to players, while continually learning,” said Dr. Pat Greer, academic director for both the Leadership and Organizations and Strategic HR programs. “These programs offer lifelong learning skills, with a deeper understanding of what leadership is and how to ‘live’ it in any coaching position.” Working as a recruiting coordinator, Katelin spends time interacting with prospective students and their families. “As I’m going through this HR certificate, when we get to the topic of recruiting I can provide a different perspective because I’m recruiting athletes,” she said. The online course format allows Katelin to stay on the road while continuing with school. From Italy to the Dominican Republic, she has been “in class” around the world, learning new ways to cultivate her coaching skills. “My coaching style can help someone perform better,” she said. “I’ve learned tools I can use to tap into my players’ intrinsic motivation to do something.” 12


STUDENTS: MAKING AN IMPACT

Erik Billinger, Head Coach for Men’s Golf and earning a master’s degree in Leadership and Organizations

David Carle, Assistant Coach for Men’s Hockey and earning a master’s degree in Leadership and Organizations

Clayton Zelin, Volunteer Assistant Coach for Men’s Soccer and earning a Graduate Certificate of Advanced Study in Human Capital in Organizations

fellow STUDENTS/COACHES

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on the

BO OKSHELF Anatomie of the World by Annie Dawid

Adjunct Faculty for Professional Creative Writing

How to Say Anything to Anyone by Shari Harley 2000 Master of Applied Communication

Raising Mediators by Emily de Schweinitz Taylor 2015 Master of Professional Studies in Communication Management (Alter native Dispute Resolution)

Relevance Raises Response by Bob Bentz Adjunct Faculty for Communication Management

Working V ir tually by Trina Hoefling Adjunct Faculty for Leadership and Organizations

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BY THE NUMBERS

THE PERKS OF BEING AN ALUM

25%

DISCOUNT FOR MOST ENRICHMENT PROGRAM COURSES

3000 VOLUNTEER ALUMNI AND FRIENDS OF DU AVAILABLE FOR INFORMATIONAL INTERVIEWS

universitycollege.du.edu/enrichment

career.du.edu

MINUTES

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CALL-IN CAREER COUNSELING 303-871-4331 MONDAYS 2-3 WEDNESDAYS 9-10 THURSDAYS 2:30-3:30

10%

DISCOUNT FOR ITEMS AT THE DU BOOKSTORE bkstr.com/denverstore

career.du.edu

40+

BUSINESSES PART OF THE DU ZONE CARD

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BOOKS CAN BE CHECKED OUT AT A TIME FROM THE LIBRARY library.du.edu

du.edu/duzone

Get Social @DUcollege:

A study done by Simply Hired found that 38% of hiring managers are more likely to check out your Instagram account rather than your LinkedIn.

twitter.com/DUcollege

@DU_Alumni:

#Spokenword artist, @BobbyLefebre will be featured in the #DUAW18 Alumni Celebration on May 19!

@DUucoldean:

A job well done to Healthcare Leadership student Melanie Byrne for her presentation at the DU Student Research Expo.

facebook.com/DUcollege instagram.com/DUcollege

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ALUMNI EVENTS

UPCOMING EVENTS Alumni Weekend 2018 May 16-May 19 du.edu/alumniweekend Leveraging LinkedIn and Social Media May 19 alumni.du.edu Alumni Career Studio May 22 alumni.du.edu Google Analytics 101 June 2 and June 9 $199 for DU Affiliates | du.edu/professional Graduate Commencement June 8 du.edu/commencement Undergraduate Commencement June 9 du.edu/commencement Colorado Nonprofit Association + University College Salary Report June 12 http://ucollege.du.edu/salarysurvey18 Get Hired Now June 12-June 13 alumni.du.edu HireDenver 2018 Alumni-Only Career Fair June 14 Financial Planning and Analysis for Small Businesses June 21, June 28, July 5, and July 12 $229 for DU Affiliates | du.edu/professional

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Looking for ways to upskill? Need to boost your business or non-profit? Explore the courses offered through the Center for Professional Development (CPD). From writing grants to getting to know Google Analytics, these short workshops were created with you in mind. CPD draws upon the University of Denver’s rich reputation and values to deliver high-quality, accessible, and affordable professional development to the Denver community. Discounts available for alumni!

www.du.edu/professional


University of Denver Women’s Coding Boot Camp Next Cohort Begins September 10

LEARN HOW TO

CODE IN 24 WEEKS

This boot camp is offered through University College in partnership with Colorado Women’s College.

WHAT YOU’LL LEARN: HTML, CSS, JavaScript, jQuery, PHP, React.js, Node.js, MongoDB, Express.js, MySQL, and more

WHAT YOU’LL EXPERIENCE: You will learn in-demand full-stack coding skills in an empowering classroom environment, taught by talented women in the tech industry and surrounded by like-minded peers. Build a network of fellow women in technology and benefit from women-led mentorship.

bootcamp.du.edu/coding/women


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WAYS TO MAKE AN IMPACT

1. STAY INFORMED Stay connected and know the latest at the University of Denver and University College by following along on social media or visiting news.du.edu. 2. GET INVOLVED Join the University College Alumni Network for professional development opportunities with your fellow alumni. 3. GIVE A GIFT By giving a gift, you can help support students through scholarships and initiatives. ucollege.du.edu/givetodu 4. BE PROUD Show your Pioneer Pride every chance you get. Request an alumni pin at du.edu/alumni, cheer on DU teams at sporting events, attend a local or regional event, and submit a Class Note. 5. TAKE A COURSE Keep learning and take a course through the Enrichment Program, OLLI, Center for Professional Development, or back at University College. 6. REFER A FRIEND Refer a friend to a University College program and receive a special thank-you package when they enroll.

What’s Your Story? We know you have a story to tell and we want to hear it. Share your latest success story with us. universitycollege.du.edu/inq/alumni


IMPACT YOUR WORLD Your Gift to the University of Denver’s University College Supports Student Scholarships, Innovation Efforts, and Leading-Edge Facilities for Learning

University College Scholarship Fund

University College is pleased to offer Graduate Impact Scholarships designed to benefit highly motivated and engaged adult learners who value education as a way to improve lives and communities both locally and globally. There are also scholarships dedicated exclusively to Bachelor of Arts Completion Program students.

Dean’s Innovation Fund

This fund is used to enhance the student experience through technological advances, timely programming, and leading-edge facilities for learning.

ucollege.du.edu/givetodu

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University College 2211 S. Josephine St. Denver, Colorado 80208

Notes of Impact | Spring 2018  

Discover the latest news from the University of Denver, plus see how our community members are making a positive impact. Learn more at www.u...

Notes of Impact | Spring 2018  

Discover the latest news from the University of Denver, plus see how our community members are making a positive impact. Learn more at www.u...

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