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Dublin LGBTQ Pride 2019

June 20th – 30th

We’re proud to empower our colleagues to be who they proud are at work. That’s why supporting We’re to empower our we’re colleagues to bethe who We’re proud to empower our colleagues to be who Dublin LGBTQ+ Pride Festival 2019. they are at work. That’s why we’re supporting the they are at work. That’s why we’re supporting the Dublin LGBTQ Pride Festival 2019. Dublin LGBTQ Pride Festival 2019. Join us for the parade on Saturday 29th June. Join us for the parade on Saturday 29th June. Register to take part at OurTesco.ie Register to take part at OurTesco.ie

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Dublin LGBTQ Pride 2019

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Bursting with Pride! At Tesco our hearts are ‘Bursting with Pride’ to return as Platinum sponsor for Dublin Pride Festival 2019. Our sponsorship builds on the success of our involvement in the festival over the past two years. Last year, we saw Tesco colleagues from across Ireland come together to proudly march in the parade alongside their partners, family and friends. It is this celebration of diversity and inclusivity that drives our excitement to be involved again for 2019. Kari Daniels, CEO, Tesco Ireland said “At Tesco, everyone is welcome, and we are proud to empower our colleagues to be who they are at work. This drive for diversity and inclusion is a huge part of our identity as a company and Pride is an excellent celebration of this. This 2

vibrant and fun festival has become hugely important to our colleagues and communities. “Our goal is to build a workplace of equal opportunity; developing a diverse team that represents our evolving communities and a company culture that builds self-esteem and celebrates our colleagues’ unique individualities. Pride gives real positive visibility for this mission, so we are bursting with pride to support again,” she concluded. Our presence in this year’s Pride parade is set to be bigger and better than any before, bringing over 200 colleagues together to take to the streets of the capital in celebration of what Pride means to them. Our Tesco delivery truck will be back, bringing Disco to the streets of

Dublin. The glitz and glam of Disco will be brought to life by our on-board DJ, bubble machines and our colleagues taking over our light-up dance platform. Colleagues from across the country will be proudly decked out in our ‘Bursting with Pride’ F&F t-shirts and will treat the crowds to rainbow roses, face-paints, bubbles and Pride flags, along with some sweet treats from Tesco. To celebrate Dublin Pride 2019, selected Tesco stores across the Dublin parade route will once again turn their iconic Tesco chevrons to the rainbow colours of Pride. To help colleagues and customers celebrate diversity throughout the festival, selected stores will also have special Pride themed décor including rainbow bunting, rainbow roses and official merchandise.


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FROM ALL AT WWW.THEGEORGE.IE

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THEGEORGEDUBLIN


Join us after the parade for a one of a kind show from all our Queens

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Gok Wan will be in the house for a special Glitterbomb

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Dolly will have all the girls turning out their broadway babies

THEGEORGEDUBLIN


#justbe

#lifeatsky

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Proud to be supporting our LGBT+ colleagues.

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At Sky, we know it’s our people that make us unique. We believe in a workplace where everyone can just be themselves.

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together let’s just be


#indeedpride

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Indeed is proud to support Pride 2019.

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Dublin Pride Festival 2019

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Proudly sponsored by Aer Lingus

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Everyone deserves to be seen, heard, and included. Salesforce is proud to support the LGBTQ community.

#EqualityForAlL Salesforce.com/Equality

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Proudly supporting Pride. Now and for generations to come.

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Editor: Richard Conway Cover, Design and Illustration: Colm Molloy Mapping Pride: Written and Curated by Tonie Walsh Mapping Pride Design: Dave Darcy Photography: Hazel Coonagh Additional Photography: Stephen Moloney, Babs Daly and Henri Blommers Interviews: Caomhan Keane and Tonie Walsh

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Festival Director: Jed Dowling Associate Festival Director: Eddie Mc Guinness Administration and Engagement Lead: Nem Kearns Pride Board of Directors: Cormac Cashman, Lisa Connell, Jason Flynn, Eoin Hendrix, Clodagh Leonard and Maura Molloy


Message from the Lord Mayor of Dublin. . . . . . . . . 19 Message from An Taoiseach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Pride Grand Marshall’s Welcome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Chairperson’s Welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Mapping Pride. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Tonie Walsh charts the LGBTQ+ journey from the Stonewall Riots to the present day through key moments.

What’s On & When . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 The lowdown on everything that’s happening during Pride week and beyond.

Parade Route and Pride Village. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Check out all the key Dublin Pride venues at a glance.

Pride Festival Advice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Dos and dont’s for the Pride Parade on Saturday.

National Prides. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Our guide to Prides festivals on the Island of Ireland.

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Final Words from Pride. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183

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This is a special year for the International Pride Movement, as it marks the 50th anniversary of its birth. Cities across the globe will join in the celebrations and the continued march for equality. Over the years Dublin City Council has been proud, not just to support Dublin. LGBTQ Pride, but to be part of it too. During my term as Lord Mayor I launched our Gender Identity and Expression Policy and had the chance to work alongside the Dublin City Council LGBT+ Staff Network. I would like to thank the festival organisers and all the statutory agencies involved in making this event one the whole city can embrace, enjoy and celebrate. Nial Ring 19

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Lord Mayor of Dublin

ON BEHALF OF DUBLIN CITY COUNCIL AND THE CITIZENS OF OUR CITY, I’M VERY HAPPY TO WELCOME EVERYONE TO THE 2019 DUBLIN LGBTQ PRIDE FESTIVAL.

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A message from the


Different + Together = Stronger

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We’re proud to stand with the LGBTQ+ community in Ireland and around the world.

Wishing you a very Happy Pride! #KnowYouCan AXA.ie/pride

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50 years on from Stonewall, Ireland will receive an award at World Pride for supporting the LGBT+ Community. Minister Katherine Zappone will accept this award on behalf of all of us at the ceremony which will take place in New York. Internationally, as well as here in Ireland, the Pride Movement has been one of the biggest forces in driving the fight for equality for half a century. This year Dublin Pride returns to its traditional route on O’Connell Street, where in 1916 a political revolution was proclaimed urging freedom and equality. Today we must cherish all of our children, gay or straight, lesbian, bisexual, intersex or transgender.

In 2022 we will mark the centenary of the founding of the State. Dublin LGBTQ+ Pride Festival and Parade are bidding to take EuroPride to Dublin in that year and I hope it is successful. It would be an important statement about Ireland today, our transformation as a country over the past 100 years, and a recognition that we believe in freedom and respect for all our people. As for this year, there will be a thousand strong group made up of people from across all Government Departments, along with a number of other statutory bodies, and elected representatives. This is perhaps the most visible endorsement of equality and LGBTQ+ rights by the Irish State in our history. We follow in the footsteps of all the brave people who started this journey when attitudes were different, and freedoms were more limited. We do so with joy, with love and with hope for the future.   Happy Pride! Leo Varadkar T.D., An Taoiseach

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Loud, proud, colourful and camp, Pride Parades helped change the world. As we know, this year marks the 50th anniversary of the Pride movement. When about 5,000 people marched down the streets of Manhattan, West Hollywood, and Chicago in June 1970, inspired by the events at Stonewall a year earlier, they were taking the first steps in a campaign to change how the world viewed its fellow citizens. It was an act of bravery, of defiance and a rallying call for equality. Over time, as the movement grew, activists defeated hostility and negativity, changing perceptions and political cultures. Today, Pride parades are a celebration of identity and diversity, and an important reminder that equality can never been taken for granted.

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Welcome


A proud supporter of being your true self. #AcceptanceMatters

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Start Something Priceless

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The legacy of those early years of the epidemic — the devastation and suffering — still colours how we think about HIV. But we need to recognise and celebrate the incredible medical progress we’ve made. We don’t have a cure, but we have highly-effective drugs that keep people with HIV healthy. Some of those same drugs can also be used by HIV-negative people to prevent HIV, as PEP or PrEP. And we’ve learned something remarkable: People living with HIV who are on effective treatment cannot pass on HIV to their sexual partners.

Welcome

REBELLIONS BEGIN WITH A REFUSAL TO STAY SILENT AND REMAIN OBEDIENT. THEY BEGIN WHEN THE COST OF DOING NOTHING OUTWEIGHS THE COST OF RESISTING. In the early 1980s, with thousands dying from AIDS-related illnesses, and no effective treatment for HIV, our community fought back in anger. Groups like ACT UP used civil disobedience to prod reluctant communities, governments and institutions into action. They changed the way that pharmaceutical research is conducted, shortening the time required to make life-saving medications more widely available, and giving people directly affected a voice in the process.

Every study that’s looked into it has confirmed this fact: even without condoms, PrEP, or PEP —there’s simply zero risk of passing the virus on to a sexual partner. With access to treatment, people living with HIV can live long, healthy lives, enjoy sex, have children, and never have to worry about passing on HIV to others. If you’re learning about U=U for the first time right now, ask yourself why that is. Why isn’t there a national campaign to educate people about the realities of living with HIV today? Why isn’t there objective, factual and LGBTinclusive sex education in the majority of Irish schools? Why is Ireland in the midst of a HIV crisis with new diagnoses at record highs? As Grand Marshall of Dublin LGBTQ Pride 2019, I will be marching alongside ACT UP Dublin. We’ll be bringing U=U to the front of the parade. It’s time to break the silence about the reality of living with HIV, it’s time to replace stigma and discrimination with compassion and hope. It’s time for a rainbow revolution. Will St Leger Grand Marshall 23

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Grand Marshall’s

That’s why we say that undetectable equals untransmittable, or “U=U”.

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When you’re on effective treatment for HIV your “viral load” — the amount of virus in your blood — gets very low, sometimes called “undetectable”. That means the is virus suppressed and can’t damage your immune system. And when your viral load is undetectable you can’t transmit the virus sexually.


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It is my absolute honour to welcome you all to this year’s Dublin LGBTQ Pride Festival. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Rising, which we’ve honoured with our theme Rainbow Revolution.

This year alone we have seen the roll-back on trans healthcare protection in the USA. A trend which is not foreign to our shores as we see a rise in transphobia and exclusion. It is a reminder to us all to stay active, stay radical.

On the 28 June 1969, the patrons of the Stonewall Inn took up the mantle, the bottle and the brick in defence of our rights. That, for many people, is where the revolution began. In Ireland, we are fortunate enough to have a multitude of revolutionaries, a great many of them here with us today. They lay the ground work, so that we may celebrate together. However, our work is not over.

We may become comfortable in a postmarriage referendum, post-repeal, post-gender recognition country, but we should not be complacent. Sometimes the most radical thing you can do in a world creating division in the name of populism is to love and welcome all the people you can. To look beyond your experience and find commonality. So, this Pride, I welcome you to reach out, find all the colours and join our Rainbow Revolution. Clodagh Leonard Chairperson of Dublin Pride Festival

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Welcome

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Chairperson’s


Thank You

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From the Pride Team

Special thanks to Mervyn and Darragh FIRST THINGS FIRST, TO THE 10,000 from CHQ & EPIC for their support of both PEOPLE WHO SIGNED THE GCN PETITION Transfusion and Dublin Pride this year. TO BRING US BACK TO O’CONNELL STREET, This year we took a huge step forward and THANK YOU. WITHOUT YOUR VOICE AND went from being an entirely voluntary run SUPPORT WE WOULD NEVER HAVE BEEN organisation, mostly run from kitchen tables ABLE TO ACHIEVE THIS. We’ve grown a lot in the three years since we were last on O’Connell Street and we’re really excited to show you what we have planned this year. There’s a saying that “it takes a village”, well Dublin LGBTQ Pride has grown so much that now “it takes a city”. I’d like to thank: Dublin City Council, our largest funder, for their continued support, assistance and belief in Pride as one the most important events of the year for our city. An Garda Siochana, Dublin Fire Brigade, Dublin Bus, Transport for Ireland, Luas, Civil Defence, the HSE, and all the statutory bodies that work with us all year round. Marty and all the team at Safe Events, who been keep us all safe at Pride every year, Boggler productions for our stage and sound, Colm Molloy for graphics and design, Cian O’Mahony for our website, the team at GCN for publishing our annual Pride Guide and managing our social media year round, and everyone on our event team. All our community partners who work year round to make life better for our community and of course our sponsors and partners. 26

to having our own offices and a staff of three. On behalf of myself, Eddie McGuinness and Nem Kearns I would like to thank our board of directors: Cormac Cashman, Lisa Connell, Jason Flynn, Eoin Hendrick, Clodagh Leonard and Maura Molloy for their support in planning this year’s festival. Of course we still rely on the support of our volunteers and special thanks goes to our chief Marshal, Pat Maher, and Stuart Garland and the team at Volunteer Ireland who help coordinate and train our team of over 300 volunteers. On behalf of the whole Dublin LGBTQ Pride team, to everyone who has ever joined us in our march.

Thank you and Happy Pride!

Jed Dowling


Since 2017, when I became manager of Dublin LGBTQ+ Pride Festival & Parade, this has been an amazing and personal journey. To see 20,000 people attend the 2016 parade and then 100,000 attend the 2018 parade was eyeopening. Not to mention seeing the city shine and light up like a rainbow. This is all because we have been getting people to talk, to interact and to tell each other who and what we are. From working with community groups to corporates — and in a way, thinking about how we can all work together for the betterment of the community — there have been some major highlights to organising this year’s festival. In 2019, there are more than 100 key events from arts, talks, culture and sports, to community and family events, to lots of fun things like our Pride dog show — and even Irish dancing. This year we will see the GAA marching in the parade for the first time. This came about with the great help of my friend David Gough, their only openly gay referee. We’ll also see members of the G-Force LGBT+ group from An Garda Síochána marching in full uniform. Join this year’s festival as we launch in the heart of the city, O’Connell Street, and the GPO flies the rainbow flag.

Eddie Mc Guinness

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THIS IS NOT ONLY MY 50TH YEAR AS A GAY PERSON — I TURN 50 JUST A FEW DAYS BEFORE THIS YEAR’S PRIDE FESTIVAL & PARADE — BUT IT’S 50 YEARS SINCE THE STONEWALL RIOTS OCCURRED IN NEW YORK. IT ALL FEELS SO MUCH A PART OF MY OWN STORY AND JOURNEY. I CAME OUT IN NEW YORK OVER 27 YEARS AGO AND ATTENDED MY FIRST PRIDE MARCH IN 1993, THE YEAR OF DECRIMINALISATION.

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Pride is many things to different people. IT IS AT ONCE A POLITICAL PROTEST AT UNFINISHED BUSINESS…A STREET RAVE... A FAMILY DAY OUT...A CHANCE TO CATCH UP WITH FRIENDS (AND EVEN EX-LOVERS). IT IS A NECESSARY CORRECTIVE TO OFTEN DRAB STREET LIFE AND PERVASIVE HETERONORMATIVITY.

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It is a time to celebrate — come what may — our relationships and our families (biological and logical). Pride is a time to wonder at the distance we’ve travelled and give thanks for where we are now, today, and remind ourselves to never take it for granted. It is a time to reflect and wave goodbye to our beautiful brothers and sisters we left behind, in particular too many we’ve lost to homophobic and transphobic violence and the devastation of AIDS. Pride is the history of LGBT liberation writ large. It is our story, the story of a rainbow society finding its voice, its agency, and marching with urgency and glamour to its rightful place at the centre of society. And in the process, hopefully liberating all in its wake. It’s good to remember that the queens and trans men and women of the Stonewall Inn were dancing together and having a good time (all of which was deemed both taboo and illegal in 1960’s USA) when they were so rudely interrupted by the police. People’s pent up anger and resentment fissured. Nothing would ever be the same again. The sexual and gender liberation movement has been founded on people finding their 30

voice and saying: Enough! This is who I am! Look at us and marvel at who we are! Government, religion, business and civic society may have put innumerable obstacles in our way along our journey of self-discovery but we were given hope and direction by people -ordinary men and women being extraordinary — laying down signposts. Here are some of those signposts and stories in 50 years of LGBT liberation. They’re mainly political in tone, because the personal is political. (In any case we would have needed a much bigger guide to list the myriad of cultural and social successes our rainbow society has made claim to in the intervening years.) If you don’t see your name mentioned, never mind. Consider it an omission of brevity. But also ask yourself, who will record my history? What else can I do to share my unique queer world view with the rest of society? In the meantime, marvel at our journey. Tonie Walsh Curator of the Irish Queer Archive


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1969

Early on the morning of 28 June, patrons of the Stonewall Inn in New York’s Greenwich Village call time on a culture of police harassment and brutality. A weekend of riots ultimately sparks activists groups and leads to the Christopher Street Liberation Day march in NYC the following year. The bar and nearby Christopher Street Park would be declared a national monument by President Barack Obama on 24 June 2016. On the other side of the Atlantic, the Scottish Minorities Group and Campaign for Homosexual Equality are founded to campaign for decriminalisation in Scotland and England, respectively.

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Inspired by a New York group of the same name that was formed in 1969, the Gay Liberation Front is established at London School of Economics on 13 October. Peter Thatchell is one of the founding members. GLF’s ideology embraced the intersectionality of feminism and socialism and, in a short time, weekly meetings attract 200-300 people.

Within a couple of years, some members of GLF are instrumental in founding Gay News, an A3-sized newsprint issued fortnightly in response to nationwide demand by British lesbians and gay men eager for news of the unfolding liberation movement. At its height, the newspaper’s circulation hits 19,000. 31


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1971

1972

The organisation’s manifesto, advocating equal rights in law and social justice for those denied rights on the basis of gender, opens up Irish public discourse on wider issues of gender and sexuality. Although short-lived, the group of activists and lobbyists were hugely influential.

In Northern Ireland, the Gay Liberation Society is founded in Belfast by Andy Hinds and Martin McQuigg. Inspired by the Gay Liberation Front and operating under the aegis of Queen’s University Student Union, GLS very quickly attracts city and university participation. From 1975 until the early 1980s, its Saturday night discos at McMordie Hall would cater for up to 300 people, at a time when the city centre was in lockdown at the height of the Troubles.

Having earlier published its manifesto, Chains or Change, forty-seven members of the Irish Women’s Liberation Movement take the train to Belfast to import contraceptives into the Republic. Riding on the second wave of feminism, IWLM included some lesbians in its ranks, among them co-founder Nell McCafferty.

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Sweden is the first country in the world to allow transsexuals — the term used at that time — to legally change their sex. Remarkably, the government also provides free hormone therapy.


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1973

A decade later, the reformed SLM, now known as Gay Soc, becomes the first LGBT Society to be recognised by an Irish university.

1974

A symposium on homosexuality is held at Trinity College Dublin in February, attracting almost 300 people from across the island of Ireland. Two of the event’s organisers, Hugo McManus and Margaret McWilliams, are the first openly gay people to be interviewed on Irish radio. The weekend symposium generates considerable publicity and propels the establishment of the telephone switchboard services Cara Friend in Belfast and Tel-A-Friend in Dublin, the latter of which is now known as the Dublin Gay Switchboard.

On 27 June, ten members of Gay Liberation Front and Sexual Liberation Movement picket the British Embassy in Dublin and then march to the Department of Justice with placards proclaiming, “Lesbians Love” and “Homosexuals Are Revolting”. A month later, the Irish Gay Rights Movement is founded at Dublin’s South County Hotel. 33

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In October of the same year, ten men and women meet at Trinity College Dublin and establish the Sexual Liberation Movement (SLM). All members of the group, Ruth Riddick, Mary Dorcey, Margaret McWilliams (deceased), Gerry McNamara (deceased). Hugo McManus, Peter Bradley, David Norris, Irene Brady, Michael Kerrigan and Edmund Lynch will go on to play significant roles in the burgeoning lesbian and gay civil rights movement.

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A conference on the general topic of human sexuality is held at the New University of Coleraine.


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Mary Dorcey

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THE WRITER MARY DORCEY, WHOSE BOOK DAUGHTER TO MOTHER: A LOVE STORY REFLECTS ON HER YEARS AS ONE OF IRELAND’S MOST PROMINENT GAY ACTIVISTS, SAYS VERY FEW PEOPLE RAISE THE LINK BETWEEN THE WOMEN’S MOVEMENT AND THE GAY RIGHTS MOVEMENT. “It’s a pivotal and critical issue. I remember attending a meeting for the women’s movement the same week as the formation of the Sexual Liberation Movement. They were discussing marriage. And I found it incredibly conventional and conservative. No one identified as a lesbian but me, yet five I found were gay. I made a vow:

I would never sit in any group assuming they were heterosexual.”

When people wanted to be ugly about the women’s movement they would call them “lezzers”, she says. “And there were times when I felt like saying, ‘You don’t know how right you are. At least one third of Irish Women United were completely openly lesbian, some would have said radically so. We were the engine of the movement, at the forefront of every debate and protest.”

After Dorcey became the first lesbian to speak openly about her sexuality in University College Indeed, some lesbians didn’t join women’s Dublin, her mother received death threats. liberation because they were interested in There were aunts and uncles she never spoke emphasising the gay part of their identity, while to again and cousins who haven’t spoken to still others didn’t join because they felt the her to this day. “People who liked me and were group was too narrowly focused on identity. fond of me wouldn’t walk down the street with “I felt lesbians could never be free unless me after the publication of my book, Kindling women had equal rights. Women are still [the first book by an Irish lesbian published prized of their capacity to breed the next under her own name] in 1982. Older lesbians generation. Lesbians were seen as the women accosted me on the street for making them who gave up on that. That was the primary more visible. oppression and prejudice we faced, as “But it was also an exciting, exhilarating time. opposed to what gay men faced. Since the We had passionate love affairs, fabulous oppression of women was the foundation for parties; extraordinary discos that people the oppression of lesbians, many of us felt we travelled from all over the country to attend. should be fighting for both.” They may not have been out at home or in work, but they were out on a Saturday night. It was so wonderful to walk down an open street and say ‘We’re gay and proud.’” 36


1975

Designated International Women’s Year, a new group called Irish Women United is formed to campaign for reproductive and legal rights. Among its demands is that “all women have the right to a self-defined sexuality”.

The Northern Ireland Gay Rights Association is established at Belfast, while the Irish Gay Rights Movement opens a community resource on Dublin’s Parnell Square. Known as the Phoenix Centre it includes a disco, library, coffee bar and meeting space for religious counselling and campaigning groups. In Cork, IGRM opens a community resource at 4 MacCurtain Street.

1976

Dublin’s first homosocial club, The Good Karma, opens on the city’s northside. In an earlier report, the UK-based Gay News considers the gay social scene in Ireland to be as bleak as that of England: “The three gay pubs that our team visited seemed to be predominantly straight.”

Meanwhile, a small Radical Faeries group, Gays Against Repression campaigns in Dublin. The ad-hoc group establishes a drop-in resource at Glover’s Alley, behind the Royal College of Physicians. Known as The Garden, the building lasts a year before being destroyed in a fire. 37

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Join Aspire Ireland in taking part in Dublin LGBTQ Pride 2019 Aspire– The Asperger Syndrome Association of Ireland are delighted to be taking part in Dublin LGBTQ Pride 2019. Our friends at Dublin Pride are working hard to make the festival as inclusive and accessible as possible for the whole community, and we are excited to have the opportunity to be part of the celebrations. We would love to have people with ASD and their families and friends march along side us on the day, and are delighted to offer our assistance to anyone who requires additional support. We will be organising a meeting point for our group and Aspire staff will be on hand throughout the march if needed.

@AspergerSyndrome Assoc @Aspire_Ireland_

www.aspireireland.ie

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Keep an eye on our social media for details of the meeting point and additional supports that Dublin Pride have put in place.

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At Bord Gรกis Energy we believe in a workplace where everyone can bring their whole selves to work. Proud to be supporting our LGBTQ+ colleagues.

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An eight-coloured rainbow flag is designed by Gilbert Baker and used for the first time in San Francisco’s Gay Freedom Day parade.

1977

At a time when “transgender” as a term and concept had barely gained currency, The Friends of Eon is established in Dublin, providing Ireland’s first support group for those who identified as transsexual and/or transvestite, which were the labels used at the time. The group also launches a weekly transgender club called Lola’s, which is held on Thursday nights in the Parliament Inn. The Inn is one of the few LGBT-friendly bars in Dublin. Lola’s would continue until the mid-1980s.

The International Lesbian & Gay Association is established at Coventry, England, with Ireland’s Campaign for Homosexual Law Reform as a founding member. Within a year, ILGA’s Information Secretariat is being run from Dublin’s Hirschfeld Centre. Some years later, it would transfer to Stockholm. Liberate Irish Lesbians is founded at the Rathgar Resource Centre. For many years, it would run a women’s night at the Hirschfeld Centre and, briefly, a club called Sita’s at the Parliament Inn. The same year, the first allIreland lesbian conference is held at Trinity College Dublin.

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1978

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Claire Farrell CLAIRE FARRELL WAS FIRST INDUCTED TO DUBLIN’S CROSS-DRESSING SCENE WHEN SHE RESPONDED TO A SMALL AD IN THE LATE 70S THAT SHE HAD SEEN IN THE EVENING HERALD.

“I cannot remember the exact wording but suffice to say it was clear to me what it meant.”

In the years that followed, she regularly travelled to the UK to spend entire weekends dressed as a woman, which she found exhilarating. But it was after one of these trips that Claire and her friend Lola asked themselves, “Is this it again for yet another year?” Armed with a copy of In Dublin magazine, they found a lesbian event in the Parliament Inn and decided that the owner must have been fairly liberal. When they finally met him, he showed them a disused room and told them they could use it. “We now had a meeting place but no organisation.” That was the beginning of Friends of Eon.

Some of those who came to Lola’s, as the night became known, would come dressed as females. Others would bring clothes with them and change into female clothes, don wigs and makeup and relax for the evening. “As I owned my own business back then I made a telephone line available for people to call on Thursdays between 6pm and 8pm. The phone rang non-stop every Thursday for years.” They attracted the attention of a Garda Inspector, who would later become the Assistant Commissioner. “He would give lectures to rank and file gardai about transvestites and transwomen based of what he learned attending FOE. He became a great friend of the group and some of us had his phone number in case we ever had a problem with the guards or trouble on the streets. “People came from all over the country to FOE at considerable expense just so they could be themselves for a few hours. It served a useful purpose for about 20 years until the arrival of TENI — [Transgender Equality Network Ireland].”

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“For me, it was elation to meet others I thought were just like me. But after a couple of meetings I soon realised there was a difference which was that these guys liked to wear female clothes for fun where as I felt I was female at all times. I decided to keep that fact to myself initially as the opportunity to dress, as a woman was more important for me at that time.”

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“I was given information to meet some people in the Harp bar. They and I were dressed as males and I was quizzed about my “dressing” activities, which confirmed to them that I was one of them.


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1980

A year later, the building is formally dedicated on Gay Pride Day by Dr Noel Browne, former Minister for Health and the first politician to raise issue of decriminalisation in the Dáil. Destroyed by fire on 4 November 1987, the centre is denied a National Lottery grant to rebuild. Partially re-opened to house the offices of Gay Community News, it would be sold amid huge controversy in 1999.

Gay Pride Week 1980 is marked by almost 20 men and women leafletting Dublin’s city centre. Without the numbers to sustain a march, the high point is a very public picnic in Merrion Square. And with perfect timing, Trinity College lecturer David Norris opens his constitutional action in the High Court.

On St. Patrick’s Day, the Hirschfeld Centre In February, Joni Crone, poet, writer and coopens to acclaim at 10 Fownes St, Dublin. founder of Liberate Irish Lesbians, comes out It is one of the earliest of its kind in the world. in spectacular fashion on The Late Late Show. Established and managed by the newly formed RTÉ’s switchboard lights up with irate and National Gay Federation, the warehouse “disgusted” callers, neatly illustrating public building housed a café, library, 16mm cinema, attitudes to lesbian invisibility. Some months counselling and office facilities and a dance later, there is less hostility evident when RTÉ club called Flikkers. All were resourced from features a gay male couple, Arthur Leahy and within the community. Laurie Steele.

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By a 15-4 majority, the European Court of Human Rights finds in favour of Belfast activist and shipping clerk Jeff Dudgeon in Dudgeon v. United Kingdom. Justice Brian Walsh, representing the Republic of Ireland, is one of the dissenting judges. The case sets a significant Europe-wide precedent. A year later, Northern Ireland’s anti-gay laws are brought into line with those of the UK, setting an age of consent of 21 for sex between men, ultimately reduced to 16 for all in 2006. During May, upwards of 200 men and women attend the first National Gay Conference at Connolly Hall, Cork. Even though it had speakers from the UK and USA, the conference receives little print or broadcast coverage.

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Pride Listings Week Long

Saturday

TRANS-FUSION Trans Festival

Outhouse Mental Health & Wellbeing Day

CHQ, Custom House Quay, Dublin 1

Outhouse, Capel St, Dublin 1

All Day

11.30-16.00

Entry: Varies

outhouse.ie

31/05/19 – 08/06/2019

The festival will include Soapbox sessions, storytelling, trans history talks, mental health workshops, film evenings and much, much more. As part of the festival, this year we will be hosting our eclectic Arts and Performance show – ‘Got to get it out of my Head’ on the 8th of June in CHQ. facebook.com/events/604167649741187

15/6/2019

From Zumba class to Chef Clair talking about healthy eating to Outhouse Soapbox Session find out more at outhouse.ie

Sunday 16/6/2019

Dublin Gay Men’s Chorus - Summer CAMP!

Union Cup DCU All Day

Union Cup is Europe’s biggest LGBT+ inclusive rugby tournament. The two-day festival of rugby will be held this June 7th-9th, at Dublin’s DCU with an expected 45 teams from 15 countries to participate, making it the biggest Union Cup to date.

18.00-19.30 €10

facebook.com/events/656367421476462/ The Dublin Gay Men’s Chorus proudly presents ‘SUMMER Camp’. We decided this summer we would camp it up a little with a mix of traditional Irish pieces and some the “Gays” and allies will know very well.

Tuesday 18/6/2019

Recognising Rainbow Families A&L Goodbody, IFSC, North Wall Quay, Dublin 1 18.30-20.00 Entry: Invite

eventbrite.com/e/recognising-rainbowfamilies-tickets-62446193245 OUTLaw is delighted to invite you to “Recognising Rainbow Families”, a collaborative event with LGBT Ireland and the Lesbian Lawyers Network hosted by OneALG, the A&L Goodbody LGBT+ allies network. This event will explore the current legal challenges facing LGBT+ families in Ireland.

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07/06/19-09/06/19

St Ann’s Church of Ireland, Dawson Street, D 2

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Friday-Sunday


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Different Families, Same Love Launch Teachers Club Entry: n/a

into.ie/lgbt/Competition Competition for modules whereby primary teachers take action in their classrooms to celebrate the diversity of people and families in Ireland and to address homophobic and transphobic bullying in schools.

Insight Matters Podcast Insight Matters, Mountjoy Centre, Dublin 1

The George, Georges St. Dublin 2 17.00-21.00

Entry: Free facebook.com/events/429794367826068/ Join us for the official opening event of Dublin LGBTQ Pride Festival

Friday

21/6/2019

Dublin Pride Run 5k Phoenix Park 19.30-20.30

13.00-15.00

Entry: â‚Ź25 registration fee

Entry: Free

register.primoevents.com/ps/event/ DublinPrideRun5K

insightmatters.ie Dil Wickremasinghe and Anne Marie Toole will host a lively and fresh discussion about mental health with an array of colourful guests. We will be asking as a community how far have we come in breaking down stigma, how proactive are we at practising self-care and what supports are still needed to ensure all members of our LGBTQ community feel supported.

Hirschfeld Centre Commemorative Plaque 10 Fownes Street Dublin 2

The Pride Run is organised by the Dublin Frontrunners and is an Athletics Ireland accredited run. Now in its eighth year, the Pride Run has raised nearly â‚Ź60k for LGBT charities. The designated charities for 2019 are Belongto, ShoutOut and HIV Ireland.

Saturday 22/6/2019

Homo Conscious Pride event

18.00-18.30

Outhouse, Capel St. Dublin 1

Entry: Free

homoconsciousnow@gmail.com

plaque unveiling ceremony

Mindfulness workshop session exploring areas such as conscious touch, breathwork, and yoga. The event offers a space where we can connect to other queerz in our community with open hearts and minds and have some laughs along the way.

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20/6/2019

Dublin LGBTQ Pride Festival Opening Event

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Pride Listings Saturday

Sunday

Speed Friending with LGBTQ+ 20’s-30’s Ladies

Dublin Pride Walking Tour

Outhouse, Capel St. Dublin 1

Sunday 23 June 2019

15.00-18.00

Hosted by Dr. Mary McAuliffe

Entry: Free

Meeting point: The George, 2pm.

outhouse.ie

Film Screening of Our Love Is History:

22/6/2019

23/6/2019

Who would be better to run a speed friending event than Ireland’s most successful MeetUp group tof LGBTQ+ women?

Dublin Devils Pride Match Location: Tolka Park, Dublin

Entry: TBC dublindevilsfc.com

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A Queer History Tour of Kilmainham Gaol by Brian Crowley

Pride Guide 2019

Shelbourne FC XI v Dublin Devils FC

This special tour Kilmainham Gaol will focus on the lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender prisoners associated with the building.

Kilmainham Gaol, Kilmainham.

Entry: Free kilmainhamgaol@opw.ie

2.30pm (Duration 20 mins)

Dir. Caroline Campbell; winner best short, GAZE Film Festival 2013 Walking Tour Start: 3.00pm

(Duration 2 hrs approx.)

Free ticketed event. See eventbrite.ie for full details and reservation.

Pride Dog Show 2019 Cabage Patch Park, Kevin St Dublin 8 14.00-17.00

Entry: Free dublinpride.ie Registration begins at 1pm and the Dog Show starts at 2.30pm. Lots of fun and games, spot prizes and great giveaways. One of the best days of the year it is going to be sunny in Cabbage Patch Park where communities come together.

Dublin Pride Family Fun Sports Day Cabage Patch Park, Kevin St Dublin 8 14.00-17.00

Entry: Free dublinpride.ie Balloon Modelling, Races, Face Painting, Magic Show, Music with DJ Ger Plus, old school sports day events Egg & Spoon Race, Sack Race, Drag Race and lots more. Bring a game you love to play.

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Pride Listings Sunday

Tuesday

Bi+ Ireland Dublin Pride Meet Up

Dublin Pride Conference

Street 66, Parliament St. Dublin 2

Radisson Blu, Golden Lane Dublin 8

15.00-18.00

09.30-16.30

Entry: Free

Entry: Free

Come and chill with us and play some boardgames. Event is open to all those that fall under the bi+ umbrella along with their friends and family. More info from biirelandnetwork@ gmail.com

dublinpride.ie

6/25/2019

This conference is for people working or volunteering in the LGBT+ sector, or people interested in this area. Please register for this event as places are limited.

An Evening with David Norris hosted by Changing Attitude Ireland

Drag + Draw with Bonnie Ann Clyde

The Music Room, at Christchurch Cathedral, Christchurch, Dublin 8

21.00-23.00

Entry: €15.00

The Outing Festival Geílí at Dublin Pride

eventbrite.ie/e/an-evening-with-david-norristickets-62287365186

Panti Bar, Caple St

Ireland’s pioneering public figure - whose challenge to the Irish state led to the decriminalisation of homosexuality - speaks about his life, work and being gay in 60s, 70s, 80s & 90s Ireland. The event kicks off with a drinks reception at 6:30pm (sharp).

Monday 24/6/2019

“Insight Matters For Your Mental Health” 46, Mountjoy Square South, Dublin 1

21.00-23.00

Entry: Free dublinpride.ie The Outing Festival Géilí at Dublin Pride’ and event description text to ‘The Outing Festival & Dublin LGBTQ+ Pride join together for or famous Géílí. This is céilí with a gay twist: all the musicians are members of the LGBT+ community and your caller will be ‘Gay Matchmaker’ Eddie McGuinness, One of Pride’s longest running events. Listen to the best of Irish Music and dance along. A funfilled night of Irish music and dancing, this is Céili - with a gay flair.

16.00-19.00 Entry: Free

insightmatters.ie Free mental health workshop entitled “Insight Matters for your Mental Health” hosted by Dil Wickremasinghe and Anne Marie Toole.

Dolly Does Pride The George, Georges St. Dublin 2 21.00-02.00

Entry: Free

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Street 66 Parliament Street Dublin 2

Pride Guide 2019

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Rainbow Revolution Pride Guide 2019

Your Mother loves you Happy Pride

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Pride Listings Movie Night with Girls Night In

6/25/2019

Outhouse, Capel St, Dublin 1

Dolly’s Show Tunes Pride Special:

outhouse.ie

22.30-Late

Entry: Free dublinpride.ie Join Dolly Grip for a sensational show featuring well known anthems from stage and screen. Dolly & her Gripettes will bring you on a musical journey for Pride week from 10.30pm. DJ Karen rocking the dancefloor with our sexy Tuesday gogo boys afterwards till very late. Free entry.

Wednesday 26/6/2019

NXF Dublin Pride Annual Political Debate CHQ, IFSC Dublin 1 18.30-20.30

Entry: Free dublinpride.ie Adam Long of the National LGBT Federation (NXF) will once again be joined by a panel comprised of leading social and political thinkers to discuss and debate how best to advance LGBT equality in this year of significant anniversaries - 50 years since the Stonewall Riots gave birth to the global LGBT Pride movement and 40 years since the foundation of the National LGBT Federation here in Ireland.

RIDE4PRIDE -Spin Class Sports & Fittness Markievicz Centre, Luke St, Dublin 2 13.15-14.15

Donation to BeLonGTo Youth Services

Join Girls’ Night In for special screening of Outitude, a film documenting grassroots Irish Lesbian herstories. Director Sonya Mulligan and Producer Ger Moane will be in attendance.

Pool Party - Aqua Fit Sports & Fittness Markievicz Centre, Luke St, Dublin 2 20.00-21.00

Entry: Donation to BeLonGTo Youth Services facebook.com/events/2202151620094890/ Dublin City Council host these events with all proceeds going to BelongTo Youth Services. Classes are fun and cater for all fitness levels. Activities are open to all over 16 years of age to attend but places are limited.

Thursday 27/6/2019

Recognising and Challenging Sexual Harassment of LGBTQIA+ Women* The Tara Building, 11 - 15 Tara Street, Dublin 2.

dublinlesbianline.ie/ Join Dublin Lesbian Line in the gorgeous surroundings of The Tara Building for a night of activism and empowerment as we launch the findings from the first ever Irish research project into sexual harassment of LGBTQIA+ Women*. Featuring music from Molly Sterling and other guests.

facebook.com/events/2202151620094890/ Dublin City Council host these events with all proceeds going to BelongTo Youth Services. Classes are fun and cater for all fitness levels. Activities are open to all over 16 years of age to attend but places are limited.

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The George

19.00-21.00

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Pride Guide 2019

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COMMUNITY PRIDE, FAMILY PRIDE, LGBTQ PRIDE, TR AVELLER

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Pride Listings Thursday

Friday

Pride Week Film Screening: Movie ‘Pride’

Dublin Bear Pride 2019 FUR

Ballyroan Library, Rathfarnham, Dublin 14, D14 XY75

Adelphi, Middle Abbey St. Dublin 1

18.00-20.00

Entry: €10

southdublinlibraries.ie/events/pride-week-filmscreening-pride PRIDE is inspired by an extraordinary true story. It’s the summer of 1984, Margaret Thatcher is in power and the National Union of Mineworkers is on strike, prompting a London-based group of gay and lesbian activists to raise money to support the strikers’ families. Initially rebuffed by the Union, the group identifies a tiny mining village in Wales and sets off to make their donation in person. As the strike drags on, the two groups discover that standing together makes for the strongest union of all.

Rainbow Vinyl Street 66, Parliament St. Dublin 2 21.00-20.00

Entry: Free Aoife Nic Canna & Kate Brennan Harding on the decks.

Friday

21.00-03.00

dublinbears.ie/ Club night, A percentage of proceeds will be donated to a nominated LGBT charity.

Discotheque Street 66, 33-34 Parliament St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2.

Mockie Ah : Dublin Pride Vogue Ball The Workman’s Club Dublin 2 23.30-03.00

Entry: €10 facebook.com/events/391054828405571/ COME ONE COME ALL LETS ALL HAVE A BALL! Ireland’s biggest drag haus Mockie Ah are bringing their Vogue Ball to Dublin this Pride! GET READY TO WERK THE FLOOR! Hosted By Candy Warhol and Sponsored by Dublin Vintage Factory with a massive lineup of special guest DJs, Performers & Judges TBA

Pride Glitter Bomb with Gok Wan! The George, Georges St, Dublin 2 22.00-02.30

28/6/2019

facebook.com/events/409831562898942/

Booty Camp - BootCamp

Gok Wan returns on Pride Friday to join Glitter Bomb resident DJs Davina Devine & DJ Mo and our SEXY Glitterati Dancers for a big Gay Pride takeover!

Dublin City Council Amphitheater 18.00-19.00

Entry: Donation to BeLonGTo Youth Services Dublin City Council host these events with all proceeds going to BelongTo Youth Services. Classes are fun and cater for all fitness levels. Activities are open to all over 16 years of age to attend but places are limited. facebook.com/events/2202151620094890/

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Entry: Free

28/6/2019

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27/6/2019


Pride Listings Pride Day at The George

Saturday

The George, Georges St Dublin 2

29/6/2019

12.00-02.30

OutHouse Pride Breakfast

Entry: FREE!

Join us and our big gay family for the biggest LGBT+ day of the year!Get your holiday request in with work now, arrange the babysitters for the (fur)babies and buy that new outfit in Penneys well in advance for what will be the most fun you can have ever had on Pride Day with Ireland’s Biggest and best loved Gay Bar - The George!

dublinpride.ie

Pride Village 2019

Ireland’s Largest Pride Parade has come back to Dublin city centre! The LGBTQ+ Community is at the heart of our parade and at the heart of our city. Setting of from the Garden of Remembrance and fetching up at the Pride Village in Merrion Square, the parade will be its usual colourful, noisy celebration. Email community@dublinpride.ie for information and assistance with specific access needs.

Merrion Sq. Dublin 2 12.00-19.00

Outhouse, Capel St, Dublin 1 10.00-12.00 outhouse.ie

Dublin LGBTQ+ Pride March & Parade O’Connell St Dublin 1

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12.00-15.00

Pride Guide 2019

facebook.com/events/409297549871997/

Find Your Pride Buddy Outhouse, Capel St, Dublin 1

Entry: Free! dublinpride.ie Join us for the biggest outdoor LGBTQ+ Pride Village! Speakers and special guests will perform on the Pride Main Stage while the Village will include food vendors, Community areas, a Pride Shop, face painters, a Quiet Zone to rest and recharge, a children’s play area and family zone and lots more.

11.00-12.30

Gold Post Parade Party

Entry: FREE!

Outhouse, Capel St, Dublin 1 15.00-19.00

outhouse.ie Our cosy library will become a friendly space for you to make new connevctions and meet people you can enjoy the day with.

Pride Brunch @WokeCup WokeCup Café, 8 Queen Street, Smithfield, D7.

wokecupcafe.ie

Entry: Free outhouse.ie Celebrate with Outhouse after the parade at our annual post parade party hosted by GOLD (A Non-alcohol event)

El Styra’s Pride Pop Party Jack Nealons, Capel St 16.00-23.00

Entry: Free Celebrating 10 years of Pride in Jack Nealon’s, Auntie El returns for her annual marathon of classic camp pop, queer disco, thumping hiNRG (and whatever else takes her fancy after seven gin & tonics). Free entry and no escape!

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Pride Listings Panti Bar & Penny Lane Street Party

Bukkake Dublin Pride at Opium

North Strand St. Dublin 1

Opium Wexford Street

14.00-12.30

22.00-03.00

Entry: Free

Entry: €15/€20

PANTIBAR’S FAMOUS FREE ALL-DAY PRIDE STREET PARTY!! Entrance to the party will be from the Jervis St end of Great Stand St, behind the Morrison Hotel. It’s a free event, but numbers are strictly capped. HAPPY PRIDE!

facebook.com/events/1329951177144207/

16.00-23.00

Entry: Sold Out

SPINSTER- Pride LADYZ Party Bad Bobs Temple Bar Dublin 2

facebook.com/events/452646728902554/

22.00-03.30

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the stonewall uprising and the birth of the pride movement, Mother in association with Dublin LGBTQ Pride are taking over the grounds of the National Museum of Ireland at Collins Barracks on the quays to bring you the biggest most dazzling display of inclusivity this site has seen in its 300 year history.

Entry: €12

Street 66 Pride + Love Street 66, Parliament st, Dublin 2 12.00-02.30

facebook.com/events/380037355916799/ SPINSTER brings you the Pride LADYZ party to end all Pride parties at Bad Bobs, Temple Bar. Dj Elle (Crush Girlclub fame) in the main club, with the best in current dance-floor stompersa mix of solid house and RnBTunes from that crafty Spinster crew rockin’ it from 10pm till VERY late on the roof You want surprises? We got surprises! Expect the unexpected with super craziness in every corner!

Profile PRIDE 2019

Entry: Wrist-Band

Tramline, 21 D’Olier St. Dublin 2

Furry Glen & Dublin Bears

Entry: €17.50/€20.00

Adelphi, Middle Abbey St. Dublin 1

facebook.com/events/391669784996095/

21.00-03.00

22.00-03.30

Club night, A percentage of proceeds will be donated to a nominated LGBT charity.

LOVE IS BIGGER THAN ANYTHING IN IT’S WAY Another year and another PRIDE. 6 years of great parties and this years party is going to be no different. What we have lined up for you will be BIGGER, BETTER and even more jaw dropping than before.

Grace #4 - QUEER Rave

Victoria & Davina’s Pride Party

Entry: €10 dublinbears.ie/

The Sound House Eden Quay, Dublin 1 23.00-03.00

Vicar Street, Dublin 7 19.00-02.30 Entry: €28-€32.65

facebook.com/events/2264800583776707/

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National Museum of Ireland, Collins Barracks, Dublin 7

Pride Guide 2019

Mother Pride Block Party 2019

You cant have Dublin Pride without Bukkake right? GOOD, because we’ve put together a WHOPPER party for yo on Saturday 29th June, and great news is that it will of course be in our home of Opium as usual! We have 8, yep EIGHT Dj’s for you on the night. It’s gonna be TROPIC! We have 8, yep EIGHT Dj’s for you on the night. It’s gonna be TROPIC!


Sunday

Trans Pride

6/27/2019

7/6/2019

01 – 08/07/2019

Casa Valentina by Harvey Fierstein hosted by Acting Out

Trans Pride Dublin 2019 (Break the Binary) Garden of Remembrance 14.00-16.00

The Teacher’s Club, Parnell Square

Entry: Free

Entry: €15/€10

facebook.com/events/363107677836527/

ticketsource.eu/casa A thought-provoking play about the past, infused, as you’d expect from the writer of Hairspray and Kinky Boots, with Harvey Fierstein’s trademark wit.

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For More Information on Pride Events Go to— Outhouse.ie


Pride Listings National Gallery of Ireland Pride Events Pop-Up Talks

Public Tours

Mon 24-Jun @1.15pm (Shaw Room, NGI)               All tours meet at Merrion Square Information Desk, NGI Constance Markievicz and Eva Gore-Booth: Sisters and Fighters Mon 24-Jun @ 2.30           Join Kate Drinane, from the Gallery’s Education LGBTQIA+ Tour of the National Collection team, for a free lunchtime talk focused on the Tue 25-Jun @ 2.30             life and work of Constance Markievicz and LGBTQIA+ Tour of the National Collection Eva Gore-Booth. Meet in the Shaw Room. All welcome! Wed 26-Jun @ 2.30            LGBTQIA+ Tour of the National Collection Thurs 27-Jun @ 2.30         LGBTQIA+ Tour of the National Collection                Fri 28-Jun @ 2.30               LGBTQIA+ Tour of the National Collection               

Join one of the Gallery’s highly trained tour guides for a free tour exploring the LGBTQIA+ works in the Gallery’s permanent collection.  

Wed 26-Jun @1.15pm (Room 15, NGI)                      All events are open to the public Gerald Dillon and Patrick Scott: Lives of Gay and free of charge. No booking or Artists in 20th Century Ireland attendance confirmation is required. Join Aoife Convery, from the Gallery’s team of highly trained tour guides, for a free lunchtime talk focused on the work of gay artists Patrick Scott and Gerard Dillon. Meet in the Room 15. All welcome! Thurs 27-Jun @1.15pm (Portrait Gallery, NGI)     Queer Art Movement, Where Is It? Join Stephen Doyle, contemporary artist who features in the Gallery’s Zurich Portrait Prize 2018, for a free lunchtime talk focused on contemporary Queer art in Ireland. Meet in the Portrait Gallery. All welcome! Fri 28-Jun @1.15pm (Room2, NGI)                             Rosa Bonheur’s A Stag Join Jennifer Duffy, from the Gallery’s team of highly trained tour guides, for a free lunchtime talk focused on the work of French artist Rosa Bonheur. Meet in the Room 2. All welcome! 63

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Sun 30-Jun @ 2.30             LGBTQIA+ Tour of the National Collection

Pride Guide 2019

Tues 25-Jun @1.15pm (Prints and Drawings Reading Room, NGI)                  William Orpen’s Portrait of the Vere Foster Family Join Iain Wynne-Jones, from the Gallery’s Library and Archives team, for a free lunchtime talk focused on William Orpen’s Portrait of the Vere Foster Family. Meet in the Atrium. All welcome!


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Pride & Accessibility DUBLIN LGBTQ+ PRIDE ARE ON A JOURNEY TO IMPROVE OUR ACCESSIBILITY FOR EVERYONE IN THE COMMUNITY. WE RECOGNISE THAT WE’RE STILL LEARNING, SO WE WELCOME YOUR IDEAS AND FEEDBACK ON HOW WE CAN IMPROVE IN THE FUTURE.

SECOND ASSEMBLY POINT

There will be an additional assembly point at City Quay where you can join the parade for the final stretch up to Merrion Square! Anyone who would like to participate in the parade but can’t manage the full route for any reason is more than welcome to come along to City Quay where we’ll have some seating, refreshments and some quieter Pride fun. The distance from City Quay to the parade’s end at Pride Village in Merrion Square is approximately 700m and will take approximately 20 minutes to walk.

QUIET AREA IN MERRION SQUARE

ISL INTERPRETATION

There will be an Irish Sign Language interpreter at the main stage and on the screens, and prerecorded videos will be subtitled. Our Dublin Pride stewards and ambassadors will be scattered throughout the parade and Pride Village and will be delighted to help anyone in need of assistance or information on the day. If you would like any further details on any of these initiatives or have any ideas for us, please get in touch with Nem at community@dublinpride.ie

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VIEWING PLATFORMS

We will have two dedicated accessible viewing areas along the Dublin LGBTQ+ Pride parade route this year, one outside the GPO and the other at the raised Luas stop outside the Gresham Hotel. These areas will be cordoned off for those that those who need to can escape the bustle of the crowd.

RAINBOW BUS

We will be running our Rainbow Bus accessibility initiative again this year, with Dublin Bus once again providing the vehicle. Anyone who finds it difficult to walk in the Dublin LGBTQ+ Pride parade for any reason – be it mobility issues, sensory issues, mental health reasons or otherwise – is welcome aboard the Rainbow Bus! You can email community@dublinpride.ie for full details on how to reserve your spot. Places are limited, so do get in touch as soon as you can.

Pride Guide 2019

Below are some of our new initiatives, which we hope will go some way towards making Dublin Pride a festival for everyone.


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Staying safe at the Pride Parade DUBLIN LGBTQ PRIDE CLG HAVE ENGAGED THE SERVICES OF SAFE EVENTS TO ACT AS EVENT CONTROLLER AND SAFETY OFFICERS AT OUR EVENT. GETTING TO PRIDE AND AROUND THE CITY

• Plan your journey well in advance from anywhere in Ireland on www. transportforireland.ie

• An Garda Siochana will have a traffic management in operation for the city. For full detais visit www.garda.ie

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• There will be some diversions on Dublin Bus routes, and a temporary suspension of LUAS Cross City services. • There will be parking restrictions around the parade assembly area and Merrion Square. Alternative parking is available for residents affected. Contact dublinpride@safeevents.ie

PRIDE PARADE

The parade is scheduled to start from O’Connell Street at 1pm. It is important to remember that this is both a parade and a march; a celebration and a protest. Members of the public can view the parade at any point along the route. If members of the public wish to join the parade they may do so from designated points on O’Connell Street an following that along the entirety of the route after O’Connell Street.

• T he assembly area and initial part of O’Connell Street will be controlled to assist with getting the parade underway. • T he Dublin LGBTQ Pride Parade is open to all, be courteous of your fellow participants and follow directions from An Garda Siochana. • B oth vehicles and pedestrians take part in the parade, please show extra care and keep a safe distance from vehicles at all times. • O nly vehicles registered and approved in advance may take part in the parade. • U nder no circumstances are there to be any objects or paraphernalia thrown from vehicles. • A lcohol is strictly prohibited on the parade route.

PRIDE VILLAGE MERRION SQUARE

• M errion Square will be open from 12.00pm with most activities starting at 1.00pm. Access before 12.00pm will be restricted while we set up the festival site. This is a family friendly event with community and sponsor areas, food stalls and a main stage with entertainment for the whole afternoon. • M errion Square and its surrounds are also residential areas and we ask all attendees to respect the privacy of the residents and respect the local communities. • M errion Square and the surrounding area have numerous local businesses including restaurants, bars and shops which will be open on the day. Support local businesses where possible. • T here are no ATMs within the Merrion Square site. ATMs are available nearby on Baggot Street. • E ntry to the area is subject to search so please don’t bring bags unless absolutely necessary. • Alcohol is strictly prohibited in this area.

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BAGS AND SEARCHES

LOOK AFTER EACH OTHER

For security we will have searches entering the controlled assembly areas and Merrion Square site. This is a legal requirement for the safety of all, please cooperate with security staff, stewards and An Garda Siochana.

• F ree wristbands for children are available at the parade assembly area and Merrion Square. The purpose of these wristbands is to help reunite lost children with their parent/guardian should they get separated.

• P lease do not bring a bag unless absolutely necessary. People without bags will be fast tracked through the search process.

• W e will have a medical team working with us, if you need assistance or you see someone who does, contact our team.

• W e all have to share this planet and we only have the one. Don’t litter and if you’re going to glitter, make sure its biodegradable. • R emember your first Pride. It’s magical and terrifying and wonderful and overwhelming all at once. Be welcoming and friendly, this is not a day to be alone. Have a happy and safe Pride! Jed Dowling Festival Director

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• E xceptions will of course be made for people with medical conditions or children, but for the sake of everybody’s safety all bags will be thoroughly searched.

• P lease look after you own welfare on the day. Stay hydrated, we will have a supply of free drinking water if needed.

Pride Guide 2019

• I f you must bring a bag, it needs to be smaller than A4 size. All bags will be subject to search and this will result in unnecessary queuing.

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Arthur Leahy BEFORE ARTHUR LEAHY AND HIS PARTNER LAURIE STEELE BECAME THE FIRST OPENLY GAY COUPLE TO BE INTERVIEWED ON IRISH TV, THEY ENGAGED IN PROTRACTED NEGOTIATIONS WITH LEAHY’S FAMILY AS TO WHETHER IT WAS THE RIGHT THING TO DO.

This visibility was part of the reason he and Laurie agreed to appear on the show. “There were papers at the time who still presented homosexuality as something foreign,” he says. “Even after the show aired, the paper put the word Irish, in Irish Gays in inverted comas. We wanted to challenge the image that was out there.”

“Lots of people said to me, ‘I have no problems with you talking about being gay,’” Leahy says. But my mother was still alive and that became a factor. When she said:

While the experience was largely positive, there was some negativity. “There were death threats, letters saying we were going to rot in hell. A couple of priests used us as an illustration in their sermons as to the rot that was setting in, in Irish society.”

“If it’s important to you, I will back you, it pulled the rug out from everybody. They had to present their own case, in their own words and not speak through her.” A lot of people were supportive, a lot of people were angry, but in the years after, everybody mellowed. “But I think it showed up the instinct, that I still see today, for people to use concern about someone else as a means of fighting something they, themselves, are not comfortable with.” The perception at the time was that everybody who was gay was high camp, like Kenneth Williams or Mr Humphries. “After the show went out, I had people coming up to me and saying, ‘Sure we had no idea you were queer at all. You were always so serious, while we were all having great fun together behind the bike shed.’” 70

Looking back on the footage now, he laughs at how stagey it was (“I had to pour so many mugs of tea!”) and remembers the main reaction he got from the public had nothing to do with his homosexuality, but his newly acquired accent. “I’d lived in London for years and had acquired a twang. People kept asking me ‘Where’d you get the accent,’ which is a big thing in Cork. You can never lose your accent.”


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“We were more angry than frightened. We thought it was absurd.

says Jeff Dudgeon who took the first case from this island to the European Court of Human Rights to fight the criminalization of Homosexuality in 1981. “Self-oppression was the order of the day.”

We were being charged with a crime that didn’t exist in England at the time, we were under direct rule. So we decided to take the case to the ECHR.”

But after that first brick was thrown, visibility seemed to fall like shards from the smashed windows on the infamous Greenwich Inn — reflecting a way forward for men like Dudgeon who had, until then, felt isolated. Gays who were proud, confident and organised. “This visibility triggered a chemical response within us, combusting with movements like the feminist and civil rights movements that were already active at the time.” In 1976, Dudgeon and around another 30 men were rounded up as the police cracked down on a so-called homosexual conspiracy. “There had been a similar round up ten years earlier in Bangor. A dozen people were put in jail or mental hospitals. Young men were tried as adults. They went through our papers, our diaries, and our love letters,” he says. “When I got them back there were notes in red pen on all of them. But unlike in the past, everyone had a connection to an organisation. There was solidarity and self-worth and that ensured that we did not go down.”

Initially, the case was taken anonymously, but Dudgeon could see quite early on that they were getting a lot of publicity and support from journalists. “We needed to take advantage of that. The taking of the case was almost as important as the verdict and that’s why I allowed myself be named.” While most of the reaction on the ground was positive or unobtrusive, the negativity came when he debated Ian Paisley on TV about the issue. “My house was attacked about five times, breeze blocks came through the windows. Local youths, who had previously not noticed me, now felt an entitlement to go and attack me.” Judgment from Strasburg was overwhelmingly in Dudgeon’s favor: the result was 15-4. This was the first time the courts had found in favor of LGBT rights. In 1982, gay sex was decriminalised in Northern Ireland and Dudgeon’s landmark case was later cited not only in David Norris’s appeal to have a similar law overturned in the south but also in the American Supreme Court. 71

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“BEFORE STONEWALL, PRIDE DIDN’T REALLY EXIST FOR A LOT OF GAY PEOPLE,”

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Jeff Dudgeon


1982

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The Gay Games are held for the first time in San Francisco, attracting almost 2,000 participants. Ireland is represented by three athletes, among them Oliver Murphy, who wins gold. Murphy returns home to find himself sacked from his teaching job. He later died of AIDS-related complications.

Pride Guide 2019

In the same year, RTÉ designer Charles Self is stabbed fatally in his Monsktown, Co. Dublin home. The gardaí focus their investigation solely within the gay community and in the process witch-hunt some 1,500 men in Cork and Dublin. The Gay Defence League is formed to protest and counter the unfolding harassment and victimisation.

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DUBLIN PRIDE SPECTACULAR


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1983

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Uproar follows the verdict in the Declan Flynn trial, where five youths walk free after murdering the 33-year-old in Fairview Park. The newly formed Dublin Lesbian & Gay Men’s Collective organises a march to “protest violence against women and gays”. The march accelerates the development of Dublin Pride, leading to almost 150 people from all over Ireland marching from St. Stephen’s Green to O’Connell Street on 25 June. At the parade’s end, Joni Crone rededicates the GPO as the Gay Person’s Organisation.

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Marina Forrestal

“It was 1982, the time of the first pro-life referendum, and we had a Chaplain who wore a [badge in the shape of a] pair of foetus feet — a symbol of the right to life for the unborn, on his lapel. And members of the staff asked him, ‘What do you think, Father, about this thing with our lads?’ And he said, ‘Well they have the right to defend themselves.’ And that stopped me in my tracks. For him, and for many, there was the right of life to the unborn but not for a gay man.”

“I was raging. I was having a hard time with discipline as I wasn’t much older than some of the boys and I didn’t understand them too well.” But after that comment in the staff room she had had enough. “I marched into them and said; ‘I don’t want any more of this. People are getting killed around here.’”

“And that scared me. I don’t know if he was involved, he was probably just claiming some of the excitement for himself. But I felt I couldn’t go to the board of management. I felt it might mark me as associated with Declan as it did in that young man’s eyes. I didn’t want to lose my job. Or have people coming to where I lived. I was terrified.” That’s why it was such a positive experience for her to go back to Fairview Park on the day of the Marriage Equality Referendum, she says. “I was standing there, on the bridge, looking at local kids helping give out balloons and waving at cars and canvassing. To see how far we had come, it was just great.”

“One lad called me over to help him with his work. And as I leant over he whispered to me, ‘We did it. You and your friends can stay out of the park. We know where you live.’” 75

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Marina Forrestal might not remember where she was when she heard Declan Flynn was murdered, but she is unlikely to forget how precarious her place in Irish society felt in its aftermath. A part time art teacher and openly gay woman at a time when there were no protections in place for LGBTQ citizens, the murder hit particularly close to home. Her place of employment, the North Strand Tech, was also the school responsible for educating some of those who committed the murder.

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“SOME OF OUR LADS KILLED YOUR MAN IN FAIRVIEW PARK.”


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1984

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Part-financed by Amsterdam City Council and the Council of Europe, the world’s first Gay Youth Congress is held in Amsterdam. Exuberantly marking International Youth Year, the conference of 100 participants aims to highlight the concerns and desires of lesbian and gay youth, at a time of limited, and often fraught, public discourse around youth sexuality.

The conference moved to Dublin in 1985 and Oslo in 1986, ultimately seeding the foundation of the IGLYO — the global NGO for LGBT youth, with UN and EU affiliation.

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Albert Dijkstra

Image: Henri Blommers

government helped a little to defray the debts of the event.

“I never thought about it at the time, but looking back, I can see we did something big. We had no idea that it would take off so successfully. And more personally, it was important to connect with people. We live in different times but for us back in the mid-80s it was amazing that there were people from across Europe, “I was studying political science. To my eyes, the from Ireland to Poland. We even had a young scene was just full of older men who wanted to woman from the USA.” flirt with me but I wanted to meet — and marry! “And remember, the reason we then decided to — a guy of my own age. There were about 25 help Dublin organise the second conference people at the first meeting called to organise a and festival in 1985 was based on seeing your conference and festival. Once we decided on situation and realising we had something to the project we quickly broke up into little sub offer you. The Netherlands wasn’t a perfect committees. place but Dublin felt medieval compared to “Remember, it was the 1980s. Amsterdam was Amsterdam at the time. Our attitude was we very, very left. There was a good network of live in Europe and Ireland needs support from politically connected people, young and old, us! We’re all European and what the fuck is to tap into, in terms of organising the event happening there?” and also making something lasting out of it. “lt was a lot of hard work but I can see now we were We knew people with the phone numbers of contacts in government and city council writing a little bit of international gay history.” departments and that helped a lot. And also, like Dublin, it helped to live in a small city where connections were easy to make. Albert Dijkstra, who is a member of its steering committee and later became active in LHJO, the National Gay Youth Platform of the Netherlands, remembers the genesis of the conference.

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It grew out of the world’s first Gay Youth Congress held at Amsterdam in the Summer of 1984.

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IGLYO, THE INTERNATIONAL LGBTQI YOUTH “At the age of 23, I became unofficially bankrupt from the conference. I had signed all the AND STUDENT ORGANISATION BASED AT contracts and by the end was liable for about BRUSSELS, HAS MORE THAN 95 MEMBER 70,000 guilders. The COC — the national ORGANISATIONS IN OVER 45 COUNTRIES. Dutch gay organisation— city council and


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Union Cup Dublin 2019, Europe’s biggest LGBT+ inclusive rugby tournament. The two-day tournament will be held this June 8-9th, at Dublin’s DCU with an expected 45 teams from 15 countries to participate. Union Cup Dublin will host a dedicated women’s tournament for the first time, alongside the men’s.

17% LGBT+ are members of a sports club or teams 55% of LGBT men, 56% women not active enough to maintain good health (compared to 33% / 45% general population) 84% of gay men, 82% gay women reported experiencing homophobic insults while participating in sports.

Nigel Owens, MBE, the current world record holder for most test matches refereed, will take time out of his international rugby and referee at tournament.

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Why is Union Cup important?

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What is Union Cup?

The host team, Emerald Warriors RFC, is inviting Ireland, along with the rugby community and visiting teams to #TryWithPride and join them for family-friendly festival vibes, as international teams battle it out on the pitch. Tickets available at www.unioncupdublin.ie 100% of proceeds will go to BelongTo Price: €10 Adult, €5 Child (under 2 go free) 81


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1985

With condoms illegal — and with the government of the day prevaricating on providing non-judgmental sexual health information — a voluntary umbrella group, Gay Health Action, launches Ireland’s first public information leaflets on HIV and AIDS. The Attorney General advises the Department of Health against any future funding of the leaflets, citing existing anti-gay criminal law. By the end of the decade, and as the death toll from AIDS continues to rise, members of GHA and Lesbian Health Action are instrumental in establishing the larger campaigning and counselling groups AIDS Action Alliance and Cairde. AIDS Action Alliance continues to operate to this day under the name HIV Ireland.

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Ciaran McKinney

“Whenever we were running low, we’d throw a fundraiser and import about six cases at a time. While there hadn’t been any cases of HIV in the Ironically, the gay scene was much bigger then than it is today. There were more bars, more country yet, Ireland was a ticking time bomb: saunas. They responded very quickly to the there was no sex education, no prophylactics free condom and lube we provided.” and no infrastructure in place to prevent an outbreak. There was also no real leadership Though it could be disheartening. In the years from successive governments on the issue. after Charles Self’s murder in 1982 —Self was It was left, seemingly as always, to grassroots a Scottish set designer who was stabbed to activists to deal with the oncoming tragedy. death in Monkstown in January of that year — paranoia was rife. Some within in the LGBTQ These activists formed Gay Health Action as community even felt that GHA members were part of the Gay Men’s Collective in January scare mongering. “One time, when we were 1985. running a workshop for nurses, one said, ‘It’s “HIV gave the Gay Men’s Collective a reason to the innocent victims like children that I feel stay together,” recalls Ciaran McKinney. “We sorry for.’ That was the mindset. That gay men mobilised around this as an issue, beginning were responsible for their own infections while to collect as much information as we could on haemophiliacs were innocent.” the virus.” While some may have had a sense of doom They provided clear and accurate information and gloom, McKinney did not. “I was 24, I was on AIDS to the media, the medical profession at college and I was clubbing all the time. And and the general public and produced the first we threw the most fabulous fundraisers. Every HIV leaflets in the country — on a hand-rolled weekend you’d be paying into your own event, stencil machine. but there was a huge amount of camaraderie amongst all of us on the loose left.” “We went out among the gay community through a series of pub ‘zaps’, talking to them McKinney turns 60 this year and he says about how to protect themselves from the disease. We were starting from scratch. The “And you can bet I am having a bash, for all gay scene was only emerging at the time, a of those people we knew who didn’t make it lot of people had no idea about good sex, let past 30” alone safe sex.” 83

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They produced a Play Safe card, outlining various sexual activities and the risks associated with them, showed explicit videos in the Hirschfield Centre and fundraised for, imported and distributed condoms.

Pride Guide 2019

IN THE EARLY 1980S, WORD STARTED GETTING BACK TO IRELAND FROM THE GAY DIASPORA ABOUT A SO-CALLED “GAY CANCER”. ONE THAT WOULD LATER BE IDENTIFIED AS THE BEGINNING OF THE AIDS EPIDEMIC.


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Maura Molloy & Bill Foley “I REALLY WANTED TO RECLAIM BEING GAY AND BEING IRISH,” SAYS MAURA MOLLOY, ONE OF THE COVER STARS AND PEOPLE BEHIND THE BOOK OUT FOR OURSELVES: THE LIVES OF IRISH LESBIANS AND GAY MEN, WHICH WAS PRODUCED BY A SUBSET OF THE DUBLIN LESBIAN & GAY MEN’S COLLECTIVES IN 1986. “All the time you would hear being gay described as a foreign influence, like someone had gone abroad and brought a germ back here. The book was a whole body of evidence that clearly stated, ‘You can’t ignore us, we are not all suddenly going to emigrate. We’re here, we’re queer and we’re Irish.’” Bill Foley, who joined her both on the cover and in the collective, concurs. “We wanted to give people something to latch onto in print. It was a snapshot of LGBT lives at the time. There were less than 10 contributors whose full names are printed within the book and plenty of people who couldn’t be named at all. But it is a document of history, of the activism and the key issues of the time.” The collective was fairly unique in that it comprised of both men and women, who were active — not just for gay rights, but also women’s rights, anti-imperialist issues and many other causes that concerned the broad left. 88

“It was a fairly dismal time for Ireland. We were forever marching down O’Connell Street, saying no to something,” adds Foley. 1982’s anti-[eighth] amendment campaign was one of the causes that helped ingratiate gay rights campaigners with other left-leaning activists. “We formed the alternative GAA — Gays Against the Amendment, the first time that groups of LGBT people were visibly speaking out about being gay within these movements.

“So that when we needed them, for the march on Fairview after the murder for Declan Flynn, we could say, “We stood with you, you really have to stand with us and see, like we see, how our causes are united,’ says Molloy. The previous year, there had been a reclaim the night march after some horrific rapes in Dublin. “We clearly linked these two things together. Everybody should be safe. It wasn’t just about gay people. Anyone should be safe to walk at night.” In the wake of Marriage Equality referendum, young gay people can now turn to Out for Ourselves to get an idea as to how things started and how things have changed. “There was a list of things that we considered priorities,” Foley says. “Asserting workers’ rights, the repeal of anti-gay or lesbian legislation. Nowhere is marriage mentioned. It was inconceivable.”


RTÉ Radio rejects an ad from Out magazine, Ireland’s first commercial gay periodical. Not long after, the magazine’s printers, the Carlow & Leinster Times, takes exception to a safer sex ad and refuses to print the publication. Later in the year, the RTE Guide refuses to accept an advert on protection against HIV submitted by Gay Health Action, on the grounds that it would be “normalising homosexual relations in a family magazine”.

The Dublin Lesbian & Gay Men’s Collective publishes Out for Ourselves: The Lives of Irish Lesbians and Gay Men. Running to 224 pages, the book constitutes the first detailed collection of Irish “coming out” stories and is launched with considerable emotion at Dublin’s Project Arts Centre.

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1986

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GROWING WITH PRIDE


1988

From the ashes of Out magazine, a new A3 monthly publication, Gay Community News, is published in Dublin and reports on Unite for Change, a seminar aimed at drawing together the best campaigning interests of Ireland’s LGBT activist community.

Pride Guide 2019

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The seminar leads to the establishment of the Gay & Lesbian Equality Network. The NGO would go on to score notable successes in over two decades of advocacy on equality and anti-discrimination legislation. GLEN would also play a central role in public discourse around civil partnership legislation.

1987

In March, a direct-action advocacy group aimed at addressing the impact of the worsening AIDS pandemic is established at New York. Within a week of being formed, the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power, also known as Act Up, engages in high profile direct action with many members arrested for civil disobedience. Very quickly local chapters are established throughout the USA and around the globe, including Dublin. Post-millennium, Act Up would be re-established in Dublin and later Cork. David Norris is the first openly gay person to be elected to public office in the Republic.Â

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Brian Sheehan

After David Norris won his case in the European Court of Human Rights in 1988 there was a realisation that to deliver on this historic ruling, a new type of politics was needed. “As well as community engagement and activism, we needed to make inroads to the political avenues where policy was created and real change could be delivered. Different strategies and tactics were needed. Yes, David won and the government was going to have to act. But then what? We had to address the economic and social issues behind it.”

They could have written reports and fired them out, but that seemed a little pointless. “We needed to engage the key stakeholders FROM ITS FOUNDATION IN 1988 UNTIL with the power to deliver change and get IT WAS SHUTTERED IN 2017, THE GAY them to endorse these reports themselves,” AND LESBIAN EQUALITY NETWORK says Sheehan. “If you didn’t have the support OPERATED ON A THREE-POINT THEORY and understanding of the service providers or OF CHANGE: CHANGE THE RULE, CHANGE unions, or whomever would be implementing the recommendations, the change wouldn’t THE CULTURE, CHANGE THE LIVED be sustainable. If you could build their capacity EXPERIENCE.

to understand it, you could leverage that into “They were three points in a circle,” says Brian action rather than have it be yet another report Sheehan, who was its Executive Director for that was going to sit on a shelf.” more than 10 years. “All the legal changes you will into the world are useless unless they make a direct change to the lived experience of LGBT people. The more you deliver real change, the more confident they became in themselves and the more likely they are to become actors in seeking that change themselves.” 93

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“Behind all that came a clear understanding that an education system that excludes LGBT people and invalidated them was a foundation level issue for their entire life’s trajectory. The consequences of all of that were poverty and poor mental health. These were the things that GLEN understood and actively worked towards changing.”

Rainbow Revolution

It was very, very difficult to be openly gay in Ireland at the time. “With your job at risk it created a very significant barrier for people. If you could create an environment where you were secure in your job, people had economic freedom that enabled them to make some choices in their lives.


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THE HIRSCHFELD CENTRE - 40th ANNIVERSARY

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To mark the 40th Anniversary of the opening of The Hirschfeld Centre Irelands First Gay Social and Community Space in 1979, named after the renowned German Sexologist and Rights activist Dr. Magnus Hirschfeld, Dublin City Council in partnership with the Hirschfeld Centre Memorial Group will erect a Commemorative Plaque at No. 10 Fownes Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2, which will be the first event in Dublin Pride 2019. The importance of this location to the LGBT community in Dublin cannot be underestimated. In 1979 the National Gay Federation was established at the Hirschfeld Centre in Temple Bar. The centre was the first full time lesbian and gay community venue in Ireland. It included a café, a small cinema and a disco called ‘Flikkers’. The centre also offered information and an advice service called ‘Tel-A-Friend’. It was a vital and much needed resource in late 1970’s and early 1980’s Ireland in helping people come to terms with their sexuality, at a time when homosexuality was still classified as an illegal offence. On 4th November 1987, a fire irrevocably damaged the Hirschfeld Centre. Thanks to Senator David Norris who has been seeking to have the centre formally marked for many years, an application was approved and supported by the Dublin City Council Commemorative Naming Committee in 2019 and working with the support of the current owner, this building will now formally be remembered and be clearly seen on the walking tour of Gay Dublin. This venue holds many great memories and fascinating stories and we are seeking any one who wishes to share a particular memory or story to email southeast@dublincity.ie marking it Hirschfeld Stories.

Photo by Seán Gilmartin of Flikkers Ball 1987, courtesy Irish Queer Archive/National Library of Ireland

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Homophobia, biphobia, transphobia, and interphobia don’t take summer holidays.

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Belfast Pride is launched, consisting of a mix of small-scale events. The first parade is held in the Summer of 1991 and numbers around 100 people on a “dander” from the city’s High Street out to the Botanic Gardens. Within two decades, there would be 15,000 and upwards parading through the city centre.

Throughout its history, the parade has faced continuous opposition from religious fundamentalists. In 2006, Free Presbyterians infiltrate the parade, attempting to disseminate anti-gay religious tracts. In response, a gay youth waves a poster declaring “Jesus is a Fag” the following year.

1989

Headed by Nuala Ward and supported by Macnas, fifteen people — made up of three lesbians, two gay US tourists and ten heterosexuals — participate in Galway’s first Lesbian & Gay Pride Parade.

In the intervening years, the festival becomes a significant adornment to Galway city, hosting everything from trans and youth workshops to soccer tournaments, art exhibitions, film screenings and the parade itself. The Prohibition of Incitement to Hatred Act becomes law and is one of the first of its kind in the EU in its inclusion of sexual orientation. 97

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are proud partners of Dublin Pride festival 2019

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Here’s to breakthroughs.

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Nuala Ward She started by setting up a helpline. But not everybody was as excited about her vision as she was. “They said, ‘No! If you don’t make a fuss, if you are not visible, you can be yourself,’” Ward adds.

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THE MIDLANDS WASN’T A GREAT PLACE FOR LESBIANS IN THE MID-80S, SO NUALA WARD CHOSE TO GO WEST WITH HER THEN PARTNER. THEY DISCOVERED PRETTY QUICKLY THAT THEY WERE NOT, IN FACT, THE ONLY ONES IN THE COUNTRY.

Pride Guide 2019

Through the phone line, she says heard from emigrants who had left the country because they saw no way to have an openly gay life in Ireland. “It brought home for me the importance of visibility, on a local level. Even if you didn’t march with us on that day, you would see that you were not on your own.”

“We actually met three other lesbians in Galway, which was the gay community as I knew it,” she says. “Through them I discovered helplines and festivals in Cork and Belfast, where we used to go to socialize. If you wanted to hang out with people like yourself for an evening, the done thing was to hike up and down the country, or sometimes go as far as London.” She decided to make a change after becoming seriously ill in 1987.

“After spending time in hospital I realised that I had only one shot at this life. And I wasn’t hiding myself for anyone.”

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“When I started talking about a Pride parade people were worried that it would attract attention and we would have a much rougher time. That we might even be killed or hassled. Nobody would march with me. I was telling this to a few straight friends of mine and they said if I wanted, they would. Macnas were starting up at the time and Padraig Breathnach gave me the keys to the workshop and told me to take what I needed to make a banner.” On the day itself, she was terrified. “I knew I would be responsible for any fall out that there may be.” In the end, a few lesbians turned up with a Lesbian Line banner along with a couple of gay American tourists. “There were 15 of us altogether. We walked from Eyre Square to the quays on a busy day,” she says. “A few people clapped, but most went about their business. When were finished, the heteros went into the bar for a drink and the gays went to work.” This year will mark the 29th pride festival and the 30th parade, but Nuala still feels the aftershocks of the first one. “I met a lad who says that even though he was only 10, he remembers seeing the parade with his mother. And while he wasn’t sure what it was about, he knew it was for him. He identified with it. That’s what Pride is about for me.”


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1991

The Red Ribbon Project is launched in New York by an anonymous group of individuals from the Visual AIDS Artists Caucus. Their aim is to keep the red ribbon copyright free and maintain it as a consciousness-raising symbol rather than a trademark or commercial tool.

In New York during the same year, the Irish Lesbian & Gay Organisation is prevented from marching in the St. Patrick’s Day parade. It would take decades of suffering police harassment, court cases and boycotts before the parade organisers, the Ancient Order of Hibernians, relent in their opposition.

1992

The World Health Organisation finally removes homosexuality from its diagnostic manual of psychotic disorders. The classification of homosexuality and bisexuality as a pathology was long used by governments and other bodies around the globe to legitimise oppressive measures and legislative sanctions against lesbians and gay men. In Ireland, the WHO classification was used by psychiatrists as a tacit endorsement of electroconvulsive therapy in so-called gay conversion therapy. The WHO’s declassification would eventually help destigmatise homosexuality as a form of psychological illness and undoubtedly helped frame the growing debate globally around sexual equality. Although homosexuality was formally depathologised, the WHO’s International Classification of Diseases still names five pathologies that are sexual-orientation related. 101

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The ribbon is first worn publicly by actor Jeremy Irons at the 1991 Tony Awards. It rapidly becomes a symbol of the fight to increase public awareness around HIV/AIDS.


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Rainbow Revolution Pride Guide 2019

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Izzy Kamikaze “Really the thing that got us galvanised was our work in Act Up and the connections we had with AIDS Action Alliance.

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We were hugely agitated by the Ancient Order of Hibernians refusing to let the Irish Lesbian & Gay Organisation walk in the NYC St. Pat’s parade of 1991. We felt we had to counter that and make a public statement of pride and defiance.

IZZY KAMIKAZE IS THAT RARE BREED OF POLITICAL ANIMAL:

“To outsiders we may have looked quite organised but the whole thing was thrown together. Barry Quirke designed a logo and screen printed three tees, Mick Quinlan and Dónal Traynor of AAA gave us loads of practical and moral support, once Irish AIDS Day was out of the way.

“We ran the march the first Saturday of July a fierce lesbian and civil rights activist who as we didn’t want to clash with London. There came of age in the turbulent 1980s, embracing was lots of resistance. Women, in general, intersectionality in her political ideology tended to be more enthusiastic than the men. decades before it became a post-millennial thing. More pertinently, she’s lived to tell the “All of us agreed we wanted to promote a tale and still has fire in her belly. carnival atmosphere, a fun party, rather than a sombre and angry civil rights march. Barry and “One came out of the other,” explains Izzy when Eoin dressed up as ‘Fashion Police’ and I wore describing how Dublin Pride reinvented itself docs, a large black cape with ‘Zombie Vampire in the early 1990s by piggybacking on the Lesbian From Hell’ painted in red, and a skirt. energies and connectedness of Act Up Dublin. Possibly the last time I wore a skirt. Although Dublin Pride has been celebrated “We were shitting ourselves that no-one would every year since 1979, the marches had ground turn up but were amazed to see almost 300 to a halt by 1986, victim to massive emigration, people at Parnell Square. When we set off, we burnout, despondency and the devastation still hadn’t figured out an end point. It was of AIDS. illegal and slightly chaotic but loads of fun and so exciting. What Pride should always be.” For Belfast’s first dander in 1991, Izzy and two of her Act Up mates, Barry Quirke and Eoin Freeney, answered the call and drove north in a battered van with a last minute “banner of tie-dyed pink that was hard to read”. Fired up after Belfast’s first march, the three returned to Dublin, determined to reinstate a march in the Dublin Pride of 1992. 104


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With immaculate timing, the Dáil repeals all anti-gay legislation during Dublin’s Pride Week. The Sexual Offences Act introduces a common age of consent of 17. Rape is made a genderneutral crime. Mayor Annie Courtney launches Gay Pride Week in Derry. The programme includes an art exhibition, film nights, a cabaret and a disco. A “Poetry for Pride” evening is facilitated by Cathal Ó Searchaigh and Cherry Smyth. Amuigh agus Bródúíl — Irish for Out & Proud — a suitably themed mural, is unveiled at the Free Derry Corner.

1994

While Germany introduces a common age of consent of 14, the British government struggles to reduce the age of consent for gay men to 18, still two years more than that for heterosexuals. It would be a further seven years before a common age of consent is introduced. Meanwhile, the Isle of Man fully decriminalises homosexuality. Mayor Tomás MacGiolla holds a reception for Dublin Pride at the Mansion House on 21 June. It is the first time such an event occurred. It started a tradition that continues to this day.

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Be who you are. Love what you do.

At Workday, we foster a culture of belonging. Through our many diversity initiatives, we strive to create a welcoming place where everyone can bring their true selves to work – and love what they do. It’s no wonder we were named one of Fortune’s 50 best workplaces for diversity.

workday.com/careers Workday, the Workday logo, and Built for the Future are registered trademarks of Workday, Inc., registered in the United States and elsewhere. ©2019 Workday, Inc. All rights reserved.

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1995

San Francisco outlaws discrimination based on gender identity.

With AIDS-related illnesses the leading cause of death for 25-44-year-old US adults, combination therapy, which often involved a cocktail of 40-60 different drugs, is shown to delay the onset of full-blown AIDS.

Irish language soap opera, Ros na Rún, provides the first on-screen gay kiss between Jack Hayes and Tom Doherty. Decriminalisation of male homosexuality and Ireland’s progressive economic success increasingly allow for more positive representations of lesbians and gay men across all Irish media platforms. Later, films such as 2000’s About Adam and 2003’s Cowboys and Angels are unapologetic in their representation of gay characters.

From the mid-1990s onwards there is a progressive decline in the number of AIDS fatalities in Ireland and other developed countries that have access to expensive anti-retroviral therapies.

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1997

A new LGBT community centre, Outhouse, opens on 9 April at Dublin’s South William Street. The facility is a successor to the troubled Hirschfeld Centre. At a wellattended public meeting, plans are unveiled that include an Eastern Health Board health screening service, offices for the NLGF, GCN and the newly formed Irish Queer Archive, a café and rooms for community groups.

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President Mary McAleese formally opens the building in 1999, by which time it has already outgrown its needs. Within a few years, it’s replaced by a new building at Capel Street that will become the lynchpin of a burgeoning queer street on Dublin’s Northside.

1998

Dundalk Outcomers’ community centre is officially opened by Senator David Norris and Jeff Dudgeon. The centre is the culmination of several years of planning and struggle to provide a range of services for LGBT people living in the Border counties. The centre’s funding is a beneficiary of the Programme for Peace and Reconciliation, following the Belfast Agreement of the same year. Within a decade, Dundalk Outcomers outgrows the centre, eventually moving to a new premises at The Coach House, and continues to provide essential outreach to LGBT people in Ireland’s North-East. 112


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What actions will you take?

Actions speak louder than words

The Stonewall uprising marked the beginning of a powerful global LGBTQI+ movement. Fifty years later, the fight for equality—and the freedom for all of us to exist as we are— continues. There’s so much more history to make. microsoft.com/pride

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The government enacts the Equal Status Act, a hugely important law promoting equality and prohibiting discrimination in the provision of goods and services, accommodation and education. No longer can a same sex couple be refused a hotel room or be asked to leave a bar, as was often the case in the past.

1999

A contact service for transgender people begins to operate from The Gemini Club, which was established in September 1996 by Natalie Conroy, Bernie and Dave Andrews with a view to providing alternative outlets for Dublin’s transgender northsiders. Called Sí, the group begins to roll out newsletters and other relevant information. The Gemini Club and Sí become the first transgender organisations to participate in the Dublin Pride Parade. 117

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MENTAL HEALTH & WELLBEING DAY Saturday 15th June The day begins with a Zumba Class by Samanta Porru (11:30am). This is followed by a cookery demonstration by Outhouse Chef Clair and Anita Thoma, highlighting the impact of a healthy balanced diet on our mental health and wellbeing (1pm). The day then concludes with the 7th annual Soapbox session in a celebration of mental health and the LGBTQIA+ community, with host, Dublin Lesbian Lines’ Laura Louise Condell (3pm). SPEED FRIENDING WITH LGBTQ+ 20s-30s LADIES* Saturday 22nd June. 3:00pm Who would be better to run a speed friending event than Ireland’s most successful MeetUp group for LGBTQ+ women?!

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MOVIE NIGHT WITH GIRLS NIGHT IN Wednesday 26th June. 7:00pm Join Girls Night In for special screening of Outitude a documentary, documenting Irish lesbian herstories. Director Sonya Mulligan and Producer Geraldine Moane will be in attendance.

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PRIDE BREAKFAST Sat 29th June. 10:00am - 1:00pm A delicious breakfast in the relaxed and welcoming Outhouse Cafe. Vegan & Veggie options available (non-alcohol event) FIND YOUR PRIDE BUDDY Saturday 29th June. 11:00am - 12:30pm Our cosy Library will become a friendly space for you to make new connections and meet people you can enjoy the day with GOLD POST PARADE PARTY Saturdy 29th June. 3:00pm - 7:00pm Celebrate with Outhouse after the parade at our annual post parade party hosted by GOLD. (A non-alcohol event) 118

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Full Irish Breakfast €8.95 Spanish Tortilla with Spicy Tomato Salsa on a Crusty Baguette €7.50 Crispy Bacon Roll with Herb Roasted Tomatoes & Mayonnaise €5.50

Red Lentil & Cheddar Roll/ Pearl Barley & Mushroom Roll (Vegan) with Country Relish & Side Salad�€5.50 Salad�

Outhouse Cafe open all year round The Outhouse Cafe prides itself on producing healthy, delicious food, made fresh in-house every day. Alongside our artisan sausage rolls, we have a daily rotation of soups and salads along with a wide range of Vegan and Vegetarian options. We have a freshly roasted Italian blend coffee which tastes even better alongside one of our home baked treats. All of our menu is available to eat in our cosy cafe surroundings or take out.

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Homemade Nutty Granola with Summer Fruits & Honey Sweetened Yoghurt (Vegan available)�€7.00 available)�

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Pride at Outhouse LBGT Community & Resource Centre Annual Pride Breakfast Saturday 29th June


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2002

Ukraine introduces an equal age of consent of 16.

In the same year, homosexuality is finally decriminalised in the People’s Republic of China.

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Amidst a slow but burgeoning global embrace of civil partnership rights, The Netherlands becomes the first country in the world to introduce marriage equality, and significantly, with joint adoption rights. The Lower House votes 109-33 in favour, followed by a unanimous yes in the Upper House.

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2001

The Equality Authority publishes a groundbreaking report on the partnership rights of same-sex couples. Speaking at the report’s launch, Niall Crowley, Chief Executive of the Equality Authority says, “Our response to the report must be based on the principles of recognising diversity and non-discrimination.” The 56-page report will become a key influence throughout the subsequent decade in shaping legislative and legal recognition of same-sex couples.

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Join TENI in the beautiful surroundings of Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, St Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2

Saturday 29 June 2019 10am - 11.30am for our annual Pride breakfast.

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Photo: Marsha P. Johnson - Sylvia Rivera

There will be plenty of food and face painting, and you’ll also get your wristbands to join the start of this year’s parade when you arrive.

Then come walk with us in Dublin Pride 2019!

*A wristband will be required to join TENI at the start of the parade. 123 Collect your TENI wristband at RCSI between 10am-11.30am only.


HELPLINE OPEN OPEN 77 DAYS DAYS :: 01 01872 8721055 1055 ask@gayswitchboard // www.gayswitchboard.ie

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HELPLINE OPEN 7 DAYS : 01 872 1055

Gay Switchboard Ireland provides a confidential telephone, email and online chat support service for the LGBT+ community. Our friendly, trained volunteers provide a safe space where listening, support, information and signposting are provided in a non-directive and non-judgmental way. The service is available to anyone who has concerns or is seeking information on sexuality, gender identity, sexual health and wellbeing, mental health and wellbeing, drugs and alcohol, clubs and organisations, the scene and anyone who just wants to talk about how they’re feeling and for them to be sure of a supportive voice to hear them.

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Whatever it is that you want to talk or type about, you can get in touch with our friendly volunteers 7 days a week: Monday to Friday: 6:30pm – 9pm Saturday & Sunday 4pm – 6pm Call us: 01 8721055 // Email us: ask@gayswitchboard.ie // Chat: gayswitchboard.ie


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EPIC The Irish Emigration Museum is proud to support our LGBTQ+ community.

#EPICmuseum

BEST OF THE WORLD

2019 Europe's Leading Tourist Attraction

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In 1992, USI Pink Training was established and has since grown to be the largest LGBT+ training event of its kind in Europe. The event brings together hundreds of LGBT+ students and their allies to get informed about their rights, their access to power and what they can do to bring

In addition to this, USI actively campaigns for issues affecting LGBTQ communities such as transgender healthcare, gender neutral bathrooms and last year we published 'An Foclรณir Aiteach/The Queer Dictionary'. An Foclรณir Aiteach was launched with the support of Transgender Equality Network Ireland (TENI) and BelongTo as a project which would allow everyone to recognise themselves and be able to describe themselves in the Irish language. Find it on our website: usi.ie/focloir-aiteach/

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about positive change in Irish society.

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The Union of Students in Ireland has always been proud of its diverse membership. USI works on behalf of students to address the injustices happening around us. The sixty year history of the student movement in Ireland is a proud one; USI has actively campaigned for decades on issues such as marriage equality and rights for the LGBT+ community.


BRIAN MERRIMAN, A FORMER ACTING CEO OF THE EQUALITY AUTHORITY AND FOUNDER OF THE INTERNATIONAL DUBLIN GAY THEATRE FESTIVAL SAYS:

Brian Merriman

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Normalizing the use of reliable and accurate information regarding LGBTQ people — a practice that had not been standard in Irish political discourse for many years — is what eventually led Ireland to the decriminalisation of homosexuality and later, relationship and gender identity legislation and protections for LGBTQ people in the workplace. Acting as an independent, authoritative voice at a time when change was being contemplated, supported and also resisted, the EA drew on many international and Irish academic resources to present a clear and accurate picture of issues facing LGBTQ people and families. Particularly where the gender or orientation of the parent appeared to be of greater interest to the mainstream than the welfare of children. “I recall contributing to an Oireachtas committee debate when the term ‘gay parenting/adoption’ was used far in excess of ‘good parenting’ by those opposed to equal rights for families with same sex parents,” Merriman says. “The Equality Authority invested considerably in researching and pointing out inequities in relation to next of kin [and] inheritance, which I think moved the middle ground, who were likely unaware but genuinely concerned for the well-being of all children and the adults who loved, provided for and protected them.” In 2002, the EA published Partnership Rights of Same-sex Couples, a 56-page report that became an influential document throughout the subsequent decade with regards the legal recognition of same-sex couples.

“If the biological parent was away for work, what status did the other parent have if the child had an accident in school? If the biological parent died, what happened to the family home?” Merriman says. “If the other parent died later could [she or he] leave the child in the family home without the child being forced to sell it, to meet a tax liability, having inherited their own home from a person deemed to be a stranger in law?” he adds. “[In this case] a child would not only have lost its parents but it’s home. The report dealt with these serious structural inequalities often hidden from mainstream scrutiny.” Indeed, it is often said that the EA’s ability to highlight these crucial issues and to disseminate accurate LGBTQ-related information is what helped bring about more security for same sex parenting of children in Ireland.

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The effect of the law was to bury discussion of gay and lesbian life, prohibiting local councils from supporting and/or funding books, plays, films and other cultural events and outlawing discussion of gay relationships in the educational sector.

2004

In Ireland, the Equality Authority releases its report, “Access to Health Services for Transsexual People”. The 56-page report by Eoin Collins and Brian Sheehan leans heavily on the work and expertise of Transgender Equality Network Ireland and contextualises international responses to trans health care. The report also identifies gaps in health service provision and recommends formal policy changes in statutory Ireland’s treatment of transgender clients.

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Prime Minister Tony Blair’s Labour government finally abolishes Section 28, an amendment to the Local Government Act of 1988. The clause, introduced by Margaret Thatcher, banned local authorities and schools from “promoting” homosexuality.


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2005

Civil partnerships are introduced in Britain, while the Gender Recognition Act becomes law across the UK. Rainbow Revolution

The 1st European Transgender Council Meeting takes place in Vienna.

2006

Better known as the KAL Case, it follows on from the unsuccessful attempts by Senator David Norris and the Labour Party to legislate for civil partnerships. The case is appealed to the Supreme Court, along the way becoming a significant pivot in Irish public discourse on the recognition of same-sex relationships.

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In December, the High Court dismisses a case taken by lesbian couple Katherine Zappone and Anne-Louise Gilligan, who wish to have their Canadian marriage recognised in Ireland.

2007

In October, 60-year-old transgender activist and retired dentist Dr. Lydia Foy wins her case for gender recognition in the High Court.

Dr Foy first began proceedings in 1997, some five years after undergoing full sex reassignment. The government opposed Dr Foy’s action but five years after being taken to task in the High Court, it states its intention to introduce amending legislation. On 28 Oct 2014, after a 21-year legal battle, Dr Foy secures her right to alter her birth cert to her acquired gender. 131


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Lydia Foy WHEN IT COMES TO THE TRANSGENDER STRUGGLE IN IRELAND, THERE IS ONE NAME THAT HAS STOOD OUT FOR MANY YEARS: LYDIA FOY. Born in Westmeath in 1947 and registered male at birth, she had gender reassignment surgery in the UK in 1992 and has lived as her true self ever since.

I had to go to a public clinic for an ultrasound and was the only person in the room who wasn’t pregnant. I had to wait a year to be tested by their own psychiatrist, who hadn’t been well. “It was a struggle. My family and job were taken away. I developed a reactive depression.”

The Gender Recognition Act was passed on 15 July 2015. It meant that a person could apply for a Gender Recognition Certificate to the “It is amazing how childish their response was. Department of Social Protection in order to Why do you need your birth cert? It is asked for have their preferred gender recognised by the if you want insurance or on any form that asks state. Lydia Foy received her birth cert later that for your name as it appears on birth cert, which year. “It was a great vindication and it’s great is on most official documents. By not having that it will help so many other people. But it your true identity reflected there, it outs you was a bit anti-climactic in that they can’t make over and over again.” up for all the years and difficulties they put me through.” Foy’s legal action started in 1997 with a case taken to the High Court. While the judge found against her in 2002, he urged the government to take urgent action to help transgender people. Instead, Foy appealed the decision to the Supreme Court and then had to lodge new cases in the High Court in 2007 and 2013, following the European Court of Human Rights finding in favour of a transwoman’s right to obtain a correct birth certificate in the UK. 133

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“People say, ‘Sure it’s only a historical document’,” Foy explains. “Which is a load of baloney. You need your true identity to be officially recognised. People in power are looking for an excuse to put you down and by not reissuing us with a birth cert, they are effectively saying, ‘We can do what we want to you in prison, on your death cert, we can mess up your right to work, we can mess up your passport. The list goes on, indefinitely.’”

“It was trauma on trauma,” Foy adds. “They used intimidating tactics and were quite adversarial.

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Or at least she has tried to. In 1993, when she applied to the Office of the Registrar General for a new birth certificate to accurately reflect her gender she was refused.


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Spend energy being yourself, not hiding it

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Our LGBT+ and Allies Employee Network


Parade for a day.

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Proud all year long.

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Mary McAuliffe “IF THE IRISH QUEER ARCHIVE DIDN’T EXIST, WE COULDN’T WRITE OUR HISTORY,” SAYS DR MARY MCAULIFFE, A HISTORIAN AND NATIONAL LGBT FEDERATION BOARD MEMBER. “IT’S ONE OF THE LARGEST LGBT ARCHIVES WORLDWIDE.”

“And why shouldn’t we be there. We have been marginalised, criminalised, demonised. We have suffered trauma and backlash. But it’s not all doom and gloom. There were parties, club nights, love affairs and engagements. As a historian, having an archive like this is like a holy grail when it comes to telling the national narrative.” That being said, there was no guarantee that the National Library would accept the IQA.

“You don’t just hand things over to institutions. Space is an issue. The material has to be looked after, catalogued, promoted.

The National Library has made commitments on equality, diversity and inclusion and the IQA is seen as safe, secure and vitally important within the library. “It’s a great privilege for us. It’s due to recognition of the LGBT community that we exist, that we have histories, culture and societies in ways that were never recognised up until now.” But running an archive costs money, and unfortunately the IQA moved to its new home at the same time as the crash took the legs out from under Celtic Tiger Ireland. “It’s not all catalogued and until it is, part of it remains inaccessible to the public. As a community we need to fundraise to catalogue the rest of it. And it’s a living archive. We continue to accept donations and deposits as we move forward, past marriage equality and on to the next chapter of our history.”

“And archives are not neutral spaces. It is informed by the culture and societal expectation of the time. Queer history wouldn’t have been seen to be as important before 2008. It’s a chicken and egg story. Activism had to be done for acceptance and expectation that our histories should be there.” 137

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“The fact that it is in our national cultural institution shows that we are considered central to the story of our nation. Our queer story is there alongside the nationalist story, the feminist story and all sorts of literary and activist endeavors.

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Containing over 500,000 press cuttings, private papers and a fascinating collection of audiovisual material — including photographs, flyers, posters, badges and other ephemera, it is housed at the National Library of Ireland, a fact McAuliffe sees as signifying the progress made in stitching queer lives into the fabric of the nation.


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Whether you’re ‘I am’ or ‘am I?’. We wish you a happy and healthy Pride. 140


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Organisational and financial records jostle with personal papers, social signifiers and ephemera of every kind, from photos, badges, buttons and stickers to textiles, flyers and posters. The collection includes an almost complete record of every LGBT print periodical published on the island of Ireland since 1974 and close to a quarter million press clippings.

INTO’s LGBT Network was established in 2004 with a stated aim of addressing inadequate protections for LGBT primary school teachers.

In a hugely symbolic moment during Dublin’s LGBT Pride Week, the eleven-year-old Irish Queer Archive is formally transferred to the National Library of Ireland. IQA’s vast holdings are the product of individual and group deposits and acquisitions stretching back to the earliest days of LGBT liberation on the island of Ireland.

The Irish National Teacher’s Organisation becomes the first teachers’ union to support the removal of Section 37 of the Employment Equality Act of 1998. The Section effectively allows religious institutions to legally discriminate against employees, citing the religious ethos of the organisation, be it a school or hospital.

Such is the complexity and scale of the “living” collection, the bulk of the archive remains in storage awaiting cataloguing and digitisation. 141

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Roberta’s is delighted to welcome festival attendees over Pride Weekend. Join us for a pre-parade brunch on Saturday, 29th June from 10am. We’ll be serving up brunch classics and delicious cocktails while our DJ spins pop anthems to get you pumped up for the day! Or join us on the 30th for a recovery Brunch!

Book@robertas.ie | 01 616 9612

We are PROUD to support Belong To organisation for Pride 2019 by donating €1 from every tasty Pride shake sold from

June 10th - July 1st!

www.wowburger.ie | #wowburger 143 PARNELL ST / WEXFORD ST / WICKLOW ST / WORKMANS CLUB / RANELAGH / TALLAGHT

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1 ESSEX STREET EAST, TEMPLE BAR, DUBLIN 2


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to be human.

At Workhuman, we value innovation, determination and, above all, respect. We believe that when we empower people to be themselves they can do the best work of their lives. workhuman.com/company/careers 146

#weworkhuman


VOLUNTEERING is for everyone www.volunteer.ie

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Proud to support the volunteers of Dublin LGBTQ+ Pride 2019!

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Viasat Pride Alliance

Viasat is a proud sponsor of Pride and believes diverse perspectives, values and identities lead to more ideas, different approaches and innovative problem solving that can change the world.

Connect to more at careers.viasat.com 148


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The Civil Partnership and Cohabitants Act is passed in the Dáil without a vote and in the Seanad by 48-4. Although pointedly leaving out adoption rights, Minister for Justice and Law Reform Dermot Ahern considers the act “one of the most important pieces of civil rights legislation to be enacted since independence.” The legislation also provides for the recognition of foreign relationships. Activists groups like Noise and Marriage Equality step up their campaign for full marriage equality.

2011

Photographer and transgender civil rights activist Louise Hannon wins a case against her former employer First Direct Logistics for discrimination on gender and disability grounds. Supported by the Equality Authority, she is awarded €35,422 in damages.

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The country’s first transgender rally takes place in Dublin. Over 100 people protest at Leinster House, calling for full legal protection of transgender people. The rally, organised by a coalition of activist groups, is timed to coincide with the fifth anniversary of the Foy constitutional action, which found that Ireland was in breach of the European Convention on Human Rights.

The new law leads to protests by LGBT activists who are in turn assaulted and victimised, often with the tacit support of Russian police. An anti-gay crackdown by religious fundamentalists, archconservatives and security forces ensues. The following year, in response to Russia’s crackdown on LGBT rights, the Sochi Winter Olympics sparks worldwide protests.

Trans Education and Advocacy organiser Cat McIlroy said the attendance at the rally showed “a growing awareness of trans experiences in Ireland [and was] also important to raise awareness that being transgender is still classified as a mental disorder.”

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In an echo of 1980’s Thatcherite legislation, the law imposes sanctions for those who are deemed to be promoting homosexual “propaganda” to minors and for those who “offend” religious believers.

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In Russia, President Vladimir Putin signs into law a bill banning “propaganda of nontraditional sexual relations to minors” after it was unanimously passed by the State Duma.


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We offer experienced business, tax and financial advice for small to medium sized businesses and entrepreneurs in a practical and proactive manner. We have a motivated team consisting of qualified Chartered Accountants, Tax Consultants and Financial Advisers who listen first to understand your financial objectives and work with you to achieve your specified goals. We are sure that we can assist you in your business needs. Should you require assistance please call us on 0879176960. Or write an email to richard@devaneyanddurkin.com

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Fintan Warfield Image: Stephen Moloney

Tabled by Senator Fintan Warfield, Sinn Fein’s spokesperson for youth, LGBT rights and the arts, the bill aims to eradicate a practice that seeks to suppress, and even eliminate, a person’s sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression. Since that time, talks have continued with the Department of Health and Minister for State, Catherine Byrne, who is researching the act and considering possible amendments. Crucially, if the bill passes without amendments, it would see Ireland become a world leader in conversion therapy legislation because the bill outlaws conversion therapy for all ages and not just for young people. “My fear is that any amendments that are made to the bill would move away from legislating in areas where faith is involved, “ Warfield says. “The British government performed the largest survey ever of the LGBT community last year, and the overwhelming amount of people who engaged with conversion therapy — about 90% — had done so through a faith-based

The stigma that people who are both religious and LGBT face is one of the primary causes of, and difficulties around, mental health, Warfield adds.

“It is perpetuated by faith intuitions. We shouldn’t veer away from having that conversation.” The bill aims to ensure that people who are distressed about their sexual orientation or identity are only offered interventions that accept and support that person for who they are. “There is lingering damage from what was a long-standing policy that still reverberates through the system. We need to rid ourselves of any remnants of criminality or the longstanding consideration that homosexuality was a diagnostic mental health disorder.” Warfield also believes that it’s important that people outside of Ireland see us passing this bill. “The international dimension is important in terms of Ireland being a beacon of hope. We can pass this. We are in a political climate where support is there for it. And it can help people pass similar legislation in parts of the world where conversion therapy is an even bigger problem than it is here.”

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It passed through the second of five stages it needs to clear to become law in the Seanad in May 2018.

organisation. It’s there that this is going on. So to step back from banning conversion therapy in faith-based organisations would be a step in the wrong direction.”

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THE PROHIBITION OF CONVERSION THERAPIES BILL 2018 WHICH PROPOSES TO MAKE IT ILLEGAL FOR ANY PERSON TO PERFORM, OFFER, ADVERTISE OR TRAVEL WITHIN OR OUTSIDE THE STATE TO PARTAKE IN CONVERSION THERAPY.


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@Love_EqualityNI

@Love_EqualityNI

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Insight Matters for Your Mental Health Monday 24th June 4:00pm — 7:00pm Insight Matters Mountjoy Square Centre

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Insight Matters is delighted to offer a complimentary workshop aimed to help you understand and take responsibility for your own mental health. At some point in our lives we all experience depression, stress, and anxiety. Yet, for members of our community, these issues are often magnified as homophobic, biphobic and transphobic attitudes prevent us from embracing our true selves. The workshop will be facilitated by Dil and Anne Marie who have lived-life experience of mental health difficulties. They combine personal stories with practical tools and tips that can be used in your daily life to improve your own wellbeing.

Insight Matters Psychotherapy . Counselling . Wellness

To book email info@insightmatters.ie as places are limited. 46, Mountjoy Square South, Dublin 1 / 106 Capel Street Dublin 1 T. 01 891 0703 W. insightmatters.ie

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Team GCN wishes everyone a safe and happy Pride.

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Diversity at our core At Grant Thornton we are committed to ensuring every member of staff feels they can bring their “whole” selves to work. Diversity and Inclusion is at the heart of our culture and our interaction with our clients.

Sasha Kerins Head of Diversity and Inclusion E sasha.kerins@ie.gt.com

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Supporting Supporting our our LGBT+ LGBT+ colleagues colleagues and and Allies Allies

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#FidelityPride #FidelityPride

Fidelity International is a proud Pride Partner of Fidelity International is a proud Pride Partner of Dublin’s LGBTQ Pride Festival 2019 Dublin’s LGBTQ Pride Festival 2019

A member of FuSIoN (Financial Services Inclusion Network) A member of FuSIoN (Financial Services Inclusion Network)

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Rory O’Neill and his drag alter ego Panti Bliss appear on RTÉ’s The Saturday Night Show. Prompted by presenter Brendon O’Connor, Rory calls out the oppressive, anti-gay behaviour of several public figures and organisations. The resulting outrage, mud-slinging, defamation threats from religious fundamentalists and financial payouts by RTÉ becomes known as “Pantigate”. Panti reframes the conversation in her Nobel Call speech at Dublin’s Abbey Theatre. It quickly becomes a global sensation. A national conversation on the topic of homophobia ensues.

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2015

Marriage equality is finally achieved in the Republic through a popular vote of 62%-38% and a with a turnout of over 60%. During the campaign, Minister for Health Leo Varadkar comes out. Two years later he is appointed Taoiseach, becoming only the fourth openly gay head of state or government in the world. The May plebiscite nearly overshadows the introduction of the Gender Recognition Act some months later. The act allows all individuals over the age of 18 to self-declare their gender identity. The legislation is the culmination of 20 years of campaigning by transgender activists and their LGB allies.

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Gay conversion therapy re-enters public discourse in the USA after a draft of the Republican Party’s official platform seems to support its implementation and practice: “We support the right of parents to determine the proper medical treatment and therapy for their minor children.”

The barbaric practice, although long discredited in most circles, is still prevalent across much of the USA. Following a survey of 100,000, the UK government in 2018 announces proposals to end the practice. In the Republic, Senator Fintan Warfield, with cross party support, moves a bill to outlaw the practice. The legislation has yet to be enacted.

2017

The Irish Blood Transfusion Service replaces its lifetime blood ban for men who have sex with men with a one-year deferral period. The ban was initially imposed as AIDS ran rampant in the 1980s. Long considered arbitrary and discriminatory, the rule was challenged in 2015 when 23-yearold Galway student Tomás Heneghan took a High Court action. He dropped his action when changes were announced, on foot of considerable, long-term lobbying by frontline HIV activists and sexual health advocates. A growing body of evidence around the efficacy of PrEP and anti-retroviral therapies would also help inform public opinion. In the same year, Donald Trump is inaugurated as president of the USA. The White House promptly removes all LGBT references from its website.

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2016

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Insight Matters for Your Mental Health Live Podcast Recording Thursday 20th June 1:00pm - 3:00pm Insight Matters Mountjoy Square Centre

As we mark the 50th Anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising and a half-century of LGBTQ liberation we ask as a community how far have we come in breaking down mental health stigma, how proactive are we at practising self-care and what supports are still needed to ensure all members of our community feel supported.

Insight Matters Psychotherapy . Counselling . Wellness

To book email info@insightmatters.ie - places are limited 46, Mountjoy Square South, Dublin 1 / 106 Capel Street Dublin 1 T. 01 891 0703 W. insightmatters.ie

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At some point in our lives we all experience depression, stress, and anxiety. Yet, for members of our community, these issues are often magniďŹ ed as homophobic, biphobic and transphobic attitudes prevent us from embracing our true selves.

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Dil Wickremasinghe and Anne Marie Toole will host a lively and fresh discussion about mental health with an array of colourful guests.


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Two years earlier, the NI Assembly passes a motion, enabling the pardon of anyone convicted of consensual anti-gay offences in Northern Ireland. Topping an unforgettable summer, the Department of Children and Youth Affairs — now headed by an openly lesbian minister, Dr. Katherine Zappone — launches its LGBTI Youth Strategy 2018-2020 at The Ark, the cultural centre for children in Ireland. The action-oriented strategy is a first for Ireland and the world, informed by several years of consultation with thousands of LGBTI youth, NGOs and statutory bodies across the country. During the abortion referendum campaign, a small ad-hoc group, Radical Queers Resist, organise a rapid response to pickets by the so-called Council for Bio-Medical Ethics, becoming overnight Repeal heroes.

2019

Journalist and author Lyra McKee is shot in the head in Derry. Her killing sparks outrage and protests. And not a little soul-searching about unfinished business in Northern Ireland.

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On June 18, the government formally apologises to men convicted of consensual sexual offences in an extraordinary Dáil debate that also recognises the suffering and discrimination faced by the families of those convicted. The apology is followed by a moving ceremony at Dublin Castle marking the 25th anniversary of legislative reform.

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LIFE

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Live Your Life, however Life shapes you.

Proudly Supporting Dublin Pride 2019

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The Irish Cancer Society is proud to support LGBTQ+ cancer patients across Ireland

Cancer can affect us all. No matter who you are, or who you love, we’re here to help. From all of us at the Irish Cancer Society, have a great Pride. 170

Cancer Nurseline Freephone 1800 200 700 E: cancernurseline@irishcancer.ie W: www.cancer.ie


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AMAZING THINGS HAPPEN WHEN YOU CAN BE YOURSELF Innovation starts with inclusion at Oracle. Not only do we respect our value and differences—we celebrate them! Pride Guide 2019

The Oracle Pride Employee Network helps us make the most of our diverse talent. We come together to advance LGBTQ+ issues in the workplace, support one another, and basically make Oracle the ideal place for everyone to grow. Join a culture where you can be your authentic self every day. Explore oracle.com/careers

Follow us and join the conversation: ExploreOracle

ExploreOracle

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Explore Oracle

Oracle


Pride Party

Kate Brennan Harding & Claire Beck

Presenting Belfast's Queertopia Subversive Cabaret

plus Special Guest is Proud to support Dublin Pride & LGBTQ+ community organisations.

LOST LANE 1-2 ADAM COURT

off Grafton St.

173 LOSTLANE.IE

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8pm till Very Late

Curated by

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Sat. 29TH June


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LET PRIDE BE YOUR GUIDE

MON 19 - SAT 31 AUG 2019 0818 719 377 www.bordgaisenergytheatre.ie Tickets from €21

All tickets include a €1 facilities fee per ticket. Telephone & internet bookings are subject to a maximum s/c of €7.15 per ticket / Agents €3.45

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newspapers magazines filmvideo audio letters journals diaries badges buttons t-shirts flags stickers theses reports essays pamphlets photographs slides flyers leaflets posters administrative financial records

...we collect irishqueerarchive@gmail.com www. i r i s h q u e e r a r c h i v e . c om www. f a c e b o o k . c om/IrishQueerArchive 176


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Una Mullally “WORKING ON THE STRATEGY WAS INSPIRING IN EVERY WAY,” SAYS UNA MULLALLY, WRITER AND BROADCASTER.

The strategy involved a consultation process with close to 4,000 young people across the country, achieved through a combination of an online survey run by SpunOut.ie and several public youth consultation events in all larger cities and towns. “We weren’t interested in designing a set of recommendations for statutory bodies. These are actions and that required establishing a significant consultative process, not only with our LGBTI youth respondents but officials across various statutory bodies. “It was a fascinating insight into best practice, working out governance structures and ensuring that our primary stakeholders, our youth, were heard. Most importantly, ensuring that LGBTI youth set the tone for this document.”

Aligning itself with “Better Outcomes, Brighter Futures” — the title of the government’s national policy framework for children, one that aims to “make Ireland the best small country in the world in which to grow up” — the LGBTI strategy set about addressing goals to improve psycho-emotional and physical well-being, along with imagining and creating inclusive, peer-mediated social and cultural environments. In the long-term, the strategy aims to develop research into better understanding the lives of Irish queer youth. The strategy was launched during Dublin Pride 2018 by Minister for Children and Youth Affairs Dr Katherine Zappone at the Irish children’s cultural centre, The Ark.

“Everything in the report came from young people. Their demands, their anxieties, their desires were taken on board and interpreted through a policy framework. And I’m happy to admit, “there were even some moments when they pulled us up [on the oversight committee]. Of lasting value is the importance of having this strategy embedded in the wider political and cultural process.”

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“It was such a beast of a project, based on ensuring practical and achievable actions after the widest possible consultation.”

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Mullally was fresh from publishing In The Name of Love, her oral history of the movement for marriage equality, when she was approached by the Department of Children and Youth Affairs to independently chair the LGBTI+ Youth Strategy 2018-2020, the first of its kind in the world.


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CARLOW July 21st www.facebook.com/carlowpride CLARE The Outing LGBT+ Music, Art & Matchmaking Festival September 27th -September 28th www.theouting.ie CORK Festival July 28th - August 4th Parade August 4th www.corkpride.com DERRY Foyle Pride Festival August 18th-August 26th Parade August 25th www.facebook.com/foylepride

Trans Pride Parade July 6th www.facebook.com/transpridedublin Gaze Film Festival August 1st-5th www.gaze.ie Love Sensation Music Festival August 17th - August 18th www.lovesensation.ie DUNDALK Festival July 12th-13th Parade July 13th www.facebook.com/DundalkPride GALWAY Festival August 13th-19th Parade August 18th www.galwaypride.com LARNE Saturday August 17th LIMERICK Festival July 5th-14th Parade July 13th www.limerickpride.ie/

DROGHEDA Parade July 20th www.facebook.com/DrogLGBTQ

NEWRY Parade and Festival August 31st www.prideinnewry.com

DUBLIN Dublin International Gay Theatre Festival May 2020 www.gaytheatre.ie

THURLES Tipperary Pride July 27th www.facebook.com/ tipperarylgbtqpride

TRANS-FUSION Trans Festival May31st - June 8th www.teni.ie

YOUGHAL Cork Pride By The Sea July 27th www.corkpride.com 179

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CASTLEBAR Mayo Pride Festival July 19th-July 21st Parade July 20th www.outwest.ie

Dublin LGBTQ+ Pride Festival June 20th-June 30th Parade June 29th www,dublinpride.ie

Pride Guide 2019

BELFAST Belfast Pride Festival July 26th-August 4th Parade August 3rd www.belfastpride.com


#NXF40 1979—2019

NXF DUBLIN PRIDE ANNUAL POLITICAL DEBATE:

HOW BEST TO ADVANCE LGBT EQUALITY Adam Long of the National LGBT Federation (NXF) will once again be joined by a panel comprising of leading social and political thinkers to discuss and debate how best to advance LGBT equality in this year of significant anniversaries - 50 years since the Stonewall Riots gave birth to the global LGBT Pride movement and 40 years since the foundation of the National LGBT Federation here in Ireland. Time: 6-30-8.30pm

NXF.ie

Date: Wed, June 26th

Venue: CHQ, IFSC Dublin 1


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Happy Pride from NXF, celebrating 40 Prides and counting with our community.

#NXF40 1979—2019

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Dublin becomes the 100th member of the European Pride Organisers Association in Belfast and launches our bid to host Europride 2022.

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The Dublin LGBTQ+ Pride team at their new offices on Montague Lane.

We hope you all have a wonderful Pride and can join us on O’Connell Street on June 29th for our annual Pride parade and march. Happy Pride x 184


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Free Rapid HIV Testing in Dublin. Find us at your local Dublin LGBT spaces

Simple finger prick HIV test with results in 60 seconds. Tuesday The George: 8 - 10pm

Saturday The Boilerhouse: 5 - 7pm

Wednesday Outhouse: 6 - 8pm

Saturday & Sunday Pantibar: 3.30 - 5.30pm

hivireland.ie


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The 2019 Pride Guide is dedicated to Jon Hanna and Lyra McKee.

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We’re proud to empower our colleagues to be who they proud are at work. That’s why supporting We’re to empower our we’re colleagues to bethe who We’re proud to empower our colleagues to be who Dublin LGBTQ+ Pride Festival 2019. they are at work. That’s why we’re supporting the they are at work. That’s why we’re supporting the Dublin LGBTQ Pride Festival 2019. Dublin LGBTQ Pride Festival 2019. Join us for the parade on Saturday 29th June. Join us for the parade on Saturday 29th June. Register to take part at OurTesco.ie Register to take part at OurTesco.ie 188

Profile for Dublin Pride

Dublin Pride 2019 Guide - July Edition  

Updated version of the 2019 guide.

Dublin Pride 2019 Guide - July Edition  

Updated version of the 2019 guide.

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